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Sample records for redox process utilizing

  1. Ceruloplasmin copper induces oxidant damage by a redox process utilizing cell-derived superoxide as reductant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Fox, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative damage by transition metals bound to proteins may be an important pathogenic mechanism. Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a Cu-containing plasma protein thought to be involved in oxidative modification of lipoproteins. We have previously shown that Cp increased cell-mediated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by a process requiring cell-derived superoxide, but the underlying chemical mechanism(s) is (are) unknown. We now show that superoxide reduction of Cp Cu is a critical reaction in cellular LDL oxidation. By bathocuproine disulfonate (BCS) binding and by superoxide utilization, we showed that exogenous superoxide reduces a single Cp Cu atom, the same Cu required for LDL oxidation. The Cu atom remained bound to Cp during the redox cycle. Three avenues of evidence showed that vascular cells reduce Cp Cu by a superoxide-dependent process. The 2-fold higher rate of Cp Cu reduction by smooth muscle cells (SMC) compared to endothelial cells (EC) was consistent with their relative rates of superoxide release. Furthermore, Cp Cu reduction by cells was blocked by Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Finally, the level of superoxide produced by EC and SMC was sufficient to cause the amount of Cu reduction observed. An important role of Cp Cu reduction in LDL oxidation was suggested by results showing that SOD1 inhibited Cp Cu reduction and LDL oxidation by SMC with equal potency, while tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated both processes. In summary, these results show that superoxide is a critical cellular reductant of divalent transition metals involved in oxidation, and that protein-bound Cu is a substrate for this reaction. The role of these mechanisms in oxidative processes in vivo has yet to be defined.

  2. Novel Redox Processes for Carbonaceous Fuel Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng

    The current study investigates oxygen carrier development, process intensification, and oxygen carrier attrition behaviors for a number of novel, redox-based energy conversion schemes. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  3. Redox processes and water quality of selected principal aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, P.B.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2008-01-01

    Reduction/oxidation (redox) conditions in 15 principal aquifer (PA) systems of the United States, and their impact on several water quality issues, were assessed from a large data base collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the USGS. The logic of these assessments was based on the observed ecological succession of electron acceptors such as dissolved oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate and threshold concentrations of these substrates needed to support active microbial metabolism. Similarly, the utilization of solid-phase electron acceptors such as Mn(IV) and Fe(III) is indicated by the production of dissolved manganese and iron. An internally consistent set of threshold concentration criteria was developed and applied to a large data set of 1692 water samples from the PAs to assess ambient redox conditions. The indicated redox conditions then were related to the occurrence of selected natural (arsenic) and anthropogenic (nitrate and volatile organic compounds) contaminants in ground water. For the natural and anthropogenic contaminants assessed in this study, considering redox conditions as defined by this framework of redox indicator species and threshold concentrations explained many water quality trends observed at a regional scale. An important finding of this study was that samples indicating mixed redox processes provide information on redox heterogeneity that is useful for assessing common water quality issues. Given the interpretive power of the redox framework and given that it is relatively inexpensive and easy to measure the chemical parameters included in the framework, those parameters should be included in routine water quality monitoring programs whenever possible.

  4. Are bioassays useful tools to assess redox processes and biodegradation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Pedersen, Philip Grinder; Ludvigsen, L.

    2002-01-01

    When evaluating potentials for natural attenuation, assessment of ongoing redox processes are important. Terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) such as denitrification, Fe(Ill), Mn(IV), and sulphate reduction and methane production have been assessed by several approaches including redox...... sensitive hydrochemical or geochemical parameters, levels of hydrogen, and redox potential. However, all these approaches have to be evaluated against TEAP-bioassays as the most direct measure. We assessed successfully ongoing microbial-mediated redox processes by TEAP-bioassays in degradation studies...... of aromatic and chlorinated aliphatic compounds in landfill leachate plumes, and of pesticides in aquifers with various redox conditions....

  5. Biogeochemical redox processes and their impact on contaminant dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borch, Thomas; Kretzschmar, Ruben; Kappler, Andreas; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Campbell, Kate M.

    2010-01-01

    Life and element cycling on Earth is directly related to electron transfer (or redox) reactions. An understanding of biogeochemical redox processes is crucial for predicting and protecting environmental health and can provide new opportunities for engineered remediation strategies. Energy can be released and stored by means of redox reactions via the oxidation of labile organic carbon or inorganic compounds (electron donors) by microorganisms coupled to the reduction of electron acceptors including humic substances, iron-bearing minerals, transition metals, metalloids, and actinides. Environmental redox processes play key roles in the formation and dissolution of mineral phases. Redox cycling of naturally occurring trace elements and their host minerals often controls the release or sequestration of inorganic contaminants. Redox processes control the chemical speciation, bioavailability, toxicity, and mobility of many major and trace elements including Fe, Mn, C, P, N, S, Cr, Cu, Co, As, Sb, Se, Hg, Tc, and U. Redox-active humic substances and mineral surfaces can catalyze the redox transformation and degradation of organic contaminants. In this review article, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of biogeochemical redox processes and their impact on contaminant fate and transport, including future research needs.

  6. An Excel Workbook for Identifying Redox Processes in Ground Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    The reduction/oxidation (redox) condition of ground water affects the concentration, transport, and fate of many anthropogenic and natural contaminants. The redox state of a ground-water sample is defined by the dominant type of reduction/oxidation reaction, or redox process, occurring in the sample, as inferred from water-quality data. However, because of the difficulty in defining and applying a systematic redox framework to samples from diverse hydrogeologic settings, many regional water-quality investigations do not attempt to determine the predominant redox process in ground water. Recently, McMahon and Chapelle (2008) devised a redox framework that was applied to a large number of samples from 15 principal aquifer systems in the United States to examine the effect of redox processes on water quality. This framework was expanded by Chapelle and others (in press) to use measured sulfide data to differentiate between iron(III)- and sulfate-reducing conditions. These investigations showed that a systematic approach to characterize redox conditions in ground water could be applied to datasets from diverse hydrogeologic settings using water-quality data routinely collected in regional water-quality investigations. This report describes the Microsoft Excel workbook, RedoxAssignment_McMahon&Chapelle.xls, that assigns the predominant redox process to samples using the framework created by McMahon and Chapelle (2008) and expanded by Chapelle and others (in press). Assignment of redox conditions is based on concentrations of dissolved oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3-), manganese (Mn2+), iron (Fe2+), sulfate (SO42-), and sulfide (sum of dihydrogen sulfide [aqueous H2S], hydrogen sulfide [HS-], and sulfide [S2-]). The logical arguments for assigning the predominant redox process to each sample are performed by a program written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The program is called from buttons on the main worksheet. The number of samples that can be analyzed

  7. Geomicrobial and Geochemical Redox Processes in a Landfill-Polluted Aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Liselotte; Heron, Gorm; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of different dominant microbial-mediated redox processes in a landfill leachate-polluted aquifer (Grindsted, Denmark) was investigated. The most probable number method was utilized for detecting bacteria able to use each of the electron acceptors, and unamended incubations were u...

  8. Information processing through a bio-based redox capacitor: signatures for redox-cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Kim, Eunkyoung; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-08-01

    Redox-cycling compounds can significantly impact biological systems and can be responsible for activities that range from pathogen virulence and contaminant toxicities, to therapeutic drug mechanisms. Current methods to identify redox-cycling activities rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and employ enzymatic or chemical methods to detect ROS. Here, we couple the speed and sensitivity of electrochemistry with the molecular-electronic properties of a bio-based redox-capacitor to generate signatures of redox-cycling. The redox capacitor film is electrochemically-fabricated at the electrode surface and is composed of a polysaccharide hydrogel with grafted catechol moieties. This capacitor film is redox-active but non-conducting and can engage diffusible compounds in either oxidative or reductive redox-cycling. Using standard electrochemical mediators ferrocene dimethanol (Fc) and Ru(NH3)6Cl3 (Ru(3+)) as model redox-cyclers, we observed signal amplifications and rectifications that serve as signatures of redox-cycling. Three bio-relevant compounds were then probed for these signatures: (i) ascorbate, a redox-active compound that does not redox-cycle; (ii) pyocyanin, a virulence factor well-known for its reductive redox-cycling; and (iii) acetaminophen, an analgesic that oxidatively redox-cycles but also undergoes conjugation reactions. These studies demonstrate that the redox-capacitor can enlist the capabilities of electrochemistry to generate rapid and sensitive signatures of biologically-relevant chemical activities (i.e., redox-cycling).

  9. Membrane Separator for Redox Flow Batteries that Utilize Anion Radical Mediators.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    A Na + ion conducting polyethylene oxide membrane is developed for an organic electrolyte redox flow battery that utilizes anion radical mediators. To achieve high specific ionic conductivity, tetraethyleneglycol dimethylether (TEGDME) is used as a plasticizer to reduce crystallinity and increase the free volume of the gel film. This membrane is physically and chemically stable in TEGDME electrolyte that contains highly reactive biphenyl anion radical mediators.

  10. Bioelectrochemical probing of intracellular redox processes in living yeast cells—application of redox polymer wiring in a microfluidic environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Coman, Vasile; Kostesha, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    utilizing a new double mediator system to map redox metabolism and screen for genetic modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The function of this new double mediator system based on menadione and osmium redox polymer (PVI-Os) is demonstrated. “Wiring” of S. cerevisiae cells using PVI-Os shows...... mutant EBY44, which lacks the enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase. The cellular responses to introduced glucose and fructose were recorded for the two S. cerevisiae strains, and the obtained results are compared with previously published work when using an electrochemical batch cell, indicating...

  11. Copper isotopes as monitors of redox processes in hydrothermal mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markl, Gregor; Lahaye, Yann; Schwinn, Gregor

    2006-08-01

    The stable copper isotope composition of 79 samples of primary and secondary copper minerals from hydrothermal veins in the Schwarzwald mining district, South Germany, shows a wide variation in δ65Cu ranging from -2.92 to 2.41‰. We investigated primary chalcopyrite, various kinds of fahlores and emplectite, as well as supergene native copper, malachite, azurite, cuprite, tenorite, olivenite, pseudomalachite and chrysocolla. Fresh primary Cu(I) ores have at most localities copper isotope ratios ( δ65Cu values) of 0 ± 0.5‰ despite the fact that the samples come from mineralogically different types of deposits covering an area of about 100 by 50 km and that they formed during three different mineralization events spanning the last 300 Ma. Relics of the primary ores in oxidized samples (i.e., chalcopyrite relics in an iron oxide matrix with an outer malachite coating) display low isotope ratios down to -2.92‰. Secondary Cu(I) minerals such as cuprite have high δ65Cu values between 0.4 and 1.65‰, whereas secondary Cu(II) minerals such as malachite show a range of values between -1.55 and 2.41‰, but typically have values above +0.5‰. Within single samples, supergene oxidation of fresh chalcopyrite with a δ value of 0‰ causes significant fractionation on the scale of a centimetre between malachite (up to 1.49‰) and relict chalcopyrite (down to -2.92‰). The results show that—with only two notable exceptions—high-temperature hydrothermal processes did not lead to significant and correlatable variations in copper isotope ratios within a large mining district mineralized over a long period of time. Conversely, low-temperature redox processes seriously affect the copper isotope compositions of hydrothermal copper ores. While details of the redox processes are not yet understood, we interpret the range in compositions found in both primary Cu(I) and secondary Cu(II) minerals as a result of two competing controls on the isotope fractionation process

  12. Redox regulation of fertilisation and the spermatogenic process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junichi Fujii; Satoshi Tsunoda

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major causes of male infertility; it damages spermatogenic cells, the spermatogenic process and sperm function. Recent advances in redox biology have revealed the signalling role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated by cells. While highly reactive oxidants, such as the hydroxyl radical, exert largely deleterious effects, hydrogen peroxide can feasibly serve as a signal mediator because it is moderately reactive and membrane permeable and because it can oxidize only limited numbers of functional groups of biological molecules. The amino acid side chain most sensitive to oxidation is cysteine sulphydryl, which is commonly involved in the catalysis of some enzymes. Although the reactivity of cysteine sulphhydryl is not very high in ordinary proteins, some phosphatases possess a highly reactive sulphydryl group at their catalytic centre and are thereby oxidatively inactivated by transiently elevated hydrogen peroxide levels after extracellular stimuli and under certain environmental conditions. Peroxiredoxins, in turn, show moderate hydrogen peroxide-reducing activity, and their role in the modulation of ROS-mediated signal transduction in ordinary cells, mediated by protecting phosphatases from oxidative inactivation, has attracted much attention. Although knowledge of the signalling role of ROS in the male reproductive system is limited at present, its significance is becoming a focal issue. Here, we present a review of the emerging signalling role of hydrogen peroxide in testes.

  13. In situ characterization of nanoscale catalysts during anodic redox processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Renu [National Institute of Standards and Technology; Crozier, Peter [Arizona State University; Adams, James [Arizona State University

    2013-09-19

    Controlling the structure and composition of the anode is critical to achieving high efficiency and good long-term performance. In addition to being a mixed electronic and ionic conductor, the ideal anode material should act as an efficient catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dry hydrocarbons without de-activating through either sintering or coking. It is also important to develop novel anode materials that can operate at lower temperatures to reduce costs and minimized materials failure associated with high temperature cycling. We proposed to synthesize and characterize novel anode cermets materials based on ceria doped with Pr and/or Gd together with either a Ni or Cu metallic components. Ceria is a good oxidation catalyst and is an ionic conductor at room temperature. Doping it with trivalent rare earths such as Pr or Gd retards sintering and makes it a mixed ion conductor (ionic and electronic). We have developed a fundamental scientific understanding of the behavior of the cermet material under reaction conditions by following the catalytic oxidation process at the atomic scale using a powerful Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (ESTEM). The ESTEM allowed in situ monitoring of structural, chemical and morphological changes occurring at the cermet under conditions approximating that of typical fuel-cell operation. Density functional calculations were employed to determine the underlying mechanisms and reaction pathways during anode oxidation reactions. The dynamic behavior of nanoscale catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and methane were used to determine: ? Fundamental processes during anodic reactions in hydrogen and carbonaceous atmospheres ? Interfacial effects between metal particles and doped ceria ? Kinetics of redox reaction in the anode material

  14. Bioelectrochemical probing of intracellular redox processes in living yeast cells--application of redox polymer wiring in a microfluidic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Coman, Vasile; Kostesha, Natalie; Sabourin, David; Haslett, Nick; Baronian, Keith; Gorton, Lo; Dufva, Martin; Emnéus, Jenny

    2013-04-01

    Conventionally, microbial bioelectrochemical assays have been conducted using immobilized cells on an electrode that is placed in an electrochemical batch cell. In this paper, we describe a developed microfluidic platform with integrated microelectrode arrays for automated bioelectrochemical assays utilizing a new double mediator system to map redox metabolism and screen for genetic modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The function of this new double mediator system based on menadione and osmium redox polymer (PVI-Os) is demonstrated. "Wiring" of S. cerevisiae cells using PVI-Os shows a significant improvement of bioelectrochemical monitoring in a microfluidic environment and functions as an effective immobilization matrix for cells that are not strongly adherent. The function of the developed microfluidic platform is demonstrated using two strains of S. cerevisiae, ENY.WA and its deletion mutant EBY44, which lacks the enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase. The cellular responses to introduced glucose and fructose were recorded for the two S. cerevisiae strains, and the obtained results are compared with previously published work when using an electrochemical batch cell, indicating that microfluidic bioelectrochemical assays employing the menadione-PVI-Os double mediator system provides an effective means to conduct automated microbial assays.

  15. The Electrochemical Properties of Biochars and How They Affect Soil Redox Properties and Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biochars are complex heterogeneous materials that consist of mineral phases, amorphous C, graphitic C, and labile organic molecules, many of which can be either electron donors or acceptors when placed in soil. Biochar is a reductant, but its electrical and electrochemical properties are a function of both the temperature of production and the concentration and composition of the various redox active mineral and organic phases present. When biochars are added to soils, they interact with plant roots and root hairs, micro-organisms, soil organic matter, proteins and the nutrient-rich water to form complex organo-mineral-biochar complexes Redox reactions can play an important role in the development of these complexes, and can also result in significant changes in the original C matrix. This paper reviews the redox processes that take place in soil and how they may be affected by the addition of biochar. It reviews the available literature on the redox properties of different biochars. It also reviews how biochar redox properties have been measured and presents new methods and data for determining redox properties of fresh biochars and for biochar/soil systems.

  16. Analyzing Distributed Processing For Electric Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stanley A.; Kirkham, Harold; Beardmore, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    Distributed Processing Trade-Off Model for Electric Utility Operation computer program based upon study performed at California Institute of Technology for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Study presented technique addressing question of tradeoffs between expanding communications network or expanding capacity of distributed computers in energy-management systems (EMS) of electric utility. Gives EMS planners macroscopic tool for evaluation of architectures of distributed-processing systems and major technical and economic tradeoffs as well as interactions within systems.

  17. More efficient redox biocatalysis by utilizing 1,4-butanediol as a ‘smart cosubstrate'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kara, S.; Spickermann, D.; Schrittwieser, J.H.; Leggewie, C.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Arends, I.W.C.E.; Hollmann, F.

    2013-01-01

    1,4-Butanediol is shown to be an efficient cosubstrate to promote NAD(P)H-dependent redox biocatalysis. The thermodynamically and kinetically inert lactone coproduct makes the regeneration reaction irreversible. Thereby not only the molar surplus of cosubstrate is dramatically reduced but also faste

  18. Role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in regulation of redox-dependent processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, E V; Chernov, N N; Novichkova, M D

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade fundamentally new features have been revealed for the participation of glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes (glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin) in cell proliferation, apoptosis, protein folding, and cell signaling. Reduced glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining cellular redox status by participating in thiol-disulfide exchange, which regulates a number of cell functions including gene expression and the activity of individual enzymes and enzyme systems. Maintaining optimum GSH/GSSG ratio is essential to cell viability. Decrease in the ratio can serve as an indicator of damage to the cell redox status and of changes in redox-dependent gene regulation. Disturbance of intracellular GSH balance is observed in a number of pathologies including cancer. Consequences of inappropriate GSH/GSSG ratio include significant changes in the mechanism of cellular redox-dependent signaling controlled both nonenzymatically and enzymatically with the participation of isoforms of glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin. This review summarizes recent data on the role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in the regulation of cellular redox-dependent processes.

  19. ARSENIC LEACHING FROM IRON RICH MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE: INFLUENCE OF PH AND REDOX POTENTIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents the effect of pH and redox potential on the potential mobility of arsenic (As) from a contaminated mineral processing waste. The selected waste contained about 0.47 g kg-1 of As and 66.2 g kg-1 of iron (Fe). The characteristic of the wast...

  20. Analyzing redox balance in a synthetic yeast platform to improve utilization of brown macroalgae as feedstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Contador

    2015-12-01

    An analysis of the redox balance during ethanol fermentation from alginate and mannitol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae using metabolic engineering tools was carried out. To represent the strain designed for conversion of macroalgae carbohydrates to ethanol, a context-specific model was derived from the available yeast genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. Flux balance analysis and dynamic simulations were used to determine the flux distributions. The model indicates that ethanol production is determined by the activity of 4-deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronate (DEHU reductase (DehR and its preferences for NADH or NADPH which influences strongly the flow of cellular resources. Different scenarios were explored to determine the equilibrium between NAD(H and NADP(H that will lead to increased ethanol yields on mannitol and DEHU under anaerobic conditions. When rates of mannitol dehydrogenase and DehRNADH tend to be close to a ratio in the range 1–1.6, high growth rates and ethanol yields were predicted. The analysis shows a number of metabolic limitations that are not easily identified through experimental procedures such as quantifying the impact of the cofactor preference by DEHU reductase in the system, the low flux into the alginate catabolic pathway, and a detailed analysis of the redox balance. These results show that production of ethanol and other chemicals can be optimized if a redox balance is achieved. A possible methodology to achieve this balance is presented. This paper shows how metabolic engineering tools are essential to comprehend and overcome this limitation.

  1. Understanding controls on redox processes in floodplain sediments of the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noël, Vincent; Boye, Kristin; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Bone, Sharon; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Cardarelli, Emily; Janot, Noémie; Fendorf, Scott; Williams, Kenneth H.; Bargar, John R.

    2017-12-01

    River floodplains, heavily used for water supplies, housing, agriculture, mining, and industry, may have water quality jeopardized by native or exogenous metals. Redox processes mediate the accumulation and release of these species in groundwater. Understanding the physicochemical, hydrological, and biogeochemical controls on the distribution and variability and variability of redox conditions is therefore critical to developing conceptual and numerical models of contaminants transport within floodplains. The distribution and intensity of redox activity at the Rifle, CO, site within the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), are believed to be controlled by textural and compositional heterogeneities. Regionally, the UCRB is impacted by former uranium and vanadium ore processing, resulting in contaminations by U, Mo, V, As, Se, and Mn. Floodplains throughout the UCRB share sediment and groundwater characteristics, making redox activity regionally important to metal and radionuclide mobility. In this study, Fe and S speciation were used to track the distribution and stability of redox processes in sediment cores from three floodplain sites covering a 250 km range in the central portion of the UCRB. The results of the present study support the hypothesis that Fe(III) and sulfate reducing sediments are regionally important in the UCRB. The presence of organic carbon together with pore saturation were the key requirements for reducing conditions, dominated by sulfate-reduction. Sediment texture moderated the response of the system to external forcing, such as oxidant infusion, making fine-grain sediments resistant to change in comparison to coarser-grained sediments. Exposure to O2 and NO3- mediates the reactivity and longevity of freshly precipitated sulfides creating the potential for release of sequestered radionuclides and metals. The physical and chemical parameters of reducing zones evidenced in this study are thus thought to be key parameters on the dynamic exchange

  2. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulenova, Alena [Principal Investigator; Vandegrift, III, George F. [Collaborator

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  3. Meeting processing challenges in clean coal utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Patwardhan, A.; Barnwal, J.P. [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining and Mineral Resources Engineering

    2003-02-01

    The paper identifies some of the major challenges facing processing for clean coal utilization today. Some of the ongoing research at Southern Illinois University in the areas of plant optimization, fine coal cleaning and dewatering, fine coal-water slurry combustion, development of multiple products and mine-mouth utilization for lower grade products, and co-management of coal processing wastes and coal combustion byproducts underground, or as a cover material suitable for vegetation in surface mine reclamation is approaching commercialization. Additional research has been initiated recently in low cost desulfurization for SOx reduction, and/or reducing scrubbing costs. An integrated approach to evaluating processing unit operation for enhancing overall profitability of a mining complex is paying dividends. The approach is a good tool to assess role of processing for clean coal utilization in any setting. The authors have attempted to demonstrate its use for Indian coals. They plan to develop a computer program for making this integrated assessment approach more user friendly. 33 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Waste heat utilization in industrial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichsel, M.; Heitmann, W.

    1978-01-01

    A survey is given of new developments in heat exchangers and heat pumps. With respect to practical applications, internal criteria for plant operation are discussed. Possibilities of government support are pointed out. Waste heat steam generators and waste heat aggregates for hot water generation or in some cases for steam superheating are used. The possibilities of utilization can be classified according to the economic improvements and according to their process applications, for example, gascooling. Examples are presented for a large variety of applications.

  5. The influence of HMF and furfural on redox-balance and energy-state of xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ask, Magnus; Bettiga, Maurizio; Mapelli, Valeria; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2013-02-15

    Pretreatment of biomass for lignocellulosic ethanol production generates compounds that can inhibit microbial metabolism. The furan aldehydes hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural have received increasing attention recently. In the present study, the effects of HMF and furfural on redox metabolism, energy metabolism and gene expression were investigated in anaerobic chemostats where the inhibitors were added to the feed-medium. By cultivating the xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain VTT C-10883 in the presence of HMF and furfural, it was found that the intracellular concentrations of the redox co-factors and the catabolic and anabolic reduction charges were significantly lower in the presence of furan aldehydes than in cultivations without inhibitors. The catabolic reduction charge decreased from 0.13(±0.005) to 0.08(±0.002) and the anabolic reduction charge decreased from 0.46(±0.11) to 0.27(±0.02) when HMF and furfural were present. The intracellular ATP concentration was lower when inhibitors were added, but resulted only in a modest decrease in the energy charge from 0.87(±0.002) to 0.85(±0.004) compared to the control. Transcriptome profiling followed by MIPS functional enrichment analysis of up-regulated genes revealed that the functional group "Cell rescue, defense and virulence" was over-represented when inhibitors were present compared to control cultivations. Among these, the ATP-binding efflux pumps PDR5 and YOR1 were identified as important for inhibitor efflux and possibly a reason for the lower intracellular ATP concentration in stressed cells. It was also found that genes involved in pseudohyphal growth were among the most up-regulated when inhibitors were present in the feed-medium suggesting nitrogen starvation. Genes involved in amino acid metabolism, glyoxylate cycle, electron transport and amino acid transport were enriched in the down-regulated gene set in response to HMF and furfural. It was hypothesized that the HMF and

  6. Utility Optimal Scheduling in Processing Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Longbo

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of utility optimal scheduling in general \\emph{processing networks} with random arrivals and network conditions. These are generalizations of traditional data networks where commodities in one or more queues can be combined to produce new commodities that are delivered to other parts of the network. This can be used to model problems such as in-network data fusion, stream processing, and grid computing. Scheduling actions are complicated by the \\emph{underflow problem} that arises when some queues with required components go empty. In this paper, we develop the Perturbed Max-Weight algorithm (PMW) to achieve optimal utility. The idea of PMW is to perturb the weights used by the usual Max-Weight algorithm to ``push'' queue levels towards non-zero values (avoiding underflows). We show that when the perturbations are carefully chosen, PMW is able to achieve a utility that is within $O(1/V)$ of the optimal value for any $V\\geq1$, while ensuring an average network backlog of $O(V)$.

  7. Assessing the Utility of Selenium Isotopes as a Deep-Time Redox Proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüeken, E.

    2015-12-01

    Non-traditional isotopic systems, in particular molybdenum, chromium or iron, have become traditional tools in biogeochemical studies of ancient environments, raising hopes that selenium may join the group. Like sulfur, selenium is found in sulfide minerals and organic matter, it forms oxyanions under oxic conditions, and its isotopes are fractionated during dissimilatory reduction, albeit at relatively higher redox potential. One would therefore expect that redox changes over Earth's history led to a response in selenium isotopes. For a first assessment, we analyzed selenium isotopes and abundances in black shales from marine and non-marine environments spanning the last 3.2 billion years (Stüeken et al. 2015). Combined with published data from the Phanerozoic eon, our results show that isotopic fractionations in bulk rocks are mostly between -2‰ and +2‰ in δ82/78Se (relative to NIST SRM 3149, bulk Earth ~ 0‰) and thus significantly smaller than what has been reported from biological experiments (up to 25‰, Johnson & Bullen 2004). In the Precambrian before 1.0 Ga, marine data are mostly positive (+0.4 ± 0.4‰); negative values occur in non-marine settings in the late Archean. In the Phanerozoic, the mean of open marine samples drops to -0.2 ± 0.6 ‰ whereas restricted anoxic basins are on average positive (+0.2 ± 0.4 ‰). The range of fractionations is generally larger in samples with a molar Setotal:Corg ratio greater than that of marine biomass (up to ~5·10-6, Mitchell et al. 2012). We conclude that selenium isotopes are sensitive to atmospheric and marine oxygenation events, but due to the scarcity and nutrient-type behavior of selenium in seawater, organic-binding likely dominates the selenium cycle, which leads to smaller net fractionations in black shales and a strong response to changes in biological productivity. The largest isotopic fractionations are probably observed where the selenium supply exceeds the biological demand due to a

  8. Incorporating redox processes improves prediction of carbon and nutrient cycling and greenhouse gas emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guoping; Zheng, Jianqiu; Yang, Ziming; Graham, David; Gu, Baohua; Mayes, Melanie; Painter, Scott; Thornton, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Among the coupled thermal, hydrological, geochemical, and biological processes, redox processes play major roles in carbon and nutrient cycling and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. Increasingly, mechanistic representation of redox processes is acknowledged as necessary for accurate prediction of GHG emission in the assessment of land-atmosphere interactions. Simple organic substrates, Fe reduction, microbial reactions, and the Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM) were added to a reaction network used in the land component of an Earth system model. In conjunction with this amended reaction network, various temperature response functions used in ecosystem models were assessed for their ability to describe experimental observations from incubation tests with arctic soils. Incorporation of Fe reduction reactions improves the prediction of the lag time between CO2 and CH4 accumulation. The inclusion of the WHAM model enables us to approximately simulate the initial pH drop due to organic acid accumulation and then a pH increase due to Fe reduction without parameter adjustment. The CLM4.0, CENTURY, and Ratkowsky temperature response functions better described the observations than the Q10 method, Arrhenius equation, and ROTH-C. As electron acceptors between O2 and CO2 (e.g., Fe(III), SO42-) are often involved, our results support inclusion of these redox reactions for accurate prediction of CH4 production and consumption. Ongoing work includes improving the parameterization of organic matter decomposition to produce simple organic substrates, examining the influence of redox potential on methanogenesis under thermodynamically favorable conditions, and refining temperature response representation near the freezing point by additional model-experiment iterations. We will use the model to describe observed GHG emission at arctic and tropical sites.

  9. Utilizing redox-mediated Bergman cyclization toward the development of dual-action metalloenediyne therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Sarah E; Park, Hyunsoo; Pink, Maren; Zaleski, Jeffrey M

    2013-03-13

    Reaction of 2 equiv of 1,2-bis((diphenylphosphino)ethynyl)benzene (dppeb, 1) with Pt(cod)Cl2 followed by treatment with N2H4 yields the reduced Pt(0) metalloenediyne, Pt(dppeb)2, 2. This complex is stable to both air oxidation and metal-mediated Bergman cyclization under ambient conditions due to the nearly idealized tetrahedral geometry. Reaction of 2 with 1 equiv of I2 in the presence of excess 1,4-cyclohexadiene (1,4-CHD) radical trap rapidly and near-quantitatively generates the cis-Bergman-cyclized, diiodo product 3 ((31)P: δ = 41 ppm, J(Pt-P) = 3346 Hz) with concomitant loss of 1 equiv of uncyclized phosphine chelate ((31)P: δ = -33 ppm). In contrast, addition of 2 equiv of I2 in the absence of additional radical trap instantaneously forms a metastable Pt(dppeb)2(2+) intermediate species, 4, that is characterized by δ = 51 ppm in the (31)P NMR (J(Pt-P) = 3171 Hz) and ν(C≡C) = 2169 cm(-1) in the Raman profile, indicating that it is an uncyclized, bis-ligated complex. Over 24 h, 4 undergoes ligand exchange to form a neutral, square planar complex that spontaneously Bergman cyclizes at ambient temperature to give the crystalline product Pt(dppnap-I2)I2 (dppnap-I2 = (1,4-diiodonaphthalene-2,3-diyl)bis(diphenylphosphine)), 5, in 52% isolated yield. Computational analysis of the oxidation reaction proposes two plausible flattened tetrahedral structures for intermediate 4: one where the phosphine core has migrated to a trans-spanning chelate geometry, and a second, higher energy structure (3.3 kcal/mol) with two cis-chelating phosphine ligands (41° dihedral angle) via a restricted alkyne-terminal starting point. While the energies are disparate, the common theme in both structures is the elongated Pt-P bond lengths (>2.4 Å), indicating that nucleophilic ligand substitution by I(-) is on the reaction trajectory to the cyclized product 5. The efficiency of the redox-mediated Bergman cyclization reaction of this stable Pt(0) metalloenediyne prodrug and

  10. Bench-to-bedside review: Neonatal sepsis - redox processes in pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The present review is aimed at elucidating the neonatal 'sepsis redox cycle' - the cascade of inflammatory and redox events involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis in neonates. While adult and neonatal sepses share some common features, there are some substantial differences: higher mortality rates occur in adult sepsis and worse long-term effects are evident in neonatal sepsis survivors. Such epidemiological data may be explained by the lower ability of IL6 and IL8 to activate NF-κB-regulated transcription in neonatal sepsis in comparison to TNF-α, which is involved in the mechanisms of adult sepsis. The activation of NF-κB in neonatal sepsis is further promoted by hydrogen peroxide and results in mitochondrial dysfunction and energy failure as septic neonates experience decreased O2 consumption as well as lower heat production and body temperature in comparison to healthy peers. In neonates, specific organs that are still under development are vulnerable to sepsis-provoked stress, which may lead to brain, lung, and heart injury, as well as vision and hearing impairments. In the light of the processes integrated here, it is clear that therapeutic approaches should also target specific steps in the neonatal 'sepsis redox cycle' in addition to the current therapeutic approach that is mainly focused on pathogen eradication. PMID:22574892

  11. Investigation of Iron Oxide Morphology in a Cyclic Redox Water Splitting Process for Hydrogen Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Bobek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A solar fuels generation research program is focused on hydrogen production by means of reactive metal water splitting in a cyclic iron-based redox process. Iron-based oxides are explored as an intermediary reactive material to dissociate water molecules at significantly reduced thermal energies. With a goal of studying the resulting oxide chemistry and morphology, chemical assistance via CO is used to complete the redox cycle. In order to exploit the unique characteristics of highly reactive materials at the solar reactor scale, a monolithic laboratory scale reactor has been designed to explore the redox cycle at temperatures ranging from 675 to 875 K. Using high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, the oxide morphology and the oxide state are quantified, including spatial distributions. These images show the change of the oxide layers directly after oxidation and after reduction. The findings show a significant non-stoichiometric O/Fe gradient in the atomic ratio following oxidation, which is consistent with a previous kinetics model, and a relatively constant, non-stoichiometric O/Fe atomic ratio following reduction.

  12. Low strength wastewater treatment under low temperature conditions by a novel sulfur redox action process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Bungo, Y; Takahashi, M; Sumino, H; Nagano, A; Araki, N; Imai, T; Yamazaki, S; Harada, H

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is to make a novel wastewater treatment process activated by a sulfur-redox cycle action of microbes in low temperature conditions. This action is carried out by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). The process was comprised of a UASB reactor as pre-treatment and an aerobic downflow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor as post-treatment. As the results of reactor operation, the whole process achieved that over 90% of CODcr removal efficiency, less than 30 mgCODcr/L (less than 15 mgBOD/L) of final effluent, at 12 h of HRT and at 8 degrees C of UASB reactor temperature. Acetobacterium sp. was detected as the predominant species by PCR-DGGE method targeting 16SrDNA with band excision and sequence analysis. In the UASB reactor, various species of sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfobulbus sp., Desulfovibrio sp., and Desulfomicrobium sp., were found by cloning analysis. In the DHS reactor, Tetracoccus sp. presented as dominant. The proposed sulfur-redox action process was considered as an applicable process for low strength wastewater treatment in low temperature conditions.

  13. Co-regulation of redox processes in freshwater wetlands as a function of organic matter availability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alewell, C; Paul, S; Lischeid, G; Storck, F R

    2008-10-15

    Wetlands have important filter functions in landscapes but are considered to be the biggest unknowns regarding their element dynamics under global climate change. Information on sink and source function of sulphur, nitrogen, organic matter and acidity in wetlands is crucial for freshwater regeneration. Recent results indicate that redox processes are not completely controlled by the sequential reduction chain (that is electron acceptor availability) but that electron donor availability may be an important regulator. Our hypothesis was that only sites which are limited in their electron donor availability (low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC)) follow the concept of the sequential reduction chain. We compared the results of two freshwater wetland systems: 1) three forested fens within a boreal spruce catchment in a low mountain range in southern Germany (high DOC regime) and 2) three floodplain soils within a groundwater enrichment area in the Rhein valley in northwest Switzerland (low DOC regime). Micro scale investigations (a few cm(3)) with dialyse chambers as well as soil solution and groundwater concentrations at the forested fens (high DOC regime) indicated simultaneous consumption of nitrate and sulphate with release of iron, manganese and methane (CH(4)) as well as an enrichment in stable sulphur isotopes indicating a co-existence of processes attributed to different redox gradients. Soil and aquifer gas measurements down to 4.6 m at the groundwater enrichment site (low DOC regime and carbon limitation) showed extreme high rates of metabolism with carbon dioxide (CO(2))(,) dinitrous oxide (N(2)O) and CH(4) concentrations reaching fifty, thirty and three times atmospheric concentrations, respectively. Simultaneously, groundwater oxygen (O(2)) saturation was between 50 and 95%. We concluded that independent of DOC regime the sequential reduction chain was not a suitable concept in our systems. Instead of electron acceptor or donor availability

  14. Co-regulation of redox processes in freshwater wetlands as a function of organic matter availability?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alewell, C. [Environmental Geosciences, University of Basel, Bernoullistr. 30, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)], E-mail: Christine.alewell@unibas.ch; Paul, S. [Institute of Soil Science and Forest Nutrition, Georg-August University Goettingen, Buesgenweg 2, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Lischeid, G. [Ecological Modelling, BAYCERR, University of Bayreuth, Dr.-Hans-Frisch-Str. 1-3, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Storck, F.R. [Environmental Geosciences, University of Basel, Bernoullistr. 30, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-10-15

    Wetlands have important filter functions in landscapes but are considered to be the biggest unknowns regarding their element dynamics under global climate change. Information on sink and source function of sulphur, nitrogen, organic matter and acidity in wetlands is crucial for freshwater regeneration. Recent results indicate that redox processes are not completely controlled by the sequential reduction chain (that is electron acceptor availability) but that electron donor availability may be an important regulator. Our hypothesis was that only sites which are limited in their electron donor availability (low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC)) follow the concept of the sequential reduction chain. We compared the results of two freshwater wetland systems: 1) three forested fens within a boreal spruce catchment in a low mountain range in southern Germany (high DOC regime) and 2) three floodplain soils within a groundwater enrichment area in the Rhein valley in northwest Switzerland (low DOC regime). Micro scale investigations (a few cm{sup 3}) with dialyse chambers as well as soil solution and groundwater concentrations at the forested fens (high DOC regime) indicated simultaneous consumption of nitrate and sulphate with release of iron, manganese and methane (CH{sub 4}) as well as an enrichment in stable sulphur isotopes indicating a co-existence of processes attributed to different redox gradients. Soil and aquifer gas measurements down to 4.6 m at the groundwater enrichment site (low DOC regime and carbon limitation) showed extreme high rates of metabolism with carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}){sub ,} dinitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and CH{sub 4} concentrations reaching fifty, thirty and three times atmospheric concentrations, respectively. Simultaneously, groundwater oxygen (O{sub 2}) saturation was between 50 and 95%. We concluded that independent of DOC regime the sequential reduction chain was not a suitable concept in our systems. Instead of electron

  15. Biomass utilization for the process of gasification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Spěvák

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass as one of the renewable resources of energy has bright future in utilization, especially in obtaining various forms of energy (heat, electrical energy, gas.According to the conception of energy policy of the Czech Republic and according to the fulfillment of the indicators of renewable resources using until the year 2010, the research of thermophysical characteristics of biofuels was realized.There were acquired considerable amount of results by combustion and gasification process on the basis of three-year project „Biomass energy parameters.” By means of combustion and gasification tests of various (biomass fuels were acquired the results which were not published so far.Acquired results are published in the fuel sheets, which are divided into four parts. They consist of information on fuel composition, ash composition, testing conditions and measurand overview. Measurements were realized for the process of combustion, fluidized-bed gasification and fixed-bed gasification. Following fuels were tested: Acacia, Pine, Birch, Beech, Spruce, Poplar, Willow, Rape, Amaranth, Corn, Flax, Wheat, Safflower, Mallow, and Sorrel.

  16. A new method for the investigation of mercury redox chemistry in natural waters utilizing deflatable Teflon[reg] bags and additions of isotopically labeled mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalin, Lindsay M. [Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland, Solomons, MD 20688 (United States); Mason, Robert P. [Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland, Solomons, MD 20688 (United States)]. E-mail: robert.mason@uconn.edu

    2006-02-03

    The toxicity and behavior of mercury (Hg) varies greatly between its chemical species, yet the mechanisms which control the redox chemistry of Hg in natural waters are still poorly understood. Previous studies have identified these processes and compared the Hg redox chemistry between water types but have been hampered by errors associated primarily with the type of reaction vessels utilized, and the inability of the methods to simultaneously measure oxidation and reduction. Presented here are the results of experiments which demonstrate the validity of a new method that addresses both these issues through the design and use of a new reaction vessel, a 5 L PFA Teflon[reg] incubation bag, and by the addition of isotopically labeled inorganic Hg species (both Hg{sup II} and Hg{sup 0}). The method development showed that mm thick FEP Teflon[reg] is permeable to Hg{sup 0}, and therefore unsuitable. Application of this method showed that both oxidation and reduction occurred simultaneously in natural waters exposed to ambient sunlight and that the rate of these transformations were of similar order (10{sup -3} to 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}). Given such reaction rates, the characteristic time to equilibrium is rapid, on the order of hours. The method is applicable for tracer studies, and the method was able to quantify rate constants of greater than 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}. Overall, this study suggests that the rates of reaction are faster than previously predicted primarily because previous studies did not account for the fact that both reactions are occurring simultaneously in natural waters.

  17. Characterization of the surface redox process of adsorbed morin at glassy carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesio, Alvaro Yamil, E-mail: atesio@exa.unrc.edu.a [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Fisico-Quimicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, Agencia Postal No 3, (5800) Rio Cuarto (Argentina); Granero, Adrian Marcelo, E-mail: agranero@exa.unrc.edu.a [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Fisico-Quimicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, Agencia Postal No 3, (5800) Rio Cuarto (Argentina); Fernandez, Hector, E-mail: hfernandez@exa.unrc.edu.a [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Fisico-Quimicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, Agencia Postal No 3, (5800) Rio Cuarto (Argentina); Zon, Maria Alicia, E-mail: azon@exa.unrc.edu.a [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Fisico-Quimicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, Agencia Postal No 3, (5800) Rio Cuarto (Argentina)

    2011-02-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetics of the adsorption of morin (MOR) on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes in 0.2 mol dm{sup -3} phosphate buffer solutions (PBS, pH 7.00) was studied by both cyclic (CV) and square wave (SWV) voltammetries. The Frumkin adsorption isotherm was the best to describe the specific interaction of MOR with GC electrodes. The SWV allowed to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetics of surface quasi-reversible redox couple of MOR, using the combination of the 'quasi-reversible maximum' and the 'splitting of SW net peaks' methods. Average values obtained for the formal potential and the anodic transfer coefficient were (0.27 {+-} 0.02) V and (0.59 {+-} 0.09), respectively. Moreover, a value of formal rate constant (k{sub s}) of 87 s{sup -1} for the overall two-electron redox process was calculated. The SWV was also employed to generate calibration curves, which were linear in the range MOR bulk concentration (c{sub MOR}*) from 1.27 x 10{sup -7} to 2.50 x 10{sup -5} mol dm{sup -3}. The lowest concentration experimentally measured for a signal to noise ratio of 3:1 was 1.25 x 10{sup -8} mol dm{sup -3} (3 ppb).

  18. Interim glycol flowsheet reduction/oxidation (redox) model for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Zamecnik, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-08

    Control of the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of glasses containing high concentrations of transition metals, such as High Level Waste (HLW) glasses, is critical in order to eliminate processing difficulties caused by overly reduced or overly oxidized melts. Operation of a HLW melter at Fe+2/ΣFe ratios of between 0.09 and 0.33, a range which is not overly oxidizing or overly reducing, helps retain radionuclides in the melt, i.e. long-lived radioactive 99Tc species in the less volatile reduced Tc4+ state, 104Ru in the melt as reduced Ru+4 state as insoluble RuO2, and hazardous volatile Cr6+ in the less soluble and less volatile Cr+3 state in the glass. The melter REDOX control balances the oxidants and reductants from the feed and from processing additives such as antifoam. Currently, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is running a formic acid-nitric acid (FN) flowsheet where formic acid is the main reductant and nitric acid is the main oxidant. During decomposition formate and formic acid releases H2 gas which requires close control of the melter vapor space flammability. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (GN) flowsheet is desired as the glycolic acid flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing. Development of an EE term for glycolic acid in the GN flowsheet is documented in this study.

  19. REDOX Technology for metal working fluids treatment: lifetime; Tecnologia REDOX aplicada al tratamiento de fluidos de corte: alargamiento de su vida util

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez de Mendiola, A.; Villaran, M. C.; Valle, B.

    2001-07-01

    Metalworking fluids play a key role in industrial production engineering, because without them it would not be possible to make full use of the capabilities of modern machine tools. Nowadays, these fluids contain harmful substances. They are classified like dangerous wastes at the end of their life and have to be properly managed. On the other hand, the change of these fluids supposes additional costs: new fluid, production break, manpower for cleaning and waste management. Considering above mentioned, it is necessary to lengthen the metalworking fluid's life. LEIA and TEMA have developed a new system based on the redox technology that allows lengthen the metalworking fluid's life without bactericides and other chemical products. In this article we show the results obtained with this new system in an industrial plant of machinery manufacture. (Author) 8 refs.

  20. Thiol switches in redox regulation of chloroplasts: balancing redox state, metabolism and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Karl-Josef; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-05-01

    In photosynthesizing chloroplasts, rapidly changing energy input, intermediate generation of strong reductants as well as oxidants and multiple participating physicochemical processes and pathways, call for efficient regulation. Coupling redox information to protein function via thiol modifications offers a powerful mechanism to activate, down-regulate and coordinate interdependent processes. Efficient thiol switching of target proteins involves the thiol-disulfide redox regulatory network, which is highly elaborated in chloroplasts. This review addresses the features of this network. Its conditional function depends on specificity of reduction and oxidation reactions and pathways, thiol redox buffering, but also formation of heterogeneous milieus by microdomains, metabolite gradients and macromolecular assemblies. One major player is glutathione. Its synthesis and function is under feedback redox control. The number of thiol-controlled processes and involved thiol switched proteins is steadily increasing, e.g., in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, plastid transcription and plastid translation. Thus chloroplasts utilize an intricate and versatile redox regulatory network for intraorganellar and retrograde communication.

  1. Solar fuel processing efficiency for ceria redox cycling using alternative oxygen partial pressure reduction methods

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Meng; Haussener, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Solar-driven non-stoichiometric thermochemical redox cycling of ceria for the conversion of solar energy into fuels shows promise in achieving high solar-to-fuel efficiency. This efficiency is significantly affected by the operating conditions, e.g. redox temperatures, reduction and oxidation pressures, solar irradiation concentration, or heat recovery effectiveness. We present a thermodynamic analysis of five redox cycle designs to investigate the effects of working conditions on the fuel pr...

  2. Time resolved XANES illustrates a substrate-mediated redox process in Prussian blue cultural heritage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Claire; Lanquille, Marie-Angélique; Moretti, Giulia; Réguer, Solenn

    2016-05-01

    The pigment Prussian blue is studied in heritage science because of its capricious fading behavior under light exposure. We show here that XANES can be used to study the photosensitivity of Prussian blue heritage materials despite X-ray radiation damage. We used an original approach based on X-ray photochemistry to investigate in depth the redox process of Prussian blue when it is associated with a cellulosic substrate, as in cyanotypes and watercolors. By modifying cation and proton contents of the paper substrate, we could tune both rate and extent of Prussian blue reduction. These results demonstrate that the photoreduction and fading of Prussian blue is principally mediated by the substrate and its interaction with the oxygen of the environment.

  3. Charge-transfer processes and redox reactions in planar lipid monolayers and bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiñki, P; Tien, H T; Ottova, A

    1999-01-01

    Supported bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) and lipid monolayers have been known for quite sometime and are attracting sustained interest since they open new research vista and offer practical approaches in biosensor development and molecular device applications. Central to these areas of interest are electric processes and redox reactions where the movement of ions and electrons plays a pivotal role. In this paper an overview of the major findings in this field is presented. Further, we summarize the work on planar lipid bilayers and monolayers that have been done in the past few years in a number of laboratories. Supported planar BLMs and their closely related systems provide the foundation for a variety of lipid bilayer-based molecular sensors that are sensitive, versatile, as well as potentially inexpensive (i.e., disposable), and open to all sorts of experimentation.

  4. Legume nodule senescence: roles for redox and hormone signalling in the orchestration of the natural aging process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppo, Alain; Groten, Karin; Bastian, Fabiola; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Soussi, Mariam; Lucas, M Mercedes; de Felipe, Maria Rosario; Harrison, Judith; Vanacker, Hélène; Foyer, Christine H

    2005-03-01

    Research on legume nodule development has contributed greatly to our current understanding of plant-microbe interactions. However, the factors that orchestrate root nodule senescence have received relatively little attention. Accumulating evidence suggests that redox signals contribute to the establishment of symbiosis and senescence. Although degenerative in nature, nodule senescence is an active process programmed in development in which reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidants, hormones and proteinases have key roles. Nodules have high levels of the redox buffers, ascorbate and glutathione, which are important in the nodulation process and in senescence. These metabolites decline with N-fixation as the nodule ages but the resultant decrease in redox buffering capacity does not necessarily lead to enhanced ROS or oxidative stress. We propose models by which ROS and antioxidants interact with hormones such as abscisic acid in the orchestration of nodule senescence.

  5. Evidence for microbial mediation of subseafloor nitrogen redox processes at Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvan, Jason B.; Wankel, Scott D.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Charoenpong, Chawalit N.; Huber, Julie A.; Moyer, Craig L.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2017-02-01

    The role of nitrogen cycling in submarine hydrothermal systems is far less studied than that of other biologically reactive elements such as sulfur and iron. In order to address this knowledge gap, we investigated nitrogen redox processes at Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, using a combination of biogeochemical and isotopic measurements, bioenergetic calculations and analysis of the prokaryotic community composition in venting fluids sampled during four cruises in 2006, 2008, 2009 and 2013. Concentrations of NH4+ were positively correlated to dissolved Si and negatively correlated to NO3- + NO2-, while NO2- was not correlated to NO3- + NO2-, dissolved Si or NH4+. This is indicative of hydrothermal input of NH4+ and biological mediation influencing NO2- concentrations. The stable isotope ratios of NO3- (δ15N and δ18O) was elevated with respect to background seawater, with δ18O values exhibiting larger changes than corresponding δ15N values, reflecting the occurrence of both production and reduction of NO3- by an active microbial community. δ15N-NH4+ values ranged from 0‰ to +16.7‰, suggesting fractionation during consumption and potentially N-fixation as well. Bioenergetic calculations reveal that several catabolic strategies involving the reduction of NO3- and NO2- coupled to sulfide and iron oxidation could provide energy to microbes in Loihi fluids, while 16S rRNA gene sequencing of Archaea and Bacteria in the fluids reveals groups known to participate in denitrification and N-fixation. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that microbes are mediating N-based redox processes in venting hydrothermal fluids at Loihi Seamount.

  6. Nitric-glycolic flowsheet reduction/oxidation (redox) model for the defense waste processing facility (DWPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Trivelpiece, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ramsey, W. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-14

    Control of the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of glasses containing high concentrations of transition metals, such as High Level Waste (HLW) glasses, is critical in order to eliminate processing difficulties caused by overly reduced or overly oxidized melts. Operation of a HLW melter at Fe+2/ΣFe ratios of between 0.09 and 0.33, retains radionuclides in the melt and thus the final glass. Specifically, long-lived radioactive 99Tc species are less volatile in the reduced Tc4+ state as TcO2 than as NaTcO4 or Tc2O7, and ruthenium radionuclides in the reduced Ru4+ state are insoluble RuO2 in the melt which are not as volatile as NaRuO4 where the Ru is in the +7 oxidation state. Similarly, hazardous volatile Cr6+ occurs in oxidized melt pools as Na2CrO4 or Na2Cr2O7, while the Cr+3 state is less volatile and remains in the melt as NaCrO2 or precipitates as chrome rich spinels. The melter REDOX control balances the oxidants and reductants from the feed and from processing additives such as antifoam.

  7. Utilization of carbohydrates by radiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, T. E-mail: kume@taka.jaeri.go.jp; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshii, F

    2002-03-01

    Upgrading and utilization of carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated for recycling these bio-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction, etc. were induced. On the other hand, some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose and carboxymethylstarch, could be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produce the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use.

  8. Clean Processing and Utilization of Coal Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈如清; 王海峰

    2006-01-01

    The dominant status of coal on the energy production and consumption structure of China will not be changed in the middle period of this century. To realize highly efficient utilization of coal, low pollution and low cost are great and impendent tasks. These difficult problems can be almost resolved through establishing large-scale pithead power stations using two-stage highly efficient dry coal-cleaning system before coal burning, which is a highly efficient, clean and economical strategy considering the current energy and environmental status of China. All these will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  9. Utilizing Statistical Dialogue Act Processing in Verbmobil

    CERN Document Server

    Reithinger, N; Reithinger, Norbert; Maier, Elisabeth

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we present a statistical approach for dialogue act processing in the dialogue component of the speech-to-speech translation system \\vm. Statistics in dialogue processing is used to predict follow-up dialogue acts. As an application example we show how it supports repair when unexpected dialogue states occur.

  10. PROCESSING AND UTILIZATION OF AFRICAN LOCUST BEAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Based on the results of the study it can be concluded that locust bean processing is a .... quality if no chemical substances such as wood ash additives as preservatives are added as processing catalysts ..... Plant Food 25. Pp. 245-250. Okafor ...

  11. CO2 utilization: Developments in conversion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdogan Alper

    2017-03-01

    The potential utilization of CO2, captured at power plants, should also been taken into consideration for sustainability. This CO2 source, which is potentially a raw material for the chemical industry, will be available at sufficient quality and at gigantic quantity upon realization of on-going tangible capture projects. Products resulting from carboxylation reactions are obvious conversions. In addition, provided that enough supply of energy from non-fossil resources, such as solar [1], is ensured, CO2 reduction reactions can produce several valuable commodity chemicals including multi-carbon compounds, such as ethylene and acrylic acid, in addition to C1 chemicals and polymers. Presently, there are only few developing technologies which can find industrial applications. Therefore, there is a need for concerted research in order to assess the viability of these promising exploratory technologies rationally.

  12. Impacts of shallow geothermal energy production on redox processes and microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonte, Matthijs; Röling, Wilfred F M; Zaura, Egija; van der Wielen, Paul W J J; Stuyfzand, Pieter J; van Breukelen, Boris M

    2013-12-17

    Shallow geothermal systems are increasingly being used to store or harvest thermal energy for heating or cooling purposes. This technology causes temperature perturbations exceeding the natural variations in aquifers, which may impact groundwater quality. Here, we report the results of laboratory experiments on the effect of temperature variations (5-80 °C) on redox processes and associated microbial communities in anoxic unconsolidated subsurface sediments. Both hydrochemical and microbiological data showed that a temperature increase from 11 °C (in situ) to 25 °C caused a shift from iron-reducing to sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. Bioenergetic calculations could explain this shift. A further temperature increase (>45 °C) resulted in the emergence of a thermophilic microbial community specialized in fermentation and sulfate reduction. Two distinct maxima in sulfate reduction rates, of similar orders of magnitude (5 × 10(-10) M s(-1)), were observed at 40 and 70 °C. Thermophilic sulfate reduction, however, had a higher activation energy (100-160 kJ mol(-1)) than mesophilic sulfate reduction (30-60 kJ mol(-1)), which might be due to a trade-off between enzyme stability and activity with thermostable enzymes being less efficient catalysts that require higher activation energies. These results reveal that while sulfate-reducing functionality can withstand a substantial temperature rise, other key biochemical processes appear more temperature sensitive.

  13. INNOVATIVE MIOR PROCESS UTILIZING INDIGENOUS RESERVOIR CONSTITUENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.O. Hitzman; A.K. Stepp; D.M. Dennis; L.R. Graumann

    2003-09-01

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions and technologies for improving oil production. The goal was to identify and utilize indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work in model sandpack cores was conducted using microbial cultures isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters using cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Increased oil recovery in multiple model sandpack systems was achieved and the technology and results were verified by successful field studies. Direct application of the research results has lead to the development of a feasible, practical, successful, and cost-effective technology which increases oil recovery. This technology is now being commercialized and applied in numerous field projects to increase oil recovery. Two field applications of the developed technology reported production increases of 21% and 24% in oil recovery.

  14. Redox Processes and Arsenic Release in the Streambed of a Semi-arid Losing Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, M. S.; Rau, G. C.; McCallum, A. M.; Acworth, I.

    2011-12-01

    The water quality of groundwater recharge is a function of rainfall chemistry, soil processes and land use. It is less obvious that the mechanism of groundwater recharge itself can influence the resulting groundwater quality, but it has been shown that slow infiltration into thick unsaturated zones generally lead to oxic groundwater (Appelo and Postma, 2005). This is due to the relatively long residence time in the unsaturated zone where reactive organic matter from the soil can be exhausted in the presence of excess atmospheric oxygen. On the other hand, in shallow unsaturated zones some of the reactive organic matter tends to survive the short residence time in the unsaturated zone. Upon reaching the saturated zone this organic matter will reduce the limited amount of dissolved oxygen and start reducing other dissolved or solid electron acceptors (e.g. NO3-, SO42-, Fe(OH)3(s)). Consequently, it is to be expected that recharge from streams, where no unsaturated zone is present, in general should lead to anoxic groundwater. This could be beneficial for attenuating nitrate, but could lead to problems with high levels of dissolved iron or mobility of problematic trace elements such as arsenic. To explore these processes a field investigation was done in the ephemeral Maules Creek in NSW, Australia. A transect of groundwater and streambed piezometers were installed adjacent to a losing section of the creek. Water samples were collected from surface water, streambed pore waters and groundwater piezometers and analysed for water quality parameters (DO, pH, EC), major ions, trace elements, redox sensitive species (NO3-, Fe2+, Mn2+ and H2S) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The distribution of radioisotopes and dissolved species below the stream channel delineates a zone of the streambed-aquifer continuum containing water of a recent surface water origin. Measurable concentrations of reduced species (Fe2+, Mn2+ and NH4+), elevated levels of DOC and the lack of oxygen

  15. Characteristics and Kinetic Analysis of AQS Transformation and Microbial Goethite Reduction:Insight into "Redox mediator-Microbe-Iron oxide" Interaction Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weihuang; Shi, Mengran; Yu, Dan; Liu, Chongxuan; Huang, Tinglin; Wu, Fengchang

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics and kinetics of redox transformation of a redox mediator, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), during microbial goethite reduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12, a dissimilatory iron reduction bacterium (DIRB), were investigated to provide insights into "redox mediator-iron oxide" interaction in the presence of DIRB. Two pre-incubation reaction systems of the "strain S12- goethite" and the "strain S12-AQS" were used to investigate the dynamics of goethite reduction and AQS redox transformation. Results show that the concentrations of goethite and redox mediator, and the inoculation cell density all affect the characteristics of microbial goethite reduction, kinetic transformation between oxidized and reduced species of the redox mediator. Both abiotic and biotic reactions and their coupling regulate the kinetic process for "Quinone-Iron" interaction in the presence of DIRB. Our results provide some new insights into the characteristics and mechanisms of interaction among "quinone-DIRB- goethite" under biotic/abiotic driven.

  16. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox...... PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  17. Anticancer clinical utility of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE/Ref-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jian

    2010-03-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE/Ref-1), as a type of multifunctional protein, plays an essential role in the base excision repair (BER) pathway, which is responsible for the repair of DNA caused by oxidative and alkylation damage. As importantly, APE/Ref-1 also functions as a redox factor maintaining transcription factors in an active reduced state. APE/Ref-1 stimulates the DNA-binding activity of numerous transcription factors that are involved in cancer promotion and progression, such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NF-kappaB, HIF-1alpha, p53, and others. Based on the structures and functions of APE1/Ref-1, we will provide an overview of its activities and explore the budding clinical use of this protein as a target in cancer treatment, and propose that APE/Ref-1 has a great potential for application in clinical research.

  18. Utility-based early modulation of processing distracting stimulus information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Mike; Luna-Rodriguez, Aquiles; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2014-12-10

    Humans are selective information processors who efficiently prevent goal-inappropriate stimulus information to gain control over their actions. Nonetheless, stimuli, which are both unnecessary for solving a current task and liable to cue an incorrect response (i.e., "distractors"), frequently modulate task performance, even when consistently paired with a physical feature that makes them easily discernible from target stimuli. Current models of cognitive control assume adjustment of the processing of distractor information based on the overall distractor utility (e.g., predictive value regarding the appropriate response, likelihood to elicit conflict with target processing). Although studies on distractor interference have supported the notion of utility-based processing adjustment, previous evidence is inconclusive regarding the specificity of this adjustment for distractor information and the stage(s) of processing affected. To assess the processing of distractors during sensory-perceptual phases we applied EEG recording in a stimulus identification task, involving successive distractor-target presentation, and manipulated the overall distractor utility. Behavioral measures replicated previously found utility modulations of distractor interference. Crucially, distractor-evoked visual potentials (i.e., posterior N1) were more pronounced in high-utility than low-utility conditions. This effect generalized to distractors unrelated to the utility manipulation, providing evidence for item-unspecific adjustment of early distractor processing to the experienced utility of distractor information.

  19. Tamarind seed: properties, processing and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Chandini S; Bhattacharya, Sila

    2008-01-01

    Tamarind seed is an underutilized byproduct of the tamarind pulp industry. Only a small portion of the seed, in the form of tamarind kernel powder (TKP), is used as a sizing material in the textile, paper, and jute industries. Though many applications of this seed are possible, there have been hardly any other uses for it including using it as an additive in food formulations. The excellent gelling cum adhesive characteristics of the decorticated seed powder can lead to several applications in food and pharmaceutical industries which are evident by the number of research papers as well as patent applications. This article thus focuses on the possibilities of using the seed in several food and non-food industries with particular reference to physical and engineering properties, hydration behavior, rheological properties, functional and nutritional characteristics, and the processing of the tamarind seed for wider applications.

  20. Microbial redox processes in deep subsurface environments and the potential application of (perchlorate in oil reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G Liebensteiner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of microorganisms to thrive under oxygen-free conditions in subsurface environments relies on the enzymatic reduction of oxidized elements, such as sulfate, ferric iron or CO2, coupled to the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. A broad phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms from subsurface environments has been described using isolation-based and advanced molecular ecological techniques. The physiological groups reviewed here comprise iron-, manganese- and nitrate-reducing microorganisms. In the context of recent findings also the potential of chlorate and perchlorate [jointly termed (perchlorate] reduction in oil reservoirs will be discussed. Special attention is given to elevated temperatures that are predominant in the deep subsurface. Microbial reduction of (perchlorate is a thermodynamically favorable redox process, also at high temperature. However, knowledge about (perchlorate reduction at elevated temperatures is still scarce and restricted to members of the Firmicutes and the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus. By analyzing the diversity and phylogenetic distribution of functional genes in (metagenome databases and combining this knowledge with extrapolations to earlier-made physiological observations we speculate on the potential of (perchlorate reduction in the subsurface and more precisely oil fields. In addition, the application of (perchlorate for bioremediation, souring control and microbial enhanced oil recovery are addressed.

  1. Investigating redox processes under diffusive and advective flow conditions using a coupled omics and synchrotron approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.; Flynn, T. M.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Kelly, S.; Skinner, K.; Mishra, B.; Brooks, S. C.; Watson, D. B.; Wu, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    FeIII- and SO42--reducing microorganisms and the mineral phases they produce have profound implications for many processes in aquatic and terrestrial systems. In addition, many of these microbially-catalysed geochemical transformations are highly dependent upon introduction of reactants via advective and diffusive hydrological transport. We have characterized microbial communities from a set of static microcosms to test the effect of ethanol diffusion and sulfate concentration on UVI-contaminated sediment. The spatial distribution, valence states, and speciation of both U and Fe were monitored in situ throughout the experiment by synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, in parallel with solution measurements of pH and the concentrations of sulfate, ethanol, and organic acids. After reaction initiation, a ~1-cm thick layer of sediment near the sediment-water (S-W) interface became visibly dark. Fe XANES spectra of the layer were consistent with the formation of FeS. Over the 4 year duration of the experiment, U LIII-edge XANES indicated reduction of U, first in the dark layer and then throughout the sediment. Next, the microcosms were disassembled and samples were taken from the overlying water and different sediment regions. We extracted DNA and characterized the microbial community by sequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons with the Illumina MiSeq platform and found that the community evolved from its originally homogeneous composition, becoming significantly spatially heterogeneous. We have also developed an x-ray accessible column to probe elemental transformations as they occur along the flow path in a porous medium with the purpose of refining reactive transport models (RTMs) that describe coupled physical and biogeochemical processes in environmental systems. The elemental distribution dynamics and the RTMs of the redox driven processes within them will be presented.

  2. Utilization of chemical looping strategy in coal gasification processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangshih Fan; Fanxing Li; Shwetha Ramkumar

    2008-01-01

    Three chemical looping gasification processes, i. e. Syngas Chemical Looping (SCL) process, Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) process, and Calcium Looping process (CLP), are being developed at the Ohio State University (OSU). These processes utilize simple reaction schemes to convert carbonaceous fuels into products such as hydrogen, electricity, and synthetic fuels through the transformation of a highly reactive, highly recyclable chemical intermediate. In this paper, these novel chemical looping gasification processes are described and their advantages and potential challenges for commercialization are discussed.

  3. The redox processes in Hg-contaminated soils from Descoberto (Minas Gerais, Brazil): implications for the mercury cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windmöller, Cláudia C; Durão Júnior, Walter A; de Oliveira, Aline; do Valle, Cláudia M

    2015-02-01

    Investigations of the redox process and chemical speciation of Hg(II) lead to a better understanding of biogeochemical processes controlling the transformation of Hg(II) into toxic and bioaccumulative monomethyl mercury, mainly in areas contaminated with Hg(0). This study investigates the speciation and redox processes of Hg in soil samples from a small area contaminated with Hg(0) as a result of gold mining activities in the rural municipality of Descoberto (Minas Gerais, Brazil). Soil samples were prepared by adding Hg(0) and HgCl2 separately to dry soil, and the Hg redox process was monitored using thermodesorption coupled to atomic absorption spectrometry. A portion of the Hg(0) added was volatilized (up to 37.4±2.0%) or oxidized (from 36±7% to 88±16%). A correlation with Mn suggests that this oxidation is favored, but many other factors must be evaluated, such as the presence of microorganisms and the types of organic matter present. The interaction of Hg with the matrix is suggested to involve Hg(II)-complexes formed with inorganic and organic sulfur ligands and/or nonspecific adsorption onto oxides of Fe, Al and/or Mn. The kinetics of the oxidation reaction was approximated for two first-order reactions; the faster reaction was attributed to the oxidation of Hg(0)/Hg(I), and the slower reaction corresponded to Hg(I)/Hg(II). The second stage was 43-139 times slower than the first. The samples spiked with Hg(II) showed low volatilization and a shifting of the signal of Hg(II) to lower temperatures. These results show that the extent, rate and type of redox process can be adverse in soils. Descoberto can serve as an example for areas contaminated with Hg(0).

  4. Relating hyporheic fluxes, residence times, and redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes upstream of beaver dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lautz, Laura; Hare, Danielle K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Small dams enhance the development of patchy microenvironments along stream corridors by trapping sediment and creating complex streambed morphologies. This patchiness drives intricate hyporheic flux patterns that govern the exchange of O2 and redox-sensitive solutes between the water column and the stream bed. We used multiple tracer techniques, naturally occurring and injected, to evaluate hyporheic flow dynamics and associated biogeochemical cycling and microbial reactivity around 2 beaver dams in Wyoming (USA). High-resolution fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing was used to collect temperature data over 9 vertical streambed profiles and to generate comprehensive vertical flux maps using 1-dimensional (1-D) heat-transport modeling. Coincident with these locations, vertical profiles of hyporheic water were collected every week and analyzed for dissolved O2, pH, dissolved organic C, and several conservative and redox-sensitive solutes. In addition, hyporheic and net stream aerobic microbial reactivity were analyzed with a constant-rate injection of the biologically sensitive resazurin (Raz) smart tracer. The combined results revealed a heterogeneous system with rates of downwelling hyporheic flow organized by morphologic unit and tightly coupled to the redox conditions of the subsurface. Principal component analysis was used to summarize the variability of all redox-sensitive species, and results indicated that hyporheic water varied from oxic-stream-like to anoxic-reduced in direct response to the hydrodynamic conditions and associated residence times. The anaerobic transition threshold predicted by the mean O2 Damko

  5. Kinetic analysis of palladium(II) adsorption process on condensed-tannin gel based on redox reaction models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Ho; Ogata, Takeshi; Nakano, Yoshio

    2007-07-01

    We have developed a novel recovery system of palladium (Pd) from wastes such as spent catalysts or scraps, using tannin gel particles synthesized from condensed-tannin molecules. The Pd(II) ionic species are reduced to metallic Pd(0) on the network of the tannin gel: a two-electron transfer from the tannin gel to Pd(II). The kinetic study of the electron transfer was performed with a multiple reaction model containing an intermediate step (formation of a ligand-substituted Pd(II)-tannin inner sphere complex), resulting in a better fit with the experimental results than with the single reaction model (outer sphere redox reaction), which means that the inner sphere redox mechanism is an appropriate reaction model for the Pd(II) adsorption process. Because the intermediate is included in the adsorption amount, the adsorption process can be divided into two steps: fast adsorption by the ligand substitution at the initial stage and slow adsorption by the subsequent redox reaction after the ligand substitution reaches an equilibrium state, with different adsorption rates between the Pd(II) ionic species (PdCl(+)>PdCl(2)>PdCl(3)(-),PdCl(4)(2-)).

  6. Mitochondrially targeted fluorescent redox sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kylie; Kolanowski, Jacek L; New, Elizabeth J

    2017-04-06

    The balance of oxidants and antioxidants within the cell is crucial for maintaining health, and regulating physiological processes such as signalling. Consequently, imbalances between oxidants and antioxidants are now understood to lead to oxidative stress, a physiological feature that underlies many diseases. These processes have spurred the field of chemical biology to develop a plethora of sensors, both small-molecule and fluorescent protein-based, for the detection of specific oxidizing species and general redox balances within cells. The mitochondrion, in particular, is the site of many vital redox reactions. There is therefore a need to target redox sensors to this particular organelle. It has been well established that targeting mitochondria can be achieved by the use of a lipophilic cation-targeting group, or by utilizing natural peptidic mitochondrial localization sequences. Here, we review how these two approaches have been used by a number of researchers to develop mitochondrially localized fluorescent redox sensors that are already proving useful in providing insights into the roles of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria.

  7. Impact of pH on hydrogen oxidizing redox processes in aquifers due to gas intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzgen, Adrian; Berta, Marton; Dethlefsen, Frank; Ebert, Markus; Dahmke, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    (first order rate constants between 0.029 and 0.036 1/h). Between pH 7 and 8, acetogenesis showed a linear trend (zeroth order rates between 3 and 5 µM/h) whereas formate production became the main process (zeroth order rates between 38 to 197 µM/h) together with methanogenesis as a minor process. The results indicated a strong dependency of the biogeochemical hydrogenotrophic redox reactions on the pH milieu. Thus, pH buffers such as dissolved or solid phase carbonates should be taken into account when predicting effects a hydrogen leakage may have on shallow aquifers. Additionally, parameters derived from the observed processes and their rates allow the design of a process based numerical model simulating a hydrogen intrusion into a shallow aquifer. Consequently the presented outcomes allow an exemplary quantification of the resulting geochemical effects. This study was carried out within the ANGUS+ project and was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) energy storage funding initiative.

  8. Utility of a redox-active pyridine(diimine) chelate in facilitating two electron oxidative addition chemistry at uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernicki, John J; Fanwick, Phillip E; Bart, Suzanne C

    2014-08-01

    Exposure of the uranium(IV) complex, Cp(P)U((Mes)PDI(Me)) (1) ((Mes)PDI(Me) = 2,6-((Mes)N=CMe)2–C5H3N; Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl; Cp(P) = 1-(7,7-dimethylbenzyl)cyclopentadienyl), which contains a [(Mes)PDI(Me)](3−) chelate, to I2, Cl2, PhSeCl, and PhEEPh (E = S, Se, Te) results in oxidative addition to form the uranium(IV) family, Cp(P)U(XX′)((Mes)PDI(Me)) (X = X′ = I, Cl, EPh; X = SePh, X′ = Cl). Spectroscopic and structural studies support products with [(Mes)PDI(Me)](1−), indicating the reducing equivalents derive from this redox-active chelate.

  9. The Possibilities of WWW Utilization for Process Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roškanin Martin

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the possibilities of www technology utilization in real time process control and describes the representation of this information on client site in the www page form. The communication between client and process over web server and socket connection is discussed. The application of one of this method is illustrated.

  10. Stable Chromium Isotopes as tracer of changes in weathering processes and redox state of the ocean during Neoproterozoic glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossing, L. N.; Gaucher, C.; Boggiani, P. C.; Frei, R.

    2010-12-01

    The chemistry of surface environments on Earth has essentially evolved from early anoxic conditions to a present day oxic state. How in detail this transition occurred is still a matter of debate but the last 200 million years (My) of the Neoproterozoic Era [(1000 to 542 million years ago (Ma)] show an emerging picture of large scale fluctuations in the redox state of the oceans [1-2]. The reasons for these fluctuations are to be sought in Earth’s atmospheric oxygenation which led to the rapid radiation of oxygen-utilizing macroscopic metazoans, but details regarding the nature of these fluctuations remain unclear. The Late Neoproterozoic is known for a number of widespread glaciations causing the return of ferruginous oceans which were absent for more than a billion years of Earth history. This study elaborates on the idea that Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes in Fe-rich chemical sediments deposited during glacial events are suitable for tracing oxygenation of surface environments through Earth's history [3]. The focus of this study is to apply the Cr isotope system to one of the Marinoan (650-630 Ma) glacio-marine sequences (Jacadigo Group, Brazil) in order to get a detailed spatial and relative temporal resolution of changes in weathering processes and redox states of the respective ocean basin during the depositional period of the sediments. The Jacadigo Group is a glacio-marine succession which is composed of the Urucum Fm. (sandstones) at the base, the Santa Cruz Fm. (BIFs) and the Puga Fm. (Fe-rich glacial diamictites) at the top. Cr stable isotope measurements on various BIF horizons of the Santa Cruz Fm. yielded positive δ53/52Cr values range from +0.4 to+ 0.9‰, while the overlying Fe-rich glaciogenic diamictites of the Puga Fm. show δ53/52Cr values range from to +0.1 to+ 0.4‰. These positively fractionated values correspond to positive δ53/52Cr values measured in other Late Neoproterozoic BIFs and speak for the occurrence of potential oxygenation

  11. Processing the Visonta lignite for utilization in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimpl, E.

    1985-01-01

    To utilize the Visonta lignite in power plants, laboratory, semi-industrial and industrial experiments were carried out. In the enrichment process, the parameters of the mensual quality fluctuations, the expected grain size distribution of the lignite, and the average ash content are to be known. Different enrichment processes as well as their results are discussed. In harmony with the obtained results the optimal lignite processing technology is described.

  12. Application of TQM principles to the utilization management process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J B; Rose, M S; Milakovich, M; Rosasco, E J

    1992-01-01

    Application of the philosophy and principles of TQM and CQI to utilization management within an institution necessitates an in-depth review of the systems and processes of the flow of inpatients throughout their stay. This encompasses a total systems perspective, beginning with the admitting process and going through the discharge process. TQM and CQI philosophies identify that the most significant and costly inefficiencies are due to faulty systems and processes, not individuals. Applying this management strategy to a health care institution requires a detailed review and analysis of processes by which service is delivered and requires evaluation of the outcomes of patient care and patient satisfaction.

  13. Immobilized redox mediator on metal-oxides nanoparticles and its catalytic effect in a reductive decolorization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L H; Perez-Cruz, M A; Rangel-Mendez, J R; Cervantes, F J

    2010-12-15

    Different metal-oxides nanoparticles (MONP) including α-Al(2)O(3), ZnO and Al(OH)(3), were utilized as adsorbents to immobilize anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Immobilized AQDS was subsequently tested as a solid-phase redox mediator (RMs) for the reductive decolorization of the azo dye, reactive red 2 (RR2), by anaerobic sludge. The highest adsorption capacity of AQDS was achieved on Al(OH)(3) nanoparticles, which was ∼0.16 mmol g(-1) at pH 4. Immobilized AQDS increased up to 7.5-fold the rate of decolorization of RR2 by anaerobic sludge as compared with sludge incubations lacking AQDS. Sterile controls including immobilized AQDS did not show significant (reduction) were not responsible for the enhanced decolorization achieved. Immobilization of AQDS on MONP was very stable under the applied experimental conditions and spectrophotometric screening did not detect any detachment of AQDS during the reductive decolorization of RR2, confirming that immobilized AQDS served as an effective RMs. The present study constitutes the first demonstration that immobilized quinones on MONP can serve as effective RMs in the reductive decolorization of an azo dye. The immobilizing technique developed could be applied in anaerobic wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the redox biotransformation of recalcitrant pollutants.

  14. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  15. Redox zone II. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the Aespoe island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorge; Changbing Yang; Guoxiang Zhang [Univ. Da Coruna (Spain)

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behaviour and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by Banwart et al. Later, Banwart presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by Molinero who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulphate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of Molinero and extends the preliminary microbial model of Zhang by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfaphe concentration, thus adding additional evidence for the possibility

  16. Reactivity at (nano)particle-water interfaces, redox processes, and arsenic transport in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Laurent; Morin, Guillaume; Rose, Jérôme; Wang, Yuheng; Auffan, Mélanie; Burnol, André; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro

    2011-02-01

    Massive deleterious impacts to human health are resulting from the use of arsenic-bearing groundwaters in South-East Asia deltas and elsewhere in the world for drinking, cooking and/or irrigation. In Bangladesh alone, a fifth of all deaths are linked to arsenicosis. In the natural and engineered subsurface environment, the fate of arsenic is, to a large extent, controlled by redox potential, pH, as well as total iron, sulfur and carbonate content, via sorption and coprecipitation on a variety of natural and engineered (nano)particles. In the present article, we address: (1) new insights in the sorption mechanisms of As on Fe(II) and Fe(III) nanophases recognized to play an important role in the microbial cycling of As and Fe; (2) artifacts often encountered in field and laboratory studies of As speciation due to the extreme redox sensitivity of the Fe-As-O-H phases; and (3) as a conclusion, the implications for water treatment. Indeed the specific reactivity of nanoparticles accounts not only for the As bioavailability within soils and aquifers, but also opens new avenues in water treatment.

  17. Global redox cycle of biospheric carbon: Interaction of photosynthesis and earth crust processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, Alexander A

    2015-11-01

    A model of the natural global redox cycle of biospheric carbon is introduced. According to this model, carbon transfer between biosphere and geospheres is accompanied by a conversion of the oxidative forms, presented by CO2, bicarbonate and carbonate ions, into the reduced forms, produced in photosynthesis. The mechanism of carbon transfer is associated with two phases of movement of lithospheric plates. In the short-term orogenic phase, CO2 from the subduction (plates' collisions) zones fills the "atmosphere-hydrosphere" system, resulting in climate warming. In the long-term quiet (geosynclynal) phase, weathering and photosynthesis become dominant depleting the oxidative forms of carbon. The above asymmetric periodicity exerts an impact on climate, biodiversity, distribution of organic matter in sedimentary deposits, etc. Along with photosynthesis expansion, the redox carbon cycle undergoes its development until it reaches the ecological compensation point, at which CO2 is depleted to the level critical to support the growth and reproduction of plants. This occurred in the Permo-Carboniferous time and in the Neogene. Shorter-term perturbations of the global carbon cycle in the form of glacial-interglacial oscillations appear near the ecological compensation point.

  18. Redox processes in subducting oceanic crust recorded by sulfide-bearing high-pressure rocks and veins (SW Tianshan, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-Lei; Gao, Jun; Klemd, Reiner; John, Timm; Wang, Xin-Shui

    2016-09-01

    The oxidized nature of the sub-arc mantle and hence arc magmas is generally interpreted as a result of the migration of subduction-related oxidizing fluids or melts from the descending slab into the mantle wedge. This is of particular importance seeing that the oxidization state of sub-arc magmas seems to play a key role in the formations of arc-related ore deposits. However, direct constraints on the redox state of subducted oceanic crust are sparse. Here, we provide a detailed petrological investigation on sulfide- and oxide-bearing eclogites, blueschists, micaschists, eclogite-facies and retrograde veins from the Akeyazi high-pressure (HP) terrane (NW China) in order to gain insight into the redox processes recorded in a subducting oceanic slab. Sulfides in these rocks are mainly pyrite and minor pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, bornite, molybdenite, sphalerite and chalcocite, including exsolution textures of bornite-chalcopyrite intergrowth. Magnetite, ilmenite and pyrite occur as inclusions in garnet, whereas sulfides are dominant in the matrix. Large pyrite grains in the matrix contain inclusions of garnet, omphacite and other HP index minerals. However, magnetite replacing pyrite textures are commonly observed in the retrograded samples. The eclogite-facies and retrograde veins display two fluid events, which are characterized by an early sulfide-bearing and a later magnetite-bearing mineral assemblage, respectively. Textural and petrological evidences show that the sulfides were mainly formed during HP metamorphism. Mineral assemblage transitions reveal that the relative oxygen fugacity of subducted oceanic crust decreases slightly with increasing depths. However, according to oxygen mass balance calculations, based on the oxygen molar quantities ( nO2), the redox conditions remain constant during HP metamorphism. At shallow levels (arc mantle melts.

  19. Computer Processing of Visual Evoked Potentials Utilizing Digital Filtering Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Vigorito, A.; Stephens, G.; Louis, H; Cinotti, A.; Michelson, L.; E. Stephens

    1981-01-01

    Recording of the VER (Visual Evoked Response) and the ERG (ElectroRetinoGram) in our laboratory is done with stimulation, using a fixed checkerboard pattern or a reversible checkerboard pattern. Questionable data frames are eliminated from the signal averaging process by means of a semiautomatic electronic analyzer or by means of a computer program. This special computer software, with flexible format constraints, is utilized on an off-line basis to remove residual artifacts and noise from av...

  20. Successful process management for public utilities; Erfolgreiches Prozessmanagement fuer Stadtwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knipprath, Daniel [projekt:unternehmensberatungsgesellschaft mbH, Muenchen (Germany); Schaefer, Anke [Dr. Schaefer PR- und Strategieberatung, Rostock (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    As a result of regulatory cuts in their revenue structure, public utilities are increasingly compelled to improve their cost efficiency. Furthermore, they have to deal with altered framework conditions of energy procurement as well as the necessity of sustainable customer loyalty management. The example of a regional supplier is used here to show how goal-oriented process management can contribute to securing a sustainable, promising position in the market.

  1. DISTRIBUTED PROCESSING TRADE-OFF MODEL FOR ELECTRIC UTILITY OPERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Distributed processing Trade-off Model for Electric Utility Operation is based upon a study performed for the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This study presented a technique that addresses the question of trade-offs between expanding a communications network or expanding the capacity of distributed computers in an electric utility Energy Management System (EMS). The technique resulted in the development of a quantitative assessment model that is presented in a Lotus 1-2-3 worksheet environment. The model gives EMS planners a macroscopic tool for evaluating distributed processing architectures and the major technical and economic tradeoffs as well as interactions within these architectures. The model inputs (which may be varied according to application and need) include geographic parameters, data flow and processing workload parameters, operator staffing parameters, and technology/economic parameters. The model's outputs are total cost in various categories, a number of intermediate cost and technical calculation results, as well as graphical presentation of Costs vs. Percent Distribution for various parameters. The model has been implemented on an IBM PC using the LOTUS 1-2-3 spreadsheet environment and was developed in 1986. Also included with the spreadsheet model are a number of representative but hypothetical utility system examples.

  2. 25 CFR 175.62 - Utility actions pending the appeal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Utility actions pending the appeal process. 175.62... POWER UTILITIES Appeals § 175.62 Utility actions pending the appeal process. Pending an appeal, utility... discontinuance of service, the utility is not required to resume such service during the appeal process...

  3. Investigation of crossover processes in a unitized bidirectional vanadium/air redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    grosse Austing, Jan; Nunes Kirchner, Carolina; Komsiyska, Lidiya; Wittstock, Gunther

    2016-02-01

    In this paper the losses in coulombic efficiency are investigated for a vanadium/air redox flow battery (VARFB) comprising a two-layered positive electrode. Ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis) spectroscopy is used to monitor the concentrations cV2+ and cV3+ during operation. The most likely cause for the largest part of the coulombic losses is the permeation of oxygen from the positive to the negative electrode followed by an oxidation of V2+ to V3+. The total vanadium crossover is followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis of the positive electrolyte after one VARFB cycle. During one cycle 6% of the vanadium species initially present in the negative electrolyte are transferred to the positive electrolyte, which can account at most for 20% of the coulombic losses. The diffusion coefficients of V2+ and V3+ through Nafion® 117 are determined as DV2+ ,N 117 = 9.05 ·10-6 cm2 min-1 and DV3+ ,N 117 = 4.35 ·10-6 cm2 min-1 and are used to calculate vanadium crossover due to diffusion which allows differentiation between vanadium crossover due to diffusion and migration/electroosmotic convection. In order to optimize coulombic efficiency of VARFB, membranes need to be designed with reduced oxygen permeation and vanadium crossover.

  4. Synchronous pulsing plasma utilization in dummy poly gate removal process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruixuan; Meng, Xiao-Ying; Han, Qiu-Hua; Zhang, Hai-Yang

    2015-03-01

    When CMOS technology reaches 28/20nm node and beyond, several new schemes are implemented such as High K metal gate (HKMG) which can enhance the device performance and has better control of device current leakage. Dummy poly gate removal (DPGR) process is introduced for HKMG, and works as a key process to control the work function of metal gate and threshold voltage (Vt) shift. In dry etch technology, conventional continuous wave (CW) plasma process has been widely used, however, it may not be capable for some challenging process in 28nm node and beyond. In DPGR process for HKMG scheme, CW scheme may result in plasma damage of gate oxide/capping layer for its inherent high electron temperature (Te) and ion energy while synchronous pulsing scheme is capable to simultaneously pulse both source and bias power, which could achieve lower Te, independent control of ion and radical flux, well control the loading of polymer deposition on dense/ isolate features. It's the first attempt to utilize synchronous pulsing plasma in DPGR process. Experiment results indicate that synchronous pulsing could provide less silicon recess under thin gate oxide which is induced by the plasma oxidation. Furthermore, the loading of HK capping layer loss between long channel and short channel can be well controlled which plays a key role on transistor performance, such as leakage and threshold voltage shift. Additionally, it has been found that synchronous pulsing could distinctly improve ILD loss when compared with CW, which is helpful to broaden the whole process window.

  5. The effect of picosecond laser pulses on redox-dependent processes in mice red blood cells studied in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronova, Olga; Gening, Tatyana; Abakumova, Tatyana; Sysolyatin, Aleksey; Zolotovskiy, Igor; Antoneeva, Inna; Ostatochnikov, Vladimir; Gening, Snezhanna

    2014-02-01

    The study highlights the effect of different modes of in vivo laser irradiation of mice using a PFL8LA laser with λ = 1560 nm, pulse duration of 1,4•10-12 s, peak power of 3,72•103 W and average output power of 20•10-3 W on the lipid peroxidation parameters: conjugated dienes, ketodienes and conjugated trienes, malondialdehyde, Schiff bases and the activity of antioxidant enzymes - catalase, glutathione -S-transferase and superoxide dismutase in erythrocytes and plasma of mice. Two groups of mice received a total dose of 3.8 J/cm2 per group, but the 1st group was irradiated only once, while the 2nd - four times. Significant differences in the parameters of the 1st and 2nd groups indicate different effects of the irradiation modes on redox-dependent processes in red blood cells of mice.

  6. Process improvements reduce utilization of resources for aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, T H; Yavorski, C C; Endean, E D; Kwolek, C J; Hyde, G L

    1998-01-01

    In conjunction with the VA reorganization to promote greater efficiency of health care provision, ambulatory surgery (AS) programs have been created. These programs institute outpatient preoperative assessment and operative management. This study examines the impact of these process changes on resources utilized by patients requiring repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). The medical records of 15 consecutively treated patients undergoing elective, infrarenal AAA repair before (1992-1993) and after (1995-1996) AS implementation were reviewed. Resource utilization was assessed by evaluating preoperative tests performed (inpatient or outpatient), ICU days, and inpatient length of stay (LOS). Postoperative morbidity and mortality were noted. Patient age, AAA size, and prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiac disease, COPD, and tobacco use were similar between the two groups. Abdominal ultrasound, CT scanning, and angiography were significantly more frequently performed on an outpatient basis after implementation of the AS program. The median preoperative LOS was reduced in the AS group (1 vs 6 days, P = 0.001, Student t test), resulting in a lower inpatient LOS (11 vs 16, P < 0.01, Student t test). All patients survived and the incidence of complications was similar between the groups. Hospital resource utilization was significantly decreased, largely by shifting preoperative assessment to the outpatient setting. This study illustrates that benefits of an ambulatory surgery program can be extended beyond facilitating outpatient operations and should result in decreased length of hospitalization for other major surgical procedures, such as abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

  7. Redox regulation of protein damage in plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R. Griffiths

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we focus on redox regulatory control of those enzymes and processes which control protein maturation during synthesis, produce reactive species, repair and remove damaged plasma proteins. We have highlighted the potential for alterations in the extracellular redox compartment to regulate intracellular redox state and, conversely, for intracellular oxidative stress to alter the cellular secretome and composition of extracellular vesicles. Through secreted, redox-active regulatory molecules, changes in redox state may be transmitted to distant sites.

  8. Redox-capacitor to connect electrochemistry to redox-biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-01-07

    It is well-established that redox-reactions are integral to biology for energy harvesting (oxidative phosphorylation), immune defense (oxidative burst) and drug metabolism (phase I reactions), yet there is emerging evidence that redox may play broader roles in biology (e.g., redox signaling). A critical challenge is the need for tools that can probe biologically-relevant redox interactions simply, rapidly and without the need for a comprehensive suite of analytical methods. We propose that electrochemistry may provide such a tool. In this tutorial review, we describe recent studies with a redox-capacitor film that can serve as a bio-electrode interface that can accept, store and donate electrons from mediators commonly used in electrochemistry and also in biology. Specifically, we (i) describe the fabrication of this redox-capacitor from catechols and the polysaccharide chitosan, (ii) discuss the mechanistic basis for electron exchange, (iii) illustrate the properties of this redox-capacitor and its capabilities for promoting redox-communication between biology and electrodes, and (iv) suggest the potential for enlisting signal processing strategies to "extract" redox information. We believe these initial studies indicate broad possibilities for enlisting electrochemistry and signal processing to acquire "systems level" redox information from biology.

  9. A novel process for comprehensive utilization of vanadium slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-ying; Du, Tao; Tan, Wen-jun; Zhang, Xin-pu; Yang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    Traditional processes for treating vanadium slag generate a huge volume of solid residue and a large amount of harmful gas, which cause serious environmental problems. In this study, a new process for the comprehensive utilization of vanadium slag was proposed, wherein zeolite A and a V2O5/TiO2 system were synthesized. The structural properties of the as-synthesized zeolite A and the V2O5/TiO2 system were characterized using various experimental techniques, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. The results reveal that zeolite A and the V2O5/TiO2 system are successfully obtained with high purity. The results of gas adsorption measurements indicate that the prepared zeolite A exhibits high selectivity for CO2 over N2 and is a candidate material for CO2 capture from flue-gas streams.

  10. Catalytic Processes for Utilizing Carbohydrates Derived from Algal Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Yamaguchi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The high productivity of oil biosynthesized by microalgae has attracted increasing attention in recent years. Due to the application of such oils in jet fuels, the algal biosynthetic pathway toward oil components has been extensively researched. However, the utilization of the residue from algal cells after oil extraction has been overlooked. This residue is mainly composed of carbohydrates (starch, and so we herein describe the novel processes available for the production of useful chemicals from algal biomass-derived sugars. In particular, this review highlights our latest research in generating lactic acid and levulinic acid derivatives from polysaccharides and monosaccharides using homogeneous catalysts. Furthermore, based on previous reports, we discuss the potential of heterogeneous catalysts for application in such processes.

  11. Production of stable isotopes utilizing the plasma separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, T. S.; Tarallo, F. J.; Stevenson, N. R.

    2005-12-01

    A plasma separation process (PSP) is being operated at Theragenics Corporation's®, Oak Ridge, TN, facility for the enrichment of stable isotopes. The PSP utilizes ion cyclotron mass discrimination to separate isotopes on a relatively large scale. With a few exceptions, nearly any metallic element could be processed with PSP. Output isotope enrichment factor depends on natural abundance and mass separation and can be fairly high in some cases. The Theragenics™ PSP facility is believed to be the only such process currently in operation. This system was developed and formerly operated under the US Department of Energy Advanced Isotope Separation program. Theragenics™ also has a laboratory at the PSP site capable of harvesting the isotopes from the process and a mass spectrometer system for analyzing enrichment and product purity. Since becoming operational in 2002, Theragenics™ has utilized the PSP to separate isotopes of several elements including: dysprosium, erbium, gadolinium, molybdenum and nickel. Currently, Theragenics™ is using the PSP for the separation of 102Pd, which is used as precursor for the production of 103Pd. The 103Pd radioisotope is the active ingredient in TheraSeed®, which is used in the treatment of early stage prostate cancer and being investigated for other medical applications. New industrial, medical and research applications are being investigated for isotopes that can be enriched on the PSP. Pre-enrichment of accelerator or reactor targets offers improved radioisotope production. Theragenics operates 14 cyclotrons for proton activation and has access to HFIR at ORNL for neutron activation of radioisotopes.

  12. Material Processing Opportunites Utilizing a Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alan

    1996-11-01

    Many properties of photocathode-driven Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are extremely attractive for material processing applications. These include: 1) broad-band tunability across the IR and UV spectra which permits wavelength optimization, depth deposition control and utilization of resonance phenomena; 2) picosecond pulse structure with continuous nanosecond spacing for optimum deposition efficiency and minimal collateral damage; 3) high peak and average radiated power for economic processing in quantity; and 4) high brightness for spatially defined energy deposition and intense energy density in small spots. We discuss five areas: polymer, metal and electronic material processing, micromachining and defense applications; where IR or UV material processing will find application if the economics is favorable. Specific examples in the IR and UV, such as surface texturing of polymers for improved look and feel, and anti-microbial food packaging films, which have been demonstrated using UV excimer lamps and lasers, will be given. Unfortunately, although the process utility is readily proven, the power levels and costs of lamps and lasers do not scale to production margins. However, from these examples, application specific cost targets ranging from 0.1=A2/kJ to 10=A2/kJ of delivered radiation at power levels from 10 kW to 500 kW, have been developed and are used to define strawman FEL processing systems. Since =46EL radiation energy extraction from the generating electron beam is typically a few percent, at these high average power levels, economic considerations dictate the use of a superconducting RF accelerator with energy recovery to minimize cavity and beam dump power loss. Such a 1 kW IR FEL, funded by the US Navy, is presently under construction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This dual-use device, scheduled to generate first light in late 1997, will test both the viability of high-power FELs for shipboard self-defense against cruise

  13. Invertebrate footprints on detritus processing, bacterial community structure, and spatiotemporal redox profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunting, E.R.; Whatley, M.H.; van der Geest, H.G.; Mulder, C.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Breure, A.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2012-01-01

    Detritus processing is driven by a complex interplay between macroinvertebrate and microbial activities. Bioturbation/feeding activities of invertebrates in sediments are known to influence decomposition rates. However, direct effects of invertebrates on bacterial communities and detritus processing

  14. Invertebrate footprints on detritus processing, bacterial community structure, and spatiotemporal redox profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunting, E.R.; Whatley, M.H.; van der Geest, H.G.; Mulder, C.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Breure, A.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2012-01-01

    Detritus processing is driven by a complex interplay between macroinvertebrate and microbial activities. Bioturbation/feeding activities of invertebrates in sediments are known to influence decomposition rates. However, direct effects of invertebrates on bacterial communities and detritus processing

  15. Space Situational Awareness Data Processing Scalability Utilizing Google Cloud Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenly, D.; Duncan, M.; Wysack, J.; Flores, F.

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is a fundamental and critical component of current space operations. The term SSA encompasses the awareness, understanding and predictability of all objects in space. As the population of orbital space objects and debris increases, the number of collision avoidance maneuvers grows and prompts the need for accurate and timely process measures. The SSA mission continually evolves to near real-time assessment and analysis demanding the need for higher processing capabilities. By conventional methods, meeting these demands requires the integration of new hardware to keep pace with the growing complexity of maneuver planning algorithms. SpaceNav has implemented a highly scalable architecture that will track satellites and debris by utilizing powerful virtual machines on the Google Cloud Platform. SpaceNav algorithms for processing CDMs outpace conventional means. A robust processing environment for tracking data, collision avoidance maneuvers and various other aspects of SSA can be created and deleted on demand. Migrating SpaceNav tools and algorithms into the Google Cloud Platform will be discussed and the trials and tribulations involved. Information will be shared on how and why certain cloud products were used as well as integration techniques that were implemented. Key items to be presented are: 1.Scientific algorithms and SpaceNav tools integrated into a scalable architecture a) Maneuver Planning b) Parallel Processing c) Monte Carlo Simulations d) Optimization Algorithms e) SW Application Development/Integration into the Google Cloud Platform 2. Compute Engine Processing a) Application Engine Automated Processing b) Performance testing and Performance Scalability c) Cloud MySQL databases and Database Scalability d) Cloud Data Storage e) Redundancy and Availability

  16. Redox chemistry of H[sub 2]S oxidation by the British Gas Stretford process. Pt. 5; Aspects of the process chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, G.H.; Thompson, I. (Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept.of Mineral Resources Engineering)

    1993-05-01

    Stretford processes use air to oxidize H[sub 2]S in process and natural gases to elemental sulphur, by absorption in aqueous solution at about pH9 and reaction of the resulting HS[sup -] ions with dissolved oxygen, in the presence of anthraquinone disulphonates (AQDS) and vanadium (v) species, which act as catalysts. Kinetic measurements of the reactions (AQ27DS + HS[sup -] ions), V (v) + HS([sup -]ions) and (AQ27DSH[sup -] + O[sub 2]), primarily used stopped flow spectrophotometry, as reported here, following papers on the electrochemical behaviour or the individual redox couples in Stretford Processes. The course of reaction (AQ27DS + HS [sup -] ions) was also followed with a gold bead indicator electrode, the potential of which was determined essentially by the AQ27DS/AQ27DSH[sup -] couple as the former species were reduced to the latter. (author)

  17. A study of the Apollo aqueous redox process for converting hydrogen sulfide in biogas to elemental sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellenor, D.T.

    2004-07-01

    An experimental study was conducted to develop a commercial biogas scrubber for municipal and agricultural use. The specific objectives were to provide design and scaling parameters that would improve the performance while minimizing the capital and operating costs of the biogas scrubber; provide a useful reaction model of the aqueous phase iron chelate catalyzed oxide of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur; develop hypotheses and determine what data are of relevance in comprehending the interfacial phenomena of colloidal sulfur in aqueous solutions that could result in unwanted sulfur deposition and poor sulfur quality; obtain interfacial chemistry data that could improve the understanding of how sulfur particles behave during flocculation and deposition on surfaces, and the factors that lead to poor surface quality; and, determine whether crystal size and characteristics of deposited and flocculated sulfur could be changed by surfactants to enhance sulfur purity and reduce process operability. Interfacial chemistry experiments were performed to determine the factors that influence the operating problems and poor quality associated with the sulfur product. Results suggest that a low foaming nonionic surfactant can improve the quality and processability of the elemental sulfur product. It was concluded that the addition of surfactant to the redox solution reduces the mean hydrogen removal efficiency of the process. The addition of surfactants also decreases the mean particle size of the precipitated sulfur product, but increases the purity of the precipitated product. This study contributed to the successful installation by Apollo Environmental Systems of a commercial biogas scrubber that is very resistant to sulfur plugging.

  18. Utilization of geothermal heat in tropical fruit-drying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, B.H.; Lopez, L.P.; King, R.; Fujii, J.; Tanaka, M.

    1982-10-01

    The power plant utilizes only the steam portion of the HGP-A well production. There are approximately 50,000 pounds per hour of 360/sup 0/F water produced (approximately 10 million Btu per hour) and the water is currently not used and is considered a waste. This tremendous resource could very well be used in applications such as food processing, food dehydration and other industrial processing that requires low-grade heat. One of the applications is examined, namely the drying of tropical fruits particularly the papaya. The papaya was chosen for the obvious reason that it is the biggest crop of all fruits produced on the Big Island. A conceptual design of a pilot plant facility capable of processing 1000 pounds of raw papaya per day is included. This facility is designed to provide a geothermally heated dryer to dehydrate papayas or other tropical fruits available on an experimental basis to obtain data such as drying time, optimum drying temperature, etc.

  19. Processing and Utilization of Naphthenic Base Heavy Crude Oil (continued)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xianqing; Men Cungui

    1995-01-01

    @@ Strategy of the Comprehensive Utilization of Naphthenic Base Heavy Crude The further study on the properties and characteristics of the naphthenic base heavy crude shows that the utilization of naphthenic acid, production of low freezing point lube stocks and a series of asphalts are important future trends for comprehensive utilization of these resources.

  20. Theoretical and experimental study of redox processes combined with adsorption phenomena under conditions of square-wave voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Gulaboski, Rubin

    2001-01-01

    Theoretical models of four electrode reactions coupled with adsorption phenomena under conditions of square-wave voltammetry are developed: simple surface redox reaction, surface catalytic reaction, cathodic stripping reaction of I order, and cathodic stripping reaction of II order.

  1. Nisin Production Utilizing Skimmed Milk Aiming to Reduce Process Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozala, Angela Faustino; de Andrade, Maura Sayuri; de Arauz, Luciana Juncioni; Pessoa, Adalberto; Penna, Thereza Christina Vessoni

    Nisin is a natural additive for conservation of food, pharmaceutical, and dental products and can be used as a therapeutic agent. Nisin inhibits the outgrowth of spores, the growth of a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. This study was performed to optimize large-scale nisin production in skimmed milk and subproducts aiming at low-costs process and stimulating its utilization. Lactococcus lactis American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 11454 was developed in a rotary shaker (30°C/36 h/100 rpm) in diluted skimmed milk and nisin activity, growth parameters, and media components were also studied. Nisin activity in growth media was expressed in arbitrary units (AU/mL) and converted to standard nisin concentration (Nisaplin®, 25 mg of pure nisin is 1.0×106 AU/mL). Nisin activity in skimmed milk 2.27 gtotal solids was up to threefold higher than transfers in skimmed milk 4.54 gtotal solids and was up to 85-fold higher than transfers in skimmed milk 1.14 gtotal solids. L. lactis was assayed in a New Brunswick fermentor with 1.5 L of diluted skimmed milk (2.27 gtotal solids) and airflow of 1.5 mL/min (30°C/36/200 rpm), without pH control. In this condition nisin activity was observed after 4 h (45.07 AU/mL) and in the end of 36 h process (3312.07 AU/mL). This work shows the utilization of a low-cost growth medium (diluted skimmed milk) to nisin production with wide applications. Furthermore, milk subproducts (milk whey) can be exploited in nisin production, because in Brazil 50% of milk whey is disposed with no treatment in rivers and because of high organic matter concentrations it is considered an important pollutant. In this particular case an optimized production of an antimicrobial would be lined up with industrial disposal recycling.

  2. Iron-Manganese Redox Processes and Synergism in the Mechanism for Manganese-Catalyzed Autoxidation of Hydrogen Sulfite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronaeus, Sture; Berglund, Johan; Elding, Lars I.

    1998-09-21

    The mechanism for manganese-catalyzed aqueous autoxidation of hydrogen sulfite at pH 2.4 has been revised on the basis of previous comprehensive kinetic studies and thermodynamic data for iron-manganese redox processes and manganese(II) and -(III) protolysis equilibria. The catalytically active manganese species is concluded to be an oxo- (or hydroxo-) bridged mixed-valence complex of composition (OH)Mn(III)OMn(II)(aq) with a formation constant beta' of (3 +/- 1) x 10(4) M(-)(1) from kinetics or ca. 7 x 10(4) M(-)(1) from thermodynamics. It is formed via rapid reaction between Mn(H(2)O)(6)(2+) and hydrolyzed manganese(III) aqua hydroxo complexes, and it initiates the chain reaction via formation of a precursor complex with HSO(3)(-), within which fast bridged electron transfer from S(IV) to Mn(III) takes place, resulting in formation of chain propagating sulfite radicals, SO(3)(*)(-). The very high acidity of Mn(3+)(aq), indicating a strong bond Mn(III)-OH(2) in hydrolyzed manganese(III), makes an attack by HSO(3)(-) on substitution labile Mn(II) in the bridged complex more favorable than one directly on manganese(III). The synergistic effect observed in systems containing iron as well as manganese and the chain initiation by trace concentrations of iron(III) of ca. 5 x 10(-)(8) M can also be rationalized in terms of formation of this bridged mixed-valence dimanganese(II,III) complex. The presence of iron(III) in a Mn(II)/HSO(3)(-) system results in rapid establishment of an iron-manganese redox equilibrium, increasing the concentration of manganese(III) and of the catalytically active bridged complex. The bridged complex oxidizes HSO(3)(-) several orders of magnitude faster than does iron(III) itself. Comparison with some previous studies shows that the different experimental rate laws reported do not necessarily indicate different reaction mechanisms. Instead, they can be rationalized in terms of different rate-determining steps within the same complex chain

  3. Ligand exchange and redox processes in iridium triazolylidene complexes relevant to catalytic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronilho, Ana; Llobet, Antoni; Albrecht, Martin

    2014-12-15

    Iridium(III) complexes containing a bidentate spectator ligand have emerged as powerful catalyst precursors for water oxidation. Here we investigate the initial steps of the transformation at the iridium center when using complex [IrCp*(pyr-trz)Cl] 1 (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, pyr-trz = 4-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,3-triazol-5-ylidene), a potent water oxidation catalyst precursor. Ligand exchange with water is facile and is reversed in the presence of chloride ions, while MeCN substitution is effective only from the corresponding aqua complex. A pKa of 8.3 for the aqua complex was determined, which is in agreement with strong electron donation from the triazolylidene ligand that is comparable to aryl anions. Evaluation of the pH-dependent oxidation process in aqueous media reveals two regimes (pH 4-8.5 and above pH 10.5) where proton-coupled electron transfer processes occur. These investigations will help to further optimize water oxidation catalysts and indicate that MeCN as a cosolvent has adverse effects for initiating water coordination in the oxidation process.

  4. Redox flow batteries: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Adam Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Mench, Matthew M [ORNL; Meyers, Jeremy [University of Texas, Austin; Ross, Philip N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gostick, Jeffrey T. [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Liu, Qinghua [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of RFBs with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  5. Environmentally and economically efficient utilization of coal processing waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, Margarita A; Strizhak, Pavel A

    2017-11-15

    High concentrations of hazardous anthropogenic emissions (sulfur, nitrogen and carbon oxides) from solid fuel combustion in coal burning plants cause environmental problems that have been especially pressing over the last 20-30 years. A promising solution to these problems is a switch from conventional pulverized coal combustion to coal-water slurry fuel. In this paper, we pay special attention to the environmental indicators characterizing the combustion of different coal ranks (gas, flame, coking, low-caking, and nonbaking coals) and coal-water slurry fuels based on the coal processing waste - filter cakes. There have been no consistent data so far on the acceptable intervals for the anthropogenic emissions of sulfur (SOx), nitrogen (NOx) and carbon (CO, CO2) oxides. Using a specialized combustion chamber and gas analyzing system, we have measured the concentrations of typical coal and filter-cake-based CWS combustion products. We have also calculated the typical combustion heat of the fuels under study and measured the ratio between environmental and energy attributes. The research findings show that the use of filter cakes in the form of CWS is even better than coals in terms of environment and economy. Wide utilization of filter cakes solves many environmental problems: the areas of contaminated sites shrink, anthropogenic emissions decrease, and there is no need to develop new coal mines anymore. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Programmable rate modem utilizing digital signal processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunya, George K.; Wallace, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The engineering development study to follow was written to address the need for a Programmable Rate Digital Satellite Modem capable of supporting both burst and continuous transmission modes with either binary phase shift keying (BPSK) or quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulation. The preferred implementation technique is an all digital one which utilizes as much digital signal processing (DSP) as possible. Here design tradeoffs in each portion of the modulator and demodulator subsystem are outlined, and viable circuit approaches which are easily repeatable, have low implementation losses and have low production costs are identified. The research involved for this study was divided into nine technical papers, each addressing a significant region of concern in a variable rate modem design. Trivial portions and basic support logic designs surrounding the nine major modem blocks were omitted. In brief, the nine topic areas were: (1) Transmit Data Filtering; (2) Transmit Clock Generation; (3) Carrier Synthesizer; (4) Receive AGC; (5) Receive Data Filtering; (6) RF Oscillator Phase Noise; (7) Receive Carrier Selectivity; (8) Carrier Recovery; and (9) Timing Recovery.

  7. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change

  8. Quantitative measures for redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Ché S; Eagling, Beatrice D; Driscoll, Scott R E; Rohwer, Johann M

    2016-07-01

    Redox signaling is now recognized as an important regulatory mechanism for a number of cellular processes including the antioxidant response, phosphokinase signal transduction and redox metabolism. While there has been considerable progress in identifying the cellular machinery involved in redox signaling, quantitative measures of redox signals have been lacking, limiting efforts aimed at understanding and comparing redox signaling under normoxic and pathogenic conditions. Here we have outlined some of the accepted principles for redox signaling, including the description of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule and the role of kinetics in conferring specificity to these signaling events. Based on these principles, we then develop a working definition for redox signaling and review a number of quantitative methods that have been employed to describe signaling in other systems. Using computational modeling and published data, we show how time- and concentration- dependent analyses, in particular, could be used to quantitatively describe redox signaling and therefore provide important insights into the functional organization of redox networks. Finally, we consider some of the key challenges with implementing these methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulation of the matrix redox signaling by mitochondrial Ca(2.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo-Domingo, Jaime; Wiederkehr, Andreas; De Marchi, Umberto

    2015-11-26

    Mitochondria sense, shape and integrate signals, and thus function as central players in cellular signal transduction. Ca(2+) waves and redox reactions are two such intracellular signals modulated by mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport is of utmost physio-pathological relevance with a strong impact on metabolism and cell fate. Despite its importance, the molecular nature of the proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport has been revealed only recently. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) promotes energy metabolism through the activation of matrix dehydrogenases and down-stream stimulation of the respiratory chain. These changes also alter the mitochondrial NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio, but at the same time will increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Reducing equivalents and ROS are having opposite effects on the mitochondrial redox state, which are hard to dissect. With the recent development of genetically encoded mitochondrial-targeted redox-sensitive sensors, real-time monitoring of matrix thiol redox dynamics has become possible. The discoveries of the molecular nature of mitochondrial transporters of Ca(2+) combined with the utilization of the novel redox sensors is shedding light on the complex relation between mitochondrial Ca(2+) and redox signals and their impact on cell function. In this review, we describe mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, focusing on a number of newly identified proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and release. We further discuss our recent findings, revealing how mitochondrial Ca(2+) influences the matrix redox state. As a result, mitochondrial Ca(2+) is able to modulate the many mitochondrial redox-regulated processes linked to normal physiology and disease.

  10. Modeling biogeochemical processes in subterranean estuaries : Effect of flow dynamics and redox conditions on submarine groundwater discharge of nutrients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiteri, C.; Slomp, C.P.; Tuncay, K.; Meile, C.

    2008-01-01

    A two-dimensional density-dependent reactive transport model, which couples groundwater flow and biogeochemical reactions, is used to investigate the fate of nutrients (NO3 −, NH4 +, and PO4) in idealized subterranean estuaries representing four end-members of oxic/anoxic aquifer and seawater redox

  11. Runtime Verification for Business Processes Utilizing the Bitcoin Blockchain

    OpenAIRE

    Prybila, Christoph; Schulte, Stefan; Hochreiner, Christoph; Weber, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    The usage of process choreographies and decentralized Business Process Management Systems has been named as an alternative to centralized business process orchestration. In choreographies, control over a process instance is shared between independent parties, and no party has full control or knowledge during process runtime. Nevertheless, it is necessary to monitor and verify process instances during runtime for purposes of documentation, accounting, or compensation. To achieve business proce...

  12. Redox theory of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean P. Jones

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metazoan genomes encode exposure memory systems to enhance survival and reproductive potential by providing mechanisms for an individual to adjust during lifespan to environmental resources and challenges. These systems are inherently redox networks, arising during evolution of complex systems with O2 as a major determinant of bioenergetics, metabolic and structural organization, defense, and reproduction. The network structure decreases flexibility from conception onward due to differentiation and cumulative responses to environment (exposome. The redox theory of aging is that aging is a decline in plasticity of genome–exposome interaction that occurs as a consequence of execution of differentiation and exposure memory systems. This includes compromised mitochondrial and bioenergetic flexibility, impaired food utilization and metabolic homeostasis, decreased barrier and defense capabilities and loss of reproductive fidelity and fecundity. This theory accounts for hallmarks of aging, including failure to maintain oxidative or xenobiotic defenses, mitochondrial integrity, proteostasis, barrier structures, DNA repair, telomeres, immune function, metabolic regulation and regenerative capacity.

  13. An important impact of the molecule-electrode couplings asymmetry on the efficiency of bias-driven redox processes in molecular junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Baldea, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Two recent experimental (Li, J.~\\emphj{et al}, \\emph{Proc.\\ Natl.\\ Acad.\\ Sci.\\ U.~S.~A.} {\\bf 2014}, 111, 1282-1287) and theoretical studies (B\\^aldea, I, \\emph{Phys.\\ Chem.\\ Chem.\\ Phys.}\\ {\\bf 2014}, 16, 25942-25949) have addressed the problem of tuning molecular charge and vibrational properties of single molecules embedded in nanojunctions. These are molecular characteristics escaping so far to an efficient experimental control in broad ranges. Here, we present a general argument demonstrating why, out of various experimental platforms possible, those wherein active molecules are asymmetrically coupled to electrodes are to be preferred to those symmetrically coupled for achieving a(n almost) complete redox process, and why electrochemical environment has advantages over "dry" setups. This study aims at helping to nanofabricate molecular junctions using the most appropriate platforms enabling the broadest possible bias-driven control of the redox state and vibrational modes of single molecules linked to e...

  14. Utility and infrastructure needs for private tank waste processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document supports the development of the Draft TWRS Privatization RFP. The document provides summaries of a wide variety of utility infrastructure and support services that are available at the Hanford Site. The needs of the privatization contractors are estimated and compared to the existing infrastructure. Recommendations are presented on the preferred and alternate routes of supplying the identifies requirements.

  15. Studies on the process aspects related to chemical decontamination of chromium-containing alloys with redox processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P.S.; Suresh, S.; Chandran, S.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Lab. of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India); Rajesh, P. [Applied Chemistry Div. of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

    2004-08-01

    Presence of chromium in the oxide layer makes oxidative pre-treatment with oxidizing agents such as potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}) a must for the decontamination of stainless steels and other chromium containing alloys. The effectiveness of pre-treatment with oxidizing reagent varies with the conditions of treatment such as temperature, concentration and whether the medium is acidic or alkaline. A comparative study of the two acidic oxidizing agents, i.e., nitric acid-permanganate and permanganic acid was made. The dissolution behavior of copper and its oxide in permanganic acid was found to be comparable to that of chromium oxide. Citric acid and ascorbic acid were investigated as alternatives to oxalic acid for the reduction/decomposition of permanganate left over after the oxidizing pre-treatment step. It has been established that the reduction of chromate by citric acid is instantaneous only in presence of Mn{sup 2+} ions. It has also been established that reduction of residual permanganate can be achieved with ascorbic acid and with minimum chemical requirement. The capabilities of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-ascorbic acid mixture for the dissolution of hematite have been explored. This study would help to choose the suitable oxidizing agent, the reducing agent used for decomposition of permanganate and to optimize the concentration of reducing formulation so that the process of decontamination is achieved with a minimum requirement of chemicals. The generation of radioactive ion exchange resin as waste is therefore held at a minimum. Ion exchange studies with metal ion complexes of relevance to decontamination were carried out with a view to choose a suitable type of ion exchanger. It has been established that treatment of the ion exchange resin with brine solution can solve the problem of leaching out of non-ionic organics from the resin. (orig.)

  16. Substrate utilization and VSS relations in activated sludge processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droste, R.L.; Fernandes, L.; Sun, X. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1993-12-31

    A new empirical substrate removal model for activated sludge in continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CFSTR) and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was developed in this study. This model includes an exponential function of volatile suspended solids to express the active biomass which is actually involved in substrate utilization. Results indicate that the proposed exponential models predict more accurately effluent COD in CFSTR and SBR systems than the first or zero order models. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Space manufacturing utilizing the directional electrostatic accretion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, A.

    1986-01-01

    The Directional Electrostatic Accretion Process (DEAP) is described with respect to both the physical process and its application to manufacturing in space. This high precision portable manufacturing method will revolutionize current practices in manufacturing and repair of spacecraft and space structures. The cost effectiveness of this process will be invaluable to future space manufacturing projects.

  18. Methods utilized in evaluating the profitability of commercial space processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, H. L.; Schmitt, P. T.

    1976-01-01

    Profitability analysis is applied to commercial space processing on the basis of business concept definition and assessment and the relationship between ground and space functions. Throughput analysis is demonstrated by analysis of the space manufacturing of surface acoustic wave devices. The paper describes a financial analysis model for space processing and provides key profitability measures for space processed isoenzymes.

  19. Carbon dioxide enrichment alleviates heat stress by improving cellular redox homeostasis through an ABA-independent process in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Ahammed, G J; Zhang, Y Q; Zhang, G Q; Sun, Z H; Zhou, J; Zhou, Y H; Xia, X J; Yu, J Q; Shi, K

    2015-01-01

    Plant responses to elevated CO₂ and high temperature are critically regulated through a complex network of phytohormones and redox homeostasis. However, the involvement of abscisic acid (ABA) in plant adaptation to heat stress under elevated CO₂ conditions has not been thoroughly studied. This study investigated the interactive effects of elevated CO₂ (800 μmol·mol(-1) ) and heat stress (42 °C for 24 h) on the endogenous level of ABA and the cellular redox state of two genotypes of tomato with different ABA biosynthesis capacities. Heat stress significantly decreased maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) and leaf water potential, but also increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and electrolyte leakage (EL) in both genotypes. Heat-induced damage was more severe in the ABA-deficient mutant notabilis (not) than in its parental cultivar Ailsa Craig (Ailsa), suggesting that a certain level of endogenous ABA is required to minimise the heat-induced oxidative damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. Irrespective of genotype, the enrichment of CO₂ remarkably stimulated Fv/Fm, MDA and EL in heat-stressed plants towards enhanced tolerance. In addition, elevated CO₂ significantly strengthened the antioxidant capacity of heat-stressed tomato seedlings towards a reduced cellular redox state for a prolonged period, thereby mitigating oxidative stress. However, elevated CO₂ and heat stress did not alter the endogenous level of ABA or the expression of its biosynthetic gene NCED2 in either genotype, indicating that ABA is not involved in elevated CO₂ -induced heat stress alleviation. The results of this study suggest that elevated CO₂ alleviated heat stress through efficient regulation of the cellular redox poise in an ABA-independent manner in tomato plants.

  20. A comprehensive review on utilization of wastewater from coffee processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Supriya; Parande, A K; Nagaraju, V D; Ghiwari, Girish K

    2015-05-01

    The coffee processing industry is one of the major agro-based industries contributing significantly in international and national growth. Coffee fruits are processed by two methods, wet and dry process. In wet processing, coffee fruits generate enormous quantities of high strength wastewater requiring systematic treatment prior to disposal. Different method approach is used to treat the wastewater. Many researchers have attempted to assess the efficiency of batch aeration as posttreatment of coffee processing wastewater from an upflow anaerobic hybrid reactor (UAHR)-continuous and intermittent aeration system. However, wet coffee processing requires a high degree of processing know-how and produces large amounts of effluents which have the potential to damage the environment. Characteristics of wastewater from coffee processing has a biological oxygen demand (BOD) of up to 20,000 mg/l and a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of up to 50,000 mg/l as well as the acidity of pH below 4. In this review paper, various methods are discussed to treat coffee processing wastewaters; the constitution of wastewater is presented and the technical solutions for wastewater treatment are discussed.

  1. Utilization of by-product sulfur in Kraft pulping process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L.; Liu, S. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering; Chung, K.H. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Edmonton Research Centre

    2004-07-01

    This presentation describes how sulfur derived from heavy oil processing can be used by the pulp and paper industry to increase yield, accelerate delignification and shorten the cooking time in the kraft pulping process. The liquor used in the kraft pulping process is a solution of sodium sulfide and sodium hydroxide. The reaction kinetics of delignification in the cooking process was examined and a new method was proposed. The 3 key kinetic steps in the new method include: (1) adsorption of hydroxide and hydrosulfide ions on the fiber wall, (2) chemical reaction on the solid surface to produce degraded lignin products, and (3) desorption of degradation products from the solid surface. The surface reaction is the most important step in the delignification process. A newly developed kinetic model based on the proposed mechanism can be used to accurately predict the pulping behaviour under a variety of conditions.

  2. Processing and Utilization of Naphthenic Base Heavy Crude Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xianqing; Men Cungui

    1995-01-01

    @@ Recently China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) has gradually set up its own down stream industry in response to the development of oil fields, the demand of domestic market and the unique characteristics of crude oil resources.The capacity of crude oil processing has reached 21million tons per year approximately and 14 million tons of crude oil was processed in 1994,making up one-tenth of CNPC's total output.

  3. Utilization of waste heat from energy conversion and industrial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A.R.; Hamilton, R.W.

    The laws of thermodynamics state that no process of energy transformation can take place with perfect efficiency--some waste heat is always produced. The generation of waste heat from energy conversion and industrial processes are discussed. First-law and second-law efficiencies are defined. After listing the amounts of waste heat produced, some technological options for reducing waste heat or using it for other purposes, such as district heating, are described.

  4. Methane fermentation process for utilization of organic waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frąc, M.; Ziemiński, K.

    2012-07-01

    Biogas is a renewable and sustainable energy carrier generated via anaerobic digestion of biomass. This fuel is derived from various biomass resources and depending on its origin it contains methane (40-75%), carbon dioxide (20-45%) and some other compounds. The aim of this paper is to present the current knowledge and prospects of using the methane fermentation process to dispose of various types of organic wastes as well as conditions and factors affecting the methane fermentation process.

  5. Mouse redox histology using genetically encoded probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Roma, Leticia P; Sobotta, Mirko C; Rose, Adam J; Diaz, Mauricio Berriel; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Breckwoldt, Michael O; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Herzig, Stephan; Müller-Decker, Karin; Dick, Tobias P

    2016-03-15

    Mapping the in vivo distribution of endogenous oxidants in animal tissues is of substantial biomedical interest. Numerous health-related factors, including diet, physical activity, infection, aging, toxins, or pharmacological intervention, may cause redox changes. Tools are needed to pinpoint redox state changes to particular organs, tissues, cell types, and subcellular organelles. We describe a procedure that preserves the in vivo redox state of genetically encoded redox biosensors within histological tissue sections, thus providing "redox maps" for any tissue and comparison of interest. We demonstrate the utility of the technique by visualizing endogenous redox differences and changes in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, embryonic development, and nutrient starvation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Particle sizing in rocket motor studies utilizing hologram image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, David; Powers, John

    1987-01-01

    A technique of obtaining particle size information from holograms of combustion products is described. The holograms are obtained with a pulsed ruby laser through windows in a combustion chamber. The reconstruction is done with a krypton laser with the real image being viewed through a microscope. The particle size information is measured with a Quantimet 720 image processing system which can discriminate various features and perform measurements of the portions of interest in the image. Various problems that arise in the technique are discussed, especially those that are a consequence of the speckle due to the diffuse illumination used in the recording process.

  7. Modulation of the matrix redox signaling by mitochondrial Ca2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime; Santo-Domingo; Andreas; Wiederkehr; Umberto; De; Marchi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria sense,shape and integrate signals,and thus function as central players in cellular signal transduction. Ca2+ waves and redox reactions are two such intracellular signals modulated by mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ transport is of utmost physio-pathological relevance with a strong impact on metabolism and cell fate. Despite its importance,the molecular nature of the proteins involvedin mitochondrial Ca2+ transport has been revealed only recently. Mitochondrial Ca2+ promotes energy metabolism through the activation of matrix dehydrogenases and downstream stimulation of the respiratory chain. These changes also alter the mitochondrial NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio,but at the same time will increase reactive oxygen species(ROS) production. Reducing equivalents and ROS are having opposite effects on the mitochondrial redox state,which are hard to dissect. With the recent development of genetically encoded mitochondrial-targeted redoxsensitive sensors,real-time monitoring of matrix thiol redox dynamics has become possible. The discoveries of the molecular nature of mitochondrial transporters of Ca2+ combined with the utilization of the novel redox sensors is shedding light on the complex relation between mitochondrial Ca2+ and redox signals and their impact on cell function. In this review,we describe mitochondrial Ca2+ handling,focusing on a number of newly identified proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release. We further discuss our recent findings,revealing how mitochondrial Ca2+ influences the matrix redox state. As a result,mitochondrial Ca2+ is able to modulate the many mitochondrial redox-regulated processes linked to normal physiology and disease.

  8. Process of optimization of district heat production by utilizing waste energy from metallurgical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovšek, Damjan; Fužir, Miran; Slatinek, Matic; Šepul, Tanja; Plesnik, Kristijan; Lečnik, Samo

    2017-07-01

    In a consortium with SIJ (Slovenian Steel Group), Metal Ravne, the local community of Ravne na Koro\\vskem and the public research Institut Jožef Stefan, with its registered office in Slovenia, Petrol Energetika, d.o.o. set up a technical and technological platform of an innovative energy case for a transition of steel industry into circular economy with a complete energy solution called »Utilization of Waste Heat from Metallurgical Processes for District Heating of Ravne na Koro\\vskem. This is the first such project designed for a useful utilization of waste heat in steel industry which uses modern technology and innovative system solutions for an integration of a smart, efficient and sustainable heating and cooling system and which shows a growth potential. This will allow the industry and cities to make energy savings, to improve the quality of air and to increase the benefits for the society we live in. On the basis of circular economy, we designed a target-oriented co-operation of economy, local community and public research institute to produce new business models where end consumers are put into the centre. This innovation opens the door for steel industry and local community to a joint aim that is a transition into efficient low-carbon energy systems which are based on involvement of natural local conditions, renewable energy sources, the use of waste heat and with respect for the principles of sustainable development.

  9. TEMPOL increases NAD+ and improves redox imbalance in obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Yamato

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous energy conversion is controlled by reduction–oxidation (redox processes. NAD+ and NADH represent an important redox couple in energy metabolism. 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL is a redox-cycling nitroxide that promotes the scavenging of several reactive oxygen species (ROS and is reduced to hydroxylamine by NADH. TEMPOL is also involved in NAD+ production in the ascorbic acid–glutathione redox cycle. We utilized the chemical properties of TEMPOL to investigate the effects of antioxidants and NAD+/NADH modulators on the metabolic imbalance in obese mice. Increases in the NAD+/NADH ratio by TEMPOL ameliorated the metabolic imbalance when combined with a dietary intervention, changing from a high-fat diet to a normal diet. Plasma levels of the superoxide marker dihydroethidium were higher in mice receiving the dietary intervention compared with a control diet, but were normalized with TEMPOL consumption. These findings provide novel insights into redox regulation in obesity.

  10. Utilizing Graphics Processing Units for Network Anomaly Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    matching system using deterministic finite automata and extended finite automata resulting in a speedup of 9x over the CPU implementation [SGO09]. Kovach ...pages 14–18, 2009. [Kov10] Nicholas S. Kovach . Accelerating malware detection via a graphics processing unit, 2010. http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr

  11. The Utility of SAR to Monitor Ocean Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    procedures should be followed to insure norma - lization in the digitization process? and (3) How would one use the derived relationship to infer wave... isI 1.43 cycles, the other 2 cycles long. The ratio of the frequencies is 1.4, which is closely approximated by the SCM spectrum. One of the

  12. Plant Pathogenic Bacteria Utilize Biofilm Growth-associated Repressor (BigR), a Novel Winged-helix Redox Switch, to Control Hydrogen Sulfide Detoxification under Hypoxia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Beatriz G.; Barbosa, Rosicler L.; Soprano, Adriana S.; Campos, Bruna M.; de Souza, Tiago A.; Tonoli, Celisa C. C.; Leme, Adriana F. P.; Murakami, Mario T.; Benedetti, Celso E.

    2011-01-01

    Winged-helix transcriptional factors play important roles in the control of gene expression in many organisms. In the plant pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the winged-helix protein BigR, a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metal sensors, regulates transcription of the bigR operon involved in bacterial biofilm growth. Previous studies showed that BigR represses transcription of its own operon through the occupation of the RNA polymerase-binding site; however, the signals that modulate its activity and the biological function of its operon are still poorly understood. Here we show that although BigR is a homodimer similar to metal sensors, it functions as a novel redox switch that derepresses transcription upon oxidation. Crystal structures of reduced and oxidized BigR reveal that formation of a disulfide bridge involving two critical cysteines induces conformational changes in the dimer that remarkably alter the topography of the winged-helix DNA-binding interface, precluding DNA binding. This structural mechanism of DNA association-dissociation is novel among winged-helix factors. Moreover, we demonstrate that the bigR operon is required for hydrogen sulfide detoxification through the action of a sulfur dioxygenase (Blh) and sulfite exporter. As hydrogen sulfide strongly inhibits cytochrome c oxidase, it must be eliminated to allow aerobic growth under low oxygen tension, an environmental condition found in bacterial biofilms, xylem vessels, and root tissues. Accordingly, we show that the bigR operon is critical to sustain bacterial growth under hypoxia. These results suggest that BigR integrates the transcriptional regulation of a sulfur oxidation pathway to an oxidative signal through a thiol-based redox switch. PMID:21632538

  13. UTILITY OF ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS IN THE MANAGEMENT PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PUICAN LILIANA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Process knowledge of the financial situation of the economic entity presupposes the use of analysis and synthesis, as indispensable tools of investigation. Financial management of the economic entity have to belong to the basic role in strategic financial decisions that would solve the problem of effective management of the process optimal growth, balanced and proportionate entity. That is why it becomes necessary and imperative objective analysis of the implications of the current financial management in economic entities familiarize managers with the basic tools with which they operate, acquiring knowledge about planning and financial control, evaluation techniques of investment projects, about how to conduct financial and economic diagnosis and management control of the entity, the key issues in its orientation towards performance.

  14. The recovery process utilizing Erikson's stages of human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel-Scibilia, Suzanne E; McNulty, Kathryn Cohan; Baxter, Beth; Miller, Steve; Dine, Max; Frese, Frederick J

    2009-12-01

    Of current interest to the field are clinical frameworks that foster recovery. The authors offer a psycho-developmental model that parallels Erik Erikson's theory of human development, and theorize that the process of psychiatric recovery involves a psychic reworking of these fundamental steps. Understanding recovery in this context allows the client and the practitioner of psychiatric rehabilitation to design and implement a coherent treatment strategy.

  15. All Optical Signal-Processing Techniques Utilizing Four Wave Mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refat Kibria

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Four Wave Mixing (FWM based optical signal-processing techniques are reviewed. The use of FWM in arithmetical operation like subtraction, wavelength conversion and pattern recognition are three key parts discussed in this paper after a brief introduction on FWM and its comparison with other nonlinear mixings. Two different approaches to achieve correlation are discussed, as well as a novel technique to realize all optical subtraction of two optical signals.

  16. Launch and landing site science processing for ISS utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Mimi; van Twest, Jacqueline; van den Ende, Oliver; Gruendel, Douglas; Wells, Deborah; Moyer, Jerry; Heuser, Jan; Etheridge, Guy

    2000-01-01

    Since 1986, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has provided support to over 500 spaceflight experiments from NASA, international agencies, academic institutions, commercial entities, and the military sector. The experiments cover a variety of science disciplines including molecular, cellular, developmental biology, chemistry, physiology, and material sciences. KSC supports simulation, pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight processing of flight hardware, specimens, and data at the primary and secondary landing sites. Science processing activities for spaceflight experiments occurs at the Life Science Support Facility (Hangar L) on the Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) and select laboratories in the Industrial Area at KSC. Planning is underway to meet the challenges of the International Space Station (ISS). ISS support activities are expected to exceed the current launch site capability. KSC plans to replace the current facilities with Space Experiments Research and Processing Laboratory (SERPL), a collaborative effort between NASA and the State of Florida. This facility will be the cornerstone of a larger Research Park at KSC and is expected to foster relations between commercial industry and academia in areas related to space research. .

  17. UF.sub.6 -Recovery process utilizing desublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Robert S.; Stephenson, Michael J.; Andrews, Deborah H.; Hamilton, Thomas H.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is a UF.sub.6 -recovery process of the kind in which a stream of substantially pure gaseous UF.sub.6 is directed through an externally chilled desublimer to convert the UF.sub.6 directly to an annular solid ring adhering to the interior wall of the desublimer. After accumulation of a desired amount of solid UF.sub.6, the desublimer is heated to liquefy the solid. Subsequently, the liquid is recovered from the desublimer. It has been found that during the heating operation the desublimer is subjected to excessive mechanical stresses. In addition, it has been found that the incorporation of a very small percentage of relatively noncondensable, nonreactive gas (e.g., nitrogen) in the UF.sub.6 input to the desublimer effects significant decreases in the stresses generated during the subsequent melting operation. This modification to the process provides valuable advantages in terms of reduced hazard, lower operating costs for the desublimer, and increased service life for the desublimer and its auxiliaries. The new process is especially suitable for the recovery of enriched UF.sub.6 from high-speed UF.sub.6 gas-centrifuge cascades.

  18. UF/sub 6/-recovery process utilizing desublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, R.S.; Stephenson, M.J.; Andrews, D.H.; Hamilton, T.H.

    1983-12-21

    The invention is a UF/sub 6/-recovery process of the kind in which a stream of substantially pure gaseous UF/sub 6/ is directed through an externally chilled desublimer to convert the UF/sub 6/ directly to an annular solid ring adhering to the interior wall of the desublimer. After accumulation of a desired amount of solid UF/sub 6/, the desublimer is heated to liquefy the solid. Subsequently, the liquid is recovered from the desublimer. It has been found that during the heating operation the desublimer is subjected to excessive mechanical stresses. In addition, it has been found that the incorporation of a very small percentage of relatively noncondensable, nonreactive gas (e.g., nitrogen) in the UF/sub 6/ input to the desublimer effects significant decreases in the stresses generated during the subsequent melting operation. This modification to the process provides valuable advantages in terms of reduced hazard, lower operating costs for the desublimer, and increased service life for the desublimer and its auxiliaries. The new process is especially suitable for the recovery of enriched UF/sub 6/ from high-speed UF/sub 6/ gas-centrifuge cascades.

  19. TvDim1 of Trichoderma virens is involved in redox-processes and confers resistance to oxidative stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán-Diez, M Eugenia; Cardoza, Rosa E; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Monte, Enrique; Hermosa, Rosa

    2010-02-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Dim1 proteins belong to the TRX fold superfamily. An EST showing high identity values with genes coding for Dim1 proteins was selected from an EST library collection of Trichoderma virens T59. Here, we report the cloning, characterization, and functional analysis of a T. virens T59 TvDim1 gene. The TvDim1 gene, with a sequence size of 614 bp, was PCR-amplified and found to contain three introns. The TvDim1 gene was present as a single copy in the T. virens genome and was also present in another five Trichoderma strains investigated. Increased levels of expression and redox-activity were detected when the fungus was grown in the presence of H(2)O(2). The overexpression and silencing of TvDim1 in T. harzianum T34 gave rise to transformants, with higher and lower growth, redox-activity, and quantities of biomass, respectively, than the wild-type strain after culture under oxidative stress.

  20. ISTAT DATA UTILIZATION TO ENHANCE LANDSAT 8 IMAGES CLASSIFICATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Mugnoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ISTAT geographic data, updated to realize census 2010 project in October 2011, represents an useful resource to improve the results derived from Land cover/use cartography or satellite image processing. In fact, both ISTAT vector data and other cartography data (i.e. satellite image classification can be integrated to realize a product that can help to better understand land cover data especially in urban environment (i. e. urban sprawl, although it can’t be considered a cartography product in a strict sense. This paper summarizes an experimental study based on a LANDSAT 8 image that cover completely 5 provinces in the north of Italy, where it’s shown that ISTAT data, DEM and combine of NDVI and NDBI indices can improve the results of the satellite image classification process, especially in urban areas. Used SW: ARCGIS 10.1 for desktop (ArcInfo license and ERDAS Imagine.

  1. Comparative cost estimates of five coal utilization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Detailed capital and operating cost estimates were prepared for the generation of electric power in a new, net 500 MW (e), coal-burning facility by five alternative processes: conventional boiler with no control of SO/sub 2/ emissions, atmospheric fluidized bed steam generator (AFB), conventional boiler equipped with a limestone FGD system, conventional boiler equipped with magnesia FGD system, and coal beneficiation followed by a conventional boiler quipped with limestone FGD for part of the flue gas stream. For a coal containing 3.5% sulfur, meeting SO/sub 2/ emission limits of 1.2 pounds per million Btu fired was most economical with the limestone FGD system. This result was unchanged for a coal containing 5% sulfur; however, for 2% sulfur, limestone FGD and AFB were competitive methods of controlling SO/sub 2/ emissions. Brief consideration of 90% reduction of SO/sub 2/ emissions led to the choice of limestone FGD as the most economical method. Byproduct credit for the sulfuric acid produced in regenerating the magnesia could make that system competitive with the limestone FGD system, depending upon local markets. The cost of sludge fixation and disposal would make limestone FGD noneconomic in many situations, if these steps are necessary.

  2. Good manufacturing practices (GMP utilized on human blood irradiation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Boghi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation of human blood is used to avoid the TA-GVHD (transfusion-associated graft-versus-host-disease, a rare but devastating adverse effect of leukocytes present in blood components for immunocompetent transfusion recipients. Usually this irradiation practice is performed to a physical elimination of lymphocytes. The implementation of the GMP will assure that the properly dose in a range of 25Gy to 50Gy will be delivered to the blood in the bag collected in a blood tissue bank. The studies to establish the GMP were developed under the guidelines of the standard ISO 11137 - Sterilization of health care products - Requirements for validation and routine control - Radiation sterilization. In this work, two dosimetric systems were used for dose mapping during the studies of irradiator qualification, loading pattern, irradiation process validation and auditing. The CaSO4: Dy dosimeter presented difficulties concerning to uncertainty on dose measurement, stability, trace ability and calibration system. The PMMA and gafchromic dosimetric systems have shown a better performance and were adopted on establishment of GMP procedures. The irradiation tests have been done using a Gammacell 220 Irradiator. The developed GMP can be adapted for different types of gamma irradiators, allowing to set up a quality assurance program for blood irradiation.

  3. Verification of redox-processes as switching and retention failure mechanisms in Nb:SrTiO3/metal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeumer, C.; Raab, N.; Menke, T.; Schmitz, C.; Rosezin, R.; Müller, P.; Andrä, M.; Feyer, V.; Bruchhaus, R.; Gunkel, F.; Schneider, C. M.; Waser, R.; Dittmann, R.

    2016-07-01

    Nanoscale redox reactions in transition metal oxides are believed to be the physical foundation of memristive devices, which present a highly scalable, low-power alternative for future non-volatile memory devices. The interface between noble metal top electrodes and Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystals may serve as a prominent but not yet well-understood example of such memristive devices. In this report, we will present experimental evidence that nanoscale redox reactions and the associated valence change mechanism are indeed responsible for the resistance change in noble metal/Nb-doped SrTiO3 junctions with dimensions ranging from the micrometer scale down to the nanometer regime. Direct verification of the valence change mechanism is given by spectromicroscopic characterization of switching filaments. Furthermore, it is found that the resistance change over time is driven by the reoxidation of a previously oxygen-deficient region. The retention times of the low resistance states, accordingly, can be dramatically improved under vacuum conditions as well as through the insertion of a thin Al2O3 layer which prevents this reoxidation. These insights finally confirm the resistive switching mechanism at these interfaces and are therefore of significant importance for the study and application of memristive devices based on Nb-doped SrTiO3 as well as systems with similar switching mechanisms.Nanoscale redox reactions in transition metal oxides are believed to be the physical foundation of memristive devices, which present a highly scalable, low-power alternative for future non-volatile memory devices. The interface between noble metal top electrodes and Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystals may serve as a prominent but not yet well-understood example of such memristive devices. In this report, we will present experimental evidence that nanoscale redox reactions and the associated valence change mechanism are indeed responsible for the resistance change in noble metal/Nb-doped Sr

  4. Study on the-Redox Process of Bilirubin and Biliverdin at Platinum Electrode by in Situ Spectroelectrochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛建军; 董绍俊

    1994-01-01

    The electrochemical redox behavior of bilirubin(BR Ⅳα),biliverdin(BV Ⅳα)and theiroxidized product bile-purpurin(Bi-Pu)have been studied by in situ spectroelectrochemical techniques,whichreveals that the transformation of BR Ⅳα■BV Ⅳα■Bi-Pu can be achieved by controlling poten-tials.The kinetic investigation has shown that the heterogeneous electron transfer reactions of the couples ofⅠ/Ⅱ and Ⅳ/Ⅲ were quasi-reversible and irreversible at a clean platinum electrode with the formal heteroge-neous electron transfer rate constants 1.5×10-4cm·s-1and 4.8×10-5cm·s-1,respectively.

  5. Optimal Design of Water Utilization Network with Energy Integration in Process Industries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    都健; 孟小琼; 杜红彬; 俞红梅; 樊希山; 姚平经

    2004-01-01

    Effective utilization of water and energy is the key factor of sustainable development in process industries, and also an important science and technology problem to be solved in systems engineering. In this paper,two new methods of optimal design of water utilization network with energy integration in process industries are presented, that is, stepwise and simultaneous optimization methods. They are suitable for both single contaminant and multi-contaminant systems, and the integration of energy can be carried out in the whole process system, not only limited in water network, so that energy can be utilized effectively. The two methods are illustrated by case study.

  6. Redox properties of titanium and its action on biochemical process in plants%钛的氧化还原特性及其在植物生化过程中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范秀菊

    2012-01-01

    Titanium improves yield and quality of crops. This paper summarized the beneficial effects of titanium on plant growth, and the mechanism behind titanium's benefits to biochemical process in plants was proposed. The paper demonstrated the change of chemical valence of titanium citrate complex between Ti+4 and Ti+3 under exposure to sunlight. It was shown that titanium had strong redox capability and tendency of losing or capturing electron under exposure to sunlight. The characteristics could be utilized by corps to help strength its important biochemical processes, which was also accompanied by various electron transferring processes.%在综述钛对植物生长作用的基础上,提出了钛有益于植物生化过程的机制.证实在阳光照射下,柠檬酸钛发生了钛在Ti+4和Ti+3之间的化合价变化,表明在阳光照射下,钛具有很强的氧化还原性和得失电子的能力.这一特性可被农作物利用于增强某些重要的生化过程,为这些过程提供和传递电子.

  7. On-line method of determining utilization factor in Hg-196 photochemical separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.; Moskowitz, Philip E.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for determining the utilization factor [U] in a photochemical mercury enrichment process (.sup.196 Hg) by measuring relative .sup.196 Hg densities using absorption spectroscopy.

  8. Redox theory of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P

    2015-08-01

    Metazoan genomes encode exposure memory systems to enhance survival and reproductive potential by providing mechanisms for an individual to adjust during lifespan to environmental resources and challenges. These systems are inherently redox networks, arising during evolution of complex systems with O2 as a major determinant of bioenergetics, metabolic and structural organization, defense, and reproduction. The network structure decreases flexibility from conception onward due to differentiation and cumulative responses to environment (exposome). The redox theory of aging is that aging is a decline in plasticity of genome-exposome interaction that occurs as a consequence of execution of differentiation and exposure memory systems. This includes compromised mitochondrial and bioenergetic flexibility, impaired food utilization and metabolic homeostasis, decreased barrier and defense capabilities and loss of reproductive fidelity and fecundity. This theory accounts for hallmarks of aging, including failure to maintain oxidative or xenobiotic defenses, mitochondrial integrity, proteostasis, barrier structures, DNA repair, telomeres, immune function, metabolic regulation and regenerative capacity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. In-depth process understanding of RECOMBIVAX HB® maturation and potential epitope improvements with redox treatment: multifaceted biochemical and immunochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinjian; Towne, Victoria; Brown, Martha; Wang, Yang; Abraham, Dicky; Oswald, C Brent; Gimenez, Juan A; Washabaugh, Michael W; Kennedy, Ronald; Sitrin, Robert D

    2011-10-19

    Recombinant Hepatitis B surface antigen virus-like particles (VLPs) produced in yeast undergo spontaneous maturation during the vaccine production process, and the biophysical characteristics of the particles with respect to maturation were described in Zhao et al. (2006) [13]. Here we report additional biochemical and immunochemical characterization by various techniques, including the use of a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that differ in their selectivity and conformation-sensitivity, for probing surface epitope structures. Crosslinking via interchain disulfide formation and binding of conformational specific antibodies in the mature particles were shown to be progressively enhanced. We show that redox-mediated VLP maturation is superior to heat-induced maturation in terms of generating VLPs which exhibit more complete crosslinking (>95%) and 2- to 3-fold higher antigenicity as defined by conformational antibodies. Therefore, the resulting VLPs from redox treatment resemble more closely their plasma-derived counterparts. The value of using multiple mAbs for probing surface epitopes was clearly demonstrated as different mAbs showed different degrees of sensitivity to the structural changes during HBsAg VLP maturation. The rapid, label-free technology of surface plasmon resonance performed at a single antigen concentration was shown to correlate well with a sandwich ELISA using parallel line analysis, currently implemented for product release and stability testing of RECOMBIVAX HB(®). Surface plasmon resonance offers both convenience and flexibility; multiple mAbs can be tested one at a time in the same set of experiments, providing a means to assess changes to individual epitopes. Taken together, these quantitative analytical tools enable more rapid, in-depth, and comprehensive process monitoring, process optimization, and assessment of product consistency and stability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of oxygen vacancy ordering and dislocation annihilation in undoped and Sm-doped CeO2 ceramics during redox processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Chen, Yu; Pradel, Ken C.; Liu, Meilin; Lin Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Ceria (CeO2) based ceramics have been widely used for many applications due to their unique ionic, electronic, and catalytic properties. Here, we report our findings in investigating into the redox processes of undoped and Sm-doped CeO2 ceramics stimulated by high-energy electron beam irradiation within a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The reduced structure with oxygen vacancy ordering has been identified as the CeO1.68 (C-Ce2O3+δ) phase via high-resolution TEM. The reduction of Ce4+ to Ce3+ has been monitored by electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The decreased electronic conductivity of the Sm-doped CeO2 (Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9, SDC) is revealed by electron holography, as positive electrostatic charges accumulated at the surfaces of SDC grains under electron beam irradiation, but not at CeO2 grains. The formation of the reduced CeO1.68 domains corresponds to lattice expansion compared to the CeO2 matrix. Therefore, the growth of CeO1.68 nuclei builds up strain inside the matrix, causing annihilation of dislocations inside the grains. By using in-situ high-resolution TEM and a fast OneView camera recording system, we investigated dislocation motion inside both CeO2 and SDC grains under electron beam irradiation. The dislocations prefer to dissociate into Shockley partials bounded by stacking faults. Then, the partials can easily glide in the {111} planes to reach the grain surfaces. Even the Lomer-Cottrell lock can be swept away by the phase change induced strain field. Our results revealed the high mobility of dislocations inside CeO2 and SDC grains during their respective redox processes.

  11. The demand-side management program development process: A utility perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, A.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yourstone, N.E. [Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This report describes an aspect of DSM that has received little attention, namely, how utilities develop DSM programs. The selection of utilities to study purposely was biased in favor of those with reputations for being experienced DSM program developers so as to optimize the chances to obtain detailed information. The DSM planning process is affected by organizational factors and external influences: (1) the location of the demand-side planning department within the utility; (2) the demand-side planning group`s functional responsibilities; (3) upper management participation in the DSM program development process; and (4) the organizational relationship between (or, separation of) supply-side and demand-side planning. Organizational factors reflect utilities` views of DSM programs and thus can affect the adoption of a technology- or customer-oriented approach. Despite repeated claims of the uniqueness of the demand- side planning process and its resistance to standardization, two general approaches to program development were discerned, namely technology- or customer-orientation. Although utilities consider customer related and technological factors in their DSM program development process, utilities can be differentiated by their emphasis on one or the other approach. 25 refs.

  12. The demand-side management program development process: A utility perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, A.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Yourstone, N.E. (Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-03-01

    This report describes an aspect of DSM that has received little attention, namely, how utilities develop DSM programs. The selection of utilities to study purposely was biased in favor of those with reputations for being experienced DSM program developers so as to optimize the chances to obtain detailed information. The DSM planning process is affected by organizational factors and external influences: (1) the location of the demand-side planning department within the utility; (2) the demand-side planning group's functional responsibilities; (3) upper management participation in the DSM program development process; and (4) the organizational relationship between (or, separation of) supply-side and demand-side planning. Organizational factors reflect utilities' views of DSM programs and thus can affect the adoption of a technology- or customer-oriented approach. Despite repeated claims of the uniqueness of the demand- side planning process and its resistance to standardization, two general approaches to program development were discerned, namely technology- or customer-orientation. Although utilities consider customer related and technological factors in their DSM program development process, utilities can be differentiated by their emphasis on one or the other approach. 25 refs.

  13. Expected Power-Utility Maximization Under Incomplete Information and with Cox-Process Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Kazufumi, E-mail: m_fuji@kvj.biglobe.ne.jp [Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd., Corporate Risk Management Division (Japan); Nagai, Hideo, E-mail: nagai@sigmath.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, Division of Mathematical Science for Social Systems, Graduate School of Engineering Science (Japan); Runggaldier, Wolfgang J., E-mail: runggal@math.unipd.it [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Matematica Pura ed Applicata (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    We consider the problem of maximization of expected terminal power utility (risk sensitive criterion). The underlying market model is a regime-switching diffusion model where the regime is determined by an unobservable factor process forming a finite state Markov process. The main novelty is due to the fact that prices are observed and the portfolio is rebalanced only at random times corresponding to a Cox process where the intensity is driven by the unobserved Markovian factor process as well. This leads to a more realistic modeling for many practical situations, like in markets with liquidity restrictions; on the other hand it considerably complicates the problem to the point that traditional methodologies cannot be directly applied. The approach presented here is specific to the power-utility. For log-utilities a different approach is presented in Fujimoto et al. (Preprint, 2012).

  14. Transport and fate of nitrate in a glacial outwash aquifer in relation to ground water age, land use practices, and redox processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, L.J.; Cowdery, T.K.

    2002-01-01

    A combination of ground water modeling, chemical and dissolved gas analyses, and chlorofluorocarbon age dating of water was used to determine the relation between changes in agricultural practices, and NO3- concentrations in ground water of a glacial outwash aquifer in west-central Minnesota. The results revealed a redox zonation throughout the saturated zone with oxygen reduction occurring near the water table, NO3- reduction immediately below it, and then a large zone of ferric iron reduction, with a small area of sulfate (SO42-) reduction and methanogenesis (CH4) near the end of the transect. Analytical and NETPATH modeling results supported the hypothesis that organic carbon served as the electron donor for the redox reactions. Denitrification rates were quite small, 0.005 to 0.047 mmol NO3- yr-1, and were limited by the small amounts of organic carbon, 0.01 to 1.45%. In spite of the organic carbon limitation, denitrification was virtually complete because residence time is sufficient to allow even slow processes to reach completion. Ground water sample ages showed that maximum residence times were on the order of 50 to 70 yr. Reconstructed NO3- concentrations, estimated from measured NO3- and dissolved N gas showed that NO3- concentrations have been increasing in the aquifer since the 1940s, and have been above the 714 ??mol L-1 maximum contaminant level at most sites since the mid- to late-1960s. This increase in NO3- has been accompanied by a corresponding increase in agricultural use of fertilizer, identified as the major source of NO3- to the aquifer.

  15. Processing and Utilization of Sorghum and Maize in Botswana: Current Status and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Nthoiwa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The study reviews the current sorghum and maize production, processing and utilization in Botswana. Most of the grains produced in Botswana are used for home consumption, while processing of commercial and export commodities are limited both in terms of quantity and extent of processing. The major processing activity by both small scale and large scale firms is grain milling into maize and sorghum flours. There is limited value-added commercial processing. This creates an opportunity for development and marketing of traditional and new value-added products. Opportunities for expanding and diversifying industrial or semi-industrial processing of maize and sorghum beyond grain milling are suggested.

  16. Systematic framework for carbon dioxide capture and utilization processes to reduce the global carbon dioxide emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Plaza, Cristina Calvera; Gani, Rafiqul

    carbon dioxide emission problems. More specifically, the prototype framework and the three-stage approach adopted for systematic and sustainable design of carbon capture and utilization processes incorporates (i) process synthesis stage, the determination of a processing path from a network...... of alternatives; (ii) process design, the design and analysis of a process or generated processing path in terms of process “hot-spots” or deficiencies to set design targets for improvement; and (iii) innovative and more sustainable design, determination of solutions matching the design targets. In this way......) and the determination of the optimal processing route. Finally, the framework has access to, a collection of tools for analysis, such as economic analysis, sustainability and life cycle assessment, and links to detailed process simulation (process simulators). Following the work-flow and data-flow implemented...

  17. Algorithmic Procedure to Design Water Utilization Systems Featuring Multiple Contaminants in Process Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王东明; 杨凤林; 张兴文

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces a non-iterative algorithmic procedure to design water utilization networks with multiple contaminants in process plants. According to the water pinch analysis rules, the processes in water utilization systems were first divided into three groups, then water-supply priority algorithm was proposed. The results of case studies showed that the water networks designed by this method gave water consumption lower than that estimated by other approaches. In addition, the procedure was subiect to no limitation on the problem scale.

  18. Synthesis and extraction studies with a rationally designed diamide ligand selective to actinide(iv) pertinent to the plutonium uranium redox extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shikha; Panja, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Dhami, Prem S; Gandhi, Preetam M; Ghosh, Sunil K

    2016-05-04

    A new class of conformationally constrained oxa-bridged tricyclo-dicarboxamide (OTDA) ligand was rationally designed for the selective extraction of tetravalent actinides pertinent to the Plutonium Uranium Redox EXtraction (PUREX) process. Two of the designed diamide ligands were synthesized and extraction studies were performed for Pu(iv) from HNO3 medium. The mechanism of extraction was investigated by studying various parameters such as feed HNO3, NaNO3 and OTDA concentrations. The nature of the extracted species was found to be [Pu(NO3)4(OTDA)]. One of the OTDA ligands was elaborately tested and showed the selective extraction of Pu(iv) and Np(iv) over other actinide species, viz., U(vi), Np(v), Am(iii), lanthanides and fission products contained in a nuclear waste from the PUREX process. DFT calculations predicted the charge density on each of the coordinating 'O' atoms of OTDA supporting its high Pu(iv) selectivity over other ions studied and also provided the energy optimized structure of OTDA and its Pu(iv) complex.

  19. Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 1: FGD process design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-04

    Part 1 of the Electric Utility Engineer`s Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Manual emphasizes the chemical and physical processes that form the basis for design and operation of lime- and limestone-based FGD systems applied to coal- or oil-fired steam electric generating stations. The objectives of Part 1 are: to provide a description of the chemical and physical design basis for lime- and limestone-based wet FGD systems; to identify and discuss the various process design parameters and process options that must be considered in developing a specification for a new FGD system; and to provide utility engineers with process knowledge useful for operating and optimizing a lime- or limestone-based wet FGD system.

  20. A methodology for the sustainable design and implementation strategy of CO2 utilization processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roh, Kosan; Frauzem, Rebecca; Nguyen, Tuan B. H.

    2016-01-01

    design and analysis is discussed as only limited amounts of process data is available for determining the optimal processing path and in the third stage the issue of implementation strategy is considered. As examples, two CO2 utilization methods for methanol production, combined reforming and direct......This work presents a systematic methodology that has been developed for the design of sustainable CO2 utilization processes that can mitigate CO2 and also guarantee profitability. First, the three-stage methodology, evaluation criteria and applicable tools are described. Especially, the process...... synthesis are considered. Methanol plants employing such methods are developed using synthesis-design and simulation tools and their evaluation indicators are calculated under various implementation strategies. It is demonstrated that integrating or replacing an existing conventional methanol plant...

  1. The Utility of Chinese Tone Processing Skill in Detecting Children with English Reading Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alida; Wang, Min

    2012-01-01

    The utility of Chinese tone processing skill in detecting children with English reading difficulties was examined through differences in a Chinese tone experimental task between a group of native English-speaking children with reading disabilities (RD) and a comparison group of children with normal reading development (NRD). General auditory…

  2. In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

    2010-12-07

    Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

  3. Benefits from remote sensing data utilization in urban planning processes and system recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, H. J.; Howard, J. Y.

    1972-01-01

    The benefits of utilizing remote sensor data in the urban planning process of the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments are investigated. An evaluation of sensor requirements, a description/ comparison of costs, benefits, levels of accuracy, ease of attainment, and frequency of update possible using sensor versus traditional data acquisition techniques are discussed.

  4. Effects of low-pressure igneous processes and subduction on Fe3+/ΣFe and redox state of mantle eclogites from Lace (Kaapvaal craton)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulbach, S.; Woodland, A. B.; Vasilyev, P.; Galvez, M. E.; Viljoen, K. S.

    2017-09-01

    Reconstructing the redox state of the mantle is critical in discussing the evolution of atmospheric composition through time. Kimberlite-borne mantle eclogite xenoliths, commonly interpreted as representing former oceanic crust, may record the chemical and physical state of Archaean and Proterozoic convecting mantle sources that generated their magmatic protoliths. However, their message is generally obscured by a range of primary (igneous differentiation) and secondary processes (seawater alteration, metamorphism, metasomatism). Here, we report the Fe3+/ΣFe ratio and δ18 O in garnet from in a suite of well-characterised mantle eclogite and pyroxenite xenoliths hosted in the Lace kimberlite (Kaapvaal craton), which originated as ca. 3 Ga-old ocean floor. Fe3+/ΣFe in garnet (0.01 to 0.063, median 0.02; n = 16) shows a negative correlation with jadeite content in clinopyroxene, suggesting increased partitioning of Fe3+ into clinopyroxene in the presence of monovalent cations with which it can form coupled substitutions. Jadeite-corrected Fe3+/ΣFe in garnet shows a broad negative trend with Eu*, consistent with incompatible behaviour of Fe3+ during olivine-plagioclase accumulation in the protoliths. This trend is partially obscured by increasing Fe3+ partitioning into garnet along a conductive cratonic geotherm. In contrast, NMORB-normalised Nd/Yb - a proxy of partial melt loss from subducting oceanic crust (1) - shows no obvious correlation with Fe3+/ΣFe, nor does garnet δ18OVSMOW (5.14 to 6.21‰) point to significant seawater alteration. Median bulk-rock Fe3+/ΣFe is roughly estimated at 0.025. This observation agrees with V/Sc systematics, which collectively point to a reduced Archaean convecting mantle source to the igneous protoliths of these eclogites compared to the modern MORB source. Oxygen fugacites (fO2) relative to the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer (FMQ) range from Δlog ⁡ fO2 = FMQ-1.3 to FMQ-4.6. At those reducing conditions, the solubility

  5. Utility Theory for Evaluation of Optimal Process Condition of SAW: A Multi-Response Optimization Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Saurav; Biswas, Ajay; Bhaumik, Swapan; Majumdar, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    Multi-objective optimization problem has been solved in order to estimate an optimal process environment consisting of optimal parametric combination to achieve desired quality indicators (related to bead geometry) of submerged arc weld of mild steel. The quality indicators selected in the study were bead height, penetration depth, bead width and percentage dilution. Taguchi method followed by utility concept has been adopted to evaluate the optimal process condition achieving multiple objective requirements of the desired quality weld.

  6. Purification and utilization of garlic processing wastewater in lotus pond wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun PANG; Xue-ling FENG; Xiu-feng WANG

    2014-01-01

    Based on the experiments of utilization of garlic processing wastewater in a lotus pond, this study demonstrates that lotus pond wetlands have a remarkable ability to remove organic pollutants and decrease chemical oxygen demand (CODCr), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), and suspended substances (SS) in garlic processing wastewater. Results also show evident effects of lotus roots on absorption of NH3-N. The pH value in a lotus pond with wastewater discharged was relatively stable. The water quality in the lotus pond reached the classⅡ emission standard, according to the Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard (GB8978-1996), seven days after pretreated garlic processing wastewater had been discharged into the lotus pond. Garlic processing wastewater irrigation does not produce pollution in the pond sediment and has no negative effect on the growth of lotus roots. Due to utilization of garlic processing wastewater, the output of lotus roots increased by 3.0% to 8.3%, and the quality of lotus roots was improved. Therefore, better purification and utilization results can be achieved.

  7. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  8. Possibilities of Utilizing the Method of Analytical Hierarchy Process Within the Strategy of Corporate Social Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieniková, Katarína; Hrdinová, Gabriela; Naňo, Tomáš; Sakál, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of the theory of corporate social responsibility, risk management and the exact method of analytic hierarchic process that is used in the decision-making processes. The Chapters 2 and 3 focus on presentation of the experience with the application of the method in formulating the stakeholders' strategic goals within the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and simultaneously its utilization in minimizing the environmental risks. The major benefit of this paper is the application of Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP).

  9. Biochemical methods for monitoring protein thiol redox states in biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Rudyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative post-translational modifications of proteins resulting from events that increase cellular oxidant levels play important roles in physiological and pathophysiological processes. Evaluation of alterations to protein redox states is increasingly common place because of methodological advances that have enabled detection, quantification and identification of such changes in cells and tissues. This mini-review provides a synopsis of biochemical methods that can be utilized to monitor the array of different oxidative and electrophilic modifications that can occur to protein thiols and can be important in the regulatory or maladaptive impact oxidants can have on biological systems. Several of the methods discussed are valuable for monitoring the redox state of established redox sensing proteins such as Keap1.

  10. Supply chain process collaboration and Internet utilization: an international perspective of business to business relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Paulo Valadares de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compiles the findings of an international study which primary objective was to investigate the relationships between Internet utilization in business-to-business relationships, collaborative efforts and their impact over supplier and customer-oriented processes performance. It highlights the Internet as an important enhancer of collaboration in supply chains and addresses the effects of such efforts on companies’ overall performance. As a conclusive-descriptive and quantitative study, data from a survey of 788 companies from the USA, China, Canada, United Kingdom, and Brazil were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics, reliability evaluation of the research model’s internal scales, path analysis and structural equation modeling to evaluate supply chain processes collaboration, both up- and down-stream. Internet utilization in supplier and customer-oriented processes was found positively related to collaborative practices in business-to-business relationships. Collaborative practices in supplier and customer-oriented processes, in turn, showed potential effects on performance. Also, supplier-oriented processes performance was found positively associated with customer-oriented process performance. Both internet use and collaborative practices are even more important in a high-context country like Brazil. The paper helps clarify the impact of internet use on business-to-business collaborative relationships. In this sense, practitioners can take this impact to redraw the organizational landscape and business processes amongst supply chain participants.

  11. Addressing data center efficiency. Lessons learned from process evaluations of utility energy efficiency programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, A.J.; Holmes, J. [Energy Market Innovations, Inc, 83 Columbia St., Suite 303, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    This paper summarizes the unique challenges related to addressing energy efficiency in the data center industry and lessons learned from original research and two process evaluations of energy efficiency programs with components that specifically target data centers. The lessons learned include: creating program opportunities specifically focused on data centers; clearly identifying target data centers able to implement energy efficiency programs; understanding decision making in these facilities; and effectively communicating the program opportunities to the target market. The growing energy use of data centers has drawn international attention from policy makers, regulators, industry consortiums, and electric utilities. Any program effective at improving the energy performance of data centers must include specific strategies and processes aimed at confronting a number of challenges specific to this industry, including: the concentrated and rapidly growing energy use of these facilities; the rapid pace of innovation; the extremely high reliability requirements; and the significant split incentives due to the typical data center management structure. The process evaluations covered in this paper are the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) High-Tech program and the Silicon Valley Power (SVP) Public Benefits Program. While the PG and E evaluation was a more complete process evaluation, the SVP evaluation focused specifically on participation from co-location facilities. These process evaluations together included interviews with program participants, nonparticipants and utility staff and also included outreach to a large variety of industry stakeholders. In addition, the PG and E evaluation included detailed process-mapping used to identify the necessity and importance of all program processes. The insights gathered from these evaluations are not only applicable to US electrical utilities but can also be applied to any international organization looking to create

  12. Results from an in-situ pore water chemistry experiment in opalinus clay: evidence of microbially mediated anaerobic redox processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P.; Mettler, S. [NAGRA - National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Wettingen (Switzerland); Canniere, P. de [SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Pearson, F.J. [Ground-Water Geochemistry, New Bern (United States); Gaucher, E. [BRGM, 75 - Paris (France); Hohener, P. [BioRem, CH (Switzerland); Eichinger, L. [Hydroisotop, Schweitenkirchen (Germany); Mader, U. [Bern Univ., CH (Switzerland); Vinsot, A. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Gabler, H.E. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Hama, K. [JNC - Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) Horonobe (Japan); Hernan, P. [ENRESA, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Low permeability argillaceous rocks are considered potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in a number of countries. Characterisation of pore water chemistry is important for assessing radionuclide behaviour, but technically challenging because of intimate clay-water association. The application of different techniques, such as in-situ extraction, squeezing and leaching has led to improved understanding. However, because of potential experimental artefacts (e.g. degassing of CO{sub 2}, ingress of O{sub 2} ), significant uncertainties remain, especially with regard to pH/pCO{sub 2} and Eh conditions. Moreover, the pore water chemistry may be perturbed by the drilling procedure itself, thus leading to oxidation and biodegradation effects. In order to reduce uncertainties mentioned above and to gain deeper insight into geochemical processes regulating pH and Eh, the internationally supported Pore water Chemistry (PC) experiment was started at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory in 2002. The basis of the study is an in-situ experiment employing the diffusive equilibration method. The field study was complemented with lab investigations which include chemical analyses for principal inorganic solutes, for reduced sulphur species and for a variety of specific organic compounds, gas measurements of core samples and a core infiltration study based on advective displacement. (authors)

  13. Whole process reclamation and utilization of wastes produced in the biological fermentation industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ling-jun; LI Da-peng; MA Fang; Chein-chi Chang; XU Shan-wen; QIU Shan

    2008-01-01

    Wastes yielded in the vintage process and the biological fermentation of itaconic acid and sodium gluconate of a winery in Shandong,such as grain stillage,melon lees,cornstarch protein residues,itaconic acid mother liquid,itaconic acid mycelium and sodium gluconate mycelium,were studied.Hish-activity biological protein feed,foliar fertilizer and irrigation fertilizer were generated from these wastes by applying biological/microbial technologies.Meanwhile,a whole set of technological pathways Was put forward.As a result,the optimal economical and social benefits can be obtained with low natural resource consumption and environmental costs by converting wastes into useful matters.In conclusion,through the utilization of limited resources in the whole process of reclamation and utilization of wastes,the harmony promotion Can be achieved between the economic system and the natural ecosystem.

  14. Update on the pathological processes, molecular biology, and clinical utility of N-acetylcysteine in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse HN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hoi Nam Tse, Cee Zhung Steven TsengMedical and Geriatric Department, Kwong Wah Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative RegionAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common and morbid disease characterized by high oxidative stress. Its pathogenesis is complex, and involves excessive oxidative stress (redox imbalance, protease/antiprotease imbalance, inflammation, apoptosis, and autoimmunity. Among these, oxidative stress has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of COPD by initiating and mediating various redox-sensitive signal transduction pathways and gene expression. The protective physiological mechanisms of the redox balance in the human body, their role in the pathogenesis of COPD, and the clinical correlation between oxidative stress and COPD are reviewed in this paper. N-acetylcysteine (NAC is a mucolytic agent with both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This paper also reviews the use of NAC in patients with COPD, especially the dose-dependent properties of NAC, eg, its effects on lung function and the exacerbation rate in patients with the disease. Earlier data from BRONCUS (the Bronchitis Randomized on NAC Cost-Utility Study did not suggest that NAC was beneficial in patients with COPD, only indicating that it reduced exacerbation in an "inhaled steroid-naïve" subgroup. With regard to the dose-dependent properties of NAC, two recent randomized controlled Chinese trials suggested that high-dose NAC (1,200 mg daily can reduce exacerbations in patients with COPD, especially in those with an earlier (moderately severe stage of disease, and also in those who are at high risk of exacerbations. However, there was no significant effect on symptoms or quality of life in patients receiving NAC. Further studies are warranted to investigate the effect of NAC at higher doses in non-Chinese patients with COPD.Keywords: N-acetylcysteine, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  15. Chloroplast Redox Poise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steccanella, Verdiana

    the redox status of the plastoquinone pool and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Furthermore, in the plant cell, the equilibrium between redox reactions and ROS signals is also maintained by various balancing mechanisms among which the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin system (TR-Trx) stands out as a mediator......The redox state of the chloroplast is maintained by a delicate balance between energy production and consumption and is affected by the need to avoid increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox power and ROS generated in the chloroplast are essential for maintaining physiological...... metabolic pathways and for optimizing chloroplast functions. The redox poise of photosynthetic electron transport components like plastoquinone is crucial to initiate signaling cascades and might also be involved in key biosynthetic pathways such as chlorophyll biosynthesis. We, therefore, explored...

  16. Modeling and Optimizing Energy Utilization of Steel Production Process: A Hybrid Petri Net Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The steel industry is responsible for nearly 9% of anthropogenic energy utilization in the world. It is urgent to reduce the total energy utilization of steel industry under the huge pressures on reducing energy consumption and CO2 emission. Meanwhile, the steel manufacturing is a typical continuous-discrete process with multiprocedures, multiobjects, multiconstraints, and multimachines coupled, which makes energy management rather difficult. In order to study the energy flow within the real steel production process, this paper presents a new modeling and optimization method for the process based on Hybrid Petri Nets (HPN in consideration of the situation above. Firstly, we introduce the detailed description of HPN. Then the real steel production process from one typical integrated steel plant is transformed into Hybrid Petri Net model as a case. Furthermore, we obtain a series of constraints of our optimization model from this model. In consideration of the real process situation, we pick the steel production, energy efficiency and self-made gas surplus as the main optimized goals in this paper. Afterwards, a fuzzy linear programming method is conducted to obtain the multiobjective optimization results. Finally, some measures are suggested to improve this low efficiency and high whole cost process structure.

  17. Ceramics Vitreous China Produced by Utilizing Sediment Soil from Water Supply Treatment Process

    OpenAIRE

    Wangrakdiskul Ubolrat; Wanasbodee Jindakarn; Sansroi Pornnapa

    2017-01-01

    Due to generating the abundant of sediment soil, it makes the high burden of disposal cost to the metropolitan waterworks authority. Enhancing the value of sediment soil has been explored. This research aims to utilize the sediment soil, wastes of water supply treatment process for producing ceramics vitreous china. In this experiment, five types of raw materials are exploited, namely, sediment soil, ball clay, kaolin, feldspar and silica sand. The formulas have been divided into two groups. ...

  18. Proceedings of a workshop on the utilization of coal fuels in process heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Almost 5% of the nation's energy consumption takes place in tubular process heaters. Currently, these units are gas- and, to a lesser extent, oil-fired. Process heaters provide energy for refining petroleum and the manufacture of numerous chemicals and petrochemicals. Since the current state-of-the-art, using waste heat recovery and forced draft burners, can achieve thermal efficiencies of about 90%, it is unlikely that current process heat and fuel requirements will be dramatically reduced by process modifications and/or conservation measures. Hence, if this sizeable, inexorable drain on our fluid petroleum reserves is to be halted, it seems reasonable to consider the utilization of coal and/or coal-based fuels to fire process heaters. In order to assess the feasibility and potential for a coal-based process heater industry, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) organized a workshop to define and explore the various problems that must be solved in order to burn coal in process heaters. A primary aim of the workshop was to consider the design methodology for process heaters when firing coal and compare it to those for gas and oil firing. The overall conclusions were: that retrofitting present process heaters to coal fuel was impractical; that it would be difficult to fit larger heaters designed to burn coal into present refineries; that there would be difficulties with process heaters burning coal; and that a better approach would be one large utility coal heater with a circulating heat transfer medium. Seven papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  19. Acupuncture Mechanism and Redox Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang-Hong Zeng; Qian-Qian Li; Qian Xu; Fang Li; Cun-Zhi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress participates in the pathological process of various diseases. Acupuncture is a component of the health care system in China that can be traced back for at least 3000 years. Recently, increased evidences indicate that acupuncture stimulation could reduce oxidative damage in organisms under pathological state, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. This review focuses on the emerging links between acupuncture and redox modulation in various disorders, such as vascular dementi...

  20. MASS PRODUCTION OF THE BENEFICIAL NEMATODE STEINERNEMA CARPOCAPSAE UTILIZING A FED-BATCH CULTURING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard D. Holmes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the batch and fed-batch mass production of Steinernema carpocapsae. S. carpocapsae is an entomoparasitic nematode that is used as a biological control agent of soil-borne crop insect pests. The ability and efficiency of fed-batch culture process was successful through the utilization of the nematode’s bacterial symbiont Xenorhabdus nematophila. Results from the fed-batch process were compared to those obtain from the standard batch process. The fed-batch process successively improved the mass production process of S. carpocapsae employing liquid medium technology. Within the first week of the fed-batch process (day six, the nematode density obtained was 202,000 nematodes mL−1; whereas on day six, batch culture mode resulted in a nematode density of 23,000 nematodes mL−1. The fed-batch process was superior to that of batch production with a yield approximately 8.8-fold higher. In fed-batch process, the nematode yield was improved 88.6 % higher within a short amount of time compared to the batch process. Fed-batch seems to make the process more efficient and possibly economically viable.

  1. A Method for Sustainable Carbon Dioxide Utilization Process Synthesis and Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Fjellerup, Kasper; Roh, Kosan

    for the process synthesis, design and more sustainable design. Using a superstructure-based approach a network of utilization alternatives is created linking CO2 and other raw materials with various products using processing blocks. This will then be optimized and verified for sustainability. Detailed design has...... also been performed for various case studies. These case studies include multiple pathways for the production of methanol and the production of dimethyl carbonate (DMC). From detailed design and analysis, CO2 conversion processes show promise as an additional method for the sustainable reduction of CO2...... compounds via chemical reactions. However, conversion is still in its infancy and requires work for implementation at an industrial level. One aspect of this is the development of a methodology for the formulation and optimization of sustainable conversion processes. This methodology follows three stages...

  2. Utilization of the Nursing Process to Foster Clinical Reasoning During a Simulation Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lambie

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nursing practice includes complex reasoning and multifaceted decision making with minimal standardized guidance in how to evaluate this phenomenon among nursing students. Learning outcomes related to the clinical reasoning process among novice baccalaureate nursing students during a simulation experience were evaluated. Nursing process records were utilized to evaluate and foster the development of clinical reasoning in a high-fidelity medical-surgical simulation experience. Students were unable to describe and process pertinent patient information appropriately prior to the simulation experience. Students’ ability to identify pertinent patient cues and plan appropriate patient care improved following the simulation. The learning activity afforded a structured opportunity to identify cues, prioritize the proper course of nursing interventions, and engage in collaboration among peers. The simulation experience provides faculty insight into the students’ clinical reasoning processes, while providing students with a clear framework for successfully accomplishing learning outcomes.

  3. Flexible simulation framework to couple processes in complex 3D models for subsurface utilization assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempka, Thomas; Nakaten, Benjamin; De Lucia, Marco; Nakaten, Natalie; Otto, Christopher; Pohl, Maik; Tillner, Elena; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of the geological subsurface for production and storage of hydrocarbons, chemical energy and heat as well as for waste disposal requires the quantification and mitigation of environmental impacts as well as the improvement of georesources utilization in terms of efficiency and sustainability. The development of tools for coupled process simulations is essential to tackle these challenges, since reliable assessments are only feasible by integrative numerical computations. Coupled processes at reservoir to regional scale determine the behaviour of reservoirs, faults and caprocks, generally demanding for complex 3D geological models to be considered besides available monitoring and experimenting data in coupled numerical simulations. We have been developing a flexible numerical simulation framework that provides efficient workflows for integrating the required data and software packages to carry out coupled process simulations considering, e.g., multiphase fluid flow, geomechanics, geochemistry and heat. Simulation results are stored in structured data formats to allow for an integrated 3D visualization and result interpretation as well as data archiving and its provision to collaborators. The main benefits in using the flexible simulation framework are the integration of data geological and grid data from any third party software package as well as data export to generic 3D visualization tools and archiving formats. The coupling of the required process simulators in time and space is feasible, while different spatial dimensions in the coupled simulations can be integrated, e.g., 0D batch with 3D dynamic simulations. User interaction is established via high-level programming languages, while computational efficiency is achieved by using low-level programming languages. We present three case studies on the assessment of geological subsurface utilization based on different process coupling approaches and numerical simulations.

  4. Redox dynamics in multicomponent, iron-bearing silicate melts and glasses: Application to the float-glass processing of high-temperature silicate glassmelts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Glen Bennett

    Processing high-strain-point glasses by the float process is challenged by the relative thermochemical properties of glassmelts and the liquid-metal float medium. As the chemical reaction between the glassmelt and the float metal involves dynamic reduction of the glassmelt, this research has examined the constraints on high-temperature float processing of glassmelts by combining metal-alloy/oxide reaction thermodynamics and Wagnerian kinetic models for redox reactions in silicate melts. The dynamic response of Fe-bearing, p-type (polaronic) semiconducting amorphous silicates to a chemical potential gradient of oxygen has been shown to be rate-limited by the chemical diffusion of network-modifying cations. The persistence of this mechanism to very low Fe concentrations in Fe-doped magnesium aluminosilicate glasses was proven with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Three glasses, with 0.1, 0.5, and 1.25 mol. % FeO were reacted with air at temperatures from 710-845sp°C. For all compositions and temperatures, oxidation was dominated by network modifier diffusion; an activation energy of 475 kJ*molsp{-1} characterized the process. Chemical dynamics in a high-temperature float environment were characterized on liquid-liquid reaction couples between two low-Fe sodium-aluminoborosilicate (NABS) glassmelts (0.01 and 0.08 mol. % FeO) and Au-30Sn and Au-28Ge (atomic basis) alloys. Experiments were performed in the temperature range 1250-1450sp°C for 30 min; wavelength-dispersive and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopies were employed. These exothermic liquid-metal alloys display large negative deviations from ideal solution behavior, with significantly depressed chemical activities. Diffusion of Sn or Ge in the NABS glassmelts (depth and concentration) was limited at all temperatures to levels comparable to conventional soda-lime (NCS) float glass (˜2 min on pure Sn at 1100sp°C). Incorporation of Sn or Ge was reduced significantly in the higher-Fe-content NABS

  5. Expanding the printable design space for lithography processes utilizing a cut mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandell, Jerome; Salama, Mohamed; Wilkinson, William; Curtice, Mark; Feng, Jui-Hsuan; Gao, Shao Wen; Asthana, Abhishek

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of a cut-mask in semiconductor patterning processes has been in practice for logic devices since the inception of 32nm-node devices, notably with unidirectional gate level printing. However, the microprocessor applications where cut-mask patterning methods are used are expanding as Self-Aligned Double Patterning (SADP) processes become mainstream for 22/14nm fin diffusion, and sub-14nm metal levels. One common weakness for these types of lithography processes is that the initial pattern requiring the follow-up cut-mask typically uses an extreme off-axis imaging source such as dipole to enhance the resolution and line-width roughness (LWR) for critical dense patterns. This source condition suffers from poor process margin in the semi-dense (forbidden pitch) realm and wrong-way directional design spaces. Common pattern failures in these limited design regions include bridging and extra-printing defects that are difficult to resolve with traditional mask improvement means. This forces the device maker to limit the allowable geometries that a designer may use on a device layer. This paper will demonstrate methods to expand the usable design space on dipole-like processes such as unidirectional gate and SADP processes by utilizing the follow-up cut mask to improve the process window. Traditional mask enhancement means for improving the process window in this design realm will be compared to this new cut-mask approach. The unique advantages and disadvantages of the cut-mask solution will be discussed in contrast to those customary methods.

  6. Kinetically Enhanced Electrochemical Redox of Polysulfides on Polymeric Carbon Nitrides for Improved Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ji; Yin, Lichang; Tang, Xiaonan; Yang, Huicong; Yan, Wensheng; Song, Li; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Li, Feng

    2016-09-28

    The kinetics and stability of the redox of lithium polysulfides (LiPSs) fundamentally determine the overall performance of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. Inspired by theoretical predictions, we herein validated the existence of a strong electrostatic affinity between polymeric carbon nitride (p-C3N4) and LiPSs, that can not only stabilize the redox cycling of LiPSs, but also enhance their redox kinetics. As a result, utilization of p-C3N4 in a Li-S battery has brought much improved performance in the aspects of high capacity and low capacity fading over prolonged cycling. Especially upon the application of p-C3N4, the kinetic barrier of the LiPS redox reactions has been significantly reduced, which has thus resulted in a better rate performance. Further density functional theory simulations have revealed that the origin of such kinetic enhancement was from the distortion of molecular configurations of the LiPSs anchored on p-C3N4. Therefore, this proof-of-concept study opens up a promising avenue to improve the performance of Li-S batteries by accelerating their fundamental electrochemical redox processes, which also has the potential to be applied in other electrochemical energy storage/conversion systems.

  7. Emergy evaluation of a production and utilization process of irrigation water in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Luo, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Jing; Kong, Jun; She, Dong-Li

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability evaluation of the process of water abstraction, distribution, and use for irrigation can contribute to the policy of decision making in irrigation development. Emergy theory and method are used to evaluate a pumping irrigation district in China. A corresponding framework for its emergy evaluation is proposed. Its emergy evaluation shows that water is the major component of inputs into the irrigation water production and utilization systems (24.7% and 47.9% of the total inputs, resp.) and that the transformities of irrigation water and rice as the systems' products (1.72E + 05 sej/J and 1.42E + 05 sej/J, resp.; sej/J = solar emjoules per joule) represent their different emergy efficiencies. The irrigated agriculture production subsystem has a higher sustainability than the irrigation water production subsystem and the integrated production system, according to several emergy indices: renewability ratio (%R), emergy yield ratio (EYR), emergy investment ratio (EIR), environmental load ratio (ELR), and environmental sustainability index (ESI). The results show that the performance of this irrigation district could be further improved by increasing the utilization efficiencies of the main inputs in both the production and utilization process of irrigation water.

  8. Emergy Evaluation of a Production and Utilization Process of Irrigation Water in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability evaluation of the process of water abstraction, distribution, and use for irrigation can contribute to the policy of decision making in irrigation development. Emergy theory and method are used to evaluate a pumping irrigation district in China. A corresponding framework for its emergy evaluation is proposed. Its emergy evaluation shows that water is the major component of inputs into the irrigation water production and utilization systems (24.7% and 47.9% of the total inputs, resp. and that the transformities of irrigation water and rice as the systems’ products (1.72E+05 sej/J and 1.42E+05 sej/J, resp.; sej/J = solar emjoules per joule represent their different emergy efficiencies. The irrigated agriculture production subsystem has a higher sustainability than the irrigation water production subsystem and the integrated production system, according to several emergy indices: renewability ratio (%R, emergy yield ratio (EYR, emergy investment ratio (EIR, environmental load ratio (ELR, and environmental sustainability index (ESI. The results show that the performance of this irrigation district could be further improved by increasing the utilization efficiencies of the main inputs in both the production and utilization process of irrigation water.

  9. Optimizing SUS 304 wire drawing process by grey relational analysis utilizing Taguchi method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the stainless steel 304 (SUS 304) wire drawing process,optimizing the die life and wire tensile strength,which are the larger-the-better quality characteristics (QCH) types,is of main interest.Three control factors,involving reduction ratio,lubricant temperature,and drawing speed,were investigated utilizing L9(34) orthogonal array (OA).The grey relational analysis was conducted for the normalized signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios.The ordinal value of the grey grade was then used to decide optimal factor levels.The anticipated improvements in die life and wire tensile strength were estimated 25.31 h and 22.50 kg/mm2,respectively.To decide the significant factor which had effect on each QCH and predict the average value of each QCH,analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed for S/N ratio and QCH.Confurmation experiments were then conducted,where a good overlap was noticed between the predicted and confirmation intervals for each QCH.The Hotelling 72 and the sample generalized variance control charts were finally utilized in controlling and monitoring future production.In conclusion,the grey relational analysis utilizing Taguchi method is an effective approach for optimizing the die life and wire tensile strength for SUS wire drawing process.

  10. Accurate Identification of Fatty Liver Disease in Data Warehouse Utilizing Natural Language Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Joseph S; Natarajan, Yamini; Hou, Jason K; Wang, Jingqi; Hanif, Muzammil; Feng, Hua; Kramer, Jennifer R; Desiderio, Roxanne; Xu, Hua; El-Serag, Hashem B; Kanwal, Fasiha

    2017-08-31

    Natural language processing is a powerful technique of machine learning capable of maximizing data extraction from complex electronic medical records. We utilized this technique to develop algorithms capable of "reading" full-text radiology reports to accurately identify the presence of fatty liver disease. Abdominal ultrasound, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging reports were retrieved from the Veterans Affairs Corporate Data Warehouse from a random national sample of 652 patients. Radiographic fatty liver disease was determined by manual review by two physicians and verified with an expert radiologist. A split validation method was utilized for algorithm development. For all three imaging modalities, the algorithms could identify fatty liver disease with >90% recall and precision, with F-measures >90%. These algorithms could be used to rapidly screen patient records to establish a large cohort to facilitate epidemiological and clinical studies and examine the clinic course and outcomes of patients with radiographic hepatic steatosis.

  11. The effects of ergonomic stressors on process tool maintenance and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.

    1998-03-31

    This study examines ergonomic stressors associated with front-end process tool maintenance, relates them to decreased machine utilization, and proposes solution strategies to reduce their negative impact on productivity. Member company ergonomists observed technicians performing field maintenance tasks on seven different bottleneck tools and recorded ergonomic stressors using SEMaCheck, a graphics-based, integrated checklist developed by Sandia National Laboratories. The top ten stressors were prioritized according to a cost formula that accounted for difficulty, time, and potential errors. Estimates of additional time on a task caused by ergonomic stressors demonstrated that machine utilization could be increased from 6% to 25%. Optimal solution strategies were formulated based on redesign budget, stressor cost, and estimates of solution costs and benefits

  12. Using the Analytic Hierarchy Process to Derive Health State Utilities from Ordinal Preference Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Brian P; Adams, Roisin; Walsh, Cathal; Barry, Michael; Kind, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire is a standardized instrument used in the economic evaluation of health care to measure health state preferences across disease groups. A time trade-off (TTO) approach is commonly used to elicit preferences from the public. However, there are issues regarding how best to measure worse-than-dead states; at present, extreme valuations are rounded up to more acceptable values. TTO elicitation is also cognitively demanding for respondents and is therefore expensive to investigate. To describe how the analytic hierarchy process approach could be used to generate utilities from the ordinal relationships between the health states instead of the ordinal relationships between health states, allowing potentially useful preference data to be incorporated rather than excluded as they are at present. It was applied to the Measurement and Valuation of Health study data set, measuring health state preferences for the United Kingdom. The analytic hierarchy process approach was explained. Five approaches to structure pairwise comparisons of health state preference were described (two concave, two convex, and one linear). All approaches described predicted the rankings of health states well. However, utilities derived followed an unconventional, bunched shape compared with the original Measurement and Valuation of Health TTO study. An approach was identified by optimizing the parameters, minimizing the sum of squared errors between the ordinal "health state ranking" approach and the original TTO-derived utilities. This approach outlined offers the potential to convert ordinal preference data into cardinal utilities. It is simpler than TTO studies to carry out and removes the need to directly alter results of the preference ranking exercise. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acupuncture mechanism and redox equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Li, Qian-Qian; Xu, Qian; Li, Fang; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress participates in the pathological process of various diseases. Acupuncture is a component of the health care system in China that can be traced back for at least 3000 years. Recently, increased evidences indicate that acupuncture stimulation could reduce oxidative damage in organisms under pathological state, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. This review focuses on the emerging links between acupuncture and redox modulation in various disorders, such as vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease, and hypertension, ranging from redox system, antioxidant system, anti-inflammatory system, and nervous system to signaling pathway. Although the molecular and cellular pathways studies of acupuncture effect on oxidative stress are preliminary, they represent an important step forward in the research of acupuncture antioxidative effect.

  14. Acupuncture Mechanism and Redox Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Hong Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress participates in the pathological process of various diseases. Acupuncture is a component of the health care system in China that can be traced back for at least 3000 years. Recently, increased evidences indicate that acupuncture stimulation could reduce oxidative damage in organisms under pathological state, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. This review focuses on the emerging links between acupuncture and redox modulation in various disorders, such as vascular dementia, Parkinson’s disease, and hypertension, ranging from redox system, antioxidant system, anti-inflammatory system, and nervous system to signaling pathway. Although the molecular and cellular pathways studies of acupuncture effect on oxidative stress are preliminary, they represent an important step forward in the research of acupuncture antioxidative effect.

  15. Redox processes in the rhizosphere of restored peatlands - The impact of vascular plant species on electrochemical properties of dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agethen, Svenja; Wolff, Franziska; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2016-04-01

    Restoration of cut over peatlands in Central Europe is challenging in a landscape overused for agriculture. Excess nutrient availability by excess fertilization triggers uncharacteristic vegetation that is one key driver for carbon cycling. Those nutrient rich systems are often dominated by graminoids, and were often found to emit substantial amounts of methane. Plants grown under nutrient rich conditions provide more labile carbon in rhizodeposition and litter that fuels methanogenesis. Such species often have aerenchyma that facilitates direct CH4 emissions to the atmosphere and therefore impair the climate cooling function of bogs. On the other hand, aerenchymatic tissue supplies oxygen to the rhizosphere, which may reduce methanogenesis or stimulate methane oxidation, as methanogenesis is a strictly anaerobic process. Which of the effects prevail is often unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the impact of different vegetation on rhizospheric redox conditions and methanogenesis, including aerenchymatic vascular plants that are dominant in restored cut over peatlands. As ombrotrophic peat is poor in inorganic electron acceptors (EAs) to suppress methanogenesis, we analyzed the electron acceptor (EACs) and electron donor capacities (EDCs) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the rhizosphere to understand the impact of vegetation on anaerobic organic matter degradation. We planted Juncus effusus, Eriophorum vaginatum, Eriophorum angustifolium, Sphagnum (mixture of S. magellanicum, S. papillosum, S. sec. acutifolia, 1/3 each) plus non-vegetated controls; six replicates per batch; in containers with untreated homogenized peat. The plants grow under constant conditions (20° C, 12h diurnal light cycles and 80% RH). Anoxic conditions were achieved by keeping the water table at +10 cm. For monitoring, the rhizosphere is equipped with suction and gas samplers. We measure dissolved CO2 and CH4 concentrations, inorganic EAs (NO3-, Fe(III), and SO42-) and

  16. Redox chemistry of H[sub 2]S oxidation in the British Gas Stretford Process. Pt. 1; Thermodynamics of sulphur-water systems at 298 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, G.H.; Thompson, I. (Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mineral Resources Engineering)

    1993-04-01

    The objectives of the thermodynamic calculations reported here were to provide a framework to describe the redox chemistry of the S/HS-couple, and to help to explain the formation of thiosulphate ions, with a view to defining appropriate conditions to minimise its yield and maximise that of sulphur. (author)

  17. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes--expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broere, Daniël L J; Plessius, Raoul; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2015-10-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This review focusses on metal complexes containing either catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine type ligands. These ligands have opened up a new area of chemistry for metals across the periodic table. The portfolio of ligand-based reactivity invoked by these redox-active entities will be discussed. This ranges from facilitating oxidative additions upon d(0) metals or cross coupling reactions with cobalt(iii) without metal oxidation state changes - by functioning as an electron reservoir - to intramolecular ligand-to-substrate single-electron transfer to create a reactive substrate-centered radical on a Pd(ii) platform. Although the current state-of-art research primarily consists of stoichiometric and exploratory reactions, several notable reports of catalysis facilitated by the redox-activity of the ligand will also be discussed. In conclusion, redox-active ligands containing catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine moieties show great potential to be exploited as reversible electron reservoirs, donating or accepting electrons to activate substrates and metal centers and to enable new reactivity with both early and late transition as well as main group metals.

  18. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes: expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L.J. Broere; R. Plessius; J.I. van der Vlugt

    2015-01-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This r

  19. The Utilization of Urine Processing for the Advancement of Life Support Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi-Soyster, Elysse; Hogan, John; Flynn, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The success of long-duration missions will depend on resource recovery and the self-sustainability of life support technologies. Current technologies used on the International Space Station (ISS) utilize chemical and mechanical processes, such as filtration, to recover potable water from urine produced by crewmembers. Such technologies have significantly reduced the need for water resupply through closed-loop resource recovery and recycling. Harvesting the important components of urine requires selectivity, whether through the use of membranes or other physical barriers, or by chemical or biological processes. Given the chemical composition of urine, the downstream benefits of urine processing for resource recovery will be critical for many aspects of life support, such as food production and the synthesis of biofuels. This paper discusses the beneficial components of urine and their potential applications, and the challenges associated with using urine for nutrient recycling for space application.

  20. Systematic methods and tools for design of sustainable chemical processes for CO2 utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongpanna, Pichayapan; Babi, Deenesh K.; Pavarajarn, Varong

    2016-01-01

    A systematic computer-aided framework for sustainable process design is presented together with its application to the synthesis and generation of processing networks for dimethyl carbonate (DMC) production with CO2 utilization. The framework integrated with various methods, tools, algorithms...... and databases is based on a combined process synthesis-design-intensification method. The method consists of three stages. The synthesis-stage involves superstructure based optimization to identify promising networks that convert a given set of raw materials to a desired set of products. The design......-stage involves selection and analysis of the identified networks as a base case design in terms of operational feasibility, economics, life cycle assessment factors and sustainability measures, which are employed to establish targets for improvement in the next-stage. The innovation-stage involves generation...

  1. The Redox Flow System for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odonnell, P.; Gahn, R. F.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The interfacing of a Solar Photovoltaic System and a Redox Flow System for storage was workable. The Redox Flow System, which utilizes the oxidation-reduction capability of two redox couples, in this case iron and titanium, for its storage capacity, gave a relatively constant output regardless of solar activity so that a load could be run continually day and night utilizing the sun's energy. One portion of the system was connected to a bank of solar cells to electrochemically charge the solutions, while a separate part of the system was used to electrochemically discharge the stored energy.

  2. Chloroplast Redox Poise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steccanella, Verdiana

    The redox state of the chloroplast is maintained by a delicate balance between energy production and consumption and is affected by the need to avoid increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox power and ROS generated in the chloroplast are essential for maintaining physiological...... the redox status of the plastoquinone pool and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Furthermore, in the plant cell, the equilibrium between redox reactions and ROS signals is also maintained by various balancing mechanisms among which the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin system (TR-Trx) stands out as a mediator...... it lacks some of the key enzymes for ROS scavenging and it is the only, so far, known species to have two NTRC genes. Our aim was to elucidate the role of the two NTRC isoforms found in moss as an alternative system for protection against oxidative damage, providing the first partial attempt of a molecular...

  3. Integrating utilization-focused evaluation with business process modeling for clinical research improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Jonathan M; Rosas, Scott; Trochim, William M K

    2010-10-01

    New discoveries in basic science are creating extraordinary opportunities to design novel biomedical preventions and therapeutics for human disease. But the clinical evaluation of these new interventions is, in many instances, being hindered by a variety of legal, regulatory, policy and operational factors, few of which enhance research quality, the safety of study participants or research ethics. With the goal of helping increase the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical research, we have examined how the integration of utilization-focused evaluation with elements of business process modeling can reveal opportunities for systematic improvements in clinical research. Using data from the NIH global HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks, we analyzed the absolute and relative times required to traverse defined phases associated with specific activities within the clinical protocol lifecycle. Using simple median duration and Kaplan-Meyer survival analysis, we show how such time-based analyses can provide a rationale for the prioritization of research process analysis and re-engineering, as well as a means for statistically assessing the impact of policy modifications, resource utilization, re-engineered processes and best practices. Successfully applied, this approach can help researchers be more efficient in capitalizing on new science to speed the development of improved interventions for human disease.

  4. Utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp CH1 in biological carbon dioxide mitigation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, C.L.; Lee, C.M.; Chen, P.C. [Hungkuang University, Taichung (Taiwan)

    2011-05-15

    Before switching totally to alternative fuel stage, CO{sub 2} mitigation process has considered a transitional strategy for combustion of fossil fuels inevitably. In comparison to other CO{sub 2} mitigation options, such as oceanic or geologic injection, the biological photosynthetic process would present a far superior and sustainable solution under both environmental and social considerations. The utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. CH1 in carbon dioxide mitigation processes is analyzed in our research. It was found that an original developed photobioreactor with internal light source exhibits high light utilization. Anabaena sp. CH1 demonstrates excellent CO{sub 2} tolerance even at 15% CO{sub 2} level. This enables flue gas from power plant to be directly introduced to Anabaena sp. CH1 culture. Double light intensity and increased 47% CO{sub 2} bubble retention time could enhance CO{sub 2} removal efficiencies by 79% and 67%, respectively. A maximum CO{sub 2} fixation rate of 1.01 g CO{sub 2} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} was measured experimentally.

  5. An Extraction Process for Optimal Utilization of Naphtha Based on Molecule Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Tianxiao; Shen Benxian; Sun Hui

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the separation of aromatics from light naphtha by using extraction process was investigated for im-proving the utilization efficiency of naphtha. It is indicated that, using a mixture of propylene carbonate-diethylene glycol as the solvent, the optimal extraction conditions cover: a volume fraction of propylene carbonate in the mixed solvent of 0.3, a solvent to feed ratio of 8, and an extraction temperature of 308 K. Through the extraction process, the aromatics mass frac-tion increases from 10.05% in naphtha to 27.74% in extract oil. It is found that the aromatics yield of extract oil,RA, reaches 92.11%. As a result, in comparison with naphtha, the potential aromatics content of extract oil increases impressively by 18.03%. Meanwhile, the aromatics content of raffinate oil decreases to 1.33%, and the normal paraffin yield of raffinate oil, Rp, is 76.61%. Accordingly, higher total olefins yields can be obtained when using raffinate oil as the raw material for steam cracking. The present results show that the utilization efficiency of naphtha is improved through extraction process.

  6. Utilizing High Pressure Processing to Induce Structural Changes in Dairy and Meat Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlien, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    . In this article the HP modification of milk and meat proteins is evaluated in relation to the changed molecular functionality and product texture. The underlying mechanisms of the pressure-induced molecular changes are surveyed and related to practical applications in the view of HP-produced milk and meat......High pressure (HP) is capable of modifying the functional properties of milk and meat proteins by pressure-induced changes of the molecular structure. Therefore, HP treatment of milk and meat has been extensively investigated to understand, clarify, and utilize HP processing in the food industry...... products...

  7. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Pérez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  8. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  9. The Utility of Free Software for Gravity and Magnetic Advanced Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandis, Hendra; Dahrin, Darharta

    2017-04-01

    The lack of computational tools, i.e. software, often hinders the proper teaching and application of geophysical data processing in academic institutions in Indonesia. Although there are academic licensing options for commercial software, such options are still way beyond the financial capability of some academic institutions. Academic community members (both lecturers and students) are supposed to be creative and resourceful to overcome such situation. Therefore, capability for writing computer programs or codes is a necessity. However, there are also many computer programs and even software that are freely available on the internet. Generally, the utility of the freely distributed software is limited for demonstration only or for visualizing and exchanging data. The paper discusses the utility of Geosoft’s Oasis Montaj Viewer along with USGS GX programs that are available for free. Useful gravity and magnetic advanced data processing (i.e. gradient calculation, spectral analysis etc.) can be performed “correctly” without any approximation that sometimes leads to dubious results and interpretation.

  10. Ethanol from Cellulosic Biomass with Emphasis of Wheat Straw Utilization. Analysis of Strategies for Process Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Dimitrov Kroumov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The "Green and Blue Technologies Strategies in HORIZON 2020" has increased the attention of scientific society on global utilization of renewable energy sources. Agricultural residues can be a valuable source of energy because of drastically growing human needs for food. The goal of this review is to show the current state of art on utilization of wheat straw as a substrate for ethanol production. The specifics of wheat straw composition and the chemical and thermodynamic properties of its components pre-determined the application of unit operations and engineering strategies for hydrolysis of the substrate and further its fermentation. Modeling of this two processes is crucially important for optimal overall process development and scale up. The authors gave much attention on main hydrolisis products as a glucose and xylose (C6 and C5 sugars, respectivelly and on the specifics of their metabolization by ethanol producing microorganisms. The microbial physiology reacting on C6 and C5 sugars and mathematical aproaches describing these phenomena are discussing, as well.

  11. Modeling and optimization of processes for clean and efficient pulverized coal combustion in utility boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belošević Srđan V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulverized coal-fired power plants should provide higher efficiency of energy conversion, flexibility in terms of boiler loads and fuel characteristics and emission reduction of pollutants like nitrogen oxides. Modification of combustion process is a cost-effective technology for NOx control. For optimization of complex processes, such as turbulent reactive flow in coal-fired furnaces, mathematical modeling is regularly used. The NOx emission reduction by combustion modifications in the 350 MWe Kostolac B boiler furnace, tangentially fired by pulverized Serbian lignite, is investigated in the paper. Numerical experiments were done by an in-house developed three-dimensional differential comprehensive combustion code, with fuel- and thermal-NO formation/destruction reactions model. The code was developed to be easily used by engineering staff for process analysis in boiler units. A broad range of operating conditions was examined, such as fuel and preheated air distribution over the burners and tiers, operation mode of the burners, grinding fineness and quality of coal, boiler loads, cold air ingress, recirculation of flue gases, water-walls ash deposition and combined effect of different parameters. The predictions show that the NOx emission reduction of up to 30% can be achieved by a proper combustion organization in the case-study furnace, with the flame position control. Impact of combustion modifications on the boiler operation was evaluated by the boiler thermal calculations suggesting that the facility was to be controlled within narrow limits of operation parameters. Such a complex approach to pollutants control enables evaluating alternative solutions to achieve efficient and low emission operation of utility boiler units. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-33018: Increase in energy and ecology efficiency of processes in pulverized coal-fired furnace and optimization of utility steam boiler air preheater by using in

  12. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living

    OpenAIRE

    Fulvio Ursini; Matilde Maiorino; Henry Jay Forman

    2016-01-01

    The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the...

  13. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celien eLismont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction-oxidation or ‘redox’ reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from ‘omics’ technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of

  14. Redox Enzymes of Red Beetroot Vacuoles (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Pradedova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Years of research have shown that some of the redox elements (enzymes, coenzymes, and co-substrate are isolated from each other kinetic and spatial manner (compartmentalization in the eukaryotic cells. The redox elements forming the "highly" and "widely" specialized redox system are found in all cell structures: mitochondria, plastids, peroxisomes, apoplast, nucleus etc. In recent years the active involvement of the central vacuole in the maintenance of the plant cell redox homeostasis is discussed, actually the information about the vacuolar redox system is very small. The high-priority redox processes and "redox-specialization" of the vacuolar compartment are not known. We have begun a study of red beet-root vacuole redox systems (Beta vulgaris L. and have identified redox enzymes such as: phenol peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7, superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1 and glutathione reductase (EC 1.8.1.7. This paper presents some of the characteristics of these enzymes and considers the probable ways of their functioning in vacuolar redox chains.

  15. Cellular cholesterol delivery, intracellular processing and utilization for biosynthesis of steroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Salman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Steroid hormones regulate diverse physiological functions such as reproduction, blood salt balance, maintenance of secondary sexual characteristics, response to stress, neuronal function and various metabolic processes. They are synthesized from cholesterol mainly in the adrenal gland and gonads in response to tissue-specific tropic hormones. These steroidogenic tissues are unique in that they require cholesterol not only for membrane biogenesis, maintenance of membrane fluidity and cell signaling, but also as the starting material for the biosynthesis of steroid hormones. It is not surprising, then, that cells of steroidogenic tissues have evolved with multiple pathways to assure the constant supply of cholesterol needed to maintain optimum steroid synthesis. The cholesterol utilized for steroidogenesis is derived from a combination of sources: 1 de novo synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER; 2 the mobilization of cholesteryl esters (CEs stored in lipid droplets through cholesteryl ester hydrolase; 3 plasma lipoprotein-derived CEs obtained by either LDL receptor-mediated endocytic and/or SR-BI-mediated selective uptake; and 4 in some cultured cell systems from plasma membrane-associated free cholesterol. Here, we focus on recent insights into the molecules and cellular processes that mediate the uptake of plasma lipoprotein-derived cholesterol, events connected with the intracellular cholesterol processing and the role of crucial proteins that mediate cholesterol transport to mitochondria for its utilization for steroid hormone production. In particular, we discuss the structure and function of SR-BI, the importance of the selective cholesterol transport pathway in providing cholesterol substrate for steroid biosynthesis and the role of two key proteins, StAR and PBR/TSO in facilitating cholesterol delivery to inner mitochondrial membrane sites, where P450scc (CYP11A is localized and where the conversion of cholesterol to

  16. Sensor Acquisition for Water Utilities: Survey, Down Selection Process, and Technology List

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alai, M; Glascoe, L; Love, A; Johnson, M; Einfeld, W

    2005-06-29

    The early detection of the biological and chemical contamination of water distribution systems is a necessary capability for securing the nation's water supply. Current and emerging early-detection technology capabilities and shortcomings need to be identified and assessed to provide government agencies and water utilities with an improved methodology for assessing the value of installing these technologies. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has tasked a multi-laboratory team to evaluate current and future needs to protect the nation's water distribution infrastructure by supporting an objective evaluation of current and new technologies. The LLNL deliverable from this Operational Technology Demonstration (OTD) was to assist the development of a technology acquisition process for a water distribution early warning system. The technology survey includes a review of previous sensor surveys and current test programs and a compiled database of relevant technologies. In the survey paper we discuss previous efforts by governmental agencies, research organizations, and private companies. We provide a survey of previous sensor studies with regard to the use of Early Warning Systems (EWS) that includes earlier surveys, testing programs, and response studies. The list of sensor technologies was ultimately developed to assist in the recommendation of candidate technologies for laboratory and field testing. A set of recommendations for future sensor selection efforts has been appended to this document, as has a down selection example for a hypothetical water utility.

  17. Characterization of redox conditions in groundwater contaminant plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwarth, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluation of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behaviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...... dubious, if not erroneous. Several other approaches have been used in addressing redox conditions in pollution plumes: redox-sensitive compounds in groundwater samples, hydrogen concentrations in groundwater, concentrations of volatile fatty acids in groundwater, sediment characteristics and microbial...... cases have been reported. No standardised or generally accepted approach exists. Slow electrode kinetics and the common lack of internal equilibrium of redox processes in pollution plumes make, with a few exceptions, direct electrochemical measurement and rigorous interpretation of redox potentials...

  18. Redox control of teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jason M; Harris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    A number of human teratogens elicit their deleterious effects through mechanisms involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. However, classic definitions of oxidative stress do not fully coincide with basic fundamental principles of teratology. Newer definitions of oxidative stress focus on the targeted redox modification of cysteine/thiol functional groups found in the regulatory domains of critical signaling pathway proteins, suggesting that the targeted disruption of signaling through specific redox couples may account for the specificity of teratogen-induced malformations which previously could not be rationalized. Here, we review examples of teratogens that induce ROS and oxidative injury, describe oxidative stress-related teratogenic mechanisms, and provide rationale for developmental periods of sensitivity and species susceptibility. Understanding how chemicals disrupt redox status, induce oxidative stress leading to dysmorphogenesis becomes important to identify potential teratogens and develop therapeutic interventions for attenuation of harmful chemical effects in utero following exposure.

  19. Phenomenological model of the clavulanic acid production process utilizing Streptomyces clavuligerus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baptista-Neto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of clavulanic acid production process by Streptomyces clavuligerus NRRL 3585 was studied. Experiments were carried out in a 4 liters bioreactor, utilizing 2 complex media containing glycerol as the carbon and energy source, and peptone or Samprosoy 90NB (soybean protein as nitrogen source. Temperature was kept at 28°C and the dissolved oxygen was controlled automatically at 40 % saturation value. Samples were withdrawn for determination of cell mass (only peptone medium, glycerol and product concentrations. Gas analyzers allowed on line determination of CO2 and O2 contents in the exit gas. With Samprosoy, cell mass was evaluated by determining glycerol consumption and considering the cell yield, Y X/S, as being the same for both cases. Oxygen uptake and CO2 production rates were strongly related to growth and substrate consumption, allowing determination of stoichiometric constants in relation to growth, substrate, oxygen, product and carbon dioxide.

  20. CHINA'S RECENT DEVELOPMENT IN COAL MINING,PROCESSING AND UTILIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范维唐; 王成龙; 朱德仁

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the state-of-the-art and outlook of coal mining and clean coal echnology in China. As the major mining method,underground mining accounts for 96% of the total production. Among the state own mines, the percentage of mechanized mining reached 71%. A rapid development of high-productive and high-profitable mines,especially those with longwall sublevel caving method, is described. The issues of heavy duty equipment, roof bolting, mine safety are also addressed. The Chinese government is paying more and more attention on the environmental problems inducing from coal mining,processing and utilization. A basic framework of clean coal technology is being formed and a wide range of technology is included.

  1. Comprehensive Utilization of Filter Residue from the Preparation Process of Zeolite-Based Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Qin Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel utilization method of filter residue from the preparation process of zeolite-based catalysts was investigated. Y zeolite and a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC catalyst were synthesized from filter residue. Compared to the Y zeolite synthesized by the conventional method, the Y zeolite synthesized from filter residue exhibited better thermal stability. The catalyst possessed wide-pore distribution. In addition, the pore volume, specific surface area, attrition resistance were superior to those of the reference catalyst. The yields of gasoline and light oil increased by 1.93 and 1.48 %, respectively. At the same time, the coke yield decreased by 0.41 %. The catalyst exhibited better gasoline and coke selectivity. The quality of the cracked gasoline had been improved.

  2. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Robl; John Groppo

    2005-09-01

    The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. A mobile demonstration unit has been designed and constructed for field demonstration. The demonstration unit was hauled to the test site on trailers that were place on a test pad located adjacent to the ash pond and re-assembled. The continuous test unit will be operated at the Ghent site and will evaluate three processing configurations while producing sufficient products to facilitate thorough product testing. The test unit incorporates all of the unit processes that will be used in the commercial design and is self sufficient with respect to water, electricity and processing capabilities. Representative feed ash for the operation of the filed testing unit was excavated from a location within the lower ash pond determined from coring activities. Approximately 150 tons of ash was excavated and pre-screened to remove +3/8 inch material that could cause plugging problems during operation of the demonstration unit.

  3. Utilization of Expert Knowledge in a Multi-Objective Hydrologic Model Automatic Calibration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quebbeman, J.; Park, G. H.; Carney, S.; Day, G. N.; Micheletty, P. D.

    2016-12-01

    Spatially distributed continuous simulation hydrologic models have a large number of parameters for potential adjustment during the calibration process. Traditional manual calibration approaches of such a modeling system is extremely laborious, which has historically motivated the use of automatic calibration procedures. With a large selection of model parameters, achieving high degrees of objective space fitness - measured with typical metrics such as Nash-Sutcliffe, Kling-Gupta, RMSE, etc. - can easily be achieved using a range of evolutionary algorithms. A concern with this approach is the high degree of compensatory calibration, with many similarly performing solutions, and yet grossly varying parameter set solutions. To help alleviate this concern, and mimic manual calibration processes, expert knowledge is proposed for inclusion within the multi-objective functions, which evaluates the parameter decision space. As a result, Pareto solutions are identified with high degrees of fitness, but also create parameter sets that maintain and utilize available expert knowledge resulting in more realistic and consistent solutions. This process was tested using the joint SNOW-17 and Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting method (SAC-SMA) within the Animas River basin in Colorado. Three different elevation zones, each with a range of parameters, resulted in over 35 model parameters simultaneously calibrated. As a result, high degrees of fitness were achieved, in addition to the development of more realistic and consistent parameter sets such as those typically achieved during manual calibration procedures.

  4. Mechanistic modeling study on process optimization and precursor utilization with atmospheric spatial atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhang; He, Wenjie; Duan, Chenlong [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Chen, Rong, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Shan, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Spatial atomic layer deposition (SALD) is a promising technology with the aim of combining the advantages of excellent uniformity and conformity of temporal atomic layer deposition (ALD), and an industrial scalable and continuous process. In this manuscript, an experimental and numerical combined model of atmospheric SALD system is presented. To establish the connection between the process parameters and the growth efficiency, a quantitative model on reactant isolation, throughput, and precursor utilization is performed based on the separation gas flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, and precursor mass fraction. The simulation results based on this model show an inverse relation between the precursor usage and the carrier gas flow rate. With the constant carrier gas flow, the relationship of precursor usage and precursor mass fraction follows monotonic function. The precursor concentration, regardless of gas velocity, is the determinant factor of the minimal residual time. The narrow gap between precursor injecting heads and the substrate surface in general SALD system leads to a low Péclet number. In this situation, the gas diffusion act as a leading role in the precursor transport in the small gap rather than the convection. Fluid kinetics from the numerical model is independent of the specific structure, which is instructive for the SALD geometry design as well as its process optimization.

  5. Evaluation of phytic acid utilization by S. cerevisiae strains used in fermentation processes and biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulski, Dawid; Kłosowski, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a well-studied yeast species used mainly in fermentation processes, bakery, and for SCP (Single Cell Protein) acquisition. The aim of the study was to analyze the possibility of phytic acid utilization as one of the hydrolysis processes carried out by yeast. The analysis of 30 yeast strains used in fermentation and for biomass production, that were grown in media containing phytic acid, revealed a high variability in the biomass production rate and the capability to hydrolyze phytates. No correlation between a high biomass concentration and a high level of phytate hydrolysis was found. Only four analyzed strains (Bayanus IOC Efficience, Sano, PINK EXCEL, FINAROME) were able to reduce the phytic acid concentration by more than 33.5%, from the initial concentration 103.0 ± 2.1 μg/ml to the level below 70 μg/ml. The presented results suggest that the selected wine and fodder yeast can be used as in situ source of phosphohydrolases in fermentation processes, and especially in the production of fodder proteins. However, further studies aimed at the optimization of growing parameters, such as the maximization of phytase secretion, and a comprehensive analysis of the catalytic activity of the isolated phosphohydrolases, are necessary.

  6. Utilization of potato starch processing wastes to produce animal feed with high lysine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Bingnan; Song, Jinzhu; Jiang, Cheng; Yang, Qian

    2015-02-01

    This work aims to utilize wastes from the potato starch industry to produce single-cell protein (SCP) with high lysine content as animal feed. In this work, S-(2-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine hydrochloride-resistant Bacillus pumilus E1 was used to produce SCP with high lysine content, whereas Aspergillus niger was used to degrade cellulose biomass and Candida utilis was used to improve the smell and palatability of the feed. An orthogonal design was used to optimize the process of fermentation for maximal lysine content. The optimum fermentation conditions were as follows: temperature of 40°C, substrate concentration of 3%, and natural pH of about 7.0. For unsterilized potato starch wastes, the microbial communities in the fermentation process were determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Results showed that the dominant population was Bacillus sp. The protein quality as well as the amino acid profile of the final product was found to be significantly higher compared with the untreated waste product at day 0. Additionally, acute toxicity test showed that the SCP product was non-toxic, indicating that it can be used for commercial processing.

  7. Utilization of electromigration in civil and environmental engineering--processes, transport rates and matrix changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Christensen, Iben V; Rorig-Dalgård, Inge; Jensen, Pernille E; Hansen, Henrik K

    2008-07-01

    Electromigration (movement of ions in an applied electric field) is utilized for supply or extraction of ions from various porous materials within both civil and environmental engineering. In civil engineering, most research has been conducted on the removal of chlorides from concrete to hinder reinforcement corrosion while in environmental engineering remediation of heavy metal polluted soil is the issue most studied. Never the less, experiments have been conducted with utilization for several other materials and purposes within both engineering fields. Even though there are many topics of common interest in the use of electromigration for the two fields, there is no tradition for collaboration. The present paper is a review with the aim of pointing out areas of shared interest. Focus is laid on the purposes of the different processes, transport rates of various ions in different materials and on changes in the matrix itself. Desorption and dissolution of the target elements into ionic form is a key issue to most of the processes, and can be the limiting step. The removal rate is generally below 1 cm day(- 1), but it can be much less than 1 mm day(- 1) when desorption is slow and insufficient. Matrix changes occurs under the action of the applied electric field and it includes both physico-chemical and hydrological changes. Some of the solid phases is weathered and new can be formed. Increased fundamental understanding of the effects and side effects, when applying the electric field to a porous material, can lead to improvement of the known technologies and possibly to new applications.

  8. An intelligent approach to optimize the EDM process parameters using utility concept and QPSO algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmaya P. Mohanty

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although significant research has gone into the field of electrical discharge machining (EDM, analysis related to the machining efficiency of the process with different electrodes has not been adequately made. Copper and brass are frequently used as electrode materials but graphite can be used as a potential electrode material due to its high melting point temperature and good electrical conductivity. In view of this, the present work attempts to compare the machinability of copper, graphite and brass electrodes while machining Inconel 718 super alloy. Taguchi’s L27 orthogonal array has been employed to collect data for the study and analyze effect of machining parameters on performance measures. The important performance measures selected for this study are material removal rate, tool wear rate, surface roughness and radial overcut. Machining parameters considered for analysis are open circuit voltage, discharge current, pulse-on-time, duty factor, flushing pressure and electrode material. From the experimental analysis, it is observed that electrode material, discharge current and pulse-on-time are the important parameters for all the performance measures. Utility concept has been implemented to transform a multiple performance characteristics into an equivalent performance characteristic. Non-linear regression analysis is carried out to develop a model relating process parameters and overall utility index. Finally, the quantum behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO and particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithms have been used to compare the optimal level of cutting parameters. Results demonstrate the elegance of QPSO in terms of convergence and computational effort. The optimal parametric setting obtained through both the approaches is validated by conducting confirmation experiments.

  9. Creation of a simple natural language processing tool to support an imaging utilization quality dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Jordan; Koziatek, Christian; Theobald, Jason; Smith, Silas; Iturrate, Eduardo

    2017-05-01

    Testing for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with cost and risk to patients (e.g. radiation). To assess the appropriateness of imaging utilization at the provider level, it is important to know that provider's diagnostic yield (percentage of tests positive for the diagnostic entity of interest). However, determining diagnostic yield typically requires either time-consuming, manual review of radiology reports or the use of complex and/or proprietary natural language processing software. The objectives of this study were twofold: 1) to develop and implement a simple, user-configurable, and open-source natural language processing tool to classify radiology reports with high accuracy and 2) to use the results of the tool to design a provider-specific VTE imaging dashboard, consisting of both utilization rate and diagnostic yield. Two physicians reviewed a training set of 400 lower extremity ultrasound (UTZ) and computed tomography pulmonary angiogram (CTPA) reports to understand the language used in VTE-positive and VTE-negative reports. The insights from this review informed the arguments to the five modifiable parameters of the NLP tool. A validation set of 2,000 studies was then independently classified by the reviewers and by the tool; the classifications were compared and the performance of the tool was calculated. The tool was highly accurate in classifying the presence and absence of VTE for both the UTZ (sensitivity 95.7%; 95% CI 91.5-99.8, specificity 100%; 95% CI 100-100) and CTPA reports (sensitivity 97.1%; 95% CI 94.3-99.9, specificity 98.6%; 95% CI 97.8-99.4). The diagnostic yield was then calculated at the individual provider level and the imaging dashboard was created. We have created a novel NLP tool designed for users without a background in computer programming, which has been used to classify venous thromboembolism reports with a high degree of accuracy. The tool is open-source and available for download at http

  10. Cost projections for Redox Energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, K.; Hall, G.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary design and system cost analysis was performed for the redox energy storage system. A conceptual design and cost estimate was prepared for each of two energy applications: (1) electric utility 100-MWh requirement (10-MW for ten hours) for energy storage for utility load leveling application, and (2) a 500-kWh requirement (10-kW for 50 hours) for use with a variety of residential or commercial applications, including stand alone solar photovoltaic systems. The conceptual designs were based on cell performance levels, system design parameters, and special material costs. These data were combined with estimated thermodynamic and hydraulic analysis to provide preliminary system designs. Results indicate that the redox cell stack to be amenable to mass production techniques with a relatively low material cost.

  11. Utilization and application of wet potato processing coproducts for finishing cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M L

    2010-04-01

    Wet coproducts fed to beef cattle include processing coproducts of the fruit, vegetable, juice, and brewing industries. Considerations for their utilization in beef cattle diets include quantity available, feeding value, quality of animal products produced, economics (e.g., transportation of water), storage and preservation, consumer perception, nuisance concerns, contaminants, and interactions with other diet ingredients. Potato (Solanum tuberosum) coproducts from processing for frozen food products may be quantitatively most important because the 11.3 million t of potatoes (fresh weight) processed in the United States and Canada in 2008 resulted in an estimated 4.3 million t (as-is basis) of coproduct. Chemical composition and feeding value of potato coproducts depends on the coproduct type. The names of coproducts vary among potato processors and some processors combine the different coproducts into one product commonly called slurry. The 4 main potato coproducts are 1) potato peels; 2) screen solids (small potatoes and pieces); 3) fried product (fries, hash browns, batter, crumbles); and 4) material from the water recovery systems (oxidation ditch, belt solids, filter cake). The coproducts, except the fried products, ensile rapidly, reaching pH 5 in 7 d or less. Dry matter content varies from 10 to 30% and on a DM basis varies in CP (5 to 27%), starch (3 to 56%), NDF (4 to 41%), and ether extract (3 to 37%) content among potato coproducts. Type of coproduct and frying greatly affect the energy value (0.6 to 1.6 Mcal of NE(g)/kg of DM). Composition, quality, and shelf life of beef was not affected by potato coproduct feeding in contrast to perceptions of some purveyors and chefs. Potato coproducts are quantitatively important energy sources in beef cattle diets, which, in turn, solve a potentially massive disposal problem for the food processing industry.

  12. Energy Utilization and Environmental Aspects of Rice Processing Industries in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ahiduzzaman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the energy utilization and environmental aspects of the rice processing industries in Bangladesh was analyzed. Rice husk, a milling by-product of rice, is used as a source of thermal energy to produce steam for parboiling of raw rice. The rice is mostly dried on a concrete floor under the sunshine. In mechanical drying, rice husks are used as a source of primary energy. In Bangladesh, the annual estimated energy used in 2000 for the drying of rice by sunshine was 10.7 million GJ and for drying and parboiling by rice husks it was 48.2 million GJ. These amounts will increase to 20.5 and 92.5 million GJ in 2030, respectively. Electrical energy consumption for mechanical drying and milling of rice was calculated as 1.83 million GJe and 3.51 million GJe in 2000 and in 2030, respectively. Biogenic carbon dioxide emission from burning of rice husk is renewed every year by the rice plant. Both the biogenic and non-biogenic carbon dioxide emissions in 2000 were calculated as 5.7 and 0.4 million tonnes, respectively, which will increase to 10.9 and 0.7 million tonnes in 2030. The demand of energy for rice processing increases every year, therefore, energy conservation in rice processing industries would be a viable option to reduce the intensity of energy by increasing the efficiency of rice processing systems which leads to a reduction in emissions and an increased supply of rice husk energy to other sectors as well.

  13. Improving wafer level CD uniformity for logic applications utilizing mask level metrology and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Avi; Trautzsch, Thomas; Buttgereit, Ute; Graitzer, Erez; Hanuka, Ori

    2013-09-01

    Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) is one of the key parameters necessary to assure good performance and reliable functionality of any integrated circuit (IC). The extension of 193nm based lithography usage combined with design rule shrinkage makes process control, in particular the wafer level CDU control, an extremely important and challenging task in IC manufacturing. In this study the WLCD-CDC closed loop solution offered by Carl Zeiss SMS was examined. This solution aims to improve the wafer level intra-field CDU without the need to run wafer prints and extensive wafer CD metrology. It combines two stand-alone tools: The WLCD tool which measures CD based on aerial imaging technology while applying the exact scanner-used illumination conditions to the photomask and the CDC tool which utilizes an ultra-short femto-second laser to write intra-volume shading elements (Shade-In Elements™) inside the photomask bulk material. The CDC process changes the dose going through the photomask down to the wafer, hence the wafer level intra-field CDU improves. The objective of this study was to evaluate how CDC process is affecting the CD for different type of features and pattern density which are typical for logic and system on chip (SOC) devices. The main findings show that the linearity and proximity behavior is maintained by the CDC process and CDU and CDC Ratio (CDCR) show a linear behavior for the different feature types. Finally, it was demonstrated that the CDU errors of the targeted (critical) feature have been effectively eliminated. In addition, the CDU of all other features have been significantly improved as well.

  14. Fenton Redox Chemistry: Arsenite Oxidation by Metallic Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borges Freitas, S.C.; Van Halem, D.; Badruzzaman, A.B.M.; Van der Meer, W.G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-oxidation of As(III) is necessary in arsenic removal processes in order to increase its efficiency. Therefore, the Fenton Redox Chemistry is defined by catalytic activation of H2O2 and currently common used for its redox oxidative properties. In this study the effect of H2O2 production catalysed

  15. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Redox Grafting of Diazotated Anthraquinone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chernyy, Sergey; Bousquet, Antoine; Torbensen, Kristian;

    2012-01-01

    Redox grafting of aryldiazonium salts containing redox units may be used to form exceptionally thick covalently attached conductingfilms, even in the micrometers range, in a controlled manner on glassy carbon and gold substrates. With the objective to investigate the mechanism of this process in ...

  16. Pyrolysis of chromium rich tanning industrial wastes and utilization of carbonized wastes in metallurgical process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tôrres Filho, Artur; Lange, Liséte Celina; de Melo, Gilberto Caldeira Bandeira; Praes, Gustavo Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Pyrolysis is the thermal degradation of organic material in oxygen-free or very lean oxygen atmosphere. This study evaluates the use of pyrolysis for conversion of leather wastes from chromium tanning processes into Carbonized Leather Residues (CLR), and the utilization of CLR in metallurgical processes through the production of iron ore pellets. CLR was used to replace mineral coal in proportions of 10% and 25% on fixed carbon basis content in the mixtures for pellets preparation. Experimental conversions were performed on a pilot scale pyrolysis plant and a pelletizing reactor of the "pot grate" type. The results demonstrated the technical feasibility of using the charcoal product from animal origin as an energy source, with recovery of up to 76.47% of chromium contained in CLR in the final produced of iron ore pellets. Pellets with 25% replacement of fixed carbon in the coal showed an enhanced compressive strength, with an average value of 344kgfpellet(-1), compared to 300kgfpellet(-1) for standard produced pellets.

  17. Spatial resolution recovery utilizing multi-ray tracing and graphic processing unit in PET image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2015-02-07

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) poses a major challenge for a PET system to achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view, particularly for small animal and organ-dedicated PET systems. In this work, we implemented an analytical method to model system matrix for resolution recovery, which was then incorporated in PET image reconstruction on a graphical processing unit platform, due to its parallel processing capacity. The method utilizes the concepts of virtual DOI layers and multi-ray tracing to calculate the coincidence detection response function for a given line-of-response. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated for a small-bore PET insert to be used for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging. In addition, the performance comparisons were studied among the following three cases: 1) no physical DOI and no resolution modeling; 2) two physical DOI layers and no resolution modeling; and 3) no physical DOI design but with a different number of virtual DOI layers. The image quality was quantitatively evaluated in terms of spatial resolution (full-width-half-maximum and position offset), contrast recovery coefficient and noise. The results indicate that the proposed method has the potential to be used as an alternative to other physical DOI designs and achieve comparable imaging performances, while reducing detector/system design cost and complexity.

  18. Cesium removal demonstration utilizing crystalline silicotitanate sorbent for processing Melton Valley Storage Tank supernate: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Taylor, P.A.; Cummins, R.L. [and others

    1998-03-01

    This report provides details of the Cesium Removal Demonstration (CsRD), which was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on radioactive waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks. The CsRD was the first large-scale use of state-of-the-art sorbents being developed by private industry for the selective removal of cesium and other radionuclides from liquid wastes stored across the DOE complex. The crystalline silicotitanate sorbent used in the demonstration was chosen because of its effectiveness in laboratory tests using bench-scale columns. The demonstration showed that the cesium could be removed from the supernate and concentrated on a small-volume, solid waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Nevada Test Site. During this project, the CsRD system processed > 115,000 L (30,000 gal) of radioactive supernate with minimal operational problems. Sluicing, drying, and remote transportation of the sorbent, which could not be done on a bench scale, were successfully demonstrated. The system was then decontaminated to the extent that it could be contact maintained with the use of localized shielding only. By utilizing a modular, transportable design and placement within existing facilities, the system can be transferred to different sites for reuse. The initial unit has now been removed from the process building and is presently being reinstalled for use in baseline operations at ORNL.

  19. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde; Forman, Henry Jay

    2016-08-01

    The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve "reactive oxygen species" rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles (parahormesis). In summary

  20. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Ursini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve “reactive oxygen species” rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles

  1. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Groppo; Thomas Robl

    2005-06-01

    The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. Filter media candidates were evaluated for dewatering the ultrafine ash (UFA) product. Media candidates were selected based on manufacturer recommendations and evaluated using standard batch filtration techniques. A final media was selected; 901F, a multifilament polypropylene. While this media would provide adequate solids capture and cake moisture, the use of flocculants would be necessary to enable adequate filter throughput. Several flocculant chemistries were also evaluated and it was determined that polyethylene oxide (PEO) at a dosage of 5 ppm (slurry basis) would be the most suitable in terms of both settling rate and clarity. PEO was evaluated on a continuous vacuum filter using 901F media. The optimum cycle time was found to be 1.25 minutes which provided a 305% moisture cake, 85% solids capture with a throughput of 115 lbs dry solids per hour and a dry cake rate of 25 lb/ft2/hr. Increasing cycle time not did not reduce cake moisture or increase throughput. A mobile demonstration unit has been designed and constructed for field demonstration. The continuous test unit will be operated at the Ghent site and will evaluate three processing configurations while producing sufficient products to facilitate thorough product testing. The test unit incorporates all of the unit processes that will be used in the commercial design and is self sufficient with respect to water, electricity and processing capabilities.

  2. Redox regulation of protein damage in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Helen R; Dias, Irundika H K; Willetts, Rachel S; Devitt, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The presence and concentrations of modified proteins circulating in plasma depend on rates of protein synthesis, modification and clearance. In early studies, the proteins most frequently analysed for damage were those which were more abundant in plasma (e.g. albumin and immunoglobulins) which exist at up to 10 orders of magnitude higher concentrations than other plasma proteins e.g. cytokines. However, advances in analytical techniques using mass spectrometry and immuno-affinity purification methods, have facilitated analysis of less abundant, modified proteins and the nature of modifications at specific sites is now being characterised. The damaging reactive species that cause protein modifications in plasma principally arise from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidases (NOX), nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and oxygenase activities; reactive nitrogen species (RNS) from myeloperoxidase (MPO) and NOS activities; and hypochlorous acid from MPO. Secondary damage to proteins may be caused by oxidized lipids and glucose autooxidation. In this review, we focus on redox regulatory control of those enzymes and processes which control protein maturation during synthesis, produce reactive species, repair and remove damaged plasma proteins. We have highlighted the potential for alterations in the extracellular redox compartment to regulate intracellular redox state and, conversely, for intracellular oxidative stress to alter the cellular secretome and composition of extracellular vesicles. Through secreted, redox-active regulatory molecules, changes in redox state may be transmitted to distant sites.

  3. NASA Supportability Engineering Implementation Utilizing DoD Practices and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David A.; Smith, John V.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I design and development program made the determination early in the System Design Review Phase to utilize DoD ILS and LSA approach for supportability engineering as an integral part of the system engineering process. This paper is to provide a review of the overall approach to design Ares-I with an emphasis on a more affordable, supportable, and sustainable launch vehicle. Discussions will include the requirements development, design influence, support concept alternatives, ILS and LSA planning, Logistics support analyses/trades performed, LSA tailoring for NASA Ares Program, support system infrastructure identification, ILS Design Review documentation, Working Group coordination, and overall ILS implementation. At the outset, the Ares I Project initiated the development of the Integrated Logistics Support Plan (ILSP) and a Logistics Support Analysis process to provide a path forward for the management of the Ares-I ILS program and supportability analysis activities. The ILSP provide the initial planning and coordination between the Ares-I Project Elements and Ground Operation Project. The LSA process provided a system engineering approach in the development of the Ares-I supportability requirements; influence the design for supportability and development of alternative support concepts that satisfies the program operability requirements. The LSA planning and analysis results are documented in the Logistics Support Analysis Report. This document was required during the Ares-I System Design Review (SDR) and Preliminary Design Review (PDR) review cycles. To help coordinate the LSA process across the Ares-I project and between programs, the LSA Report is updated and released quarterly. A System Requirement Analysis was performed to determine the supportability requirements and technical performance measurements (TPMs). Two working groups were established to provide support in the management and implement the Ares-I ILS program, the Integrated Logistics

  4. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  5. A process supported by the utility BBPC for analysing Braun-Blanquet data on a personal computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bezuidenhout

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Many South African vegetation scientists use utilise the Braun-Blanquet methodology. The main aim of this paper is to describe an affordable, rapid and efficient process for analysing Braun-Blanquet phytosociological data sets on a personal computer. It describes a suite of utilities joining various phases and this makes the entire process possible.

  6. Stimulating utilities to promote energy efficiency: Process evaluation of Madison Gas and Electric's Competition Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, E.; De Buen, O.; Goldfman, C.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the process evaluation of the design and implementation of the Energy Conservation Competition Pilot (hereafter referred to as the Competition), ordered by the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (PSCW) with a conceptual framework defined by PSCW staff for the Madison Gas and Electric (MGE) Company. This process evaluation documents the history of the Competition, describing the marketing strategies adopted by MGE and its competitors, customer service and satisfaction, administrative issues, the distribution of installed measures, free riders, and the impact of the Competition on MGE, its competitors, and other Wisconsin utilities. We also suggest recommendations for a future Competition, compare the Competition with other approaches that public utility commissions (PUCs) have used to motivate utilities to promote energy efficiency, and discuss its transferability to other utilities. 48 refs., 8 figs., 40 tabs.

  7. Redox regulation in cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processe...

  8. Sources and potential application of waste heat utilization at a gas processing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehhi, Alyas Ali

    Waste heat recovery (WHR) has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of oil and gas plants, chemical and other processing facilities, and reduce their environmental impact. In this Thesis a comprehensive energy audit at Abu Dhabi Gas Industries Ltd. (GASCO) ASAB gas processing facilities is undertaken to identify sources of waste heat and evaluate their potential for on-site recovery. Two plants are considered, namely ASAB0 and ASAB1. Waste heat evaluation criteria include waste heat grade (i.e., temperature), rate, accessibility (i.e., proximity) to potential on-site waste heat recovery applications, and potential impact of recovery on installation performance and safety. The operating parameters of key waste heat source producing equipment are compiled, as well as characteristics of the waste heat streams. In addition, potential waste heat recovery applications and strategies are proposed, focusing on utilities, i.e., enhancement of process cooling/heating, electrical/mechanical power generation, and steam production. The sources of waste heat identified at ASAB facilities consist of gas turbine and gas generator exhaust gases, flared gases, excess propane cooling capacity, excess process steam, process gas air-cooler heat dissipation, furnace exhaust gases and steam turbine outlet steam. Of the above waste heat sources, exhaust gases from five gas turbines and one gas generator at ASAB0 plant, as well as from four gas turbines at ASAB1 plant, were found to meet the rate (i.e., > 1 MW), grade (i.e., > 180°C), accessibility (i.e., absorption refrigeration unit for gas turbine inlet air cooling, which would result in additional electric or mechanical power generation, and pre-cooling of process gas, which could reduce the need for or eliminate air coolers, as well as reduce propane chiller load, and ii) serve for heating of lean gas, which would reduce furnace load. At ASAB1, it is proposed that exhaust gases from all four gas turbines be used to

  9. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Groppo; Thomas Robl

    2006-06-30

    The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utility's 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station. The secondary classification testing was concluded using a continuous demonstration-scale lamella classifier that was operated at a feed rate of 0.3 to 1.5 tons/hr. Feed to the secondary classifier was generated by operating the primary classifier at the conditions shown to be effective previously. Samples were taken while the secondary classifier was operated under a variety of conditions in order to determine the range of conditions where the unit could be efficiently operated. A Topical Report was prepared and included all of the pertinent processing data generated during Budget Period 1 of the project as well as results of beneficiated ash product evaluations in mortar and concrete, schematic plant designs with mass and water balances for the four flowsheets tested with equipment lists, capital and installation costs, expected product outputs and equipment justifications. A proposal for continuation of the project to Budget Period 2 was also prepared and submitted, with the exception of a Letter of Commitment from Cemex. The proposal is currently under internal review with Cemex and a decision is expected by the end of September, 2006.

  10. The Utilization of Novel Bandpass Sigma-delta Modulator for Capacitance Pressure Sensor Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Michaeli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a novel approach to processing of pressure sensor signals. A bandpass sigma-delta modulator is used for this purpose. This technique is relatively new and it is not used widely, because this kind of modulator is usually utilized for wireless and video applications. Since the bandpass sigma-delta modulator works within its defined band it is resistant to offsets of its sub-circuits. The main stages of this modulator are implemented by means of switched-capacitor (SC technique. The article presents the basic ideas of this approach and simulation results of the first order of ideal and real modulator. The paper also shows the design of the phase locked loop (PLL block for synchronization of sensor signal and modulator driving signal. The simple evaluation board was fabricated for confirmation of the proposed principle. Also shown are the results of the chip testing, the modulator layout and the design and test results of the second order of bandpass sigma-delta modulator briefly.

  11. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Jackura; John Groppo; Thomas Robl

    2006-12-31

    The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station. The market study for the products of the processing plant (Subtask 1.6), conducted by Cemex, is reported herein. The study incorporated simplifying assumptions and focused only on pozzolan and ultra fine fly ash (UFFA). It found that the market for pozzolan in the Ghent area was oversupplied, with resultant poor pricing structure. Reachable export markets for the Ghent pozzolan market were mostly locally served with the exception of Florida. It was concluded that a beneficiated material for that market may be at a long term disadvantage. The market for the UFFA was more complex as this material would compete with other beneficiated ash and potential metakaolin and silica fume as well. The study concluded that this market represented about 100,000 tons of sales per year and, although lucrative, represented a widely dispersed niche market.

  12. Ceramics Vitreous China Produced by Utilizing Sediment Soil from Water Supply Treatment Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangrakdiskul Ubolrat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to generating the abundant of sediment soil, it makes the high burden of disposal cost to the metropolitan waterworks authority. Enhancing the value of sediment soil has been explored. This research aims to utilize the sediment soil, wastes of water supply treatment process for producing ceramics vitreous china. In this experiment, five types of raw materials are exploited, namely, sediment soil, ball clay, kaolin, feldspar and silica sand. The formulas have been divided into two groups. Sediment soil has been used as substituted material in ball clay for the first group, and substituted in kaolin for the second group. The specimens of each formula are formed by uniaxial pressing at 100 bar of size 50×100×7 mm. Then they have been sintered at two different temperatures, 1200°C and 1250°C, with heating rate 400° C/ hr and soaking for 30 minutes. The result reveals that the suitable formula for ceramics vitreous china is No. 2_4 of Group 2 with sintering temperature 1250°C. Its mixture consists of 0% kaolin, 35% ball clay, 30% feldspar, 20% silica sand and 15% sediment soil. The properties of this formula are 9.4% shrinkage, 9.39 MPa of bending strength, 6.34×10−6/K coefficient of thermal expansion, and 0.66% water absorption.

  13. Utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 in CO2 removal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González López, C V; Acién Fernández, F G; Fernández Sevilla, J M; Sánchez Fernández, J F; Cerón García, M C; Molina Grima, E

    2009-12-01

    In this paper the utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. in carbon dioxide removal processes is evaluated. For this, continuous cultures of this strain were performed at different dilution rates; alternatives for the recovery of the organic matter produced being also studied. A maximum CO(2) fixation rate of 1.45 g CO(2) L(-1) day(-1) was measured experimentally, but it can be increased up to 3.0 g CO(2) L(-1) day(-1) outdoors. The CO(2) is mainly transformed into exopolysaccharides, biomass representing one third of the total organic matter produced. Organic matter can be recovered by sedimentation with efficiencies higher than 90%, the velocity of sedimentation being 2.10(-4) s(-1). The major compounds were carbohydrates and proteins with productivities of 0.70 and 0.12 g L(-1) day(-1), respectively. The behaviour of the cultures of Anabaena sp. has been modelized, also the characteristics parameters requested to design separation units being reported. Finally, to valorizate the organic matter as biofertilizers and biofuels is proposed.

  14. A modular molecular framework for utility in small-molecule solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Gregory C. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials; Perez, Louis A. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials and Dept. of Materials; Hoven, Corey V. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials; Zhang, Yuan [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials; Dang, Xuan-Dung [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials; Sharenko, Alexander [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials and Dept. of Materials; Toney, Michael F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL); Kramer, Edward J. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Dept. of Materials; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials, Center for Polymers and Organic Solids and Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry; Bazan, Guillermo C. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials, Center for Polymers and Organic Solids, Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Dept. of Materials

    2011-07-22

    We report on the design, synthesis and characterization of light harvesting small molecules for use in solution-processed small molecule bulk heterojunction (SM-BHJ) solar cell devices. These molecular materials are based upon an acceptor/donor/acceptor (A/D/A) core with donor endcapping units. Utilization of a dithieno(3,2-b;2',3'-d)silole (DTS) donor and pyridal[2,1,3]thiadiazole (PT) acceptor leads to strong charge transfer characteristics, resulting in broad optical absorption spectra extending well beyond 700 nm. SM-BHJ solar cell devices fabricated with the specific example 5,5'-bis{7-(4-(5-hexylthiophen-2-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine}-3,3'-di-2-ethylhexylsilylene-2,2'-bithiophene (6) as the donor and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) as the acceptor component showed short circuit currents above -10 mA cm-2 and power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) over 3%. Thermal processing is a critical factor in obtaining favorable active layer morphologies and high PCE values. A combination of UV-visible spectroscopy, conductive and photo-conductive atomic force microscopies, dynamic secondary mass ion spectrometry (DSIMS), and grazing incident wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) experiments were carried out to characterize how thermal treatment influences the active layer structure and organization.

  15. Redox proteomics for the assessment of redox-related posttranslational regulation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Hans-Peter; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-08-01

    The methodological developments of in vivo and in vitro protein labeling and subsequent detection enable sensitive and specific detection of redox modifications. Such methods are presently applied to diverse cells and tissues, subproteomes and developmental as well as environmental conditions. The chloroplast proteome is particularly suitable for such kind of studies, because redox regulation of chloroplast proteins is well established, many plastid proteins are abundant, redox network components have been inventoried in great depth, and functional consequences explored. Thus the repertoire of redox-related posttranslational modifications on the one hand side and their abundance on the other pose a challenge for the near future to understand their contribution to physiological regulation. The various posttranslational redox modifications are introduced, followed by a description of the available proteomics methods. The significance of the redox-related posttranslational modification is exemplarily worked out using established examples from photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  16. Redox regulation in malaria: current concepts and pharmacotherapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, M; Alam, A; Bandyopadhyay, U

    2012-01-01

    Malaria imposes a serious threat to human and becomes more prevalent due to the emergence of drug resistant parasite. Understanding of the underlying mechanism of drug resistance and identification of novel drug targets are key effective processes for the management of malaria. Malaria parasite is highly susceptible to oxidative stress but lives in a pro-oxidant rich environment containing oxygen and iron, which produce a large amount of reactive oxygen species. Management of oxidative stress in malaria parasite is tightly regulated through active redox and antioxidant defense systems. The elevation of oxidative stress as a result of inhibition of any component of this defense system leads to redox imbalance and ultimately parasite death. Therefore, redox system plays an indispensable role for the survival of parasite within the host. Identification of key molecules, which disrupt parasite redox balance by altering key redox reactions and promote oxidative stress in parasites, would be an effective approach to develop novel antimalarial drugs. During the last few decades, contributions by researchers around the globe provide even better understanding of redox biology of malaria parasite. Here, in this review, we are highlighting the knowledge gathered so far regarding the essential redox-active processes and their components in malaria parasite to overcome elevated oxidative insults. We have also given maximum efforts to enlist currently used redox-active antimalarials, their mode of action and pharmacotherapeutic implications.

  17. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase constitute an energy consuming redox circuit

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cellular proteins rely on reversible redox reactions to establish and maintain biological structure and function. How redox catabolic (NAD+:NADH) and anabolic (NADP+:NADPH) processes integrate during metabolism to maintain cellular redox homeostasis however is unknown. The present work identifies a continuously cycling, mitochondrial membrane potential-dependent redox circuit between the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT). PDHC is shown to...

  18. Microfluidic redox battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-01

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  19. Utilization of the gypsum from a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Patel, V.; Lytle, J.M.; Chou, S.J.; Carty, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have been developing a process which converts FGD-gypsum to ammonium sulfate fertilizer with precipitated calcium carbonate as a by-product during the conversion. Preliminary cost estimates suggest that the process is economically feasible when ammonium sulfate crystals are produced in a granular size (1.2 to 3.3 mm), instead of a powder form. However, if additional revenue from the sale of the PCC for higher-value commercial application is applicable, this could further improve the economics of the process. Ammonium sulfate is known to be an excellent source of nitrogen and sulfur in fertilizer for corn and wheat production. It was not known what impurities might co-exist in ammonium sulfate derived from scrubber gypsum. Before the product could be recommended for use on farm land, the impurities and their impact on soil productivity had to be assessed. The objectives of this phase of the study were to evaluate the chemical properties of ammonium sulfate made from the FGD-gypsum, to estimate its effects on soil productivity, and to survey the marketability of the two products. The results of this phase of the study indicated that the impurities in the ammonium sulfate produced would not impose any practical limitations on its use at application levels used by farmers. The market survey showed that the sale price of solid ammonium sulfate fertilizer increased significantly from 1974 at $110/ton to 1998 at $187/ton. Utilities currently pay $16 to $20/ton for the calcium carbonate they use in their flue gas scrubber system. The industries making animal-feed grade calcium supplement pay $30/ton to $67/m-ton for their source of calcium carbonate. Paper, paint, and plastic industries pay as much as $200 to $300/ton for their calcium carbonate filers. The increased sale price of solid ammonium sulfate fertilizer and the possible additional revenue from the sale of the PCC by-product could further improve the economics of producing ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum.

  20. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  1. Engineering and economic analysis for the utilization of geothermal fluids in a cane sugar processing plant. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humme, J.T.; Tanaka, M.T.; Yokota, M.H.; Furumoto, A.S.

    1979-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of geothermal resource utilization at the Puna Sugar Company cane sugar processing plant, located in Keaau, Hawaii. A proposed well site area was selected based on data from surface exploratory surveys. The liquid dominated well flow enters a binary thermal arrangement, which results in an acceptable quality steam for process use. Hydrogen sulfide in the well gases is incinerated, leaving sulfur dioxide in the waste gases. The sulfur dioxide in turn is recovered and used in the cane juice processing at the sugar factory. The clean geothermal steam from the binary system can be used directly for process requirements. It replaces steam generated by the firing of the waste fibrous product from cane sugar processing. The waste product, called bagasse, has a number of alternative uses, but an evaluation clearly indicated it should continue to be employed for steam generation. This steam, no longer required for process demands, can be directed to increased electric power generation. Revenues gained by the sale of this power to the utility, in addition to other savings developed through the utilization of geothermal energy, can offset the costs associated with hydrothermal utilization.

  2. Variation of fermentation redox potential during cell-recycling continuous ethanol operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thani, Arthit; Lin, Yen-Han; Laopaiboon, Pattana; Laopaiboon, Lakkana

    2016-12-10

    Fermentation redox potential was monitored during cell-recycling continuous ethanol operation. The cell-recycling system (CRS) was operated using two hollow fibre (HF) membranes (pore sizes 0.20 and 0.65μm) at three dilution rates (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08h(-1)). Saccharomyces cerevisiae NP 01 were recycled in the fermenter at a recycle ratio of 0.625. Aeration was provided at 2.5vvm for the first 4h and then further supplied continuously at 0.25vvm. As steady state was established, results showed that the fermentation redox potential was lower for processes employing CRS than those without. At the same dilution rates, the sugar utilization and ethanol production with CRS were higher than those without CRS. The highest fermentation efficiency (87.94g/l of ethanol, ∼90% of theoretical yield) was achieved using a 0.2-μm HF membrane CRS at a dilution rate of 0.02h(-1). It was found that 7.53-10.07% of the carbon derived from glucose was incorporated into the yeast. Further, at the same dilution rates, yeast in the processes with CRS incorporated less carbon into ethanol than in those grown without CRS. This result suggests that processes involving CRS utilize more carbon for metabolite synthesis than biomass formation. This indicated that the processes with CRS could utilize more carbon for metabolite synthesis than biomass formation.

  3. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Redox-Neutral and Redox-Green C-H Bond Functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongli; Huang, Hanmin

    2016-08-01

    Transition-metal-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization has become one of the most promising strategies to prepare complex molecules from simple precursors. However, the utilization of environmentally unfriendly oxidants in the oxidative C-H bond functionalization reactions reduces their potential applications in organic synthesis. This account describes our recent efforts in the development of a redox-neutral C-H bond functionalization strategy for direct addition of inert C-H bonds to unsaturated double bonds and a redox-green C-H bond functionalization strategy for realization of oxidative C-H functionalization with O2 as the sole oxidant, aiming to circumvent the problems posed by utilizing environmentally unfriendly oxidants. In principle, these redox-neutral and redox-green strategies pave the way for establishing new environmentally benign transition-metal-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization strategies. © 2016 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from electroactive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Although the capacity for electroactive bacteria to convert environmental metallic minerals and organic pollutants is well known, the role of the redox properties of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in this process is poorly understood. In this work, the redox properties of EPS from two widely present electroactive bacterial strains (Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida) were explored. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates that the EPS extracted from the two strains exhibited redox properties. Spectroelectrochemical and protein electrophoresis analyses indicate that the extracted EPS from S. oneidensis and P. putida contained heme-binding proteins, which were identified as the possible redox components in the EPS. The results of heme-mediated behavior of EPS may provide an insight into the important roles of EPS in electroactive bacteria to maximize their redox capability for biogeochemical cycling, environmental bioremediation and wastewater treatment.

  5. A generic methodology for the design of sustainable carbon dioxide utilization processes using superstructure optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Gani, Rafiqul

    ) is the primary greenhouse gas that is targeted via carbon capture and storage (CCS) as well as carbon capture and utilization (CCU) [1]. Carbon capture and utilization is showing promise because, in contrast with carbon capture and storage, it takes the captured carbon dioxide and makes further use of it......Global warming and other environmental concerns are fueling increased focus on sustainability resulting in new and stringent guidelines, especially with regard to emissions [1]. Greenhouse gases are prevalent and among harmful emissions that are targeted to be reduced; carbon dioxide (CO2......, including as an extractive agent or raw material. Chemical conversion, an important element of utilization, involves the use of carbon dioxide as a reactant in the production of chemical compounds [2]. However, for feasible implementation, a systematic methodology is needed for the design of the utilization...

  6. Ethanol from Cellulosic Biomass with Emphasis of Wheat Straw Utilization. Analysis of Strategies for Process Development

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Dimitrov Kroumov; Maya Zaharieva; Venko Beshkov

    2015-01-01

    The "Green and Blue Technologies Strategies in HORIZON 2020" has increased the attention of scientific society on global utilization of renewable energy sources. Agricultural residues can be a valuable source of energy because of drastically growing human needs for food. The goal of this review is to show the current state of art on utilization of wheat straw as a substrate for ethanol production. The specifics of wheat straw composition and the chemical and thermodynamic properties of its co...

  7. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Robl; John Groppo

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. These potential products are primarily concentrated in the lower end of the pond adjacent to the outlet. A representative bulk sample was excavated for conducting laboratory-scale process testing while a composite 150 ton sample was also excavated for demonstration-scale testing at the Ghent site. A mobile demonstration plant with a design feed rate of 2.5 tph was constructed and hauled to the Ghent site to evaluate unit processes (i.e. primary classification, froth flotation, spiral concentration, secondary classification, etc.) on a continuous basis to determine appropriate scale-up data. Unit processes were configured into four different flowsheets and operated at a feed rate of 2.5 tph to verify continuous operating performance and generate bulk (1 to 2 tons) products for product testing. Cementitious products were evaluated for performance in mortar and concrete as well as cement manufacture process addition. All relevant data from the four flowsheets was compiled to compare product yields and quality while preliminary flowsheet designs were generated to determine throughputs, equipment size specifications and capital cost summaries. A detailed market study was completed to evaluate the potential markets for cementitious products. Results of the study revealed that the Ghent local fly ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i

  8. Redox Transformations of Mercury in Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyot, M.

    2007-12-01

    Wetlands are valued for their high biodiversity and for their ecosystem services. However, we still have a poor understanding of their role in the redox transformation of contaminants such as mercury. We first propose a brief overview of past studies conducted on wetlands from different latitudes. In most instances, photochemical processes are determinant in the upper portion of the water column. At the sediment/water interface, evidence is currently supporting a significant contribution of bacterial communities, as promoters of Hg(II) reduction, particularly in the presence of anoxia. A multi-year study was recently conducted on Hg redox cycling in a fluvial wetland of the St. Lawrence River, where wetland restoration could have unintended consequences. In addition to photochemistry and bacterial reduction, Hg redox cycling was affected by epiphytes living on macrophytes, through adsorption/absorption processes. Redox studies such as this one have been historically seen as having implication for water/air flux studies, since Hg(0) is volatile. We here also discuss the potential bioavailability of Hg(0) towards bacteria. An emerging axis of our wetland research effort deals with beaver dams, which are in expansion and shown to produce high levels of methylHg

  9. Redox markers for drought-induced nodule senescence, a process occurring after drought-induced senescence of the lowest leaves in soybean (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Garcia, Belén; Shaw, Daniel; Cooper, James William; Karpinska, Barbara; Quain, Marian Dorcas; Makgopa, Eugene Matome; Kunert, Karl; Foyer, Christine Helen

    2015-09-01

    Water is an increasingly scarce resource that limits crop productivity in many parts of the world, and the frequency and severity of drought are predicted to increase as a result of climate change. Improving tolerance to drought stress is therefore important for maximizing future crop yields. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of drought on soybean (Glycine max) leaves and nodules in order to define phenotypic markers and changes in cellular redox state that characterize the stress response in different organs, and to characterize the relationships between leaf and nodule senescence during drought. Leaf and crown nodule metabolite pools were measured together with leaf and soil water contents, and leaf chlorophyll, total protein contents and chlorophyll a fluorescence quenching parameters in nodulated soybeans that were grown under either well-watered conditions or deprived of water for up to 21 d. Ureides, ascorbate, protein, chlorophyll and the ratios of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence (Fv') to maximal chlorophyll a fluorescence (Fm') fell to levels below detection in the oldest leaves after 21 d of drought. While these drought-induced responses were not observed in the youngest leaf ranks, the Fv'/Fm' ratios, pyridine nucleotide levels and the reduction state of the ascorbate pool were lower in all leaf ranks after 21 d of drought. In contrast to leaves, total nodule protein, pyridine nucleotides, ureides, ascorbate and glutathione contents increased as a result of the drought treatment. However, the nodule ascorbate pool was significantly less reduced as a result of drought. Higher levels of transcripts encoding two peroxiredoxins were detected in nodules exposed to drought stress but senescence-associated transcripts and other mRNAs encoding redox-related proteins were similar under both conditions. While the physiological impact of the drought was perceived throughout the shoot, stress-induced senescence occurred only in the oldest

  10. Cyanobacteria to Link Closed Ecological Systems and In-Situ Resources Utilization Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Igor

    Introduction: A major goal for the Vision of Space Exploration is to extend human presence across the solar sys-tem. With current technology, however, all required consumables for these missions (propellant, air, food, water) as well as habitable volume and shielding to support human explorers will need to be brought from Earth. In-situ pro-duction of consumables (In-Situ Resource Utilization-ISRU) will significantly facilitate current plans for human ex-ploration and colonization of the solar system, especially by reducing the logistical overhead such as recurring launch mass. The production of oxygen from lunar materials is generally recognized as the highest priority process for lunar ISRU, for both human metabolic and fuel oxidation needs. The most challenging technology developments for future lunar settlements may lie in the extraction of elements (O, Fe, Mn, Ti, Si, etc) from local rocks and soils for life support, industrial feedstock and the production of propellants. With few exceptions (e.g., Johannson, 1992), nearly all technology development to date has employed an ap-proach based on inorganic chemistry (e.g. Allen et al., 1996). None of these technologies include concepts for inte-grating the ISRU system with a bioregenerative life support system and a food production systems. Bioregenerative life support efforts have recently been added to the Constellation ISRU development program (Sanders et al, 2007). Methods and Concerns: The European Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an ad-vanced concept for organizing a bioregenerative system for long term space flights and extraterrestrial settlements (Hendrickx, De Wever et al., 2005). However the MELiSSA system is a net consumer of ISRU products without a net return to in-situ technologies, e.g.. to extract elements as a result of complete closure of MELiSSA. On the other hand, the physical-chemical processes for ISRU are typically massive (relative to the rate of oxygen

  11. Identification of redox-sensitive cysteines in the arabidopsis proteome using OxiTRAQ, a quantitative redox proteomics method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Pei

    2014-01-28

    Cellular redox status plays a key role in mediating various physiological and developmental processes often through modulating activities of redox-sensitive proteins. Various stresses trigger over-production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species which lead to oxidative modifications of redox-sensitive proteins. Identification and characterization of redox-sensitive proteins are important steps toward understanding molecular mechanisms of stress responses. Here, we report a high-throughput quantitative proteomic approach termed OxiTRAQ for identifying proteins whose thiols undergo reversible oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells subjected to oxidative stress. In this approach, a biotinylated thiol-reactive reagent is used for differential labeling of reduced and oxidized thiols. The biotin-tagged peptides are affinity purified, labeled with iTRAQ reagents, and analyzed using a paralleled HCD-CID fragmentation mode in an LTQ-Orbitrap. With this approach, we identified 195 cysteine-containing peptides from 179 proteins whose thiols underwent oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells following the treatment with hydrogen peroxide. A majority of those redox-sensitive proteins, including several transcription factors, were not identified by previous redox proteomics studies. This approach allows identification of the specific redox-regulated cysteine residues, and offers an effective tool for elucidation of redox proteomes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The decay of Redox-stress Response Capacity is a substantive characteristic of aging: Revising the redox theory of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jiao; Lv, Zhenyu; Qiao, Xinhua; Li, Xiaopeng; Li, Yazi; Zhang, Yuying; Chen, Chang

    2017-04-01

    Aging is tightly associated with redox events. The free radical theory of aging indicates that redox imbalance may be an important factor in the aging process. Most studies about redox and aging focused on the static status of oxidative stress levels, there has been little research investigating differential responses to redox challenge during aging. In this study, we used Caenorhabditis elegans and human fibroblasts as models to compare differential responses to oxidative stress challenge in young and old individuals. In response to paraquat stress, young individuals generated more ROS and activated signaling pathways including p-ERK, p-AKT and p-AMPKα/β. After the initial response, young individuals then promoted NRF2 translocation and induced additional antioxidant enzymes and higher expression of phase II enzymes, including SOD, CAT, GPX, HO-1, GSTP-1and others, to maintain redox homeostasis. Moreover, young individuals also demonstrated a better ability to degrade damaged proteins by up-regulating the expression of chaperones and improving proteasome activity. Based on these data, we propose a new concept "Redox-stress Response Capacity (RRC)", which suggests cells or organisms are capable of generating dynamic redox responses to activate cellular signaling and maintain cellular homeostasis. The decay of RRC is the substantive characteristic of aging, which gives a new understand of the redox theory of aging. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Korean red ginseng extract rejuvenates testicular ineffectiveness and sperm maturation process in aged rats by regulating redox proteins and oxidative defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopalli, Spandana Rajendra; Hwang, Seock-Yeon; Won, Yu-Jin; Kim, Sung-Won; Cha, Kyu-Min; Han, Chang-Kyun; Hong, Jae-Yup; Kim, Si-Kwan

    2015-09-01

    Distortion of intracellular oxidant and antioxidant balances appears to be a common feature that underlies in age-related male sexual impairment. Therefore regulating oxidative defense mechanisms might be an ideal approach in improving male sexual dysfunctions. In the present study, the effect of Korean red ginseng aqueous extract (KRG) on age-induced testicular dysfunction in rats was investigated. KRG (200mg/kg) mixed with regular pellet diet was administered orally for six months and the morphological, spermatogenic and antioxidant enzyme status in testis of aged rats (18months) were evaluated. Data indicated a significant change in morphology and decrease in spermatogenesis-related parameters in aged rats (AC) compared with young rats (YC). Sperm number, germ cell count, Sertoli cell count and Sertoli cell index were significantly (pglutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase and catalase) and non-enzymatic (reduced glutathione, ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol) antioxidants (ptesticular ineffectiveness in rats by modulating redox proteins and oxidative defense mechanisms.

  14. Electric Power Supply of Meat Processing Enterprise through Utilization Heat of Compressor Station Secondary Energy Sources in Main Gasline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nesenchuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a structure of power consumption by a meat processing enterprise with indication of specific power consumption norms in accordance with product nomenclature. Schemes for supply of the enterprise with heat and cold through utilization of compressor station secondary energy sources in main gasline have been presented in the paper.

  15. ADVANCED MULTI-PRODUCT COAL UTILIZATION BY-PRODUCT PROCESSING PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Jewell; Thomas Robl; John Groppo

    2005-03-01

    The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. The ash produced by the plant was found to be highly variable as the plant consumes high and low sulfur bituminous coal, in Units 1 and 2 and a mixture of subbituminous and bituminous coal in Units 3 and 4. The ash produced reflected this consisting of an iron-rich ({approx}24%, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum rich ({approx}29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and high calcium (6%-7%, CaO) ash, respectively. The LOI of the ash typically was in the range of 5.5% to 6.5%, but individual samples ranged from 1% to almost 9%. The lower pond at Ghent is a substantial body, covering more than 100 acres, with a volume that exceeds 200 million cubic feet. The sedimentation, stratigraphy and resource assessment of the in place ash was investigated with vibracoring and three-dimensional, computer-modeling techniques. Thirteen cores to depths reaching nearly 40 feet, were retrieved, logged in the field and transported to the lab for a series of analyses for particle size, loss on ignition, petrography, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence. Collected data were processed using ArcViewGIS, Rockware, and Microsoft Excel to create three-dimensional, layered iso-grade maps, as well as stratigraphic columns and profiles, and reserve estimations. The ash in the pond was projected to exceed 7 million tons and contain over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon, and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. The size, quality and consistency of the ponded material suggests that it is the better feedstock for the beneficiation plant.

  16. Life cycle assessment of carbon capture and utilization from ammonia process in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Mora, M A; Vergara, C Pretelín; Leiva, M A; Martínez Delgadillo, S A; Rosa-Domínguez, E R

    2016-12-01

    Post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) of flue gas from an ammonia plant (AP) and the environmental performance of the carbon capture utilization (CCU) technology for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) system in Mexico was performed as case study. The process simulations (PS) and life cycle assessment (LCA) were used as supporting tools to quantify the CO2 capture and their environmental impacts, respectively. Two scenarios were considered: 1) the AP with its shift and CO2 removal unit and 2) Scenario 1 plus PCC of the flue gas from the AP primary reformer (AP-2CO2) and the global warming (GW) impact. Also, the GW of the whole of a CO2-EOR project, from these two streams of captured CO2, was evaluated. Results show that 372,426 tCO2/year can be PCC from the flue gas of the primary reformer and 480,000 tons/y of capacity from the AP. The energy requirement for solvent regeneration is estimated to be 2.8 MJ/kgCO2 or a GW impact of 0.22 kgCO2e/kgCO2 captured. GW performances are 297.6 kgCO2e emitted/barrel (bbl) for scenario one, and 106.5 kgCO2e emitted/bbl for the second. The net emissions, in scenario one, were 0.52 tCO2e/bbl and 0.33 tCO2e/bbl in scenario two. Based on PS, this study could be used to evaluate the potential of CO2 capture of 4080 t/d of 4 ammonia plants. The integration of PS-LCA to a PCC study allows the applicability as methodological framework for the development of a cluster of projects in which of CO2 could be recycled back to fuel, chemical, petrochemical products or for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). With AP-2CO2, "CO2 emission free" ammonia production could be achieved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The influence of reactive oxygen species on local redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Rose

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Redox conditions in natural waters are a fundamental control on biogeochemical processes and ultimately many ecosystem functions. While the dioxygen/water redox couple controls redox thermodynamics in oxygenated aquatic environments on geological timescales, it is kinetically inert in the extracellular environment on the much shorter timescales on which many biogeochemical processes occur. Instead, electron transfer processes on these timescales are primarily mediated by a relatively small group of trace metals and stable radicals, including the reactive oxygen species superoxide. Such processes are of critical biogeochemical importance because many of these chemical species are scarce nutrients, but may also be toxic at high concentrations. Furthermore, their bioavailability and potentially toxicity is typically strongly influenced by their redox state. In this paper, I examine to what extent redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters are expected to be reflected in the redox states of labile redox-active compounds that readily exchange electrons with the dioxygen/superoxide redox couple, and potentially with each other. Additionally, I present the hypothesis that that the relative importance of the dioxygen/superoxide and superoxide/hydrogen peroxide redox couples exerts a governing control on local redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters on biogeochemically important timescales. Given the recent discovery of widespread extracellular superoxide production by a diverse range of organisms, this suggests the existence of a fundamental mechanism for organisms to tightly regulate local redox conditions in their extracellular environment in oxygenated natural waters.

  18. Utilization of electromigration in civil and environmental engineering - Processes, transport rates and matrix changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge

    2008-01-01

    Electromigration (movement of ions in an applied electric field) is utilized for supply or extraction of ions from various porous materials within both civil and environmental engineering. In civil engineering, most research has been conducted on the removal of chlorides from concrete to hinder...... reinforcement corrosion while in environmental engineering remediation of heavy metal polluted soil is the issue most studied. Never the less, experiments have been conducted with utilization for several other materials and purposes within both engineering fields. Even though there are many topics of common...

  19. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Groppo; Thomas Robl; Robert Rathbone

    2006-06-01

    The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station. The secondary classification testing was concluded using a continuous demonstration-scale lamella classifier that was operated at a feed rate of 0.3 to 1.5 tons/hr. Feed to the secondary classifier was generated by operating the primary classifier at the conditions shown to be effective previously. Samples were taken while the secondary classifier was operated under a variety of conditions in order to determine the range of conditions where the unit could be efficiently operated. Secondary classification was effective for producing an ultra-fine ash (UFA) product. Inclined lamella plates provided an effective settling surface for coarser ash particles and plate spacing was shown to be an important variable. Results showed that the closer the plate spacing, the finer the size distribution of the UFA product. Flotation of the secondary classifier feed provided a lower LOI UFA product (2.5% LOI vs. 4.5% LOI) and a dispersant dosage of 2 to 2.5 g/kg was adequate to provide UFA grade (3.8 to 4.4 {micro}m) and recovery (53 to 68% 5{micro}m recovery). The UFA yield without flotation was {approx}33% and lower ({approx}20%) with flotation. Demonstration plant product evaluations showed that water requirements in mortar were reduced and 100% of control strength was achieved in 28 days for the coarser products followed by further strength gain of up to 130% in 56 days. The highest strengths of 110% of control in 7 days and 140% in 56 days were achieved with the finer products. Mortar air requirements for processed products were essentially the same as those for standard mortar, suggesting that the unburned carbon remaining does not have

  20. Power Generation Utilizing Process Gases to Avoid Flaring; Elkraftproduktion ur processgas som idag facklas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naesvall, Henrik; Larfeldt, Jenny

    2011-01-15

    There is an increasing awareness that process gases, such as associated gases in oil extraction and byproduct gases in liquidizing of natural gas, can be utilized for energy production. Efficient energy production through the use of a gas turbine is profitable both from economical and environmental point of view compared to simply getting rid of the process gas in flares. Gases with an elevated amount of heavier hydrocarbons generally speaking burns faster and more intense compared to standard natural gas. In gas turbines with so called premixed, low emitting combustor systems this might induce changes in flame stability and the combustion stability connected with this. This might in turn affect the emissions from the gas turbine, the operation life and ability to operate. This work aimed at proving the potential of running Siemens standard SGT-600 and SGT-700 engines on gas with elevated amount of heavy hydrocarbons. Pentane (C{sub 5}H{sub 12}) was used as a model substance for heavy hydrocarbons and a facility for feeding and mixing pentane with natural gas was designed and built at Siemens delivery test bed in Finspaang. The two engines were demonstrated to be able to operate on the mixed fuel at various loads. The results show that both engines are able to stable operation on fuels with up to 10% by volume pentane content. Stable in the sense that no change in combustion dynamics was noted and the control system worked as normal. There were no impact on the temperature distribution through the turbine that could be seen and a boroscope inspection after the test did not reveal anything unusual. A slight increase in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) was detected explained by a slightly more intense flame which also explains the simultaneous lowering of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. Unexpected difficulties were faced by the external laboratories when the sampled gas samples should be analysed. If the difficulties in analysing the samples could have been

  1. Measuring E(GSH) and H2O2 with roGFP2-based redox probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Bruce; Sobotta, Mirko C; Dick, Tobias P

    2011-12-01

    Redox biochemistry plays an important role in a wide range of cellular events. However, investigation of cellular redox processes is complicated by the large number of cellular redox couples, which are often not in equilibrium with one another and can vary significantly between subcellular compartments and cell types. Further, it is becoming increasingly clear that different redox systems convey different biological information; thus it makes little sense to talk of an overall "cellular redox state". To gain a more differentiated understanding of cellular redox biology, quantitative, redox couple-specific, in vivo measurements are necessary. Unfortunately our ability to investigate specific redox couples or redox-reactive molecules with the necessary degree of spatiotemporal resolution is very limited. The development of genetically encoded redox biosensors offers a promising new way to investigate redox biology. Recently developed redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFPs), genetically fused to redox-active proteins, allow rapid equilibration of the roGFP moiety with a specific redox couple. Two probes based on this principle are now available: Grx1-roGFP2 for the measurement of glutathione redox potential (E(GSH)) and roGFP2-Orp1 for measuring changes in H(2)O(2) concentration. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the use of these probes in both yeast and mammalian systems using either plate-reader- or microscopy-based measurements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mediated Electron Transfer at Redox Active Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E.G. Lyons

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model describing the transport and kinetic processes involved in heterogeneous redox catalysis of solution phase reactants at electrode surfaces coated with redox active monolayers is presented. Although the analysis presented has quite general applicability, a specific focus of the paper is concerned with the idea that redox active monolayers can be used to model an ensemble of individual molecular nanoelectrodes. Three possible rate determining steps are considered: heterogeneous electron transfer between immobilized mediator and support electrode ; bimolecular chemical reaction between redox mediator and reactant species in the solution phase, and diffusional mass transport of reactant in solution. A general expression for the steady state reaction flux is derived which is valid for any degree of reversibility of both the heterogeneous electron transfer reaction involving immobilized mediator species and of the bimolecular cross exchange reaction between immobilized mediator and solution phase reactant. The influence of reactant transport in solution is also specifically considered. Simplified analytical expressions for the net reaction flux are derived for experimentally reasonable situations and a kinetic case diagram is constructed outlining the relationships between the various approximate solutions. The theory enables simple diagnostic plots to be constructed which can be used to analyse experimental data.

  3. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Groppo; Thomas Robl

    2006-09-30

    The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station.

  4. Utilization of K-technology for waste processing. Nutzung der KS-Technologie fuer die Verarbeitung von Abfallstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelskamp, H.

    1992-03-01

    In addition to continuous inprovements the product range and capacity adaptations to the state of the market, observations are made in sand-lime brick industry to apply existing technology for a further utilization. An interesting aspect is the utilization or further preparation of certain waste materials which cannot be reused at present due to their chemical-physical composition. These investigations show the possibilities as well as the disadvantages, which result from the processing of waste materials by means of KS-technology. These investigations are restricted to a few characteristic residues from power stations waste incineration and steel production. (orig./BBR). 27 figs., 26 tabs.

  5. Redox-regulated transcription in plants: Emerging concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehad Shaikhali

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, different stimuli, both internal and external, activate production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Photosynthesis is considered as high rate redox-metabolic process with rapid transients including light/photon capture, electron fluxes, and redox potentials that can generate ROS; thus, regulatory systems are required to minimize ROS production. Despite their potential for causing harmful oxidations, it is now accepted that redox homeostasis mechanisms that maintain the intracellular reducing environment make it possible to use ROS as powerful signaling molecules within and between cells. Redox and ROS information from the chloroplasts is a fine-tuning mechanism both inside the chloroplast and as retrograde signal to the cytosol and nucleus to control processes such as gene expression/transcription and translation. Wide repertoires of downstream target genes expression (activation/repression is regulated by transcription factors. In many cases, transcription factors function through various mechanisms that affect their subcellular localization and or activity. Some post-translational modifications (PTMs known to regulate the functional state of transcription factors are phosphorylation, acetylation, and SUMOylation, ubiquitylation and disulfide formation. Recently, oxPTMs, targeted in redox proteomics, can provide the bases to study redox regulation of low abundant nuclear proteins. This review summarizes the recent advances on how cellular redox status can regulate transcription factor activity, the implications of this regulation for plant growth and development, and by which plants respond to environmental/abiotic stresses.

  6. Redox Reactions of Metalloporphyrins and their Role in Catalyzed Reduction of Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neta, P.

    2002-09-01

    Pulse radiolysis and laser photolysis are used to study redox processes of metalloporphyrins and related complexes in order to evaluate these light absorbing molecules as sensitizers and intermediates in solar energy conversion schemes. The main thrust of the current studies is to investigate the role of reduced metalloporphyrins as intermediates in the catalyzed reduction of carbon dioxide. Studies involve cobalt and iron porphyrins, phthalocyanines, corroles, and corrins as homogeneous catalysts for reduction of carbon dioxide in solution. The main aim is to understand the mechanisms of these photochemical schemes in order to facilitate their potential utilization.

  7. Tri-reforming as a process of CO2 utilization and a novel concept of energy storage in chemical products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świrk Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    In this paper two scenarios for methane tri-reforming implementation are discussed: (i Tri-reforming as a effective way for chemical CO2 utilization, without the separation of carbon dioxide from flue gases from fossil fuel-fired power stations, and (ii dry reforming of methane improved by the addition of water and oxygen, which may be applied as a chemical energy storage process. The literature on the subject of trireforming is shortly reviewed, including thermodynamics of the process, the possible conversions of methane and carbon dioxide, and proposed catalysts, both studied in tri-reforming, and in single processes (SRM, DRM and POM.

  8. Direct electrochemistry of redox proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heering, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the project was to obtain more detailed insight in interactions between redox proteins and solid electrodes and the mechanisms of electron transfer. In addition to this, the influence of the protein environment on the redox properties of the active site and the possible influence of the

  9. Glutathione redox potential in the mitochondrial intermembrane space is linked to the cytosol and impacts the Mia40 redox state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojer, Kerstin; Bien, Melanie; Gangel, Heike; Morgan, Bruce; Dick, Tobias P; Riemer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione is an important mediator and regulator of cellular redox processes. Detailed knowledge of local glutathione redox potential (EGSH) dynamics is critical to understand the network of redox processes and their influence on cellular function. Using dynamic oxidant recovery assays together with EGSH-specific fluorescent reporters, we investigate the glutathione pools of the cytosol, mitochondrial matrix and intermembrane space (IMS). We demonstrate that the glutathione pools of IMS and cytosol are dynamically interconnected via porins. In contrast, no appreciable communication was observed between the glutathione pools of the IMS and matrix. By modulating redox pathways in the cytosol and IMS, we find that the cytosolic glutathione reductase system is the major determinant of EGSH in the IMS, thus explaining a steady-state EGSH in the IMS which is similar to the cytosol. Moreover, we show that the local EGSH contributes to the partially reduced redox state of the IMS oxidoreductase Mia40 in vivo. Taken together, we provide a comprehensive mechanistic picture of the IMS redox milieu and define the redox influences on Mia40 in living cells. PMID:22705944

  10. Discovery and Utilization of Nanoscale and Mesoscale Enabling Materials and Processes for Optoelectronics and Electronic Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    strained wetting layer surface. We have demonstrated this methology on Ge/Si, although it should work equally well for ni-V systems such as InAs/GaAs... observe multisecond response times to 100 nsec UV excitation pulses. PCCA(SH)DMSO PCCA (S-Azb) DMSO H O 300 400 500 600 700 Wavelength /nm...in adjacent spectral intervals would freely transmit to allow the observer to view the scene. These PCCA optical switches could also be utilized

  11. Cobalt and marine redox evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Saito, Mak A.; Kappler, Andreas; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2014-03-01

    Cobalt (Co) is a bio-essential trace element and limiting nutrient in some regions of the modern oceans. It has been proposed that Co was more abundant in poorly ventilated Precambrian oceans based on the greater utilization of Co by anaerobic microbes relative to plants and animals. However, there are few empirical or theoretical constraints on the history of seawater Co concentrations. Herein, we present a survey of authigenic Co in marine sediments (iron formations, authigenic pyrite and bulk euxinic shales) with the goal of tracking changes in the marine Co reservoir throughout Earth's history. We further provide an overview of the modern marine Co cycle, which we use as a platform to evaluate how changes in the redox state of Earth's surface were likely to have affected marine Co concentrations. Based on sedimentary Co contents and our understanding of marine Co sources and sinks, we propose that from ca. 2.8 to 1.8 Ga the large volume of hydrothermal fluids circulating through abundant submarine ultramafic rocks along with a predominantly anoxic ocean with a low capacity for Co burial resulted in a large dissolved marine Co reservoir. We tentatively propose that there was a decrease in marine Co concentrations after ca. 1.8 Ga resulting from waning hydrothermal Co sources and the expansion of sulfide Co burial flux. Changes in the Co reservoir due to deep-water ventilation in the Neoproterozoic, if they occurred, are not resolvable with the current dataset. Rather, Co enrichments in Phanerozoic euxinic shales deposited during ocean anoxic events (OAE) indicate Co mobilization from expanded anoxic sediments and enhanced hydrothermal sources. A new record of marine Co concentrations provides a platform from which we can reevaluate the role that environmental Co concentrations played in shaping biological Co utilization throughout Earth's history.

  12. Signaling of Escherichia coli enterotoxin on supramolecular redox bilayer vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Q.; Peng, T.; Stevens, R.C.

    1999-07-21

    Electron transport in supramolecular assemblies containing redox centers has been a subject of great interest. Depending on spatial arrangement of redox moieties in macromolecular structures, transport of electrons may occur via a diffusion mechanism or electron hopping between the neighboring redox sites. While research has largely dealt with 3-D redox polymers, some 2-D systems such as self-assembled and Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers have been exploited as well. The authors describe here a new interfacial architecture that combines the high redox concentration in 3-D polymers and controllable structure and functionality of the 2-D monolayer systems. The new interface utilizes structurally defined redox liposomes engineered with biomolecular recognition capability by incorporating cell surface receptor G{sub M1} into the bilayer membrane. The design allows for direct inspection of the dependency of electron transport on the state and extent of biomolecular recognition that has taken place on the vesicles and, thus, provides a method for direct measurement of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin binding by electrochemistry.

  13. A nano switch mechanism for the redox-responsive sulfotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Lin, En-Shyh; Su, Tian-Mu; Hung, Kuo-Sheng; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-07-15

    Cellular redox signaling is important in diverse physiological and pathological processes. The activity of rat phenol sulfotransferase (rSULT1A1), which is important for the metabolism of hormone and drug, is subjected to redox regulation. Two cysteines, Cys232 and Cys66, nanometer away from each other and from the enzyme active site were proposed to form disulfide bond to regulate the activity of rSULT1A1. A nano switch, composed of a flexible loop from amino acid residues 59-70, explained how this long distance interaction between two cysteines can be achieved. The enzyme properties were investigated through site-directed muatagnesis, circular dichroism, enzyme kinetics and homologous modeling of the rSULT1A1 structures. We proposed that the formation of disulfide bond between Cys232 and Cys66 induced conformational changes of sulfotransferase, then in turn affected its nucleotide binding and enzyme activity. This discovery was extended to understand the possible redox regulation of other sulfotransferases from different organisms. The redox switch can be created in other redox-insensitive sulfotransferases, such as human phenol sulfotransferase (hSULT1A1) and human alcohol sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1), to produce mutant enzymes with redox regulation capacity. This study strongly suggested that redox regulation of drug and hormone metabolism can be significantly varied even though the sequence and structure of SULT1A1 of human and rat have a high degree of homology.

  14. Literature survey of mild gasification processes, co-products upgrading and utilization, and market assessment: Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootten, J.M.; Nawaz, M.; Duthie, R.G.; Knight, R.A.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Bair, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    The primary objective of this DOE-sponsored project is to develop an advanced mild gasification process to produce coal-derived co- products that can readily open new markets for coal in both the utility and nonutility sectors. The study will incorporate novel and innovative concepts for process development and for co-products utilization. The former includes the development of a means to promote the rapid, continuous devolatilization of caking coals, the use of inexpensive reactor additives for capturing sulfur compounds, and the use of inexpensive reaction gases to produce co-products of optimal quality and quantity. It is the ultimate goal of this project to commercialize the advanced mild gasification technology in the next 5 to 10 years. 109 refs., 86 figs., 45 tabs.

  15. OIL SHALE ASH UTILIZATION IN INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES AS AN ALTERNATIVE RAW MATERIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Azeez Mohamed, Hussain; Campos, Leonel

    2016-01-01

    Oil shale is a fine-grained sedimentary rock with the potential to yield significant amounts of oil and combustible gas when retorted. Oil shale deposits have been found on almost every continent, but only Estonia, who has the 8th largest oil shale deposit in the world has continuously utilized oil shale in large scale operations. Worldwide, Estonia accounts for 80% of the overall activity involving oil shale, consuming approximately 18 million tons while producing 5–7 million tons of oil sha...

  16. Alternative Evaluation for the REDOX (202-S) Plutonium Loadout Hood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. R. Kerr

    1999-09-20

    Located in the 200 Areas is the inactive 202-S Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) Facility, which is managed by the Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Surveillance/Maintenance and Transition project. This facility is contaminated from nuclear material processes related to nuclear material separation from Hanford Site facility operations. This alternative evaluation report describes the alternatives and selection criteria based on the necessary protective requirements to maintain the REDOX Plutonium Loadout Hood in a safe and stable condition awaiting a final waste response action.

  17. Redox Regulation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakh, Sonam; Spencer, Damian M.; Halloran, Mark A.; Soo, Kai Y.; Atkin, Julie D.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that results from the death of upper and lower motor neurons. Due to a lack of effective treatment, it is imperative to understand the underlying mechanisms and processes involved in disease progression. Regulations in cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) processes are being increasingly implicated in disease. Here we discuss the possible involvement of redox dysregulation in the pathophysiology of ALS, either as a cause of cellular abnormalities or a consequence. We focus on its possible role in oxidative stress, protein misfolding, glutamate excitotoxicity, lipid peroxidation and cholesterol esterification, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired axonal transport and neurofilament aggregation, autophagic stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We also speculate that an ER chaperone protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) could play a key role in this dysregulation. PDI is essential for normal protein folding by oxidation and reduction of disulphide bonds, and hence any disruption to this process may have consequences for motor neurons. Addressing the mechanism underlying redox regulation and dysregulation may therefore help to unravel the molecular mechanism involved in ALS. PMID:23533690

  18. Redox Regulation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Parakh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease that results from the death of upper and lower motor neurons. Due to a lack of effective treatment, it is imperative to understand the underlying mechanisms and processes involved in disease progression. Regulations in cellular reduction/oxidation (redox processes are being increasingly implicated in disease. Here we discuss the possible involvement of redox dysregulation in the pathophysiology of ALS, either as a cause of cellular abnormalities or a consequence. We focus on its possible role in oxidative stress, protein misfolding, glutamate excitotoxicity, lipid peroxidation and cholesterol esterification, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired axonal transport and neurofilament aggregation, autophagic stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. We also speculate that an ER chaperone protein disulphide isomerase (PDI could play a key role in this dysregulation. PDI is essential for normal protein folding by oxidation and reduction of disulphide bonds, and hence any disruption to this process may have consequences for motor neurons. Addressing the mechanism underlying redox regulation and dysregulation may therefore help to unravel the molecular mechanism involved in ALS.

  19. Redox regulation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakh, Sonam; Spencer, Damian M; Halloran, Mark A; Soo, Kai Y; Atkin, Julie D

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that results from the death of upper and lower motor neurons. Due to a lack of effective treatment, it is imperative to understand the underlying mechanisms and processes involved in disease progression. Regulations in cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) processes are being increasingly implicated in disease. Here we discuss the possible involvement of redox dysregulation in the pathophysiology of ALS, either as a cause of cellular abnormalities or a consequence. We focus on its possible role in oxidative stress, protein misfolding, glutamate excitotoxicity, lipid peroxidation and cholesterol esterification, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired axonal transport and neurofilament aggregation, autophagic stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We also speculate that an ER chaperone protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) could play a key role in this dysregulation. PDI is essential for normal protein folding by oxidation and reduction of disulphide bonds, and hence any disruption to this process may have consequences for motor neurons. Addressing the mechanism underlying redox regulation and dysregulation may therefore help to unravel the molecular mechanism involved in ALS.

  20. Hydrogen production from a combination of the water-gas shift and redox cycle process of methane partial oxidation via lattice oxygen over LaFeO3 perovskite catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiao Ping; Wu, Qiong; Li, Ran Jia; Yu, Chang Chun; Hao, Zheng Ping

    2006-12-28

    A redox cycle process, in which CH4 and air are periodically brought into contact with a solid oxide packed in a fixed-bed reactor, combined with the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, is proposed for hydrogen production. The sole oxidant for partial oxidation of methane (POM) is found to be lattice oxygen instead of gaseous oxygen. A perovskite-type LaFeO3 oxide was prepared by a sol-gel method and employed as an oxygen storage material in this process. The results indicate that, under appropriate reaction conditions, methane can be oxidized to CO and H2 by the lattice oxygen of LaFeO3 perovskite oxide with a selectivity higher than 95% and the consumed lattice oxygen can be replenished in a reoxidation procedure by a redox operation. It is suggested that the POM to H2/CO by using the lattice oxygen of the oxygen storage materials instead of gaseous oxygen should be possibly applicable. The LaFeO3 perovskite oxide maintained relatively high catalytic activity and structural stability, while the carbonaceous deposits, which come from the dissociation of CH4 in the pulse reaction, occurred due to the low migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. A new dissociation-oxidation mechanism for this POM without gaseous oxygen is proposed based on the transient responses of the products checked at different surface states via both pulse reaction and switch reaction over the LaFeO3 catalyst. In the absence of gaseous-phase oxygen, the rate-determining step of methane conversion is the migration rate of lattice oxygen, but the process can be carried out in optimized cycles. The product distribution for POM over LaFeO3 catalyst in the absence of gaseous oxygen was determined by the concentration of surface oxygen, which is relevant with the migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. This process of hydrogen production via selective oxidation of methane by lattice oxygen is better in avoiding the deep oxidation (to CO2) and

  1. Utilization of Digital Image Processing In Process of Quality Control of The Primary Packaging of Drug Using Color Normalization Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwanto, Danang; Arttini Dwi Prasetyowati, Sri; Nuryanto Budi Susila, Eka

    2017-04-01

    In the process of quality control, accuracy is required so that the improper drug packaging is not included into the next production process. The automatic inspection system using digital image processing can be applied to replace the manual inspection system done by humans. The image captured from the vision sensor is RGB image which is then converted into grayscale. The process of converting RGB image into grayscale image is performed using the color normalization method to spread the data of RGB colors at each pixel. From the software of image processing using the color normalization method that have been created, it shows grayscale images on the drug object which have degrees of gray higher than the grayscale image section of the background when the degree of the R, G or B color of drug is higher than the degree of the R, G, B color on the background of packaging. The determination of threshold value indicates that the binary image of the drug is white and a binary image of the background of drug packaging is black.

  2. The utilization of six sigma and statistical process control techniques in surgical quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlack, Jeffrey D

    2010-01-01

    Surgeons have been slow to incorporate industrial reliability techniques. Process control methods were applied to surgeon waiting time between cases, and to length of stay (LOS) after colon surgery. Waiting times between surgeries were evaluated by auditing the operating room records of a single hospital over a 1-month period. The medical records of 628 patients undergoing colon surgery over a 5-year period were reviewed. The average surgeon wait time between cases was 53 min, and the busiest surgeon spent 291/2 hr in 1 month waiting between surgeries. Process control charting demonstrated poor overall control of the room turnover process. Average LOS after colon resection also demonstrated very poor control. Mean LOS was 10 days. Weibull's conditional analysis revealed a conditional LOS of 9.83 days. Serious process management problems were identified in both analyses. These process issues are both expensive and adversely affect the quality of service offered by the institution. Process control mechanisms were suggested or implemented to improve these surgical processes. Industrial reliability and quality management tools can easily and effectively identify process control problems that occur on surgical services.

  3. Utilizing product configuration systems for supporting the critical parts of the engineering processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansdottir, Katrin; Shafiee, Sara; Hvam, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Engineering-To-Order (ETO) companies have to respond to increasing demands to provide highly customized and complex products with high quality at competitive prices. In order to respond to those challenges ETO companies have started to implement product configuration systems (PCS) to increase...... efficiency of the specification processes. As a result to complex products and processes in ETO companies, PCS are usually gradually implemented where only subsets of the products are included to support specific processes. However, a systematic way to identify and evaluate the products and the processes...... to be supported with the PCSs is not described in the current literature. This paper aims to pursue that research opportunity by presenting a framework, which aims to identifying the critical parts of the engineering processes in order to identify where it most beneficial to implement a PCSs and how to prioritize...

  4. Globin-based redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Henau, Sasha; Braeckman, Bart P

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have become recognized as signaling cues that participate at all levels of cellular organization. Globins, with their redox-active heme iron and ubiquitous presence, seem ideally suited to participate in ROS metabolism. Here we comment on our recent findings that show the participation of a globin, GLB-12, in a redox signaling pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that GLB-12 produces superoxide, a type of ROS, after which this is converted to what appears to be a hydrogen peroxide gradient over the plasma membrane by the activity of intracellular and extracellular superoxide dismutases. In the first part, we discuss in more detail the different regulatory mechanisms that increase the effectiveness of this redox signal. In the second part, we comment on how specific structural and biochemical properties allow this globin to perform redox reactions. Interestingly, these properties are also observed in 2 other C. elegans globins that appear to be involved in redox biology. We therefore hypothesize that globins involved in redox signaling display similar structural and biochemical characteristics and propose that a subgroup of globins can be added to the group of proteins that play a vital role in redox signaling.

  5. Principles in redox signaling: from chemistry to functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoli, Alberto; Rigobello, Maria Pia

    2013-05-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are currently considered not only harmful byproducts of aerobic respiration but also critical mediators of redox signaling. The molecules and the chemical principles sustaining the network of cellular redox regulated processes are described. Special emphasis is placed on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), now considered as acting as a second messenger, and on sulfhydryl groups, which are the direct targets of the oxidant signal. Cysteine residues of some proteins, therefore, act as sensors of redox conditions and are oxidized in a reversible reaction. In particular, the formation of sulfenic acid and disulfide, the initial steps of thiol oxidation, are described in detail. The many cell pathways involved in reactive oxygen species formation are reported. Central to redox signaling processes are the glutathione and thioredoxin systems controlling H(2)O(2) levels and, hence, the thiol/disulfide balance. Lastly, some of the most important redox-regulated processes involving specific enzymes and organelles are described. The redox signaling area of research is rapidly expanding, and future work will examine new pathways and clarify their importance in cellular pathophysiology.

  6. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Robl; John Groppo

    2007-03-31

    The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. Phase 1 was completed successfully, but the project did not continue on to Phase 2 due to withdrawal of CEMEX from the project. Attempts at replacing CEMEX were not successful. Problematic to the continuation of the project was its location in the Ohio Valley which is oversupplied and has low prices for fly ash and the change in CEMEX priorities due to merger and acquisitions. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007.

  7. Process improvement and cost reduction utilizing a fully automated CD SEM for thin film head pole 2 resist measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutrud, Paul C.; Newcomb, Robert M.

    1996-05-01

    Thin film head (TFH) manufacturers are constantly striving to improve process control, eliminate scrap material and reduce the total cost of manufacturing their devices. Successful measurement and control of the Pole 2 Resist structure is a critical component of the TFH process which directly impacts disk drive performance, reliability and final product cost. Until recently, white light optical metrology systems have been the only option for measuring the Pole 2 structures. However, recent advances in TFH process technology have resulted in aspect ratios up to 10:1 which has limited the ability of the white light optical metrology systems. IVS has developed a unique metrology solution to image and measure these high aspect ratio structures utilizing the IVS-200TM CD SEM. This technology provides state of the art measurement performance for repeatability and stability which in turn has provided manufacturers with the ability to monitor the Pole 2 process and reap both technical and financial benefits.

  8. Nanocrystallization of LiCoO2 Cathodes for Thin Film Batteries Utilizing Pulse Thermal Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose focus is on the nanocrystallization of the LiCoO2 cathode thin films on polyimide substrates and evaluate the microstructural evolution and resistance as a function of PTP processing conditions.

  9. Reciprocal Control of the Circadian Clock and Cellular Redox State - a Critical Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putker, Marrit; O'Neill, John Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Redox signalling comprises the biology of molecular signal transduction mediated by reactive oxygen (or nitrogen) species. By specific and reversible oxidation of redox-sensitive cysteines, many biological processes sense and respond to signals from the intracellular redox environment. Redox signals are therefore important regulators of cellular homeostasis. Recently, it has become apparent that the cellular redox state oscillates in vivo and in vitro, with a period of about one day (circadian). Circadian time-keeping allows cells and organisms to adapt their biology to resonate with the 24-hour cycle of day/night. The importance of this innate biological time-keeping is illustrated by the association of clock disruption with the early onset of several diseases (e.g. type II diabetes, stroke and several forms of cancer). Circadian regulation of cellular redox balance suggests potentially two distinct roles for redox signalling in relation to the cellular clock: one where it is regulated by the clock, and one where it regulates the clock. Here, we introduce the concepts of redox signalling and cellular timekeeping, and then critically appraise the evidence for the reciprocal regulation between cellular redox state and the circadian clock. We conclude there is a substantial body of evidence supporting circadian regulation of cellular redox state, but that it would be premature to conclude that the converse is also true. We therefore propose some approaches that might yield more insight into redox control of cellular timekeeping.

  10. Simulation of Magnetic Field Assisted Finishing (MFAF) Process Utilizing Smart MR Polishing Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Anwesa; Das, Manas

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic field assisted finishing process is an advanced finishing process. This process is capable of producing nanometer level surface finish. In this process magnetic field is applied to control the finishing forces using magnetorheological polishing medium. In the current study, permanent magnet is used to provide the required magnetic field in the finishing zone. The working gap between the workpiece and the magnet is filled with MR fluid which is used as the polishing brush to remove surface undulations from the top surface of the workpiece. In this paper, the distribution of magnetic flux density on the workpiece surface and behaviour of MR polishing medium during finishing are analyzed using commercial finite element packages (Ansys Maxwell® and Comsol®). The role of magnetic force in the indentation of abrasive particles on the workpiece surface is studied. A two-dimensional simulation study of the steady, laminar, and incompressible MR fluid flow behaviour during finishing process is carried out. The material removal and surface roughness modelling of the finishing process are also presented. The indentation force by a single active abrasive particle on the workpiece surface is modelled during simulation. The velocity profile of MR fluid with and without application of magnetic field is plotted. It shows non-Newtonian property without application of magnetic field. After that the total material displacement due to one abrasive particle is plotted. The simulated roughness profile is in a good agreement with the experimental results. The conducted study will help in understanding the fluid behavior and the mechanism of finishing during finishing process. Also, the modelling and simulation of the process will help in achieving better finishing performance.

  11. Development of Metal Plate with Internal Structure Utilizing the Metal Injection Molding (MIM Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangho Shin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on making a double-sided metal plate with an internal structure, such as honeycomb. The stainless steel powder was used in the metal injection molding (MIM process. The preliminary studies were carried out for the measurement of the viscosity of the stainless steel feedstock and for the prediction of the filling behavior through Computer Aided Engineering (CAE simulation. PE (high density polyethylene (HDPE and low density polyethylene (LDPE and polypropylene (PP resins were used to make the sacrificed insert with a honeycomb structure using a plastic injection molding process. Additionally, these sacrificed insert parts were inserted in the metal injection mold, and the metal injection molding process was carried out to build a green part with rectangular shape. Subsequently, debinding and sintering processes were adopted to remove the sacrificed polymer insert. The insert had a suitable rigidity that was able to endure the filling pressure. The core shift analysis was conducted to predict the deformation of the insert part. The 17-4PH feedstock with a low melting temperature was applied. The glass transition temperature of the sacrificed polymer insert would be of a high grade, and this insert should be maintained during the MIM process. Through these processes, a square metal plate with a honeycomb structure was made.

  12. Bioreactor process parameter screening utilizing a Plackett-Burman design for a model monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarabi, Cyrus D; Schiel, John E; Lute, Scott C; Chavez, Brittany K; Boyne, Michael T; Brorson, Kurt A; Khan, Mansoor A; Read, Erik K

    2015-06-01

    Consistent high-quality antibody yield is a key goal for cell culture bioprocessing. This endpoint is typically achieved in commercial settings through product and process engineering of bioreactor parameters during development. When the process is complex and not optimized, small changes in composition and control may yield a finished product of less desirable quality. Therefore, changes proposed to currently validated processes usually require justification and are reported to the US FDA for approval. Recently, design-of-experiments-based approaches have been explored to rapidly and efficiently achieve this goal of optimized yield with a better understanding of product and process variables that affect a product's critical quality attributes. Here, we present a laboratory-scale model culture where we apply a Plackett-Burman screening design to parallel cultures to study the main effects of 11 process variables. This exercise allowed us to determine the relative importance of these variables and identify the most important factors to be further optimized in order to control both desirable and undesirable glycan profiles. We found engineering changes relating to culture temperature and nonessential amino acid supplementation significantly impacted glycan profiles associated with fucosylation, β-galactosylation, and sialylation. All of these are important for monoclonal antibody product quality.

  13. Redox chemistry of H[sub 2]S oxidation by the British Gas Stretford Process. Pt. 3; Electrochemical behaviour of anthraquinone 2,7 disulphonate in alkaline electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, G.H.; Thompson, I. (Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mineral Resources Engineering)

    1993-04-01

    Electrochemical reduction of aqueous anthraquinone 2,7 disulphonate (AQ27DS) solutions at pH 9.3 were studied at Hg, Au and Pt electrodes. Cyclic voltammograms showed about 40 mV potential separation of the single pair of current peaks, precluding a simple one or two electron process. Charge measurements in controlled potential exhaustive reductions indicated a 2 mol e[sup -] per mol AQ27DS process leading to quinolate anions, whereas the partially reduced solution showed an EPR spectrum, indicating the presence of radical species, which, if produced directly, would involve only a 1 mol e[sup -] per mol AQ27DS process. The results are congruous with a reduction mechanism involving an initial 2 mol e[sup -] per mol AQ27DS process to give anthraquinolate anions, from which electron transfer in solution to AQ27DS species produced AQ27DS[center dot][sup -] radical anions (a comproportionation). (author)

  14. Implementation, change management and benefit realization: investigating the utility of ethnographically enriched process maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkings, K Neil

    2007-03-01

    Following developments in the use of ethnographies in systems design, this article illustrates an investigation into using ethnography for healthcare system implementation, change management and benefits realization. The article illustrates the possibility of creating ethnographically enriched process maps. These are process maps that are created for specific implementation sites to facilitate the locally situated work of implementation, change management and benefits realization teams. The simple premise is that, to change and improve what you are doing, you need to know what you are currently doing. Reported are the pros and cons of a potential solution and, importantly, why it was not adopted. While not producing a definitive solution, this approach to looking at the problems, and using ethnographically enriched process maps, does suggest itself as an area for further development.

  15. Soil redox resistance as factor of nitrate stability in soil; Il potenziale resistivo redox come fattore stabilizzante dello ione nitrato nei terreni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepniewska, Z. [Polish Academy of Science, Lublin (Poland). Inst. of agrophysics

    1994-12-31

    Oxygen exhaust in flooded soils causes successive reduction of inorganic compounds, playing the role of final electron acceptors in the metabolism of anoxic microorganisms. The consequence of the proceeding redox processes is a decrease of soil redox potential. The rate of the decrease of redox potential (Eh) in water saturated soil varies among the soil materials and can be characterized by the parameter called soil redox resistance. This parameter is defined by the time needed to decrease Eh value to the level 300 mV corresponding to reduction of Mn and Fe (T{sub 300}).

  16. High-energy-density, aqueous, metal-polyiodide redox flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2017-08-29

    Improved metal-based redox flow batteries (RFBs) can utilize a metal and a divalent cation of the metal (M.sup.2+) as an active redox couple for a first electrode and electrolyte, respectively, in a first half-cell. For example, the metal can be Zn. The RFBs can also utilize a second electrolyte having I.sup.-, anions of I.sub.x (for x.gtoreq.3), or both in an aqueous solution, wherein the I.sup.- and the anions of I.sub.x (for x.gtoreq.3) compose an active redox couple in a second half-cell.

  17. Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of polymeric materials utilizing close proximity indirect exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Bonds, Truman

    2016-09-20

    A plasma treatment method that includes providing treatment chamber including an intermediate heating volume and an interior treatment volume. The interior treatment volume contains an electrode assembly for generating a plasma and the intermediate heating volume heats the interior treatment volume. A work piece is traversed through the treatment chamber. A process gas is introduced to the interior treatment volume of the treatment chamber. A plasma is formed with the electrode assembly from the process gas, wherein a reactive species of the plasma is accelerated towards the fiber tow by flow vortices produced in the interior treatment volume by the electrode assembly.

  18. Natural gas engineering and safety challenges downstream process, analysis, utilization and safety

    CERN Document Server

    Nasr, GG

    2014-01-01

    Provides a critical and extensive compilation of the downstream processes of natural gas that involve the principle of gas processing , transmission and distribution, gas flow and network analysis, instrumentation and measurement systems and its utilisation Enriches understanding of the business and management aspects of natural gas as well as highlighting some of the recent research and innovations in the field Covers the needs of practising engineers from different disciplines, who may include project managers, planning and design engineers - the book is also suitable for the demands of u

  19. Evolution of robusta green coffee redox enzymatic activities with maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montavon, Philippe; Bortlik, Karlheinz

    2004-06-02

    Oxidation reactions in coffee involve redox-sensitive polyphenols and appear to control the fragmentation of coffee storage proteins both in solution and during roasting. Coffee-specific nitrogenous flavor precursors may derive from this process. Accordingly, data converge to suggest that the redox status of the green bean before roasting might control the development of subsequent redox reactions during roasting. Consequently, we decided to identify biological events that may trigger or prevent oxidation during maturation of the coffee cherry and set the final redox status of the green bean. In a previous study, we observed that the sensitivity of green coffee to oxidative processes decreased along maturation. By using the very same samples originating from open-pollinated Robusta clones, we followed the activity of three essential redox enzymes: catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO). While CAT and POD activities increased with maturation, PPO activities decreased. Thanks to the identification of an atypical immature subclass, it appeared that CAT might be an essential factor in setting the final redox status of the green bean before the roasting event.

  20. Can postoperative process of care utilization or complication rates explain the volume-cost relationship for cancer surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vivian; Short, Marah N; Aloia, Thomas A

    2017-08-01

    Past studies identify an association between provider volume and outcomes, but less is known about the volume-cost relationship for cancer surgery. We analyze the volume-cost relationship for 6 cancer operations and explore whether it is influenced by the occurrence of complications and/or utilization of processes of care. Medicare hospital and inpatient claims for the years 2005 through 2009 were analyzed for 6 cancer resections: colectomy, rectal resection, pulmonary lobectomy, pneumonectomy, esophagectomy, and pancreatic resection. Regressions were first estimated to quantify the association of provider volume with costs, excluding measures of complications and processes of care as explanatory variables. Next, these variables were added to the regressions to test whether they weakened any previously observed volume-cost relationship. Higher hospital volume is associated with lower patient costs for esophagectomy but not for other operations. Higher surgeon volume reduces costs for most procedures, but this result weakens when processes of care are added to the regressions. Processes of care that are frequently implemented in response to adverse events are associated with 14% to 34% higher costs. Utilization of these processes is more prevalent among low-volume versus high-volume surgeons. Processes of care implemented when complications occur explain much of the surgeon volume-cost relationship. Given that surgeon volume is readily observed, better outcomes and lower costs may be achieved by referring patients to high-volume surgeons. Increasing patient access to surgeons with lower rates of complications may be the most effective strategy for avoiding costly processes of care, controlling expenditure growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  2. Scalar utility theory and proportional processing: What does it actually imply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenström, Tom; Wiesner, Karoline; Houston, Alasdair I

    2016-09-01

    Scalar Utility Theory (SUT) is a model used to predict animal and human choice behaviour in the context of reward amount, delay to reward, and variability in these quantities (risk preferences). This article reviews and extends SUT, deriving novel predictions. We show that, contrary to what has been implied in the literature, (1) SUT can predict both risk averse and risk prone behaviour for both reward amounts and delays to reward depending on experimental parameters, (2) SUT implies violations of several concepts of rational behaviour (e.g. it violates strong stochastic transitivity and its equivalents, and leads to probability matching) and (3) SUT can predict, but does not always predict, a linear relationship between risk sensitivity in choices and coefficient of variation in the decision-making experiment. SUT derives from Scalar Expectancy Theory which models uncertainty in behavioural timing using a normal distribution. We show that the above conclusions also hold for other distributions, such as the inverse Gaussian distribution derived from drift-diffusion models. A straightforward way to test the key assumptions of SUT is suggested and possible extensions, future prospects and mechanistic underpinnings are discussed.

  3. Nutritional composition, processing, and utilization of horse gram and moth bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, S S; Salunkhe, D K

    1985-01-01

    Horse gram and moth bean are the unexploited legumes of the tropics and subtropics grown mostly under dry-land agriculture. The chemical composition is comparable with commonly cultivated legumes. Like other legumes, these are deficient in methionine and tryptophan. Horse gram is an excellent source of iron and molybdenum. Comparatively, horse gram seeds have higher trypsin inhibitor and hemagglutinin activities and polyphenols than moth bean seeds. Dehusking, germination, cooking, and roasting have been shown to produce beneficial effects on nutritional quality of both the legumes. Both the legumes require prolonged cooking to obtain product of acceptable nature. A soak solution (1.5% NaHCO3 + 0.5% Na2CO3 + 0.75% citric acid) treatment has been shown to reduce cooking time and improve protein quality. Moth bean is mostly consumed as dhal or sprouts. The whole seeds of horse gram are generally utilized as cattle feed. However, it is consumed as a whole seed, sprouts, or whole meal by a large population in rural areas of southern India. Medical uses of these legumes have been discussed.

  4. Thermal Analyses of Combined Utilization Process of Seawater by Solar Chimney

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yiping; FANG Zhenlei; ZHU Li

    2009-01-01

    It is promising to simultaneously develop multiple products through the combined utilization of sea-water by solar chimney technology. A small scale experimental system was set up. The collector temperature, the seawater temperature, and the temperature and humidity of the airflow under the collector were measured. Thermal network analysis of the system was carried out. The results show that the airflow is nearly saturated at the entrance of the chimney, and the mean dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures of the airflow have increased by 8.4℃ and 9.6℃ respectively. The radiation heat transfer between the collector and the sky is the biggest heat loss in the system, which is up to 29.1% on average of the solar energy. However, the water evaporation heat is about 23.6% on average of the solar energy. To reduce the heat loss and enhance the water evaporation, it is necessary to reduce the emissivity and thermal conductivity of the collector and increase the evaporation areas.

  5. Utilizing the Theoretical Framework of Collective Identity to Understand Processes in Youth Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futch, Valerie A.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores collective identity as a useful theoretical framework for understanding social and developmental processes that occur in youth programs. Through narrative analysis of past participant interviews (n = 21) from an after-school theater program, known as "The SOURCE", it was found that participants very clearly describe…

  6. Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, M.V.; Lacy, S.B.; Lowe, G.D.; Nussbaum, A.M.; Walter, K.M.; Willens, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The engineering, economic, and environmental feasibility of the use of low and moderate temperature geothermal heat in the mining and processing of tungsten ore is explored. The following are covered: general engineering evaluation, design of a geothermal energy system, economics, the geothermal resource, the institutional barriers assessment, environmental factors, an alternate geothermal energy source, and alternates to geothermal development. (MHR)

  7. Utilization of respiratory energy in higher plants : requirements for 'maintenance' and transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative knowledge of both photosynthesis and respiration is required to understand plant growth and resulting crop yield. However, especially the nature of the energy demanding processes that are dependent on dark respiration in full-grown tissues is largely unknown. The main objective

  8. A Process Analysis of the Uniform Chart of Accounts Personnel Utilization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-23

    Graduate Dental Education Gen Residency Program Periodontics Residency Endodontics Residency Prosthodontics Residency Oral...cost-accounting systems. American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy; 45, 1103-10. Dean, E.B. (1996). Business Process Reengineering. Retrieved from the...UCAPERS 53 Hughes, M. (1999). Nursing workload: an unquantifiable entity. Journal of Nursing Management, 7, 17-22

  9. Utilizing the Theoretical Framework of Collective Identity to Understand Processes in Youth Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futch, Valerie A.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores collective identity as a useful theoretical framework for understanding social and developmental processes that occur in youth programs. Through narrative analysis of past participant interviews (n = 21) from an after-school theater program, known as "The SOURCE", it was found that participants very clearly describe…

  10. Utilization of respiratory energy in higher plants. Requirements for 'maintenance' and transport processes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative knowledge of both photosynthesis and respiration is required to understand plant growth and resulting crop yield. However, especially the nature of the energy demanding processes that are dependent on dark respiration in full-grown tissues is largely unknown. The main objective of the p

  11. Bifunctional redox flow battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Y.H. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China)], E-mail: wen_yuehua@126.com; Cheng, J. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Science and Technology University, Beijing 100083 (China); Xun, Y. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, P.H. [Full Cell R and D Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Yang, Y.S. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Science and Technology University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-08-20

    A new bifunctional redox flow battery (BRFB) system, V(III)/V(II)-L-cystine(O{sub 2}), was systematically investigated by using different separators. It is shown that during charge, water transfer is significantly restricted with increasing the concentration of HBr when the Nafion 115 cation exchange membrane is employed. The same result can be obtained when the gas diffusion layer (GDL) hot-pressed separator is used. The organic electro-synthesis is directly correlated with the crossover of vanadium. When employing the anion exchange membrane, the electro-synthesis efficiency is over 96% due to a minimal crossover of vanadium. When the GDL hot-pressed separator is applied, the crossover of vanadium and water transfer are noticeably prevented and the electro-synthesis efficiency of over 99% is obtained. Those impurities such as vanadium ions and bromine can be eliminated through the purification of organic electro-synthesized products. The purified product is identified to be L-cysteic acid by IR spectrum. The BRFB shows a favorable discharge performance at a current density of 20 mA cm{sup -2}. Best discharge performance is achieved by using the GDL hot-pressed separator. The coulombic efficiency of 87% and energy efficiency of about 58% can be obtained. The cause of major energy losses is mainly associated with the cross-contamination of anodic and cathodic active electrolytes.

  12. Globin-based redox signaling

    OpenAIRE

    De Henau, Sasha; Braeckman, Bart

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have become recognized as signaling cues that participate at all levels of cellular organization. Globins, with their redox-active heme iron and ubiquitous presence, seem ideally suited to participate in ROS metabolism. Here we comment on our recent findings that show the participation of a globin, GLB-12, in a redox signaling pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that GLB-12 produces superoxide, a type of ROS, a...

  13. A Comprehensive Utilization Process for Black Manganese-silver Ores by Pyrite Reducing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    On a 5 kg bench scale, the separating of Mn-Ag from black manganese-silver ores by pyrite reducing was investigated. Leached Mn content of 98.3% (mass fraction) along with silver loss of 1.5% is achieved. The purification of solution by the precipitation method was effectively used. Chemical grade -MnO2 with TMn content of 60.13% (mass fraction) and MnO2 content of 92.28% (mass fraction) is obtained. Mn recovery efficiency is 94.04%. The residues from leaching Mn process of black Mn-Ag ores was employed for silver extraction by cyanidation with leached silver content of 92.17% (mass fraction), displacement ratio of 99.5%, recovery efficiency of 90.79%. Therefore, the present study provides a feasible process for making full use of black manganese-silver ore resources.

  14. Pipelined data processing system utilizing ideal floating point execution condition detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.P.S.; Rawlinson, S.J.; Si, S.S.C.

    1988-09-20

    This patent describes an instruction execution unit responsive to an instruction for providing a sequence of microcode control words to direct the processing of operand data associated with the instruction. The instruction execution unit consists of: (a) sequencing means, responsive to the instruction, for issuing first and second sequences of microcode control words corresponding to the instruction, the sequencing means including selector means for selecting the first or the second sequence of microcode control words for issuance by the sequencing means; and (b) determining means for determining from the operand data, concurrent with the issuance of a microcode control word by the sequencing means, whether the operand data is ideal with respect to the instruction, the determining means causing the selector means to select the second sequence of microcode control words for issuance to complete the processing of the operand data in response to the instruction when the operand data is ideal with respect to the instruction.

  15. Utilization of Paper Sludge Wastes for Treatment of Wastewater from Food Processing Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Suzuki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The food processing industries usually produced large amount of wastewater containing fine and small particles. It takes long time for complete settlement of the fine and small particles in the wastewater. The coagulation method appears to become one of the useful treatments. New inorganic coagulant named “Agoclean‒P” has been developed from paper sludge ash. The treatment by coagulation and flocculation were carried out for the wastewater from three different food processing industries namely soup, tofu, and natto. “Hi‒Biah‒System”, which is an in‒situ solidification system, was used for the continuous treatment of wastewater. The parameters for the water quality were pH, five‒day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5, chemical oxygen demand (COD, total suspended solids (TSS, total nitrogen (TN and total phosphorus (TP. These parameters after the treatment became much lower values relative to those obtained before the treatment.

  16. Utilization of kaolin processing waste for the production of porous ceramic bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Romualdo R; Brasileiro, Maria I; Santana, Lisiane N L; Neves, Gelmires A; Lira, Helio L; Ferreira, Heber C

    2008-08-01

    The kaolin processing industry generates large amounts of waste in producing countries such as Brazil. The aim of this study was to characterize kaolin processing waste and evaluate its suitability as an alternative ceramic raw material for the production of porous technical ceramic bodies. The waste material was physically and chemically characterized and its thermal behaviour is described. Several formulations were prepared and sintered at different temperatures. The sintered samples were characterized to determine their porosity, water absorption, firing shrinkage and mechanical strength. Fired samples were microstructurally analysed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the waste consisted of quartz, kaolinite, and mica, and that ceramic formulations containing up to 66% of waste can be used for the production of ceramics with porosities higher than 40% and strength of about 70 MPa.

  17. The Recovery Process Utilizing Erikson’s Stages of Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Of current interest to the field are clinical frameworks that foster recovery. The authors offer a psycho-developmental model that parallels Erik Erikson’s theory of human development, and theorize that the process of psychiatric recovery involves a psychic reworking of these fundamental steps. Understanding recovery in this context allows the client and the practitioner of psychiatric rehabilitation to design and implement a coherent treatment strategy.

  18. UV-LIGA microfabrication process for sub-terahertz waveguides utilizing multiple layered SU-8 photoresist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekabadi, Ali; Paoloni, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    A microfabrication process based on UV LIGA (German acronym of lithography, electroplating and molding) is proposed for the fabrication of relatively high aspect ratio sub-terahertz (100-1000 GHz) metal waveguides, to be used as a slow wave structure in sub-THz vacuum electron devices. The high accuracy and tight tolerances required to properly support frequencies in the sub-THz range can be only achieved by a stable process with full parameter control. The proposed process, based on SU-8 photoresist, has been developed to satisfy high planar surface requirements for metal sub-THz waveguides. It will be demonstrated that, for a given thickness, it is more effective to stack a number of layers of SU-8 with lower thickness rather than using a single thick layer obtained at lower spin rate. The multiple layer approach provides the planarity and the surface quality required for electroforming of ground planes or assembly surfaces and for assuring low ohmic losses of waveguides. A systematic procedure is provided to calculate soft and post-bake times to produce high homogeneity SU-8 multiple layer coating as a mold for very high quality metal waveguides. A double corrugated waveguide designed for 0.3 THz operating frequency, to be used in vacuum electronic devices, was fabricated as test structure. The proposed process based on UV LIGA will enable low cost production of high accuracy sub-THz 3D waveguides. This is fundamental for producing a new generation of affordable sub-THz vacuum electron devices, to fill the technological gap that still prevents a wide diffusion of numerous applications based on THz radiation.

  19. Measuring the Utility of a Cyber Incident Mission Impact Assessment (CIMIA) Process for Mission Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    mockup pop-up 18 2.8 Current Cyber Incident Notification Process When a cyber incident occurs, it is essential to notify decision...CHOICE OR PERFORM A DEINAL-OF-SERVICE (DOS) AGAINST A VULNERABLE SYSTEM. MS INTERNET EXPLORER IS A WEB BROWSER FOR MICROSOFT SYSTEMS. SYSTEM(S...typically viewed as communications whose purpose is to inform and influence behavior, the mockup of the pop-up was based on Laughery and Wogalter’s

  20. The establishment of a production-ready manufacturing process utilizing thin silicon substrates for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Three inch diameter Czochralski silicon substrates sliced directly to 5 mil, 8 mil, and 27 mil thicknesses with wire saw techniques were procured. Processing sequences incorporating either diffusion or ion implantation technologies were employed to produce n+p or n+pp+ solar cell structures. These cells were evaluated for performance, ease of fabrication, and cost effectiveness. It was determined that the use of 7 mil or even 4 mil wafers would provide near term cost reductions for solar cell manufacturers.

  1. Utilization of Food Processing By-products as Dietary, Functional, and Novel Fiber: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Satish Kumar; Bansal, Sangita; Mangal, Manisha; Dixit, Anil Kumar; Gupta, Ram K; Mangal, A K

    2016-07-26

    Fast growing food processing industry in most countries across the world, generates huge quantity of by-products, including pomace, hull, husk, pods, peel, shells, seeds, stems, stalks, bran, washings, pulp refuse, press cakes, etc., which have less use and create considerable environmental pollution. With growing interest in health promoting functional foods, the demand of natural bioactives has increased and exploration for new sources is on the way. Many of the food processing industrial by-products are rich sources of dietary, functional, and novel fibers. These by-products can be directly (or after certain modifications for isolation or purification of fiber) used for the manufacture of various foods, i.e. bread, buns, cake, pasta, noodles, biscuit, ice creams, yogurts, cheese, beverages, milk shakes, instant breakfasts, ice tea, juices, sports drinks, wine, powdered drink, fermented milk products, meat products and meat analogues, synthetic meat, etc. A comprehensive literature survey has been carried on this topic to give an overview in the field dietary fiber from food by-products. In this article, the developments in the definition of fiber, fiber classification, potential sources of dietary fibers in food processing by-products, their uses, functional properties, caloric content, energy values and the labelling regulations have been discussed.

  2. Complex processing and utilization of waste as the basis for sustainable economic development district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.М. Ilchenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main environmental problems of Ukraine. The problems that are connected with complex processing and recycling, the example Dnieper economic paradise-one, which allows more detailed present environmental situation of the country at this stage. The article is used and analyzed recent environmental performance and the basic problems of on-disposal and recycling. Basic research methods: observation, analysis and comparison. The aim was to find ways to overcome the ecological crisis in Ukraine. As a result of the research, it was determined that most types of waste-tion prevail in Ukraine and found the best solutions to problems related to waste and their processing. It was possible to find the main problem that has caused serious environmental situation, and the main task for the country at this stage. The main problems and tasks Dnieper economic region. Also indicate how to save, due to complex processing waste. The article is very relevant and important because it is here that the basic problems and tasks of Ukraine concerning the ecological situation. It also focuses on eco-logical problems, which the government does not pay enough attention.

  3. Flexibility and utility of pre-processing methods in converting STXM setups for ptychography - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fromm, Catherine [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-20

    Ptychography is an advanced diffraction based imaging technique that can achieve resolution of 5nm and below. It is done by scanning a sample through a beam of focused x-rays using discrete yet overlapping scan steps. Scattering data is collected on a CCD camera, and the phase of the scattered light is reconstructed with sophisticated iterative algorithms. Because the experimental setup is similar, ptychography setups can be created by retrofitting existing STXM beam lines with new hardware. The other challenge comes in the reconstruction of the collected scattering images. Scattering data must be adjusted and packaged with experimental parameters to calibrate the reconstruction software. The necessary pre-processing of data prior to reconstruction is unique to each beamline setup, and even the optical alignments used on that particular day. Pre-processing software must be developed to be flexible and efficient in order to allow experiments appropriate control and freedom in the analysis of their hard-won data. This paper will describe the implementation of pre-processing software which successfully connects data collection steps to reconstruction steps, letting the user accomplish accurate and reliable ptychography.

  4. Direct utilization of geothermal energy resources in food processing. Final report, May 17, 1978-May 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, J.C.

    1982-05-01

    In early 1978 financial assistance was granted for a project to utilize geothermal energy at Ore-Ida Foods, Inc.'s food processing plant in Ontario, Oregon. Specifically, the project included exploring, testing, and developing the potential geothermal resource; retrofitting the existing gas/oil-fired steam system; utilizing the geothermal resource for food processing, space heating, and hot potable water; and injecting the spent geothermal water back into a disposal well. Based on preliminary investigations which indicated the presence of a local geothermal resource, drilling began in August 1979. Although the anticipated resource temperature of 380/sup 0/F was reached at total well depth (10,054 feet), adequate flow to meet processing requirements could not be obtained. Subsequent well testing and stimulation techniques also failed to produce the necessary flow, and the project was eventually abandoned. However, throughout the duration of the project, all activities were carefully monitored and recorded to ensure the program's value for future evaluation. This report presents a culmination of data collected during the Ore-Ida project.

  5. Redox regulation by reversible protein S-thiolation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Vu Van; Rossius, Martina; Antelmann, Haike

    2015-01-01

    Low molecular weight (LMW) thiols function as thiol-redox buffers to maintain the reduced state of the cytoplasm. The best studied LMW thiol is the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) present in all eukaryotes and Gram-negative bacteria. Firmicutes bacteria, including Bacillus and Staphylococcus species utilize the redox buffer bacillithiol (BSH) while Actinomycetes produce the related redox buffer mycothiol (MSH). In eukaryotes, proteins are post-translationally modified to S-glutathionylated proteins under conditions of oxidative stress. S-glutathionylation has emerged as major redox-regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes and protects active site cysteine residues against overoxidation to sulfonic acids. First studies identified S-glutathionylated proteins also in Gram-negative bacteria. Advances in mass spectrometry have further facilitated the identification of protein S-bacillithiolations and S-mycothiolation as BSH- and MSH-mixed protein disulfides formed under oxidative stress in Firmicutes and Actinomycetes, respectively. In Bacillus subtilis, protein S-bacillithiolation controls the activities of the redox-sensing OhrR repressor and the methionine synthase MetE in vivo. In Corynebacterium glutamicum, protein S-mycothiolation was more widespread and affected the functions of the maltodextrin phosphorylase MalP and thiol peroxidase (Tpx). In addition, novel bacilliredoxins (Brx) and mycoredoxins (Mrx1) were shown to function similar to glutaredoxins in the reduction of BSH- and MSH-mixed protein disulfides. Here we review the current knowledge about the functions of the bacterial thiol-redox buffers glutathione, bacillithiol, and mycothiol and the role of protein S-thiolation in redox regulation and thiol protection in model and pathogenic bacteria.

  6. Redox regulation by reversible protein S-thiolation in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Van Loi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight (LMW thiols function as thiol-redox buffers to maintain the reduced state of the cytoplasm. The best studied LMW thiol is the tripeptide glutathione (GSH present in all eukaryotes and Gram-negative bacteria. Firmicutes bacteria, including Bacillus and Staphylococcus species utilize the redox buffer bacillithiol (BSH while Actinomycetes produce the related redox buffer mycothiol (MSH. In eukaryotes, proteins are post-translationally modified to S-glutathionylated proteins under conditions of oxidative stress. S-glutathionylation has emerged as major redox-regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes and protects active site cysteine residues against overoxidation to sulfonic acids. First studies identified S-glutathionylated proteins also in Gram-negative bacteria. Advances in mass spectrometry have further facilitated the identification of protein S-bacillithiolations and S-mycothiolation as BSH- and MSH-mixed protein disulfides formed under oxidative stress in Firmicutes and Actinomycetes, respectively. In Bacillus subtilis, protein S-bacillithiolation controls the activities of the redox-sensing OhrR repressor and the methionine synthase MetE in vivo. In Corynebacterium glutamicum, protein S-mycothiolation was more widespread and affected the functions of the maltodextrin phosphorylase MalP and thiol peroxidase (Tpx. In addition, novel bacilliredoxins (Brx and mycoredoxins (Mrx1 were shown to function similar to glutaredoxins in the reduction of BSH- and MSH-mixed protein disulfides. Here we review the current knowledge about the functions of the bacterial thiol-redox buffers glutathione, bacillithiol and mycothiol and the role of protein S-thiolation in redox regulation and thiol protection in model and pathogenic bacteria.

  7. Utilization of parallel processing in solving the inviscid form of the average-passage equation system for multistage turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulac, Richard A.; Celestina, Mark L.; Adamczyk, John J.; Misegades, Kent P.; Dawson, Jef M.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure is outlined which utilizes parallel processing to solve the inviscid form of the average-passage equation system for multistage turbomachinery along with a description of its implementation in a FORTRAN computer code, MSTAGE. A scheme to reduce the central memory requirements of the program is also detailed. Both the multitasking and I/O routines referred to are specific to the Cray X-MP line of computers and its associated SSD (Solid-State Disk). Results are presented for a simulation of a two-stage rocket engine fuel pump turbine.

  8. The utilization of parallel processing in solving the inviscid form of the average-passage equation system for multistage turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulac, Richard A.; Celestina, Mark L.; Adamczyk, John J.; Misegades, Kent P.; Dawson, Jef M.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure is outlined which utilizes parallel processing to solve the inviscid form of the average-passage equation system for multistage turbomachinery along with a description of its implementation in a FORTRAN computer code, MSTAGE. A scheme to reduce the central memory requirements of the program is also detailed. Both the multitasking and I/O routines referred to in this paper are specific to the Cray X-MP line of computers and its associated SSD (Solid-state Storage Device). Results are presented for a simulation of a two-stage rocket engine fuel pump turbine.

  9. Method of preparing and utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Smith, Mark; Haynes, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    The disclosure relates to a method of utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream with a mitigation of carbon accumulation. The system is comprised of a catalytically active phase deposited onto an oxygen conducting phase, with or without supplemental support. The catalytically active phase has a specified crystal structure where at least one catalytically active metal is a cation within the crystal structure and coordinated with oxygen atoms within the crystal structure. The catalyst system employs an optimum coverage ratio for a given set of oxidation conditions, based on a specified hydrocarbon conversion and a carbon deposition limit. Specific embodiments of the catalyst system are disclosed.

  10. Optimizing hippocampal segmentation in infants utilizing MRI post-acquisition processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Deanne K; Ahmadzai, Zohra M; Wood, Stephen J; Inder, Terrie E; Warfield, Simon K; Doyle, Lex W; Egan, Gary F

    2012-04-01

    This study aims to determine the most reliable method for infant hippocampal segmentation by comparing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging post-acquisition processing techniques: contrast to noise ratio (CNR) enhancement, or reformatting to standard orientation. MR scans were performed with a 1.5 T GE scanner to obtain dual echo T2 and proton density (PD) images at term equivalent (38-42 weeks' gestational age). 15 hippocampi were manually traced four times on ten infant images by 2 independent raters on the original T2 image, as well as images processed by: a) combining T2 and PD images (T2-PD) to enhance CNR; then b) reformatting T2-PD images perpendicular to the long axis of the left hippocampus. CNRs and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. T2-PD images had 17% higher CNR (15.2) than T2 images (12.6). Original T2 volumes' ICC was 0.87 for rater 1 and 0.84 for rater 2, whereas T2-PD images' ICC was 0.95 for rater 1 and 0.87 for rater 2. Reliability of hippocampal segmentation on T2-PD images was not improved by reformatting images (rater 1 ICC = 0.88, rater 2 ICC = 0.66). Post-acquisition processing can improve CNR and hence reliability of hippocampal segmentation in neonate MR scans when tissue contrast is poor. These findings may be applied to enhance boundary definition in infant segmentation for various brain structures or in any volumetric study where image contrast is sub-optimal, enabling hippocampal structure-function relationships to be explored.

  11. Numerical processing efficiency improved in children using mental abacus: ERP evidence utilizing a numerical Stroop task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan eYao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether long-term abacus-based mental calculation (AMC training improved numerical processing efficiency and at what stage of information processing the effect appeard. Thirty-three children participated in the study and were randomly assigned to two groups at primary school entry, matched for age, gender and IQ. All children went through the same curriculum except that the abacus group received a 2-hour/per week AMC training, while the control group did traditional numerical practice for a similar amount of time. After a two-year training, they were tested with a numerical Stroop task. Electroencephalographic (EEG and event related potential (ERP recording techniques were used to monitor the temporal dynamics during the task. Children were required to determine the numerical magnitude (NC task or the physical size (PC task of two numbers presented simultaneously. In the NC task, the AMC group showed faster response times but similar accuracy compared to the control group. In the PC task, the two groups exhibited the same speed and accuracy. The saliency of numerical information relative to physical information was greater in AMC group. With regards to ERP results, the AMC group displayed congruity effects both in the earlier (N1 and later (N2 and LPC (late positive component time domain, while the control group only displayed congruity effects for LPC. In the left parietal region, LPC amplitudes were larger for the AMC than the control group. Individual differences for LPC amplitudes over left parietal area showed a positive correlation with RTs in the NC task in both congruent and neutral conditions. After controlling for the N2 amplitude, this correlation also became significant in the incongruent condition. Our results suggest that AMC training can strengthen the relationship between symbolic representation and numerical magnitude so that numerical information processing becomes quicker and automatic in AMC children.

  12. Numerical processing efficiency improved in children using mental abacus: ERP evidence utilizing a numerical Stroop task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Du, Fenglei; Wang, Chunjie; Liu, Yuqiu; Weng, Jian; Chen, Feiyan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether long-term abacus-based mental calculation (AMC) training improved numerical processing efficiency and at what stage of information processing the effect appeard. Thirty-three children participated in the study and were randomly assigned to two groups at primary school entry, matched for age, gender and IQ. All children went through the same curriculum except that the abacus group received a 2-h/per week AMC training, while the control group did traditional numerical practice for a similar amount of time. After a 2-year training, they were tested with a numerical Stroop task. Electroencephalographic (EEG) and event related potential (ERP) recording techniques were used to monitor the temporal dynamics during the task. Children were required to determine the numerical magnitude (NC) (NC task) or the physical size (PC task) of two numbers presented simultaneously. In the NC task, the AMC group showed faster response times but similar accuracy compared to the control group. In the PC task, the two groups exhibited the same speed and accuracy. The saliency of numerical information relative to physical information was greater in AMC group. With regards to ERP results, the AMC group displayed congruity effects both in the earlier (N1) and later (N2 and LPC (late positive component) time domain, while the control group only displayed congruity effects for LPC. In the left parietal region, LPC amplitudes were larger for the AMC than the control group. Individual differences for LPC amplitudes over left parietal area showed a positive correlation with RTs in the NC task in both congruent and neutral conditions. After controlling for the N2 amplitude, this correlation also became significant in the incongruent condition. Our results suggest that AMC training can strengthen the relationship between symbolic representation and numerical magnitude so that numerical information processing becomes quicker and automatic in AMC children.

  13. Utilization of citrus crops processing by-products in the preparation of tarhana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Magala

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available After processing of citrus fruits (e.g. lemon, orange, grapefruit, mandarin for juice and essential oils production, approximately 50% of the original fruit mass is left as waste material. Citrus crops processing by-products are valuable components as they contain nutrients such as pectins, saccharides, carotenoids, some vitamins, minerals, polyphenols and substances with antioxidant activity. Utilisation of these kind of side products in the recipe of various cereal product led to enhancement of final product nutritional value and better sensory attributes as well as improvement of product functional properties. In this work was studied the effect of orange and mandarin dietary fibre application at level 5 and 10% (w/w in tarhana preparation and the influence on tarhana fermentation process. Chemical analysis showed, that dietary fibre preparations reached higher concentration of ash, fat and total dietary fibre compared to wheat flour. Wheat flour exhibited higher moisture content and protein concentration than citrus dietary fibre preparations. Orange and mandarin dietary fibre preparations showed higher values of water and oil absorption capacity, swelling capacity and least gellation concentration compared to wheat flour. Application of fruit dietary fibre preparations to tarhana recipe caused a rapid decrease in pH from 4.70 - 5.02 to values 4.31 - 4.51 during fermentation process. Reducing saccharides served as an available source of energy for fermenting microbiota and their concentration decreased from 24.5 - 32.8 to 2.2 - 0.2 g/kg after 144 h incubation. Fermentation also led to lactic acid (1.67 - 2.09 g/kg and acetic acid (1.91 - 2.53 g/kg production as a consequence of present microorganisms metabolic activity. Sensory evaluation of samples showed, that higher proportion of citrus dietary fibre preparations (10% negatively affected taste, odour, consistency and sourness. Among all prepared tarhana samples with proportion of citrus

  14. Application of a systematic methodology for sustainable carbon dioxide utilization process design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plaza, Cristina Calvera; Frauzem, Rebecca; Gani, Rafiqul

    As concerns about the environment are growing, new efforts are needed to achieve more sustainable processes. One such environmental concern is global warming, which is primarily caused by the greenhouse effect or the increase in concentration of greenhouse gases [1]. The most significant greenhouse...... gases are carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, of which carbon dioxide is the highest constituent at 82%. Furthermore, the amount of carbon dioxide emissions is growing with time. These trends make it evident that there is a need for methods to reduce these greenhouse gases emissions. While...

  15. NAD(H) and NADP(H) Redox Couples and Cellular Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wusheng; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2017-07-28

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))/reduced NAD(+) (NADH) and NADP(+)/reduced NADP(+) (NADPH) redox couples are essential for maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and for modulating numerous biological events, including cellular metabolism. Deficiency or imbalance of these two redox couples has been associated with many pathological disorders. Recent Advances: Newly identified biosynthetic enzymes and newly developed genetically encoded biosensors enable us to understand better how cells maintain compartmentalized NAD(H) and NADP(H) pools. The concept of redox stress (oxidative and reductive stress) reflected by changes in NAD(H)/NADP(H) has increasingly gained attention. The emerging roles of NAD(+)-consuming proteins in regulating cellular redox and metabolic homeostasis are active research topics. The biosynthesis and distribution of cellular NAD(H) and NADP(H) are highly compartmentalized. It is critical to understand how cells maintain the steady levels of these redox couple pools to ensure their normal functions and simultaneously avoid inducing redox stress. In addition, it is essential to understand how NAD(H)- and NADP(H)-utilizing enzymes interact with other signaling pathways, such as those regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor, to maintain cellular redox homeostasis and energy metabolism. Additional studies are needed to investigate the inter-relationships among compartmentalized NAD(H)/NADP(H) pools and how these two dinucleotide redox couples collaboratively regulate cellular redox states and cellular metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. Furthermore, recent studies suggest the utility of using pharmacological interventions or nutrient-based bioactive NAD(+) precursors as therapeutic interventions for metabolic diseases. Thus, a better understanding of the cellular functions of NAD(H) and NADP(H) may facilitate efforts to address a host of pathological disorders effectively. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  16. Eco-friendly copper recovery process from waste printed circuit boards using Fe³⁺/Fe²⁺ redox system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarasi, Szabolcs; Imre-Lucaci, Florica; Egedy, Attila; Imre-Lucaci, Árpád; Ilea, Petru

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed at developing an original and environmentally friendly process for the recovery of copper from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) by chemical dissolution with Fe(3+) combined with the simultaneous electrowinning of copper and oxidant regeneration. The recovery of copper was achieved in an original set-up consisting of a three chamber electrochemical reactor (ER) connected in series with a chemical reactor (CR) equipped with a perforated rotating drum. Several experiments were performed in order to identify the optimal flow rate for the dissolution of copper in the CR and to ensure the lowest energy consumption for copper electrodeposition in the ER. The optimal hydrodynamic conditions were provided at 400 mL/min, leading to the 75% dissolution of metals and to a low specific energy consumption of 1.59 kW h/kg Cu for the electrodeposition process. In most experiments, the copper content of the obtained cathodic deposits was over 99.9%.

  17. Lunar-Forming Giant Impact Model Utilizing Modern Graphics Processing Units

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. C. Eiland; T. C. Salzillo; B. H. Hokr; J. L. Highland; W. D. Mayfield; B. M. Wyatt

    2014-12-01

    Recent giant impact models focus on producing a circumplanetary disk of the proper composition around the Earth and defer to earlier works for the accretion of this disk into the Moon. The discontinuity between creating the circumplanetary disk and accretion of the Moon is unnatural and lacks simplicity. In addition, current giant impact theories are being questioned due to their inability to find conditions that will produce a system with both the proper angular momentum and a resultant Moon that is isotopically similar to the Earth. Here we return to first principles and produce a continuous model that can be used to rapidly search the vast impact parameter space to identify plausible initial conditions. This is accomplished by focusing on the three major components of planetary collisions: constant gravitational attraction, short range repulsion and energy transfer. The structure of this model makes it easily parallelizable and well-suited to harness the power of modern Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The model makes clear the physically relevant processes, and allows a physical picture to naturally develop. We conclude by demonstrating how the model readily produces stable Earth–Moon systems from a single, continuous simulation. The resultant systems possess many desired characteristics such as an iron-deficient, heterogeneously-mixed Moon and accurate axial tilt of the Earth.

  18. Epilepsy Classification Framework Utilizing Joint Time-Frequency Signal Analysis and Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva KHOSHNOUD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Time Frequency Signal Analysis and Processing (TFSAP have been proposed in order to analyse the signal in both the time and the frequency domains. Electroencephalography (EEG as a time-varying frequency signal is an interesting field in which Time Frequency Distribution (TFD could be used in order to visualize the simultaneous distributions of signal energy in different physiological and pathological brain states. Particularly, epileptic signals due to their great features of seizure activity are introduced as the most attractive research field among researchers. This study outlines an investigation on two main pathologic brain states including, pre-ictal activity and seizure activity compared to normal activity. Pseudo-Wigner -Ville and Choi-William distributions are used in order to visualize the energy content of signals in these states. Different segments of brain electrical activity are analyzed using these distributions. Finally, Renyi’s entropy as an important characteristic which offer insight towards the EEG signal processing has been extracted from TFDs. The results obtained indicate that Renyi’s entropy is a high-quality discriminative feature especially in alpha and delta sub-bands of the EEG signal.

  19. Utilizing Stable Isotopes and Isotopic Anomalies to Study Early Solar System Formation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites contain a diversity of particle components, i.e., chondrules and calcium-, aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs), that have survived since the formation of the Solar System. The chemical and isotopic compositions of these materials provide a record of the conditions present in the protoplanetary disk where they formed and can aid our understanding of the processes and reservoirs in which solids formed in the solar nebula, an important step leading to the accretion of planetesimals. Isotopic anomalies associated with nucleosynthetic processes are observed in these discrete materials, and can be compared to astronomical observations and astrophysical formation models of stars and more recently proplyds. The existence and size of these isotopic anomalies are typically thought to reflect a significant state of isotopic heterogeneity in the earliest Solar System, likely left over from molecular cloud heterogeneities on the grain scale, but some could also be due to late stellar injection. The homogenization of these isotopic anomalies towards planetary values can be used to track the efficiency and timescales of disk wide mixing,

  20. Application of the SULF-X process to coal conversion and utilization. Phase II final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, E.; Bramer, H.C.; New, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Pittsburgh Environmental and Energy Systems, Inc. contracted with the Department of Energy to demonstrate the efficacy of an iron sulfide flue gas treatment system (FGT) for removing sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) and to correlate process variables to system performance. Laboratory and bench-scale testing was conducted with the SULF-X process, using both synthesized gas and actual flue gas from a coal-fired furnace. Laboratory tests resulted in 95% SO/sub 2/ removal and up to 95% NO/sub x/ removal. The bench-scale system demonstrated similar SO/sub 2/ removal efficiencies, but achieved only 39% NO/sub x/ removal due to relatively high oxygen concentrations in the flue gas and insufficient liquid-gas interfacial area within the absorber. Elemental sulfur was recovered during the regeneration steps. Total capital investment for the SULF-X system was estimated to be $91 to $103 per kilowatt (electric), compared to $90/kw for sodium solution scrubbing, $78 to $83/kw for magnesia slurry scrubbing and $74/kw for limestone slurry scrubbing. Annual operating costs for the SULF-X system were estimated to be 5.44 to 6.90 mills per kilowatt-hour, compared to 4.96 to 5.22 for sodium, 3.68 to 3.99 for magnesia and 3.73 to 4.25 for limestone. 6 references, 6 figures, 9 tables.

  1. Simulation of a Wet Sulfuric Acid Process (WSA for Utilization of Acid Gas Separated from Omani Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Jawad Ali Al-Dallal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a proposed process for the utilization of hydrogen sulphide separated with other gases from omani natural gas for the production of sulphuric acid by wet sulphuric acid process (WSA was studied. The processwas simulated at an acid gas feed flow of 5000 m3/hr using Aspen ONE- V7.1-HYSYS software. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the optimum conditions for the operation of plant. This included primarily the threepacked bed reactors connected in series for the production of sulphur trioxidewhich represented the bottleneck of the process. The optimum feed temperature and catalyst bed volume for each reactor were estimated and then used in the simulation of the whole process for two cases namely 4 and 6 mole% SO2 stream fed to the first catalytic reactor. The 4mole% SO2 gaves the highest conversion (98% compared with 6 mole% SO2 (94.7%. A valuable quantity of heat was generated from the process. This excess heat could also be transformed into power in a turbine or used as a heating media in neighbouring process units.

  2. Uniform lateral etching of tungsten in deep trenches utilizing reaction-limited NF3 plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofuji, Naoyuki; Mori, Masahito; Nishida, Toshiaki

    2017-06-01

    The reaction-limited etching of tungsten (W) with NF3 plasma was performed in an attempt to achieve the uniform lateral etching of W in a deep trench, a capability required by manufacturing processes for three-dimensional NAND flash memory. Reaction-limited etching was found to be possible at high pressures without ion irradiation. An almost constant etching rate that showed no dependence on NF3 pressure was obtained. The effect of varying the wafer temperature was also examined. A higher wafer temperature reduced the threshold pressure for reaction-limited etching and also increased the etching rate in the reaction-limited region. Therefore, the control of the wafer temperature is crucial to controlling the etching amount by this method. We found that the uniform lateral etching of W was possible even in a deep trench where the F radical concentration was low.

  3. Six Sigma Methodology Utilization in Telecom Sector for Quality Improvement- A DMAIC Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANISH BHARGAVA,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents tools of Six Sigma for Telecom Industries; these can achieve powerful operational improvements that produce sustainable business benefits. Six Sigma Qualtec’s dedicated Six Sigma for Telecom practice is specifically designed to help traditional and modern telecommunications providers, become more efficient in their operating procedures. By learning and implementing improvements such as Voice of the Customer (VOC, , Six Sigma, Business Process Management Design for Six Sigma and Lean Enterprise principles, those companies will be able to dramatically improve the way they do business thus attracting and keeping customers in this hyper-competitive industry. This paper maps some of the changes in the telecom markets that resulted from competitive entry and givesan insight into the dynamics of competitive markets in relation to quality improvement. Additionally, the presentation seeks to demonstrate that in the quest for the particular competitive outcome via independent and transparent regulation.

  4. Utility of adaptive control processing for the interpretation of digital mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinnouchi, Mikako; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Kubo, Makoto; Tokunaga, Eriko; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Background Adaptive control processing for mammography (ACM) is a novel program that automatically sets up appropriate image-processing parameters for individual mammograms (MMGs) by analyzing the focal and whole breast histogram. Purpose To investigate whether ACM improves the image contrast of digital MMGs and whether it improves radiologists' diagnostic performance in reading of MMGs. Material and Methods One hundred normal cases for image quality assessment and another 100 cases (50 normal and 50 cancers) for observer performance assessment were enrolled. All mammograms were examined with and without ACM. Five radiologists assessed the intra- and extra-mammary contrast of 100 normal MMGs, and the mean scores of the intra- and extra-mammary contrast were compared between MMGs with and without ACM in both the dense and non-dense group. They classified 100 MMGs into BI-RADS categories 1-5, and were asked to rate the images on a scale of 0 to 100 for the likelihood of the presence of category 3-5 lesions in each breast. Detectability of breast cancer, reading time, and frequency of window adjustment were compared between MMGs with and without ACM. Results ACM improved the intra-mammary contrast in both the dense and non-dense group but degraded extra-mammary contrast in the dense group. There was no significant difference in detectability of breast cancer between MMGs with and without ACM. Frequency of window adjustment without ACM was significantly higher than that with ACM. Reading time without ACM was significantly longer than that with ACM. Conclusion ACM improves the image contrast of MMGs and shortens reading time.

  5. Kinetic investigations on redox processes of metal oxides for the storage of concentrated solar radiation. Final report; Kinetische Untersuchungen an Redoxprozessen von Metalloxiden zur Speicherung konzentrierter Solarstrahlung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, P.; Ehrensberger, K.; Frei, A.; Nueesch, P.; Steiner, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-04-01

    The main emphasis of high-temperature solar chemistry is to investigate processes for converting highly concentrated solar radiation into storable and transportable chemical energy. This project focused on reduction and oxidation processes with metal oxides. In particular a two step thermochemical water splitting cycle with mixed iron oxides was studied. The first step of the cycle, the thermal reduction of the oxide by highly concentrated solar radiation at temperatures around 2000{sup o}C, was investigated in a direct-absorption powder cloud reactor. The metal oxide powder was dispersed in a carrier gas and continuously transported through the focus of a solar concentrator. The experiments were performed in the solar furnace at Paul Scherrer Institute. The second step of the thermochemical cycle, the water splitting reaction in the temperature range between 400{sup o}C and 900{sup o}C, was investigated in the laboratory. The reactive time and reachable degree of reduction for the solar reduction step are important to estimate the maximum energy efficiency. It could be shown, that a reactive time of less than 0.5s is enough to reduce mixed iron oxides. Nevertheless, only small degrees of reduction could be reached at solar flux densities around 300 W/cm{sup 2}. Another important aspect for demonstrating the feasibility of the cycle is the need to recycle the oxides without undesired side reactions, such as e.g. segregation effects. For the water splitting reaction we could show, that only temporary segregation effects occur, which were re-formed at the end of the reaction. The chemical feasibility of the process could not decisively be demonstrated. In particular a satisfactory degree of reduction for the solar step has not been achieved. Further solar experiments at higher solar flux densities have to be conducted. However, the potential to optimize the cycle by partial substitution of iron with manganese or cobalt was demonstrated.

  6. Major Modification Determination Process Utilized for Proposed Idaho National Laboratory Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Lehto, Ph.D.; Boyd D. Christensen

    2008-05-01

    Over the past three years, several new projects with the potential for major modifications to existing facilities have been considered for implementation at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These projects were designated to take place in existing nuclear facilities with existing documented safety analyses. 10 CFR 830.206 requires the contractor for a major modification to a Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to obtain Department of Energy (DOE) approval for the nuclear facility design criteria to be used for preparation of a preliminary documented safety analysis (PDSA), as well as creation and approval of the PDSA, before the contractor can procure materials or components or begin construction on the project. Given the significant effort and expense of preparation and approval of a PDSA, a major modification determination for new projects is warranted to determine if the rigorous requirements of a major modification are actually required. Furthermore, performing a major modification determination helps to ensure that important safety aspects of a project are appropriately considered prior to modification construction or equipment procurement. The projects considered for major modification status at the INL included: treatment and packaging of unirradiated, sodium-bonded highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and miscellaneous casting scrap in the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF); post irradiation examination of Advance Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) fuel in the MFC Analytical Laboratory (AL); the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) gas test loop (GTL); and the hydraulic shuttle irradiation system (HSIS) at ATR. The major modification determinations for three of the proposed projects resulted in a negative major modification. On the other hand, the major modification determination for the GTL project concluded that the project would require a major modification. This paper discusses the process, methods, and considerations used by

  7. Transmission Planning Process and Opportunities for Utility-Scale Solar Engagement within the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, J.; Hurlbut, D.; Milligan, M.; Coles, L.; Green, B.

    2011-11-01

    This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. Market barriers unrelated to technology often limit the expansion of utility-scale solar power, even in areas with exceptional resource potential. Many of these non-technical barriers have to do with policy, regulation, and planning, and hardly ever do they resolve themselves in a timely fashion. In most cases, pre-emptive intervention by interested stakeholders is the easiest way to remove/address such barriers, but it requires knowing how to navigate the institutional waters of the relevant agencies and boards. This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. It focuses on the Western Interconnection (WI), primarily because the quality of solar resources in the Southwest makes utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics (PV) economically feasible, and because the relevant institutions have evolved in a way that has opened up opportunities for removing non-technical market barriers. Developers will find in this report a high-level field manual to identify the venues for mitigating and possibly eliminating systemic market obstacles and ensuring that the economic playing field is reasonably level. Project-specific issues such as siting for transmission and generation resources are beyond the scope of this report. Instead, the aim is to examine issues that pervasively affect all utility-scale PV and CSP in the region regardless of where the project may be. While the focus is on the WI, many of the institutions described here also have their counterparts in the Eastern and the Texas interconnections. Specifically, this report suggests a number of critical engagement points relating to generation and transmission planning.

  8. 马铃薯废弃物的资源化利用%Utilization of potato processing waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安志刚; 韩黎明; 刘玲玲; 童丹; 孙永军

    2015-01-01

    The potato processing waste which produced from the potato harvesting and potato processing has a serious impact on the environment.By studying scientific articles,this study discussed the technology on utilization of potato waste in four aspects,including potato stems and leaves,potato-starch wastewater,potato-starch residue and potato-peel waste.Potato waste has a good potential to be used due to its rich compounds.%通过检索大量科学文献,从马铃薯的茎叶、废水、废渣、废皮4个方面论述了资源化利用马铃薯废弃物的技术.马铃薯废弃物有效成分丰富,具有良好的开发利用价值.

  9. Development of an innovative approach for management of coal processing waste with natural resource utilization byproducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Raju, C.B.; Patwardhan, A. [Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, Carbondale, IL (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The paper summarizes studies to develop and demonstrate suitable bulk mixes of tailings or fine coal processing waste (FCPW) and coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) that will minimize environmental impacts on the land, water and air in the short-term as well as in the long-term. Samples of FCPW and slurry pond water were characterized for total and pyritic sulfur, trace elements, and water chemistry. Important characteristics of desired mixes were also identified based on planned use at each study mine. Tailings were characterized for particle size distribution, calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE) oxide composition, and ASTM leaching characterization tests. A series of mixes were developed. The test data was developed using standardized test procedures. These studies were first conducted on a small scale (100-200 gm sample size) and then scaled up to 500-1000 gm size samples. The final developed mixes were tested for their environmental properties in columns developed accounting to ASTM standards. Vegetation studies on the developed mixes were initiated in ice-cube trays and eventually upscaled to 2-gallon size aquariums. The studies involved plant-height growth, soil studies, water-pH and changes in soil mineralogy. 5 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Utilization of Facebook by School Children in the Apprenticeship Seeking Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Sander

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The search for a practical apprenticeship place can be the first step in the business world for German students. The students have to apply for this placement, as Companies require applicants. Facebook is one of the most often used social networks among the younger generation in Germany, which can provide a direct communication channel between businesses and candidates. The research evaluates the reasons to use Facebook to identify a solid apprenticeship training platform for German students. Research methods applied: scientific publication analysis, survey (by paper-based questionnaire of German students of the ninth and tenth grade. Analysis of survey data by main indicators of descriptive statistics: arithmetic mean, mode, median, and standard deviations to get an impression of evaluations on analysed aspects by survey respondents. Analysis of variance – ANOVA – is applied to study the difference of the assessments between female and male school children and the differences between the ninth and tenth classes. The existence of correlations between the intensity of use of social network sites (SNS and the apprenticeship seeking process have been investigated. The results of the research have shown that there are differences in evaluations, on analysed aspects, between female and male school children in the analysed classes on the occasion career entry by the apprenticeship.

  11. 3-Dimensional Microorifice Fabricated Utilizing Single Undercut Etching Process for Producing Ultrasmall Water and Chitosan Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Hsin Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research reports a microfluidic device for producing small droplets via a microorifice and a T-junction structure. The orifice is fabricated using an isotropic undercut etching process of amorphous glass materials. Since the equivalent hydraulic diameter of the produced microorifice can be as small as 1.1 μm, the microdevice can easily produce droplets of the size smaller than 10 μm in diameter. In addition, a permanent hydrophobic coating technique is also applied to modify the main channel to be hydrophobic to enhance the formation of water-based droplets. Experimental results show that the developed microfluidic chip with the ultrasmall orifice can steadily produce water-in-oil droplets with different sizes. Uniform water-in-oil droplets with the size from 60 μm to 6.5 μm in diameter can be formed by adjusting the flow rate ratio of the continuous phase and the disperse phases from 1 to 7. Moreover, curable linear polymer of chitosan droplets with the size smaller than 100 μm can also be successfully produced using the developed microchip device. The microfluidic T-junction with a micro-orifice developed in the present study provides a simple yet efficient way to produce various droplets of different sizes.

  12. Metabolic and redox barriers in the skin exposed to drugs and xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkina, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    Growing exposure of human skin to environmental and occupational hazards, to numerous skin care/beauty products, and to topical drugs led to a biomedical concern regarding sustainability of cutaneous chemical defence that is essential for protection against intoxication. Since skin is the largest extra-hepatic drug/xenobiotic metabolising organ where redox-dependent metabolic pathways prevail, in this review, publications on metabolic processes leading to redox imbalance (oxidative stress) and its autocrine/endocrine impact to cutaneous drug/xenobiotic metabolism were scrutinised. Chemical and photo-chemical skin barriers contain metabolic and redox compartments: their protective and homeostatic functions. The review will examine the striking similarity of adaptive responses to exogenous chemical/photo-chemical stressors and endogenous toxins in cutaneous metabolic and redox system; the role(s) of xenobiotics/drugs and phase II enzymes in the endogenous antioxidant defence and maintenance of redox balance; redox regulation of interactions between metabolic and inflammatory responses in skin cells; skin diseases sharing metabolic and redox problems (contact dermatitis, lupus erythematosus, and vitiligo) Due to exceptional the redox dependence of cutaneous metabolic pathways and interaction of redox active metabolites/exogenous antioxidants with drug/xenobiotic metabolism, metabolic tests of topical xenobiotics/drugs should be combined with appropriate redox analyses and performed on 3D human skin models.

  13. The utilization natural mineral in the process of palm oil glycerolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujdalipah, Siti

    2015-09-01

    The reaction of glycerolysis currently has weakness, which uses a catalyst with a high price and performed at a high temperature. Indonesia is rich in minerals that have the potential to be used as a catalyst. Besides that, the solvent allows the glycerolysis reaction done in a low temperature so that it can maintain the quality of product. The purpose of this research is to study the influence of a type of solvent and a type of natural mineral to the chemistry and physical characteristic of palm oil glycerolysis product. The research activity consists of four steps. The first is the analysis of chemistry characteristics of palm oil. The second is the process of palm oil as the effect of a type of solvent and a type of natural mineral factors. The third is the analysis of chemistry and physical characteristics of glycerolysis product. The last is the analysis of data. Based on the analysis variant at α=0.05, it shows that type of solvent and type of natural mineral doesnot influence significantly to the ability of glycerolysis product in decreasing the water surface tension and to the free glycerol content. The best product is able to decrease the water surface tension from 44.933 dyne/cm to 29.00 dyne/cm. It contains the free glycerol content of 1.30%, 1-monoglyceride content of 43.10%, acid number of 0.146 mg KOH/g sample, and it has simillar fatty acid composition with the raw material.

  14. Redox regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantadosi, Claude A; Suliman, Hagir B

    2012-12-01

    The cell renews, adapts, or expands its mitochondrial population during episodes of cell damage or periods of intensified energy demand by the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. This bigenomic program is modulated by redox-sensitive signals that respond to physiological nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. This review summarizes our current ideas about the pathways involved in the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis by the physiological gases leading to changes in the redox milieu of the cell, with an emphasis on the responses to oxidative stress and inflammation. The cell's energy supply is protected from conditions that damage mitochondria by an inducible transcriptional program of mitochondrial biogenesis that operates in large part through redox signals involving the nitric oxide synthase and the heme oxygenase-1/CO systems. These redox events stimulate the coordinated activities of several multifunctional transcription factors and coactivators also involved in the elimination of defective mitochondria and the expression of counterinflammatory and antioxidant genes, such as IL10 and SOD2, as part of a unified damage-control network. The redox-regulated mechanisms of mitochondrial biogenesis schematically outlined in the graphical abstract link mitochondrial quality control to an enhanced capacity to support the cell's metabolic needs while improving its resistance to metabolic failure and avoidance of cell death during periods of oxidative stress.

  15. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Ježek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed mechanisms that determine reactive oxygen species (redox homeostasis, redox information signaling and metabolic/regulatory function of autocrine insulin signaling in pancreatic β cells, and consequences of oxidative stress and dysregulation of redox/information signaling for their dysfunction. We emphasize the role of mitochondrion in β cell molecular physiology and pathology, including the antioxidant role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2. Since in pancreatic β cells pyruvate cannot be easily diverted towards lactate dehydrogenase for lactate formation, the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation intensity are governed by the availability of glucose, leading to a certain ATP/ADP ratio, whereas in other cell types, cell demand dictates respiration/metabolism rates. Moreover, we examine the possibility that type 2 diabetes mellitus might be considered as an inevitable result of progressive self-accelerating oxidative stress and concomitantly dysregulated information signaling in peripheral tissues as well as in pancreatic β cells. It is because the redox signaling is inherent to the insulin receptor signaling mechanism and its impairment leads to the oxidative and nitrosative stress. Also emerging concepts, admiting participation of redox signaling even in glucose sensing and insulin release in pancreatic β cells, fit in this view. For example, NADPH has been firmly established to be a modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin release.

  16. Redox electrode materials for supercapatteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z.

    2016-09-01

    Redox electrode materials, including transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers, are capable of faradaic charge transfer reactions, and play important roles in most electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitor, battery and supercapattery. Batteries are often based on redox materials with low power capability and safety concerns in some cases. Supercapacitors, particularly those based on redox inactive materials, e.g. activated carbon, can offer high power output, but have relatively low energy capacity. Combining the merits of supercapacitor and battery into a hybrid, the supercapattery can possess energy as much as the battery and output a power almost as high as the supercapacitor. Redox electrode materials are essential in the supercapattery design. However, it is hard to utilise these materials easily because of their intrinsic characteristics, such as the low conductivity of metal oxides and the poor mechanical strength of conducting polymers. This article offers a brief introduction of redox electrode materials, the basics of supercapattery and its relationship with pseudocapacitors, and reviews selectively some recent progresses in the relevant research and development.

  17. Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton Wu; Paul Yuran

    2006-12-31

    Universal Aggregates LLC (UA) was awarded a cost sharing Co-operative Agreement from the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Power Plant Improvement Initiative Program (PPII) to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia in October 2001. The Agreement was signed in November 2002. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the UA share is $12.3 million (63%). The original project team consists of UA, SynAggs, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc. and P. J. Dick, Inc. Using 115,000 ton per year of spray dryer ash (SDA), a dry FGD by-product from the power station, UA will produce 167,000 tons of manufactured lightweight aggregate for use in production of concrete masonry units (CMU). Manufacturing aggregate from FGD by-products can provide an economical high-volume use and substantially expand market for FGD by-products. Most of the FGD by-products are currently disposed of in landfills. Construction of the Birchwood Aggregate Facility was completed in March 2004. Operation startup was begun in April 2004. Plant Integration was initiated in December 2004. Integration includes mixing, extrusion, curing, crushing and screening. Lightweight aggregates with proper size gradation and bulk density were produced from the manufacturing aggregate plant and loaded on a stockpile for shipment. The shipped aggregates were used in a commercial block plant for CMU production. However, most of the production was made at low capacity factors and for a relatively short time in 2005. Several areas were identified as important factors to improve plant capacity and availability. Equipment and process control modifications and curing vessel clean up were made to improve plant operation in the first half of 2006. About 3,000 tons of crushed aggregate was produced in August 2006. UA is continuing to work to improve plant

  18. An Aqueous Redox Flow Battery Based on Neutral Alkali Metal Ferri/ferrocyanide and Polysulfide Electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xia, Gordon; Kirby, Brent W.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-13

    Aiming to explore low-cost redox flow battery systems, a novel iron-polysulfide (Fe/S) flow battery has been demonstrated in a laboratory cell. This system employs alkali metal ferri/ferrocyanide and alkali metal polysulfides as the redox electrolytes. When proper electrodes, such as pretreated graphite felts, are used, 78% energy efficiency and 99% columbic efficiency are achieved. The remarkable advantages of this system over current state-of-the-art redox flow batteries include: 1) less corrosive and relatively environmentally benign redox solutions used; 2) excellent energy and utilization efficiencies; 3) low cost for redox electrolytes and cell components. These attributes can lead to significantly reduced capital cost and make the Fe/S flow battery system a promising low-cost energy storage technology. The major drawbacks of the present cell design are relatively low power density and possible sulfur species crossover. Further work is underway to address these concerns.

  19. Effects of Secondary Task Modality and Processing Code on Automation Trust and Utilization During Simulated Airline Luggage Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Rachel; Madhavan, Poornima

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the impact of environmental distractions on human trust and utilization of automation during the process of visual search. Participants performed a computer-simulated airline luggage screening task with the assistance of a 70% reliable automated decision aid (called DETECTOR) both with and without environmental distractions. The distraction was implemented as a secondary task in either a competing modality (visual) or non-competing modality (auditory). The secondary task processing code either competed with the luggage screening task (spatial code) or with the automation's textual directives (verbal code). We measured participants' system trust, perceived reliability of the system (when a target weapon was present and absent), compliance, reliance, and confidence when agreeing and disagreeing with the system under both distracted and undistracted conditions. Results revealed that system trust was lower in the visual-spatial and auditory-verbal conditions than in the visual-verbal and auditory-spatial conditions. Perceived reliability of the system (when the target was present) was significantly higher when the secondary task was visual rather than auditory. Compliance with the aid increased in all conditions except for the auditory-verbal condition, where it decreased. Similar to the pattern for trust, reliance on the automation was lower in the visual-spatial and auditory-verbal conditions than in the visual-verbal and auditory-spatial conditions. Confidence when agreeing with the system decreased with the addition of any kind of distraction; however, confidence when disagreeing increased with the addition of an auditory secondary task but decreased with the addition of a visual task. A model was developed to represent the research findings and demonstrate the relationship between secondary task modality, processing code, and automation use. Results suggest that the nature of environmental distractions influence

  20. Exploring the linkage between cell culture process parameters and downstream processing utilizing a plackett-burman design for a model monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarabi, Cyrus D; Chavez, Brittany K; Lute, Scott C; Read, Erik K; Rogstad, Sarah; Awotwe-Otoo, David; Brown, Matthew R; Boyne, Michael T; Brorson, Kurt A

    2017-01-01

    Linkage of upstream cell culture with downstream processing and purification is an aspect of Quality by Design crucial for efficient and consistent production of high quality biopharmaceutical proteins. In a previous Plackett-Burman screening study of parallel bioreactor cultures we evaluated main effects of 11 process variables, such as agitation, sparge rate, feeding regimens, dissolved oxygen set point, inoculation density, supplement addition, temperature, and pH shifts. In this follow-up study, we observed linkages between cell culture process parameters and downstream capture chromatography performance and subsequent antibody attributes. In depth analysis of the capture chromatography purification of harvested cell culture fluid yielded significant effects of upstream process parameters on host cell protein abundance and behavior. A variety of methods were used to characterize the antibody both after purification and buffer formulation. This analysis provided insight in to the significant impacts of upstream process parameters on aggregate formation, impurities, and protein structure. This report highlights the utility of linkage studies in identifying how changes in upstream parameters can impact downstream critical quality attributes. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:163-170, 2017.

  1. Donor/Acceptor Mixed Self-Assembled Monolayers for Realising a Multi-Redox-State Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Montenegro, Javier; Marchante, Elena; Crivillers, Núria; Rovira, Concepció; Mas-Torrent, Marta

    2016-06-17

    Mixed molecular self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold, based on two types of electroactive molecules, that is, electron-donor (ferrocene) and electron-acceptor (anthraquinone) molecules, are prepared as an approach to realise surfaces exhibiting multiple accessible redox states. The SAMs are investigated in different electrolyte media. The nature of these media has a strong impact on the types of redox processes that take place and on the redox potentials. Under optimised conditions, surfaces with three redox states are achieved. Such states are accessible in a relatively narrow potential window in which the SAMs on gold are stable. This communication elucidates the key challenges in fabricating bicomponent SAMs as electrochemical switches.

  2. Electrochemistry of dithienylethenes and their application in electropolymer modified photo- and redox switchable surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logtenberg, Hella; Browne, Wesley R

    2013-01-14

    Diarylethenes have proven to be versatile responsive components in many applications due to their photochromic properties. In recent years their potential use as redox switchable components has become increasingly apparent. Applying dithienylethenes as redox switchable components requires their immobilisation on conducting substrates and hence electropolymerisation is a promising, albeit, challenging approach to developing such systems. In this review the electrochemical properties of dithienylethenes will be discussed together with a consideration of mechanistic aspects of the switching processes observed followed by a review of recent efforts to develop dithienylethene based redox and photoswitchable redox polymers through electropolymerisation.

  3. Sedimentary cobalt concentrations track marine redox evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth; Planavsky, Noah; Lalonde, Stefan; Robbins, Jamie; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2013-04-01

    Oxygen production by photosynthesis drove the redox evolution of the atmosphere and ocean. Primary productivity by oxygenic photosynthesizers in the modern surface ocean is limited by trace nutrients such as iron, but previous studies have also observed high Co uptake associated with natural cyanobacterial populations. Constraining the size and variation of the oceanic reservoir of Co through time will help to understand the regulation of primary productivity and hence oxygenation through time. In this study, Co concentrations from iron formations (IF), shales and marine pyrites deposited over nearly 4 billion years of Earth's history are utilized to reconstruct secular changes in the mechanisms of Co removal from the oceanic reservoir. The Co reservoir prior to ~2 Ga was dominated by hydrothermal inputs and Fe(III)oxyhydroxides were likely involved in the removal of Co from the water column. Fe(II) oxidation in the water column resulted in the deposition of IF in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic, and the Co inventory of IF records a large oceanic reservoir of Co during this time. Lower Co concentrations in sediments during the Middle Proterozoic signify a decrease in the oceanic reservoir due to the expansion euxinic environments, corresponding to the results of previous studies. A transition to an oxidized deep ocean in the Phanerozoic is evidenced by correlation between Co and manganese (Mn) concentrations in hydrothermal and exhalative deposits, and in marine pyrites. This relationship between Co and Mn, signifying deposition of Co in association with Mn(IV)oxides, does not occur in the Precambrian. Mn(II) oxidation occurs at higher redox potentials than that required for Fe(II) oxidation, and the extent of Mn redox cycling prior to full ventilation of the oceans at the end of the Neoproterozoic was likely limited to spatially restricted oxic surface waters. In this regard, Co is another valuable redox proxy for tracking the growth and decline in oxygenated

  4. Quantitative proteomic characterization of redox-dependent post-translational modifications on protein cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Jicheng; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Protein cysteine thiols play a crucial role in redox signaling, regulation of enzymatic activity and protein function, and maintaining redox homeostasis in living systems. The unique chemical reactivity of thiol groups makes cysteine susceptible to oxidative modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to form a broad array of reversible and irreversible protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). The reversible modifications in particular are one of the major components of redox signaling and are involved in regulation of various cellular processes under physiological and pathological conditions. The biological significance of these redox PTMs in health and diseases has been increasingly recognized. Herein, we review the recent advances of quantitative proteomic approaches for investigating redox PTMs in complex biological systems, including the general considerations of sample processing, various chemical or affinity enrichment strategies, and quantitative approaches. We also highlight a number of redox proteomic approaches that enable effective profiling of redox PTMs for addressing specific biological questions. Although some technological limitations remain, redox proteomics is paving the way towards a better understanding of redox signaling and regulation in human health and diseases.

  5. Hierarchical networks of redox-active reduced crumpled graphene oxide and functionalized few-walled carbon nanotubes for rapid electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeongyong; Lee, Chongmin; Liu, Tianyuan; Eom, Kwangsup; Chen, Zhongming; Noda, Suguru; Fuller, Thomas F.; Jang, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung Woo

    2016-06-01

    Crumpled graphene is known to have a strong aggregation-resistive property due to its unique 3D morphology, providing a promising solution to prevent the restacking issue of graphene based electrode materials. Here, we demonstrate the utilization of redox-active oxygen functional groups on the partially reduced crumpled graphene oxide (r-CGO) for electrochemical energy storage applications. To effectively utilize the surface redox reactions of the functional groups, hierarchical networks of electrodes including r-CGO and functionalized few-walled carbon nanotubes (f-FWNTs) are assembled via a vacuum-filtration process, resulting in a 3D porous structure. These composite electrodes are employed as positive electrodes in Li-cells, delivering high gravimetric capacities of up to ~170 mA h g-1 with significantly enhanced rate-capability compared to the electrodes consisting of conventional 2D reduced graphene oxide and f-FWNTs. These results highlight the importance of microstructure design coupled with oxygen chemistry control, to maximize the surface redox reactions on functionalized graphene based electrodes.Crumpled graphene is known to have a strong aggregation-resistive property due to its unique 3D morphology, providing a promising solution to prevent the restacking issue of graphene based electrode materials. Here, we demonstrate the utilization of redox-active oxygen functional groups on the partially reduced crumpled graphene oxide (r-CGO) for electrochemical energy storage applications. To effectively utilize the surface redox reactions of the functional groups, hierarchical networks of electrodes including r-CGO and functionalized few-walled carbon nanotubes (f-FWNTs) are assembled via a vacuum-filtration process, resulting in a 3D porous structure. These composite electrodes are employed as positive electrodes in Li-cells, delivering high gravimetric capacities of up to ~170 mA h g-1 with significantly enhanced rate-capability compared to the electrodes

  6. Redox Couples with Unequal Diffusion Coefficients: Effect on Redox Cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil Augustine, Dileep; Mathwig, Klaus; Kang, Shuo; Lemay, Serge G.

    2013-01-01

    Redox cycling between two electrodes separated by a narrow gap allows dramatic amplification of the faradaic current. Unlike conventional electrochemistry at a single electrode, however, the mass-transport-limited current is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of both the reduced and oxidized fo

  7. Utilization of sludge waste from natural rubber manufacturing process as a raw material for clay-ceramic production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichaphund, S; Intiya, W; Kongkaew, A; Loykulnant, S; Thavorniti, P

    2012-12-01

    The possibility of utilization of the sludge waste obtained from the natural rubber manufacturing process as a raw material for producing clay ceramics was investigated. To prepared clay-based ceramic, the mixtures of traditional clay and sludge waste (10-30 wt%) were milled, uniaxilly pressed and sintered at a temperature between 1000 and 1200 degrees C. The effect of sludge waste on the properties of clay-based ceramic products was examined. The results showed that the amount of sludge waste addition had an effect on both sinterability and properties of the clay ceramics. Up to 30 wt% of sludge waste can be added into the clay ceramics, and the sintered samples showed good properties.

  8. Possibility of utilizing water-atomized Fe-Ni-Mo steel powder as base materials for warm compaction process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Water-atomized Fe-Ni-Mo steel powder, was utilized as base powder for designing powder mixtures for warm pressing The warm pressing and sintering behaviours of the powder mixtures were studied. The results show that, compared with the pressing at room temperature, the green density gain by warm pressing is within a range of 0.10-0.19 g/cm3 and reduction in spring back is 30%-40% of the ambient, and maximum green density of 7.32 g′cm3 at 735 MPa is obtained as the graphite mass fraction is 0.8%. It was found than sintered densities of the compacts were reduced slightly due to releasing of elastic stress stored in the compacts during sintering. The warm pressing of steel powders gives evidence for substituting the traditional double pressing and double sintering process.

  9. Redox potential - field measurements - meassured vs. expected values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavělová, Monika; Kovář, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) potential is an important and theoretically very well defined parameter and can be calculated accurately. Its value is determinative for management of many electrochemical processes, chemical redox technologies as well as biotechnologies. To measure the redox value that would correspond with the accuracy level of theoretical calculations in field or operational conditions is however nearly impossible. Redox is in practice measured using combined argentochloride electrode with subsequent value conversion to standard hydrogen electrode (EH). Argentochloride electrode does not allow for precise calibration. Prior to the measurement the accuracy of measurement of particular electrode can only be verified in comparative/control solution with value corresponding with oxic conditions (25°C: +220 mV argentochloride electrode, i.e.. +427 mV after conversion to EH). A commercial product of stabile comparative solution for anoxic conditions is not available and therefore not used in every day practice - accuracy of negative redox is not verified. In this presentation results of two tests will be presented: a) monitoring during dynamic groundwater sampling from eight monitoring wells at a site contaminated by chlorinated ethenes (i.e. post-oxic to anoxic conditions) and b) laboratory test of groundwater contaminated by arsenic from two sites during reaction with highly oxidized compounds of iron (ferrates) - i.e. strongly oxic conditions. In both tests a simultaneous measurement by four argentochloride electrodes was implemented - all four electrodes were prior to the test maintained expertly. The redox values of testing electrodes in a comparative solution varied by max. 6 mV. The redox values measured by four electrodes in both anoxic and oxic variant varied by tens to a hundred mV, while with growing time of test the variance of measured redox values increased in both oxic and anoxic variant. Therefore the interpretation of measured redox

  10. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  11. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2016-06-14

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  12. Monitoring intra- and extracellular redox capacity of intact barley aleurone layers responding to phytohormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    2016-01-01

    Redox regulation is important for numerous processes in plant cells including abiotic stress, pathogen defence, tissue development, seed germination and programmed cell death. However, there are few methods allowing redox homeostasis to be addressed in whole plant cells, providing insight into th...

  13. Investigation of the shear thinning behavior of epoxy resins for utilization in vibration assisted liquid composite molding processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, R.; Kirdar, C.; Rudolph, N.; Zaremba, S.; Drechsler, K.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient production and consumption of energy are of greatest importance for contemporary industries and their products. This has led to an increasing application of lightweight materials in general and of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) in particular. However, broader application of CFRP is often limited by high costs and manual labor production processes. These constraints are addressed by Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes. In LCM a dry fibrous preform is placed into a cavity and infiltrated mostly by thermoset resins; epoxy resins are wide spread in CFRP applications. One crucial parameter for a fast mold filling is the viscosity of the resin, which is affected by the applied shear rates as well as temperature and curing time. The work presented focuses on the characterization of the shear thinning behavior of epoxy resins. Furthermore, the correlation with the conditions in vibration assisted LCM processes, where additional shear rates are created during manufacture, is discussed. Higher shear rates result from high frequencies and/or high amplitudes of the vibration motions which are created by a vibration engine mounted on the mold. In rheological investigations the shear thinning behavior of a representative epoxy resin is studied by means of rotational and oscillatory experiments. Moreover, possible effects of shear rates on the chemical curing reaction are studied. Here, the time for gelation is measured for different levels of shear rates in a pre-shearing phase. Based on the rheological studies, the beneficial effect of vibration assistance in LCM processes with respect to mold filling can further be predicted and utilized.

  14. Interplay of electron hopping and bounded diffusion during charge transport in redox polymer electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhoury, Abhinav; Bromberg, Lev; Hatton, T Alan

    2013-01-10

    Redox polymer electrodes (RPEs) have been prepared both by attachment of random copolymers of hydroxybutyl methacrylate and vinylferrocene (poly(HBMA-co-VF)) to carbon substrates by grafting either "to" or "from" the substrate surfaces, and by impregnation of porous carbon substrates with redox polymer gels of similar composition. An observed linear dependence of peak current on the square root of the applied voltage scan rate in cyclic voltammetry (CV) led to the conclusion that the rate controlling step in the redox process was the diffusive transfer of electrons through the redox polymer layer. The variation in the peak current with increasing concentration of the redox species in the polymer indicated that the electron transport transitioned from bounded diffusion to electron hopping. A modified form of the Blauch-Saveant equation for apparent diffusivity of electrons through a polymer film indicated that bounded diffusion was the dominant mechanism of electron transport in RPEs with un-cross-linked polymer chains at low concentrations of the redox species, but, as the concentration of the redox species increased, electron hopping became more dominant, and was the primary mode of electron diffusion above a certain concentration level of redox species. In the cross-linked polymer gels, bounded diffusion was limited because of the restricted mobility of the polymer chains. Electron hopping was the primary mode of electron diffusion in such systems at all concentrations of the redox species.

  15. Improvements in anatomy knowledge when utilizing a novel cyclical "Observe-Reflect-Draw-Edit-Repeat" learning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhouse, Mark; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Hutchinson, Joseph; Thandi, Charankumal S; Keenan, Iain D

    2017-01-01

    Innovative educational strategies can provide variety and enhance student learning while addressing complex logistical and financial issues facing modern anatomy education. Observe-Reflect-Draw-Edit-Repeat (ORDER), a novel cyclical artistic process, has been designed based on cognitivist and constructivist learning theories, and on processes of critical observation, reflection and drawing in anatomy learning. ORDER was initially investigated in the context of a compulsory first year surface anatomy practical (ORDER-SAP) at a United Kingdom medical school in which a cross-over trial with pre-post anatomy knowledge testing was utilized and student perceptions were identified. Despite positive perceptions of ORDER-SAP, medical student (n = 154) pre-post knowledge test scores were significantly greater (P learning methods (3.26, SD = ±2.25) than with ORDER-SAP (2.17, ±2.30). Based on these findings, ORDER was modified and evaluated in the context of an optional self-directed gross anatomy online interactive tutorial (ORDER-IT) for participating first year medical students (n = 55). Student performance was significantly greater (P  0.05) to those students without these characteristics. These findings will be of value to anatomy instructors seeking to engage students from diverse learning backgrounds in a research-led, innovative, time and cost-effective learning method, in the context of contrasting learning environments. Anat Sci Educ 10: 7-22. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  16. Bubbling bed catalytic hydropyrolysis process utilizing larger catalyst particles and smaller biomass particles featuring an anti-slugging reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    This invention relates to a process for thermochemically transforming biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks into high quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. In particular, a catalytic hydropyrolysis reactor, containing a deep bed of fluidized catalyst particles is utilized to accept particles of biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks that are significantly smaller than the particles of catalyst in the fluidized bed. The reactor features an insert or other structure disposed within the reactor vessel that inhibits slugging of the bed and thereby minimizes attrition of the catalyst. Within the bed, the biomass feedstock is converted into a vapor-phase product, containing hydrocarbon molecules and other process vapors, and an entrained solid char product, which is separated from the vapor stream after the vapor stream has been exhausted from the top of the reactor. When the product vapor stream is cooled to ambient temperatures, a significant proportion of the hydrocarbons in the product vapor stream can be recovered as a liquid stream of hydrophobic hydrocarbons, with properties consistent with those of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel. Separate streams of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel may also be obtained, either via selective condensation of each type of fuel, or via later distillation of the combined hydrocarbon liquid.

  17. Redox iodine and nitric acid absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoker, D.J.; Rohrmann, C.A.

    1955-08-02

    A desirable radio-iodine emission goal for all HAPO has recently been set at one curie per day maximum. At the same time it was suggested that a more relaxed limit of ten curries per week with no more than three in any one day, would probably be satisfactory. To assure the achievement of these goal figures in the separations plants it was deemed necessary to either cool'' the irradiated material a greater length of time than is presently done before processing, or provide more efficient, iodine retention facilities. Increased power levels, higher production rates, and an increase in the awareness of radio-iodine emissions, have all coupled together to make present facilities generally inadequate when processing material aged less than about 100 days. Several alternate methods of providing additional iodine retention facilities for Redox were preliminarily scoped and presented for consideration. The purpose of this report is to present a scope design for improving iodine emission control at Redox.

  18. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and ROS-dependent (redox regulation signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs has been gaining ground as the subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties and characteristics have been identified in various cancers. CSCs possess low levels of ROS and are responsible for cancer recurrence after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, how CSCs control ROS production and scavenging and how ROS-dependent signaling pathways contribute to CSCs function remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the role of redox balance, especially in ROS-dependent cellular processes in cancer stem cells (CSCs. We updated recent advances in our understanding of ROS generation and elimination in CSCs and their effects on CSC self-renewal and differentiation through modulating signaling pathways and transcriptional activities. The review concludes that targeting CSCs by manipulating ROS metabolism/dependent pathways may be an effective approach for improving cancer treatment.

  19. Flight Computer Processing Avionics for Space Station Microgravity Experiments: A Risk Assessment of Commercial Off-the-Shelf Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Howard; Liggin, Karl; Crawford, Kevin; Humphries, Rick (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is continually looking for ways to reduce the costs and schedule and minimize the technical risks during the development of microgravity programs. One of the more prominent ways to minimize the cost and schedule is to use off-the-shelf hardware (OTS). However, the use of OTS often increases the risk. This paper addresses relevant factors considered during the selection and utilization of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) flight computer processing equipment for the control of space station microgravity experiments. The paper will also discuss how to minimize the technical risks when using COTS processing hardware. Two microgravity experiments for which the COTS processing equipment is being evaluated for are the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) and the Self-diffusion in Liquid Elements (SDLE) experiment. Since MSFC is the lead center for Microgravity research, EDSE and SDLE processor selection will be closely watched by other experiments that are being designed to meet payload carrier requirements. This includes the payload carriers planned for the International Space Station (ISS). The purpose of EDSE is to continue to investigate microstructural evolution of, and thermal interactions between multiple dendrites growing under diffusion controlled conditions. The purpose of SDLE is to determine accurate self-diffusivity data as a function of temperature for liquid elements selected as representative of class-like structures. In 1999 MSFC initiated a Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) effort to investigate and determine the optimal commercial data bus architecture that could lead to faster, better, and lower cost data acquisition systems for the control of microgravity experiments. As part of this effort various commercial data acquisition systems were acquired and evaluated. This included equipment with various form factors, (3U, 6U, others) and equipment that utilized various bus structures, (VME

  20. The energy-redox axis in aging and age-related neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Li-Peng; Garcia, Jerome V; Han, Derick; Cadenas, Enrique

    2009-11-30

    Decrease in mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity is a feature of the aging process that accompanies redox alterations, such as increased generation of mitochondrial oxidants, altered GSH status, and increased protein oxidation. The decrease in mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity and altered redox status should be viewed as a concerted process that embodies the mitochondrial energy-redox axis and is linked through various mechanisms including: (a) an inter-convertible reducing equivalents pool (i.e., NAD(P)(+)/NAD(P)H) and (b) redox-mediated protein post-translational modifications involved in energy metabolism. The energy-redox axis provides the rationale for therapeutic approaches targeted to each or both component(s) of the axis that effectively preserves or improve mitochondrial function and that have implications for aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Electron Transfer in Flavodoxin-based Redox Maquettes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alagaratnam, S.

    2005-01-01

    Small redox proteins play the role of electron taxis in the cell, picking electrons up at one location and delivering them at another. While it is known that these reactions are the basis for the processes of energy generation by respiration and photosynthesis, the means by which these 'taxis' recog

  2. The azomethine ylide route to amine C-H functionalization: redox-versions of classic reactions and a pathway to new transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Daniel

    2015-02-17

    Conspectus Redox-neutral methods for the functionalization of amine α-C-H bonds are inherently efficient because they avoid external oxidants and reductants and often do not generate unwanted byproducts. However, most of the current methods for amine α-C-H bond functionalization are oxidative in nature. While the most efficient variants utilize atmospheric oxygen as the terminal oxidant, many such transformations require the use of expensive or toxic oxidants, often coupled with the need for transition metal catalysts. Redox-neutral amine α-functionalizations that involve intramolecular hydride transfer steps provide viable alternatives to certain oxidative reactions. These processes have been known for some time and are particularly well suited for tertiary amine substrates. A mechanistically distinct strategy for secondary amines has emerged only recently, despite sharing common features with a range of classic organic transformations. Among those are such widely used reactions as the Strecker, Mannich, Pictet-Spengler, and Kabachnik-Fields reactions, Friedel-Crafts alkylations, and iminium alkynylations. In these classic processes, condensation of a secondary amine with an aldehyde (or a ketone) typically leads to the formation of an intermediate iminium ion, which is subsequently attacked by a nucleophile. The corresponding redox-versions of these transformations utilize identical starting materials but incorporate an isomerization step that enables α-C-H bond functionalization. Intramolecular versions of these reactions include redox-neutral amine α-amination, α-oxygenation, and α-sulfenylation. In all cases, a reductive N-alkylation is effectively combined with an oxidative α-functionalization, generating water as the only byproduct. Reactions are promoted by simple carboxylic acids and in some cases require no additives. Azomethine ylides, dipolar species whose usage is predominantly in [3 + 2] cycloadditions and other pericyclic processes, have been

  3. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, O; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    on the redox potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximate to 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative...

  4. Mitochondrial redox and pH signaling occurs in axonal and synaptic organelle clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckwoldt, Michael O; Armoundas, Antonis A; Aon, Miguel A; Bendszus, Martin; O'Rourke, Brian; Schwarzländer, Markus; Dick, Tobias P; Kurz, Felix T

    2016-03-22

    Redox switches are important mediators in neoplastic, cardiovascular and neurological disorders. We recently identified spontaneous redox signals in neurons at the single mitochondrion level where transients of glutathione oxidation go along with shortening and re-elongation of the organelle. We now have developed advanced image and signal-processing methods to re-assess and extend previously obtained data. Here we analyze redox and pH signals of entire mitochondrial populations. In total, we quantified the effects of 628 redox and pH events in 1797 mitochondria from intercostal axons and neuromuscular synapses using optical sensors (mito-Grx1-roGFP2; mito-SypHer). We show that neuronal mitochondria can undergo multiple redox cycles exhibiting markedly different signal characteristics compared to single redox events. Redox and pH events occur more often in mitochondrial clusters (medium cluster size: 34.1 ± 4.8 μm(2)). Local clusters possess higher mitochondrial densities than the rest of the axon, suggesting morphological and functional inter-mitochondrial coupling. We find that cluster formation is redox sensitive and can be blocked by the antioxidant MitoQ. In a nerve crush paradigm, mitochondrial clusters form sequentially adjacent to the lesion site and oxidation spreads between mitochondria. Our methodology combines optical bioenergetics and advanced signal processing and allows quantitative assessment of entire mitochondrial populations.

  5. The utilization of waste by-products for removing silicate from mineral processing wastewater via chemical precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jianhua; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yuehua; Gao, Zhiyong; Liu, Runqing; Zhang, Qingpeng; Liu, Hang; Meng, Xiangsong

    2017-08-22

    This study investigates an environmentally friendly technology that utilizes waste by-products (waste acid and waste alkali liquids) to treat mineral processing wastewater. Chemical precipitation is used to remove silicate from scheelite (CaWO4) cleaning flotation wastewater and the waste by-products are used as a substitute for calcium chloride (CaCl2). A series of laboratory experiments is conducted to explain the removal of silicate and the characterization and formation mechanism of calcium silicate. The results show that silicate removal reaches 90% when the Ca:Si molar ratio exceeds 1.0. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the characterization and formation of calcium silicate. The pH is the key factor for silicate removal, and the formation of polysilicic acid with a reduction of pH can effectively improve the silicate removal and reduce the usage of calcium. The economic analysis shows that the treatment costs with waste acid (0.63 $/m(3)) and waste alkali (1.54 $/m(3)) are lower than that of calcium chloride (2.38 $/m(3)). The efficient removal of silicate is confirmed by industrial testing at a plant. The results show that silicate removal reaches 85% in the recycled water from tailings dam. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-Term Reliability of a Hard-Switched Boost Power Processing Unit Utilizing SiC Power MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikpe, Stanley A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Carr, Gregory A.; Hunter, Don; Ludwig, Lawrence L.; Wood, William; Iannello, Christopher J.; Del Castillo, Linda Y.; Fitzpatrick, Fred D.; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) power devices have demonstrated many performance advantages over their silicon (Si) counterparts. As the inherent material limitations of Si devices are being swiftly realized, wide-band-gap (WBG) materials such as SiC have become increasingly attractive for high power applications. In particular, SiC power metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors' (MOSFETs) high breakdown field tolerance, superior thermal conductivity and low-resistivity drift regions make these devices an excellent candidate for power dense, low loss, high frequency switching applications in extreme environment conditions. In this paper, a novel power processing unit (PPU) architecture is proposed utilizing commercially available 4H-SiC power MOSFETs from CREE Inc. A multiphase straight boost converter topology is implemented to supply up to 10 kilowatts full-scale. High Temperature Gate Bias (HTGB) and High Temperature Reverse Bias (HTRB) characterization is performed to evaluate the long-term reliability of both the gate oxide and the body diode of the SiC components. Finally, susceptibility of the CREE SiC MOSFETs to damaging effects from heavy-ion radiation representative of the on-orbit galactic cosmic ray environment are explored. The results provide the baseline performance metrics of operation as well as demonstrate the feasibility of a hard-switched PPU in harsh environments.

  7. High-Gravity Carbonation Process for Enhancing CO2 Fixation and Utilization Exemplified by the Steelmaking Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chen, Chun-Da; Shen, Ai-Lin; Lin, Michael; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2015-10-20

    The high-gravity carbonation process for CO2 mineralization and product utilization as a green cement was evaluated using field operation data from the steelmaking industry. The effect of key operating factors, including rotation speed, liquid-to-solid ratio, gas flow rate, and slurry flow rate, on CO2 removal efficiency was studied. The results indicated that a maximal CO2 removal of 97.3% was achieved using basic oxygen furnace slag at a gas-to-slurry ratio of 40, with a capture capacity of 165 kg of CO2 per day. In addition, the product with different carbonation conversions (i.e., 0%, 17%, and 48%) was used as supplementary cementitious materials in blended cement at various substitution ratios (i.e., 0%, 10%, and 20%). The performance of the blended cement mortar, including physicochemical properties, morphology, mineralogy, compressive strength, and autoclave soundness, was evaluated. The results indicated that the mortar with a high carbonation conversion of slag exhibited a higher mechanical strength in the early stage than pure portland cement mortar, suggesting its suitability for use as a high early strength cement. It also possessed superior soundness compared to the mortar using fresh slag. Furthermore, the optimal operating conditions of the high-gravity carbonation were determined by response surface models for maximizing CO2 removal efficiency and minimizing energy consumption.

  8. Redox accountability test program: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, R.A.; Bray, L.A.

    1958-11-25

    This report details initial results of a large scale accountability test program which was recently carried out in the Redox Facility. The test, as originally planned which was to consist of the complete processing (no inventory-clean plant basis) of about 55 tons of selected metal in conjunction with an extensive analytical, sampling, and volume measurement program. With the exception of two incidents, the processing requirements (minimum inventory and measurement of all material) necessary to the success of the test, were met. The two incidents which increase the uncertainties associated with some of the material balance values obtained were: the discharge of an estimated 700 pounds of uranium to the floor in a transfer from F-5 to F-4 due tot he improper installation of the F-5 to F-4 transfer line (jumper) and the discovery of a large accumulation of plutonium ({approximately} 15 kg) in the L-2 stripping tower after completion of the test run.

  9. Hydrogen permeable high-temperature membranes. Development and application in gas separation processes and in hydrogen-producing reactions for process heat utilization. Wasserstoffpermeable Hochtemperaturmembranen. Entwicklung und Einsatz in Gastrennprozessen und in Wasserstoff erzeugenden Reaktionen zur Nutzung von Prozesswaerme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirich, W.

    1990-04-03

    The thesis deals with hydrogen-permeable, high-temperature membranes consisting of metal-bare or ceramic-base materials, discussing their fabrication and properties as well as the analyses and experimentes performed for studying the applicability of these membranes in hydrogen production processes or in energy conversion processes for the utilization of process heat from HTGR-type reactors. (orig.)

  10. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  11. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Watson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an ‘end-stage’ process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation–reduction (redox reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This

  12. An Alternative Evaluation Approach for the Problem-Solving Training Program: A Utilization-Focused Evaluation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    1984-01-01

    A utilization-focused approach in evaluating a problem-solving skills training program (see TM 510 179) would have placed more emphasis on identifying evaluation users, their information needs, and likely use of findings. Other methods options are also discussed, along with how to prepare decision makers for utilization. (Author/BW)

  13. Assessing the redox properties of iron-bearing clay minerals using homogeneous electrocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorski, Christopher A., E-mail: Christopher.gorski@eawag.ch [Environmental Chemistry, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Uberlandstrasse 133, P.O. Box 611, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Sander, Michael; Aeschbacher, Michael [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics (IBP), ETH Zurich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Hofstetter, Thomas B. [Environmental Chemistry, Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Uberlandstrasse 133, P.O. Box 611, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)] [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics (IBP), ETH Zurich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Iron-bearing clay minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and have been shown to play important roles in several biogeochemical processes. Previous efforts to characterize the Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 3+} redox couple in clay minerals using electrochemical techniques have been limited by experimental difficulties due to inadequate reactivity between clay minerals and electrodes. The current work overcomes this limitation by utilizing organic electron transfer mediators that rapidly transfer electrons with both the Fe-bearing clay minerals and electrodes. Here, an Fe-rich source clay mineral (ferruginous smectite, SWa-1) is examined with respect to what fraction of structural Fe participates in oxidation/reduction reactions and the relationship between bulk Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratios to the reduction potential (E{sub h}).

  14. Prioritizing Roads Safety Based on the Quasi-Induced Exposure Method and Utilization of the Analytical Hierarchy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad rezaei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Safety analysis of the roads through the accident rates which is one of the widely used tools has been resulted from the direct exposure method which is based on the ratio of the vehicle-kilometers traveled and vehicle-travel time. However, due to some fundamental flaws in its theories and difficulties in gaining access to the data required such as traffic volume, distance and duration of the trip, and various problems in determining the exposure in a specific time, place, and individual categories, there is a need for an algorithm for prioritizing the road safety so that with a new exposure method, the problems of the previous approaches would be resolved. In this way, an efficient application may lead to have more realistic comparisons and the new method would be applicable to a wider range of time, place, and individual categories. Therefore, an algorithm was introduced to prioritize the safety of roads using the quasi-induced exposure method and utilizing the analytical hierarchy process. For this research, 11 provinces of Iran were chosen as case study locations. A rural accidents database was created for these provinces, the validity of quasi-induced exposure method for Iran’s accidents database was explored, and the involvement ratio for different characteristics of the drivers and the vehicles was measured. Results showed that the quasi-induced exposure method was valid in determining the real exposure in the provinces under study. Results also showed a significant difference in the prioritization based on the new and traditional approaches. This difference mostly would stem from the perspective of the quasi-induced exposure method in determining the exposure, opinion of experts, and the quantity of accidents data. Overall, the results for this research showed that prioritization based on the new approach is more comprehensive and reliable compared to the prioritization in the traditional approach which is dependent on various

  15. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase constitute an energy-consuming redox circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Lin, Chien-Te; Ryan, Terence E; Reese, Lauren R; Gilliam, Laura A A; Cathey, Brook L; Lark, Daniel S; Smith, Cody D; Muoio, Deborah M; Neufer, P Darrell

    2015-04-15

    Cellular proteins rely on reversible redox reactions to establish and maintain biological structure and function. How redox catabolic (NAD+/NADH) and anabolic (NADP+/NADPH) processes integrate during metabolism to maintain cellular redox homoeostasis, however, is unknown. The present work identifies a continuously cycling mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm)-dependent redox circuit between the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT). PDHC is shown to produce H2O2 in relation to reducing pressure within the complex. The H2O2 produced, however, is effectively masked by a continuously cycling redox circuit that links, via glutathione/thioredoxin, to NNT, which catalyses the regeneration of NADPH from NADH at the expense of ΔΨm. The net effect is an automatic fine-tuning of NNT-mediated energy expenditure to metabolic balance at the level of PDHC. In mitochondria, genetic or pharmacological disruptions in the PDHC-NNT redox circuit negate counterbalance changes in energy expenditure. At the whole animal level, mice lacking functional NNT (C57BL/6J) are characterized by lower energy-expenditure rates, consistent with their well-known susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings suggest the integration of redox sensing of metabolic balance with compensatory changes in energy expenditure provides a potential mechanism by which cellular redox homoeostasis is maintained and body weight is defended during periods of positive and negative energy balance.

  16. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase constitute an energy consuming redox circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Lin, Chien-Te; Ryan, Terence E.; Reese, Lauren R.; Gilliam, Laura A. A.; Cathey, Brook L.; Lark, Daniel S.; Smith, Cody D.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cellular proteins rely on reversible redox reactions to establish and maintain biological structure and function. How redox catabolic (NAD+:NADH) and anabolic (NADP+:NADPH) processes integrate during metabolism to maintain cellular redox homeostasis however is unknown. The present work identifies a continuously cycling, mitochondrial membrane potential-dependent redox circuit between the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT). PDHC is shown to produce H2O2 in relation to reducing pressure within the complex. The H2O2 produced however is effectively masked by a continuously cycling redox circuit that links, via glutathione/thioredoxin, to NNT, which catalyzes the regeneration of NADPH from NADH at the expense of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The net effect is an automatic fine tuning of NNT-mediated energy expenditure to metabolic balance at the level of PDHC. In mitochondria, genetic or pharmacological disruptions in the PDHC-NNT redox circuit negate counterbalance changes in energy expenditure. At the whole animal level, mice lacking functional NNT (C57BL/6J) are characterized by lower energy expenditure rates, consistent with their well known susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings suggest the integration of redox sensing of metabolic balance with compensatory changes in energy expenditure provides a potential mechanism by which cellular redox homeostasis is maintained and body weight is defended during periods of positive and negative energy balance. PMID:25643703

  17. Monitoring intra- and extracellular redox capacity of intact barley aleurone layers responding to phytohormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Christina; Zór, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto; Dufva, Martin; Emnéus, Jenny; Finnie, Christine

    2016-12-15

    Redox regulation is important for numerous processes in plant cells including abiotic stress, pathogen defence, tissue development, seed germination and programmed cell death. However, there are few methods allowing redox homeostasis to be addressed in whole plant cells, providing insight into the intact in vivo environment. An electrochemical redox assay that applies the menadione-ferricyanide double mediator is used to assess changes in the intracellular and extracellular redox environment in living aleurone layers of barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Himalaya) grains, which respond to the phytohormones gibberellic acid and abscisic acid. Gibberellic acid is shown to elicit a mobilisation of electrons as detected by an increase in the reducing capacity of the aleurone layers. By taking advantage of the membrane-permeable menadione/menadiol redox pair to probe the membrane-impermeable ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox pair, the mobilisation of electrons was dissected into an intracellular and an extracellular, plasma membrane-associated component. The intracellular and extracellular increases in reducing capacity were both suppressed when the aleurone layers were incubated with abscisic acid. By probing redox levels in intact plant tissue, the method provides a complementary approach to assays of reactive oxygen species and redox-related enzyme activities in tissue extracts.

  18. Redox control of 20S proteasome gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gustavo M; Netto, Luis E S; Simões, Vanessa; Santos, Luiz F A; Gozzo, Fabio C; Demasi, Marcos A A; Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Bicev, Renata N; Klitzke, Clécio F; Sogayar, Mari C; Demasi, Marilene

    2012-06-01

    The proteasome is the primary contributor in intracellular proteolysis. Oxidized or unstructured proteins can be degraded via a ubiquitin- and ATP-independent process by the free 20S proteasome (20SPT). The mechanism by which these proteins enter the catalytic chamber is not understood thus far, although the 20SPT gating conformation is considered to be an important barrier to allowing proteins free entrance. We have previously shown that S-glutathiolation of the 20SPT is a post-translational modification affecting the proteasomal activities. The goal of this work was to investigate the mechanism that regulates 20SPT activity, which includes the identification of the Cys residues prone to S-glutathiolation. Modulation of 20SPT activity by proteasome gating is at least partially due to the S-glutathiolation of specific Cys residues. The gate was open when the 20SPT was S-glutathiolated, whereas following treatment with high concentrations of dithiothreitol, the gate was closed. S-glutathiolated 20SPT was more effective at degrading both oxidized and partially unfolded proteins than its reduced form. Only 2 out of 28 Cys were observed to be S-glutathiolated in the proteasomal α5 subunit of yeast cells grown to the stationary phase in glucose-containing medium. We demonstrate a redox post-translational regulatory mechanism controlling 20SPT activity. S-glutathiolation is a post-translational modification that triggers gate opening and thereby activates the proteolytic activities of free 20SPT. This process appears to be an important regulatory mechanism to intensify the removal of oxidized or unstructured proteins in stressful situations by a process independent of ubiquitination and ATP consumption. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1183-1194.

  19. A Review of RedOx Cycling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Anode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Van herle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cells are able to convert fuels, including hydrocarbons, to electricity with an unbeatable efficiency even for small systems. One of the main limitations for long-term utilization is the reduction-oxidation cycling (RedOx cycles of the nickel-based anodes. This paper will review the effects and parameters influencing RedOx cycles of the Ni-ceramic anode. Second, solutions for RedOx instability are reviewed in the patent and open scientific literature. The solutions are described from the point of view of the system, stack design, cell design, new materials and microstructure optimization. Finally, a brief synthesis on RedOx cycling of Ni-based anode supports for standard and optimized microstructures is depicted.

  20. A general approach toward enhancement of pseudocapacitive performance of conducting polymers by redox-active electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A general approach is demonstrated where the pseudocapacitive performance of different conducting polymers is enhanced in redox-active electrolytes. The concept is demonstrated using several electroactive conducting polymers, including polyaniline, polypyrrole, and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). As compared to conventional electrolytes, the redox-active electrolytes, prepared by simply adding a redox mediator to the conventional electrolyte, can significantly improve the energy storage capacity of pseudocapacitors with different conducting polymers. The results show that the specific capacitance of conducting polymer based pseudocapacitors can be increased by a factor of two by utilization of the redox-active electrolytes. In fact, this approach gives some of the highest reported specific capacitance values for electroactive conducting polymers. Moreover, our findings present a general and effective approach for the enhancement of energy storage performance of pseudocapacitors using a variety of polymeric electrode materials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Subduction Zone Redox and the Deep Earth Cycles of Sulfur and Chalcophile Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canil, D.

    2013-12-01

    -electron change in redox state, with significant oxidation/ reduction capacity. The concomitant higher fO2 can in turn facilitate the mobility and/or extraction of chalcophile metals from the arc mantle into magmas by the melting process in arcs. Sedimentary records show that through most of Earth's history sulfur has mostly been subducted in reduced form as sulfide. The fate of sulfide in ocean sediments during subduction (and subsequent dehydration or melting) has not been thoroughly investigated, nor its interplay with other redox couples (C, H, Fe) in sediments, subducted basalt or in the mantle. I examine the redox controls on sulfate versus sulfide stability in subducted oceanic crust, and their disposition relative to other redox couples in the mantle. Sulfate-sulfide equilibria impact the fate of sulfur and chalcophile elements in subducted lithologies, especially if dehydrated or melted depending on a variety subduction P-T trajectories. In this light, new high P-T experiments show the utility of Cu as a proxy for S in the subduction system . These proxies can potentially be applied to examine the deep S cycle, subduction redox and its role in arc magmatism over geologic time.

  2. Computational Redox Potential Predictions: Applications to Inorganic and Organic Aqueous Complexes, and Complexes Adsorbed to Mineral Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamoorthy Arumugam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of redox processes range over a number of scientific fields. This review article summarizes the theory behind the calculation of redox potentials in solution for species such as organic compounds, inorganic complexes, actinides, battery materials, and mineral surface-bound-species. Different computational approaches to predict and determine redox potentials of electron transitions are discussed along with their respective pros and cons for the prediction of redox potentials. Subsequently, recommendations are made for certain necessary computational settings required for accurate calculation of redox potentials. This article reviews the importance of computational parameters, such as basis sets, density functional theory (DFT functionals, and relativistic approaches and the role that physicochemical processes play on the shift of redox potentials, such as hydration or spin orbit coupling, and will aid in finding suitable combinations of approaches for different chemical and geochemical applications. Identifying cost-effective and credible computational approaches is essential to benchmark redox potential calculations against experiments. Once a good theoretical approach is found to model the chemistry and thermodynamics of the redox and electron transfer process, this knowledge can be incorporated into models of more complex reaction mechanisms that include diffusion in the solute, surface diffusion, and dehydration, to name a few. This knowledge is important to fully understand the nature of redox processes be it a geochemical process that dictates natural redox reactions or one that is being used for the optimization of a chemical process in industry. In addition, it will help identify materials that will be useful to design catalytic redox agents, to come up with materials to be used for batteries and photovoltaic processes, and to identify new and improved remediation strategies in environmental engineering, for example the

  3. Redox Active Polymers as Soluble Nanomaterials for Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Mark; Moore, Jeffrey S; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-11-15

    RAPs conveniently translate the redox properties of small molecules into a nanostructure, they give rise to charge transfer mechanisms and electrolyte interactions that elicit distinct electrochemical responses. To understand how the electrochemical characteristics of RAPs depend on molecular features, including redox moiety, macromolecular size, and backbone structure, a range of techniques has been employed by our groups, including voltammetry at macro- and microelectrodes, rotating disk electrode voltammetry, bulk electrolysis, and scanning electrochemical microscopy. RAPs rely on three-dimensional charge transfer within their inner bulk, which is an efficient process and allows quantitative electrolysis of particles of up to ∼800 nm in radius. Interestingly, we find that interactions between neighboring pendants create unique opportunities for fine-tuning their electrochemical reactivity. Furthermore, RAP interrogation toward the single particle limit promises to shed light on fundamental charge storage mechanisms.

  4. A Multistep Equilibria-Redox-Complexation Demonstration to Illustrate Le Chatelier's Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Tomas G.; Mellon, Edward K.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a process that can be used to illustrate a number of chemical principles including Le Chatelier's principle, redox chemistry, equilibria versus steady state situations, and solubility of species. (JRH)

  5. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Skyllas-Kazacos; Aishwarya Parasuraman; Tuti Mariana Lim; Suminto Winardi; Helen Prifti

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. Th...

  6. Quantitative redox biology: an approach to understand the role of reactive species in defining the cellular redox environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Garry R; Wagner, Brett A; Rodgers, Victor G J

    2013-11-01

    Systems biology is now recognized as a needed approach to understand the dynamics of inter- and intra-cellular processes. Redox processes are at the foundation of nearly all aspects of biology. Free radicals, related oxidants, and antioxidants are central to the basic functioning of cells and tissues. They set the cellular redox environment and, therefore, are the key to regulation of biochemical pathways and networks, thereby influencing organism health. To understand how short-lived, quasi-stable species, such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, connect to the metabolome, proteome, lipidome, and genome we need absolute quantitative information on all redox active compounds as well as thermodynamic and kinetic information on their reactions, i.e., knowledge of the complete redoxome. Central to the state of the redoxome are the interactive details of the superoxide/peroxide formation and removal systems. Quantitative information is essential to establish the dynamic mathematical models needed to reveal the temporal evolution of biochemical pathways and networks. This new field of Quantitative Redox Biology will allow researchers to identify new targets for intervention to advance our efforts to achieve optimal human health.

  7. Silencing of nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase impairs cellular redox homeostasis and energy metabolism in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Cadenas, Enrique

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondrial NADPH generation is largely dependent on the inner-membrane nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT), which catalyzes the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH utilizing the proton gradient as the driving force and NADH as the electron donor. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of NNT in PC12 cells results in decreased cellular NADPH levels, altered redox status of the cell in terms of decreased GSH/GSSG ratios and increased H(2)O(2) levels, thus leading to an increased redox potential (a more oxidized redox state). NNT knockdown results in a decrease of oxidative phosphorylation while anaerobic glycolysis levels remain unchanged. Decreased oxidative phosphorylation was associated with a) inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) activity; b) reduction of NADH availability, c) decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, and d) decrease of ATP levels. Moreover, the alteration of redox status actually precedes the impairment of mitochondrial bioenergetics. A possible mechanism could be that the activation of the redox-sensitive c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and its translocation to the mitochondrion leads to the inhibition of PDH (upon phosphorylation) and induction of intrinsic apoptosis, resulting in decreased cell viability. This study supports the notion that oxidized cellular redox state and decline in cellular bioenergetics - as a consequence of NNT knockdown - cannot be viewed as independent events, but rather as an interdependent relationship coordinated by the mitochondrial energy-redox axis. Disruption of electron flux from fuel substrates to redox components due to NNT suppression induces not only mitochondrial dysfunction but also cellular disorders through redox-sensitive signaling.

  8. Redox signaling in pathophysiology of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzunova, Miroslava; Dovinova, Ima; Barancik, Miroslav; Chan, Julie Y H

    2013-09-18

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are products of normal cellular metabolism and derive from various sources in different cellular compartments. Oxidative stress resultant from imbalance between ROS generation and antioxidant defense mechanisms is important in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cardiac hypertrophy. In this review we focus on hypertension and address sources of cellular ROS generation, mechanisms involved in regulation of radical homeostasis, superoxide dismutase isoforms in pathophysiology of hypertension; as well as radical intracellular signaling and phosphorylation processes in proteins of the affected cardiovascular tissues. Finally, we discuss the transcriptional factors involved in redox-sensitive gene transcription and antioxidant response, as well as their roles in hypertension.

  9. 火龙果加工综合利用状况%Research Progress of Processing and Comprehensive Utilization of Pitaya

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱春华; 李进学; 龚琪; 高俊燕; 岳建强

    2014-01-01

    综述火龙果花、果皮、果肉及种仁各部位的营养保健价值及其加工利用的研究现状,提出对火龙果进行精深加工利用、研究开发新产品、提高产品附加值的建议,旨在为火龙果资源的综合开发利用提供参考依据。%This paper summarized the nutrition and health care values of flower, fruit peel, pulp and seeds of pitaya, and research status of their processing and utilization, put forward some proposals such as deep processing and utilization of pitaya, research and development of new products, and improving product added value, in order to provide reference for comprehensive exploitation and utilization of resources of pitaya.

  10. A redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein sensor for monitoring nuclear glutathione redox dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach-Latapy, Agata; Dardalhon, Michèle; Huang, Meng-Er

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular redox homeostasis is crucial for many cellular functions, but accurate measurements of cellular compartment-specific redox states remain technically challenging. Genetically encoded biosensors, including the glutathione-specific redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP), provide an alternative approach to overcome the limitations of conventional glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) redox measurements. In this chapter we describe methods to measure the nuclear rxYFP redox state in human cells by a redox Western blot technique. A nucleus-targeted rxYFP sensor can be used to sense nuclear steady-state and dynamic redox changes in response to oxidative stress. Complementary to existing redox sensors and conventional redox measurements, nucleus-targeted rxYFP sensors provide a novel tool for examining nuclear redox homeostasis in mammalian cells, permitting high-resolution readout of steady glutathione state and dynamics of redox changes. The technique described may be used with minimal variations to study the effects of stress conditions which lead to glutathione redox changes.

  11. Student Discipline Intervention Strategies: A Case Study of Two Institutions' Processes Utilized to Resolve Misconduct of Students Who Concomitantly Experience a Mental Health Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, Gary G.

    2011-01-01

    This study contributes to the research regarding processes and procedures utilized by two institutions of higher education to respond to students who participate in inappropriate behavior and who are concomitantly experiencing a mental health crisis. A case study analysis of two institutions of higher education was used to examine this issue. The…

  12. Redox control of senescence and age-related disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshaya Chandrasekaran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The signaling networks that drive the aging process, associated functional deterioration, and pathologies has captured the scientific community's attention for decades. While many theories exist to explain the aging process, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS provides a signaling link between engagement of cellular senescence and several age-associated pathologies. Cellular senescence has evolved to restrict tumor progression but the accompanying senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP promotes pathogenic pathways. Here, we review known biological theories of aging and how ROS mechanistically control senescence and the aging process. We also describe the redox-regulated signaling networks controlling the SASP and its important role in driving age-related diseases. Finally, we discuss progress in designing therapeutic strategies that manipulate the cellular redox environment to restrict age-associated pathology.

  13. Advanced water processing system (AWPS), including advanced filtration system (AFS) and advanced ion selective system (AISS) for improved utility (PWR/BWR) water processing performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, Mark S. [ATG, Inc.(United States); Vance, Jene N. [V and V, Inc. (United States)

    1999-07-01

    ( particularly resin volumes). Evaporation and drying has been combined to create a greatly improved process, especially when the customer can send sludges and/or resins to the ATG catalytics facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Filtration and selective media systems have been provided on a service basis (by month or gallon) or sold outright to the utility. Typical problems encountered in current demineralization/media systems include build-up, recycle, or bleed of cesium (Cs), cobalt (Co), boron (B), and iron (Fe) in BWRs and Cs, Co, antimony (Sb), and B in PWRs. The advanced Ion Selective sSystem (AISS) features specific ion removals rather than brute force techniques such as total demineralization or reverse osmosis, thus offering smaller equipment skids, eliminates the chance of accidental releases/spiking during plant upsets. Such media can also be added solely to existing, available vessels or to top off existing media. (author)

  14. Molecular controls of the oxygenation and redox reactions of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Celia; Henkens, Robert; Alayash, Abdu I; Banerjee, Sambuddha; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2013-06-10

    The broad classes of O(2)-binding proteins known as hemoglobins (Hbs) carry out oxygenation and redox functions that allow organisms with significantly different physiological demands to exist in a wide range of environments. This is aided by allosteric controls that modulate the protein's redox reactions as well as its O(2)-binding functions. The controls of Hb's redox reactions can differ appreciably from the molecular controls for Hb oxygenation and come into play in elegant mechanisms for dealing with nitrosative stress, in the malarial resistance conferred by sickle cell Hb, and in the as-yet unsuccessful designs for safe and effective blood substitutes. An important basic principle in consideration of Hb's redox reactions is the distinction between kinetic and thermodynamic reaction control. Clarification of these modes of control is critical to gaining an increased understanding of Hb-mediated oxidative processes and oxidative toxicity in vivo. This review addresses emerging concepts and some unresolved questions regarding the interplay between the oxygenation and oxidation reactions of structurally diverse Hbs, both within red blood cells and under acellular conditions. Developing methods that control Hb-mediated oxidative toxicity will be critical to the future development of Hb-based blood substitutes.

  15. Extracellular cysteine in connexins: role as redox sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Antonio Retamal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Connexin-based channels comprise hemichannels and gap junction channels. The opening of hemichannels allow for the flux of ions and molecules from the extracellular space into the cell and vice versa. Similarly, the opening of gap junction channels permits the diffusional exchange of ions and molecules between the cytoplasm and contacting cells. The controlled opening of hemichannels has been associated with several physiological cellular processes; thereby unregulated hemichannel activity may induce loss of cellular homeostasis and cell death. Hemichannel activity can be regulated through several mechanisms, such as phosphorylation, divalent cations and changes in membrane potential. Additionally, it was recently postulated that redox molecules could modify hemichannels properties in vitro. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox molecules interact with hemichannels is poorly understood. In this work, we discuss the current knowledge on connexin redox regulation and we propose the hypothesis that extracellular cysteine could be important for sensing changes in redox potential. Future studies on this topic will offer new insight into hemichannel function, thereby expanding the understanding of the contribution of hemichannels to disease progression.

  16. Role of redox status in development of glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleli eSalazar-Ramiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is a highly aggressive neoplasia, prognosis remains dismal and current therapy is mostly palliative. There are no known risk factors associated with gliomagenesis; however, it is well established that chronic inflammation in brain tissue induces oxidative stress in astrocytes and microglia. High quantities of reactive species of oxygen into the cells can react with several macromolecules, including chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA, leading to damage and malfunction of DNA repair enzymes. These changes bring genetic instability and abnormal metabolic processes favoring oxidative environment and increase rate of cell proliferation. In GBM, a high metabolic rate and increased basal levels of ROS play an important role as chemical mediators in the regulation of signal transduction, protecting malignant cells from apoptosis, thus creating an immunosuppressive environment. New redox therapeutics could reduce oxidative stress preventing cellular damage and high mutation rate accompanied by chromosomal instability, reducing the immunosuppressive environment. In addition, therapies directed to modulate redox rate reduce resistance and moderate the high rate of cell proliferation, favoring apoptosis of tumoral cells. This review describes the redox status in GBM and how this imbalance could promote gliomagenesis through genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, inducing the pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory environment involved in tumor cell proliferation, resistance and immune scape. In addition, are described some therapeutic agents that modulate redox status and might be advantageous in therapy against GBM.

  17. Nitrate bioreduction in redox-variable low permeability sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Sen; Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Liang; Shang, Jianying; Shan, Huimei; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kennedy, David W.; Resch, Charles T.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Fansler, Sarah J.

    2015-09-09

    Denitrification is a microbial process that reduces nitrate and nitrite to nitrous oxide (N2O) or dinitrogen (N2) with a strong implication to global nitrogen cycling and climate change. This paper reports the effect of sediment redox conditions on the rate and end product of denitrification. The sediments were collected from a redox transition zone consisting of oxic and reduced layers at US Department of Energy’s Hanford Site where N2O was locally accumulated in groundwater. The results revealed that denitrification rate and end product varied significantly with initial sediment redox state. The denitrification rate was relatively faster, limited by organic carbon content and bioavailability in the oxic sediment. In contrast, the rate was much slower in the reduced sediment, limited by biomass and microbial function. A significant amount of N2O was accumulated in the reduced sediment; while in the oxic sediment, N2O was further reduced to N2. RT-PCR analysis revealed that nosZ, the gene that codes for N2O reductase, was below detection in the reduced sediment. The results implied that redox transition zones can be important sinks or sources of N2O depending on local biogeochemical and microbial conditions, and are important systems for understanding and modeling denitrification in subsurface environments.

  18. S-Glutathionylation and Redox Protein Signaling in Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womersley, Jacqueline S; Uys, Joachim D

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that comes at a high cost to individuals and society. Therefore understanding the mechanisms by which drugs exert their effects is of prime importance. Drugs of abuse increase the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species resulting in oxidative stress. This change in redox homeostasis increases the conjugation of glutathione to protein cysteine residues; a process called S-glutathionylation. Although traditionally regarded as a protective mechanism against irreversible protein oxidation, accumulated evidence suggests a more nuanced role for S-glutathionylation, namely as a mediator in redox-sensitive protein signaling. The reversible modification of protein thiols leading to alteration in function under different physiologic/pathologic conditions provides a mechanism whereby change in redox status can be translated into a functional response. As such, S-glutathionylation represents an understudied means of post-translational protein modification that may be important in the mechanisms underlying drug addiction. This review will discuss the evidence for S-glutathionylation as a redox-sensing mechanism and how this may be involved in the response to drug-induced oxidative stress. The function of S-glutathionylated proteins involved in neurotransmission, dendritic spine structure, and drug-induced behavioral outputs will be reviewed with specific reference to alcohol, cocaine, and heroin. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Electrochemical analyses of redox-active iron minerals: a review of nonmediated and mediated approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Gorski, Christopher A

    2015-05-19

    Redox-active minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and are involved in numerous electron transfer reactions that significantly affect biogeochemical processes and cycles as well as pollutant dynamics. As a consequence, research in different scientific disciplines is devoted to elucidating the redox properties and reactivities of minerals. This review focuses on the characterization of mineral redox properties using electrochemical approaches from an applied (bio)geochemical and environmental analytical chemistry perspective. Establishing redox equilibria between the minerals and working electrodes is a major challenge in electrochemical measurements, which we discuss in an overview of traditional electrochemical techniques. These issues can be overcome with mediated electrochemical analyses in which dissolved redox mediators are used to increase the rate of electron transfer and to facilitate redox equilibration between working electrodes and minerals in both amperometric and potentiometric measurements. Using experimental data on an iron-bearing clay mineral, we illustrate how mediated electrochemical analyses can be employed to derive important thermodynamic and kinetic data on electron transfer to and from structural iron. We summarize anticipated methodological advancements that will further contribute to advance an improved understanding of electron transfer to and from minerals in environmentally relevant redox processes.

  20. Redox pioneer: professor Barry Halliwell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-05-01

    Professor Barry Halliwell is recognized as a Redox Pioneer because he has published eight articles on redox biology that have been each cited more than 1000 times, and 158 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. His contributions go back as far as 1976, when he was involved in elucidation of the Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle, an efficient mechanism for preventing oxidative damage to chloroplasts. His subsequent work established the important role of iron and zinc in free radical reactions and their relevance to human pathologies. Professor Halliwell is also a leader in developing novel methodology for detecting free radical intermediates in vivo, and his contributions to our knowledge of reactive nitrogen species are highly significant. His sustained excellence won him the top-cited scientist award in the United Kingdom in biomedical sciences in 1999, and in 2003 he was recognized as a highly cited scientist by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for work on plant antioxidants, and the same year ranked 28 out of 5494 biochemists/biologists for scientific impact. Two pieces of his scholarly work have been listed as Citation Classics by ISI, and in 2007 his laboratory was ranked number 1 worldwide based on highest citation score in research on free radicals.

  1. Distinct Redox Profiles of Selected Human Prostate Carcinoma Cell Lines: Implications for Rational Design of Redox Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiswing, Luksana [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Ave., WIMR 7168, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Zhong, Weixiong; Oberley, Terry D., E-mail: toberley@wisc.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Ave., WIMR 7168, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Service, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Rm A-35, 2500 Overlook Terrace, Madison, WI 53705 (United States)

    2011-09-13

    The effects of several cancer chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation are mediated, at least in part, by oxidative stress. To better understand this process, we analyzed certain biochemical properties affecting reduction-oxidation (redox) balance in normal prostate epithelial cells and several prostate cancer cell lines. Highly aggressive androgen-independent prostate cancer PC3 cells demonstrated significantly higher levels of total antioxidant capacity (AC) and intra- and extracellular glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratios when compared with normal prostate epithelial PrEC cells. WPE1-NB26 cells, a prostate cancer cell line derived from immortalized RWPE1 human prostate epithelial cells, demonstrated significantly higher levels of total AC and intra- and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratios, but lower levels of intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and lipid peroxidation compared with RWPE1 cells. LNCaP-C4-2 cells, a more aggressive prostate cancer derived from less aggressive androgen-responsive LNCaP cells, exhibited higher levels of AC and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratio when compared to LNCaP cells. Specific cell types showed distinct cytotoxic responses to redox-modulating compounds. WPE1-NB26 cells were more sensitive to phenethyl isothiocyanate and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) than RWPE1 cells, while PC3 cells were more sensitive to TNF than PrEC cells. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that cancer cell redox state may modulate responses to redox-modulating therapeutic regimens.

  2. Distinct Redox Profiles of Selected Human Prostate Carcinoma Cell Lines: Implications for Rational Design of Redox Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luksana Chaiswing

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of several cancer chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation are mediated, at least in part, by oxidative stress. To better understand this process, we analyzed certain biochemical properties affecting reduction-oxidation (redox balance in normal prostate epithelial cells and several prostate cancer cell lines. Highly aggressive androgen-independent prostate cancer PC3 cells demonstrated significantly higher levels of total antioxidant capacity (AC and intra- and extracellular glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG ratios when compared with normal prostate epithelial PrEC cells. WPE1-NB26 cells, a prostate cancer cell line derived from immortalized RWPE1 human prostate epithelial cells, demonstrated significantly higher levels of total AC and intra- and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratios, but lower levels of intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and lipid peroxidation compared with RWPE1 cells. LNCaP-C4-2 cells, a more aggressive prostate cancer derived from less aggressive androgen-responsive LNCaP cells, exhibited higher levels of AC and extracellular GSH/GSSG ratio when compared to LNCaP cells. Specific cell types showed distinct cytotoxic responses to redox-modulating compounds. WPE1-NB26 cells were more sensitive to phenethyl isothiocyanate and tumor necrosis factor (TNF than RWPE1 cells, while PC3 cells were more sensitive to TNF than PrEC cells. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that cancer cell redox state may modulate responses to redox-modulating therapeutic regimens.

  3. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  4. Redox characteristics of the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R

    2007-01-01

    (ROS) and glutathionylated proteins are maintained at very low levels. In the present review, recent progress in the understanding of the cytosolic thiol-disulfide redox metabolism and novel analytical approaches to studying cytosolic redox properties are discussed. We will focus on the yeast model...

  5. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M.F.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain informatio

  6. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  7. Studying of preconditions of introduction of integrating-utilizing balls in the process of physical education of children of the senior preschool age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasichnyk V. M.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The condition of introduction of integrating-utilizing balls in process of physical education of children of the senior preschool age is considered. In research is used the data of questionnaire of 95 teachers of preschool educational establishments of Lvov. It is established that all interrogated are interested in innovations in physical education process. It is noticed that the majority of respondents 54, 6 % prefer sports employment with elements of games, entertainments and relay races. Determined that 72, 9 % interrogated combined sports employment with other subjects. It is shown that impellent activity promotes mental development of children. By the overwhelming majority of respondents of 98, 8 % are noticed that in the course of physical education it is expedient to combine impellent and informative activity. It is established that all respondents would like to introduce is integrating-utilizing balls in process of physical education of the pre-school educational establishments and see expedient working out of methodical recommendations.

  8. Online monitoring of Mezcal fermentation based on redox potential measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante-Minakata, P; Ibarra-Junquera, V; Rosu, H C; De León-Rodríguez, A; González-García, R

    2009-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the continuous monitoring of the biomass and ethanol concentrations as well as the growth rate in the Mezcal fermentation process. The algorithm performs its task having available only the online measurements of the redox potential. The procedure combines an artificial neural network (ANN) that relates the redox potential to the ethanol and biomass concentrations with a nonlinear observer-based algorithm that uses the ANN biomass estimations to infer the growth rate of this fermentation process. The results show that the redox potential is a valuable indicator of the metabolic activity of the microorganisms during Mezcal fermentation. In addition, the estimated growth rate can be considered as a direct evidence of the presence of mixed culture growth in the process. Usually, mixtures of microorganisms could be intuitively clear in this kind of processes; however, the total biomass data do not provide definite evidence by themselves. In this paper, the detailed design of the software sensor as well as its experimental application is presented at the laboratory level.

  9. Redox regulation of autophagy in healthy brain and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kenneth; Harris-White, Marni E

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy and redox biochemistry are two major sub disciplines of cell biology which are both coming to be appreciated for their paramount importance in the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus far, however, there has been relatively little exploration of the interface between autophagy and redox biology. Autophagy normally recycles macro-molecular aggregates produced through oxidative-stress mediated pathways, and also may reduce the mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species through recycling of old and damaged mitochondria. Conversely, dysfunction in autophagy initiation, progression or clearance is evidenced to increase aggregation-prone proteins in neural and extraneural tissues. Redox mechanisms of autophagy regulation have been documented at the level of cross-talk between the Nrf2/Keap1 oxidant and electrophilic defense pathway and p62/sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1)-associated autophagy, at least in extraneural tissue; but other mechanisms of redox autophagy regulation doubtless remain to be discovered and the relevance of such processes to maintenance of neural homeostasis remains to be determined. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the relationship of redox signaling, autophagy control, and oxidative stress as these phenomena relate to neurodegenerative disease. AD is specifically addressed as an example of the theme and as a promising indication for new therapies that act through engagement of autophagy pathways. To exemplify one such novel therapeutic entity, data is presented that the antioxidant and neurotrophic agent lanthionine ketimine-ethyl ester (LKE) affects autophagy pathway proteins including beclin-1 in the 3xTg-AD model of Alzheimer's disease where the compound has been shown to reduce pathological features and cognitive dysfunction.

  10. Coupling photocatalysis and redox biocatalysis toward biocatalyzed artificial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sahng Ha; Kim, Jae Hong; Park, Chan Beum

    2013-04-02

    In green plants, solar-energy utilization is accomplished through a cascade of photoinduced electron transfer, which remains a target model for realizing artificial photosynthesis. We introduce the concept of biocatalyzed artificial photosynthesis through coupling redox biocatalysis with photocatalysis to mimic natural photosynthesis based on visible-light-driven regeneration of enzyme cofactors. Key design principles for reaction components, such as electron donors, photosensitizers, and electron mediators, are described for artificial photosynthesis involving biocatalytic assemblies. Recent research outcomes that serve as a proof of the concept are summarized and current issues are discussed to provide a future perspective. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Utilization of process energy from supermarket refrigeration systems. Coupling of cooling and heating; Prozessenergienutzung von Supermarktkaelteanlagen. Kaelte-Waerme-Kopplung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirsching, Alexander [TEKO Gesellschaft fuer Kaeltetechnik mbH, Altenstadt (Germany). Technologie und Kommunikation

    2010-03-15

    The efficiency is defined as the relation between utility and expenditure. Thus, it is obvious for the specialist of refrigeration to tackle with the expenditure (energy consumption) since the utilization conventionally is defined as the produced/need cooling performance of a refrigeration plant. If refrigeration plants are regarded according to their function (withdrawal of heat from a refrigeration chamber and delivery to the environment), the heating system is the producer of the requirement for cooling in 'the winter' (heating season). Thus, the refrigeration plant perhaps already has a marvellous efficiency, and the separate heating system too - however in interaction. The broad view moves into the focus. The possible approaches and effects are described in the contribution under consideration using the example of a Discount supermarket with a sales area of 800 square meters and a requirement of cooling of more than 30 kW.

  12. Social autopsy: INDEPTH Network experiences of utility, process, practices, and challenges in investigating causes and contributors to mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Yevoo Lucy; Nielsen Rikke; Williams Thomas N; Kadobera Daniel; Källander Karin; Mutebi Aloysius; Akpakli Jonas; Narh Clement; Gyapong Margaret; Amu Alberta; Waiswa Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Effective implementation of child survival interventions depends on improved understanding of cultural, social, and health system factors affecting utilization of health care. Never the less, no standardized instrument exists for collecting and interpreting information on how to avert death and improve the implementation of child survival interventions. Objective To describe the methodology, development, and first results of a standard social autopsy tool for the collectio...

  13. Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) And Virtual Private Network (VPN) Compared Using An Utility Function And The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP)

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Edward Dishman

    2002-01-01

    This paper compares two technologies, Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) and Virtual Private Network (VPN). PKI and VPN are two approaches currently in use to resolve the problem of securing data in computer networks. Making this comparison difficult is the lack of available data. Additionally, an organization will make their decision based on circumstances unique to their information security needs. Therefore, this paper will illustrate a method using a utility function and the Analytic Hie...

  14. Hydrogen Production By Anaerobic Fermentation Using Agricultural and Food Processing Wastes Utilizing a Two-Stage Digestion System

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Reese S

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen production by means of anaerobic fermentation was researched utilizing three different substrates. Synthetic wastewater, dairy manure, and cheese whey were combined together at different concentrations under batch anaerobic conditions to determine the optimal hydrogen producing potential and waste treatment of each. Cheese whey at a concentration of 55% was combined with dairy manure at a concentration of 45% to produce 1.53 liters of hydrogen per liter of substrate. These results...

  15. Redox transformations in peroxidases studied by pulse radiolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebicka, L.; Gebicki, J.L. (Lodz Univ. (Poland))

    1992-01-01

    By means of pulse radiolysis technique, redox processes in two heme enzymes, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) have been studied. It has been found that both hydrated electron and hydroxyl radical reduce HRP and LPO to their ferrous forms. The formation of compound III (an oxyform of the heme enzyme) in a two-step reaction of LPO and HRP with superoxide anion has been proposed. (author).

  16. Redox regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle: something old, something new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelet, Laure; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Morisse, Samuel; Sparla, Francesca; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Francia, Francesco; Danon, Antoine; Marchand, Christophe H; Fermani, Simona; Trost, Paolo; Lemaire, Stéphane D

    2013-11-25

    Reversible redox post-translational modifications such as oxido-reduction of disulfide bonds, S-nitrosylation, and S-glutathionylation, play a prominent role in the regulation of cell metabolism and signaling in all organisms. These modifications are mainly controlled by members of the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin families. Early studies in photosynthetic organisms have identified the Calvin-Benson cycle, the photosynthetic pathway responsible for carbon assimilation, as a redox regulated process. Indeed, 4 out of 11 enzymes of the cycle were shown to have a low activity in the dark and to be activated in the light through thioredoxin-dependent reduction of regulatory disulfide bonds. The underlying molecular mechanisms were extensively studied at the biochemical and structural level. Unexpectedly, recent biochemical and proteomic studies have suggested that all enzymes of the cycle and several associated regulatory proteins may undergo redox regulation through multiple redox post-translational modifications including glutathionylation and nitrosylation. The aim of this review is to detail the well-established mechanisms of redox regulation of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes as well as the most recent reports indicating that this pathway is tightly controlled by multiple interconnected redox post-translational modifications. This redox control is likely allowing fine tuning of the Calvin-Benson cycle required for adaptation to varying environmental conditions, especially during responses to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  17. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signalling and their interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nathan Cobley

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1 redox signalling and (2 macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signalling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signalling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signalling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signalling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signalling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signalling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation.

  18. Direct determination of the redox status of cysteine residues in proteins in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Satoshi [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259-R1-8, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Tatenaka, Yuki; Ohuchi, Yuya [Dojindo Laboratories, 2025-5 Tabaru, Mashiki-machi, Kumamoto 861-2202 (Japan); Hisabori, Toru, E-mail: thisabor@res.titech.ac.jp [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259-R1-8, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • A new DNA-maleimide which is cleaved by UV irradiation, DNA-PCMal, was developed. • DNA-PCMal can be used like DNA-Mal to analyze the redox state of cysteine residues. • It is useful for detecting the thiol redox status of a protein in vivo by Western blotting method. • Thus, DNA-PCMal can be a powerful tool for redox proteomics analysis. - Abstract: The redox states of proteins in cells are key factors in many cellular processes. To determine the redox status of cysteinyl thiol groups in proteins in vivo, we developed a new maleimide reagent, a photocleavable maleimide-conjugated single stranded DNA (DNA-PCMal). The DNA moiety of DNA-PCMal is easily removed by UV-irradiation, allowing DNA-PCMal to be used in Western blotting applications. Thereby the state of thiol groups in intracellular proteins can be directly evaluated. This new maleimide compound can provide information concerning redox proteins in vivo, which is important for our understanding of redox networks in the cell.

  19. HMGB1 redox during sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Patel, Devika; Rabadi, May M; Azar, Tala; Jules, Edson; Lipphardt, Mark; Hashemiyoon, Rameen; Ratliff, Brian B

    2017-10-01

    During sepsis, the alarmin HMGB1 is released from tissues and promotes systemic inflammation that results in multi-organ damage, with the kidney particularly susceptible to injury. The severity of inflammation and pro-damage signaling mediated by HMGB1 appears to be dependent on the alarmin's redox state. Therefore, we examined HMGB1 redox in kidney cells during sepsis. Using intravital microscopy, CellROX labeling of kidneys in live mice indicated increased ROS generation in the kidney perivascular endothelium and tubules during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. Subsequent CellROX and MitoSOX labeling of LPS-stressed endothelial and kidney proximal tubule cells demonstrated increased ROS generation in these cells as sepsis worsens. Consequently, HMGB1 oxidation increased in the cytoplasm of kidney cells during its translocation from the nucleus to the circulation, with the degree of oxidation dependent on the severity of sepsis, as measured in in vivo mouse samples using a thiol assay and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The greater the oxidation of HMGB1, the greater the ability of the alarmin to stimulate pro-inflammatory cyto-/chemokine release (measured by Luminex Multiplex) and alter mitochondrial ATP generation (Luminescent ATP Detection Assay). Administration of glutathione and thioredoxin inhibitors to cell cultures enhanced HMGB1 oxidation during sepsis in endothelial and proximal tubule cells, respectively. In conclusion, as sepsis worsens, ROS generation and HMGB1 oxidation increases in kidney cells, which enhances HMGB1's pro-inflammatory signaling. Conversely, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems work to maintain the protein in its reduced state. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development and Testing of the Advanced CHP System Utilizing the Off-Gas from the Innovative Green Coke Calcining Process in Fluidized Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chudnovsky, Yaroslav; Kozlov, Aleksandr

    2013-08-15

    Green petroleum coke (GPC) is an oil refining byproduct that can be used directly as a solid fuel or as a feedstock for the production of calcined petroleum coke. GPC contains a high amount of volatiles and sulfur. During the calcination process, the GPC is heated to remove the volatiles and sulfur to produce purified calcined coke, which is used in the production of graphite, electrodes, metal carburizers, and other carbon products. Currently, more than 80% of calcined coke is produced in rotary kilns or rotary hearth furnaces. These technologies provide partial heat utilization of the calcined coke to increase efficiency of the calcination process, but they also share some operating disadvantages. However, coke calcination in an electrothermal fluidized bed (EFB) opens up a number of potential benefits for the production enhancement, while reducing the capital and operating costs. The increased usage of heavy crude oil in recent years has resulted in higher sulfur content in green coke produced by oil refinery process, which requires a significant increase in the calcinations temperature and in residence time. The calorific value of the process off-gas is quite substantial and can be effectively utilized as an “opportunity fuel” for combined heat and power (CHP) production to complement the energy demand. Heat recovered from the product cooling can also contribute to the overall economics of the calcination process. Preliminary estimates indicated the decrease in energy consumption by 35-50% as well as a proportional decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. As such, the efficiency improvement of the coke calcinations systems is attracting close attention of the researchers and engineers throughout the world. The developed technology is intended to accomplish the following objectives: - Reduce the energy and carbon intensity of the calcined coke production process. - Increase utilization of opportunity fuels such as industrial waste off-gas from the novel

  1. Pareto utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masako, I.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.

    2013-01-01

    In searching for an appropriate utility function in the expected utility framework, we formulate four properties that we want the utility function to satisfy. We conduct a search for such a function, and we identify Pareto utility as a function satisfying all four desired properties. Pareto utility

  2. Negative electrode catalyst for the iron chromium redox energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, R. F.; Hagedorn, N. H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A redox cell which operates at elevated temperatures and which utilizes the same two metal couples in each of the two reactant fluids is disclosed. Each fluid includes a bismuth salt and may also include a lead salt. A low cost, cation permselective membrane separates the reactant fluids.

  3. Sub-nanometer expansions of redox responsive polymer films monitored by imaging ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumurcu, Aysegul; Feng, X.; Dos Ramos, L.; Hempenius, M.A.; Schon, P.M.; Vancso, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to quantitatively visualize sub nm height changes occurring in thin films of redox active polymers upon reversible electrochemical oxidation/reduction in situ and in real-time with electrochemical imaging ellipsometry (EC-IE). Our approach is based on the utilization of

  4. Expansion of metal-redox nanosynthesis: the case study of iron gallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeminde, Alec; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-05-21

    Metal nanoalloys have rapidly grown in importance due to their higher surface area and unique nanosized properties. The metal-redox methodology is used and expanded upon utilizing FeGa as a model system. It is shown to control the stoichiometry and size of magnetic FeGa nanoalloy composites for the first time.

  5. UNIFIED PROCEDURE FOR BALANCING THE REDOX REACTION THROUGH THE ION-ELECTRON METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    Lavado Soto, Mooner; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos; Yenque Dedios, Julio; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation-reduction reactions, typically known as “redox reactions”, are the most important group of chemical reactions. This study proposes a unified procedure for balancing those reactions through an ionelectron method, either in acid or basic medium. Traditionally, balancing is carried out through different stages in most parts of the process. Las reacciones de oxidación-reducción, generalmente conocidas como reacciones redox, constituyen un grupo de reacciones químicas importantes....

  6. Enhancing the Electronic Conductivity of Vanadium-tellurite Glasses by Tuning the Redox State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Yue, Yuanzheng

    . In this work we vary the redox state of a given vanadium tellurite system by performing post heat-treatment in controlled atmosphere. This process is in theory not limited only to varying electronic conductivity, but also varying the glass structure, and hence, changing properties of the glasses, e.g, thermal...... and mechanical properties. Finally we give insight into the relation between the redox state and electronic conductivity....

  7. Chromium isotopes in siliciclastic sediments and sedimentary rocks as a proxy for Earth surface redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, C. T.; Planavsky, N. J.; Wang, X.; Owens, J. D.; Johnson, T. M.; Fischer, W. W.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) isotopes are an emerging and potentially promising proxy for tracking redox processes at Earth's surface. However, recent efforts to reconstruct the Cr isotope record through time have primarily focused on sporadically deposited iron-rich chemical sediments, with large temporal gaps and limited capacity to explore the Cr isotope record relative to modern and recent marine processes. However, the basic inorganic chemistry of Cr suggests that anoxic marine basins factor prominently in the global Cr cycle, and that likewise sediments deposited within anoxic basins may offer an unexplored Cr isotope archive throughout Earth's history. We present authigenic δ53Cr data from sediments of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela--a ';type' environment on the modern Earth for large, perennially anoxic basins with relatively strong hydrological connections to the global ocean. Combined with currently available constraints on the δ53Cr composition of modern Atlantic seawater, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that anoxic marine basins can serve as a chemical archive of the first-order features of seawater δ53Cr variation. We employ a simple quantitative model to explore the implications of this hypothesis for global Cr isotope mass balance and the possible utility of authigenic δ53Cr in anoxically deposited siliciclastic sediments and sedimentary rocks as a global paleoredox proxy. Our focus is a basic analysis of the primary controls on seawater δ53Cr as related to both the marine redox landscape and the processes involved in the weathering and aqueous-particulate transport of Cr at Earth's surface. As a case study, we provide analysis of new bulk δ53Cr data through a Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE-2), which shows a well-defined ~1.0‰ negative excursion during the event coupled with evidence for a drawdown of the marine Cr reservoir. We present a conceptual model to explain these observations, and interpret this shift to suggest a shutdown of

  8. Modelling sulfamethoxazole degradation under different redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vila, X.; Rodriguez-Escales, P.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is a low adsorptive, polar, sulfonamide antibiotic, widely present in aquatic environments. Degradation of SMX in subsurface porous media is spatially and temporally variable, depending on various environmental factors such as in situ redox potential, availability of nutrients, local soil characteristics, and temperature. It has been reported that SMX is better degraded under anoxic conditions and by co-metabolism processes. In this work, we first develop a conceptual model of degradation of SMX under different redox conditions (denitrification and iron reducing conditions), and second, we construct a mathematical model that allows reproducing different experiments of SMX degradation reported in the literature. The conceptual model focuses on the molecular behavior and contemplates the formation of different metabolites. The model was validated using the experimental data from Barbieri et al. (2012) and Mohatt et al. (2011). It adequately reproduces the reversible degradation of SMX under the presence of nitrite as an intermediate product of denitrification. In those experiments degradation was mediated by the transient formation of a diazonium cation, which was considered responsible of the substitution of the amine radical by a nitro radical, forming the 4-nitro-SMX. The formation of this metabolite is a reversible process, so that once the concentration of nitrite was back to zero due to further advancement of denitrification, the concentration of SMX was fully recovered. The forward reaction, formation of 4-nitro SMX, was modeled considering a kinetic of second order, whereas the backward reaction, dissociation of 4-nitro-SMX back to the original compound, could be modeled with a first order degradation reaction. Regarding the iron conditions, SMX was degraded due to the oxidation of iron (Fe2+), which was previously oxidized from goethite due to the degradation of a pool of labile organic carbon. As the oxidation of iron occurred on the

  9. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-12-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V.

  10. Redox subpopulations and the risk of cancer progression: a new method for characterizing redox heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N.; Li, Lin Z.

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that a malignant tumor is akin to a complex organ comprising of various cell populations including tumor cells that are genetically, metabolically and functionally different. Our redox imaging data have demonstrated intra-tumor redox heterogeneity in all mouse xenografts derived from human melanomas, breast, prostate, and colon cancers. Based on the signals of NADH and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)) and their ratio, i.e., the redox ratio, which is an indicator of mitochondrial metabolic status, we have discovered several distinct redox subpopulations in xenografts of breast tumors potentially recapitulating functional/metabolic heterogeneity within the tumor. Furthermore, xenografts of breast tumors with higher metastatic potential tend to have a redox subpopulation whose redox ratio is significantly different from that of tumors with lower metastatic potential and usually have a bi-modal distribution of the redox ratio. The redox subpopulations from human breast cancer samples can also be very complex with multiple subpopulations as determined by fitting the redox ratio histograms with multi- Gaussian functions. In this report, we present a new method for identifying the redox subpopulations within individual breast tumor xenografts and human breast tissues, which may be used to differentiate between breast cancer and normal tissue and among breast cancer with different risks of progression.

  11. Controls on the redox potential of rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Joan D; Mullaugh, Katherine M; Kieber, Robert J; Avery, G Brooks; Mead, Ralph N

    2012-12-18

    Hydrogen peroxide acting as a reductant affects the redox potential of rainwater collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Station, the South Island of New Zealand, the contiguous USA, and the primary study site in Wilmington, NC. Analytical measurements of both halves of redox couples for dissolved iron, mercury, and the nitrate-nitrite-ammonium system can predict the rainwater redox potential measured directly by a platinum electrode. Measurements of these redox couples along with the pH in rain yields pe⁻ between 8 and 11; the half reaction for hydrogen peroxide acting as a reductant using typical rainwater conditions of 15 μM H₂O₂ at pH 4.7 gives pe⁻ = 9.12, where pe⁻ = negative log of the activity of hydrated electrons. Of the six rainwater redox systems investigated, only manganese speciation appeared to be controlled by molecular oxygen (pe⁻ = 15.90). Copper redox speciation was consistent with superoxide acting as a reductant (pe⁻ = 2.7). The concentration of H₂O₂ in precipitation has more than doubled over the preceding decade due to a decrease in SO₂ emissions, which suggests the redox chemistry of rainwater is dynamic and changing, potentially altering the speciation of many organic compounds and trace metals in atmospheric waters.

  12. Enhanced microbial decolorization of methyl red with oxidized carbon fiber as redox mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emilia Rios-Del Toro, E. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Celis, Lourdes B. [División de Geociencias Aplicadas, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Rangel-Mendez, J. Rene, E-mail: rene@ipicyt.edu.mx [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) act as redox mediator. • Electron accepting capacity increased with oxidation time of ACF. •ACFs increased 8-fold the reduction of methyl red in biological assays. •Biofilm formed on the ACFs partly blocked their redox mediator capacity. -- Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions is possible but at a slow rate. Redox mediators (quinones, activated carbon) are used to improve the reduction rate. The aim of this work was to use activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a redox mediator for the anaerobic reduction of the azo dye methyl red. ACF was chemically modified with 8 M HNO{sub 3} to increase its redox-mediating capacity and used in chemical and anaerobic biological batch assays for the reduction of methyl red. ACF increased its redox-mediating capacity up to 3-fold in chemical assays; in biological assays ACF increased the reduction rate up to 8-fold compared to controls without ACF. However, since the ACF served as support for biomass, a biofilm formed on the fiber significantly reduced its redox-mediating capacity; substrate consumption suggested that the electron transport from ACF to methyl red was the rate-limiting step in the process. These results are the first evidence of the role of ACF as a redox mediator in the reductive decolorization of methyl red, in addition to the effect of biofilm attached to ACF on methyl red reduction. Due to the versatile characteristics of ACF and its redox-mediating capacity, carbon fibers could be used in biological wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the reductive transformation of pollutants commonly found in industrial effluents.

  13. Cavitation in hydraulic turbines: the benefits of new processes and materials utilization; Cavitacao em turbinas hidraulicas: os beneficios da utilizacao de novos processos e novos materiais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Nelio Cesar de [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Politecnico

    1995-12-31

    Due to the introduction of new metallurgic technologies, this work proposes the substitution of the existing materials and processes used for the maintenance of electric turbines which present the cavitation effect. the methodology is presented. Considering the so far obtained results, it was concluded that by the utilization of the suggested techniques it is possible to obtain significant maintenance costs and time reduction 8 figs., 1 tab., 5 refs.

  14. Development of an Advanced Deshaling Technology to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Coal Handling, Processing, and Utilization Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Honaker; Gerald Luttrell

    2007-09-30

    The concept of using a dry, density-based separator to achieve efficient, near-face rock removal, commonly referred to as deshaling, was evaluated in several applications across the U.S.. Varying amounts of high-density rock exist in most run-of-mine feed. In the central Appalachian coalfields, a rock content exceeding 50% in the feed to a preparation plant is commonplace due to high amounts of out-of-seam dilution made necessary by extracting coal from thin seams. In the western U.S, an increase in out-of-seam dilution and environmental regulations associated with combustion emissions have resulted in a need to clean low rank coals and dry cleaning may be the only option. A 5 ton/hr mobile deshaling unit incorporating a density-based, air-table technology commercially known as the FGX Separator has been evaluated at mine sites located within the states of Utah, Wyoming, Texas, West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Kentucky. The FGX technology utilizes table riffling principles with air as the medium. Air enters through the table and creates a fluidized bed of particles comprised of mostly fine, high density particles. The high density particle bed lifts the low-density coal particles to the top of the bed. The low-density coal moves toward the front of the table due to mass action and the downward slope of the table. The high-density particles settle through the fluidized particle bed and, upon making contact with the table, moves toward the back of the table with the assistance of table vibration. As a result, the low-density coal particles exit the front of the table closest to the feed whereas the high-density, high-ash content particles leave on the side and front of the table located at the farthest from the feed entry. At each test site, the run-of-mine feed was either directly fed to the FGX unit or pre-screened to remove the majority of the -6mm material. The surface moisture of the feed must be maintained below 9%. Pre-screening is required when the

  15. Information, evolution and utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Samuelson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Human utility embodies a number of seemingly irrational aspects. The leading example in this paper is that utilities often depend on the presence of salient unchosen alternatives. Our focus is to understand why an evolutionary process might optimally lead to such seemingly dysfunctional features in our motivations and to derive implications for the nature of our utility functions.

  16. Improving digestive utilization of fiber-rich feedstuffs in pigs and poultry by processing and enzyme technologies: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de S.; Pustjens, A.M.; Schols, H.A.; Hendriks, W.H.; Gerrits, W.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of processing technologies, whether or not combined with cell wall degrading enzymes, on the physicochemical properties of non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) and the resulting effects on NSP degradation in both pigs and poultry were reviewed. Evaluation of the effects of processing technol

  17. Utilizing Multiple Objectives for the Optimization of the Pultrusion Process Based on a Thermo-Chemical Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutum, Cem C.; Baran, Ismet; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2013-01-01

    Pultrusion is one of the most effective manufacturing processes for producing composites with constant cross-sectional profiles. This obviously makes it more attractive for both researchers and practitioners to investigate the optimum process parameters, i.e. pulling speed, power and dimensions of t

  18. Scaling behavior in mitochondrial redox fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Biener, Gabriel; Herman, Brian A

    2006-05-15

    Scale-invariant long-range correlations have been reported in fluctuations of time-series signals originating from diverse processes such as heart beat dynamics, earthquakes, and stock market data. The common denominator of these apparently different processes is a highly nonlinear dynamics with competing forces and distinct feedback species. We report for the first time an experimental evidence for scaling behavior in NAD(P)H signal fluctuations in isolated mitochondria and intact cells isolated from the liver of a young (5-month-old) mouse. Time-series data were collected by two-photon imaging of mitochondrial NAD(P)H fluorescence and signal fluctuations were quantitatively analyzed for statistical correlations by detrended fluctuation analysis and spectral power analysis. Redox [NAD(P)H / NAD(P)(+)] fluctuations in isolated mitochondria and intact liver cells were found to display nonrandom, long-range correlations. These correlations are interpreted as arising due to the regulatory dynamics operative in Krebs' cycle enzyme network and electron transport chain in the mitochondria. This finding may provide a novel basis for understanding similar regulatory networks that govern the nonequilibrium properties of living cells.

  19. Redox regulation in plant programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pinto, M C; Locato, V; De Gara, L

    2012-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically controlled process described both in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Even if it is clear that PCD occurs in plants, in response to various developmental and environmental stimuli, the signalling pathways involved in the triggering of this cell suicide remain to be characterized. In this review, the main similarities and differences in the players involved in plant and animal PCD are outlined. Particular attention is paid to the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as key inducers of PCD in plants. The involvement of different kinds of ROS, different sites of ROS production, as well as their interaction with other molecules, is crucial in activating PCD in response to specific stimuli. Moreover, the importance is stressed on the balance between ROS production and scavenging, in various cell compartments, for the activation of specific steps in the signalling pathways triggering this cell suicide process. The review focuses on the complexity of the interplay between ROS and antioxidant molecules and enzymes in determining the most suitable redox environment required for the occurrence of different forms of PCD. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Reductant-dependent electron distribution among redox sites of laccase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Goldberg, M; Wherland, S

    1978-01-01

    chemical and thermodynamic properties. The distribution of electron equivalents among the redox sites was found to be reductant dependent. When the data for titration by various reductants of the type 3 site were plotted against those of the type 1 site according to the Nernst formalism, the slope n varied...... from 2.0 to 1.0. The redox potential of the reductant's first oxidation step is qualitatively correlated with the value of n and is suggested as the factor that modulates the electron distribution. Such a behavior implies a nonequilibrium situation. A very good simulation of the data was provided...... by an analysis assuming a formally variable cooperativity between the two type 3 copper ions. This apparent variability is suggested to result from a process whereby sufficiently strong reductants induce a transition of the type 3 site from a cooperative two-electron acceptor to a pair of independent one...

  1. Ocean redox change at the Permian-Triassic mass extinction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhl, Micha; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2013-01-01

    and marine (mass) ex¬tinction. The geographic and temporal extend and the intensity (ferruginous vs. euxinic) of anoxic con¬ditions is, however, strongly debated and not well constraint. This complicates understanding of close coupling between Earth’s physical, chemical and bi¬ological processes. We studied...... ocean redox change over the largest mass extinction event in Earth history, at the Permian-Tri¬assic boundary (at ~252 Ma). This event is marked by a major perturbation in the global exogenic carbon cycle (and associated major negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE)), likely initiated by carbon...... (anoxic but not euxinic) coinciding with the main extinction event. Molybdenum enrichments, often indicative for freely available sulfide in the water-column, only occur dur¬ing the second phase of euxinia. This pattern of ocean redox-change in Svalbard direct¬ly reflects similar trends in Greenland...

  2. Redox pioneer: Professor Wulf Dröge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinscherf, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    Dr. Wulf Dröge is recognized here as a redox pioneer because he has published as first author an article on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited more than 2000 times and over 10 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. One of the key discoveries (1987) was the stimulatory effect of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide on lymphocyte functions, which triggered a series of studies on the role of reactive oxygen species, glutathione, and its precursor cysteine in physiological and pathological processes. He discovered abnormally low cysteine and glutathione levels in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients and the age-related decline in the postabsorptive plasma cysteine concentration, which is believed to cause age-related oxidative stress. He developed a theoretical concept of the mechanism of aging and death, which is outlined in his books Avoiding the First Cause of Death and Challenging the Limits of the Human Lifespan.

  3. Feasibility of utilizing bioindicators for testing microbial inactivation in sweetpotato purees processed with a continuous-flow microwave system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinley, T A; Dock, C N; Truong, V-D; Coronel, P; Kumar, P; Simunovic, J; Sandeep, K P; Cartwright, G D; Swartzel, K R; Jaykus, L-A

    2007-06-01

    Continuous-flow microwave heating has potential in aseptic processing of various food products, including purees from sweetpotatoes and other vegetables. Establishing the feasibility of a new processing technology for achieving commercial sterility requires evaluating microbial inactivation. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of using commercially available plastic pouches of bioindicators containing spores of Geobacillius stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 35021 for evaluating the degree of microbial inactivation achieved in vegetable purees processed in a continuous-flow microwave heating unit. Sweetpotato puree seeded with the bioindicators was subjected to 3 levels of processing based on the fastest particles: undertarget process (F(0) approximately 0.65), target process (F(0) approximately 2.8), and overtarget process (F(0) approximately 10.10). After initial experiments, we found it was necessary to engineer a setup with 2 removable tubes connected to the continuous-flow microwave system to facilitate the injection of indicators into the unit without interrupting the puree flow. Using this approach, 60% of the indicators injected into the system could be recovered postprocess. Spore survival after processing, as evaluated by use of growth indicator dyes and standard plating methods, verified inactivation of the spores in sweetpotato puree. The log reduction results for B. subtilis were equivalent to the predesigned degrees of sterilization (F(0)). This study presents the first report suggesting that bioindicators such as the flexible, food-grade plastic pouches can be used for microbial validation of commercial sterilization in aseptic processing of foods using a continuous-flow microwave system.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Microbial Fuel Cell Based on Redox Electron Mediator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nanqi Ren

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of redox electron mediator and its impact to power generation of microbial fuel cell ( MFC ) , this study carries out the numerical modeling of a typical two⁃chamber MFC based on assumption of interfacial electron transfer via redox electron mediator and acetate as sole electron donor. The model simulates the development of cell voltage, current, substrate concentration, redox electron mediator concentration, polarization and power density output under defined conditions. The results demonstrate that the developed models can fit the experimental results well on a qualitative basis, and concentration of electron reduced mediator plays a dominant role in electron transfer process, and the mass transfer may constitute the limiting step when its concentration is at a relatively low level. This study not only provides a better understanding of electron redox mediator behavior during power generation, but also suggests a strategy to improve electron transfer in the anode of MFC.

  5. CANGS: a user-friendly utility for processing and analyzing 454 GS-FLX data in biodiversity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlötterer Christian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies have substantially increased the sequence output while the costs were dramatically reduced. In addition to the use in whole genome sequencing, the 454 GS-FLX platform is becoming a widely used tool for biodiversity surveys based on amplicon sequencing. In order to use NGS for biodiversity surveys, software tools are required, which perform quality control, trimming of the sequence reads, removal of PCR primers, and generation of input files for downstream analyses. A user-friendly software utility that carries out these steps is still lacking. Findings We developed CANGS (Cleaning and Analyzing Next Generation Sequences a flexible and user-friendly integrated software utility: CANGS is designed for amplicon based biodiversity surveys using the 454 sequencing platform. CANGS filters low quality sequences, removes PCR primers, filters singletons, identifies barcodes, and generates input files for downstream analyses. The downstream analyses rely either on third party software (e.g.: rarefaction analyses or CANGS-specific scripts. The latter include modules linking 454 sequences with the name of the closest taxonomic reference retrieved from the NCBI database and the sequence divergence between them. Our software can be easily adapted to handle sequencing projects with different amplicon sizes, primer sequences, and quality thresholds, which makes this software especially useful for non-bioinformaticians. Conclusion CANGS performs PCR primer clipping, filtering of low quality sequences, links sequences to NCBI taxonomy and provides input files for common rarefaction analysis software programs. CANGS is written in Perl and runs on Mac OS X/Linux and is available at http://i122server.vu-wien.ac.at/pop/software.html

  6. Redox potential tuning by redox-inactive cations in nature's water oxidizing catalyst and synthetic analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewald, Vera; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-04-28

    The redox potential of synthetic oligonuclear transition metal complexes has been shown to correlate with the Lewis acidity of a redox-inactive cation connected to the redox-active transition metals of the cluster via oxo or hydroxo bridges. Such heterometallic clusters are important cofactors in many metalloenzymes, where it is speculated that the redox-inactive constituent ion of the cluster serves to optimize its redox potential for electron transfer or catalysis. A principal example is the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of natural photosynthesis, a Mn4CaO5 cofactor that oxidizes water into dioxygen, protons and electrons. Calcium is critical for catalytic function, but its precise role is not yet established. In analogy to synthetic complexes it has been suggested that Ca(2+) fine-tunes the redox potential of the manganese cluster. Here we evaluate this hypothesis by computing the relative redox potentials of substituted derivatives of the oxygen-evolving complex with the cations Sr(2+), Gd(3+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Sc(3+), Na(+) and Y(3+) for two sequential transitions of its catalytic cycle. The theoretical approach is validated with a series of experimentally well-characterized Mn3AO4 cubane complexes that are structural mimics of the enzymatic cluster. Our results reproduce perfectly the experimentally observed correlation between the redox potential and the Lewis acidities of redox-inactive cations for the synthetic complexes. However, it is conclusively demonstrated that this correlation does not hold for the oxygen evolving complex. In the enzyme the redox potential of the cluster only responds to the charge of the redox-inactive cations and remains otherwise insensitive to their precise identity, precluding redox-tuning of the metal cluster as a primary role for Ca(2+) in biological water oxidation.

  7. Process Design Report for Wood Feedstock: Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Desing and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis Current and Futuristic Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooley, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sheehan, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ibsen, Kelly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Majdeski, Henry [Delta-T Corporation, Lexington, KY (United States); Galves, Adrian [Delta-T Corporation, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a complete review and update of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process based on co-current dilute acid prehydrolysis, along with simultaneous saccharification (enzymatic) and co-fermentation. The process design includes the core technologies being researched by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE): prehydrolysis, simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation, and cellulase enzyme production.

  8. Efficient utilization of greenhouse gas in a gas-to-liquids process combined with carbon dioxide reforming of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyoung-Su; Bae, Jong Wook; Woo, Kwang-Jae; Jun, Ki-Won

    2010-02-15

    A process model for a gas-to-liquids (GTL) process mainly producing Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetic oils has been developed to assess the effects of reforming methods, recycle ratio of unreacted syngas mixture on the process efficiency and the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. The reforming unit of our study is composed of both steam reforming of methane (SRM) and carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CDR) to form syngas, which gives composition flexibility, reduction in GHG emission, and higher cost-competitiveness. With recycling, it is found that zero emission of CO(2) from the process can be realized and the required amount of natural gas (NG) can be significantly reduced. This GTL process model has been built by using Aspen Plus software, and it is mainly composed of a feeding unit, a reforming unit, an FT synthesis unit, several separation units and a recycling unit. The composition flexibility of the syngas mixture due to the two different types of reforming reactions raises an issue that in order to attain the optimized feed composition of FT synthesis the amount of flow rate of each component in the fresh feed mixture should be determined considering the effects of the recycle and its split ratio. In the FT synthesis unit, the 15 representative reactions for the chain growth and water gas shift on the cobalt-based catalyst are considered. After FT synthesis, the unreacted syngas mixture is recycled to the reforming unit or the FT synthesis unit or both to enhance process efficiency. The effect of the split ratio, the recycle flow rate to the FT reactor over the recycle flow rate to the reforming unit, on the efficiency of the process was also investigated. This work shows that greater recycle to the reforming unit is less effective than that to the FT synthesis unit from the standpoint of the net heat efficiency of the process, since the reforming reactions are greatly endothermic and greater recycle to the reformer requires more energy.

  9. Process Parameter Optimization of Extrusion-Based 3D Metal Printing Utilizing PW–LDPE–SA Binder System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luquan Ren

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, with a broadening range of available materials and alteration of feeding processes, several extrusion-based 3D printing processes for metal materials have been developed. An emerging process is applicable for the fabrication of metal parts into electronics and composites. In this paper, some critical parameters of extrusion-based 3D printing processes were optimized by a series of experiments with a melting extrusion printer. The raw materials were copper powder and a thermoplastic organic binder system and the system included paraffin wax, low density polyethylene, and stearic acid (PW–LDPE–SA. The homogeneity and rheological behaviour of the raw materials, the strength of the green samples, and the hardness of the sintered samples were investigated. Moreover, the printing and sintering parameters were optimized with an orthogonal design method. The influence factors in regard to the ultimate tensile strength of the green samples can be described as follows: infill degree > raster angle > layer thickness. As for the sintering process, the major factor on hardness is sintering temperature, followed by holding time and heating rate. The highest hardness of the sintered samples was very close to the average hardness of commercially pure copper material. Generally, the extrusion-based printing process for producing metal materials is a promising strategy because it has some advantages over traditional approaches for cost, efficiency, and simplicity.

  10. Microglia antioxidant systems and redox signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhardt, F; Haslund-Vinding, J; Jaquet, V

    2017-01-01

    of protein thiolation of target redox proteins the necessity for tightly localized, timed, and confined oxidant production to work in concert with antioxidant proteins to promote redox signaling. NOX2-mediated redox signaling modulate the acquisition of the classical or alternative microglia activation...... of the antioxidant response in microglia will reveal antioxidant proteins as dynamic players in redox signaling, which in concert with NOX-derived oxidants fulfill important roles in the autocrine or paracrine regulation of essential enzymes or transcriptional programs. This article is protected by copyright. All......'t stand alone however, and are not always pernicious. We discuss in general terms, and where available in microglia, GSH synthesis and relation to cystine import and glutamate export, and the thioredoxin system as the most important antioxidative defense mechanism, and further, we discuss in the context...

  11. Composite separators and redox flow batteries based on porous separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Luo, Qingtao; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-01-12

    Composite separators having a porous structure and including acid-stable, hydrophilic, inorganic particles enmeshed in a substantially fully fluorinated polyolefin matrix can be utilized in a number of applications. The inorganic particles can provide hydrophilic characteristics. The pores of the separator result in good selectivity and electrical conductivity. The fluorinated polymeric backbone can result in high chemical stability. Accordingly, one application of the composite separators is in redox flow batteries as low cost membranes. In such applications, the composite separator can also enable additional property-enhancing features compared to ion-exchange membranes. For example, simple capacity control can be achieved through hydraulic pressure by balancing the volumes of electrolyte on each side of the separator. While a porous separator can also allow for volume and pressure regulation, in RFBs that utilize corrosive and/or oxidizing compounds, the composite separators described herein are preferable for their robustness in the presence of such compounds.

  12. Overexpression of the transcription factor Yap1 modifies intracellular redox conditions and enhances recombinant protein secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marizela Delic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative folding of secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a redox active process, which also impacts the redox conditions in the cytosol. As the transcription factor Yap1 is involved in the transcriptional response to oxidative stress, we investigate its role upon the production of secretory proteins, using the yeast Pichia pastoris as model, and report a novel important role of Yap1 during oxidative protein folding. Yap1 is needed for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS caused by increased oxidative protein folding. Constitutive co-overexpression of PpYAP1 leads to increased levels of secreted recombinant protein, while a lowered Yap1 function leads to accumulation of ROS and strong flocculation. Transcriptional analysis revealed that more than 150 genes were affected by overexpression of YAP1, in particular genes coding for antioxidant enzymes or involved in oxidation-reduction processes. By monitoring intracellular redox conditions within the cytosol and the ER using redox-sensitive roGFP1 variants, we could show that overexpression of YAP1 restores cellular redox conditions of protein-secreting P. pastoris by reoxidizing the cytosolic redox state to the levels of the wild type. These alterations are also reflected by increased levels of oxidized intracellular glutathione (GSSG in the YAP1 co-overexpressing strain. Taken together, these data indicate a strong impact of intracellular redox balance on the secretion of (recombinant proteins without affecting protein folding per se. Re-establishing suitable redox conditions by tuning the antioxidant capacity of the cell reduces metabolic load and cell stress caused by high oxidative protein folding load, thereby increasing the secretion capacity.

  13. A genome-wide screen in yeast identifies specific oxidative stress genes required for the maintenance of sub-cellular redox homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Ayer

    Full Text Available Maintenance of an optimal redox environment is critical for appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival. Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis, it is not clear how the optimal redox potential is sensed and set, and the processes that impact redox on a cellular/organellar level are poorly understood. The genetic bases of cellular redox homeostasis were investigated using a green fluorescent protein (GFP based redox probe, roGFP2 and a pH sensitive GFP-based probe, pHluorin. The use of roGFP2, in conjunction with pHluorin, enabled determination of pH-adjusted sub-cellular redox potential in a non-invasive and real-time manner. A genome-wide screen using both the non-essential and essential gene collections was carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using cytosolic-roGFP2 to identify factors essential for maintenance of cytosolic redox state under steady-state conditions. 102 genes of diverse function were identified that are required for maintenance of cytosolic redox state. Mutations in these genes led to shifts in the half-cell glutathione redox potential by 75-10 mV. Interestingly, some specific oxidative stress-response processes were identified as over-represented in the data set. Further investigation of the role of oxidative stress-responsive systems in sub-cellular redox homeostasis was conducted using roGFP2 constructs targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome and E(GSH was measured in cells in exponential and stationary phase. Analyses allowed for the identification of key redox systems on a sub-cellular level and the identification of novel genes involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis.

  14. Assessment of redox markers in cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Nathaniel Caleb

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic redox status may have important implications to cattle health and production. Antioxidants and biomarkers of oxidative stress were evaluated in cattle under three phases of management. Each phase stood alone as a treatment model, and managerial aspects during the phase were evaluated as potential moderators of redox balance. Yearling heifers were used to assess the impact of fescue toxicosis and heat stress on selected markers in study 1. Intravaginal temperatures, ADG, serum prolac...

  15. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Skyllas-Kazacos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  16. Membranes for redox flow battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-06-19

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  17. Survey of potential process-heat and reject-heat utilization at a Green River nuclear-energy center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M.; Sandquist, G.M.

    1982-03-01

    Potential uses of process heat and reject heat from a nuclear-energy center at Green River, Utah have been investigated. The remoteness of the Green River site would preclude many potential industrial uses for economical reasons such as transportation costs and lack of local markets. Water-consumption requirements would also have serious impact on some applications due to limitations imposed by other contractual agreements upon the water in the region. Several processes were identified which could be considered for the Green River site; including the use of heat to separate bitumens from tar sands, district heating, warming of greenhouses and soil, and the production of fish for game and commercial sales. The size of these industries would be limited and no single process or industry can be identified at this time which could use the full amount of low-temperature reject heat that would be generated at a NEC.

  18. A conceptual demonstration of freeze desalination-membrane distillation (FD-MD) hybrid desalination process utilizing liquefied natural gas (LNG) cold energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2012-09-01

    The severe global water scarcity and record-high fossil oil price have greatly stimulated the research interests on new desalination technologies which can be driven by renewable energy or waste energy. In this study, a hybrid desalination process comprising freeze desalination and membrane distillation (FD-MD) processes was developed and explored in an attempt to utilize the waste cold energy released from re-gasification of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The concept of this technology was demonstrated using indirect-contact freeze desalination (ICFD) and direct-contact membrane distillation (DCMD) configurations. By optimizing the ICFD operation parameters, namely, the usage of nucleate seeds, operation duration and feed concentration, high quality drinkable water with a low salinity ∼0.144 g/L was produced in the ICFD process. At the same time, using the optimized hollow fiber module length and packing density in the DCMD process, ultra pure water with a low salinity of 0.062 g/L was attained at a condition of high energy efficiency (EE). Overall, by combining FD and MD processes and adopting the optimized operation parameters, the hybrid FD-MD system has been successfully demonstrated. A high total water recovery of 71.5% was achieved, and the water quality obtained met the standard for drinkable water. In addition, with results from specific energy calculation, it was proven that the hybrid process is an energy-saving process and utilization of LNG cold energy could greatly reduce the total energy consumption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Process Design Report for Stover Feedstock: Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis for Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aden, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ruth, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ibsen, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jechura, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Neeves, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sheehan, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wallace, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Montague, L. [Harris Group, Seattle, WA (United States); Slayton, A. [Harris Group, Seattle, WA (United States); Lukas, J. [Harris Group, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is promoting the development of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks as an alternative to conventional petroleum-based transportation fuels. DOE funds both fundamental and applied research in this area and needs a method for predicting cost benefits of many research proposals. To that end, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has modeled many potential process designs and estimated the economics of each process during the last 20 years. This report is an update of the ongoing process design and economic analyses at NREL.

  20. Redox- and non-redox-metal-induced formation of free radicals and their role in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valko, Marian; Jomova, Klaudia; Rhodes, Christopher J; Kuča, Kamil; Musílek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal ions are key elements of various biological processes ranging from oxygen formation to hypoxia sensing, and therefore, their homeostasis is maintained within strict limits through tightly regulated mechanisms of uptake, storage and secretion. The breakdown of metal ion homeostasis can lead to an uncontrolled formation of reactive oxygen species, ROS (via the Fenton reaction, which produces hydroxyl radicals), and reactive nitrogen species, RNS, which may cause oxidative damage to biological macromolecules such as DNA, proteins and lipids. An imbalance between the formation of free radicals and their elimination by antioxidant defense systems is termed oxidative stress. Most vulnerable to free radical attack is the cell membrane which may undergo enhanced lipid peroxidation, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal and other exocyclic DNA adducts. While redox-active iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) undergo redox-cycling reactions, for a second group of redox-inactive metals such as arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd), the primary route for their toxicity is depletion of glutathione and bonding to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. While arsenic is known to bind directly to critical thiols, other mechanisms, involving formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions, have been proposed. Redox-inert zinc (Zn) is the most abundant metal in the brain and an essential component of numerous proteins involved in biological defense mechanisms against oxidative stress. The depletion of zinc may enhance DNA damage by impairing DNA repair mechanisms. Intoxication of an organism by arsenic and cadmium may lead to metabolic disturbances of redox-active copper and iron, with the occurrence of oxidative stress induced by the enhanced formation of ROS/RNS. Oxidative stress occurs when excessive formation of ROS overwhelms the antioxidant defense system, as is maintained by antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, alpha