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Sample records for redox active fine

  1. Amplified and in situ detection of redox-active metabolite using a biobased redox capacitor.

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2013-02-19

    Redox cycling provides a mechanism to amplify electrochemical signals for analyte detection. Previous studies have shown that diverse mediators/shuttles can engage in redox-cycling reactions with a biobased redox capacitor that is fabricated by grafting redox-active catechols onto a chitosan film. Here, we report that redox cycling with this catechol-chitosan redox capacitor can amplify electrochemical signals for detecting a redox-active bacterial metabolite. Specifically, we studied the redox-active bacterial metabolite pyocyanin that is reported to be a virulence factor and signaling molecule for the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that redox cycling can amplify outputs from various electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry, and differential pulse voltammetry) and can lower the detection limit of pyocyanin to 50 nM. Further, the compatibility of this biobased redox capacitor allows the in situ monitoring of the production of redox-active metabolites (e.g., pyocyanin) during the course of P. aeruginosa cultivation. We anticipate that the amplified output of redox-active virulence factors should permit an earlier detection of life-threatening infections by the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa while the "bio-compatibility" of this measurement approach should facilitate in situ study of the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial redox signaling.

  2. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of heart tissue viability under redox-magnetohydrodynamics conditions: toward fine-tuning flow in biological microfluidics applications.

    Cheah, Lih Tyng; Fritsch, Ingrid; Haswell, Stephen J; Greenman, John

    2012-07-01

    A microfluidic system containing a chamber for heart tissue biopsies, perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing glucose and antibiotic (KHGB) using peristaltic pumps and continuously stimulated, was used to evaluate tissue viability under redox-magnetohydrodynamics (redox-MHD) conditions. Redox-MHD possesses unique capabilities to control fluid flow using ionic current from oxidation and reduction processes at electrodes in a magnetic field, making it attractive to fine-tune fluid flow around tissues for "tissue-on-a-chip" applications. The manuscript describes a parallel setup to study two tissue samples simultaneously, and 6-min static incubation with Triton X100. Tissue viability was subsequently determined by assaying perfusate for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, where LDH serves as an injury marker. Incubation with KHGB containing 5 mM hexaammineruthenium(III) (ruhex) redox species with and without a pair of NdFeB magnets (∼ 0.39 T, placed parallel to the chamber) exhibited no additional tissue insult. MHD fluid flow, viewed by tracking microbeads with microscopy, occurred only when the magnet was present and stimulating electrodes were activated. Pulsating MHD flow with a frequency similar to the stimulating waveform was superimposed over thermal convection (from a hotplate) for Triton-KHGB, but fluid speed was up to twice as fast for ruhex-Triton-KHGB. A large transient ionic current, achieved when switching on the stimulating electrodes, generates MHD perturbations visible over varying peristaltic flow. The well-controlled flow methodology of redox-MHD is applicable to any tissue type, being useful in various drug uptake and toxicity studies, and can be combined equally with on- or off-device analysis modalities. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Redox active polymers and colloidal particles for flow batteries

    Gavvalapalli, Nagarjuna; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Rodriguez-Lopez, Joaquin; Cheng, Kevin; Shen, Mei; Lichtenstein, Timothy

    2018-05-29

    The invention provides a redox flow battery comprising a microporous or nanoporous size-exclusion membrane, wherein one cell of the battery contains a redox-active polymer dissolved in the non-aqueous solvent or a redox-active colloidal particle dispersed in the non-aqueous solvent. The redox flow battery provides enhanced ionic conductivity across the electrolyte separator and reduced redox-active species crossover, thereby improving the performance and enabling widespread utilization. Redox active poly(vinylbenzyl ethylviologen) (RAPs) and redox active colloidal particles (RACs) were prepared and were found to be highly effective redox species. Controlled potential bulk electrolysis indicates that 94-99% of the nominal charge on different RAPs is accessible and the electrolysis products are stable upon cycling. The high concentration attainable (>2.0 M) for RAPs in common non-aqueous battery solvents, their electrochemical and chemical reversibility, and their hindered transport across porous separators make them attractive materials for non-aqueous redox flow batteries based on size-selectivity.

  5. "JCE" Classroom Activity #111: Redox Reactions in Three Representations

    Nieves, Edgardo L. Ortiz; Barreto, Reizelie; Medina, Zuleika

    2012-01-01

    This activity introduces students to the concept of reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. To help students obtain a thorough understanding of redox reactions, the concept is explored at three levels: macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic. In this activity, students perform hands-on investigations of the three levels as they work at different…

  6. Redox activity of airborne particulate matter at different sites in the Los Angeles Basin

    Cho, Arthur K.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Miguel, Antonio H.; Kumagai, Yoshito; Schmitz, Debra A.; Singh, Manisha; Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantza; Froines, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown associations between ambient particulate matter (PM) and adverse health outcomes including increased mortality, emergency room visits, and time lost from school and work. The mechanisms of PM-related health effects are still incompletely understood, but a hypothesis under investigation is that many of the adverse health effects may derive from oxidative stress, initiated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within affected cells. While the adverse effects from PM have historically been associated with the airborne concentration of PM and more recently fine-particle PM, we considered it relevant to develop an assay to quantitatively measure the ability of PM to catalyze ROS generation as the initial step in the induction of oxidative stress. This ability of PM could then be related to different sources, chemical composition, and physical and spatial/temporal characteristics in the ambient environment. The measurement of ROS-forming ability in relation to sources and other factors will have potential relevance to control of redox-active PM. If oxidative stress represents a relevant mechanism of toxicity from PM, the measurement of redox activity represents a first step in the elucidation of the subsequent downstream processes. We have developed an assay for PM redox activity, utilizing the reduction of oxygen by dithiothreitol which serves as an electron source. We have found that PM will catalyze the reduction of oxygen and have examined the distribution and chemical characteristics of the redox activity of PM fractions collected in different sites in the Los Angeles Basin. Samples of concentrated coarse, fine, and ultrafine PM, obtained with aerosol concentrators, were studied with regard to their chemical properties and redox activity. Redox activity was highest in the ultrafine fraction, in agreement with results indicating ultrafines were the most potent toward inducing that heme oxygenase expression and depleting

  7. Polyoxometalate active charge-transfer material for mediated redox flow battery

    Anderson, Travis Mark; Hudak, Nicholas; Staiger, Chad; Pratt, Harry

    2017-01-17

    Redox flow batteries including a half-cell electrode chamber coupled to a current collecting electrode are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, a separator is coupled to the half-cell electrode chamber. The half-cell electrode chamber comprises a first redox-active mediator and a second redox-active mediator. The first redox-active mediator and the second redox-active mediator are circulated through the half-cell electrode chamber into an external container. The container includes an active charge-transfer material. The active charge-transfer material has a redox potential between a redox potential of the first redox-active mediator and a redox potential of the second redox-active mediator. The active charge-transfer material is a polyoxometalate or derivative thereof. The redox flow battery may be particularly useful in energy storage solutions for renewable energy sources and for providing sustained power to an electrical grid.

  8. Redox modulation of thimet oligopeptidase activity by hydrogen peroxide.

    Icimoto, Marcelo Y; Ferreira, Juliana C; Yokomizo, César H; Bim, Larissa V; Marem, Alyne; Gilio, Joyce M; Oliveira, Vitor; Nantes, Iseli L

    2017-07-01

    Thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15, TOP) is a cytosolic mammalian zinc protease that can process a diversity of bioactive peptides. TOP has been pointed out as one of the main postproteasomal enzymes that process peptide antigens in the MHC class I presentation route. In the present study, we describe a fine regulation of TOP activity by hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). Cells from a human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293) underwent an ischemia/reoxygenation-like condition known to increase H 2 O 2 production. Immediately after reoxygenation, HEK293 cells exhibited a 32% increase in TOP activity, but no TOP activity was observed 2 h after reoxygenation. In another model, recombinant rat TOP (rTOP) was challenged by H 2 O 2 produced by rat liver mitoplasts (RLMt) alone, and in combination with antimycin A, succinate, and antimycin A plus succinate. In these conditions, rTOP activity increased 17, 30, 32 and 38%, respectively. Determination of H 2 O 2 concentration generated in reoxygenated cells and mitoplasts suggested a possible modulation of rTOP activity dependent on the concentration of H 2 O 2 . The measure of pure rTOP activity as a function of H 2 O 2 concentration corroborated this hypothesis. The data fitted to an asymmetrical bell-shaped curve in which the optimal activating H 2 O 2 concentration was 1.2 nM, and the maximal inhibition (75% about the control) was 1 μm. Contrary to the oxidation produced by aging associated with enzyme oligomerization and inhibition, H 2 O 2 oxidation produced sulfenic acid and maintained rTOP in the monomeric form. Consistent with the involvement of rTOP in a signaling redox cascade, the H 2 O 2 -oxidized rTOP reacted with dimeric thioredoxin-1 (TRx-1) and remained covalently bound to one subunit of TRx-1.

  9. Redox-active and Redox-silent Compounds: Synergistic Therapeutics in Cancer

    Tomasetti, M.; Santarelli, L.; Alleva, R.; Dong, L.F.; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2015), s. 552-568 ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Apoptosis * autophagy * redox-active agents Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.455, year: 2015

  10. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  11. A cell for extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of oxygen sensitive products of redox reactions

    Furenlid, L.R.; Renner, M.W.; Fajer, J.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a cell suitable for extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of oxygen and/or water sensitive products of redox reactions. The cell utilizes aluminized Mylar windows that are transparent to x rays, provide low gas permeability, and allow vacuum to be maintained in the cell. The windows are attached to the glassware with an epoxy that resists attack by common organic solvents. Additional side arms allow multiple spectroscopic probes of the same sample under anaerobic and anhydrous conditions

  12. Synthesis and characterization of redox-active ferric nontronite

    Ilgen, A. G.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Dunphy, D. R.; Artyushkova, K.; Cerrato, J. M.; Kruichak, J. N.; Janish, M. T.; Sun, C. J.; Argo, J. M.; Washington, R. E.

    2017-10-01

    Heterogeneous redox reactions on clay mineral surfaces control mobility and bioavailability of redox-sensitive nutrients and contaminants. Iron (Fe) residing in clay mineral structures can either catalyze or directly participate in redox reactions; however, chemical controls over its reactivity are not fully understood. In our previous work we demonstrated that converting a minor portion of Fe(III) to Fe(II) (partial reduction) in the octahedral sheet of natural Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite (NAu-1) activates its surface, making it redox-active. In this study we produced and characterized synthetic ferric nontronite (SIP), highlighting structural and chemical similarities and differences between this synthetic nontronite and its natural counterpart NAu-1, and probed whether mineral surface is redox-active by reacting it with arsenic As(III) under oxic and anoxic conditions. We demonstrate that synthetic nontronite SIP undergoes the same activation as natural nontronite NAu-1 following the partial reduction treatment. Similar to NAu-1, SIP oxidized As(III) to As(V) under both oxic (catalytic pathway) and anoxic (direct oxidation) conditions. The similar reactivity trends observed for synthetic nontronite and its natural counterpart make SIP an appropriate analog for laboratory studies. The development of chemically pure analogs for ubiquitous soil minerals will allow for systematic research of the fundamental properties of these minerals.

  13. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  14. Redox-Flow Batteries: From Metals to Organic Redox-Active Materials.

    Winsberg, Jan; Hagemann, Tino; Janoschka, Tobias; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2017-01-16

    Research on redox-flow batteries (RFBs) is currently experiencing a significant upturn, stimulated by the growing need to store increasing quantities of sustainably generated electrical energy. RFBs are promising candidates for the creation of smart grids, particularly when combined with photovoltaics and wind farms. To achieve the goal of "green", safe, and cost-efficient energy storage, research has shifted from metal-based materials to organic active materials in recent years. This Review presents an overview of various flow-battery systems. Relevant studies concerning their history are discussed as well as their development over the last few years from the classical inorganic, to organic/inorganic, to RFBs with organic redox-active cathode and anode materials. Available technologies are analyzed in terms of their technical, economic, and environmental aspects; the advantages and limitations of these systems are also discussed. Further technological challenges and prospective research possibilities are highlighted. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  15. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    Prabhakar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD. Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP. Results show that curcumin significantly (p<0.01 downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects.

  16. Redox Proteomics and Platelet Activation: Understanding the Redox Proteome to Improve Platelet Quality for Transfusion

    Sonego, Giona; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Prudent, Michel; Lion, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Blood banks use pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies to increase the safety of platelet concentrates (PCs). The characteristics of PI-treated PCs slightly differ from those of untreated PCs, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. One possible cause is the generation of oxidative stress during the PI process. This is of great interest since reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as second messengers in platelet functions. Furthermore, there are links between protein oxidation and phosphorylation, another mechanism that is critical for cell regulation. Current research efforts focus on understanding the underlying mechanisms and identifying new target proteins. Proteomics technologies represent powerful tools for investigating signaling pathways involving ROS and post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, while quantitative techniques enable the comparison of the platelet resting state versus the stimulated state. In particular, redox cysteine is a key player in platelet activation upon stimulation by different agonists. This review highlights the experiments that have provided insights into the roles of ROS in platelet function and the implications for platelet transfusion, and potentially in diseases such as inflammation and platelet hyperactivity. The review also describes the implication of redox mechanism in platelet storage considerations. PMID:28208668

  17. Redox-active media for permeable reactive barriers

    Sivavec, T.M.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.; Baghel, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, three classes of redox-active media are described and evaluated in terms of their long-term effectiveness in treating TCE-contaminated groundwater in permeable reactive zones. Zero-valent iron, in the form of recycled cast iron filings, the first class, has received considerable attention as a reactive media and has been used in about a dozen pilot- and full-scale subsurface wall installations. Criteria used in selecting commercial sources of granular iron, will be discussed. Two other classes of redox-active media that have not yet seen wide use in pilot- or full-scale installations will also be described: Fe(II) minerals and bimetallic systems. Fe(II) minerals, including magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), and ferrous sulfide (troilite, FeS), are redox-active and afford TCE reduction rates and product distributions that suggest that they react via a reductive mechanism similar to that which operates in the FeO system. Fe(II) species within the passive oxide layer coating the iron metal may act as electron transfer mediators, with FeO serving as the bulk reductant. Bimetallic systems, the third class of redox-active media, are commonly prepared by plating a second metal onto zero-valent iron (e.g., Ni/Fe and Pd/Fe) and have been shown to accelerate solvent degradation rates relative to untreated iron metal. The long-term effectiveness of this approach, however, has not yet been determined in groundwater treatability tests. The results of a Ni-plated iron column study using site groundwater indicate that a change in reduction mechanism (to catalytic dehydrohalogenation/hydrogenation) accounts for the observed rate enhancement. A significant loss in media reactivity was observed over time, attributable to Ni catalyst deactivation or poisoning. Zero-valent iron systems have not shown similar losses in reactivity in long-term laboratory, pilot or field investigations

  18. Redox-active Hybrid Materials for Pseudocapacitive Energy Storage

    Boota, Muhammad

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials show a great promise for the purpose of manufacturing high performance electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage systems and beyond. Molecular level combination of two best suited components in a hybrid material leads to new or sometimes exceptional sets of physical, chemical, mechanical and electrochemical properties that makes them attractive for broad ranges of applications. Recently, there has been growing interest in producing redox-active hybrid nanomaterials for energy storage applications where generally the organic component provides high redox capacitance and the inorganic component offers high conductivity and robust support. While organic-inorganic hybrid materials offer tremendous opportunities for electrochemical energy storage applications, the task of matching the right organic material out of hundreds of natural and nearly unlimited synthetic organic molecules to appropriate nanostructured inorganic support hampers their electrochemical energy storage applications. We aim to present the recent development of redox-active hybrid materials for pseudocapacitive energy storage. We will show the impact of combination of suitable organic materials with distinct carbon nanostructures and/or highly conductive metal carbides (MXenes) on conductivity, charge storage performance, and cyclability. Combined experimental and molecular simulation results will be discussed to shed light on the interfacial organic-inorganic interactions, pseudocapacitive charge storage mechanisms, and likely orientations of organic molecules on conductive supports. Later, the concept of all-pseudocapacitive organic-inorganic asymmetric supercapacitors will be highlighted which open up new avenues for developing inexpensive, sustainable, and high energy density aqueous supercapacitors. Lastly, future challenges and opportunities to further tailor the redox-active hybrids will be highlighted.

  19. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Relations between Playing Activities and Fine Motor Development

    Suggate, Sebastian; Stoeger, Heidrun; Pufke, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Children's fine motor skills (FMS) are being increasingly recognized as an important aspect of preschool development; yet, we know very little about the experiences that foster their development. We utilized a parent-administered children's fine and gross motor activities questionnaire (MAQ) to investigate links with FMS. We recruited a sample of…

  1. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    Chen, Wei; Baby, Rakhi Raghavan; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active

  2. Mutagenesis of the redox-active disulfide in mercuric ion reductase: Catalysis by mutant enzymes restricted to flavin redox chemistry

    Distefano, M.D.; Au, K.G.; Walsh, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    Mercuric reductase, a flavoenzyme that possesses a redox-active cystine, Cys 135 Cys 140 , catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by NADPH. As a probe of mechanism, the authors have constructed mutants lacking a redox-active disulfide by eliminating Cys 135 (Ala 135 Cys 140 ), Cys 14 (Cys 135 Ala 140 ), or both (Ala 135 Ala 140 ). Additionally, they have made double mutants that lack Cys 135 (Ala 135 Cys 139 Cys 140 ) or Cys 140 (Cys 135 Cys 139 Ala 140 ) but introduce a new Cys in place of Gly 139 with the aim of constructing dithiol pairs in the active site that do not form a redox-active disulfide. The resulting mutant enzymes all lack redox-active disulfides and are hence restricted to FAD/FADH 2 redox chemistry. Each mutant enzyme possesses unique physical and spectroscopic properties that reflect subtle differences in the FAD microenvironment. Preliminary evidence for the Ala 135 Cys 139 Cys 14 mutant enzyme suggests that this protein forms a disulfide between the two adjacent Cys residues. Hg(II) titration experiments that correlate the extent of charge-transfer quenching with Hg(II) binding indicate that the Ala 135 Cys 140 protein binds Hg(II) with substantially less avidity than does the wild-type enzyme. All mutant mercuric reductases catalyze transhydrogenation and oxygen reduction reactions through obligatory reduced flavin intermediates at rates comparable to or greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. In multiple-turnover assays which monitored the production of Hg(0), two of the mutant enzymes were observed to proceed through at least 30 turnovers at rates ca. 1000-fold slower than that of wild-type mercuric reductase. They conclude that the Cys 135 and Cys 140 thiols serve as Hg(II) ligands that orient the Hg(II) for subsequent reduction by a reduced flavin intermediate

  3. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    Alfonta, Lital [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  4. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2017-10-10

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  5. Redox-​Active Ligand-​Induced Homolytic Bond Activation

    Broere, D.L.J.; Metz, L.L.; de Bruin, B.; Reek, J.N.H.; Siegler, M.A.; van der Vlugt, J.I.

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of the novel redox-​active phosphine-​appended aminophenol pincer ligand (PNOH2) to PdII generates a paramagnetic complex with a persistent ligand-​centered radical. The complex undergoes fully reversible single-​electron oxidn. and redn. Homolytic bond activation of diphenyldisulfide

  6. Inhibitors of nuclease and redox activity of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1).

    Laev, Sergey S; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F; Lavrik, Olga I

    2017-05-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein which is essential in the base excision repair (BER) pathway of DNA lesions caused by oxidation and alkylation. This protein hydrolyzes DNA adjacent to the 5'-end of an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site to produce a nick with a 3'-hydroxyl group and a 5'-deoxyribose phosphate moiety or activates the DNA-binding activity of certain transcription factors through its redox function. Studies have indicated a role for APE1/Ref-1 in the pathogenesis of cancer and in resistance to DNA-interactive drugs. Thus, this protein has potential as a target in cancer treatment. As a result, major efforts have been directed to identify small molecule inhibitors against APE1/Ref-1 activities. These agents have the potential to become anticancer drugs. The aim of this review is to present recent progress in studies of all published small molecule APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors. The structures and activities of APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors, that target both DNA repair and redox activities, are presented and discussed. To date, there is an urgent need for further development of the design and synthesis of APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors due to high importance of this protein target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cupryphans, metal-binding, redox-active, redesigned conopeptides.

    Barba, Marco; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Romeo, Cristina; Schininà, M Eugenia; Pietraforte, Donatella; Mannina, Luisa; Musci, Giovanni; Polticelli, Fabio

    2009-03-01

    Contryphans are bioactive peptides, isolated from the venom of marine snails of the genus Conus, which are characterized by the short length of the polypeptide chain and the high degree of unusual post-translational modifications. The cyclization of the polypeptide chain through a single disulphide bond, the presence of two conserved Pro residues, and the epimerization of a Trp/Leu residue confer to Contryphans a stable and well-defined structure in solution, conserved in all members of the family, and tolerant to multiple substitutions. The potential of Contryphans as scaffolds for the design of redox-active (macro)molecules was tested by engineering a copper-binding site on two different variants of the natural peptide Contryphan-Vn. The binding site was designed by computational modeling, and the redesigned peptides were synthesized and characterized by optical, fluorescence, electron spin resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The novel peptides, named Cupryphan and Arg-Cupryphan, bind Cu(2+) ions with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a K(d) in the 100 nM range. Other divalent metals (e.g., Zn(2+) and Mg(2+)) are bound with much lower affinity. In addition, Cupryphans catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anions with an activity comparable to other nonpeptidic superoxide dismutase mimics. We conclude that the Contryphan motif represents a natural robust scaffold which can be engineered to perform different functions, providing additional means for the design of catalytically active mini metalloproteins.

  8. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    Lytvynenko, Anton S. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Kiskin, Mikhail A., E-mail: mkiskin@igic.ras.ru [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, Victoria N.; Mishura, Andrey M.; Titov, Vladimir E.; Kolotilov, Sergey V. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Eremenko, Igor L.; Novotortsev, Vladimir M. [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6} (Piv=O{sub 2}CC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics.

  9. Redox regulation of the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Yingying Han

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Redox state is a critical determinant of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death.The aim of this study is to determine if AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, a cellular energy sensor, is activated by oxidants generated by Berberine in endothelial cells (EC.Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC were exposed to Berberine. AMPK activity and reactive oxygen species were monitored after the incubation.In BAEC, Berberine caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of AMPK at Thr172 and acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC at Ser79, a well characterized downstream target of AMPK. Concomitantly, Berberine increased peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant formed by simultaneous generation of superoxide and nitric oxide. Pre-incubation of BAEC with anti-oxidants markedly attenuated Berberine-enhanced phosphorylation of both AMPK and ACC. Consistently, adenoviral expression of superoxide dismutase and pretreatment of L-N(G-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME; a non-selective NOS inhibitor blunted Berberine-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. Furthermore, mitochondria-targeted tempol (mito-tempol pretreatment or expression of uncoupling protein attenuated AMPK activation caused by Berberine. Depletion of mitochondria abolished the effects of Berberine on AMPK in EC. Finally, Berberine significantly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 at Ser307 and gene silencing of LKB1 attenuated Berberine-enhanced AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation in BAEC.Our results suggest that mitochondria-derived superoxide anions and peroxynitrite are required for Berberine-induced AMPK activation in endothelial cells.

  10. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    Chen, Wei; Rakhi, R. B.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2013-05-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles).We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section, supporting figures including SEM, TEM, XPS, BET, CV and CD curves and a summary table of capacitance. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00773a

  11. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    Börjesson, Karl; Wiberg, Joanna; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Ljungdahl, Thomas; Må rtensson, Jerker; Brown, Tom; Nordén, Bengt; Albinsson, Bo

    2010-01-01

    , such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore

  12. A general approach toward enhancement of pseudocapacitive performance of conducting polymers by redox-active electrolytes

    Chen, Wei; Xia, Chuan; Baby, Rakhi Raghavan; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2014-01-01

    A general approach is demonstrated where the pseudocapacitive performance of different conducting polymers is enhanced in redox-active electrolytes. The concept is demonstrated using several electroactive conducting polymers, including polyaniline

  13. The self-assembly of redox active peptides: Synthesis and electrochemical capacitive behavior.

    Piccoli, Julia P; Santos, Adriano; Santos-Filho, Norival A; Lorenzón, Esteban N; Cilli, Eduardo M; Bueno, Paulo R

    2016-05-01

    The present work reports on the synthesis of a redox-tagged peptide with self-assembling capability aiming applications in electrochemically active capacitive surfaces (associated with the presence of the redox centers) generally useful in electroanalytical applications. Peptide containing ferrocene (fc) molecular (redox) group (Ac-Cys-Ile-Ile-Lys(fc)-Ile-Ile-COOH) was thus synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). To obtain the electrochemically active capacitive interface, the side chain of the cysteine was covalently bound to the gold electrode (sulfur group) and the side chain of Lys was used to attach the ferrocene in the peptide chain. After obtaining the purified redox-tagged peptide, the self-assembly and redox capability was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance-based capacitance spectroscopy techniques. The obtained results confirmed that the redox-tagged peptide was successfully attached by forming an electroactive self-assembled monolayer onto gold electrode. The design of redox active self-assembly ferrocene-tagged peptide is predictably useful in the development of biosensor devices precisely to detect, in a label-free platform, those biomarkers of clinical relevance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 357-367, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A general approach toward enhancement of pseudocapacitive performance of conducting polymers by redox-active electrolytes

    Chen, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A general approach is demonstrated where the pseudocapacitive performance of different conducting polymers is enhanced in redox-active electrolytes. The concept is demonstrated using several electroactive conducting polymers, including polyaniline, polypyrrole, and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). As compared to conventional electrolytes, the redox-active electrolytes, prepared by simply adding a redox mediator to the conventional electrolyte, can significantly improve the energy storage capacity of pseudocapacitors with different conducting polymers. The results show that the specific capacitance of conducting polymer based pseudocapacitors can be increased by a factor of two by utilization of the redox-active electrolytes. In fact, this approach gives some of the highest reported specific capacitance values for electroactive conducting polymers. Moreover, our findings present a general and effective approach for the enhancement of energy storage performance of pseudocapacitors using a variety of polymeric electrode materials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Flowable Conducting Particle Networks in Redox-Active Electrolytes for Grid Energy Storage

    Hatzell, K. B.; Boota, M.; Kumbur, E. C.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a new hybrid approach toward achieving high volumetric energy and power densities in an electrochemical flow capacitor for grid energy storage. The electrochemical flow capacitor suffers from high self-discharge and low energy density because charge storage is limited to the available surface area (electric double layer charge storage). Here, we examine two carbon materials as conducting particles in a flow battery electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple. Highly porous activated carbon spheres (CSs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are investigated as conducting particle networks that facilitate both faradaic and electric double layer charge storage. Charge storage contributions (electric double layer and faradaic) are distinguished for flow-electrodes composed of MWCNTs and activated CSs. A MWCNT flow-electrode based in a redox-active electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple demonstrates 18% less self-discharge, 10 X more energy density, and 20 X greater power densities (at 20 mV s-1) than one based on a non-redox active electrolyte. Furthermore, a MWCNT redox-active flow electrode demonstrates 80% capacitance retention, and >95% coulombic efficiency over 100 cycles, indicating the feasibility of utilizing conducting networks with redox chemistries for grid energy storage.

  16. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding.

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J; Rudenko, Gabby

    2017-11-02

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a 'redox switch' centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the 'OFF' state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Activator Protein-1: redox switch controlling structure and DNA-binding

    Yin, Zhou; Machius, Mischa; Nestler, Eric J.; Rudenko, Gabby (Texas-MED); (Icahn)

    2017-09-07

    The transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), binds to cognate DNA under redox control; yet, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. A series of crystal structures of the AP-1 FosB/JunD bZIP domains reveal ordered DNA-binding regions in both FosB and JunD even in absence DNA. However, while JunD is competent to bind DNA, the FosB bZIP domain must undergo a large conformational rearrangement that is controlled by a ‘redox switch’ centered on an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Solution studies confirm that FosB/JunD cannot undergo structural transition and bind DNA when the redox-switch is in the ‘OFF’ state, and show that the mid-point redox potential of the redox switch affords it sensitivity to cellular redox homeostasis. The molecular and structural studies presented here thus reveal the mechanism underlying redox-regulation of AP-1 Fos/Jun transcription factors and provide structural insight for therapeutic interventions targeting AP-1 proteins.

  18. The Activity of Menkes Disease Protein ATP7A Is Essential for Redox Balance in Mitochondria

    Bhattacharjee, Ashima; Yang, Haojun; Duffy, Megan; Robinson, Emily; Conrad-Antoville, Arianrhod; Lu, Ya-Wen; Capps, Tony; Braiterman, Lelita; Wolfgang, Michael; Murphy, Michael P.; Yi, Ling; Kaler, Stephen G.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Ralle, Martina

    2016-05-16

    Copper-transporting ATPase ATP7A is essential for mammalian copper homeostasis. Loss of ATP7A activity is associated with fatal Menkes disease and various other pathologies. In cells, ATP7A inactivation disrupts copper transport from the cytosol into the secretory pathway. Using fibroblasts from Menkes disease patients and mouse 3T3-L1 cells with a CRISPR/Cas9-inactivated ATP7A, we demonstrate that ATP7A dysfunction is also damaging to mitochondrial redox balance. In these cells, copper accumulates in nuclei, cytosol, and mitochondria, causing distinct changes in their redox environment. Quantitative imaging of live cells using GRX1-roGFP2 and HyPer sensors reveals highest glutathione oxidation and elevation of H2O2 in mitochondria, whereas the redox environment of nuclei and the cytosol is much less affected. Decreasing the H2O2 levels in mitochondria with MitoQ does not prevent glutathione oxidation; i.e. elevated copper and not H2O2 is a primary cause of glutathione oxidation. Redox misbalance does not significantly affect mitochondrion morphology or the activity of respiratory complex IV but markedly increases cell sensitivity to even mild glutathione depletion, resulting in loss of cell viability. Thus, ATP7A activity protects mitochondria from excessive copper entry, which is deleterious to redox buffers. Mitochondrial redox misbalance could significantly contribute to pathologies associated with ATP7A inactivation in tissues with paradoxical accumulation of copper (i.e. renal epithelia).

  19. Sources of mutagenic activity in urban fine particles

    Stevens, R.K.; Lewis, C.W.; Dzubay, T.G.; Cupitt, L.T.; Lewtas, J.

    1990-01-01

    Samples were collected during the winter of 1984-1985 in the cities of Albuquerque, NM and Raleigh NC as part of a US Environmental Protection Agency study to evaluate methods to determine the emission sources contributing to the mutagenic properties of extractable organic matter (EOM) present in fine particles. Data derived from the analysis of the composition of these fine particles served as input to a multi-linear regression (MLR) model used to calculate the relative contribution of wood burning and motor vehicle sources to mutagenic activity observed in the extractable organic matter. At both sites the mutagenic potency of EOM was found to be greater (3-5 times) for mobile sources when compared to wood smoke extractable organics. Carbon-14 measurements which give a direct determination of the amount of EOM that originated from wood burning were in close agreement with the source apportionment results derived from the MLR model

  20. Redox/methylation mediated abnormal DNA methylation as regulators of ambient fine particulate matter-induced neurodevelopment related impairment in human neuronal cells

    Wei, Hongying; Liang, Fan; Meng, Ge; Nie, Zhiqing; Zhou, Ren; Cheng, Wei; Wu, Xiaomeng; Feng, Yan; Wang, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been implicated as a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders including autism in children. However, the underlying biological mechanism remains unclear. DNA methylation is suggested to be a fundamental mechanism for the neuronal responses to environmental cues. We prepared whole particle of PM2.5 (PM2.5), water-soluble extracts (Pw), organic extracts (Po) and carbon core component (Pc) and characterized their chemical constitutes. We found that PM2.5 induced significant redox imbalance, decreased the levels of intercellular methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine and caused global DNA hypomethylation. Furthermore, PM2.5 exposure triggered gene-specific promoter DNA hypo- or hypermethylation and abnormal mRNA expression of autism candidate genes. PM2.5-induced DNA hypermethylation in promoter regions of synapse related genes were associated with the decreases in their mRNA and protein expression. The inhibiting effects of antioxidative reagents, a methylation-supporting agent and a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor demonstrated the involvement of redox/methylation mechanism in PM2.5-induced abnormal DNA methylation patterns and synaptic protein expression. The biological effects above generally followed a sequence of PM2.5 ≥ Pwo > Po > Pw > Pc. Our results implicated a novel epigenetic mechanism for the neurodevelopmental toxicity of particulate air pollution, and that eliminating the chemical components could mitigate the neurotoxicity of PM2.5.

  1. Redox-active antibiotics control gene expression and community behavior in divergent bacteria.

    Dietrich, Lars E P; Teal, Tracy K; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Newman, Dianne K

    2008-08-29

    It is thought that bacteria excrete redox-active pigments as antibiotics to inhibit competitors. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the endogenous antibiotic pyocyanin activates SoxR, a transcription factor conserved in Proteo- and Actinobacteria. In Escherichia coli, SoxR regulates the superoxide stress response. Bioinformatic analysis coupled with gene expression studies in P. aeruginosa and Streptomyces coelicolor revealed that the majority of SoxR regulons in bacteria lack the genes required for stress responses, despite the fact that many of these organisms still produce redox-active small molecules, which indicates that redox-active pigments play a role independent of oxidative stress. These compounds had profound effects on the structural organization of colony biofilms in both P. aeruginosa and S. coelicolor, which shows that "secondary metabolites" play important conserved roles in gene expression and development.

  2. Redox active polymer devices and methods of using and manufacturing the same

    Johnson, Paul; Bautista-Martinez, Jose Antonio; Friesen, Cody; Switzer, Elise

    2018-06-05

    The disclosed technology relates generally to apparatus comprising conductive polymers and more particularly to tag and tag devices comprising a redox-active polymer film, and method of using and manufacturing the same. In one aspect, an apparatus includes a substrate and a conductive structure formed on the substrate which includes a layer of redox-active polymer film having mobile ions and electrons. The conductive structure further includes a first terminal and a second terminal configured to receive an electrical signal therebetween, where the layer of redox-active polymer is configured to conduct an electrical current generated by the mobile ions and the electrons in response to the electrical signal. The apparatus additionally includes a detection circuit operatively coupled to the conductive structure and configured to detect the electrical current flowing through the conductive structure.

  3. Redox-active labile iron in fortified flours from the Brazilian market Ferro lábil redox-ativo em farinhas fortificadas do mercado brasileiro

    Breno Pannia Espósito

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the fraction of redox-active labile iron in iron-fortified flours acquired on the Brazilian market. METHODS: Samples of wheat flour, maize flour and breadcrumbs were extracted with buffers that mimic gastric juice, saliva and intestinal juice. Redox-active labile iron levels were assessed through the reaction of autoxidation of ascorbic acid catalyzed by iron in the presence of a fluorescence probe. RESULTS: Redox-active labile iron represents 1% to 9% of the total iron in the flour and breadcrumb samples, with the lowest values found under gastric juice conditions and the highest in the more alkaline media. Redox-active labile iron possibly arises from the decomposition of an iron-phytic acid complex. A positive correlation between redox-active labile iron and total iron was found in saline biomimetic fluids. CONCLUSION: Redox-active labile iron may be a risk factor for people with impaired antioxidant defenses, such as those who are atransferrinemic or iron overloaded (e.g. thalassemic. Total iron can be used to predict redox-active labile iron absorption at each stage of the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion of iron-fortified flours.OBJETIVO: Quantificar a porcentagem de ferro lábil redox ativo em farinhas fortificadas adquiridas no comércio popular. MÉTODOS: Amostras de farinha de trigo, fubá e rosca foram extraídas com tampões miméticos de suco gástrico, saliva e suco intestinal. Os níveis de ferro lábil redox ativo foram determinados por meio da reação de auto-oxidação do ácido ascórbico catalisada pelo ferro, em presença de uma sonda fluorimétrica. RESULTADOS: A fração de ferro lábil redox ativo representa entre 1% e 9% do ferro total nas farinhas estudadas, sendo os menores valores encontrados em condições miméticas do suco gástrico e os maiores nos meios mais alcalinos. Há indícios de que o ferro lábil redox ativo origina-se da decomposição de um complexo entre ferro e ácido f

  4. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    Mahoney Noreen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. Natural phenolic compounds can serve as potent redox cyclers that inhibit microbial growth through destabilization of cellular redox homeostasis and/or antioxidation systems. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that disrupt the fungal antioxidation system. These compounds could then function as chemosensitizing agents in concert with conventional drugs or fungicides to improve antifungal efficacy. Methods Benzaldehydes were tested as natural antifungal agents against strains of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. terreus and Penicillium expansum, fungi that are causative agents of human invasive aspergillosis and/or are mycotoxigenic. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a model system for identifying gene targets of benzaldehydes. The efficacy of screened compounds as effective chemosensitizers or as antifungal agents in formulations was tested with methods outlined by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. Results Several benzaldehydes are identified having potent antifungal activity. Structure-activity analysis reveals that antifungal activity increases by the presence of an ortho-hydroxyl group in the aromatic ring. Use of deletion mutants in the oxidative stress-response pathway of S. cerevisiae (sod1Δ, sod2Δ, glr1Δ and two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK mutants of A. fumigatus (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ, indicates antifungal activity of the benzaldehydes is through disruption of cellular antioxidation. Certain benzaldehydes, in combination with phenylpyrroles, overcome tolerance of A. fumigatus MAPK mutants to this agent and/or increase sensitivity of fungal pathogens to mitochondrial respiration inhibitory agents. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC or fungicidal (MFC

  5. Fundamental understanding and practical challenges of anionic redox activity in Li-ion batteries

    Assat, Gaurav; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2018-05-01

    Our increasing dependence on lithium-ion batteries for energy storage calls for continual improvements in the performance of their positive electrodes, which have so far relied solely on cationic redox of transition-metal ions for driving the electrochemical reactions. Great hopes have recently been placed on the emergence of anionic redox—a transformational approach for designing positive electrodes as it leads to a near-doubling of capacity. But questions have been raised about the fundamental origins of anionic redox and whether its full potential can be realized in applications. In this Review, we discuss the underlying science that triggers a reversible and stable anionic redox activity. Furthermore, we highlight its practical limitations and outline possible approaches for improving such materials and designing new ones. We also summarize their chances for market implementation in the face of the competing nickel-based layered cathodes that are prevalent today.

  6. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    Boland, Susan; Foster, Kevin; Leech, Donal

    2009-01-01

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl) 2 (4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF 6 , to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E 0 '' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period

  7. Electron transfer across the polarized interface between water and a hydrophobic redox-active ionic liquid

    Langmaier, Jan; Trojánek, Antonín; Samec, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2010), s. 1333-1335 ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME08098; GA ČR GAP206/10/1231 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : redox-active ionic liquid * membrane * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.282, year: 2010

  8. Investigating Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Lung Cells Exposed to Redox-Active PM Components

    Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) causes cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality through mechanisms that involve oxidative stress. 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ) is a ubiquitous component of PM and a potent redox-active electrophile. We previously reported that 1,2-NQ incr...

  9. Bayesian Regression of Thermodynamic Models of Redox Active Materials

    Johnston, Katherine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Finding a suitable functional redox material is a critical challenge to achieving scalable, economically viable technologies for storing concentrated solar energy in the form of a defected oxide. Demonstrating e ectiveness for thermal storage or solar fuel is largely accomplished by using a thermodynamic model derived from experimental data. The purpose of this project is to test the accuracy of our regression model on representative data sets. Determining the accuracy of the model includes parameter tting the model to the data, comparing the model using di erent numbers of param- eters, and analyzing the entropy and enthalpy calculated from the model. Three data sets were considered in this project: two demonstrating materials for solar fuels by wa- ter splitting and the other of a material for thermal storage. Using Bayesian Inference and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), parameter estimation was preformed on the three data sets. Good results were achieved, except some there was some deviations on the edges of the data input ranges. The evidence values were then calculated in a variety of ways and used to compare models with di erent number of parameters. It was believed that at least one of the parameters was unnecessary and comparing evidence values demonstrated that the parameter was need on one data set and not signi cantly helpful on another. The entropy was calculated by taking the derivative in one variable and integrating over another. and its uncertainty was also calculated by evaluating the entropy over multiple MCMC samples. Afterwards, all the parts were written up as a tutorial for the Uncertainty Quanti cation Toolkit (UQTk).

  10. Long-term aerobic exercise increases redox-active iron through nitric oxide in rat hippocampus.

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, De-Sheng

    2014-01-30

    Adult hippocampus is highly vulnerable to iron-induced oxidative stress. Aerobic exercise has been proposed to reduce oxidative stress but the findings in the hippocampus are conflicting. This study aimed to observe the changes of redox-active iron and concomitant regulation of cellular iron homeostasis in the hippocampus by aerobic exercise, and possible regulatory effect of nitric oxide (NO). A randomized controlled study was designed in the rats with swimming exercise treatment (for 3 months) and/or an unselective inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) (L-NAME) treatment. The results from the bleomycin-detectable iron assay showed additional redox-active iron in the hippocampus by exercise treatment. The results from nonheme iron content assay, combined with the redox-active iron content, showed increased storage iron content by exercise treatment. NOx (nitrate plus nitrite) assay showed increased NOx content by exercise treatment. The results from the Western blot assay showed decreased ferroportin expression, no changes of TfR1 and DMT1 expressions, increased IRP1 and IRP2 expression, increased expressions of eNOS and nNOS rather than iNOS. In these effects of exercise treatment, the increased redox-active iron content, storage iron content, IRP1 and IRP2 expressions were completely reversed by L-NAME treatment, and decreased ferroportin expression was in part reversed by L-NAME. L-NAME treatment completely inhibited increased NOx and both eNOS and nNOS expression in the hippocampus. Our findings suggest that aerobic exercise could increase the redox-active iron in the hippocampus, indicating an increase in the capacity to generate hydroxyl radicals through the Fenton reactions, and aerobic exercise-induced iron accumulation in the hippocampus might mainly result from the role of the endogenous NO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Adsorption behavior of redox-active suppressor additives: Combined electrochemical and STM studies

    Hai, N.T.M.; Huynh, T.M.T.; Fluegel, A.; Mayer, D.; Broekmann, P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Janus Green B and safranine are prototypical redox-active leveler additives for copper electroplating. → Their redox-transitions lie within the copper potential window. → Reduced additives are identified as active species for the leveling effect. → Electro-reduction affects in particular the central aromatic cores of the additives. - Abstract: The redox chemistry and the related surface phase behavior of Safranine (SAF) and Janus Green B (JGB) have been studied by means of cyclic voltammetry in combination with in situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy using HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite) and single crystalline Cu(1 0 0) as model substrates, both revealing different widths of the accessible potential windows. JGB and SAF serve as prototypical heterocyclic suppressor/leveler additives that are used for the metallization of 3D-TSVs (3D Through Silicon Vias) following a classical 'leveling' concept. SAF can be considered as the reductive decomposition product of JGB that is formed at the copper/electrolyte interface upon electroplating. Both additives reveal a pronounced pH-dependent redox-chemistry with redox-transitions lying close to or even beyond the anodic limit of the copper potential window. Affected by these redox-processes are in particular the aromatic cores of those heterocycles that can be (quasi)reversibly reduced by a two electron transfer process within the potential window of copper. Therefore we identify the reduced form of those dyes as the active components for the suppressing/leveling effect in copper plating. STM data clearly shows a dye surface phase behavior that is crucially determined by its potential-dependent redox-chemistry. This will be exemplarily discussed for the SAF dye. On chloride-modified Cu(1 0 0) mono-reduced SAF forms a structurally well-defined monolayer of cationic stacking polymers. However, this coupled anion/cation layer reveals only minor suppressing capabilities with respect to the copper

  12. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound

    Pookpanratana, S; Zhu, H; Bittle, E G; Richter, C A; Li, Q; Hacker, C A; Natoli, S N; Ren, T

    2016-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al 2 O 3 /molecule/SiO 2 /Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a ‘click’ reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The ‘click’ reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices. (paper)

  13. Redox-Active Antibiotics Control Gene Expression and Community Behavior in Divergent Bacteria

    Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Teal, Tracy K.; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Newman, Dianne K.

    2008-01-01

    It is thought that bacteria excrete redox-active pigments as antibiotics to inhibit competitors. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the endogenous antibiotic pyocyanin activates SoxR, a transcription factor conserved in Proteo- and Actinobacteria. In Escherichia coli, SoxR regulates the superoxide stress response. Bioinformatic analysis coupled with gene expression studies in P. aeruginosa and Streptomyces coelicolor revealed that the majority of SoxR regulons in bacteria lack the genes required for ...

  14. Application of a redox gradostat reactor for assessing rhizosphere microorganism activity on lambda-cyhalothrin.

    Peacock, T J; Mikell, A T; Moore, M T; Smith, S

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial activity on pesticides can lead to decreased toxicity or persistence in aquatic systems. Rhizosphere activity is difficult to measure in situ. To mimic rhizosphere properties of the soft rush, Juncus effusus, a single-stage gradostat reactor was developed to study cycling of lambda-cyhalothrin by rhizobacteria and the effects of Fe(III) and citrate, both common in wetland soil, on lambda-cyhalothrin degradation. Redox gradient changes, greater than ± 10 mV, were apparent within days 5-15 both in the presence and absence of ferric citrate. Through the production of a redox gradient (p < 0.05) by rhizobacteria and the ability to measure pesticide loss over time (p < 0.05), reactors were useful in expanding knowledge on this active environment.

  15. Catalytic Water Oxidation by a Bio-inspired Nickel Complex with Redox Active Ligand

    Wang, Dong; Bruner, Charlie O.

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation of water to dioxygen is important in natural photosynthesis. One of nature’s strategies for managing such multi-electron transfer reactions is to employ redox active metal-organic cofactor arrays. One prototype example is the copper-tyrosinate active site found in galactose oxidase. In this work, we have implemented such a strategy to develop a bio-inspired nickel-phenolate complex capable of catalyzing the oxidation of water to O2 electrochemically at neutral pH with a modest overpotential. The employment of the redox-active ligand turned out to be a useful strategy to avoid the formation of high-valent nickel intermediates while a reasonable turnover rate (0.15 s−1) is retained. PMID:29099176

  16. Catalytic Water Oxidation by a Bio-inspired Nickel Complex with a Redox-Active Ligand.

    Wang, Dong; Bruner, Charlie O

    2017-11-20

    The oxidation of water (H 2 O) to dioxygen (O 2 ) is important in natural photosynthesis. One of nature's strategies for managing such multi-electron transfer reactions is to employ redox-active metal-organic cofactor arrays. One prototype example is the copper tyrosinate active site found in galactose oxidase. In this work, we have implemented such a strategy to develop a bio-inspired nickel phenolate complex capable of catalyzing the oxidation of H 2 O to O 2 electrochemically at neutral pH with a modest overpotential. Employment of the redox-active ligand turned out to be a useful strategy to avoid the formation of high-valent nickel intermediates while a reasonable turnover rate (0.15 s -1 ) is retained.

  17. Redox active molecules cytochrome c and vitamin C enhance heme-enzyme peroxidations by serving as non-specific agents for redox relay

    Gade, Sudeep Kumar; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► At low concentrations, cytochrome c/vitamin C do not catalyze peroxidations. ► But low levels of cytochrome c/vitamin C enhance diverse heme peroxidase activities. ► Enhancement positively correlates to the concentration of peroxide in reaction. ► Reducible additives serve as non-specific agents for redox relay in the system. ► Insight into electron transfer processes in routine and oxidative-stress states. -- Abstract: We report that incorporation of very low concentrations of redox protein cytochrome c and redox active small molecule vitamin C impacted the outcome of one-electron oxidations mediated by structurally distinct plant/fungal heme peroxidases. Evidence suggests that cytochrome c and vitamin C function as a redox relay for diffusible reduced oxygen species in the reaction system, without invoking specific or affinity-based molecular interactions for electron transfers. The findings provide novel perspectives to understanding – (1) the promiscuous role of cytochrome b 5 in the metabolism mediated by liver microsomal xenobiotic metabolizing systems and (2) the roles of antioxidant molecules in affording relief from oxidative stress.

  18. Redox active molecules cytochrome c and vitamin C enhance heme-enzyme peroxidations by serving as non-specific agents for redox relay

    Gade, Sudeep Kumar; Bhattacharya, Subarna [Heme and Flavo Proteins Laboratory, 204, Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632014 (India); Manoj, Kelath Murali, E-mail: satyamjayatu@yahoo.com [Heme and Flavo Proteins Laboratory, 204, Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632014 (India)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At low concentrations, cytochrome c/vitamin C do not catalyze peroxidations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer But low levels of cytochrome c/vitamin C enhance diverse heme peroxidase activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement positively correlates to the concentration of peroxide in reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reducible additives serve as non-specific agents for redox relay in the system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insight into electron transfer processes in routine and oxidative-stress states. -- Abstract: We report that incorporation of very low concentrations of redox protein cytochrome c and redox active small molecule vitamin C impacted the outcome of one-electron oxidations mediated by structurally distinct plant/fungal heme peroxidases. Evidence suggests that cytochrome c and vitamin C function as a redox relay for diffusible reduced oxygen species in the reaction system, without invoking specific or affinity-based molecular interactions for electron transfers. The findings provide novel perspectives to understanding - (1) the promiscuous role of cytochrome b{sub 5} in the metabolism mediated by liver microsomal xenobiotic metabolizing systems and (2) the roles of antioxidant molecules in affording relief from oxidative stress.

  19. Synthesis, DNA Cleavage Activity, Cytotoxicity, Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition, and Acute Murine Toxicity of Redox-Active Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes.

    Alatrash, Nagham; Narh, Eugenia S; Yadav, Abhishek; Kim, Mahn-Jong; Janaratne, Thamara; Gabriel, James; MacDonnell, Frederick M

    2017-07-06

    Four mononuclear [(L-L) 2 Ru(tatpp)] 2+ and two dinuclear [(L-L) 2 Ru(tatpp)Ru(L-L) 2 ] 4+ ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RPCs) containing the 9,11,20,22-tetraazatetrapyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c:3'',2''-l:2''',3'''-n]pentacene (tatpp) ligand were synthesized, in which L-L is a chelating diamine ligand such as 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me 4 phen) or 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Ph 2 phen). These Ru-tatpp analogues all undergo reduction reactions with modest reducing agents, such as glutathione (GSH), at pH 7. These, plus several structurally related but non-redox-active RPCs, were screened for DNA cleavage activity, cytotoxicity, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, and acute mouse toxicity, and their activities were examined with respect to redox activity and lipophilicity. All of the redox-active RPCs show single-strand DNA cleavage in the presence of GSH, whereas none of the non-redox-active RPCs do. Low-micromolar cytotoxicity (IC 50 ) against malignant H358, CCL228, and MCF7 cultured cell lines was mainly restricted to the redox-active RPCs; however, they were substantially less toxic toward nonmalignant MCF10 cells. The IC 50 values for AChE inhibition in cell-free assays and the acute toxicity of RPCs in mice revealed that whereas most RPCs show potent inhibitory action against AChE (IC 50 values <15 μm), Ru-tatpp complexes as a class are surprisingly well tolerated in animals relative to other RPCs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. DNA repair enzyme APE1 from evolutionarily ancient Hydra reveals redox activity exclusively found in mammalian APE1.

    Pekhale, Komal; Haval, Gauri; Perween, Nusrat; Antoniali, Giulia; Tell, Gianluca; Ghaskadbi, Surendra; Ghaskadbi, Saroj

    2017-11-01

    Only mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1) has been reported to possess both DNA repair and redox activities. C terminal of the protein is required for base excision repair, while the redox activity resides in the N terminal due to cysteine residues at specific positions. APE1s from other organisms studied so far lack the redox activity in spite of having the N terminal domain. We find that APE1 from the Cnidarian Hydra exhibits both endonuclease and redox activities similar to mammalian APE1. We further show the presence of the three indispensable cysteines in Hydra APE1 for redox activity by site directed mutagenesis. Importance of redox domain but not the repair domain of APE1 in regeneration has been demonstrated by using domain-specific inhibitors. Our findings clearly demonstrate that the redox function of APE1 evolved very early in metazoan evolution and is not a recent acquisition in mammalian APE1 as believed so far. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    Börjesson, Karl

    2010-09-28

    We have synthesized and studied a supramolecular system comprising a 39-mer DNA with porphyrin-modified thymidine nucleosides anchored to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes). Liposome porphyrin binding characteristics, such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore, the binding characteristics and hybridization capabilities were studied as a function of anchor size and number of anchoring points, properties that are of importance for our future plans to use the addressability of these redox-active nodes in larger DNA-based nanoconstructs. Electron transfer from photoexcited porphyrin to a lipophilic benzoquinone residing in the lipid membrane was characterized by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and verified by femtosecond transient absorption. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  2. Content of redox-active compounds (ie, antioxidants) in foods consumed in the United States.

    Halvorsen, Bente L; Carlsen, Monica H; Phillips, Katherine M; Bøhn, Siv K; Holte, Kari; Jacobs, David R; Blomhoff, Rune

    2006-07-01

    Supplements containing ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, or beta-carotene do not protect against oxidative stress-related diseases in most randomized intervention trials. We suggest that other redox-active phytochemicals may be more effective and that a combination of different redox-active compounds (ie, antioxidants or reductants) may be needed for proper protection against oxidative damage. We aimed to generate a ranked food table with values for total content of redox-active compounds to test this alternative antioxidant hypothesis. An assay that measures the total concentration of redox-active compounds above a certain cutoff reduction potential was used to analyze 1113 food samples obtained from the US Department of Agriculture National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program. Large variations in the content of antioxidants were observed in different foods and food categories. The food groups spices and herbs, nuts and seeds, berries, and fruit and vegetables all contained foods with very high antioxidant contents. Most food categories also contained products almost devoid of antioxidants. Of the 50 food products highest in antioxidant concentrations, 13 were spices, 8 were in the fruit and vegetables category, 5 were berries, 5 were chocolate-based, 5 were breakfast cereals, and 4 were nuts or seeds. On the basis of typical serving sizes, blackberries, walnuts, strawberries, artichokes, cranberries, brewed coffee, raspberries, pecans, blueberries, ground cloves, grape juice, and unsweetened baking chocolate were at the top of the ranked list. This ranked antioxidant food table provides a useful tool for investigations into the possible health benefit of dietary antioxidants.

  3. Redox substoichiometric determination of arsenic in biological materials by neutron activation analysis

    Kanda, Y.; Suzuki, N.

    1979-01-01

    Redox substoichiometry is proposed for an accurate and precise determination of arsenic. This method is based on the substoichiometric oxidation of trivalent arsenic to pentavalent with potassium bromate or ceric sulfate followed by the separation of these species by thionalide extraction of trivalent arsenic. It was applied to neutron activation analysis of arsenic in the NBS SRM Orchard Leaves and the Shark Powder. The results were obtained with and excellent accuracy and precision. (author)

  4. Electrochemistry and electrochemiluminescence from a redox-active metal-organic framework.

    Xu, Yang; Yin, Xue-Bo; He, Xi-Wen; Zhang, Yu-Kui

    2015-06-15

    The marriage of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) can combine their merits together. Designing ECL-active MOF with a high electron transfer capacity and high stability is critical for ECL emission. Here we reported the ECL from a redox-active MOF prepared from {Ru[4,4'-(HO2C)2-bpy]2bpy}(2+) and Zn(2+); a property of MOFs has not been reported previously. The MOF structure is independent of its charge and is therefore stable electrochemically. The redox-activity and well-ordered porous structure of the MOF were confirmed by its electrochemical properties and ECL emission. The high ECL emission indicated the ease of electron transfer between the MOF and co-reactants. Furthermore, the MOF exhibited permselectivity, charge selectivity, and catalytic selectivity along with a stable and concentration-dependent ECL emission toward co-reactants. ECL mechanism was proposed based on the results. The detection and recovery of cocaine in the serum sample was used to validate the feasibility of MOF- based ECL system. The information obtained in this study provides a better understanding of the redox properties of MOFs and their potential electrochemical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    Thomas, Christine M. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  6. Redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles protect human dermal fibroblasts from PQ-induced damage

    Claudia von Montfort

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been published that cerium (Ce oxide nanoparticles (CNP; nanoceria are able to downregulate tumor invasion in cancer cell lines. Redox-active CNP exhibit both selective pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties, the first being responsible for impairment of tumor growth and invasion. A non-toxic and even protective effect of CNP in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF has already been observed. However, the effect on important parameters such as cell death, proliferation and redox state of the cells needs further clarification. Here, we present that nanoceria prevent HDF from reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced cell death and stimulate proliferation due to the antioxidative property of these particles.

  7. Improving the electrocatalytic performance of carbon nanotubes for VO"2"+/VO_2"+ redox reaction by KOH activation

    Dai, Lei; Jiang, Yingqiao; Meng, Wei; Zhou, Huizhu; Wang, Ling; He, Zhangxing

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • KOH-activated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was investigated as superior catalyst for VO"2"+/VO_2"+ redox reaction for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) for the first time. • KOH activation for CNTs can result in the chemical etching of surface and improved wettability, accelerating the mass transfer of vanadium ions. • KOH activation can introduce many oxygen-containing groups as active sites on the surface of CNTs. • KOH-activated CNTs as positive catalyst could increase the comprehensive energy storage performance of VRFB. - Abstract: In this paper, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was activated by KOH treatment at high temperature and investigated as catalyst for VO"2"+/VO_2"+ redox reaction for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that the oxygen-containing groups can be introduced on CNTs by KOH activation. The mass transfer of vanadium ions can be accelerated by chemical etching by KOH activation and improved wettability due to the introduction of hydrophilic groups. The electrochemical properties of VO"2"+/VO_2"+ redox reaction can be enhanced by introduced oxygen-containing groups as active sites. The sample treated at 900 °C with KOH/CNTs mass ratio of 3:1 (CNTs-3) exhibits the highest electrocatalytic activity for VO"2"+/VO_2"+ redox reaction. The cell using CNTs-3 as positive catalyst demonstrates the smallest electrochemical polarization, the highest capacity and efficiency among the samples. Using KOH-activated CNTs-3 can increase the average energy efficiency of the cell by 4.4%. This work suggests that KOH-activated CNTs is a low-cost, efficient and promising catalyst for VO"2"+/VO_2"+ redox reaction for VRFB system.

  8. Redox competition mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy (RC-SECM) for visualisation of local catalytic activity.

    Eckhard, Kathrin; Chen, Xingxing; Turcu, Florin; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2006-12-07

    In order to locally analyse catalytic activity on modified surfaces a transient redox competition mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) has been developed. In a bi-potentiostatic experiment the SECM tip competes with the sample for the very same analyte. This leads to a current decrease at the SECM tip, if it is positioned in close proximity to an active catalyst site on the surface. Specifically, local catalytic activity of a Pt-catalyst modified sample with respect to the catalytic reduction of molecular oxygen was investigated. At higher local catalytic activity the local 02 partial pressure within the gap between accurately positioned SECM tip and sample is depleted, leading to a noticeable tip current decrease over active sites. A flexible software module has been implemented into the SECM to adapt the competition conditions by proper definition of tip and sample potentials. A potential pulse profile enables the localised electrochemically induced generation of molecular oxygen prior to the competition detection. The current decay curves are recorded over the entire duration of the applied reduction pulse. Hence, a time resolved processing of the acquired current values provides movies of the local oxygen concentration against x,y-position. The SECM redox competition mode was verified with a macroscopic Pt-disk electrode as a test sample to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. Moreover, highly dispersed electro-deposited spots of gold and platinum on glassy carbon were visualised using the redox competition mode of SECM. Catalyst spots of different nature as well as activity inhomogeneities within one spot caused by local variations in Pt-loading were visualised successfully.

  9. NAC selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity: A higher redox homeostasis threshold exists in cancer cells

    Pengying Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity controls telomere length, and this plays an important role in stem cells, aging and tumors. Antioxidant was shown to protect telomerase activity in normal cells but inhibit that in cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism is elusive. Here we found that 7721 hepatoma cells held a higher redox homeostasis threshold than L02 normal liver cells which caused 7721 cells to have a higher demand for ROS; MnSOD over-expression in 7721 decreased endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS and inhibited telomerase activity; Akt phosphorylation inhibitor and NAC both inhibited 7721 telomerase activity. The over-elimination of ROS by NAC resulted in the inhibition of Akt pathway. Our results suggest that ROS is involved in the regulation of cancer telomerase activity through Akt pathway. The different intracellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant system in normal cells and tumor cells may be the cause of the opposite effect on telomerase activity in response to NAC treatment. Our results provide a theoretical base of using antioxidants selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity. Findings of the present study may provide insights into novel approaches for cancer treatment.

  10. Nitric oxide activation by distal redox modulation in tetranuclear iron nitrosyl complexes.

    de Ruiter, Graham; Thompson, Niklas B; Lionetti, Davide; Agapie, Theodor

    2015-11-11

    A series of tetranuclear iron complexes displaying a site-differentiated metal center was synthesized. Three of the metal centers are coordinated to our previously reported ligand, based on a 1,3,5-triarylbenzene motif with nitrogen and oxygen donors. The fourth (apical) iron center is coordinatively unsaturated and appended to the trinuclear core through three bridging pyrazolates and an interstitial μ4-oxide moiety. Electrochemical studies of complex [LFe3(PhPz)3OFe][OTf]2 revealed three reversible redox events assigned to the Fe(II)4/Fe(II)3Fe(III) (-1.733 V), Fe(II)3Fe(III)/Fe(II)2Fe(III)2 (-0.727 V), and Fe(II)2Fe(III)2/Fe(II)Fe(III)3 (0.018 V) redox couples. Combined Mössbauer and crystallographic studies indicate that the change in oxidation state is exclusively localized at the triiron core, without changing the oxidation state of the apical metal center. This phenomenon is assigned to differences in the coordination environment of the two metal sites and provides a strategy for storing electron and hole equivalents without affecting the oxidation state of the coordinatively unsaturated metal. The presence of a ligand-binding site allowed the effect of redox modulation on nitric oxide activation by an Fe(II) metal center to be studied. Treatment of the clusters with nitric oxide resulted in binding of NO to the apical iron center, generating a {FeNO}(7) moiety. As with the NO-free precursors, the three reversible redox events are localized at the iron centers distal from the NO ligand. Altering the redox state of the triiron core resulted in significant change in the NO stretching frequency, by as much as 100 cm(-1). The increased activation of NO is attributed to structural changes within the clusters, in particular, those related to the interaction of the metal centers with the interstitial atom. The differences in NO activation were further shown to lead to differential reactivity, with NO disproportionation and N2O formation performed by the more

  11. Characterization of mammalian selenoprotein o: a redox-active mitochondrial protein.

    Han, Seong-Jeong; Lee, Byung Cheon; Yim, Sun Hee; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Lee, Seung-Rock

    2014-01-01

    Selenoproteins exhibit diverse biological functions, most of which are associated with redox control. However, the functions of approximately half of mammalian selenoproteins are not known. One such protein is Selenoprotein O (SelO), the largest mammalian selenoprotein with orthologs found in a wide range of organisms, including bacteria and yeast. Here, we report characterization of mammalian SelO. Expression of this protein could be verified in HEK 293T cells by metabolic labeling of cells with 75Se, and it was abolished when selenocysteine was replaced with serine. A CxxU motif was identified in the C-terminal region of SelO. This protein was reversibly oxidized in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in HEK 293T cells when cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide. This treatment led to the formation of a transient 88 kDa SelO-containing complex. The formation of this complex was enhanced by replacing the CxxU motif with SxxC, but abolished when it was replaced with SxxS, suggesting a redox interaction of SelO with another protein through its Sec residue. SelO was localized to mitochondria and expressed across mouse tissues. Its expression was little affected by selenium deficiency, suggesting it has a high priority for selenium supply. Taken together, these results show that SelO is a redox-active mitochondrial selenoprotein.

  12. Characterization of mammalian selenoprotein o: a redox-active mitochondrial protein.

    Seong-Jeong Han

    Full Text Available Selenoproteins exhibit diverse biological functions, most of which are associated with redox control. However, the functions of approximately half of mammalian selenoproteins are not known. One such protein is Selenoprotein O (SelO, the largest mammalian selenoprotein with orthologs found in a wide range of organisms, including bacteria and yeast. Here, we report characterization of mammalian SelO. Expression of this protein could be verified in HEK 293T cells by metabolic labeling of cells with 75Se, and it was abolished when selenocysteine was replaced with serine. A CxxU motif was identified in the C-terminal region of SelO. This protein was reversibly oxidized in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in HEK 293T cells when cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide. This treatment led to the formation of a transient 88 kDa SelO-containing complex. The formation of this complex was enhanced by replacing the CxxU motif with SxxC, but abolished when it was replaced with SxxS, suggesting a redox interaction of SelO with another protein through its Sec residue. SelO was localized to mitochondria and expressed across mouse tissues. Its expression was little affected by selenium deficiency, suggesting it has a high priority for selenium supply. Taken together, these results show that SelO is a redox-active mitochondrial selenoprotein.

  13. Inhibition of Ape1 Redox Activity Promotes Odonto/osteogenic Differentiation of Dental Papilla Cells.

    Chen, Tian; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Wenhua; Li, Jingyu; Liang, Yan; Yang, Xianrui; Xu, Yang; Yu, Mei; Tian, Weidong; Chen, Guoqing; Bai, Ding

    2015-12-07

    Dentinogenesis is the formation of dentin, a substance that forms the majority of teeth, and this process is performed by odontoblasts. Dental papilla cells (DPCs), as the progenitor cells of odontoblasts, undergo the odontogenic differentiation regulated by multiple cytokines and paracrine signal molecules. Ape1 is a perfect paradigm of the function complexity of a biological macromolecule with two major functional regions for DNA repair and redox regulation, respectively. To date, it remains unclear whether Ape1 can regulate the dentinogenesis in DPCs. In the present study, we firstly examed the spatio-temporal expression of Ape1 during tooth germ developmental process, and found the Ape1 expression was initially high and then gradually reduced along with the tooth development. Secondly, the osteo/odontogenic differentiation capacity of DPCs was up-regulated when treated with either Ape1-shRNA or E3330 (a specific inhibitor of the Ape1 redox function), respectively. Moreover, we found that the canonical Wnt signaling pathway was activated in this process, and E3330 reinforced-osteo/odontogenic differentiation capacity was suppressed by Dickkopf1 (DKK1), a potent antagonist of canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Taken together, we for the first time showed that inhibition of Ape1 redox regulation could promote the osteo/odontogenic differentiation capacity of DPCs via canonical Wnt signaling pathway.

  14. Factors Controlling the Redox Activity of Oxygen in Perovskites: From Theory to Application for Catalytic Reactions

    Chunzhen Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Triggering the redox reaction of oxygens has become essential for the development of (electro catalytic properties of transition metal oxides, especially for perovskite materials that have been envisaged for a variety of applications such as the oxygen evolution or reduction reactions (OER and ORR, respectively, CO or hydrocarbons oxidation, NO reduction and others. While the formation of ligand hole for perovskites is well-known for solid state physicists and/or chemists and has been widely studied for the understanding of important electronic properties such as superconductivity, insulator-metal transitions, magnetoresistance, ferroelectrics, redox properties etc., oxygen electrocatalysis in aqueous media at low temperature barely scratches the surface of the concept of oxygen ions oxidation. In this review, we briefly explain the electronic structure of perovskite materials and go through a few important parameters such as the ionization potential, Madelung potential, and charge transfer energy that govern the oxidation of oxygen ions. We then describe the surface reactivity that can be induced by the redox activity of the oxygen network and the formation of highly reactive surface oxygen species before describing their participation in catalytic reactions and providing mechanistic insights and strategies for designing new (electro catalysts. Finally, we give a brief overview of the different techniques that can be employed to detect the formation of such transient oxygen species.

  15. Characterization of a BODIPY Dye as an Active Species for Redox Flow Batteries.

    Kosswattaarachchi, Anjula M; Friedman, Alan E; Cook, Timothy R

    2016-12-08

    An all-organic redox flow battery (RFB) employing a fluorescent boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dye (PM567) was investigated. In a RFB, the stability of the electrolyte in all charged states is critically linked to coulombic efficiency. To evaluate stability, bulk electrolysis and cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments were performed. Oxidized and reduced, PM567 does not remain intact; however, the products of bulk electrolysis evolve over time to show stable redox behavior, making the dye a precursor for the active species of an RFB. A theoretical cell potential of 2.32 V was predicted from CV experiments with a working discharge voltage of approximately 1.6 V in a static test cell. Mass spectrometry was used to identify the products of bulk electrolysis. Related experiments were carried out using ferrocene and cobaltocenium hexafluorophosphate as redox-stable benchmarks to further explain the stability results. The coulombic efficiency of a model cell using PM567 as a precursor for charge carriers stabilized around 73 %. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Thioredoxin Txnl1/TRP32 Is a Redox-active Cofactor of the 26 S Proteasome

    Andersen, Katrine M; Klausen, Louise Kjær; Prag, Søren

    2009-01-01

    in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Txnl1 has thioredoxin activity with a redox potential of about -250 mV. Mutant Txnl1 with one active site cysteine replaced by serine formed disulfide bonds to eEF1A1, a substrate-recruiting factor of the 26S proteasome. eEF1A1 is therefore a likely physiological substrate....... In response to knock-down of Txnl1, ubiquitin-protein conjugates were moderately stabilised. Hence, Txnl1 is the first example of a direct connection between protein reduction and proteolysis, two major intracellular protein quality control mechanisms....

  17. Water-activated graphite felt as a high-performance electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries

    Kabtamu, Daniel Manaye; Chen, Jian-Yu; Chang, Yu-Chung; Wang, Chen-Hao

    2017-02-01

    A simple, green, novel, time-efficient, and potentially cost-effective water activation method was employed to enhance the electrochemical activity of graphite felt (GF) electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The GF electrode prepared with a water vapor injection time of 5 min at 700 °C exhibits the highest electrochemical activity for the VO2+/VO2+ couple among all the tested electrodes. This is attributed to the small, controlled amount of water vapor that was introduced producing high contents of oxygen-containing functional groups, such as sbnd OH groups, on the surface of the GF fibers, which are known to be electrochemically active sites for vanadium redox reactions. Charge-discharge tests further confirm that only 5 min of GF water activation is required to improve the efficiency of the VRFB cell. The average coulombic efficiency, voltage efficiency, and energy efficiency are 95.06%, 87.42%, and 83.10%, respectively, at a current density of 50 mA cm-2. These voltage and energy efficiencies are determined to be considerably higher than those of VRFB cells assembled using heat-treated GF electrodes without water activation and pristine GF electrodes.

  18. Electrochemical investigation of tetravalent uranium β-diketones for active materials of all-uranium redox flow battery

    Yamamura, Tomoo; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2002-01-01

    For active materials of the all-uranium redox flow battery for the power storage, tetravalent uranium β-diketones were investigated. The electrode reactions of U(ba) 4 and U(btfa) 4 were examined in comparison with that of U(acac) 4 , where ba denotes benzoylacetone, btfa benzoyltrifluoroacetone and acac acetylacetone. The cyclic voltammograms of U(ba) 4 and U(btfa) 4 solutions indicate that there are two series of redox reactions corresponding to the complexes with different coordination numbers of four and three. The electrode kinetics of the U(IV)/U(III) redox reactions for btfa complexes is examined. The obtained result supports that the uranium β-diketone complexes examined in the present study will serve as excellent active materials for negative electrolyte in the redox flow battery. (author)

  19. Strategies for "wiring" redox-active proteins to electrodes and applications in biosensors, biofuel cells, and nanotechnology.

    Nöll, Tanja; Nöll, Gilbert

    2011-07-01

    In this tutorial review the basic approaches to establish electrochemical communication between redox-active proteins and electrodes are elucidated and examples for applications in electrochemical biosensors, biofuel cells and nanotechnology are presented. The early stage of protein electrochemistry is described giving a short overview over electron transfer (ET) between electrodes and proteins, followed by a brief introduction into experimental procedures for studying proteins at electrodes and possible applications arising thereof. The article starts with discussing the electrochemistry of cytochrome c, the first redox-active protein, for which direct reversible ET was obtained, under diffusion controlled conditions and after adsorption to electrodes. Next, examples for the electrochemical study of redox enzymes adsorbed on electrodes and modes of immobilization are discussed. Shortly the experimental approach for investigating redox-active proteins adsorbed on electrodes is outlined. Possible applications of redox enzymes in electrochemical biosensors and biofuel cells working by direct ET (DET) and mediated ET (MET) are presented. Furthermore, the reconstitution of redox active proteins at electrodes using molecular wire-like units in order to "wire" the proteins to the electrode surface and possible applications in nanotechnology are discussed.

  20. A study of the fine structure, enzyme activities and pattern of 14CO2 ...

    A detailed study of selected grasses has been made with respect to fine structures characteristics, enzyme activities associated with C-4 and C-3 pathway photosynthesis, and short term carbon dioxide-14 incorporation experiments. A good correlation was obtained between the fine structure, the carbon pathway and the ...

  1. High efficiency of CO2-activated graphite felt as electrode for vanadium redox flow battery application

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Chen, Jian-Yu; Kabtamu, Daniel Manaye; Lin, Guan-Yi; Hsu, Ning-Yih; Chou, Yi-Sin; Wei, Hwa-Jou; Wang, Chen-Hao

    2017-10-01

    A simple method for preparing CO2-activated graphite felt as an electrode in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) was employed by the direct treatment in a CO2 atmosphere at a high temperature for a short period. The CO2-activated graphite felt demonstrates excellent electrochemical activity and reversibility. The VRFB using the CO2-activated graphite felts in the electrodes has coulombic, voltage, and energy efficiencies of 94.52%, 88.97%, and 84.15%, respectively, which is much higher than VRFBs using the electrodes of untreated graphite felt and N2-activated graphite felt. The efficiency enhancement was attributed to the higher number of oxygen-containing functional groups on the graphite felt that are formed during the CO2-activation, leading to improving the electrochemical behaviour of the resultant VRFB.

  2. Lateral transport of solutes in microfluidic channels using electrochemically generated gradients in redox-active surfactants.

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2011-04-15

    We report principles for a continuous flow process that can separate solutes based on a driving force for selective transport that is generated by a lateral concentration gradient of a redox-active surfactant across a microfluidic channel. Microfluidic channels fabricated with gold electrodes lining each vertical wall were used to electrochemically generate concentration gradients of the redox-active surfactant 11-ferrocenylundecyl-trimethylammonium bromide (FTMA) in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The interactions of three solutes (a hydrophobic dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthylamine (yellow AB), an amphiphilic molecule, 2-(4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-pentanoyl)-1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (BODIPY C(5)-HPC), and an organic salt, 1-methylpyridinium-3-sulfonate (MPS)) with the lateral gradients in surfactant/micelle concentration were shown to drive the formation of solute-specific concentration gradients. Two distinct physical mechanisms were identified to lead to the solute concentration gradients: solubilization of solutes by micelles and differential adsorption of the solutes onto the walls of the microchannels in the presence of the surfactant concentration gradient. These two mechanisms were used to demonstrate delipidation of a mixture of BODIPY C(5)-HPC (lipid) and MPS and purification of BODIPY C(5)-HPC from a mixture of BODIPY C(5)-HPC and yellow AB. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that lateral concentration gradients of redox-active surfactants formed within microfluidic channels can be used to transport solutes across the microfluidic channels in a solute-dependent manner. The approach employs electrical potentials (solutions having high ionic strength (>0.1M), and offers the basis of continuous processes for the purification or separation of solutes in microscale systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Tissue redox activity as a hallmark of carcinogenesis: from early to terminal stages of cancer.

    Bakalova, Rumiana; Zhelev, Zhivko; Aoki, Ichio; Saga, Tsuneo

    2013-05-01

    The study aimed to clarify the dynamics of tissue redox activity (TRA) in cancer progression and assess the importance of this parameter for therapeutic strategies. The experiments were carried out on brain tissues of neuroblastoma-bearing, glioma-bearing, and healthy mice. TRA was visualized in vivo by nitroxide-enhanced MRI on anesthetized animals or in vitro by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy on isolated tissue specimens. Two biochemical parameters were analyzed in parallel: tissue total antioxidant capacity (TTAC) and plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). In the early stage of cancer, the brain tissues were characterized by a shorter-lived MRI signal than that from healthy brains (indicating a higher reducing activity for the nitroxide radical), which was accompanied by an enhancement of TTAC and MMP9 plasma levels. In the terminal stage of cancer, tissues in both hemispheres were characterized by a longer-lived MRI signal than in healthy brains (indicating a high-oxidative activity) that was accompanied by a decrease in TTAC and an increase in the MMP2/MMP9 plasma levels. Cancer progression also affected the redox potential of tissues distant from the primary tumor locus (liver and lung). Their oxidative status increased in both stages of cancer. The study shows that tissue redox balance is very sensitive to the progression of cancer and can be used as a diagnostic marker of carcinogenesis. The study also suggests that the noncancerous tissues of a cancer-bearing organism are susceptible to oxidative damage and should be considered a therapeutic target. ©2013 AACR.

  4. Impedance aspect of charge storage at graphite and glassy carbon electrodes in potassium hexacyanoferrate (II redox active electrolyte

    Katja Magdić

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Different types of charge storage mechanisms at unmodified graphite vs. glassy carbon electrodes in acid sulphate supporting solution containing potassium hexacyanoferrate (II redox active electrolyte, have been revealed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and supported by cyclic voltammetry experiments. Reversible charge transfer of Fe(CN63-/4- redox reaction detected by assessment of CVs of glassy carbon electrode, is in impedance spectra indicated by presence of bulk diffusion impedance and constant double-layer/pseudocapacitive electrode impedance compared to that measured in the pure supporting electrolyte. Some surface retention of redox species detected by assessment of CVs of graphite electrode is in impedance spectra indicated by diffusion impedance coupled in this case by diminishing of double-layer/pseudo­capacitive impedance compared to that measured in the pure supporting electrolyte. This phenomenon is ascribed to contribution of additional pseudocapacitive impedance generated by redox reaction of species confined at the electrode surface.

  5. The Redox Code.

    Jones, Dean P; Sies, Helmut

    2015-09-20

    The redox code is a set of principles that defines the positioning of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, NADP) and thiol/disulfide and other redox systems as well as the thiol redox proteome in space and time in biological systems. The code is richly elaborated in an oxygen-dependent life, where activation/deactivation cycles involving O₂ and H₂O₂ contribute to spatiotemporal organization for differentiation, development, and adaptation to the environment. Disruption of this organizational structure during oxidative stress represents a fundamental mechanism in system failure and disease. Methodology in assessing components of the redox code under physiological conditions has progressed, permitting insight into spatiotemporal organization and allowing for identification of redox partners in redox proteomics and redox metabolomics. Complexity of redox networks and redox regulation is being revealed step by step, yet much still needs to be learned. Detailed knowledge of the molecular patterns generated from the principles of the redox code under defined physiological or pathological conditions in cells and organs will contribute to understanding the redox component in health and disease. Ultimately, there will be a scientific basis to a modern redox medicine.

  6. Redox poly[Ni(saldMp)] modified activated carbon electrode in electrochemical supercapacitors

    Gao Fei [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Li Jianling, E-mail: lijianling@ustb.edu.c [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang Yakun; Wang Xindong [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Kang Feiyu [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-08-01

    The complex (2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediaminebis(salicylideneaminato))-nickel(II), [Ni(saldMp)], was oxidatively electropolymerized on activated carbon (AC) electrode in acetonitrile solution. The poly[Ni(saldMp)] presented an incomplete coated film on the surface of carbon particles of AC electrode by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of poly[Ni(saldMp)] modified activated carbon (PAC) electrode were evaluated in different potential ranges by cyclic voltammetry. Counterions and solvent swelling mainly occurred up to 0.6 V for PAC electrode by the comparison of D{sup 1/2}C values calculated from chronoamperometry experiments. Both the Ohmic resistance and Faraday resistance of PAC electrode gradually approached to those of AC electrode when its potential was ranging from 1.2 V to 0.0 V. Galvanostatic charge/discharge experiments indicated that both the specific capacitance and energy density were effectively improved by the reversible redox reaction of poly[Ni(saldMp)] film under the high current density up to 10 mA cm{sup -2} for AC electrode. The specific capacitance of PAC electrode decreased during the first 50 cycles but thereafter it remained constant for the next 200 cycles. This study showed the redox polymer may be an attractive material in supercapacitors.

  7. Redox-active porous coordination polymers prepared by trinuclear heterometallic pivalate linking with the redox-active nickel(II) complex: synthesis, structure, magnetic and redox properties, and electrocatalytic activity in organic compound dehalogenation in heterogeneous medium.

    Lytvynenko, A S; Kolotilov, S V; Kiskin, M A; Cador, O; Golhen, S; Aleksandrov, G G; Mishura, A M; Titov, V E; Ouahab, L; Eremenko, I L; Novotortsev, V M

    2014-05-19

    Linking of the trinuclear pivalate fragment Fe2CoO(Piv)6 by the redox-active bridge Ni(L)2 (compound 1; LH is Schiff base from hydrazide of 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid and 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde, Piv(-) = pivalate) led to formation of a new porous coordination polymer (PCP) {Fe2CoO(Piv)6}{Ni(L)2}1.5 (2). X-ray structures of 1 and 2 were determined. A crystal lattice of compound 2 is built from stacked 2D layers; the Ni(L)2 units can be considered as bridges, which bind two Fe2CoO(Piv)6 units. In desolvated form, 2 possesses a porous crystal lattice (SBET = 50 m(2) g(-1), VDR = 0.017 cm(3) g(-1) estimated from N2 sorption at 78 K). At 298 K, 2 absorbed a significant quantity of methanol (up to 0.3 cm(3) g(-1)) and chloroform. Temperature dependence of molar magnetic susceptibility of 2 could be fitted as superposition of χMT of Fe2CoO(Piv)6 and Ni(L)2 units, possible interactions between them were taken into account using molecular field model. In turn, magnetic properties of the Fe2CoO(Piv)6 unit were fitted using two models, one of which directly took into account a spin-orbit coupling of Co(II), and in the second model the spin-orbit coupling of Co(II) was approximated as zero-field splitting. Electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of 2 were studied by cyclic voltammetry in suspension and compared with electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of a soluble analogue 1. A catalytic effect was determined by analysis of the catalytic current dependency on concentrations of the substrate. Compound 1 possessed electrocatalytic activity in organic halide dehalogenation, and such activity was preserved for the Ni(L)2 units, incorporated into the framework of 2. In addition, a new property occurred in the case of 2: the catalytic activity of PCP depended on its sorption capacity with respect to the substrate. In contrast to homogeneous catalysts, usage of solid PCPs may allow selectivity due to porous structure and simplify separation of product.

  8. Plant redox proteomics

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs......In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  9. Antioxidant activity and electrochemical elucidation of the enigmatic redox behavior of curcumin and its structurally modified analogues

    Jha, Niki S.; Mishra, Satyendra; Jha, Shailendra K.; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Structural analogues of curcumin have been synthesized. • Confirmation of redox behaviour emanates from H- shift from central methylene group in curcumin. • Mechanism of curcumin oxidation has been proposed. • Correlation between redox behavior and antioxidant activity has been established. - Abstract: Here, we report studies on the antioxidant activity and redox behavior of curcumin and its structurally modified synthetic analogues. We have synthesized a number of analogues of curcumin which abrogate its keto-enol tautomerism or substitute the methylene group at the centre of its heptadione moiety implicated in the hydride transfer and studied their redox property. From cyclic voltammetric studies, it is demonstrated that H- atom transfer from CH 2 group at the center of the heptadione link also plays an important role in the antioxidant properties of curcumin along with that of its phenolic –OH group. In addition, we also show that the conversion of 1, 3- dicarbonyl moiety of curcumin to an isosteric heterocycle as in pyrazole curcumin, which decreases its rotational freedom, leads to an improvement of its redox properties as well as its antioxidant activity

  10. High Electrocatalytic Activity of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes towards Sulfide Redox Shuttles.

    Hao, Feng; Dong, Pei; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yongchang; Loya, Phillip E; Hauge, Robert H; Li, Jianbao; Lou, Jun; Lin, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VASWCNTs) have been successfully transferred onto transparent conducting oxide glass and implemented as efficient low-cost, platinum-free counter electrode in sulfide -mediated dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), featuring notably improved electrocatalytic activity toward thiolate/disulfide redox shuttle over conventional Pt counter electrodes. Impressively, device with VASWCNTs counter electrode demonstrates a high fill factor of 0.68 and power conversion efficiency up to 5.25%, which is significantly higher than 0.56 and 3.49% for that with a conventional Pt electrode. Moreover, VASWCNTs counter electrode produces a charge transfer resistance of only 21.22 Ω towards aqueous polysulfide electrolyte commonly applied in quantum dots-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs), which is several orders of magnitude lower than that of a typical Pt electrode. Therefore, VASWCNTs counter electrodes are believed to be a versatile candidate for further improvement of the power conversion efficiency of other iodine-free redox couple based DSCs and polysulfide electrolyte based QDSCs.

  11. Harnessing redox activity for the formation of uranium tris(imido) compounds

    Anderson, Nickolas H.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Yao, Yiyi; Williams, Ursula J.; Schaefer, Brian A.; Kiernicki, John J.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Goshert, Mitchell D.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Schelter, Eric J.; Walensky, Justin R.; Gagliardi, Laura; Bart, Suzanne C.

    2014-10-01

    Classically, late transition-metal organometallic compounds promote multielectron processes solely through the change in oxidation state of the metal centre. In contrast, uranium typically undergoes single-electron chemistry. However, using redox-active ligands can engage multielectron reactivity at this metal in analogy to transition metals. Here we show that a redox-flexible pyridine(diimine) ligand can stabilize a series of highly reduced uranium coordination complexes by storing one, two or three electrons in the ligand. These species reduce organoazides easily to form uranium-nitrogen multiple bonds with the release of dinitrogen. The extent of ligand reduction dictates the formation of uranium mono-, bis- and tris(imido) products. Spectroscopic and structural characterization of these compounds supports the idea that electrons are stored in the ligand framework and used in subsequent reactivity. Computational analyses of the uranium imido products probed their molecular and electronic structures, which facilitated a comparison between the bonding in the tris(imido) structure and its tris(oxo) analogue.

  12. Synthesis and Electrochemical Study of a TCAA Derivative – A potential bipolar redox-active material

    Hagemann, Tino; Winsberg, Jan; Wild, Andreas; Schubert, Ulrich S.

    2017-01-01

    The 2,3,7,8-tetracyano-1,4,5,6,9,10-hexazaanthracene (TCAA) derivatives represent an interesting substance class for future research on organic electronic devices, such as solar cells, organic batteries or redox-flow batteries (RFBs). Because of their multivalent redox behavior they are potentially “bipolar”, usable both as cathode and anode activ charge-storage materials. Furthermore, they show a strong absorption and fluorescence behavior both in solution and solid state, rendering them a promising emitter for electroluminescence devices, like lamps or displays. In order to evaluate a TCAA for electrochemical applications the derivative 2,3,7,8-tetracyano-5,10-diphenyl-5,10-dihydrodipyrazino[2,3-b:2′,3′-e] pyrazine (2) was synthesized in two straightforward synthesis steps. The electrochemical behavior of 2 was initially determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculation and afterwards investigated via rotating disc electrode (RDE), UV–vis–NIR spectroelectrochemical as well as cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements. It features a quasi-reversible oxidation and re-reduction at E ½ = 1.42 V vs. Fc + /Fc with a peak split of 96 mV and a quasi-reversible reduction and re-oxidation at E ½ = −1.49 V vs. Fc + /Fc with a peak split of 174 mV, which lead to a theoretical potential difference of 2.91 V.

  13. Electrochemical properties and diffusion of a redox active surfactant incorporated in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phase

    Kostela, J.; Elmgren, M.; Almgren, M.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the electrochemical behaviour of the divalent redox active surfactant, N-cetyl-N'-methylviologen (CMV), in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phases. The liquid crystalline phases were prepared from the system glycerolmonooleate (GMO)-water (and brine)-cationic surfactant. A comparison of the phase behaviour of GMO with the monovalent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and the divalent CMV surfactant showed that the surfactants gave about the same effect at the same surface charge density. The electrochemical measurements were made with a mixture of CTAB and CMV as the surfactant. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the electrochemistry of CMV incorporated in the cubic and lamellar phases that were spread on a gold electrode. The E 0 -values in the cubic samples were more negative (-0.55 V versus SCE) than in the lamellar samples (-0.53 V versus SCE). This can be explained by the higher charge density in the lamellar phase. The diffusion coefficients were also measured in the cubic phase. The mass transport is slowed down about fifty times in the cubic phase compared to in the pure electrolyte. The concentration dependence on the diffusion coefficient was also investigated. No electron hopping could be observed, which suggest that diffusional movement of the redox probe is the main source of charge transport. By placing the samples on a conducting glass slide, spectroelectrochemical investigations were performed. In the lamellar phase strong dimerization was detected at high concentration of viologen, but much less in the cubic phase

  14. Electrocatalytic activity of cobalt phosphide-modified graphite felt toward VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction

    Ge, Zhijun; Wang, Ling; He, Zhangxing; Li, Yuehua; Jiang, Yingqiao; Meng, Wei; Dai, Lei

    2018-04-01

    A novel strategy for improving the electro-catalytic properties of graphite felt (GF) electrode in vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) is designed by depositing cobalt phosphide (CoP) onto GF surface. The CoP powder is synthesized by direct carbonization of Co-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) followed by phosphidation. Cyclic voltammetry results confirm that the CoP-modified graphite felt (GF-CoP) electrode has excellent reversibility and electro-catalytic activity to the VO2+/VO2+ cathodic reaction compared with the pristine GF electrode. The cell using GF-CoP electrode shows apparently higher discharge capacity over that based on GF electrode. The cell using GF-CoP electrode has the capacity of 67.2 mA h at 100 mA cm-2, 32.7 mA h larger than that using GF electrode. Compared with cell using GF electrode, the voltage efficiency of the cell based on GF-CoP electrode increases by 5.9% and energy efficiency by 5.4% at a current density of 100 mA cm-2. The cell using GF-CoP electrode can reach 94.31% capacity retention after 50 cycles at a current density of 30 mA cm-2. The results show that the CoP can effectively promote the VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction, implying that metal phosphides are a new kind of potential catalytic materials for VRFB.

  15. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-18

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  16. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review

    Feng Pan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  17. The Redox Proteome*

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2013-01-01

    The redox proteome consists of reversible and irreversible covalent modifications that link redox metabolism to biologic structure and function. These modifications, especially of Cys, function at the molecular level in protein folding and maturation, catalytic activity, signaling, and macromolecular interactions and at the macroscopic level in control of secretion and cell shape. Interaction of the redox proteome with redox-active chemicals is central to macromolecular structure, regulation, and signaling during the life cycle and has a central role in the tolerance and adaptability to diet and environmental challenges. PMID:23861437

  18. Redox-Active Selenium Compounds—From Toxicity and Cell Death to Cancer Treatment

    Sougat Misra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is generally known as an antioxidant due to its presence in selenoproteins as selenocysteine, but it is also toxic. The toxic effects of selenium are, however, strictly concentration and chemical species dependent. One class of selenium compounds is a potent inhibitor of cell growth with remarkable tumor specificity. These redox active compounds are pro-oxidative and highly cytotoxic to tumor cells and are promising candidates to be used in chemotherapy against cancer. Herein we elaborate upon the major forms of dietary selenium compounds, their metabolic pathways, and their antioxidant and pro-oxidant potentials with emphasis on cytotoxic mechanisms. Relative cytotoxicity of inorganic selenite and organic selenocystine compounds to different cancer cells are presented as evidence to our perspective. Furthermore, new novel classes of selenium compounds specifically designed to target tumor cells are presented and the potential of selenium in modern oncology is extensively discussed.

  19. Electro-kinetic separation of rare earth elements using a redox-active ligand

    Fang, Huayi; Cole, Bren E.; Qiao, Yusen; Bogart, Justin A.; Cheisson, Thibault; Manor, Brian C.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Purification of rare earth elements is challenging due to their chemical similarities. All of the deployed separation methods rely on thermodynamic properties, such as distribution equilibria in solvent extraction. Rare-earth-metal separations based on kinetic differences have not been examined. Herein, we demonstrate a new approach for rare-earth-element separations by exploiting differences in the oxidation rates within a series of rare earth compounds containing the redox-active ligand [{2-(tBuN(O))C_6H_4CH_2}{sub 3}N]{sup 3-}. Using this method, a single-step separation factor up to 261 was obtained for the separation of a 50:50 yttrium-lutetium mixture. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Redox Activation of the Universally Conserved ATPase YchF by Thioredoxin 1.

    Hannemann, Liya; Suppanz, Ida; Ba, Qiaorui; MacInnes, Katherine; Drepper, Friedel; Warscheid, Bettina; Koch, Hans-Georg

    2016-01-20

    YchF/Ola1 are unconventional members of the universally conserved GTPase family because they preferentially hydrolyze ATP rather than GTP. These ATPases have been associated with various cellular processes and pathologies, including DNA repair, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. In particular, a possible role in regulating the oxidative stress response has been suggested for both bacterial and human YchF/Ola1. In this study, we analyzed how YchF responds to oxidative stress and how it potentially regulates the antioxidant response. Our data identify a redox-regulated monomer-dimer equilibrium of YchF as a key event in the functional cycle of YchF. Upon oxidative stress, the oxidation of a conserved and surface-exposed cysteine residue promotes YchF dimerization, which is accompanied by inhibition of the ATPase activity. No dimers were observed in a YchF mutant lacking this cysteine. In vitro, the YchF dimer is dissociated by thioredoxin 1 (TrxA) and this stimulates the ATPase activity. The physiological significance of the YchF-thioredoxin 1 interaction was demonstrated by in vivo cross-linking, which validated this interaction in living cells. This approach also revealed that both the ATPase domain and the helical domain of YchF are in contact with TrxA. YchF/Ola1 are the first redox-regulated members of the universally conserved GTPase family and are inactivated by oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue within the nucleotide-binding motif. Our data provide novel insights into the regulation of the so far ill-defined YchF/Ola1 family of proteins and stipulate their role as negative regulators of the oxidative stress response.

  1. Skin Redox Balance Maintenance: The Need for an Nrf2-Activator Delivery System

    Maya Ben-Yehuda Greenwald

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The skin, being the largest organ of the body, functions as a barrier between our body and the environment. It is consistently exposed to various exogenous and endogenous stressors (e.g., air pollutants, ionizing and non-ionizing irradiation, toxins, mitochondrial metabolism, enzyme activity, inflammatory process, etc. producing reactive oxygen species (ROS and physical damage (e.g., wounds, sunburns also resulting in reactive oxygen species production. Although skin is equipped with an array of defense mechanisms to counteract reactive oxygen species, augmented exposure and continued reactive oxygen species might result in excessive oxidative stress leading to many skin disorders including inflammatory diseases, pigmenting disorders and some types of cutaneous malignancy. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is an emerging regulator of cellular resistance and of defensive enzymes such as the phase II enzymes. Induction of the Keap1–Nrf2 pathway may have a beneficial effect in the treatment of a large number of skin disorders by stimulating an endogenous defense mechanism. However, prolonged and enhanced activation of this pathway is detrimental and, thus, limits the therapeutic potential of Keap1–Nrf2 modulators. Here, we review the consequences of oxidative stress to the skin, and the defense mechanisms that skin is equipped with. We describe the challenges of maintaining skin redox balance and its impact on skin status and function. Finally, we suggest a novel strategy for maintenance of skin redox homeostasis by modulating the Keap1–Nrf2 pathway using nanotechnology-based delivery systems.

  2. Purification of reversibly oxidized proteins (PROP reveals a redox switch controlling p38 MAP kinase activity.

    Dennis J Templeton

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of cysteine residues of proteins is emerging as an important means of regulation of signal transduction, particularly of protein kinase function. Tools to detect and quantify cysteine oxidation of proteins have been a limiting factor in understanding the role of cysteine oxidation in signal transduction. As an example, the p38 MAP kinase is activated by several stress-related stimuli that are often accompanied by in vitro generation of hydrogen peroxide. We noted that hydrogen peroxide inhibited p38 activity despite paradoxically increasing the activating phosphorylation of p38. To address the possibility that cysteine oxidation may provide a negative regulatory effect on p38 activity, we developed a biochemical assay to detect reversible cysteine oxidation in intact cells. This procedure, PROP, demonstrated in vivo oxidation of p38 in response to hydrogen peroxide and also to the natural inflammatory lipid prostaglandin J2. Mutagenesis of the potential target cysteines showed that oxidation occurred preferentially on residues near the surface of the p38 molecule. Cysteine oxidation thus controls a functional redox switch regulating the intensity or duration of p38 activity that would not be revealed by immunodetection of phosphoprotein commonly interpreted as reflective of p38 activity.

  3. Macromolecular Design Strategies for Preventing Active-Material Crossover in Non-Aqueous All-Organic Redox-Flow Batteries.

    Doris, Sean E; Ward, Ashleigh L; Baskin, Artem; Frischmann, Peter D; Gavvalapalli, Nagarjuna; Chénard, Etienne; Sevov, Christo S; Prendergast, David; Moore, Jeffrey S; Helms, Brett A

    2017-02-01

    Intermittent energy sources, including solar and wind, require scalable, low-cost, multi-hour energy storage solutions in order to be effectively incorporated into the grid. All-Organic non-aqueous redox-flow batteries offer a solution, but suffer from rapid capacity fade and low Coulombic efficiency due to the high permeability of redox-active species across the battery's membrane. Here we show that active-species crossover is arrested by scaling the membrane's pore size to molecular dimensions and in turn increasing the size of the active material above the membrane's pore-size exclusion limit. When oligomeric redox-active organics (RAOs) were paired with microporous polymer membranes, the rate of active-material crossover was reduced more than 9000-fold compared to traditional separators at minimal cost to ionic conductivity. This corresponds to an absolute rate of RAO crossover of less than 3 μmol cm -2  day -1 (for a 1.0 m concentration gradient), which exceeds performance targets recently set forth by the battery industry. This strategy was generalizable to both high and low-potential RAOs in a variety of non-aqueous electrolytes, highlighting the versatility of macromolecular design in implementing next-generation redox-flow batteries. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Ground-state thermodynamics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Cao, Dennis; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2012-09-18

    Fashioned through billions of years of evolution, biological molecular machines, such as ATP synthase, myosin, and kinesin, use the intricate relative motions of their components to drive some of life's most essential processes. Having control over the motions in molecules is imperative for life to function, and many chemists have designed, synthesized, and investigated artificial molecular systems that also express controllable motions within molecules. Using bistable mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), based on donor-acceptor recognition motifs, we have sought to imitate the sophisticated nanoscale machines present in living systems. In this Account, we analyze the thermodynamic characteristics of a series of redox-switchable [2]rotaxanes and [2]catenanes. Control and understanding of the relative intramolecular movements of components in MIMs have been vital in the development of a variety of applications of these compounds ranging from molecular electronic devices to drug delivery systems. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs undergo redox-activated switching between two isomeric states. Under ambient conditions, the dominant translational isomer, the ground-state coconformation (GSCC), is in equilibrium with the less favored translational isomer, the metastable-state coconformation (MSCC). By manipulating the redox state of the recognition site associated with the GSCC, we can stimulate the relative movements of the components in these bistable MIMs. The thermodynamic parameters of model host-guest complexes provide a good starting point to rationalize the ratio of GSCC to MSCC at equilibrium. The bistable [2]rotaxanes show a strong correlation between the relative free energies of model complexes and the ground-state distribution constants (K(GS)). This relationship does not always hold for bistable [2]catenanes, most likely because of the additional steric and electronic constraints present when the two rings are mechanically interlocked with each other

  5. Engineering Lipases: walking the fine line between activity and stability

    Dasetty, Siva; Blenner, Mark A.; Sarupria, Sapna

    2017-11-01

    Lipases are enzymes that hydrolyze lipids and have several industrial applications. There is a tremendous effort in engineering the activity, specificity and stability of lipases to render them functional in a variety of environmental conditions. In this review, we discuss the recent experimental and simulation studies focused on engineering lipases. Experimentally, mutagenesis studies have demonstrated that the activity, stability, and specificity of lipases can be modulated by mutations. It has been particularly challenging however, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms through which these mutations affect the lipase properties. We summarize results from experiments and molecular simulations highlighting the emerging picture to this end. We end the review with suggestions for future research which underscores the delicate balance of various facets in the lipase that affect their activity and stability necessitating the consideration of the enzyme as a network of interactions.

  6. Gold Redox Catalysis through Base-Initiated Diazonium Decomposition toward Alkene, Alkyne, and Allene Activation.

    Dong, Boliang; Peng, Haihui; Motika, Stephen E; Shi, Xiaodong

    2017-08-16

    The discovery of photoassisted diazonium activation toward gold(I) oxidation greatly extended the scope of gold redox catalysis by avoiding the use of a strong oxidant. Some practical issues that limit the application of this new type of chemistry are the relative low efficiency (long reaction time and low conversion) and the strict reaction condition control that is necessary (degassing and inert reaction environment). Herein, an alternative photofree condition has been developed through Lewis base induced diazonium activation. With this method, an unreactive Au I catalyst was used in combination with Na 2 CO 3 and diazonium salts to produce a Au III intermediate. The efficient activation of various substrates, including alkyne, alkene and allene was achieved, followed by rapid Au III reductive elimination, which yielded the C-C coupling products with good to excellent yields. Relative to the previously reported photoactivation method, our approach offered greater efficiency and versatility through faster reaction rates and broader reaction scope. Challenging substrates such as electron rich/neutral allenes, which could not be activated under the photoinitiation conditions (<5 % yield), could be activated to subsequently yield the desired coupling products in good to excellent yield. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Thermodynamic aspects of the electron transfer across the interface between water and a hydrophobic redox-active ionic liquid

    Langmaier, Jan; Samec, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 58, - (2011), s. 606-613 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/11/0707; GA ČR GAP206/10/1231 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : redox-active ionic liquid * membrane * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.832, year: 2011

  8. Iron and Zinc Complexes of Bulky Bis-Imidazole Ligands : Enzyme Mimicry and Ligand-Centered Redox Activity

    Folkertsma, E.

    2016-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is directed to the development of cheap and non-toxic iron-based homogeneous catalysts, using enzyme models and redox non-innocent ligands. Inspired by nature, the first approach focuses on the synthesis of structural models of the active site of non-heme iron

  9. Synthesis, structural characterisation and bonding in an anionic hexavanadate bearing redox-active ferrocenyl groups at the periphery

    Schulz, J.; Gyepes, Robert; Císařová, I.; Štěpnička, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 12 (2010), s. 2749-2756 ISSN 1144-0546 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : synthesis * redox-active ferrocenyl groups * ferrocene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2010

  10. Activated Carbon as an Electron Acceptor and Redox Mediator during the Anaerobic Biotransformation of Azo Dyes

    Zee, van der F.P.; Bisschops, I.A.E.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of AC as redox mediator in accelerating the reductive transformation of pollutants as well as a terminal electron acceptor in the biological oxidation of an organic substrate is described. This study explores the use of AC as an immobilized redox mediator for the reduction of a recalcitrant

  11. Simultaneous anionic and cationic redox

    Jung, Sung-Kyun; Kang, Kisuk

    2017-12-01

    It is challenging to unlock anionic redox activity, accompanied by full utilization of available cationic redox process, to boost capacity of battery cathodes. Now, material design by tuning the metal-oxygen interaction is shown to be a promising solution.

  12. Electrochemical properties and diffusion of a redox active surfactant incorporated in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phase

    Kostela, J. [Uppsala University, Department of Physical Chemistry, Box 579, S-75123 Uppsala (Sweden)]. E-mail: johan.kostela@fki.uu.se; Elmgren, M. [Uppsala University, Department of Physical Chemistry, Box 579, S-75123 Uppsala (Sweden); Almgren, M. [Uppsala University, Department of Physical Chemistry, Box 579, S-75123 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-05-30

    The objective of this study was to investigate the electrochemical behaviour of the divalent redox active surfactant, N-cetyl-N'-methylviologen (CMV), in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phases. The liquid crystalline phases were prepared from the system glycerolmonooleate (GMO)-water (and brine)-cationic surfactant. A comparison of the phase behaviour of GMO with the monovalent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and the divalent CMV surfactant showed that the surfactants gave about the same effect at the same surface charge density. The electrochemical measurements were made with a mixture of CTAB and CMV as the surfactant. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the electrochemistry of CMV incorporated in the cubic and lamellar phases that were spread on a gold electrode. The E {sup 0}-values in the cubic samples were more negative (-0.55 V versus SCE) than in the lamellar samples (-0.53 V versus SCE). This can be explained by the higher charge density in the lamellar phase. The diffusion coefficients were also measured in the cubic phase. The mass transport is slowed down about fifty times in the cubic phase compared to in the pure electrolyte. The concentration dependence on the diffusion coefficient was also investigated. No electron hopping could be observed, which suggest that diffusional movement of the redox probe is the main source of charge transport. By placing the samples on a conducting glass slide, spectroelectrochemical investigations were performed. In the lamellar phase strong dimerization was detected at high concentration of viologen, but much less in the cubic phase.

  13. Maleimide-activated aryl diazonium salts for electrode surface functionalization with biological and redox-active molecules.

    Harper, Jason C; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R; Brozik, Susan M

    2008-03-04

    A versatile and simple method is introduced for formation of maleimide-functionalized surfaces using maleimide-activated aryl diazonium salts. We show for the first time electrodeposition of N-(4-diazophenyl)maleimide tetrafluoroborate on gold and carbon electrodes which was characterized via voltammetry, grazing angle FTIR, and ellipsometry. Electrodeposition conditions were used to control film thickness and yielded submonolayer-to-multilayer grafting. The resulting phenylmaleimide surfaces served as effective coupling agents for electrode functionalization with ferrocene and the redox-active protein cytochrome c. The utility of phenylmaleimide diazonium toward formation of a diazonium-activated conjugate, followed by direct electrodeposition of the diazonium-modified DNA onto the electrode surface, was also demonstrated. Effective electron transfer was obtained between immobilized molecules and the electrodes. This novel application of N-phenylmaleimide diazonium may facilitate the development of bioelectronic devices including biofuel cells, biosensors, and DNA and protein microarrays.

  14. Micromagnetic simulation of thermally activated switching in fine particles

    Scholz, Werner; Schrefl, Thomas; Fidler, J.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of thermal activation are included in micromagnetic simulations by adding a random thermal field to the effective magnetic field. As a result, the Landau-Lifshitz equation is converted into a stochastic differential equation of Langevin type with multiplicative noise. The Stratonovich interpretation of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz equation leads to the correct thermal equilibrium properties. The proper generalization of Taylor expansions to stochastic calculus gives suitable time integration schemes. For a single rigid magnetic moment the thermal equilibrium properties are investigated. It is found, that the Heun scheme is a good compromise between numerical stability and computational complexity. Small cubic and spherical ferromagnetic particles are studied

  15. Special Issue: Redox Active Natural Products and Their Interaction with Cellular Signalling Pathways

    Claus Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, “natural” cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature’s treasure chest of “green gold”. Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic “sensor/effector” anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for “intracellular diagnostics”. In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur

  16. Sodium-ion supercapacitors based on nanoporous pyroproteins containing redox-active heteroatoms

    Cho, Se Youn; Yoon, Hyeon Ji; Kim, Na Rae; Yun, Young Soo; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2016-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon-based materials fabricated via simple methods from renewable bio-resources have great potential in rechargeable energy storage systems. In this study, nanoporous pyroproteins containing a large amount of redox-active heteroatoms (H-NPs) were fabricated from silk fibroin by an in situ carbonization/activation method. The H-NPs have a large surface area of ∼3050 m2 g-1, which is mainly comprised of nanometer-scale pores. Also, these H-NPs have oxygen and nitrogen heteroatoms of 17.4 wt% and 2.9 wt%, respectively. Synergistic sodium ion storage behaviors originate from electrochemical double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance, leading to very high electrochemical performances of H-NPs in aqueous and non-aqueous electrolyte systems. Sodium-ion supercapacitors (NISs) based on commercial graphite//H-NPs show a high specific power of ∼1900 W kg-1 at ∼77 Wh kg-1. Also, NISs based on commercial hard carbon//H-NPs exhibit a high specific energy of ∼217 Wh kg-1 at ∼42 W kg-1. In addition, outstanding cycling performances over 30,000 cycles are achieved for symmetric NISs.

  17. Feasibility of a Supporting-Salt-Free Nonaqueous Redox Flow Battery Utilizing Ionic Active Materials.

    Milshtein, Jarrod D; Fisher, Sydney L; Breault, Tanya M; Thompson, Levi T; Brushett, Fikile R

    2017-05-09

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries (NAqRFBs) are promising devices for grid-scale energy storage, but high projected prices could limit commercial prospects. One route to reduced prices is to minimize or eliminate the expensive supporting salts typically employed in NAqRFBs. Herein, the feasibility of a flow cell operating in the absence of supporting salt by utilizing ionic active species is demonstrated. These ionic species have high conductivities in acetonitrile (12-19 mS cm -1 ) and cycle at 20 mA cm -2 with energy efficiencies (>75 %) comparable to those of state-of-the-art NAqRFBs employing high concentrations of supporting salt. A chemistry-agnostic techno-economic analysis highlights the possible cost savings of minimizing salt content in a NAqRFB. This work offers the first demonstration of a NAqRFB operating without supporting salt. The associated design principles can guide the development of future active species and could make NAqRFBs competitive with their aqueous counterparts. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Digallane with redox-active diimine ligand: dualism of electron-transfer reactions.

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Chudakova, Valentina A; Bazyakina, Natalia L; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy V; Fukin, Georgy K

    2014-05-19

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1), which consists of redox-active ligand 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene (dpp-Bian), has been studied. The reaction of 1 with I2 proceeds via one-electron oxidation of each of two dpp-Bian ligands to a radical-anionic state and affords complex (dpp-Bian)IGa-GaI(dpp-Bian) (2). Dissolution of complex 2 in pyridine (Py) gives monomeric compound (dpp-Bian)GaI(Py) (3) as a result of a solvent-induced intramolecular electron transfer from the metal-metal bond to the dpp-Bian ligands. Treatment of compound 3 with B(C6F5)3 leads to removal of pyridine and restores compound 2. The reaction of compound 1 with 3,6-di-tert-butyl-ortho-benzoquinone (3,6-Q) proceeds with oxidation of all the redox-active centers in 1 (the Ga-Ga bond and two dpp-Bian dianions) and results in mononuclear catecholate (dpp-Bian)Ga(Cat) (4) (Cat = [3,6-Q](2-)). Treatment of 4 with AgBF4 gives a mixture of [(dpp-Bian)2Ag][BF4] (5) and (dpp-Bian)GaF(Cat) (6), which both consist of neutral dpp-Bian ligands. The reduction of benzylideneacetone (BA) with 1 generates the BA radical-anions, which dimerize, affording (dpp-Bian)Ga-(BA-BA)-Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). In this case the Ga-Ga bond remains unchanged. Within 10 min at 95 °C in solution compound 7 undergoes transformation to paramagnetic complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(BA-BA) (8) and metal-free compound C36H40N2 (9). The latter is a product of intramolecular addition of the C-H bond of one of the iPr groups to the C═N bond in dpp-Bian. Diamagnetic compounds 3, 5, 6, and 9 have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and paramagnetic complexes 2, 4, 7, and 8 by ESR spectroscopy. Molecular structures of 2-7 and 9 have been established by single-crystal X-ray analysis.

  19. The Effect of Fine Motor Skill Activities on Kindergarten Student Attention

    Stewart, Roger A.; Rule, Audrey C.; Giordano, Debra A.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the effect of fine motor skill activities on the development of attention in kindergarteners (n = 68) in five classes at a suburban public school in the Intermountain West through a pretest/posttest experimental group (n = 36) control group (n = 32) design. All children received the regular curriculum which included typical…

  20. Educational Gymnastics: The Effectiveness of Montessori Practical Life Activities in Developing Fine Motor Skills in Kindergartners

    Bhatia, Punum; Davis, Alan; Shamas-Brandt, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: A quasi-experiment was undertaken to test the effect of Montessori practical life activities on kindergarten children's fine motor development and hand dominance over an 8-month period. Participants were 50 children age 5 in 4 Montessori schools and 50 students age 5 in a kindergarten program in a high-performing suburban…

  1. Redox fronts

    Chapman, N.; McKinley, I.; Shea, M.; Smellie, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the investigations of redox fronts performed at the Osamu Utsumi mine. Results obtained by modelling groups on the rate of movement of the redox fronts and on the chemical reactions involved are discussed. Some of the most important rockwater interactions which occur at redox fronts can be modelled reasonably well but the complex redox chemistry of elements like sulphur is poorly simulated. The observed enrichment of many trace elements close to the redox fronts could be of significance for high-level waste repositories, but cannot be quantified by existing models. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. Electrochemical Switching of Conductance with Diarylethene-Based Redox-Active Polymers

    Logtenberg, Hella; van der Velde, Jasper H. M.; de Mendoza, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Reversible switching of conductance using redox triggered switching of a polymer-modified electrode is demonstrated. A bifunctional monomer comprising a central electroswitchable core and two bithiophene units enables formation of a film through anodic electropolymerization. The conductivity...... of the polymer can be switched electrochemically in a reversible manner by redox triggered opening and closing of the diarylethene unit. In the closed state, the conductivity of the modified electrode is higher than in the open state....

  3. Faradic redox active material of Cu7S4 nanowires with a high conductance for flexible solid state supercapacitors

    Javed, Muhammad Sufyan; Dai, Shuge; Wang, Mingjun; Xi, Yi; Lang, Qiang; Guo, Donglin; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-08-01

    The exploration of high Faradic redox active materials with the advantages of low cost and low toxicity has been attracting great attention for producing high energy storage supercapacitors. Here, the high Faradic redox active material of Cu7S4-NWs coated on a carbon fiber fabric (CFF) is directly used as a binder-free electrode for a high performance flexible solid state supercapacitor. The Cu7S4-NW-CFF supercapacitor exhibits excellent electrochemical performance such as a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 at the scan rate of 10 mV s-1 and a high energy density of 35 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 200 W kg-1, with the advantages of a light weight, high flexibility and long term cycling stability by retaining 95% after 5000 charge-discharge cycles at a constant current of 10 mA. The high Faradic redox activity and high conductance behavior of the Cu7S4-NWs result in a high pseudocapacitive performance with a relatively high specific energy and specific power. Such a new type of pseudocapacitive material of Cu7S4-NWs with its low cost is very promising for actual application in supercapacitors.The exploration of high Faradic redox active materials with the advantages of low cost and low toxicity has been attracting great attention for producing high energy storage supercapacitors. Here, the high Faradic redox active material of Cu7S4-NWs coated on a carbon fiber fabric (CFF) is directly used as a binder-free electrode for a high performance flexible solid state supercapacitor. The Cu7S4-NW-CFF supercapacitor exhibits excellent electrochemical performance such as a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 at the scan rate of 10 mV s-1 and a high energy density of 35 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 200 W kg-1, with the advantages of a light weight, high flexibility and long term cycling stability by retaining 95% after 5000 charge-discharge cycles at a constant current of 10 mA. The high Faradic redox activity and high conductance behavior of the Cu7S4-NWs result in

  4. Unravelling ``off-target'' effects of redox-active polymers and polymer multilayered capsules in prostate cancer cells

    Beretta, Giovanni L.; Folini, Marco; Cavalieri, Francesca; Yan, Yan; Fresch, Enrico; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Hasenöhrl, Christoph; Richardson, Joseph J.; Tinelli, Stella; Fery, Andreas; Caruso, Frank; Zaffaroni, Nadia

    2015-03-01

    Redox-active polymers and carriers are oxidizing nanoagents that can potentially trigger intracellular off-target effects. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence of off-target effects in prostate cancer cells following exposure to redox-active polymer and thin multilayer capsules with different chemical properties. We show that, depending on the intracellular antioxidant capacity, thiol-functionalized poly(methacrylic acid), PMASH triggers cell defense responses/perturbations that result in off-target effects (i.e., induction of autophagy and down-regulation of survivin). Importantly, the conversion of the carboxyl groups of PMASH into the neutral amides of poly(hydroxypropylmetacrylamide) (pHPMASH) nullified the off-target effects and cytotoxicity in tested cell lines. This suggests that the simultaneous action of carboxyl and disulfide groups in PMASH polymer or capsules may play a role in mediating the intracellular off-target effects. Our work provides evidence that the rational design of redox-active carriers for therapeutic-related application should be guided by a careful investigation on potential disturbance of the cellular machineries related to the carrier association.Redox-active polymers and carriers are oxidizing nanoagents that can potentially trigger intracellular off-target effects. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence of off-target effects in prostate cancer cells following exposure to redox-active polymer and thin multilayer capsules with different chemical properties. We show that, depending on the intracellular antioxidant capacity, thiol-functionalized poly(methacrylic acid), PMASH triggers cell defense responses/perturbations that result in off-target effects (i.e., induction of autophagy and down-regulation of survivin). Importantly, the conversion of the carboxyl groups of PMASH into the neutral amides of poly(hydroxypropylmetacrylamide) (pHPMASH) nullified the off-target effects and cytotoxicity in tested cell

  5. Controllable Electrochemical Activities by Oxidative Treatment toward Inner-Sphere Redox Systems at N-Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Films

    Yoriko Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical activity of the surface of Nitrogen-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films (a-CNH, N-doped DLC toward the inner sphere redox species is controllable by modifying the surface termination. At the oxygen plasma treated N-doped DLC surface (O-DLC, the surface functional groups containing carbon doubly bonded to oxygen (C=O, which improves adsorption of polar molecules, were generated. By oxidative treatment, the electron-transfer rate for dopamine (DA positively charged inner-sphere redox analyte could be improved at the N-doped DLC surface. For redox reaction of 2,4-dichlorophenol, which induces an inevitable fouling of the anode surface by forming passivating films, the DLC surfaces exhibited remarkably higher stability and reproducibility of the electrode performance. This is due to the electrochemical decomposition of the passive films without the interference of oxygen evolution by applying higher potential. The N-doped DLC film can offer benefits as the polarizable electrode surface with the higher reactivity and higher stability toward inner-sphere redox species. By making use of these controllable electrochemical reactivity at the O-DLC surface, the selective detection of DA in the mixed solution of DA and uric acid could be achieved.

  6. Ground-state kinetics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Li, Hao; Trabolsi, Ali; Coskun, Ali; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2014-02-18

    The ability to design and confer control over the kinetics of theprocesses involved in the mechanisms of artificial molecular machines is at the heart of the challenge to create ones that can carry out useful work on their environment, just as Nature is wont to do. As one of the more promising forerunners of prototypical artificial molecular machines, chemists have developed bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) over the past couple of decades. These bistable MIMs generally come in the form of [2]rotaxanes, molecular compounds that constitute a ring mechanically interlocked around a dumbbell-shaped component, or [2]catenanes, which are composed of two mechanically interlocked rings. As a result of their interlocked nature, bistable MIMs possess the inherent propensity to express controllable intramolecular, large-amplitude, and reversible motions in response to redox stimuli. In this Account, we rationalize the kinetic behavior in the ground state for a large assortment of these types of bistable MIMs, including both rotaxanes and catenanes. These structures have proven useful in a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery to molecular electronic devices. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs can switch between two different isomeric states. The favored isomer, known as the ground-state co-conformation (GSCC) is in equilibrium with the less favored metastable state co-conformation (MSCC). The forward (kf) and backward (kb) rate constants associated with this ground-state equilibrium are intimately connected to each other through the ground-state distribution constant, KGS. Knowing the rate constants that govern the kinetics and bring about the equilibration between the MSCC and GSCC, allows researchers to understand the operation of these bistable MIMs in a device setting and apply them toward the construction of artificial molecular machines. The three biggest influences on the ground-state rate constants arise from

  7. Activation of persulfate/copper by hydroxylamine via accelerating the cupric/cuprous redox couple.

    Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Liang, Juan; Zhang, Yongli; Liu, Ya; Liu, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Cuprous copper [Cu(I)] reacts with sodium persulfate (PDS) to generate sulfate radical SO4(-)•, but it has been seldom investigated owing to its instability and difficulty in dissolving it. This study proposes a new method to regenerate Cu(I) from cupric copper [Cu(II)] by addition of hydroxylamine (HA) to induce the continuous production of radicals through active PDS, and investigates the resulting enhanced methyl orange (MO) degradation efficiency and mechanism in the new system. HA accelerated the degradation of MO markedly in the pH range from 6.0 to 8.0 in the HA/Cu(II)/PDS process. Both SO4(-)• and hydroxyl radicals (•OH) were considered as the primary reactive radicals in the process. The MO degradation in the HA/Cu(II)/PDS process can be divided into three stages: the fast stage, the transitory stage, and the low stage. MO degradation was enhanced with increased dosage of PDS. Although high dosage of HA could accelerate the transformation of the Cu(II)/Cu(I) cycle to produce more reactive radicals, excess HA can quench the reactive radicals. This study indicates that through a copper-redox cycling mechanism by HA, the production of SO4(-)• and •OH can be strongly enhanced, and the effective pH range can be expanded to neutral conditions.

  8. Boosting lithium storage in covalent organic framework via activation of 14-electron redox chemistry.

    Lei, Zhendong; Yang, Qinsi; Xu, Yi; Guo, Siyu; Sun, Weiwei; Liu, Hao; Lv, Li-Ping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yong

    2018-02-08

    Conjugated polymeric molecules have been heralded as promising electrode materials for the next-generation energy-storage technologies owing to their chemical flexibility at the molecular level, environmental benefit, and cost advantage. However, before any practical implementation takes place, the low capacity, poor structural stability, and sluggish ion/electron diffusion kinetics remain the obstacles that have to be overcome. Here, we report the synthesis of a few-layered two-dimensional covalent organic framework trapped by carbon nanotubes as the anode of lithium-ion batteries. Remarkably, upon activation, this organic electrode delivers a large reversible capacity of 1536 mAh g -1 and can sustain 500 cycles at 100 mA g -1 . Aided by theoretical calculations and electrochemical probing of the electrochemical behavior at different stages of cycling, the storage mechanism is revealed to be governed by 14-electron redox chemistry for a covalent organic framework monomer with one lithium ion per C=N group and six lithium ions per benzene ring. This work may pave the way to the development of high-capacity electrodes for organic rechargeable batteries.

  9. Influence of non ionizing radiation of base stations on the activity of redox proteins in bovines.

    Hässig, Michael; Wullschleger, Marietta; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Kupper, Jaqueline; Spiess, Bernhard; Kuster, Niels; Capstick, Myles; Murbach, Manuel

    2014-06-19

    The influence of electromagnetic fields on the health of humans and animals is still an intensively discussed and scientifically investigated issue (Prakt Tierarzt 11:15-20, 2003; Umwelt Medizin Gesellschaft 17:326-332, 2004; J Toxicol Environment Health, Part B 12:572-597, 2009). We are surrounded by numerous electromagnetic fields of variable strength, coming from electronic equipment and its power cords, from high-voltage power lines and from antennas for radio, television and mobile communication. Particularly the latter cause's controversy, as everyone likes to have good mobile reception at anytime and anywhere, whereas nobody wants to have such a basestation antenna in their proximity. In this experiment, the NIR has resulted in changes in the enzyme activities. Certain enzymes were disabled, others enabled by NIR. Furthermore, individual behavior patterns were observed. While certain cows reacted to NIR, others did not react at all, or even inversely. The present results coincide with the information from the literature, according to which NIR leads to changes in redox proteins, and that there are individuals who are sensitive to radiation and others that are not. However, the latter could not be distinctly attributed - there are cows that react clearly with one enzyme while they do not react with another enzyme at all, or even the inverse. The study approach of testing ten cows each ten times during three phases has proven to be appropriate. Future studies should however set the post-exposure phase later on.

  10. A novel redox-based switch: LMW-PTP oxidation enhances Grb2 binding and leads to ERK activation

    Giannoni, Elisa; Raugei, Giovanni; Chiarugi, Paola; Ramponi, Giampietro

    2006-01-01

    Low molecular weight-PTP has been reported as a redox-sensitive protein during both platelet-derived growth factor and integrin signalling. In response to oxidation the phosphatase undergoes a reversible inactivation, which in turn leads to the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of its substrates and the properly executed anchorage-dependent proliferation program. Here, we report that an exogenous oxidative stress enhances LMW-PTP tyrosine phosphorylation, through oxidation/inactivation of the enzyme, thus preventing its auto-dephosphorylation activity. In particular, we observed a selective hyper-phosphorylation of Tyr132, that acts as a docking site for the adaptor protein Grb2. The redox-dependent enhancement of Grb2 recruitment to LMW-PTP ultimately leads to an improvement of ERK activation, likely triggering a prosurvival signal against the oxidant environment

  11. Redox signaling in plants.

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Our aim is to deliver an authoritative and challenging perspective of current concepts in plant redox signaling, focusing particularly on the complex interface between the redox and hormone-signaling pathways that allow precise control of plant growth and defense in response to metabolic triggers and environmental constraints and cues. Plants produce significant amounts of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of photosynthetic electron transport and metabolism. Such pathways contribute to the compartment-specific redox-regulated signaling systems in plant cells that convey information to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. Like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, the apoplast-cell wall compartment makes a significant contribution to the redox signaling network, but unlike these organelles, the apoplast has a low antioxidant-buffering capacity. The respective roles of ROS, low-molecular antioxidants, redox-active proteins, and antioxidant enzymes are considered in relation to the functions of plant hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, in the composite control of plant growth and defense. Regulation of redox gradients between key compartments in plant cells such as those across the plasma membrane facilitates flexible and multiple faceted opportunities for redox signaling that spans the intracellular and extracellular environments. In conclusion, plants are recognized as masters of the art of redox regulation that use oxidants and antioxidants as flexible integrators of signals from metabolism and the environment.

  12. Fine Slicing of the Value Chain and Offshoring of Essential Activities

    Linares-Navarro, Esmeralda; Pedersen, Torben; Pla-Barber, José

    2014-01-01

    The offshoring of more advanced activities is increasing and a debate about the limits of offshoring has emerged. Companies are fine-slicing their value chains, and moving beyond the offshoring of peripheral and non-core activities to the offshoring of advanced and essential activities that are c......The offshoring of more advanced activities is increasing and a debate about the limits of offshoring has emerged. Companies are fine-slicing their value chains, and moving beyond the offshoring of peripheral and non-core activities to the offshoring of advanced and essential activities...... that companies are redefining their core activities and in this process, some essential activities previously viewed as core activities are being detached from the core, and they become more offshorable. The study uses a sample of 565 offshoring operations conducted by 263 multinational companies from 15...... European countries. A logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between the activities offshored (non-core versus essential activities) and the offshoring mode implemented (captive offshoring versus offshore outsourcing). We find that essential activities are typically offshored using...

  13. The structure of Plasmodium falciparum serine hydroxymethyltransferase reveals a novel redox switch that regulates its activities

    Chitnumsub, Penchit; Ittarat, Wanwipa; Jaruwat, Aritsara; Noytanom, Krittikar [National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, 113 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Amornwatcharapong, Watcharee [Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Pornthanakasem, Wichai [National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, 113 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Chaiyen, Pimchai [Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree [National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, 113 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand)

    2014-06-01

    The crystal structure of P. falciparum SHMT revealed snapshots of an intriguing disulfide/sulfhydryl switch controlling the functional activity. Plasmodium falciparum serine hydroxymethyltransferase (PfSHMT), an enzyme in the dTMP synthesis cycle, is an antimalarial target because inhibition of its expression or function has been shown to be lethal to the parasite. As the wild-type enzyme could not be crystallized, protein engineering of residues on the surface was carried out. The surface-engineered mutant PfSHMT-F292E was successfully crystallized and its structure was determined at 3 Å resolution. The PfSHMT-F292E structure is a good representation of PfSHMT as this variant revealed biochemical properties similar to those of the wild type. Although the overall structure of PfSHMT is similar to those of other SHMTs, unique features including the presence of two loops and a distinctive cysteine pair formed by Cys125 and Cys364 in the tetrahydrofolate (THF) substrate binding pocket were identified. These structural characteristics have never been reported in other SHMTs. Biochemical characterization and mutation analysis of these two residues confirm that they act as a disulfide/sulfhydryl switch to regulate the THF-dependent catalytic function of the enzyme. This redox switch is not present in the human enzyme, in which the cysteine pair is absent. The data reported here can be further exploited as a new strategy to specifically disrupt the activity of the parasite enzyme without interfering with the function of the human enzyme.

  14. The structure of Plasmodium falciparum serine hydroxymethyltransferase reveals a novel redox switch that regulates its activities

    Chitnumsub, Penchit; Ittarat, Wanwipa; Jaruwat, Aritsara; Noytanom, Krittikar; Amornwatcharapong, Watcharee; Pornthanakasem, Wichai; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of P. falciparum SHMT revealed snapshots of an intriguing disulfide/sulfhydryl switch controlling the functional activity. Plasmodium falciparum serine hydroxymethyltransferase (PfSHMT), an enzyme in the dTMP synthesis cycle, is an antimalarial target because inhibition of its expression or function has been shown to be lethal to the parasite. As the wild-type enzyme could not be crystallized, protein engineering of residues on the surface was carried out. The surface-engineered mutant PfSHMT-F292E was successfully crystallized and its structure was determined at 3 Å resolution. The PfSHMT-F292E structure is a good representation of PfSHMT as this variant revealed biochemical properties similar to those of the wild type. Although the overall structure of PfSHMT is similar to those of other SHMTs, unique features including the presence of two loops and a distinctive cysteine pair formed by Cys125 and Cys364 in the tetrahydrofolate (THF) substrate binding pocket were identified. These structural characteristics have never been reported in other SHMTs. Biochemical characterization and mutation analysis of these two residues confirm that they act as a disulfide/sulfhydryl switch to regulate the THF-dependent catalytic function of the enzyme. This redox switch is not present in the human enzyme, in which the cysteine pair is absent. The data reported here can be further exploited as a new strategy to specifically disrupt the activity of the parasite enzyme without interfering with the function of the human enzyme

  15. On the activation of Pt/Al2O3 catalysts in HC-SCR by sintering. Determination of redox-active sites using Multitrack

    Vaccaro, A.R.; Mul, G.; Moulijn, J.A.; Perez-Ramirez, J.

    2003-01-01

    A highly dispersed Pt/Al 2 O 3 catalyst was used for the selective catalytic reduction of NO x using propene (HC-SCR). Contact with the reaction gas mixture led to a significant activation of the catalyst at temperatures above 523K. According to CO chemisorption data and HRTEM analysis, Pt particles on the activated catalyst had sintered. The redox behavior of the fresh and sintered catalysts was investigated using Multitrack, a TAP-like pulse reactor. If Pt particles on the catalyst are highly dispersed (average size below =2nm), only a small part (=10%) of the total number of Pt surface sites as determined by CO chemisorption (Pt surf ) participates in H 2 /O 2 redox cycles (Pt surf,redox ) in Multitrack conditions. For a sintered catalyst, with an average particle size of 2.7nm, the number of Pt surf and Pt surf,redox sites are in good agreement. Similar results were obtained for both catalysts using NO as the oxidant. The low number of Pt surf,redox sites on highly dispersed Pt/Al 2 O 3 is explained by the presence of a kinetically more stable-probably ionic-form of Pt-O bonds on all surface sites of the smaller Pt particles, including corner, edge and terrace sites. When the average particle size shifts to =2.7nm, the kinetic stability of all Pt-O bonds is collectively decreased, enabling the participation of all Pt surface sites in the redox cycles. A linear correlation between the NO x conversion in HC-SCR, and the amount of Pt surf,redox was found. This suggests that redox-active Pt sites are necessary for catalytic activity. In addition, the correlation could be significantly improved by assuming that Pt surf,terrace sites of the particles larger than 2.7nm are mainly responsible for HC-SCR activity in steady state conditions. Implications of these results for the pathway of HC-SCR over Pt catalysts are discussed

  16. Location of the redox-active thiols of ribonucleotide reductase: sequences similarity between the Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus leichmannii enzymes

    Lin, A.N.I.; Ashley, G.W.; Stubbe, J.

    1987-01-01

    The redox-active thiols of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase and of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase have been located by a procedure involving (1) prereduction of enzyme with dithiothreitol, (2) specific oxidation of the redox-active thiols by treatment with substrate in the absence of exogenous reductant, (3) alkylation of other thiols with iodoacetamide, and (4) reduction of the disulfides with dithiothreitol and alkylation with [1- 14 C]iodoacetamide. The dithiothreitol-reduce E. coli B1 subunit is able to convert 3 equiv of CDP to dCDP and is labeled with 5.4 equiv of 14 C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 2.8 equiv of 14 C is on cysteines-752 and -757 at the C-terminus of B1, while 1.0-1.5 equiv of 14 C is on cysteines-222 and -227. It thus appears that two sets of redox-active dithiols are involved in substrate reduction. The L. leichmannii reductase is able to convert 1.1 equiv of CTP to dCTP and is labeled with 2.1 equiv of 14 C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 1.4 equiv of 14 C is located on the two cysteines of C-E-G-G-A-C-P-I-K. This peptide shows remarkable and unexpected similarity to the thiol-containing region of the C-terminal peptide of E. coli B1, C-E-S-G-A-C-K-I

  17. 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl as a model organic redox active compound for nonaqueous flow batteries

    Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Barton, John L.; Darling, Robert M.; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-09-01

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries (NAqRFBs) that utilize redox active organic molecules are an emerging energy storage concept with the possibility of meeting grid storage requirements. Sporadic and uneven advances in molecular discovery and development, however, have stymied efforts to quantify the performance characteristics of nonaqueous redox electrolytes and flow cells. A need exists for archetypal redox couples, with well-defined electrochemical properties, high solubility in relevant electrolytes, and broad availability, to serve as probe molecules. This work investigates the 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (AcNH-TEMPO) redox pair for such an application. We report the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the reduced and oxidized compounds at dilute concentrations for electroanalysis, as well as moderate-to-high concentrations for RFB applications. Changes in conductivity, viscosity, and UV-vis absorbance as a function of state-of-charge are quantified. Cyclic voltammetry investigates the redox potential, reversibility, and diffusion coefficients of dilute solutions, while symmetric flow cell cycling determines the stability of the AcNH-TEMPO redox pair over long experiment times. Finally, single electrolyte flow cell studies demonstrate the utility of this redox couple as a platform chemistry for benchmarking NAqRFB performance.

  18. PKI 166 induced redox signalling and apoptosis through activation of p53, MAP kinase and caspase pathway in epidermoid carcinoma.

    Das, Subhasis; Dey, Kaushik Kumar; Bharti, Rashmi; MaitiChoudhury, Sujata; Maiti, Sukumar; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2012-01-01

    Cellular redox changes have emerged as a pivotal and proximal event in cancer. PKI 166 is used to determine the effects of redox sensitive inhibition of EGFR, metastasis and apoptosis in epidermoid carcinoma. Cytotoxicity study of PKI 166 (IC50 1.0 microM) treated A431 cells were performed by MTT assay for 48 and 72 hrs. Morphological analysis of PKI 166 treated A431 cells for 48 hrs. revealed the cell shrinkage, loss of filopodia and lamellipodia by phase contrast and SEM images in dose dependent manner. It has cytotoxic effects through inhibiting cellular proliferation, leads to the induction of apoptosis, as increased fraction of sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle, chromatin condensation and DNA ladder. It inhibited cyclin-D1 and cyclin-E expression and induced p53, p21 expression in dose dependent manner. Consequently, an imbalance of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio triggered caspase cascade and subsequent cleavage of PARP, thereby shifting the balance in favour of apoptosis. PKI 166 treatment actively stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. It inhibited some metastatic properties of A431 cells supressing colony formation by soft agar assay and inhibition of MMP 9 activity by gelatin zymography and western blot analysis. PKI 166 inhibited growth factor induced phosphorylation of EGFR, Akt, MAPK, JNK and colony formation in A431 cells. Thus the inhibition of proliferation was associated with redox regulation of the caspase cascade, EGFR, Akt/PI3K, MAPK/ ERK and JNK pathway. On the other hand, increased antioxidant activity leads to decreased ROS generation inhibit the anti-proliferative and apoptotic properties of PKI 166 in A431 cells. These observations indicated PKI 166 induced redox signalling dependent inhibition of cell proliferation, metastatic properties and induction of apoptotic potential in epidermoid carcinoma.

  19. Direct voltammetric determination of redox-active iron in carbon nanotubes.

    Teo, Wei Zhe; Pumera, Martin

    2014-12-01

    With the advances in nanotechnology over the past decade, consumer products are increasingly being incorporated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). As the harmful effects of CNTs are suggested to be primarily due to the bioavailable amounts of metallic impurities, it is vital to detect and quantify these species using sensitive and facile methods. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the possibility of quantifying the amount of redox-available iron-containing impurities in CNTs with voltammetric techniques such as cyclic voltammetry. We examined the electrochemistry of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles in phosphate buffer solution and discovered that its electrochemical behavior could be affected by pH of the electrolyte. By utilizing the unique redox reaction between the iron and phosphate species, the redox available iron content in CNTs was determined successfully using voltammetry. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Metal-Organic Frameworks as Highly Active Electrocatalysts for High-Energy Density, Aqueous Zinc-Polyiodide Redox Flow Batteries.

    Li, Bin; Liu, Jian; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Reed, David; Liu, Jun; McGrail, Pete; Sprenkle, Vincent

    2016-07-13

    The new aqueous zinc-polyiodide redox flow battery (RFB) system with highly soluble active materials as well as ambipolar and bifunctional designs demonstrated significantly enhanced energy density, which shows great potential to reduce RFB cost. However, the poor kinetic reversibility and electrochemical activity of the redox reaction of I3(-)/I(-) couples on graphite felts (GFs) electrode can result in low energy efficiency. Two nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), MIL-125-NH2 and UiO-66-CH3, that have high surface areas when introduced to GF surfaces accelerated the I3(-)/I(-) redox reaction. The flow cell with MOF-modified GFs serving as a positive electrode showed higher energy efficiency than the pristine GFs; increases of about 6.4% and 2.7% occurred at the current density of 30 mA/cm(2) for MIL-125-NH2 and UiO-66-CH3, respectively. Moreover, UiO-66-CH3 is more promising due to its excellent chemical stability in the weakly acidic electrolyte. This letter highlights a way for MOFs to be used in the field of RFBs.

  1. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    Kristina Wedege; Emil Dražević; Denes Konya; Anders Bentien

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined ...

  2. Simultaneous Activation of Iron- and Thiol-Based Sensor-Regulator Systems by Redox-Active Compounds.

    Lee, Kang-Lok; Yoo, Ji-Sun; Oh, Gyeong-Seok; Singh, Atul K; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria in natural habitats are exposed to myriad redox-active compounds (RACs), which include producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive electrophile species (RES) that alkylate or oxidize thiols. RACs can induce oxidative stress in cells and activate response pathways by modulating the activity of sensitive regulators. However, the effect of a certain compound on the cell has been investigated primarily with respect to a specific regulatory pathway. Since a single compound can exert multiple chemical effects in the cell, its effect can be better understood by time-course monitoring of multiple sensitive regulatory pathways that the compound induces. We investigated the effect of representative RACs by monitoring the activity of three sensor-regulators in the model actinobacterium Streptomyces coelicolor ; SoxR that senses reactive compounds directly through oxidation of its [2Fe-2S] cluster, CatR/PerR that senses peroxides through bound iron, and an anti-sigma factor RsrA that senses RES via disulfide formation. The time course and magnitude of induction of their target transcripts were monitored to predict the chemical activities of each compound in S. coelicolor . Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) was found to be an effective RAC that directly activated SoxR and an effective ROS-producer that induced CatR/PerR with little thiol-perturbing activity. p -Benzoquinone was an effective RAC that directly activated SoxR, with slower ROS-producing activity, and an effective RES that induced the RsrA-SigR system. Plumbagin was an effective RAC that activated SoxR, an effective ROS-producer, and a less agile but effective RES. Diamide was an RES that effectively formed disulfides and a weak RAC that activated SoxR. Monobromobimane was a moderately effective RES and a slow producer of ROS. Interestingly, benzoquinone induced the SigR system by forming adducts on cysteine thiols in RsrA, revealing a new pathway to modulate RsrA activity. Overall, this study showed

  3. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  4. REDOX DISRUPTING POTENTIAL OF TOXCAST CHEMICALS RANKED BY ACTIVITY IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    To gain insight regarding the adverse outcome pathways leading to developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals, we evaluated ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay and identified a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with al...

  5. Improving the electrocatalytic performance of carbon nanotubes for VO{sup 2+}/VO{sub 2}{sup +} redox reaction by KOH activation

    Dai, Lei; Jiang, Yingqiao; Meng, Wei; Zhou, Huizhu [School of Chemical Engineering, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan 063009 (China); Wang, Ling, E-mail: tswling@126.com [School of Chemical Engineering, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan 063009 (China); He, Zhangxing, E-mail: zxhe@ncst.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan 063009 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • KOH-activated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was investigated as superior catalyst for VO{sup 2+}/VO{sub 2}{sup +} redox reaction for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) for the first time. • KOH activation for CNTs can result in the chemical etching of surface and improved wettability, accelerating the mass transfer of vanadium ions. • KOH activation can introduce many oxygen-containing groups as active sites on the surface of CNTs. • KOH-activated CNTs as positive catalyst could increase the comprehensive energy storage performance of VRFB. - Abstract: In this paper, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was activated by KOH treatment at high temperature and investigated as catalyst for VO{sup 2+}/VO{sub 2}{sup +} redox reaction for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that the oxygen-containing groups can be introduced on CNTs by KOH activation. The mass transfer of vanadium ions can be accelerated by chemical etching by KOH activation and improved wettability due to the introduction of hydrophilic groups. The electrochemical properties of VO{sup 2+}/VO{sub 2}{sup +} redox reaction can be enhanced by introduced oxygen-containing groups as active sites. The sample treated at 900 °C with KOH/CNTs mass ratio of 3:1 (CNTs-3) exhibits the highest electrocatalytic activity for VO{sup 2+}/VO{sub 2}{sup +} redox reaction. The cell using CNTs-3 as positive catalyst demonstrates the smallest electrochemical polarization, the highest capacity and efficiency among the samples. Using KOH-activated CNTs-3 can increase the average energy efficiency of the cell by 4.4%. This work suggests that KOH-activated CNTs is a low-cost, efficient and promising catalyst for VO{sup 2+}/VO{sub 2}{sup +} redox reaction for VRFB system.

  6. Strategies for enhancing electrochemical activity of carbon-based electrodes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    Flox, Cristina; Skoumal, Marcel; Rubio-Garcia, Javier; Andreu, Teresa; Morante, Juan Ramón

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Improved reactions at the positive electrode in all-vanadium redox flow batteries. ► Graphene-derived and PAN-modified electrodes have been successfully prepared. ► Modification with bimetallic CuPt 3 nanocubes yielded the best catalytic behavior. ► N and O-containing groups enhances the vanadium flow battery performance. - Abstract: Two strategies for improving the electroactivity towards VO 2+ /VO 2 + redox pair, the limiting process in all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VFBs), were presented. CuPt 3 nanoparticles supported onto graphene substrate and nitrogen and oxygen polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-functionalized electrodes materials have been evaluated. The morphology, composition, electrochemical properties of all electrodes prepared was characterized with field emission-scanning electrode microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cell charge–discharge test. The presence of the CuPt 3 nanocubes and nitrogen and oxygen functionalities enhance the electrocatalytic activity of the electrodes materials accelerating the oxygen and electron transfer processes. The battery performance was also evaluated using PAN-functionalized electrodes exhibiting a high of energy efficiency of 84% (at current density 20 mA cm −2 ) up to 30th cycle, indicating a promising alternative for improving the VFB

  7. Removal of metals from landfill leachate by sorption to activated carbon, bone meal and iron fines.

    Modin, Hanna; Persson, Kenneth M; Andersson, Anna; van Praagh, Martijn

    2011-05-30

    Sorption filters based on granular activated carbon, bone meal and iron fines were tested for their efficiency of removing metals from landfill leachate. Removal of Al, As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn were studied in a laboratory scale setup. Activated carbon removed more than 90% of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni. Ca, Pb, Sr and Zn were removed but less efficiently. Bone meal removed over 80% of Cr, Fe, Hg, Mn and Sr and 20-80% of Al, Ca, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn. Iron fines removed most metals (As, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, Sr and Zn) to some extent but less efficiently. All materials released unwanted substances (metals, TOC or nutrients), highlighting the need to study the uptake and release of a large number of compounds, not only the target metals. To remove a wide range of metals using these materials two or more filter materials may need to be combined. Sorption mechanisms for all materials include ion exchange, sorption and precipitation. For iron fines oxidation of Fe(0) seems to be important for metal immobilisation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of estrogenic compounds on DNA integrity in human spermatozoa: Evidence for cross-linking and redox cycling activities

    Bennetts, L.E.; De Iuliis, G.N.; Nixon, B.; Kime, M.; Zelski, K.; McVicar, C.M.; Lewis, S.E.; Aitken, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    A great deal of circumstantial evidence has linked DNA damage in human spermatozoa with adverse reproductive outcomes including reduced fertility and high rates of miscarriage. Although oxidative stress is thought to make a significant contribution to DNA damage in the male germ line, the factors responsible for creating this stress have not been elucidated. One group of compounds that are thought to be active in this context are the estrogens, either generated as a result of the endogenous metabolism of androgens within the male reproductive tract or gaining access to the latter as a consequence of environmental exposure. In this study, a wide variety of estrogenic compounds were assessed for their direct effects on human spermatozoa in vitro. DNA integrity was assessed using the Comet and TUNEL assays, lesion frequencies were quantified by QPCR using targets within the mitochondrial and nuclear (β-globin) genomes, DNA adducts were characterized by mass spectrometry and redox activity was monitored using dihydroethidium (DHE) as the probe. Of the estrogenic and estrogen analogue compounds evaluated, catechol estrogens, quercetin, diethylstilbestrol and pyrocatechol stimulated intense redox activity while genistein was only active at the highest doses tested. Other estrogens and estrogen analogues, such as 17β-estradiol, nonylphenol, bisphenol A and 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene were inactive. Estrogen-induced redox activity was associated with a dramatic loss of motility and, in the case of 2-hydroxyestradiol, the induction of significant DNA fragmentation. Mass spectrometry also indicated that catechol estrogens were capable of forming dimers that can cross-link the densely packed DNA strands in sperm chromatin, impairing nuclear decondensation. These results highlight the potential importance of estrogenic compounds in creating oxidative stress and DNA damage in the male germ line and suggest that further exploration of these compounds in the aetiology of male

  9. Impact of estrogenic compounds on DNA integrity in human spermatozoa: Evidence for cross-linking and redox cycling activities

    Bennetts, L.E.; De Iuliis, G.N.; Nixon, B.; Kime, M.; Zelski, K. [ARC Centre of Excellence in Biotechnology and Development and Discipline of Biological Sciences, University of Newcastle, NSW (Australia); McVicar, C.M.; Lewis, S.E. [Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom); Aitken, R.J. [ARC Centre of Excellence in Biotechnology and Development and Discipline of Biological Sciences, University of Newcastle, NSW (Australia)], E-mail: jaitken@mail.newcastle.edu.au

    2008-05-10

    A great deal of circumstantial evidence has linked DNA damage in human spermatozoa with adverse reproductive outcomes including reduced fertility and high rates of miscarriage. Although oxidative stress is thought to make a significant contribution to DNA damage in the male germ line, the factors responsible for creating this stress have not been elucidated. One group of compounds that are thought to be active in this context are the estrogens, either generated as a result of the endogenous metabolism of androgens within the male reproductive tract or gaining access to the latter as a consequence of environmental exposure. In this study, a wide variety of estrogenic compounds were assessed for their direct effects on human spermatozoa in vitro. DNA integrity was assessed using the Comet and TUNEL assays, lesion frequencies were quantified by QPCR using targets within the mitochondrial and nuclear ({beta}-globin) genomes, DNA adducts were characterized by mass spectrometry and redox activity was monitored using dihydroethidium (DHE) as the probe. Of the estrogenic and estrogen analogue compounds evaluated, catechol estrogens, quercetin, diethylstilbestrol and pyrocatechol stimulated intense redox activity while genistein was only active at the highest doses tested. Other estrogens and estrogen analogues, such as 17{beta}-estradiol, nonylphenol, bisphenol A and 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene were inactive. Estrogen-induced redox activity was associated with a dramatic loss of motility and, in the case of 2-hydroxyestradiol, the induction of significant DNA fragmentation. Mass spectrometry also indicated that catechol estrogens were capable of forming dimers that can cross-link the densely packed DNA strands in sperm chromatin, impairing nuclear decondensation. These results highlight the potential importance of estrogenic compounds in creating oxidative stress and DNA damage in the male germ line and suggest that further exploration of these compounds in the aetiology of

  10. Redox-Active Star Molecules Incorporating the 4-Benzoylpyridinium Cation - Implications for the Charge Transfer Along Branches vs. Across the Perimeter in Dendrimer

    Leventis, Nicholas; Yang, Jinua; Fabrizio,Even F.; Rawashdeh, Abdel-Monem M.; Oh, Woon Su; Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia

    2004-01-01

    Dendrimers are self-repeating globular branched star molecules, whose fractal structure continues to fascinate, challenge, and inspire. Functional dendrimers may incorporate redox centers, and potential applications include antennae molecules for light harvesting, sensors, mediators, and artificial biomolecules. We report the synthesis and redox properties of four star systems incorporating the 4-benzoyl-N-alkylpyridinium cation; the redox potential varies along the branches but remains constant at fixed radii. Bulk electrolysis shows that at a semi-infinite time scale all redox centers are electrochemically accessible. However, voltammetric analysis (cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry) shows that on1y two of the three redox-active centers in the perimeter are electrochemically accessible during potential sweeps as slow as 20 mV/s and as fast as 10 V/s. On the contrary, both redox centers along branches are accessible electrochemically within the same time frame. These results are explained in terms of slow through-space charge transfer and the globular 3-D folding of the molecules and are discussed in terms of their implications on the design of efficient redox functional dendrimers.

  11. Impaired redox state and respiratory chain enzyme activities in the cerebellum of vitamin A-treated rats

    Oliveira, Marcos Roberto de; Fonseca Moreira, Jose Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin A is a micronutrient that participates in the maintenance of the mammalian cells homeostasis. However, excess of vitamin A, which may be achieved through increased intake of the vitamin either therapeutically or inadvertently, induces several deleterious effects in a wide range of mammalian cells, including neuronal cells. Vitamin A is a redox-active molecule, and it was previously demonstrated that it induces oxidative stress in several cell types. Therefore, in the present work, we investigated the effects of vitamin A supplementation at clinical doses (1000-9000 IU/(kg day)) on redox environment and respiratory chain activity in the adult rat cerebellum. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) enzyme activity was also measured here. The animals were treated for 3, 7, or 28 days with vitamin A as retinol palmitate. We found increased levels of molecular markers of oxidative damage in the rat cerebellum in any period analyzed. Additionally, vitamin A supplementation impaired cerebellar mitochondrial electron transfer chain (METC) activity. GST enzyme activity was increased in the cerebellum of rats chronically treated with vitamin A. Based on our results and data previously published, we recommend more caution in prescribing vitamin A at high doses even clinically, since there is a growing concern regarding toxic effects associated to vitamin A intake

  12. Electrochemical catalytic activity of tungsten trioxide- modified graphite felt toward VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction

    Shen, Yang; Xu, Hongfeng; Xu, Pengcheng; Wu, Xiaoxin; Dong, Yiming; Lu, Lu

    2014-01-01

    A novel graphite felt electrode modified with tungsten trioxide (WO 3 ) was developed to improve the electrochemical performance of graphite felt toward the VO 2 + /VO 2+ redox pair. WO 3 was prepared using a hydrothermal method, and the morphology of WO 3 structures was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical property of WO 3 -modified graphite felt toward VO 2 + /VO 2+ was carefully characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The hydrogen-vanadium redox flow battery (H-VRFB) test indicates that single cells using 1.1 mg cm −2 WO 3 -modified graphite felt exhibited excellent performance at 70 mA cm −2 , and the corresponding coulombic, voltage, and energy efficiencies were 99.1%, 88.66% and 87.86%, respectively

  13. Characterization of Mammalian Selenoprotein O: A Redox-Active Mitochondrial Protein

    Han, Seong-Jeong; Lee, Byung Cheon; Yim, Sun Hee; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Lee, Seung-Rock

    2014-01-01

    Selenoproteins exhibit diverse biological functions, most of which are associated with redox control. However, the functions of approximately half of mammalian selenoproteins are not known. One such protein is Selenoprotein O (SelO), the largest mammalian selenoprotein with orthologs found in a wide range of organisms, including bacteria and yeast. Here, we report characterization of mammalian SelO. Expression of this protein could be verified in HEK 293T cells by metabolic labeling of cells ...

  14. Topical ethyl chloride fine spray. Does it have any antimicrobial activity?

    Burney, K.; Bowker, K.; Reynolds, R.; Bradley, M

    2006-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess whether ethyl chloride fine spray (Cryogesic[reg]) has antimicrobial activity. Material and methods: Blood agar plates supplemented with 5% horse blood were inoculated with five different organisms, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Streptococcus pyogenes and Enterococcus faecalis. The plates were assessed for growth inhibition at 24 and 48 h by the microbiologist and compared with the non-sprayed control plates. Results: The model showed a highly significant (p < 0.0001) reduction in bacterial count for the plates treated with fine ethyl chloride spray. The estimate of the percentage of bacteria remaining after spraying with ethyl chloride was 42.7%, with a 95% confidence interval of 35.9-50.9%. There was no evidence that the effect of ethyl chloride fine spray was different for the different organisms (p = 0.49). Conclusion: The use of ethyl chloride shows bacterial count reduction but the clinical implication of this needs to be determined. The authors postulate that any statistically significant reduction can only be helpful in reducing the infection rates. This coupled with the already proven local anaesthetic effects of ethyl chloride will make it an important tool for procedures like arthrocentesis and venepunctures.

  15. Topical ethyl chloride fine spray. Does it have any antimicrobial activity?

    Burney, K.; Bowker, K.; Reynolds, R.; Bradley, M.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess whether ethyl chloride fine spray (Cryogesic[reg]) has antimicrobial activity. Material and methods: Blood agar plates supplemented with 5% horse blood were inoculated with five different organisms, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Streptococcus pyogenes and Enterococcus faecalis. The plates were assessed for growth inhibition at 24 and 48 h by the microbiologist and compared with the non-sprayed control plates. Results: The model showed a highly significant (p < 0.0001) reduction in bacterial count for the plates treated with fine ethyl chloride spray. The estimate of the percentage of bacteria remaining after spraying with ethyl chloride was 42.7%, with a 95% confidence interval of 35.9-50.9%. There was no evidence that the effect of ethyl chloride fine spray was different for the different organisms (p = 0.49). Conclusion: The use of ethyl chloride shows bacterial count reduction but the clinical implication of this needs to be determined. The authors postulate that any statistically significant reduction can only be helpful in reducing the infection rates. This coupled with the already proven local anaesthetic effects of ethyl chloride will make it an important tool for procedures like arthrocentesis and venepunctures

  16. Zn and Fe complexes containing a redox active macrocyclic biquinazoline ligand.

    Banerjee, Priyabrata; Company, Anna; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Bill, Eckhard; Hess, Corinna R

    2009-04-06

    A series of iron and zinc complexes has been synthesized, coordinated by the macrocyclic biquinazoline ligand, 2-4:6-8-bis(3,3,4,4-tetramethyldihydropyrrolo)-10-15-(2,2'-biquinazolino)-[15]-1,3,5,8,10,14-hexaene-1,3,7,9,11,14-N(6) (Mabiq). The Mabiq ligand consists of a bipyrimidine moiety and two dihydropyrrole units. The electronic structures of the metal-Mabiq complexes have been characterized using spectroscopic and density-functional theory (DFT) computational methods. The parent zinc complex exhibits a ligand-centered reduction to generate the metal-coordinated Mabiq radical dianion, establishing the redox non-innocence of this ligand. Iron-Mabiq complexes have been isolated in three oxidation states. This redox series includes low-spin ferric and low-spin ferrous species, as well as an intermediate-spin Fe(II) compound. In the latter complex, the iron ion is antiferromagnetically coupled to a Mabiq-centered pi-radical. The results demonstrate the rich redox chemistry and electronic properties of metal complexes coordinated by the Mabiq ligand.

  17. Meristem Plant Cells as a Sustainable Source of Redox Actives for Skin Rejuvenation

    Korkina, Liudmila G.; Mayer, Wolfgang; de Luca, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Recently, aggressive advertisement claimed a “magic role” for plant stem cells in human skin rejuvenation. This review aims to shed light on the scientific background suggesting feasibility of using plant cells as a basis of anti-age cosmetics. When meristem cell cultures obtained from medicinal plants are exposed to appropriate elicitors/stressors (ultraviolet, ultrasound ultraviolet (UV), ultrasonic waves, microbial/insect metabolites, heavy metals, organic toxins, nutrient deprivation, etc.), a protective/adaptive response initiates the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Highly bioavailable and biocompatible to human cells, low-molecular weight plant secondary metabolites share structural/functional similarities with human non-protein regulatory hormones, neurotransmitters, pigments, polyamines, amino-/fatty acids. Their redox-regulated biosynthesis triggers in turn plant cell antioxidant and detoxification molecular mechanisms resembling human cell pathways. Easily isolated in relatively large quantities from contaminant-free cell cultures, plant metabolites target skin ageing mechanisms, above all redox imbalance. Perfect modulators of cutaneous oxidative state via direct/indirect antioxidant action, free radical scavenging, UV protection, and transition-metal chelation, they are ideal candidates to restore photochemical/redox/immune/metabolic barriers, gradually deteriorating in the ageing skin. The industrial production of plant meristem cell metabolites is toxicologically and ecologically sustainable for fully “biological” anti-age cosmetics. PMID:28498360

  18. All-oxide Raman-active traps for light and matter: probing redox homeostasis model reactions in aqueous environment.

    Alessandri, Ivano; Depero, L E

    2014-04-09

    Core-shell colloidal crystals can act as very efficient traps for light and analytes. Here it is shown that Raman-active probes can be achieved using SiO2-TiO2 core-shell beads. These systems are successfully tested in monitoring of glutathione redox cycle at physiological concentration in aqueous environment, without need of any interfering enhancers. These materials represent a promising alternative to conventional, metal-based SERS probes for investigating chemical and biochemical reactions under real working conditions. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The N-terminal domain of human DNA helicase Rtel1 contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster.

    Landry, Aaron P; Ding, Huangen

    2014-01-01

    Human telomere length regulator Rtel1 is a superfamily II DNA helicase and is essential for maintaining proper length of telomeres in chromosomes. Here we report that the N-terminal domain of human Rtel1 (RtelN) expressed in Escherichia coli cells produces a protein that contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster with the redox midpoint potential of -248 ± 10 mV (pH 8.0). The iron-sulfur cluster in RtelN is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, indicating that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species may modulate the DNA helicase activity of Rtel1 via modification of its iron-sulfur cluster. Purified RtelN retains a weak binding affinity for the single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) DNA in vitro. However, modification of the iron-sulfur cluster by hydrogen peroxide or nitric oxide does not significantly affect the DNA binding activity of RtelN, suggesting that the iron-sulfur cluster is not directly involved in the DNA interaction in the N-terminal domain of Rtel1.

  20. The N-Terminal Domain of Human DNA Helicase Rtel1 Contains a Redox Active Iron-Sulfur Cluster

    Aaron P. Landry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human telomere length regulator Rtel1 is a superfamily II DNA helicase and is essential for maintaining proper length of telomeres in chromosomes. Here we report that the N-terminal domain of human Rtel1 (RtelN expressed in Escherichia coli cells produces a protein that contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster with the redox midpoint potential of −248 ± 10 mV (pH 8.0. The iron-sulfur cluster in RtelN is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, indicating that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species may modulate the DNA helicase activity of Rtel1 via modification of its iron-sulfur cluster. Purified RtelN retains a weak binding affinity for the single-stranded (ss and double-stranded (ds DNA in vitro. However, modification of the iron-sulfur cluster by hydrogen peroxide or nitric oxide does not significantly affect the DNA binding activity of RtelN, suggesting that the iron-sulfur cluster is not directly involved in the DNA interaction in the N-terminal domain of Rtel1.

  1. FINE MAGNETIC FEATURES AND CHIRALITY IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    Zhang Hongqi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present fine magnetic features near the magnetic inversion line in the solar active region NOAA 10930. The high-resolution vector magnetograms obtained by Hinode allow detailed analyses around magnetic fibrils in the active region. The analyses are based on the fact that the electric current density can be divided into two components: the shear component caused by the magnetic inhomogeneity and the twist component caused by the magnetic field twist. The relationships between magnetic field, electric current density, and its two components are examined. It is found that the individual magnetic fibrils are dominated by the current density component caused by the magnetic inhomogeneity, while the large-scale magnetic region is generally dominated by the electric current component associated with the magnetic twist. The microstructure of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere is far from the force-free field. The current mainly flows around the magnetic flux fibrils in the active regions.

  2. Redox electrode materials for supercapatteries

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z.

    2016-01-01

    Redox electrode materials, including transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers, are capable of faradaic charge transfer reactions, and play important roles in most electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitor, battery and supercapattery. Batteries are often based on redox materials with low power capability and safety concerns in some cases. Supercapacitors, particularly those based on redox inactive materials, e.g. activated carbon, can offer high power...

  3. A Redox-Active Bistable Molecular Switch Mounted inside a Metal-Organic Framework.

    Chen, Qishui; Sun, Junling; Li, Peng; Hod, Idan; Moghadam, Peyman Z; Kean, Zachary S; Snurr, Randall Q; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-11-02

    We describe the incorporation of a bistable mechanically interlocked molecule (MIM) into a robust Zr-based metal-organic framework (MOF), NU-1000, by employing a post-synthetic functionalization protocol. On average, close to two bistable [2]catenanes can be incorporated per repeating unit of the hexagonal channels of NU-1000. The reversible redox-switching of the bistable [2]catenanes is retained inside the MOF, as evidenced by solid-state UV-vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. This research demonstrates that bistable MIMs are capable of exhibiting robust dynamics inside the nanopores of a MOF.

  4. Redox status affects the catalytic activity of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase

    Katz, Assaf; Banerjee, Rajat; de Armas, Merly

    2010-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases (GluRS) provide Glu-tRNA for different processes including protein synthesis, glutamine transamidation and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. Many organisms contain multiple GluRSs, but whether these duplications solely broaden tRNA specificity or also play additional roles in t...... inactivation by hemin plus hydrogen peroxide. The sensitivity to oxidation of A. ferrooxidans GluRS1 might provide a means to regulate tetrapyrrole and protein biosynthesis in response to extreme changes in both the redox and heme status of the cell via a single enzyme....

  5. Highly sensitive electrochemical immunoassay for human IgG using double-encoded magnetic redox-active nanoparticles

    Tang, D.; Tang, J.; Su, B.; Chen, H.; Chen, G.; Huang, J.

    2010-01-01

    A new sandwich-type electrochemical immunoassay was developed for the detection of human IgG using doubly-encoded and magnetic redox-active nanoparticles as recognition elements on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified with anti-IgG on nanogold particles. The recognition elements were synthesized by coating magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with Prussian blue nanoparticles and then covered with peroxidase-labeled anti-IgG antibodies (POx-anti-IgG) on Prussian blue nanoparticles. The immunoelectrode displays very good electrochemical properties towards detection of IgG via using double-encoded magnetic redox-active nanoparticles as trace and hydrogen peroxide as enzyme substrate. Its limit of detection (10 pmol.L -1 ) is 10-fold better than that of using plain POx-anti-IgG secondary antibodies. The method was applied to the detection of IgG in serum samples, and an excellent correspondence with the reference values was found. (author)

  6. One-step synthesis of redox-active polymer/AU nanocomposites for electrochemical immunoassay of multiplexed tumor markers.

    Liu, Zhimin; Rong, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhanfang; Han, Hongliang

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a simple and sensitive multiplexed immunoassay protocol for simultaneous electrochemical determination of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was designed using redox-active nanocomposites. As the redox-active species, the poly(o-phenylenediamine) (POPD)/Au nanocomposite and poly(vinyl ferrocene-2-aminothiophenol) (poly(VFc-ATP))/Au nanocomposite were obtained by one-step method which HAuCl4 was used as the oxidant. With Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), the nanocomposites were successful to immobilize labeled anti-CEA and anti-AFP as the immunosensing probes. The proposed electrochemical immunoassay enabled the simultaneous monitoring of AFP and CEA in a wide range of 0.01-100ngmL(-1). The detection limits was 0.006ngmL(-1) for CEA and 0.003ngmL(-1) for AFP (S/N=3). The assay results of serum samples with the proposed method were well consistent with the reference values from standard ELISA method. And the negligible cross-reactivity between the two analytes makes it possesses potential promise in clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The different behaviors of three oxidative mediators in probing the redox activities of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Zhao Jinsheng; Wang Min; Yang Zhenyu; Wang Zhong; Wang Huaisheng; Yang Zhengyu

    2007-01-01

    The different behaviors of three lipophilic mediators including 2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenedione(menadione), 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in probing the redox activity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by several comparative factor-influencing experiments. Hydrophilic ferricyanide was employed as an extracellular electron acceptor, and constituted dual mediator system with each of three lipophilic mediators. Limiting-current microelectrode voltammetry was used to measure the quantity of ferrocyanide accumulations, giving a direct measure of the redox activity. It was found that under anaerobic condition, menadione interacts with anaerobic respiration pathway, whereas DCPIP and TMPD interact with fermentation pathway in the yeast. Based on the understanding of the interaction between the yeast and each of three mediators, three mediators were respectively employed in evaluating the toxicity of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae and, the results for the first showed that the mediators are complementary to each other when used as electron carriers in biotoxicity assay

  8. The different behaviors of three oxidative mediators in probing the redox activities of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Zhao Jinsheng [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Wang Min [School of Medicine, Ehime University, Toon 791-0295 (Japan); Yang Zhenyu [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Wang Zhong [School of Medicine, Ehime University, Toon 791-0295 (Japan); Wang Huaisheng [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Yang Zhengyu [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2007-07-30

    The different behaviors of three lipophilic mediators including 2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenedione(menadione), 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in probing the redox activity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by several comparative factor-influencing experiments. Hydrophilic ferricyanide was employed as an extracellular electron acceptor, and constituted dual mediator system with each of three lipophilic mediators. Limiting-current microelectrode voltammetry was used to measure the quantity of ferrocyanide accumulations, giving a direct measure of the redox activity. It was found that under anaerobic condition, menadione interacts with anaerobic respiration pathway, whereas DCPIP and TMPD interact with fermentation pathway in the yeast. Based on the understanding of the interaction between the yeast and each of three mediators, three mediators were respectively employed in evaluating the toxicity of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae and, the results for the first showed that the mediators are complementary to each other when used as electron carriers in biotoxicity assay.

  9. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms.

    Bellin, Daniel L; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Levine, Peter M; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E P; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites that are produced by microbial biofilms and can affect their development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. 'Images' over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm(2) area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression.

  10. A non-aqueous all-copper redox flow battery with highly soluble active species

    Li, Yun; Sniekers, Jeroen; Malaquias, João; Li, Xianfeng; Schaltin, Stijn; Stappers, Linda; Binnemans, Koen; Fransaer, Jan; Vankelecom, Ivo F.J.

    2017-01-01

    A metal-based redox pair with acetonitrile as ligand [Cu(MeCN)_4][Tf_2N] is described for use in non-aqueous redox flow battery (RFB). The electrode kinetics of the anode and cathode are studied using cyclic voltammetry. The Cu"2"+/Cu"+ and Cu"+/Cu couples in this system yield a cell potential of 1.24 V. The diffusion coefficient for [Cu(MeCN)_4][Tf_2N] in acetonitrile is estimated to be 6.8 × 10"−"6 cm"2 s"−"1 at room temperature. The copper-acetonitrile complex has a very high solubility of 1.68 M in acetonitrile, the most widely used organic solvent for non-aqueous electrochemical applications. Hence, a maximum theoretical energy density around 28 Wh L"−"1 can be reached with the reported system. The RFB with this electrolyte shows a promising performance, with coulombic efficiencies of 87% and energy efficiencies of 44% (5 mA cm"−"2).

  11. Improving Settling Dynamics of Activated Sludge by Adding Fine Talc Powder

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Larsen, Torben; Clauss, F.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of adding varying mixtures of talc and chlorite powder to activated sludge in order to improve the settling characteristic has been studied. The powder is found to improve the settling velocity of the sludge, strictly by increasing the average density of the sludge floc aggregate. The ....... The settling velocity was measured with a recirculated settling column under different concentrations and turbulence levels. Numerical simulation of a secondary settling tank indicates that adding fine powder will improve the overall performance considerably.......The effect of adding varying mixtures of talc and chlorite powder to activated sludge in order to improve the settling characteristic has been studied. The powder is found to improve the settling velocity of the sludge, strictly by increasing the average density of the sludge floc aggregate...

  12. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    Li, Jason Z.; Ke, Yuebin; Misra, Hara P.; Trush, Michael A.; Li, Y. Robert; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-01-01

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  13. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    Li, Jason Z. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Ke, Yuebin [Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Misra, Hara P. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Trush, Michael A. [Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Li, Y. Robert [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University SBES, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States); Zhu, Hong, E-mail: zhu@campbell.edu [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Jia, Zhenquan, E-mail: z_jia@uncg.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  14. Redox regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle: something old, something new

    Laure eMichelet

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reversible redox post-translational modifications such as oxido-reduction of disulfide bonds, S-nitrosylation and S-glutathionylation, play a prominent role in the regulation of cell metabolism and signaling in all organisms. These modifications are mainly controlled by members of the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin families. Early studies in photosynthetic organisms have identified the Calvin-Benson cycle, the photosynthetic pathway responsible for carbon assimilation, as a redox regulated process. Indeed, 4 out of 11 enzymes of the cycle were shown to have a low activity in the dark and to be activated in the light through thioredoxin-dependent reduction of regulatory disulfide bonds. The underlying molecular mechanisms were extensively studied at the biochemical and structural level. Unexpectedly, recent biochemical and proteomic studies have suggested that all enzymes of the cycle and several associated regulatory proteins may undergo redox regulation through multiple redox post-translational modifications including glutathionylation and nitrosylation. The aim of this review is to detail the well-established mechanisms of redox regulation of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes as well as the most recent reports indicating that this pathway is tightly controlled by multiple interconnected redox post-translational modifications. This redox control is likely allowing fine tuning of the Calvin-Benson cycle required for adaptation to varying environmental conditions, especially during responses to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  15. Functionalized carbon nanotube based hybrid electrochemical capacitors using neutral bromide redox-active electrolyte for enhancing energy density

    Tang, Xiaohui; Lui, Yu Hui; Chen, Bolin; Hu, Shan

    2017-06-01

    A hybrid electrochemical capacitor (EC) with enhanced energy density is realized by integrating functionalized carbon nanotube (FCNT) electrodes with redox-active electrolyte that has a neutral pH value (1 M Na2SO4 and 0.5 M KBr mixed aqueous solution). The negative electrode shows an electric double layer capacitor-type behavior. On the positive electrode, highly reversible Br-/Br3- redox reactions take place, presenting a battery-type behavior, which contributes to increase the capacitance of the hybrid cell. The voltage window of the whole cell is extended up to 1.5 V because of the high over-potentials of oxygen and hydrogen evolution reactions in the neutral electrolyte. Compared with raw CNT, the FCNT has better wettability in the aqueous electrolyte and contributes to increase the electric double layer capacitance of the cell. As a result, the maximum energy density of 28.3 Wh kg-1 is obtained from the hybrid EC at 0.5 A g-1 without sacrificing its power density, which is around 4 times larger than that of the electrical double layer capacitor constructed by FCNT electrodes and 1 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. Moreover, the discharge capacity retained 86.3% of its initial performance after 10000 cycles of galvanostatic charge and discharge test (10 A/g), suggesting its long life cycle even at high current loading.

  16. The electrochemical catalytic activity of single-walled carbon nanotubes towards VO2+/VO2+ and V3+/V2+ redox pairs for an all vanadium redox flow battery

    Li Wenyue; Liu Jianguo; Yan Chuanwei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► SWCNT shows excellent electrochemical catalytic activity towards VO 2 + /VO 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ redox couples. ► The anodic reactions are more sensitive to the surface oxygen atom content change compared with the cathodic reactions. ► The enhanced battery performance clearly demonstrated that the SWCNT is suitable to be used as an electrode catalyst for VRFB. - Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was used as an electrode catalyst for an all vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). The electrochemical property of SWCNT towards VO 2 + /VO 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ was carefully characterized by cyclic voltammetric (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The peak current values for these redox pairs were significantly higher on the modified glassy carbon electrode compared with those obtained on the bare electrode, suggesting the excellent electrochemical activity of the SWCNT. Moreover, it was proved that the anodic process was more dependent on the surface oxygen of the SWCNT than the cathodic process through changing its surface oxygen content. Detailed EIS analysis of different modified electrodes revealed that the charge and mass transfer processes were accelerated at the modified electrode–electrolyte interface, which could be ascribed to the large specific surface area, the surface defects and the oxygen functional groups of the SWCNT. The enhanced battery performance effectively demonstrated that the SWCNT was suitable to serve as an electrode catalyst for the VRFB.

  17. Electrochemical behaviour of gold and stainless steel under proton irradiation and active RedOx couples

    Leoni, E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)], E-mail: elisa.leoni@polytechnique.edu; Corbel, C. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)], E-mail: catherine.corbel@polytechnique.fr; Cobut, V. [Laboratoire Atomes et Molecules en Astrophysique, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 Mail Gay-Lussac, Neuville/Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Simon, D. [CNRS-CERI 3a rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Cedex 2 Orleans (France); Feron, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)], E-mail: Damien.FERON@cea.fr; Roy, M.; Raquet, O. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-12-01

    Model experiments are reported where proton beams delivered by the cyclotron located at CERI (CNRS-Orleans) are used for irradiating AISI 316L/water and Au/water high purity interfaces with 6 MeV protons. The free exchange potentials at the interfaces are recorded as a function of time at room temperature in situ before, under, and after proton irradiation. The evolutions are compared to those calculated for the Nernst potentials associated with the radiolytic RedOx couples. It is shown how the comparison gives evidence that five radiolytic species - O{sub 2}{center_dot}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, HO{sub 2}{sup -}, HO{sub 2}{center_dot} and O{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -} exchange electrons at the Au interfaces in a range of dose rates that vary over three orders of magnitudes, i.e. 0.0048 < dr(10{sup 7} Gy h{sup -1}) < 4.8. The balance between the electron exchanges at Au interfaces is adjusted by the RedOx reactions associated with the above species. The free exchange potential reaches the same steady value for Au and AISI 316L interfaces irradiated at high doses, {>=}2.5 x 10{sup 7} Gy, (0.020 {+-} 0.025) V versus NHE. Such low values are the first ones to be reported. The HO{sub 2}{center_dot} and O{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -} radical disproportionations play a key role and control the potential at the interfaces under 6 MeV proton flux. This role is generally mostly overlooked for gamma irradiation.

  18. Physicochemical characteristics and occupational exposure to coarse, fine and ultrafine particles during building refurbishment activities

    Azarmi, Farhad; Kumar, Prashant, E-mail: p.kumar@surrey.ac.uk, E-mail: prashant.kumar@cantab.net; Mulheron, Mike [University of Surrey, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences (United Kingdom); Colaux, Julien L.; Jeynes, Chris [University of Surrey, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Ion Beam Centre (United Kingdom); Adhami, Siavash; Watts, John F. [University of Surrey, The Surface Analysis Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Understanding of the emissions of coarse (PM{sub 10} ≤10 μm), fine (PM{sub 2.5} ≤2.5 μm) and ultrafine particles (UFP <100 nm) from refurbishment activities and their dispersion into the nearby environment is of primary importance for developing efficient risk assessment and management strategies in the construction and demolition industry. This study investigates the release, occupational exposure and physicochemical properties of particulate matter, including UFPs, from over 20 different refurbishment activities occurring at an operational building site. Particles were measured in the 5–10,000-nm-size range using a fast response differential mobility spectrometer and a GRIMM particle spectrometer for 55 h over 8 days. The UFPs were found to account for >90 % of the total particle number concentrations and <10 % of the total mass concentrations released during the recorded activities. The highest UFP concentrations were 4860, 740, 650 and 500 times above the background value during wall-chasing, drilling, cementing and general demolition activities, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ion beam analysis were used to identify physicochemical characteristics of particles and attribute them to probable sources considering the size and the nature of the particles. The results confirm that refurbishment activities produce significant levels (both number and mass) of airborne particles, indicating a need to develop appropriate regulations for the control of occupational exposure of operatives undertaking building refurbishment.

  19. Cooperative redox-active additives of anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonate and K4Fe(CN)6 for enhanced performance of active carbon-based capacitors

    Tian, Ying; Liu, Ming; Che, Ruxing; Xue, Rong; Huang, Liping

    2016-08-01

    Two redox additives of anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonate (AQDS) and K4Fe(CN)6 are introduced into the neutral medium of KNO3 for enhanced performance of active carbon-based (AC) capacitor. The Faradaic redox reactions of AQ/H2AQ and Fe(CN)63-/Fe(CN)64- are diffusion-controlled and occurred on the negative electrode and the positive electrode respectively and simultaneously, resulting in the enhancement of specific capacitance, power density and energy density of 240 F g-1, 527 W kg-1 and 26.3 Wh kg-1, respectively at a current density of 1.0 A g-1 for a symmetric AC capacitor in the electrolyte of 1 M KNO3-0.017 M K4Fe(CN)6-0.017 M AQDS. These values are much higher than those in the controls of either 1 M KNO3-0.017 M K4Fe(CN)6 or 1 M KNO3-0.017 M AQDS with only one pair of redox additives. These results demonstrate the cooperative K4Fe(CN)6 and AQDS for enhanced performance of AC capacitor, and thus provide an alternative approach for efficient capacitors.

  20. Redox-active on-surface polymerization of single-site divalent cations from pure metals by a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline

    Skomski, Daniel; Tempas, Christopher D.; Bukowski, Gregory S.; Smith, Kevin A.; Tait, Steven L., E-mail: tait@indiana.edu [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, 800 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2015-03-14

    Metallic iron, chromium, or platinum mixing with a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline ligand on a single crystal gold surface demonstrates redox activity to a well-defined oxidation state and assembly into thermally stable, one dimensional, polymeric chains. The diverging ligand geometry incorporates redox-active sub-units and bi-dentate binding sites. The gold surface provides a stable adsorption environment and directs growth of the polymeric chains, but is inert with regard to the redox chemistry. These systems are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The relative propensity of the metals to interact with the ketone group is examined, and it is found that Fe and Cr more readily complex the ligand than Pt. The formation and stabilization of well-defined transition metal single-sites at surfaces may open new routes to achieve higher selectivity in heterogeneous catalysts.

  1. Geochemistry of Natural Redox Fronts

    Hofmann, B.A.

    1999-05-01

    U, V, Cu, Ni, Au and Ag. The mineralogy of redox fronts is extremely complex, with redox fronts formed at elevated temperature showing more complex assemblages than lower temperature redox fronts. The redox behaviour of individual elements is discussed based on results from natural redox fronts and, to a more limited extent, on experimental evidence. Other aspects of redox fronts such as organic geochemistry, mineral phases, microbial activity, radiolysis and geochemical self-organisation are briefly reviewed. A short overview of active and fossil redox fronts in Northern Switzerland and Southwest Germany is given. The review also includes information on commercially available analytical methods suitable for redox front geochemistry. The general conclusion of this report is that there is widespread evidence that the elements U, Se, Pd and many others are systematically and efficiently immobilised at variable types of redox fronts. Co-precipitation is widely observed for the rare earth elements and perhaps for Th. While these general observations conform to the known geochemical properties of these elements, unexplained differences exist between the behaviour of some elements in different types of redox fronts, e.g. the strongly contrasting behaviour of the otherwise geochemically similar elements Ni and Co in the fossil meteorite Brunflo. Th is another element for which evidence of unusual geochemical behaviour exists at certain localities. A strong influence of local parameters that may be hard to identify appears to be one of the main obstacles in the interpretation of data from natural systems. The systematic overview of natural and human-induced redox fronts in this report allows types of redox fronts suitable for natural analogue studies to be identified. Particularly promising in this respect are weathering phenomena in homogeneous dumps of ore processing products (type IVb) and redox fronts formed by injection of seawater into deep oil reservoirs. (author)

  2. Development of a local anesthetic lidocaine-loaded redox-active injectable gel for postoperative pain management.

    Nagasaki, Yukio; Mizukoshi, Yutaro; Gao, Zhenyu; Feliciano, Chitho P; Chang, Kyungho; Sekiyama, Hiroshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-15

    Although local anesthesia is commonly applied for pain relief, there are several issues such as its short duration of action and low effectiveness at the areas of inflammation due to the acidic pH. The presence of excessive amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to induce inflammation and aggravate pain. To resolve these issues, we developed a redox-active injectable gel (RIG) with ROS-scavenging activity. RIG was prepared by mixing polyamine-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polyamine with nitroxide radical moieties as side chains on the polyamine segments (PMNT-b-PEG-b-PMNT) with a polyanion, which formed a flower-type micelle via electrostatic complexation. Lidocaine could be stably incorporated in its core. When the temperature of the solution was increased to 37°C, the PIC-type flower micelle transformed to gel. The continuous release of lidocaine from the gel was observed for more than three days, without remarkable initial burst, which is probably owing to the stable entrapment of lidocaine in the PIC core of the gel. We evaluated the analgesic effect of RIG in carrageenan-induced arthritis mouse model. Results showed that lidocaine-loaded RIG has stronger and longer analgesic effect when administered in inflamed areas. In contrast, while the use of non-complexed lidocaine did not show analgesic effect one day after its administration. Note that no effect was observed when PIC-type flower micelle without ROS-scavenging ability was used. These findings suggest that local anesthetic-loaded RIG can effectively reduce the number of injection times and limit the side effects associated with the use of anti-inflammatory drugs for postoperative pain management. 1. We have been working on nanomaterials, which effectively eliminate ROS, avoiding dysfunction of mitochondria in healthy cells. 2. We designed redox injectable gel using polyion complexed flower type micelle, which can eliminates ROS locally. 3. We could prepare local anesthesia-loaded redox injectable

  3. Oligo-Carrageenan Kappa-Induced Reducing Redox Status and Increase in TRR/TRX Activities Promote Activation and Reprogramming of Terpenoid Metabolism in Eucalyptus Trees

    Alberto González

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze whether the reducing redox status and activation of thioredoxin reductase (TRR/thioredoxin(TRX system induced by oligo-carrageenan (OC kappa in Eucalyptus globulus activate secondary metabolism increasing terpenoid synthesis, trees were sprayed on the leaves with water, with OC kappa, or with inhibitors of NAD(PH, ascorbate (ASC and (GSH synthesis and TRR activity, CHS-828, lycorine, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO and auranofine, respectively, and with OC kappa and cultivated for four months. The main terpenoids in control Eucalyptus trees were eucalyptol (76%, α-pinene (7.4%, aromadendrene (3.6%, silvestrene (2.8%, sabinene (2% and α-terpineol (0.9%. Treated trees showed a 22% increase in total essential oils as well as a decrease in eucalyptol (65% and sabinene (0.8% and an increase in aromadendrene (5%, silvestrene (7.8% and other ten terpenoids. In addition, treated Eucalyptus showed seven de novo synthesized terpenoids corresponding to carene, α-terpinene, α-fenchene, γ-maaliene, spathulenol and α-camphenolic aldehyde. Most increased and de novo synthesized terpenoids have potential insecticidal and antimicrobial activities. Trees treated with CHS-828, lycorine, BSO and auranofine and with OC kappa showed an inhibition of increased and de novo synthesized terpenoids. Thus, OC kappa-induced reducing redox status and activation of TRR/TRX system enhance secondary metabolism increasing the synthesis of terpenoids and reprogramming of terpenoid metabolism in Eucalyptus trees.

  4. Oligo-carrageenan kappa-induced reducing redox status and increase in TRR/TRX activities promote activation and reprogramming of terpenoid metabolism in Eucalyptus trees.

    González, Alberto; Gutiérrez-Cutiño, Marlen; Moenne, Alejandra

    2014-06-05

    In order to analyze whether the reducing redox status and activation of thioredoxin reductase (TRR)/thioredoxin(TRX) system induced by oligo-carrageenan (OC) kappa in Eucalyptus globulus activate secondary metabolism increasing terpenoid synthesis, trees were sprayed on the leaves with water, with OC kappa, or with inhibitors of NAD(P)H, ascorbate (ASC) and (GSH) synthesis and TRR activity, CHS-828, lycorine, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and auranofine, respectively, and with OC kappa and cultivated for four months. The main terpenoids in control Eucalyptus trees were eucalyptol (76%), α-pinene (7.4%), aromadendrene (3.6%), silvestrene (2.8%), sabinene (2%) and α-terpineol (0.9%). Treated trees showed a 22% increase in total essential oils as well as a decrease in eucalyptol (65%) and sabinene (0.8%) and an increase in aromadendrene (5%), silvestrene (7.8%) and other ten terpenoids. In addition, treated Eucalyptus showed seven de novo synthesized terpenoids corresponding to carene, α-terpinene, α-fenchene, γ-maaliene, spathulenol and α-camphenolic aldehyde. Most increased and de novo synthesized terpenoids have potential insecticidal and antimicrobial activities. Trees treated with CHS-828, lycorine, BSO and auranofine and with OC kappa showed an inhibition of increased and de novo synthesized terpenoids. Thus, OC kappa-induced reducing redox status and activation of TRR/TRX system enhance secondary metabolism increasing the synthesis of terpenoids and reprogramming of terpenoid metabolism in Eucalyptus trees.

  5. Time- and cell-resolved dynamics of redox-sensitive Nrf2, HIF and NF-κB activities in 3D spheroids enriched for cancer stem cells

    Anna P. Kipp

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells have an altered redox status, with changes in intracellular signaling pathways. The knowledge of how such processes are regulated in 3D spheroids, being well-established tumor models, is limited. To approach this question we stably transfected HCT116 cells with a pTRAF reporter that enabled time- and cell-resolved activity monitoring of three redox-regulated transcription factors Nrf2, HIF and NF-κB in spheroids enriched for cancer stem cells. At the first day of spheroid formation, these transcription factors were activated and thereafter became repressed. After about a week, both HIF and Nrf2 were reactivated within the spheroid cores. Further amplifying HIF activation in spheroids by treatment with DMOG resulted in a dominant quiescent stem-cell-like phenotype, with high resistance to stress-inducing treatments. Auranofin, triggering oxidative stress and Nrf2 activation, had opposite effects with increased differentiation and proliferation. These novel high-resolution insights into spatiotemporal activation patterns demonstrate a striking coordination of redox regulated transcription factors within spheroids not occurring in conventional cell culture models. Keywords: Redox regulation, Cancer stem cells, Spheroids, Nrf2, HIF, NF-κB

  6. Fine-scale differences in diel activity among nocturnal freshwater planarias (Platyhelminthes: Tricladida

    Cicolani Bruno

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most freshwater planarias are well known photonegative organisms, their diel rhythms have never been quantified. Differences in daily activity rhythms may be particularly important for temperate-climate, freshwater planarias, which tend to overlap considerably in spatial distribution and trophic requirements. Methods Activity of stress-free, individually tested young adults of three common planarian species was recorded at 3-h intervals in a 10-d experiment under natural sunlight and photoperiod during autumnal equinox (D:L ~12:12. Individual activity status was averaged over the 10-d experiment, each tested individual thus serving as a true replicate. Twelve individuals per species were tested. Food was provided every 36 h, resulting in alternating day- and nighttime feeding events. Activity during the first post-feeding h was recorded and analyzed separately. Statistical procedures included ANOVAs, correlations, and second-order analyses of angles. Results Dugesia (= Girardia tigrina Girard 1850 exhibited clear nocturnal behavior, Dugesia (= Schmidtea polychroa Schmidt 1861 was predominantly but not exclusively nocturnal, and Polycelis tenuis Ijima 1884 was relatively more active from midnight through noon. Species-specific activity peaks were statistically similar, with peaks at dawn for P. tenuis and just before midnight for the two dugesiids; however, D. tigrina was comparatively more active in the early night hours, while D. polychroa was more active than D. tigrina during daytime. D. tigrina also responded less readily to daytime food addition. P. tenuis remained poorly active and unresponsive throughout the experiment. Individual variability in diel behavior was highest for D. polychroa and lowest for D. tigrina. P. tenuis's general low degree of activity and late activity peak in the experiment may be related to a strong reliance on external stimuli. Conclusions The tested species are mainly nocturnal

  7. Redox-active quinones induces genome-wide DNA methylation changes by an iron-mediated and Tet-dependent mechanism

    Zhao, Bailin; Yang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation has been proven to be a critical epigenetic mark important for various cellular processes. Here, we report that redox-active quinones, a ubiquitous class of chemicals found in natural products, cancer therapeutics and environment, stimulate the conversion of 5 mC to 5 hmC in vivo,...

  8. Gamma oscillations and spontaneous network activity in the hippocampus are highly sensitive to decreases in pO2 and concomitant changes in mitochondrial redox state.

    Huchzermeyer, Christine; Albus, Klaus; Gabriel, Hans-Jürgen; Otáhal, Jakub; Taubenberger, Nando; Heinemann, Uwe; Kovács, Richard; Kann, Oliver

    2008-01-30

    Gamma oscillations have been implicated in higher cognitive processes and might critically depend on proper mitochondrial function. Using electrophysiology, oxygen sensor microelectrode, and imaging techniques, we investigated the interactions of neuronal activity, interstitial pO2, and mitochondrial redox state [NAD(P)H and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide) fluorescence] in the CA3 subfield of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. We find that gamma oscillations and spontaneous network activity decrease significantly at pO2 levels that do not affect neuronal population responses as elicited by moderate electrical stimuli. Moreover, pO2 and mitochondrial redox states are tightly coupled, and electrical stimuli reveal transient alterations of redox responses when pO2 decreases within the normoxic range. Finally, evoked redox responses are distinct in somatic and synaptic neuronal compartments and show different sensitivity to changes in pO2. We conclude that the threshold of interstitial pO2 for robust CA3 network activities and required mitochondrial function is clearly above the "critical" value, which causes spreading depression as a result of generalized energy failure. Our study highlights the importance of a functional understanding of mitochondria and their implications on activities of individual neurons and neuronal networks.

  9. Novel electrochemical redox-active species: one-step synthesis of polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd and its application for multiplexed immunoassay

    Wang, Liyuan; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2015-11-01

    Electrochemical redox-active species play crucial role in electrochemically multiplexed immunoassays. A one-pot method for synthesizing four kinds of new electrochemical redox-active species was reported using HAuCl4 and Na2PdCl4 as dual oxidating agents and aniline derivatives as monomers. The synthesized polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd composites, namely poly(N-methyl-o-benzenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-o-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd and poly(3,3’,5,5’-tetramethylbenzidine)-Au/Pd, exhibited electrochemical redox activity at -0.65 V, -0.3 V, 0.12 V, and 0.5 V, respectively. Meanwhile, these composites showed high H2O2 electrocatalytic activity because of the presence of Au/Pd. The as-prepared composites were used as electrochemical immunoprobes in simultaneous detection of four tumor biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA199), carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA724), and alpha fetoprotein (AFP)). This immunoassay shed light on potential applications in simultaneous gastric cancer (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, CA724) and liver cancer diagnosis (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, AFP). The present strategy to the synthesize redox species could be easily extended to other polymers such as polypyrrole derivatives and polythiophene derivatives. This would be of great significance in the electrochemical detection of more analytes.

  10. Glycan shield and fusion activation of a deltacoronavirus spike glycoprotein fine-tuned for enteric infections.

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Tortorici, M Alejandra; Snijder, Joost; Yoshioka, Craig; Walls, Alexandra C; Li, Wentao; McGuire, Andrew T; Rey, Félix A; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Veesler, David

    2017-11-01

    Coronaviruses recently emerged as major human pathogens causing outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle-East respiratory syndrome. They utilize the spike (S) glycoprotein anchored in the viral envelope to mediate host attachment and fusion of the viral and cellular membranes to initiate infection. The S protein is a major determinant of the zoonotic potential of coronaviruses and is also the main target of the host humoral immune response. We report here the 3.5 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of the S glycoprotein trimer from the pathogenic porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV), which belongs to the recently identified delta genus. Structural and glycoproteomics data indicate that the glycans of PDCoV S are topologically conserved when compared with the human respiratory coronavirus HCoV-NL63 S, resulting in similar surface areas being shielded from neutralizing antibodies and implying that both viruses are under comparable immune pressure in their respective hosts. The structure further reveals a shortened S 2 ' activation loop, containing a reduced number of basic amino acids, which participates to rendering the spike largely protease-resistant. This property distinguishes PDCoV S from recently characterized betacoronavirus S proteins and suggests that the S protein of enterotropic PDCoV has evolved to tolerate the protease-rich environment of the small intestine and to fine-tune its fusion activation to avoid premature triggering and reduction of infectivity. IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses use transmembrane spike (S) glycoprotein trimers to promote host attachment and fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. We determined a near-atomic resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of the S ectodomain trimer from the pathogenic porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV), which is responsible for diarrhea in piglets and has had devastating consequences for the swine industry worldwide. Structural and glycoproteomics data reveal that PDCoV S is

  11. Application of thermally activated municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash fines as binder substitute

    Tang, P.; Florea, M.V.A.; Spiesz, P.R.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    Untreated municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash fines (0–2 mm) have poor pozzolanic properties, and contain substances which can pose an environmental risk (e.g. heavy metals and salts). This study investigates combined treatments applied on bottom ash fines (BAF) to increase their

  12. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis Is Regulated by the Redox State of a Heme-Binding Translational Activator.

    Soto, Iliana C; Barrientos, Antoni

    2016-02-20

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the respiratory chain, catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to water and therefore is essential for cell function and viability. COX is a multimeric complex, whose biogenesis is extensively regulated. One type of control targets cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (Cox1), a key COX enzymatic core subunit translated on mitochondrial ribosomes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cox1 synthesis and COX assembly are coordinated through a negative feedback regulatory loop. This coordination is mediated by Mss51, a heme-sensing COX1 mRNA-specific processing factor and translational activator that is also a Cox1 chaperone. In this study, we investigated whether Mss51 hemylation and Mss51-mediated Cox1 synthesis are both modulated by the reduction-oxidation (redox) environment. We report that Cox1 synthesis is attenuated under oxidative stress conditions and have identified one of the underlying mechanisms. We show that in vitro and in vivo exposure to hydrogen peroxide induces the formation of a disulfide bond in Mss51 involving CPX motif heme-coordinating cysteines. Mss51 oxidation results in a heme ligand switch, thereby lowering heme-binding affinity and promoting its release. We demonstrate that in addition to affecting Mss51-dependent heme sensing, oxidative stress compromises Mss51 roles in COX1 mRNA processing and translation. H2O2-induced downregulation of mitochondrial translation has so far not been reported. We show that high H2O2 concentrations induce a global attenuation effect, but milder concentrations specifically affect COX1 mRNA processing and translation in an Mss51-dependent manner. The redox environment modulates Mss51 functions, which are essential for regulation of COX biogenesis and aerobic energy production.

  13. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of electrically conductive metal-organic frameworks doped with redox active species

    Alberding, Brian G.; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2015-09-01

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are three-dimensional coordination polymers that are well known for large pore surface area and their ability to adsorb molecules from both the gaseous and solution phases. In general, MOFs are electrically insulating, but promising opportunities for tuning the electronic structure exist because MOFs possess synthetic versatility; the metal and organic ligand subunits can be exchanged or dopant molecules can be introduced into the pore space. Two such MOFs with demonstrated electrical conductivity are Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2, a.k.a HKUST-1, and Cu[Ni(pyrazine-2,3-dithiolate)2]. Herein, these two MOFs have been infiltrated with the redox active species 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and iodine under solution phase conditions and shown to produce redox products within the MOF pore space. Vibrational bands assignable to TCNQ anion and triiodide anion have been observed in the Mid-IR and Terahertz ranges using FTIR Spectroscopy. The MOF samples have been further investigated by Time-Resolved Terehertz Spectroscopy (TRTS). Using this technique, the charge mobility, separation, and recombination dynamics have been followed on the picosecond time scale following photoexcitation with visible radiation. The preliminary results show that the MOF samples have small inherent photoconductivity with charge separation lifetimes on the order of a few picoseconds. In the case of HKUST-1, the MOF can also be supported by a TiO2 film and initial results show that charge injection into the TiO2 layer occurs with a comparable efficiency to the dye sensitizer N3, [cis-Bis(isothiocyanato)-bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylato ruthenium(II)], and therefore this MOF has potential as a new light absorbing and charge conducting material in photovoltaic devices.

  14. Redox-active tyrosine residue in the microcin J25 molecule

    Chalon, Miriam C. [Departamento de Bioquimica de la Nutricion, Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas-Universidad Nacional de Tucuman) and Instituto de Quimica Biologica ' Dr Bernabe Bloj' , Chacabuco 461, 4000 San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman (Argentina); Wilke, Natalia [CIQUIBIC, Dpto. de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Pabellon Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA, Cordoba (Argentina); Pedersen, Jens; Rufini, Stefano [Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata 00133, Rome (Italy); Morero, Roberto D.; Cortez, Leonardo; Chehin, Rosana N.; Farias, Ricardo N. [Departamento de Bioquimica de la Nutricion, Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas-Universidad Nacional de Tucuman) and Instituto de Quimica Biologica ' Dr Bernabe Bloj' , Chacabuco 461, 4000 San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman (Argentina); Vincent, Paula A., E-mail: pvincent@fbqf.unt.edu.ar [Departamento de Bioquimica de la Nutricion, Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas-Universidad Nacional de Tucuman) and Instituto de Quimica Biologica ' Dr Bernabe Bloj' , Chacabuco 461, 4000 San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman (Argentina)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of MccJ25 and MccJ25 (Y9F). {yields} Infrared spectroscopy studies showed that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation. {yields} Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was demonstrated. {yields} Tyr9 but not Tyr20 can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical. -- Abstract: Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a 21 amino acid lasso-peptide antibiotic produced by Escherichia coli and composed of an 8-residues ring and a terminal 'tail' passing through the ring. We have previously reported two cellular targets for this antibiotic, bacterial RNA polymerase and the membrane respiratory chain, and shown that Tyr9 is essential for the effect on the membrane respiratory chain which leads to superoxide overproduction. In the present paper we investigated the redox behavior of MccJ25 and the mutant MccJ25 (Y9F). Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of both Tyr9 and Tyr20 in MccJ25, but infrared spectroscopy studies demonstrated that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation in solution. Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was demonstrated by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; this radical was not detected when the reaction was carried out with the MccJ25 (Y9F) mutant. These results show that the essential Tyr9, but not Tyr20, can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical.

  15. Redox-active tyrosine residue in the microcin J25 molecule

    Chalon, Miriam C.; Wilke, Natalia; Pedersen, Jens; Rufini, Stefano; Morero, Roberto D.; Cortez, Leonardo; Chehin, Rosana N.; Farias, Ricardo N.; Vincent, Paula A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of MccJ25 and MccJ25 (Y9F). → Infrared spectroscopy studies showed that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation. → Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H 2 O 2 was demonstrated. → Tyr9 but not Tyr20 can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical. -- Abstract: Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a 21 amino acid lasso-peptide antibiotic produced by Escherichia coli and composed of an 8-residues ring and a terminal 'tail' passing through the ring. We have previously reported two cellular targets for this antibiotic, bacterial RNA polymerase and the membrane respiratory chain, and shown that Tyr9 is essential for the effect on the membrane respiratory chain which leads to superoxide overproduction. In the present paper we investigated the redox behavior of MccJ25 and the mutant MccJ25 (Y9F). Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of both Tyr9 and Tyr20 in MccJ25, but infrared spectroscopy studies demonstrated that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation in solution. Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H 2 O 2 was demonstrated by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; this radical was not detected when the reaction was carried out with the MccJ25 (Y9F) mutant. These results show that the essential Tyr9, but not Tyr20, can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical.

  16. Synthesis and reduction of uranium(V) imido complexes with redox-active substituents

    Mullane, Kimberly C.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J. [P. Roy and Diana T. Vagelos Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-04-27

    Organic azides that contain naphthyl functional groups were used to prepare uranium(V) imido complexes U{sup V}[=NC(2-naph)Ph{sub 2}][N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 3} (2), U{sup V}[=NC(2-naph){sub 3}][N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 3} (3), and U{sup V}[=N(2-naph)][N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 3} (4), and their properties were compared with U{sup V}[=NCPh{sub 3}][N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 3} (1). The electronic structures of these compounds were investigated by solution electrochemistry studies, which revealed accessible U{sup V/VI}, U{sup IV/V}, and naphthalene{sup 0}/naphthalene{sup -1} couples. The uranium(V) naphthylimido complexes were reduced by potassium graphite to yield their uranium(IV) congeners K[U{sup IV}[=NC(2-naph)Ph{sub 2}][N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 3}] (2-K), K[U{sup IV}[=NC(2-naph){sub 3}][N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 3}] (3-K), and K[U{sup IV}[=N(2-naph)][N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 3}] (4-K). The electronic structure of the dianionic compounds were investigated by DFT calculations, and this revealed that the second reduction was ligand-based, which opens the possibility of accomplishing multi-electron redox chemistry by using a tailored multiply-bonded ligand. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Phospho-Pon Binding-Mediated Fine-Tuning of Plk1 Activity.

    Zhu, Kang; Shan, Zelin; Zhang, Lu; Wen, Wenyu

    2016-07-06

    In Drosophila neuroblasts (NBs), the asymmetrical localization and segregation of the cell-fate determinant Numb are regulated by its adaptor Partner of Numb (Pon) and the cell-cycle kinase Polo. Polo phosphorylates the Pon localization domain, thus leading to its basal distribution together with Numb, albeit through an unclear mechanism. Here, we find that Cdk1 phosphorylates Pon at Thr63, thus creating a docking site for the Polo-box domain (PBD) of Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). The crystal structure of the Plk1 PBD/phospho-Pon complex reveals that two phospho-Pon bound PBDs associate to form a dimer of dimers. We provide evidence that phospho-Pon binding-induced PBD dimerization relieves the autoinhibition of Plk1. Moreover, we demonstrate that the priming Cdk1 phosphorylation of Pon is important for sequential Plk1 phosphorylation. Our results not only provide structural insight into how phosphoprotein binding activates Plk1 but also suggest that binding to different phosphoproteins might mediate the fine-tuning of Plk1 activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. On the Redox Activity of Urban Aerosol Particles: Implications for Size Distribution and Relationships with Organic Aerosol Components

    Constantini Samara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the distribution of the dithiothreitol-based (DTT redox activity of water-soluble airborne particulate matter (PM from two urban sites in the city of Thessaloniki, northern Greece in four size ranges (<0.49, 0.49–0.97, 0.97–3.0 and >3 μm. Seasonal and spatial variations are examined. The correlations of the mass-normalized DTT activity with the content of PM in water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC and non-water-soluble carbonaceous species, such as organic and elemental carbon, as well as with solvent-extractable trace organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitro-derivatives, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorines, polybrominated biphenyl ethers and polar organic markers (dicarboxylic acids and levoglucosan, are investigated. Our study provides new and additional insights into the ambient size distribution of the DTT activity of the water-soluble fraction of airborne PM at urban sites and its associations with organic PM components.

  19. Ionic liquid-doped polyaniline and its redox activities in the zwitterionic biological buffer MOPS

    Qu, Ke; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2016-01-01

    The electropolymerization of aniline in several common imidazolium-based ionic liquids has been accomplished successfully with the potentiodynamic method. Considering the fact that imidazolium-based ionic liquids are acidic, they have been selected as the electrolyte for the electropolymerization of aniline, eliminating the usage of extra inorganic or organic acids. The ionic liquids not only serve as the reaction media, exerting the unique favorable π-π interactions between the imidazolium rings and benzene rings of aniline monomer or the growing polymer, but also act as the dopants to render different properties to the resulting polyaniline. Among the tested imidazolium-based ionic liquids, [BMIM][BF_4], [BMIM][PF_6], [BMIM][NTf_2], [EMIM][ES] and [HMIM][FAP], polyaniline doped by the hydrophilic ionic liquid [BMIM][BF_4] displays the good electrochemical responses in the biologically important MOPS (3-(N-Morpholino)-propanesulfonic acid) solution with 2.34 × 10"−"3 M of sulfuric acid additive. NMR, UV–vis and electrochemical impedance experiments were performed to further characterize the polyaniline/[BMIM][BF_4] composite. In contrast, polyaniline that is doped by the hydrophobic ionic liquid [BMIM][PF_6] is electroactive in the MOPS solution in the absence of the acid additive, with a pH of 5, extending the working pH range of polyaniline, which is typically electroactive in the solutions with the pH values less than 3. It is suggested that the effective hydrogen bonding interactions between BF_4 anion and water facilitate its hydrolysis in the microenvironment of the polymer backbone to provide the acidic protons, which are beneficial to the adjustment of the microenvironments of the polyaniline system and thus renders its observed well-resolved reversible pair of redox peaks in the MOPS solution. PF_6 anion, on the other hand, with its larger size and less basicity, has the weaker interaction with water, thus releasing the protons in a relatively slow

  20. Flexible strategy for immobilizing redox-active compounds using in situ generation of diazonium salts. Investigations of the blocking and catalytic properties of the layers.

    Noël, Jean-Marc; Sjöberg, Béatrice; Marsac, Rémi; Zigah, Dodzi; Bergamini, Jean-François; Wang, Aifang; Rigaut, Stéphane; Hapiot, Philippe; Lagrost, Corinne

    2009-11-03

    A versatile two-step method is developed to covalently immobilize redox-active molecules onto carbon surfaces. First, a robust anchoring platform is grafted onto surfaces by electrochemical reduction of aryl diazonium salts in situ generated. Depending on the nature of the layer termini, -COOH or -NH(2), a further chemical coupling involving ferrocenemethylamine or ferrocene carboxylic acid derivatives leads to the covalent binding of ferrocene centers. The chemical strategy using acyl chloride activation is efficient and flexible, since it can be applied either to surface-reactive end groups or to reactive species in solution. Cyclic voltammetry analyses point to the covalent binding of ferrocene units restricted to the upper layers of the underlying aryl films, while AFM measurements show a lost of compactness of the layers after the chemical attachment of ferrocene centers. The preparation conditions of the anchoring layers were found to determine the interfacial properties of the resulted ferrocenyl-modified electrodes. The ferrocene units promoted effective redox mediation providing that the free redox probes are adequately chosen (i.e., vs size/formal potential) and the underlying layers exhibit strong blocking properties. For anchoring films with weaker blocking effect, the coexistence of two distinct phenomena, redox mediation and ET at pinholes could be evidenced.

  1. Influence of microbial activity on the migration behaviour of redox-sensitive radionuclides (technetium and selenium) in loose rock

    Stroetmann, I.

    1995-01-01

    In closed cycle column tests under sterile conditions there was no or hardly any sorption of the two radionuclides. In closed cycle column tests with unsterile soils, however, the two radionuclides were extremely immobilised (80 % of the output activity of Tc-95m and 40 % of the output activity of Se-75). By inoculation of the sterile columns with mixed soil cultures an increase in sorption of 40 % of the output activity was achieved which is attributed to the microbial activity. The adsorbed radionuclides in unsterile columns could be remobilized by adding a bactericide. In columns with saline water the sorption of radionuclides was slightly lower. Soils with a 5 % organic carbon content showed extremely increased sorption of the two radionuclides. In comparison with closed cycle columns shake tests were carried out. During turbulent intermixing of water and solid, no sorption of technetium was observed in unsterile tests either, while Se-75 added as selenite was strongly adsorbed to the solid. When adding acetate as a C-source, the microbially conditioned reduction of the redox potential to -100 mV and, subsequently, a strong increase of sorption could be observed. A reduction of the pH value in the soils to pH 4, and simultaneous adding of acetate significally reduced the microbial activity and the sorption of technetium, while selenite sorption remained strong as before. Sorption tests with bacteria-pure and mixed cultures showed no sorption of the pertechnetate anion in the oxidation stage (VII). However, when reducing the pertechnetate by means of SnCl2, up to 40 % of the feed activity of killed and living biomass was immobilized. Between 20-30 % of the adsorbed technetium quantity was outside at the membrane, and 40% inside the cells. After a three-day incubation period in a technetium-containing solution, a factor of 15,5 was achieved as the maximum intracellular concentration factor for the isolate 143 (Xanthomas sp.). (orig./MG) [de

  2. Enhanced visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity of α-Fe2O3 adsorbing redox enzymes

    Kai Kamada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report fabrication of hybrid photocatalyst composed of an n-type semiconductor (α-Fe2O3 and a redox enzyme (horseradish peroxidase; HRP, and its performance for oxidation of luminol in an aqueous solution. The hybrid photocatalyst is simply formed via physical adsorption of HRP to an α-Fe2O3 sintered body. Under visible light irradiation, the bare α-Fe2O3 with a narrow bandgap photocatalytically oxidizes luminol along with blue emission that can be used as an indicator of the photocatalytic performance. The blue emission is largely strengthened after the adsorption of HRP, demonstrating that the presence of enzyme improves apparent photocatalytic activity of α-Fe2O3. The favorable effect is derived from synergistic oxidation of luminol by the biocatalysts (HRP as well as by the photocatalyst (α-Fe2O3. In this paper, influence of excitation wavelength, adsorption amount of HRP, and reaction temperature on the overall photocatalytic activity are elucidated, and then a reaction mechanism of the proposed novel hybrid photocatalyst is discussed in detail.

  3. Evidence for anionic redox activity in a tridimensional-ordered Li-rich positive electrode β-Li2IrO3.

    Pearce, Paul E; Perez, Arnaud J; Rousse, Gwenaelle; Saubanère, Mathieu; Batuk, Dmitry; Foix, Dominique; McCalla, Eric; Abakumov, Artem M; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Doublet, Marie-Liesse; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-05-01

    Lithium-ion battery cathode materials have relied on cationic redox reactions until the recent discovery of anionic redox activity in Li-rich layered compounds which enables capacities as high as 300 mAh g -1 . In the quest for new high-capacity electrodes with anionic redox, a still unanswered question was remaining regarding the importance of the structural dimensionality. The present manuscript provides an answer. We herein report on a β-Li 2 IrO 3 phase which, in spite of having the Ir arranged in a tridimensional (3D) framework instead of the typical two-dimensional (2D) layers seen in other Li-rich oxides, can reversibly exchange 2.5 e - per Ir, the highest value ever reported for any insertion reaction involving d-metals. We show that such a large activity results from joint reversible cationic (M n+ ) and anionic (O 2 ) n- redox processes, the latter being visualized via complementary transmission electron microscopy and neutron diffraction experiments, and confirmed by density functional theory calculations. Moreover, β-Li 2 IrO 3 presents a good cycling behaviour while showing neither cationic migration nor shearing of atomic layers as seen in 2D-layered Li-rich materials. Remarkably, the anionic redox process occurs jointly with the oxidation of Ir 4+ at potentials as low as 3.4 V versus Li + /Li 0 , as equivalently observed in the layered α-Li 2 IrO 3 polymorph. Theoretical calculations elucidate the electrochemical similarities and differences of the 3D versus 2D polymorphs in terms of structural, electronic and mechanical descriptors. Our findings free the structural dimensionality constraint and broaden the possibilities in designing high-energy-density electrodes for the next generation of Li-ion batteries.

  4. Highly Sensitive Electrochemical Sensor for the Detection of Anions in Water Based on a Redox-Active Monolayer Incorporating an Anion Receptor.

    Kaur, Balwinder; Erdmann, Cristiane Andreia; Daniëls, Mathias; Dehaen, Wim; Rafiński, Zbigniew; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2017-12-05

    In the present work, gold electrodes were modified using a redox-active layer based on dipyrromethene complexes with Cu(II) or Co(II) and a dipodal anion receptor functionalized with dipyrromethene. These modified gold electrodes were then applied for the electrochemical detection of anions (Cl - , SO 4 2- , and Br - ) in a highly diluted water solution (in the picomolar range). The results showed that both systems, incorporating Cu(II) as well as Co(II) redox centers, exhibited highest sensitivity toward Cl - . The selectivity sequence found for both systems was Cl - > SO 4 2- > Br - . The high selectivity of Cl - anions can be attributed to the higher binding constant of Cl - with the anion receptor and the stronger electronic effect between the central metal and anion in the complex. The detection limit for the determination of Cl - was found at the 1.0 pM level for both sensing systems. The electrodes based on Co(II) redox centers displayed better selectivity toward Cl - anion detection than those based on Cu(II) centers which can be attributed to the stronger electronic interaction between the receptor-target anion complex and the Co(II)/Co(III) redox centers in comparison to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) system. Applicability of gold electrodes modified with DPM-Co(II)-DPM-AR for the electrochemical determination of Cl - anions was demonstrated using the artificial matrix mimicking human serum.

  5. Highly active, bi-functional and metal-free B4C-nanoparticle-modified graphite felt electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries

    Jiang, H. R.; Shyy, W.; Wu, M. C.; Wei, L.; Zhao, T. S.

    2017-10-01

    The potential of B4C as a metal-free catalyst for vanadium redox reactions is investigated by first-principles calculations. Results show that the central carbon atom of B4C can act as a highly active reaction site for redox reactions, due primarily to the abundant unpaired electrons around it. The catalytic effect is then verified experimentally by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests, both of which demonstrate that B4C nanoparticles can enhance the kinetics for both V2+/V3+ and VO2+/VO2+ redox reactions, indicating a bi-functional effect. The B4C-nanoparticle-modified graphite felt electrodes are finally prepared and tested in vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). It is shown that the batteries with the prepared electrodes exhibit energy efficiencies of 88.9% and 80.0% at the current densities of 80 and 160 mA cm-2, which are 16.6% and 18.8% higher than those with the original graphite felt electrodes. With a further increase in current densities to 240 and 320 mA cm-2, the batteries can still maintain energy efficiencies of 72.0% and 63.8%, respectively. All these results show that the B4C-nanoparticle-modified graphite felt electrode outperforms existing metal-free catalyst modified electrodes, and thus can be promising electrodes for VRFBs.

  6. Medium activity long-lived nuclear waste; microbial paradise or hadean environment - Evaluation of biomass and impact on redox conditions

    Albrecht, A.; Libert, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The evaluation of the impact of possible microbial activity in nuclear waste cells has been a subject for more than a quarter of a century. Some of the items of interest in relation to microbial impact on near field biogeochemistry indicated in Table 1 had already been known as pertinent. Recently, it became clear that a distinction needed to be made between high-level, vitrified waste and organic matter containing intermediate-level waste, of which the bituminized waste is used as an example here. For high-level waste the canister walls play an important safety role and the most probable limiting aspects, next to space and water, are the low concentrations in organic matter as a carbon source and phosphorous and nitrogen as essential elements. In this particular case, microbially induced corrosion is of primary concern. In the case of the French intermediate bituminized waste, primary interest is on the impact of microbial activity on redox reactions, with the high pH environment, as a consequence of the concrete engineered barrier, as the most probable limiting condition. The canister wall has no explicit long-term safety role and all components for microbial activity will become readily available. The presence of nitrates, sulphates and Fe(III) as electron acceptors and organic matter, hydrogen gas and zero-valent metals (i.e. Fe) as electron donors allows the system to supply energy for bacterial activity and to move through the entire redox sequence from O 2 (present only shortly after waste-cell closure) to nitrate, Fe(III), sulphate and organic matter reduction. Prevailing uncertainties do not allow specification of timing for the redox-changes. These uncertainties are essentially related to the lack of knowledge regarding microbial catalysis. As no natural or anthropogenic analogues are available, parameters need to be obtained from experiments. Two approaches will be presented that allow estimation of the

  7. Caspase 1 activation is protective against hepatocyte cell death by up-regulating beclin 1 protein and mitochondrial autophagy in the setting of redox stress.

    Sun, Qian; Gao, Wentao; Loughran, Patricia; Shapiro, Rick; Fan, Jie; Billiar, Timothy R; Scott, Melanie J

    2013-05-31

    Caspase 1 activation can be induced by oxidative stress, which leads to the release of the proinflammatory cytokines IL1β and IL18 in myeloid cells and a potentially damaging inflammatory response. However, little is known about the role of caspase 1 in non-immune cells, such as hepatocytes, that express and activate the inflammasome but do not produce a significant amount of IL1β/IL18. Here we demonstrate that caspase 1 activation protects against cell death after redox stress induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation in hepatocytes. Mechanistically, we show that caspase 1 reduces mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species by increasing mitochondrial autophagy and subsequent clearance of mitochondria in hepatocytes after hypoxia/reoxygenation. Caspase 1 increases autophagic flux through up-regulating autophagy initiator beclin 1 during redox stress and is an important cell survival factor in hepatocytes. We find that during hemorrhagic shock with resuscitation, an in vivo mouse model associated with severe hepatic redox stress, caspase 1 activation is also protective against liver injury and excessive oxidative stress through the up-regulation of beclin 1. Our findings suggest an alternative role for caspase 1 activation in promoting adaptive responses to oxidative stress and, more specifically, in limiting reactive oxygen species production and damage in cells and tissues where IL1β/IL18 are not highly expressed.

  8. Caspase 1 Activation Is Protective against Hepatocyte Cell Death by Up-regulating Beclin 1 Protein and Mitochondrial Autophagy in the Setting of Redox Stress*

    Sun, Qian; Gao, Wentao; Loughran, Patricia; Shapiro, Rick; Fan, Jie; Billiar, Timothy R.; Scott, Melanie J.

    2013-01-01

    Caspase 1 activation can be induced by oxidative stress, which leads to the release of the proinflammatory cytokines IL1β and IL18 in myeloid cells and a potentially damaging inflammatory response. However, little is known about the role of caspase 1 in non-immune cells, such as hepatocytes, that express and activate the inflammasome but do not produce a significant amount of IL1β/IL18. Here we demonstrate that caspase 1 activation protects against cell death after redox stress induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation in hepatocytes. Mechanistically, we show that caspase 1 reduces mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species by increasing mitochondrial autophagy and subsequent clearance of mitochondria in hepatocytes after hypoxia/reoxygenation. Caspase 1 increases autophagic flux through up-regulating autophagy initiator beclin 1 during redox stress and is an important cell survival factor in hepatocytes. We find that during hemorrhagic shock with resuscitation, an in vivo mouse model associated with severe hepatic redox stress, caspase 1 activation is also protective against liver injury and excessive oxidative stress through the up-regulation of beclin 1. Our findings suggest an alternative role for caspase 1 activation in promoting adaptive responses to oxidative stress and, more specifically, in limiting reactive oxygen species production and damage in cells and tissues where IL1β/IL18 are not highly expressed. PMID:23589298

  9. The Redox Cycler Plasmodione Is a Fast-Acting Antimalarial Lead Compound with Pronounced Activity against Sexual and Early Asexual Blood-Stage Parasites.

    Ehrhardt, Katharina; Deregnaucourt, Christiane; Goetz, Alice-Anne; Tzanova, Tzvetomira; Gallo, Valentina; Arese, Paolo; Pradines, Bruno; Adjalley, Sophie H; Bagrel, Denyse; Blandin, Stephanie; Lanzer, Michael; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    Previously, we presented the chemical design of a promising series of antimalarial agents, 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones, with potent in vitro and in vivo activities. Ongoing studies on the mode of action of antimalarial 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones revealed that these agents disturb the redox balance of the parasitized erythrocyte by acting as redox cyclers-a strategy that is broadly recognized for the development of new antimalarial agents. Here we report a detailed parasitological characterization of the in vitro activity profile of the lead compound 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione 1c (henceforth called plasmodione) against intraerythrocytic stages of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum We show that plasmodione acts rapidly against asexual blood stages, thereby disrupting the clinically relevant intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite, and furthermore has potent activity against early gametocytes. The lead's antiplasmodial activity was unaffected by the most common mechanisms of resistance to clinically used antimalarials. Moreover, plasmodione has a low potential to induce drug resistance and a high killing speed, as observed by culturing parasites under continuous drug pressure. Drug interactions with licensed antimalarial drugs were also established using the fixed-ratio isobologram method. Initial toxicological profiling suggests that plasmodione is a safe agent for possible human use. Our studies identify plasmodione as a promising antimalarial lead compound and strongly support the future development of redox-active benzylmenadiones as antimalarial agents. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of a uranium(III) complex containing a redox-active 2,2'-bipyridine ligand.

    Kraft, Steven J; Fanwick, Phillip E; Bart, Suzanne C

    2010-02-01

    Hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate uranium(III) diiodide derivatives have been prepared as an entry into low-valent uranium chemistry with these ligands. The bis(tetrahydrofuran) adduct, Tp*UI(2)(THF)(2) (1) (Tp* = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate), was synthesized by addition of sodium hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate (NaTp*) to an equivalent of UI(3)(THF)(4). Addition of 2,2'-bipyridine (2,2'-bpy) to 1 displaced the THF molecules producing Tp*UI(2)(2,2'-bpy) (2). Both derivatives were characterized by (1)H NMR and IR spectroscopies, magnetic measurements, and X-ray crystallography. Reduction of both species was attempted with two equivalents of potassium graphite. The reduction of 1 did not result in a clean product, but rather decomposition and ligand redistribution. However, compound 2 was reduced to form Tp*(2)U(2,2'-bpy), 3, which is composed of a uranium(III) ion with a radical monoanionic bipyridine ligand. This was confirmed by X-ray crystallography, which revealed distortions in the bond lengths of the bipyridine consistent with reduction. Further support was obtained by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, which showed resonances shifted far upfield, consistent with radical character on the 2,2'-bipyridine ligand. Future studies will explore the reactivity of this compound as well as the consequences for redox-activity in the bipyridine ligand.

  11. Arts in Higher Education: an evaluation of Fine Arts research activity in Spain through quality indicators

    Raquel Caerols Mateo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The long-standing conflict between research evaluation standards and the fine arts dates from the transformation of the former schools of fine arts into bachelor’s degree programs. The origin of the conflict is epistemological in nature and has consequences at both the academic and curricular level. The quality indicators for evaluating professors are the central issue of this problem still to be solved. Although current systems of evaluation cover both the production of scientific publications as part of traditional research and the artistic creation itself, academics in the fine arts note that deficiencies exist in the assessment of both these aspects.The focus of this paper is primarily on the study of the main national and international databases in the arts, in order to assess their validity as quality indicators for the scholarly output of academics.

  12. Modulation of redox regulatory molecules and electron transport chain activity in muscle of air breathing fish Heteropneustes fossilis under air exposure stress.

    Paital, Biswaranjan

    2014-01-01

    Responses of redox regulatory system to long-term survival (>18 h) of the catfish Heteropneustes fossilis in air are not yet understood. Lipid and protein oxidation level, oxidant (H2O2) generation, antioxidative status (levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and reductase, ascorbic acid and non-protein sulfhydryl) and activities of respiratory complexes (I, II, III and IV) in mitochondria were investigated in muscle of H. fossilis under air exposure condition (0, 3, 6, 12 and 18 h at 25 °C). The increased levels of both H2O2 and tissue oxidation were observed due to the decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes in muscle under water deprivation condition. However, ascorbic acid and non-protein thiol groups were the highest at 18 h air exposure time. A linear increase in complex II activity with air exposure time and an increase up to 12 h followed by a decrease in activity of complex I at 18 h were observed. Negative correlation was observed for complex III and V activity with exposure time. Critical time to modulate the above parameters was found to be 3 h air exposure. Dehydration induced oxidative stress due to modulation of electron transport chain and redox metabolizing enzymes in muscle of H. fossilis was clearly observed. Possible contribution of redox regulatory system in muscle tissue of the fish for long-term survival in air is elucidated. Results of the present study may be useful to understand the redox metabolism in muscle of fishes those are exposed to air in general and air breathing fishes in particular.

  13. Information processing through a bio-based redox capacitor: signatures for redox-cycling.

    Liu, Yi; Kim, Eunkyoung; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-08-01

    Redox-cycling compounds can significantly impact biological systems and can be responsible for activities that range from pathogen virulence and contaminant toxicities, to therapeutic drug mechanisms. Current methods to identify redox-cycling activities rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and employ enzymatic or chemical methods to detect ROS. Here, we couple the speed and sensitivity of electrochemistry with the molecular-electronic properties of a bio-based redox-capacitor to generate signatures of redox-cycling. The redox capacitor film is electrochemically-fabricated at the electrode surface and is composed of a polysaccharide hydrogel with grafted catechol moieties. This capacitor film is redox-active but non-conducting and can engage diffusible compounds in either oxidative or reductive redox-cycling. Using standard electrochemical mediators ferrocene dimethanol (Fc) and Ru(NH3)6Cl3 (Ru(3+)) as model redox-cyclers, we observed signal amplifications and rectifications that serve as signatures of redox-cycling. Three bio-relevant compounds were then probed for these signatures: (i) ascorbate, a redox-active compound that does not redox-cycle; (ii) pyocyanin, a virulence factor well-known for its reductive redox-cycling; and (iii) acetaminophen, an analgesic that oxidatively redox-cycles but also undergoes conjugation reactions. These studies demonstrate that the redox-capacitor can enlist the capabilities of electrochemistry to generate rapid and sensitive signatures of biologically-relevant chemical activities (i.e., redox-cycling). Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Effects of antimony on redox activities and antioxidant defence systems in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. plants.

    Alfonso Ortega

    Full Text Available The alterations induced by the toxicity of antimony (Sb in the roots and leaves of sunflower plants were determined. The plants were grown hydroponically with different concentrations of Sb, a heavy metal which reduces biomass production and growth. There was preferential accumulation of Sb in the tissues of the roots, with the concentrations in the leaves being much lower. The accumulation of other mineral elements was also altered, especially that of Fe and Zn. Chlorophyll content declined, as also did the photosynthetic efficiency, but the carotenoid content remained unaltered. The total content of phenolics, flavonoids, and phenylpropanoid glycosides rose, evidence of their participation in the defence response. Increases were observed in the amount of superoxide anion in both roots and leaves, and in lipid peroxidation levels, especially with the highest Sb concentration of 1.0 mM. The induced oxidative stress leads to a strong increase in the SOD, POX and APX antioxidant activities, while the GR activity was only increased in the leaves and at the 1.0 mM Sb concentration. In contrast, the DHAR activity increased considerably in both organs. The GSNOR activity increased only in roots, and the total RSNOs increased. The total amount of AsA + DHA increased in roots and remained unaltered in leaves, whereas that of GSH + GSSG decreased considerably in all cases. As a whole, these results are evidence for the development of a strong oxidative stress induced by Sb, with there being a clear imbalance in the content of the compounds that constitute the AsA/GSH cycle. 0.5 mM Sb enhances GST expression, especially in leaves. This, together with the increase that was observed in the amount of GSH, may play an important part in detoxification. This oxidative stress affects both the phenolic and the ROS/RNS metabolic processes, which seems to implicate their involvement in the plant's defence and response to the stress.

  15. Redox-Active Carbohydrate-Coated Nanoparticles: Self-Assembly of a Cyclodextrin-Polystyrene Glycopolymer with Tetrazine-Naphthalimide.

    Gross, Andrew J; Haddad, Raoudha; Travelet, Christophe; Reynaud, Eric; Audebert, Pierre; Borsali, Redouane; Cosnier, Serge

    2016-11-15

    The controlled self-assembly of precise and well-defined photochemically and electrochemically active carbohydrate-coated nanoparticles offers the exciting prospect of biocompatible catalysts for energy storage/conversion and biolabeling applications. Here an aqueous nanoparticle system has been developed with a versatile outer layer for host-guest molecule encapsulation via β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes. A β-cyclodextrin-modified polystyrene polymer was first obtained by copper nanopowder click chemistry. The glycopolymer enables self-assembly and controlled encapsulation of tetrazine-naphthalimide, as a model redox-active agent, into nanoparticles via nanoprecipitation. Cyclodextrin host-guest interactions permit encapsulation and internanoparticle cross-linking for the formation of fluorescent compound and clustered self-assemblies with chemically reversible electroactivity in aqueous solution. Light scattering experiments revealed stable particles with hydrodynamic diameters of 138 and 654 nm for nanoparticles prepared with tetrazine, of which 95% of the nanoparticles represent the smaller objects by number. Dynamic light scattering revealed differences as a function of preparation method in terms of size, 3-month stability, polydispersity, radius of gyration, and shape factor. Individual self-assemblies were visualized by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy and monitored in real-time by nanoparticle tracking analysis. UV-vis and fluorescence spectra provided insight into the optical properties and critical evidence for host-guest encapsulation as evidenced by solvachromatism and enhanced tetrazine uptake. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical properties and provided further support for encapsulation and an estimate of the tetrazine loading capacity in tandem with light scattering data.

  16. Nanoscale visualization of redox activity at lithium-ion battery cathodes.

    Takahashi, Yasufumi; Kumatani, Akichika; Munakata, Hirokazu; Inomata, Hirotaka; Ito, Komachi; Ino, Kosuke; Shiku, Hitoshi; Unwin, Patrick R; Korchev, Yuri E; Kanamura, Kiyoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2014-11-17

    Intercalation and deintercalation of lithium ions at electrode surfaces are central to the operation of lithium-ion batteries. Yet, on the most important composite cathode surfaces, this is a rather complex process involving spatially heterogeneous reactions that have proved difficult to resolve with existing techniques. Here we report a scanning electrochemical cell microscope based approach to define a mobile electrochemical cell that is used to quantitatively visualize electrochemical phenomena at the battery cathode material LiFePO4, with resolution of ~100 nm. The technique measures electrode topography and different electrochemical properties simultaneously, and the information can be combined with complementary microscopic techniques to reveal new perspectives on structure and activity. These electrodes exhibit highly spatially heterogeneous electrochemistry at the nanoscale, both within secondary particles and at individual primary nanoparticles, which is highly dependent on the local structure and composition.

  17. Metabolomics insights into activated redox signaling and lipid metabolism dysfunction in chronic kidney disease progression

    Hua Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Early detection is critical in prevention and treatment of kidney disease. However currently clinical laboratory and histopathological tests do not provide region-specific and accurate biomarkers for early detection of kidney disease. The present study was conducted to identify sensitive biomarkers for early detection and progression of tubulo-interstitial nephropathy in aristolochic acid I-induced rats at weeks 4, 8 and 12. Biomarkers were validated using aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN rats at week 24, adenine-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD rats and CKD patients. Compared with control rats, AAN rats showed anemia, increased serum urea and creatinine, progressive renal interstitial fibrosis, activation of nuclear factor-kappa B, and up-regulation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-fibrotic proteins at weeks 8 and 12. However, no significant difference was found at week 4. Metabolomics identified 12-ketodeoxycholic acid, taurochenodesoxycholic acid, LPC(15:0 and docosahexaenoic acid as biomarkers for early detection of tubulo-interstitial nephropathy. With prolonging aristolochic acid I exposure, LPE(20:2, cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and LPC(17:0 were identified as biomarkers for progression from early to advanced AAN and lysoPE(22:5, indoxyl sulfate, uric acid and creatinine as biomarkers of advanced AAN. These biomarkers were reversed by treatment of irbesartan and ergone in AAN rats at week 24 and adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, these biomarkers were also reversed by irbesartan treatment in CKD patients.

  18. Assessing the impact of electrolyte conductivity and viscosity on the reactor cost and pressure drop of redox-active polymer flow batteries

    Iyer, Vinay A.; Schuh, Jonathon K.; Montoto, Elena C.; Pavan Nemani, V.; Qian, Shaoyi; Nagarjuna, Gavvalapalli; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Ewoldt, Randy H.; Smith, Kyle C.

    2017-09-01

    Redox-active small molecules, used traditionally in redox flow batteries (RFBs), are susceptible to crossover and require expensive ion exchange membranes (IEMs) to achieve long lifetimes. Redox-active polymer (RAP) solutions show promise as candidate electrolytes to mitigate crossover through size-exclusion, enabling the use of porous separators instead of IEMs. Here, poly(vinylbenzyl ethyl viologen) is studied as a surrogate RAP for RFBs. For oxidized RAPs, ionic conductivity varies weakly between 1.6 and 2.1 S m-1 for RAP concentrations of 0.13-1.27 mol kg-1 (monomeric repeat unit per kg solvent) and 0.32 mol kg-1 LiBF4 with a minor increase upon reduction. In contrast, viscosity varies between 1.8 and 184.0 mPa s over the same concentration range with weakly shear-thinning rheology independent of oxidation state. Techno-economic analysis is used to quantify reactor cost as a function of electrolyte transport properties for RAP concentrations of 0.13-1.27 mol kg-1, assuming a hypothetical 3V cell and facile kinetics. Among these concentrations, reactor cost is minimized over a current density range of 600-1000 A m-2 with minimum reactor cost between 11-17 per kWh, and pumping pressures below 10 kPa. The predicted low reactor cost of RAP RFBs is enabled by sustained ionic mobility in spite of the high viscosity of concentrated RAP solutions.

  19. Investigation of multi-state charge-storage properties of redox-active organic molecules in silicon-molecular hybrid devices for DRAM and Flash applications

    Gowda, Srivardhan Shivappa

    Molecular electronics has recently spawned a considerable amount of interest with several molecules possessing charge-conduction and charge-storage properties proposed for use in electronic devices. Hybrid silicon-molecular technology has the promise of augmenting the current silicon technology and provide for a transitional path to future molecule-only technology. The focus of this dissertation work has been on developing a class of hybrid silicon-molecular electronic devices for DRAM and Flash memory applications utilizing redox-active molecules. This work exploits the ability of molecules to store charges with single-electron precision at room temperature. The hybrid devices are fabricated by forming self-assembled monolayers of redox-active molecules on Si and oxide (SiO2 and HfO2) surfaces via formation of covalent linkages. The molecules possess discrete quantum states from which electrons can tunnel to the Si substrate at discrete applied voltages (oxidation process, cell write), leaving behind a positively charged layer of molecules. The reduction (erase) process, which is the process of electrons tunneling back from Si to the molecules, neutralizes the positively charged molecular monolayer. Hybrid silicon-molecular capacitor test structures were electrically characterized with an electrolyte gate using cyclic voltammetry (CyV) and impedance spectroscopy (CV) techniques. The redox voltages, kinetics (write/erase speeds) and charge-retention characteristics were found to be strongly dependent on the Si doping type and densities, and ambient light. It was also determined that the redox energy states in the molecules communicate with the valence band of the Si substrate. This allows tuning of write and read states by modulating minority carriers in n- and p-Si substrates. Ultra-thin dielectric tunnel barriers (SiO2, HfO2) were placed between the molecules and the Si substrate to augment charge-retention for Flash memory applications. The redox response was

  20. Redox flow batteries having multiple electroactive elements

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo; Nie, Zimin

    2018-05-01

    Introducing multiple redox reactions with a suitable voltage range can improve the energy density of redox flow battery (RFB) systems. One example includes RFB systems utilizing multiple redox pairs in the positive half cell, the negative half cell, or in both. Such RFB systems can have a negative electrolyte, a positive electrolyte, and a membrane between the negative electrolyte and the positive electrolyte, in which at least two electrochemically active elements exist in the negative electrolyte, the positive electrolyte, or both.

  1. The Redox-Sensitive Transcriptional Activator OxyR Regulates the Peroxide Response Regulon in the Obligate Anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis

    Rocha, Edson R.; Owens, Gary; Smith, C. Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    The peroxide response-inducible genes ahpCF, dps, and katB in the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis are controlled by the redox-sensitive transcriptional activator OxyR. This is the first functional oxidative stress regulator identified and characterized in anaerobic bacteria. oxyR and dps were found to be divergently transcribed, with an overlap in their respective promoter regulatory regions. B. fragilis OxyR and Dps proteins showed high identity to homologues from a closely related anaerobe, Porphyromonas gingivalis. Northern blot analysis revealed that oxyR was expressed as a monocistronic 1-kb mRNA and that dps mRNA was approximately 500 bases in length. dps mRNA was induced over 500-fold by oxidative stress in the parent strain and was constitutively induced in the peroxide-resistant mutant IB263. The constitutive peroxide response in strain IB263 was shown to have resulted from a missense mutation at codon 202 (GAT to GGT) of the oxyR gene [oxyR(Con)] with a predicted D202G substitution in the OxyR protein. Transcriptional fusion analysis revealed that deletion of oxyR abolished the induction of ahpC and katB following treatment with hydrogen peroxide or oxygen exposure. However, dps expression was induced approximately fourfold by oxygen exposure in ΔoxyR strains but not by hydrogen peroxide. This indicates that dps expression is also under the control of an oxygen-dependent OxyR-independent mechanism. Complementation of ΔoxyR mutant strains with wild-type oxyR and oxyR(Con) restored the inducible peroxide response and the constitutive response of the ahpCF, katB, and dps genes, respectively. However, overexpression of OxyR abolished the catalase activity but not katB expression, suggesting that higher levels of intracellular OxyR may be involved in other physiological processes. Analysis of oxyR expression in the parents and in ΔoxyR and overexpressing oxyR strains by Northern blotting and oxyR′::xylB fusions revealed that B. fragilis OxyR does

  2. Regulatory redox state in tree seeds

    Ewelina Ratajczak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins (Prx are important regulators of the redox status of tree seeds during maturation and long-term storage. Thioredoxins (Trx are redox transmitters and thereby regulate Prx activity. Current research is focused on the association of Trx with Prx in tree seeds differing in the tolerance to desiccation. The results will allow for better understanding the regulation of the redox status in orthodox, recalcitrant, and intermediate seeds. The findings will also elucidate the role of the redox status during the loss of viability of sensitive seeds during drying and long-term storage.

  3. Monitoring thioredoxin redox with a genetically encoded red fluorescent biosensor.

    Fan, Yichong; Makar, Merna; Wang, Michael X; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2017-09-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is one of the two major thiol antioxidants, playing essential roles in redox homeostasis and signaling. Despite its importance, there is a lack of methods for monitoring Trx redox dynamics in live cells, hindering a better understanding of physiological and pathological roles of the Trx redox system. In this work, we developed the first genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor for Trx redox by engineering a redox relay between the active-site cysteines of human Trx1 and rxRFP1, a redox-sensitive red fluorescent protein. We used the resultant biosensor-TrxRFP1-to selectively monitor perturbations of Trx redox in various mammalian cell lines. We subcellularly localized TrxRFP1 to image compartmentalized Trx redox changes. We further combined TrxRFP1 with a green fluorescent Grx1-roGFP2 biosensor to simultaneously monitor Trx and glutathione redox dynamics in live cells in response to chemical and physiologically relevant stimuli.

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic studies of different redox states of the active site of thioredoxin 1 from the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Campos-Acevedo, Adam A.; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the different redox states of the catalytic cysteines in four crystallographic structures of thioredoxin 1 from the Pacific whiteleg shrimp L. vannamei highlights their reactivity and corroborates the existence of a structural dimer mediated by an interface of 12 residues which includes a disulfide bridge between the Cys73 residues of each monomer. Thioredoxin (Trx) is a 12 kDa cellular redox protein that belongs to a family of small redox proteins which undergo reversible oxidation to produce a cystine disulfide bond through the transfer of reducing equivalents from the catalytic site cysteine residues (Cys32 and Cys35) to a disulfide substrate. In this study, crystals of thioredoxin 1 from the Pacific whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvTrx) were successfully obtained. One data set was collected from each of four crystals at 100 K and the three-dimensional structures of the catalytic cysteines in different redox states were determined: reduced and oxidized forms at 2.00 Å resolution using data collected at a synchrotron-radiation source and two partially reduced structures at 1.54 and 1.88 Å resolution using data collected using an in-house source. All of the crystals belonged to space group P3 2 12, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.5 (4), b = 57.5 (4), c = 118.1 (8) Å. The asymmetric unit contains two subunits of LvTrx, with a Matthews coefficient (V M ) of 2.31 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 46%. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement using the crystallographic model of Trx from Drosophila melanogaster as a template. In the present work, LvTrx was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Structural analysis of the different redox states at the Trx active site highlights its reactivity and corroborates the existence of a dimer in the crystal. In the crystallographic structures the dimer is stabilized by several interactions, including a disulfide bridge between Cys73 of each LvTrx monomer, a

  5. Fine Arts: 4. Proposals Regarding Work Strategies in Visual Arts Activities II. Creating an Interrogative Attitude

    Aprotosoaie-Iftimi Ana-Maria

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Between the age of six and eleven, children easily express themselves through drawing. After this age, there is a blockage due to the development of critical thinking. If during the 6 - 11 age stage children draw using symbol schemes, reporting what they remember and what they understood from what they saw, after the age of 10-11 (secondary phase children want to draw what they see and thus they face challenges related to technical means and language specific for arts. In this regard, a mediation is necessary between the technical means and the artwork or reproductions of fine art (either in albums, or displayed on a screen using guided questions. This process, that over the years of teaching proved its efficiency, contributes to the development of students’ imagination and creativity, and to the formation of a useful general culture.

  6. Reversible Redox Activity by Ion-pH Dually Modulated Duplex Formation of i-Motif DNA with Complementary G-DNA

    Soyoung Chang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The unique biological features of supramolecular DNA have led to an increasing interest in biomedical applications such as biosensors. We have developed an i-motif and G-rich DNA conjugated single-walled carbon nanotube hybrid materials, which shows reversible conformational switching upon external stimuli such as pH (5 and 8 and presence of ions (Li+ and K+. We observed reversible electrochemical redox activity upon external stimuli in a quick and robust manner. Given the ease and the robustness of this method, we believe that pH- and ion-driven reversible DNA structure transformations will be utilized for future applications for developing novel biosensors.

  7. Redox Pioneer: Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev.

    Hatfield, Dolph L

    2016-07-01

    Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer, because he has published an article on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited more than 1000 times and 29 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. Gladyshev is world renowned for his characterization of the human selenoproteome encoded by 25 genes, identification of the majority of known selenoprotein genes in the three domains of life, and discoveries related to thiol oxidoreductases and mechanisms of redox control. Gladyshev's first faculty position was in the Department of Biochemistry, the University of Nebraska. There, he was a Charles Bessey Professor and Director of the Redox Biology Center. He then moved to the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, where he is Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for Redox Medicine. His discoveries in redox biology relate to selenoenzymes, such as methionine sulfoxide reductases and thioredoxin reductases, and various thiol oxidoreductases. He is responsible for the genome-wide identification of catalytic redox-active cysteines and for advancing our understanding of the general use of cysteines by proteins. In addition, Gladyshev has characterized hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling and regulation of protein function by methionine-R-sulfoxidation. He has also made important contributions in the areas of aging and lifespan control and pioneered applications of comparative genomics in redox biology, selenium biology, and aging. Gladyshev's discoveries have had a profound impact on redox biology and the role of redox control in health and disease. He is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 1-9.

  8. Zinc and the modulation of redox homeostasis

    Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc, a redox inactive metal, has been long viewed as a component of the antioxidant network, and growing evidence points to its involvement in redox-regulated signaling. These actions are exerted through several mechanisms based on the unique chemical and functional properties of zinc. Overall, zinc contributes to maintain the cell redox balance through different mechanisms including: i) the regulation of oxidant production and metal-induced oxidative damage; ii) the dynamic association of zinc with sulfur in protein cysteine clusters, from which the metal can be released by nitric oxide, peroxides, oxidized glutathione and other thiol oxidant species; iii) zinc-mediated induction of the zinc-binding protein metallothionein, which releases the metal under oxidative conditions and act per se scavenging oxidants; iv) the involvement of zinc in the regulation of glutathione metabolism and of the overall protein thiol redox status; and v) a direct or indirect regulation of redox signaling. Findings of oxidative stress, altered redox signaling, and associated cell/tissue disfunction in cell and animal models of zinc deficiency, stress the relevant role of zinc in the preservation of cell redox homeostasis. However, while the participation of zinc in antioxidant protection, redox sensing, and redox-regulated signaling is accepted, the involved molecules, targets and mechanisms are still partially known and the subject of active research. PMID:22960578

  9. Fine time course expression analysis identifies cascades of activation and repression and maps a putative regulator of mammalian sex determination.

    Steven C Munger

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, primary sex determination refers to the decision within a bipotential organ precursor to differentiate as a testis or ovary. Bifurcation of organ fate begins between embryonic day (E 11.0-E12.0 in mice and likely involves a dynamic transcription network that is poorly understood. To elucidate the first steps of sexual fate specification, we profiled the XX and XY gonad transcriptomes at fine granularity during this period and resolved cascades of gene activation and repression. C57BL/6J (B6 XY gonads showed a consistent ~5-hour delay in the activation of most male pathway genes and repression of female pathway genes relative to 129S1/SvImJ, which likely explains the sensitivity of the B6 strain to male-to-female sex reversal. Using this fine time course data, we predicted novel regulatory genes underlying expression QTLs (eQTLs mapped in a previous study. To test predictions, we developed an in vitro gonad primary cell assay and optimized a lentivirus-based shRNA delivery method to silence candidate genes and quantify effects on putative targets. We provide strong evidence that Lmo4 (Lim-domain only 4 is a novel regulator of sex determination upstream of SF1 (Nr5a1, Sox9, Fgf9, and Col9a3. This approach can be readily applied to identify regulatory interactions in other systems.

  10. Roles of the redox-active disulfide and histidine residues forming a catalytic dyad in reactions catalyzed by 2-ketopropyl coenzyme M oxidoreductase/carboxylase.

    Kofoed, Melissa A; Wampler, David A; Pandey, Arti S; Peters, John W; Ensign, Scott A

    2011-09-01

    NADPH:2-ketopropyl-coenzyme M oxidoreductase/carboxylase (2-KPCC), an atypical member of the disulfide oxidoreductase (DSOR) family of enzymes, catalyzes the reductive cleavage and carboxylation of 2-ketopropyl-coenzyme M [2-(2-ketopropylthio)ethanesulfonate; 2-KPC] to form acetoacetate and coenzyme M (CoM) in the bacterial pathway of propylene metabolism. Structural studies of 2-KPCC from Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 have revealed a distinctive active-site architecture that includes a putative catalytic triad consisting of two histidine residues that are hydrogen bonded to an ordered water molecule proposed to stabilize enolacetone formed from dithiol-mediated 2-KPC thioether bond cleavage. Site-directed mutants of 2-KPCC were constructed to test the tenets of the mechanism proposed from studies of the native enzyme. Mutagenesis of the interchange thiol of 2-KPCC (C82A) abolished all redox-dependent reactions of 2-KPCC (2-KPC carboxylation or protonation). The air-oxidized C82A mutant, as well as wild-type 2-KPCC, exhibited the characteristic charge transfer absorbance seen in site-directed variants of other DSOR enzymes but with a pK(a) value for C87 (8.8) four units higher (i.e., four orders of magnitude less acidic) than that for the flavin thiol of canonical DSOR enzymes. The same higher pK(a) value was observed in native 2-KPCC when the interchange thiol was alkylated by the CoM analog 2-bromoethanesulfonate. Mutagenesis of the flavin thiol (C87A) also resulted in an inactive enzyme for steady-state redox-dependent reactions, but this variant catalyzed a single-turnover reaction producing a 0.8:1 ratio of product to enzyme. Mutagenesis of the histidine proximal to the ordered water (H137A) led to nearly complete loss of redox-dependent 2-KPCC reactions, while mutagenesis of the distal histidine (H84A) reduced these activities by 58 to 76%. A redox-independent reaction of 2-KPCC (acetoacetate decarboxylation) was not decreased for any of the

  11. Redox regulation of plant development.

    Considine, Michael J; Foyer, Christine H

    2014-09-20

    We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context.

  12. Decision-Related Activity in Macaque V2 for Fine Disparity Discrimination Is Not Compatible with Optimal Linear Readout.

    Clery, Stephane; Cumming, Bruce G; Nienborg, Hendrikje

    2017-01-18

    Fine judgments of stereoscopic depth rely mainly on relative judgments of depth (relative binocular disparity) between objects, rather than judgments of the distance to where the eyes are fixating (absolute disparity). In macaques, visual area V2 is the earliest site in the visual processing hierarchy for which neurons selective for relative disparity have been observed (Thomas et al., 2002). Here, we found that, in macaques trained to perform a fine disparity discrimination task, disparity-selective neurons in V2 were highly selective for the task, and their activity correlated with the animals' perceptual decisions (unexplained by the stimulus). This may partially explain similar correlations reported in downstream areas. Although compatible with a perceptual role of these neurons for the task, the interpretation of such decision-related activity is complicated by the effects of interneuronal "noise" correlations between sensory neurons. Recent work has developed simple predictions to differentiate decoding schemes (Pitkow et al., 2015) without needing measures of noise correlations, and found that data from early sensory areas were compatible with optimal linear readout of populations with information-limiting correlations. In contrast, our data here deviated significantly from these predictions. We additionally tested this prediction for previously reported results of decision-related activity in V2 for a related task, coarse disparity discrimination (Nienborg and Cumming, 2006), thought to rely on absolute disparity. Although these data followed the predicted pattern, they violated the prediction quantitatively. This suggests that optimal linear decoding of sensory signals is not generally a good predictor of behavior in simple perceptual tasks. Activity in sensory neurons that correlates with an animal's decision is widely believed to provide insights into how the brain uses information from sensory neurons. Recent theoretical work developed simple

  13. Microbial activity in argillite waste storage cells for the deep geological disposal of French bituminous medium activity long lived nuclear waste: Impact on redox reaction kinetics and potential

    Albrecht, A.; Leone, L.; Charlet, L.

    2009-04-01

    Micro-organisms are ubiquitous and display remarkable capabilities to adapt and survive in the most extreme environmental conditions. It has been recognized that microorganisms can survive in nuclear waste disposal facilities if the required major (P, N, K) and trace elements, a carbon and energy source as well as water are present. The space constraint is of particular interest as it has been shown that bacteria do not prosper in compacted clay. An evaluation of the different types of French medium and high level waste, in a clay-rich host rock storage environment at a depth between 500 and 600 m, has shown that the bituminous waste is the most likely candidate to accommodate significant microbial activity. The waste consists of a mixture of bitumen (source of bio-available organic matter and H2 as a consequence of its degradation and radiolysis) and nitrates and sulphates kept in a stainless steel container. The assumption, that microbes only have an impact on reaction kinetics needs to be reassessed in the case where nitrates and sulphates are present since both are known not to react at low temperatures without bacterial catalysis. The additional impact of both oxy-anions and their reduced species on redox conditions, radionuclide speciation and mobility gives this evaluation their particular relevance. Storage architecture proposes four primary waste containers positioned into armoured cement over packs and placed with others into the waste storage cell itself composed of a cement mantle enforcing the argillite host rock, the latter being characterized by an excavation damaged zone constricted both in space and in time and a pristine part of 60 m thickness. Bacterial activity within the waste and within the pristine argillite is disregarded because of the low water activity (biofilms are within the interface zones. A major restriction for the initial development of microbial colonies is the high pH controlled by the cement solution. Archea are able to survive

  14. Specific inhibition of the redox activity of ape1/ref-1 by e3330 blocks tnf-α-induced activation of IL-8 production in liver cancer cell lines.

    Laura Cesaratto

    Full Text Available APE1/Ref-1 is a main regulator of cellular response to oxidative stress via DNA-repair function and co-activating activity on the NF-κB transcription factor. APE1 is central in controlling the oxidative stress-based inflammatory processes through modulation of cytokines expression and its overexpression is responsible for the onset of chemoresistance in different tumors including hepatic cancer. We examined the functional role of APE1 overexpression during hepatic cell damage related to fatty acid accumulation and the role of the redox function of APE1 in the inflammatory process. HepG2 cells were stably transfected with functional and non-functional APE1 encoding plasmids and the protective effect of APE1 overexpression toward genotoxic compounds or FAs accumulation, was tested. JHH6 cells were stimulated with TNF-α in the presence or absence of E3330, an APE1 redox inhibitor. IL-8 promoter activity was assessed by a luciferase reporter assay, gene expression by Real-Time PCR and cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 levels measured by ELISA. APE1 over-expression did not prevent cytotoxicity induced by lipid accumulation. E3330 treatment prevented the functional activation of NF-κB via the alteration of APE1 subcellular trafficking and reduced IL-6 and IL-8 expression induced by TNF-α and FAs accumulation through blockage of the redox-mediated activation of NF-κB. APE1 overexpression observed in hepatic cancer cells may reflect an adaptive response to cell damage and may be responsible for further cell resistance to chemotherapy and for the onset of inflammatory response. The efficacy of the inhibition of APE1 redox activity in blocking TNF-α and FAs induced inflammatory response opens new perspectives for treatment of inflammatory-based liver diseases.

  15. Specific Inhibition of the Redox Activity of Ape1/Ref-1 by E3330 Blocks Tnf-Α-Induced Activation of Il-8 Production in Liver Cancer Cell Lines

    Vascotto, Carlo; Leonardi, Antonio; Kelley, Mark R.; Tiribelli, Claudio; Tell, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    APE1/Ref-1 is a main regulator of cellular response to oxidative stress via DNA-repair function and co-activating activity on the NF-κB transcription factor. APE1 is central in controlling the oxidative stress-based inflammatory processes through modulation of cytokines expression and its overexpression is responsible for the onset of chemoresistance in different tumors including hepatic cancer. We examined the functional role of APE1 overexpression during hepatic cell damage related to fatty acid accumulation and the role of the redox function of APE1 in the inflammatory process. HepG2 cells were stably transfected with functional and non-functional APE1 encoding plasmids and the protective effect of APE1 overexpression toward genotoxic compounds or FAs accumulation, was tested. JHH6 cells were stimulated with TNF-α in the presence or absence of E3330, an APE1 redox inhibitor. IL-8 promoter activity was assessed by a luciferase reporter assay, gene expression by Real-Time PCR and cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-12) levels measured by ELISA. APE1 over-expression did not prevent cytotoxicity induced by lipid accumulation. E3330 treatment prevented the functional activation of NF-κB via the alteration of APE1 subcellular trafficking and reduced IL-6 and IL-8 expression induced by TNF-α and FAs accumulation through blockage of the redox-mediated activation of NF-κB. APE1 overexpression observed in hepatic cancer cells may reflect an adaptive response to cell damage and may be responsible for further cell resistance to chemotherapy and for the onset of inflammatory response. The efficacy of the inhibition of APE1 redox activity in blocking TNF-α and FAs induced inflammatory response opens new perspectives for treatment of inflammatory-based liver diseases. PMID:23967134

  16. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V. PMID:27966605

  17. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-12-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V.

  18. A Redox-Active, Compact Molecule for Cross-Linking Amyloidogenic Peptides into Nontoxic, Off-Pathway Aggregates: In Vitro and In Vivo Efficacy and Molecular Mechanisms

    Derrick, Jeffrey S.; Kerr, Richard A.; Nam, Younwoo; Oh, Shin Bi; Lee, Hyuck Jin; Earnest, Kaylin G.; Suh, Nayoung; Peck, Kristy L.; Ozbil, Mehmet; Korshavn, Kyle J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Prabhakar, Rajeev; Merino, Edward J.; Shearer, Jason; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T.; Lim, Mi Hee

    2015-11-25

    Chemical reagents targeting and controlling amyloidogenic peptides have received much attention for helping identify their roles in the pathogenesis of protein-misfolding disorders. Herein, we report a novel strategy for redirecting amyloidogenic peptides into nontoxic, off-pathway aggregates, which utilizes redox properties of a small molecule (DMPD, N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine) to trigger covalent adduct formation with the peptide. In addition, for the first time, biochemical, biophysical, and molecular dynamics simulation studies have been performed to demonstrate a mechanistic understanding for such an interaction between a small molecule (DMPD) and amyloid-β (Aβ) and its subsequent anti-amyloidogenic activity, which, upon its transformation, generates ligand–peptide adducts via primary amine-dependent intramolecular cross-linking correlated with structural compaction. Furthermore, in vivo efficacy of DMPD toward amyloid pathology and cognitive impairment was evaluated employing 5xFAD mice of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Such a small molecule (DMPD) is indicated to noticeably reduce the overall cerebral amyloid load of soluble Aβ forms and amyloid deposits as well as significantly improve cognitive defects in the AD mouse model. Overall, our in vitro and in vivo studies of DMPD toward Aβ with the first molecular-level mechanistic investigations present the feasibility of developing new, innovative approaches that employ redox-active compounds without the structural complexity as next-generation chemical tools for amyloid management.

  19. Monitoring the solid-state electrochemistry of Cu(2,7-AQDC) (AQDC = anthraquinone dicarboxylate) in a lithium battery: coexistence of metal and ligand redox activities in a metal-organic framework.

    Zhang, Zhongyue; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Awaga, Kunio

    2014-11-19

    By adopting a facile synthetic strategy, we obtained a microporous redox-active metal-organic framework (MOF), namely, Cu(2,7-AQDC) (2,7-H2AQDC = 2,7-anthraquinonedicarboxylic acid) (1), and utilized it as a cathode active material in lithium batteries. With a voltage window of 4.0-1.7 V, both metal clusters and anthraquinone groups in the ligands exhibited reversible redox activity. The valence change of copper cations was clearly evidenced by in situ XANES analysis. By controlling the voltage window of operation, extremely high recyclability of batteries was achieved, suggesting the framework was robust. This MOF is the first example of a porous material showing independent redox activity on both metal cluster nodes and ligand sites.

  20. Terminal uranium(V/VI) nitride activation of carbon dioxide and carbon disulfide. Factors governing diverse and well-defined cleavage and redox reactions

    Cleaves, Peter A.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Liddle, Stephen T.; Kefalidis, Christos E.; Maron, Laurent; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J.L.; Lewis, William

    2017-01-01

    The reactivity of terminal uranium(V/VI) nitrides with CE 2 (E=O, S) is presented. Well-defined C=E cleavage followed by zero-, one-, and two-electron redox events is observed. The uranium(V) nitride [U(Tren TIPS )(N)][K(B15C5) 2 ] (1, Tren TIPS =N(CH 2 CH 2 NSiiPr 3 ) 3 ; B15C5=benzo-15-crown-5) reacts with CO 2 to give [U(Tren TIPS )(O)(NCO)][K(B15C5) 2 ] (3), whereas the uranium(VI) nitride [U(Tren TIPS )(N)] (2) reacts with CO 2 to give isolable [U(Tren TIPS )(O)(NCO)] (4); complex 4 rapidly decomposes to known [U(Tren TIPS )(O)] (5) with concomitant formation of N 2 and CO proposed, with the latter trapped as a vanadocene adduct. In contrast, 1 reacts with CS 2 to give [U(Tren TIPS )(κ 2 -CS 3 )][K(B15C5) 2 ] (6), 2, and [K(B15C5) 2 ][NCS] (7), whereas 2 reacts with CS 2 to give [U(Tren TIPS )(NCS)] (8) and ''S'', with the latter trapped as Ph 3 PS. Calculated reaction profiles reveal outer-sphere reactivity for uranium(V) but inner-sphere mechanisms for uranium(VI); despite the wide divergence of products the initial activation of CE 2 follows mechanistically related pathways, providing insight into the factors of uranium oxidation state, chalcogen, and NCE groups that govern the subsequent divergent redox reactions that include common one-electron reactions and a less-common two-electron redox event. Caution, we suggest, is warranted when utilising CS 2 as a reactivity surrogate for CO 2 . (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Measurement of fine particles and smoking activity in a statewide survey of 36 California Indian casinos

    Jiang, Ru O-Ting; Cheng, Ka I-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Klepeis, Neil E; Repace, James L; Ott, Wayne R; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2011-01-01

    Despite California's 1994 statewide smoking ban, exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) continues in California's Indian casinos. Few data are available on exposure to airborne fine particles (PM2.5) in casinos, especially on a statewide basis. We sought to measure PM2.5 concentrations in Indian casinos widely distributed across California, exploring differences due to casino size, separation of smoking and non-smoking areas, and area smoker density. A selection of 36 out of the 58 Indian casinos throughout California were each visited for 1–3 h on weekend or holiday evenings, using two or more concealed monitors to measure PM2.5 concentrations every 10 s. For each casino, the physical dimensions and the number of patrons and smokers were estimated. As a preliminary assessment of representativeness, we also measured eight casinos in Reno, NV. The average PM2.5 concentration for the smoking slot machine areas (63 μg/m3) was nine times as high as outdoors (7 μg/m3), whereas casino non-smoking restaurants (29 μg/m3) were four times as high. Levels in non-smoking slot machine areas varied: complete physical separation reduced concentrations almost to outdoor levels, but two other separation types had mean levels that were 13 and 29 μg/m3, respectively, higher than outdoors. Elevated PM2.5 concentrations in casinos can be attributed primarily to SHS. Average PM2.5 concentrations during 0.5–1 h visits to smoking areas exceeded 35 μg/m3 for 90% of the casino visits. PMID:20160761

  2. Oxidative Stress, Redox Signaling, and Autophagy: Cell Death Versus Survival

    Navarro-Yepes, Juliana; Burns, Michaela; Anandhan, Annadurai; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; del Razo, Luz Maria; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The molecular machinery regulating autophagy has started becoming elucidated, and a number of studies have undertaken the task to determine the role of autophagy in cell fate determination within the context of human disease progression. Oxidative stress and redox signaling are also largely involved in the etiology of human diseases, where both survival and cell death signaling cascades have been reported to be modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Recent Advances: To date, there is a good understanding of the signaling events regulating autophagy, as well as the signaling processes by which alterations in redox homeostasis are transduced to the activation/regulation of signaling cascades. However, very little is known about the molecular events linking them to the regulation of autophagy. This lack of information has hampered the understanding of the role of oxidative stress and autophagy in human disease progression. Critical Issues: In this review, we will focus on (i) the molecular mechanism by which ROS/RNS generation, redox signaling, and/or oxidative stress/damage alter autophagic flux rates; (ii) the role of autophagy as a cell death process or survival mechanism in response to oxidative stress; and (iii) alternative mechanisms by which autophagy-related signaling regulate mitochondrial function and antioxidant response. Future Directions: Our research efforts should now focus on understanding the molecular basis of events by which autophagy is fine tuned by oxidation/reduction events. This knowledge will enable us to understand the mechanisms by which oxidative stress and autophagy regulate human diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 66–85. PMID:24483238

  3. Physical activity in relation to cognitive decline in elderly men: the FINE study

    Gelder, van B.M.; Tijhuis, M.A.R.; Kromhout, D.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity may be associated with better cognition. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether change in duration and intensity of physical activity is associated with 10-year cognitive decline in elderly men. METHODS: Data of 295 healthy survivors, born between 1900 and 1920, from the

  4. Redox sensor proteins for highly sensitive direct imaging of intracellular redox state.

    Sugiura, Kazunori; Nagai, Takeharu; Nakano, Masahiro; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Ohta, Nobuhiro; Hisabori, Toru

    2015-02-13

    Intracellular redox state is a critical factor for fundamental cellular functions, including regulation of the activities of various metabolic enzymes as well as ROS production and elimination. Genetically-encoded fluorescent redox sensors, such as roGFP (Hanson, G. T., et al. (2004)) and Redoxfluor (Yano, T., et al. (2010)), have been developed to investigate the redox state of living cells. However, these sensors are not useful in cells that contain, for example, other colored pigments. We therefore intended to obtain simpler redox sensor proteins, and have developed oxidation-sensitive fluorescent proteins called Oba-Q (oxidation balance sensed quenching) proteins. Our sensor proteins derived from CFP and Sirius can be used to monitor the intracellular redox state as their fluorescence is drastically quenched upon oxidation. These blue-shifted spectra of the Oba-Q proteins enable us to monitor various redox states in conjunction with other sensor proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The influence of chemical composition and fineness on the performance of alkali activated cements obtained from blast furnace slags

    Langaro, Eloise Aparecida; Matoski, Adalberto; Luz, Caroline Angulski da; Buth, Islas Stein; Moraes, Maryah Costa de; Pereira Filho, Jose Ilo

    2017-01-01

    New binders are being developed for concrete in order to reduce the environmental impact mainly related to CO_2 emissions. Alkali -activated cements (CATs) are obtained from lime-aluminosilicate materials and an alkali activator and can reduce by 80% the emission of CO_2 compared to Portland Cement (PC). Papers have also shown physical and mechanical properties similar or higher than those presented by the PC, however, the activation of raw material is complex. Recent papers have also have showed a strong influence of the characteristics of raw material on the performance of CAT, however, little mentioned in the literature.. Therefore, this paper aimed to analyze the influence of characteristics of blast furnace slag (fineness and chemical composition) on the behavior of activated alkali cements. For this purpose, two slags were used, A and B, which were submitted to different milling times; and activated using 5% of NaOH. Mortars and pastes were prepared for compressive strength testing (7 and 28 days), measurements of heat of hydration and investigation of microstructure (XRD and DSC) were made. The results showed that the mortar made with slag A reached a very good mechanical performance, close to 48MPa at 28 days, and higher formation of CSH, in opposite of slag B. The probable hypothesis of this study is that the system formed in CAT made with slag A (containing more Al_2O_3) could provide CSH with a greater incorporation of Al and a lower crystallinity, increasing the mechanical strength. (author)

  6. A density functional theory study on the active center of Fe-only hydrogenase: characterization and electronic structure of the redox states.

    Liu, Zhi-Pan; Hu, P

    2002-05-08

    We have carried out extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations for possible redox states of the active center in Fe-only hydrogenases. The active center is modeled by [(H(CH(3))S)(CO)(CN(-))Fe(p)(mu-DTN)(mu-CO)Fe(d)(CO)(CN(-))(L)](z)() (z is the net charge in the complex; Fe(p)= the proximal Fe, Fe(d) = the distal Fe, DTN = (-SCH(2)NHCH(2)S-), L is the ligand that bonds with the Fe(d) at the trans position to the bridging CO). Structures of possible redox states are optimized, and CO stretching frequencies are calculated. By a detailed comparison of all the calculated structures and the vibrational frequencies with the available experimental data, we find that (i) the fully oxidized, inactive state is an Fe(II)-Fe(II) state with a hydroxyl (OH(-)) group bonded at the Fe(d), (ii) the oxidized, active state is an Fe(II)-Fe(I) complex which is consistent with the assignment of Cao and Hall (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3734), and (iii) the fully reduced state is a mixture with the major component being a protonated Fe(I)-Fe(I) complex and the other component being its self-arranged form, Fe(II)-Fe(II) hydride. Our calculations also show that the exogenous CO can strongly bond with the Fe(II)-Fe(I) species, but cannot bond with the Fe(I)-Fe(I) complex. This result is consistent with experiments that CO tends to inhibit the oxidized, active state, but not the fully reduced state. The electronic structures of all the redox states have been analyzed. It is found that a frontier orbital which is a mixing state between the e(g) of Fe and the 2 pi of the bridging CO plays a key role concerning the reactivity of Fe-only hydrogenases: (i) it is unoccupied in the fully oxidized, inactive state, half-occupied in the oxidized, active state, and fully occupied in the fully reduced state; (ii) the e(g)-2 pi orbital is a bonding state, and this is the key reason for stability of the low oxidation states, such as Fe(I)-Fe(I) complexes; and (iii) in the e(g)-2 pi orbital

  7. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Bio-Active Heterocycles and Fine Chemicals in Aqueous Media

    Human health, especially in the aging population, mostly depends on various medicines, and researchers are combating against emerging diseases by new drug discovery. Heterocyclic compounds hold a special place among pharmaceutically active natural products as well as synthetic co...

  8. Activation of Al–Cu–Fe quasicrystalline surface: fabrication of a fine nanocomposite layer with high catalytic performance

    Satoshi Kameoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A fine layered nanocomposite with a total thickness of about 200 nm was formed on the surface of an Al63Cu25Fe12 quasicrystal (QC. The nanocomposite was found to exhibit high catalytic performance for steam reforming of methanol. The nanocomposite was formed by a self-assembly process, by leaching the Al–Cu–Fe QC using a 5 wt% Na2CO3 aqueous solution followed by calcination in air at 873 K. The quasiperiodic nature of the QC played an important role in the formation of such a structure. Its high catalytic activity originated from the presence of highly dispersed copper and iron species, which also suppressed the sintering of nanoparticles.

  9. Disruption of Pyridine Nucleotide Redox Status During Oxidative Challenge at Normal and Low-Glucose States: Implications for Cellular Adenosine Triphosphate, Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity, and Reducing Capacity in Colon Epithelial Cells

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Maloney, Ronald E.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We recently demonstrated that menadione (MQ), a redox cycling quinone, mediated the loss of mitochondrial glutathione/glutathione disulfide redox balance. In this study, we showed that MQ significantly disrupted cellular pyridine nucleotide (NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH) redox balance that compromised cellular ATP, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and NADPH-dependent reducing capacity in colonic epithelial cells, a scenario that was exaggerated by low glucose. In the cytosol, MQ induced NAD+ loss concurrent with increased NADP+ and NAD kinase activity, but decreased NADPH. In the mitochondria, NADH loss occurred in conjunction with increased nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase activity and NADP+, and decreased NADPH. These results are consistent with cytosolic NAD+-to-NADP+ and mitochondrial NADH-to-NADPH shifts, but compromised NADPH availability. Thus, despite the sacrifice of NAD+/NADH in favor of NADPH generation, steady-state NADPH levels were not maintained during MQ challenge. Impairments of cellular bioenergetics were evidenced by ATP losses and increased mitochondrial O2 dependence of pyridine nucleotide oxidation–reduction; half-maximal oxidation (P50) was 10-fold higher in low glucose, which was lowered by glutamate or succinate supplementation. This exaggerated O2 dependence is consistent with increased O2 diversion to nonmitochondrial O2 consumption by MQ-semiquinone redox cycling secondary to decreased NADPH-dependent MQ detoxication at low glucose, a situation that was corrected by glucose-sparing mitochondrial substrates. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 2151–2162. PMID:21083422

  10. Redox Behavior of Fe2+/Fe3+ Redox Couple by Absorption Spectroscopy and Measurement

    Oh, J. Y.; Park, S.; Yun, J. I.

    2010-01-01

    Redox behavior has influences on speciation and other geochemical reactions of radionuclides such as sorption, solubility, and colloid formation, etc. It is one of the factors for evaluation of long-term safety assessment under high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal conditions. Accordingly, redox potential (Eh) measurement in aquatic system is important to investigate the redox conditions. Eh is usually measured with redox active electrodes (Pt, Au, glassy carbon, etc.). Nevertheless, Eh measurements by general methods using electrodes provide low accuracy and high uncertainty problem. Therefore, Eh calculated from the concentration of redox active elements with a proper complexing reagent by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy is progressed. Iron exists mostly as spent nuclear waste container material and in hydro-geologic minerals. In this system, iron controls the redox condition in near-field area and influences chemical behavior and speciation of radionuclides including redox sensitive actinides such as U, Np, and Pu. In the present work, we present the investigation on redox phenomena of iron in aquatic system by a combination of absorption spectroscopy and redox potential measurements

  11. A High-Throughput Mass Spectrometry Assay Coupled with Redox Activity Testing Reduces Artifacts and False Positives in Lysine Demethylase Screening.

    Wigle, Tim J; Swinger, Kerren K; Campbell, John E; Scholle, Michael D; Sherrill, John; Admirand, Elizabeth A; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Kuntz, Kevin W; Chesworth, Richard; Moyer, Mikel P; Scott, Margaret Porter; Copeland, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Demethylation of histones by lysine demethylases (KDMs) plays a critical role in controlling gene transcription. Aberrant demethylation may play a causal role in diseases such as cancer. Despite the biological significance of these enzymes, there are limited assay technologies for study of KDMs and few quality chemical probes available to interrogate their biology. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of self-assembled monolayer desorption/ionization (SAMDI) mass spectrometry for the investigation of quantitative KDM enzyme kinetics and for high-throughput screening for KDM inhibitors. SAMDI can be performed in 384-well format and rapidly allows reaction components to be purified prior to injection into a mass spectrometer, without a throughput-limiting liquid chromatography step. We developed sensitive and robust assays for KDM1A (LSD1, AOF2) and KDM4C (JMJD2C, GASC1) and screened 13,824 compounds against each enzyme. Hits were rapidly triaged using a redox assay to identify compounds that interfered with the catalytic oxidation chemistry used by the KDMs for the demethylation reaction. We find that overall this high-throughput mass spectrometry platform coupled with the elimination of redox active compounds leads to a hit rate that is manageable for follow-up work. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  12. Graphene-Nanowall-Decorated Carbon Felt with Excellent Electrochemical Activity Toward VO2+/VO2+ Couple for All Vanadium Redox Flow Battery.

    Li, Wenyue; Zhang, Zhenyu; Tang, Yongbing; Bian, Haidong; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Zhang, Wenjun; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2016-04-01

    3D graphene-nanowall-decorated carbon felts (CF) are synthesized via an in situ microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method and used as positive electrode for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). The carbon fibers in CF are successfully wrapped by vertically grown graphene nanowalls, which not only increase the electrode specific area, but also expose a high density of sharp graphene edges with good catalytic activities to the vanadium ions. As a result, the VRFB with this novel electrode shows three times higher reaction rate toward VO 2 + /VO 2+ redox couple and 11% increased energy efficiency over VRFB with an unmodified CF electrode. Moreover, this designed architecture shows excellent stability in the battery operation. After 100 charging-discharging cycles, the electrode not only shows no observable morphology change, it can also be reused in another battery and practical with the same performance. It is believed that this novel structure including the synthesis procedure will provide a new developing direction for the VRFB electrode.

  13. Graphene‐Nanowall‐Decorated Carbon Felt with Excellent Electrochemical Activity Toward VO2 +/VO2+ Couple for All Vanadium Redox Flow Battery

    Li, Wenyue; Zhang, Zhenyu; Bian, Haidong; Ng, Tsz‐Wai

    2015-01-01

    3D graphene‐nanowall‐decorated carbon felts (CF) are synthesized via an in situ microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method and used as positive electrode for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). The carbon fibers in CF are successfully wrapped by vertically grown graphene nanowalls, which not only increase the electrode specific area, but also expose a high density of sharp graphene edges with good catalytic activities to the vanadium ions. As a result, the VRFB with this novel electrode shows three times higher reaction rate toward VO2 +/VO2+ redox couple and 11% increased energy efficiency over VRFB with an unmodified CF electrode. Moreover, this designed architecture shows excellent stability in the battery operation. After 100 charging–discharging cycles, the electrode not only shows no observable morphology change, it can also be reused in another battery and practical with the same performance. It is believed that this novel structure including the synthesis procedure will provide a new developing direction for the VRFB electrode. PMID:27774399

  14. Highly enhanced electrochemical activity of Ni foam electrodes decorated with nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for non-aqueous redox flow batteries

    Lee, Jungkuk; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) are directly grown on the surface of a three-dimensional (3D) Ni foam substrate by floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD). The electrochemical properties of the 3D NCNT-Ni foam are thoroughly examined as a potential electrode for non-aqueous redox flow batteries (RFBs). During synthesis, nitrogen atoms can be successfully doped onto the carbon nanotube (CNT) lattices by forming an abundance of nitrogen-based functional groups. The 3D NCNT-Ni foam electrode exhibits excellent electrochemical activities toward the redox reactions of [Fe (bpy)3]2+/3+ (in anolyte) and [Co(bpy)3]+/2+ (in catholyte), which are mainly attributed to the hierarchical 3D structure of the NCNT-Ni foam electrode and the catalytic effect of nitrogen atoms doped onto the CNTs; this leads to faster mass transfer and charge transfer during operation. As a result, the RFB cell assembled with 3D NCNT-Ni foam electrodes exhibits a high energy efficiency of 80.4% in the first cycle; this performance is maintained up to the 50th cycle without efficiency loss.

  15. A multimodal optical and electrochemical device for monitoring surface reactions: redox active surfaces in porous silicon Rugate filters.

    Ciampi, Simone; Guan, Bin; Darwish, Nadim A; Zhu, Ying; Reece, Peter J; Gooding, J Justin

    2012-12-21

    Herein, mesoporous silicon (PSi) is configured as a single sensing device that has dual readouts; as a photonic crystal sensor in a Rugate filter configuration, and as a high surface area porous electrode. The as-prepared PSi is chemically modified to provide it with stability in aqueous media and to allow for the subsequent coupling of chemical species, such as via Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions between 1-alkynes and azides ("click" reactions). The utility of the bimodal capabilities of the PSi sensor for monitoring surface coupling procedures is demonstrated by the covalent coupling of a ferrocene derivative, as well as by demonstrating ligand-exchange reactions (LER) at the PSi surface. Both types of reactions were monitored through optical reflectivity measurements, as well as electrochemically via the oxidation/reduction of the surface tethered redox species.

  16. Organic molecules as tools to control the growth, surface structure, and redox activity of colloidal quantum dots.

    Weiss, Emily A

    2013-11-19

    In order to achieve efficient and reliable technology that can harness solar energy, the behavior of electrons and energy at interfaces between different types or phases of materials must be understood. Conversion of light to chemical or electrical potential in condensed phase systems requires gradients in free energy that allow the movement of energy or charge carriers and facilitate redox reactions and dissociation of photoexcited states (excitons) into free charge carriers. Such free energy gradients are present at interfaces between solid and liquid phases or between inorganic and organic materials. Nanostructured materials have a higher density of these interfaces than bulk materials. Nanostructured materials, however, have a structural and chemical complexity that does not exist in bulk materials, which presents a difficult challenge: to lower or eliminate energy barriers to electron and energy flux that inevitably result from forcing different materials to meet in a spatial region of atomic dimensions. Chemical functionalization of nanostructured materials is perhaps the most versatile and powerful strategy for controlling the potential energy landscape of their interfaces and for minimizing losses in energy conversion efficiency due to interfacial structural and electronic defects. Colloidal quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals synthesized with wet-chemical methods and coated in organic molecules. Chemists can use these model systems to study the effects of chemical functionalization of nanoscale organic/inorganic interfaces on the optical and electronic properties of a nanostructured material, and the behavior of electrons and energy at interfaces. The optical and electronic properties of colloidal quantum dots have an intense sensitivity to their surface chemistry, and their organic adlayers make them dispersible in solvent. This allows researchers to use high signal-to-noise solution-phase spectroscopy to study processes at interfaces. In this

  17. Comparison of the redox activities of sol-gel and conventionally prepared Bi-Mo-Ti mixed oxides

    Wildberger, M.; Grundwaldt, J.D.; Mallat, T.; Baiker, A. [Lab. of Technical Chemistry, Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, ETH-Zentrum, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1998-12-31

    Novel sol-gel Bi-Mo-Ti oxides have been prepared and characterized by XRD, XPS, FT-Raman and HRTEM. The surface Bi{sup 3+} and Mo{sup 6+} species of some xerogels and an aerogel could be reduced and oxidized at room temperature, whereas the conventionally prepared reference materials were not reduced by H{sub 2} below 300 C. The unusual redox properties, under very mild conditions, are likely due to the unique morphology of Bi-Mo-oxides stabilized by titania. During butadiene oxidation to furan at above 400 C to sol-gel mixed oxides restructured considerably and their performance was barely better than that of titania-supported Bi-Mo oxides. (orig.)

  18. Rate of hydrolysis in ATP synthase is fine-tuned by  -subunit motif controlling active site conformation

    Beke-Somfai, T.; Lincoln, P.; Norden, B.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-designed artificial enzymes will require precise understanding of how conformation of active sites may control barrier heights of key transition states, including dependence on structure and dynamics at larger molecular scale. F(o)F(1) ATP synthase is interesting as a model system: a delicate molecular machine synthesizing or hydrolyzing ATP using a rotary motor. Isolated F(1) performs hydrolysis with a rate very sensitive to ATP concentration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, at low ATP concentrations, ATP is slowly hydrolyzed in the so-called tight binding site, whereas at higher concentrations, the binding of additional ATP molecules induces rotation of the central γ-subunit, thereby forcing the site to transform through subtle conformational changes into a loose binding site in which hydrolysis occurs faster. How the 1-Å-scale rearrangements are controlled is not yet fully understood. By a combination of theoretical approaches, we address how large macromolecular rearrangements may manipulate the active site and how the reaction rate changes with active site conformation. Simulations reveal that, in response to γ-subunit position, the active site conformation is fine-tuned mainly by small α-subunit changes. Quantum mechanics-based results confirm that the sub-Ångström gradual changes between tight and loose binding site structures dramatically alter the hydrolysis rate.

  19. Rate of hydrolysis in ATP synthase is fine-tuned by  -subunit motif controlling active site conformation

    Beke-Somfai, T.

    2013-01-23

    Computer-designed artificial enzymes will require precise understanding of how conformation of active sites may control barrier heights of key transition states, including dependence on structure and dynamics at larger molecular scale. F(o)F(1) ATP synthase is interesting as a model system: a delicate molecular machine synthesizing or hydrolyzing ATP using a rotary motor. Isolated F(1) performs hydrolysis with a rate very sensitive to ATP concentration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, at low ATP concentrations, ATP is slowly hydrolyzed in the so-called tight binding site, whereas at higher concentrations, the binding of additional ATP molecules induces rotation of the central γ-subunit, thereby forcing the site to transform through subtle conformational changes into a loose binding site in which hydrolysis occurs faster. How the 1-Å-scale rearrangements are controlled is not yet fully understood. By a combination of theoretical approaches, we address how large macromolecular rearrangements may manipulate the active site and how the reaction rate changes with active site conformation. Simulations reveal that, in response to γ-subunit position, the active site conformation is fine-tuned mainly by small α-subunit changes. Quantum mechanics-based results confirm that the sub-Ångström gradual changes between tight and loose binding site structures dramatically alter the hydrolysis rate.

  20. Measuring and Explaining Cognitive Load During Design Activities: A fine-grained approach

    Weber, Barbara; Neurauter, Manuel; Burattin, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in neuro–physiological measurements resulted in reliable and objective measures of Cognitive Load (CL), e.g., using pupillary responses. However, continuous measurement of CL in software design activities, e.g., conceptual modeling, has received little attention. In this paper, we...... present the progress of our work intended to close this gap by continuously measuring cognitive load during design activities. This work aims at advancing our understanding of WHEN and WHY designers face challenges. For this, we attempt to explore and explain the occurrence of CL using fine–granular units...

  1. Active region fine structure observed at 0.08 arcsec resolution

    Schlichenmaier, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Hoch, S.; Soltau, D.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Denker, C.; Balthasar, H.; Hofmann, A.; Strassmeier, K.G.; Staude, J.; Feller, A.; Lagg, A.; Solanki, S.K.; Collados Vera, M.; Sigwarth, M.; Volkmer, R.; Waldmann, T.A.; Kneer, F.; Nicklas, H.; Sobotka, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 596, December (2016), A7/1-A7/8 ISSN 0004-6361 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 312495 - SOLARNET Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * activity * sunspots Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  2. Helium generated cold plasma finely regulates activation of human fibroblast-like primary cells.

    Paola Brun

    Full Text Available Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and

  3. Synthesis and characterisation of iron, cobalt and gallium complexes wit the redox-active amide ligand systems pyridinocarboxiamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide; Synthese und Charakterisierung von Eisen-, Cobalt- und Galliumkomplexen mit den redoxaktiven Amidligandsystemen Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid

    Beckmann, U.

    2001-07-01

    The interactions of the redox-active ligand systems piridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide with the metals iron, cobalt and gallium were investigated. It was found that metal complexes with ligands of the pyridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide type can be redox-active in the sense of a ligand-centered reaction. This may provide a better understanding of natural catalysis mechanisms and redox processes. [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde die Wechselwirkung der redoxaktiven Ligandsysteme Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid mit den Metallen Eisen, Cobalt und Gallium untersucht. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass Metallkomplexe mit Liganden vom Typ Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid auch im Sinne einer ligandzentrierten Reaktion redoxaktiv sein koennen. Dies kann dazu beitragen, Katalysemechanismen und Redoxprozesse in der Natur besser zu verstehen. (orig.)

  4. Fishing for space: fine-scale multi-sector maritime activities influence fisher location choice.

    Alex N Tidd

    Full Text Available The European Union and other states are moving towards Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management to balance food production and security with wider ecosystem concerns. Fishing is only one of several sectors operating within the ocean environment, competing for renewable and non-renewable resources that overlap in a limited space. Other sectors include marine mining, energy generation, recreation, transport and conservation. Trade-offs of these competing sectors are already part of the process but attempts to detail how the seas are being utilised have been primarily based on compilations of data on human activity at large spatial scales. Advances including satellite and shipping automatic tracking enable investigation of factors influencing fishers' choice of fishing grounds at spatial scales relevant to decision-making, including the presence or avoidance of activities by other sectors. We analyse the determinants of English and Welsh scallop-dredging fleet behaviour, including competing sectors, operating in the eastern English Channel. Results indicate aggregate mining activity, maritime traffic, increased fishing costs, and the English inshore 6 and French 12 nautical mile limits negatively impact fishers' likelihood of fishing in otherwise suitable areas. Past success, net-benefits and fishing within the 12 NM predispose fishers to use areas. Systematic conservation planning has yet to be widely applied in marine systems, and the dynamics of spatial overlap of fishing with other activities have not been studied at scales relevant to fisher decision-making. This study demonstrates fisher decision-making is indeed affected by the real-time presence of other sectors in an area, and therefore trade-offs which need to be accounted for in marine planning. As marine resource extraction demands intensify, governments will need to take a more proactive approach to resolving these trade-offs, and studies such as this will be required as the evidential

  5. Fishing for space: fine-scale multi-sector maritime activities influence fisher location choice.

    Tidd, Alex N; Vermard, Youen; Marchal, Paul; Pinnegar, John; Blanchard, Julia L; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2015-01-01

    The European Union and other states are moving towards Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management to balance food production and security with wider ecosystem concerns. Fishing is only one of several sectors operating within the ocean environment, competing for renewable and non-renewable resources that overlap in a limited space. Other sectors include marine mining, energy generation, recreation, transport and conservation. Trade-offs of these competing sectors are already part of the process but attempts to detail how the seas are being utilised have been primarily based on compilations of data on human activity at large spatial scales. Advances including satellite and shipping automatic tracking enable investigation of factors influencing fishers' choice of fishing grounds at spatial scales relevant to decision-making, including the presence or avoidance of activities by other sectors. We analyse the determinants of English and Welsh scallop-dredging fleet behaviour, including competing sectors, operating in the eastern English Channel. Results indicate aggregate mining activity, maritime traffic, increased fishing costs, and the English inshore 6 and French 12 nautical mile limits negatively impact fishers' likelihood of fishing in otherwise suitable areas. Past success, net-benefits and fishing within the 12 NM predispose fishers to use areas. Systematic conservation planning has yet to be widely applied in marine systems, and the dynamics of spatial overlap of fishing with other activities have not been studied at scales relevant to fisher decision-making. This study demonstrates fisher decision-making is indeed affected by the real-time presence of other sectors in an area, and therefore trade-offs which need to be accounted for in marine planning. As marine resource extraction demands intensify, governments will need to take a more proactive approach to resolving these trade-offs, and studies such as this will be required as the evidential foundation for future

  6. Fine-Mapping Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene: Separate QTLs Identified for Hypertension and for ACE Activity

    Chung, Chia-Min; Wang, Ruey-Yun; Fann, Cathy S. J.; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Jong, Yuh-Shiun; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Kang, Chih-Sen; Chen, Chien-Chung; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been implicated in multiple biological system, particularly cardiovascular diseases. However, findings associating ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism with hypertension or other related traits are inconsistent. Therefore, in a two-stage approach, we aimed to fine-map ACE in order to narrow-down the function-specific locations. We genotyped 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ACE from 1168 individuals from 305 young-onset (age ≤40) hypertension pedigrees, and found four linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks. A tag-SNP, rs1800764 on LD block 2, upstream of and near the ACE promoter, was significantly associated with young-onset hypertension (p = 0.04). Tag-SNPs on all LD blocks were significantly associated with ACE activity (p-value: 10–16 to ACE activity were found between exon13 and intron18 and between intron 20 and 3′UTR, as revealed by measured haplotype analysis. These two major QTLs of ACE activity and the moderate effect variant upstream of ACE promoter for young-onset hypertension were replicated by another independent association study with 842 subjects. PMID:23469169

  7. Measuring and Explaining Cognitive Load During Design Activities: A fine-grained approach

    Weber, Barbara; Neurauter, Manuel; Burattin, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in neuro–physiological measurements resulted in reliable and objective measures of Cognitive Load (CL), e.g., using pupillary responses. However, continuous measurement of CL in software design activities, e.g., conceptual modeling, has received little attention. In this paper, we...... of analysis (e.g., type of subtasks, evolution of design artifact’s quality, and manner of technology use). We expect implications for the future development of intelligent software systems, which are aware WHEN a particular designer experiences challenges, but also WHY challenges occur....

  8. Fine-tuning of mast cell activation by FceRIbeta chain

    Chisei eRa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells play the key role in allergic reaction and disorders, being activated by the high affinity receptor for IgE, FceRI. There are two types of FceRI expressed on the cell surface of human mast cells, abg2 type and ag2 type (without b chain, while in mouse mast cells only the tetrameric abg2 type is expressed. In the lesion of allergic inflammation such as atopic conjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis, mast cells increase in number and exclusively express the abg2 type FceRI, in contrast in healthy conjunctiva and skin most mast cells express the ag2 type. The human and mouse FceRI genes contain seven exons and in the human gene we found a repressor element locates in the forth intron. Through the repressor element HDACs are recruited to the FceRIb gene by MZF-1/FHL3/NFY complex and repress b transcription by deacetylation of histones in the presence of GM-CSF. It has been long recognized that the function of the b chain ITAM is a signal amplifier, but we have recently revealed bidirectional (positive and negative functions of the b chain ITAM in the regulation of the mast cell activation and effector functions. Namely, the b chain enhances the mast cell activation signal triggered with low intensity stimulation such as lower dose antigen than threshold while it suppresses the signal of high intensity stimulation. Employing mouse model of CHS induced by oxazolone, we have revealed that IgE-mediated mast cell activation is required for CHS and that the b chain is crucially involved in this model. On the other hand diverse immune receptors including TLRs, SCF receptor and GPCRs are known to mediate signals which modulate FceRI・adenosine receptors, one of GPCRs, trigger synergistic degranulation response in mast cells even when the FceRI stimulation is of ‘lower intensity’ than the threshold. We have recently elucidated, in this synergistic degranulation response, b chain ITAM plays positive role, possibly reflecting in vivo allergic

  9. Anne Fine

    Philip Gaydon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An interview with Anne Fine with an introduction and aside on the role of children’s literature in our lives and development, and our adult perceptions of the suitability of childhood reading material. Since graduating from Warwick in 1968 with a BA in Politics and History, Anne Fine has written over fifty books for children and eight for adults, won the Carnegie Medal twice (for Goggle-Eyes in 1989 and Flour Babies in 1992, been a highly commended runner-up three times (for Bill’s New Frock in 1989, The Tulip Touch in 1996, and Up on Cloud Nine in 2002, been shortlisted for the Hans Christian Andersen Award (the highest recognition available to a writer or illustrator of children’s books, 1998, undertaken the positon of Children’s Laureate (2001-2003, and been awarded an OBE for her services to literature (2003. Warwick presented Fine with an Honorary Doctorate in 2005. Philip Gaydon’s interview with Anne Fine was recorded as part of the ‘Voices of the University’ oral history project, co-ordinated by Warwick’s Institute of Advanced Study.

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) in macrophage biology and cardiovascular disease. A redox-regulated master controller of monocyte function and macrophage phenotype.

    Kim, Hong Seok; Asmis, Reto

    2017-08-01

    MAPK pathways play a critical role in the activation of monocytes and macrophages by pathogens, signaling molecules and environmental cues and in the regulation of macrophage function and plasticity. MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) has emerged as the main counter-regulator of MAPK signaling in monocytes and macrophages. Loss of MKP-1 in monocytes and macrophages in response to metabolic stress leads to dysregulation of monocyte adhesion and migration, and gives rise to dysfunctional, proatherogenic monocyte-derived macrophages. Here we review the properties of this redox-regulated dual-specificity MAPK phosphatase and the role of MKP-1 in monocyte and macrophage biology and cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mapping the fine structure of cortical activity with different micro-ECoG electrode array geometries

    Wang, Xi; Gkogkidis, C. Alexis; Iljina, Olga; Fiederer, Lukas D. J.; Henle, Christian; Mader, Irina; Kaminsky, Jan; Stieglitz, Thomas; Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Ball, Tonio

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Innovations in micro-electrocorticography (µECoG) electrode array manufacturing now allow for intricate designs with smaller contact diameters and/or pitch (i.e. inter-contact distance) down to the sub-mm range. The aims of the present study were: (i) to investigate whether frequency ranges up to 400 Hz can be reproducibly observed in µECoG recordings and (ii) to examine how differences in topographical substructure between these frequency bands and electrode array geometries can be quantified. We also investigated, for the first time, the influence of blood vessels on signal properties and assessed the influence of cortical vasculature on topographic mapping. Approach. The present study employed two µECoG electrode arrays with different contact diameters and inter-contact distances, which were used to characterize neural activity from the somatosensory cortex of minipigs in a broad frequency range up to 400 Hz. The analysed neural data were recorded in acute experiments under anaesthesia during peripheral electrical stimulation. Main results. We observed that µECoG recordings reliably revealed multi-focal cortical somatosensory response patterns, in which response peaks were often less than 1 cm apart and would thus not have been resolvable with conventional ECoG. The response patterns differed by stimulation site and intensity, they were distinct for different frequency bands, and the results of functional mapping proved independent of cortical vascular. Our analysis of different frequency bands exhibited differences in the number of activation peaks in topographical substructures. Notably, signal strength and signal-to-noise ratios differed between the two electrode arrays, possibly due to their different sensitivity for variations in spatial patterns and signal strengths. Significance. Our findings that the geometry of µECoG electrode arrays can strongly influence their recording performance can help to make informed decisions that maybe

  12. The association between ambient fine particulate air pollution and physical activity: a cohort study of university students living in Beijing.

    Yu, Hongjun; Yu, Miao; Gordon, Shelby Paige; Zhang, Ruiling

    2017-10-05

    Air pollution has become a substantial environmental issue affecting human health and health-related behavior in China. Physical activity is widely accepted as a method to promote health and well-being and is potentially influenced by air pollution. Previous population-based studies have focused on the impact of air pollution on physical activity in the U.S. using a cross-sectional survey method; however, few have examined the impact on middle income countries such as China using follow-up data. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ambient fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) air pollution on physical activity among freshmen students living in Beijing by use of follow-up data. We conducted 4 follow-up health surveys on 3445 freshmen students from Tsinghua University from 2012 to 2013 and 2480 freshmen completed all 4 surveys. Linear individual fixed-effect regressions were performed based on repeated-measure physical activity-related health behaviors and ambient PM 2.5 concentrations among the follow-up participants. An increase in ambient PM 2.5 concentration by one standard deviation (44.72 μg/m 3 ) was associated with a reduction in 22.32 weekly minutes of vigorous physical activity (95% confidence interval [CI] = 24.88-19.77), a reduction in 10.63 weekly minutes of moderate physical activity (95% CI = 14.61-6.64), a reduction in 32.45 weekly minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (95% CI = 37.63-27.28), and a reduction in 226.14 weekly physical activity MET-minute scores (95% CI = 256.06-196.21). The impact of ambient PM 2.5 concentration on weekly total minutes of moderate physical activity tended to be greater among males than among females. Ambient PM 2.5 air pollution significantly discouraged physical activity among Chinese freshmen students living in Beijing. Future studies are warranted to replicate study findings in other Chinese cities and universities, and policy interventions are urgently needed to reduce air

  13. A fine structural localization of the non-specific cholinesterase activity in glomerular nerve formations (endings).

    Dubový, P

    1990-01-01

    Snout glabrous skin (rhinarium) of the cat is innervated not only by typical simple lamellar corpuscles but also glomerular formations. In contrast to simple lamellar corpuscles, glomerular nerve formations are located away the dermal papillae. In cross sections, glomerular nerve formation consists of several axonal profiles enveloped by 1-2 cytoplasmic lamellae of Schwann cells. The space among them is filled by collagenous microfibrils and the basal lamina-like material. Capsule was composed from fibroblast-like cells without definite basal lamina. An electron-dense reaction product due to non-specific cholinesterase activity was associated with Schwann cells and their processes surrounding unmyelinated terminal portion of the sensory axons. Abundant reaction product was bound to the collagenous microfibrils and was deposited in extracellular matrix between Schwann cell processes. These results are further evidence for the presence of the non-specific cholinesterase molecules as integral component of the extracellular matrix in sensory corpuscles. On the basis of histochemical study two possible explanation are considered for functional involving of this enzyme in sensory nerve formations.

  14. Effects of some inhibitors of protein synthesis on the chloroplast fine structure, CO2 fixation and the Hill reaction activity

    S. Więckowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study concerning the effects of chloramphenicol (100 μg ml-1, actidione (10 μg ml-1, 5-bromouracil (190 μg ml-1, actinomycin D (30 μg ml-1 and DL-ethionine (800 μg ml-1 on the chloroplast fine structure, 14CO2 incorporation and the Hill reaction activity was the subject of the experiments presented in this paper. The experiments were conducted on bean seedlings under the conditions when chlorophyll accumulation was inhibited only partially. The results obtained indicate that chloromphenicol is responsible for the reduction of the number of grana per section of plastid and for the formation of numerous vesicles in the stroma. In the presence of actidione, actinomycin D or DL-ethionine the lamellae are poorly differentiated into .stroma and granum regions and there occur disturbances in the typical orientation of lamellae within chloroplasts. Only in the presence of 5-bromouracil the development of chloroplast structure resemble that in control plants. A comparison of the results obtained with those published earlier (Więckowski et al., 1974; Ficek and Więckowski, 1974 shows that such processes as assimilatory pigment accumulation, the rate of CO2 fixation, the Hill reaction activity, and the development of lamellar system are suppressed in a different extent by the inhibitors used.

  15. Active thermal fine laser tuning in a broad spectral range and optical properties of cholesteric liquid crystal.

    Jeong, Mi-Yun; Kwak, Keumcheol

    2016-11-20

    In this study, we achieved active fine laser tuning in a broad spectral range with dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal wedge-type cells through temperature control. The spatial pitch gradient of each position of the wedge cell at room temperature was almost maintained after developing a temperature gradient. To achieve the maximum tuning range, the chiral dopant concentration, thickness, thickness gradient, and temperature gradient on the wedge cell should be matched properly. In order to understand the laser tuning mechanism for temperature change, we studied the temperature dependence of optical properties of the photonic bandgap of cholesteric liquid crystals. In our cholesteric liquid crystal samples, when temperature was increased, photonic bandgaps were shifted toward blue, while the width of the photonic bandgap was decreased, regardless of whether the helicity was left-handed or right-handed. This is mainly due to the combination of decreased refractive indices, higher molecular anisotropy of chiral molecules, and increased chiral molecular solubility. We envisage that this kind of study will prove useful in the development of practical active tunable CLC laser devices.

  16. Activity patterns and fine-scale resource partitioning in the gregarious Kihansi spray toad Nectophrynoides asperginis in captivity.

    Rija, Alfan A; Goboro, Ezekiel M; Mwamende, Kuruthumu A; Said, Abubakari; Kohi, Edward M; Hassan, Shombe N

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of species threatened with extinction is important for conservation planning and for solving problems facing species in captivity and the wild. We examined diurnal activity budgets and habitat use of the extinct in the wild Kihansi spray toad to provide insights into ongoing conservation initiatives for this species. Observations on eight target behaviors were made each morning and evening for 14 days, in two subpopulations at Kihansi and University of Dar es Salaam captive breeding centers. There were significantly more bouts of resting than calling, amplexing, hunting, walking, climbing, or feeding. There was no difference in mean time spent in each activity between the two subpopulations. The use of habitat was variable between age classes, subpopulations and sampling time. Young toads spent significantly more time resting at the top of vegetation and on walls while adults rested more on logs. Further, adults foraged more on the walls and vegetation in the morning and on the ground in the evening. Contrastingly, young toads foraged more on the ground in the morning and switched to elevated patches during evening. The similarity of the toads' behavior suggests that important biological traits are still maintained in captivity and retained across toad generations. Furthermore, temporal and spatial variations in the use of habitat structures between age groups suggest fine-scale resource partitioning to reduce competition in this gregarious species. These results highlight the importance of maintaining diverse habitat structures in captivity and are useful for planning species reintroduction and future restocking programs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Biogeochemical reactive-transport modelling of the interactions of medium activity long-lived nuclear waste in fractured argillite and the effect on redox conditions

    Small, J.S.; Steele, H.; Kwong, S.; Albrecht, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The role of anaerobic microbial processes in mediating gas generation and redox reactions in organic (cellulose) containing low level activity nuclear wastes (LLW) is well established through monitoring of operational near-surface LLW disposal sites and municipal waste disposal sites. Modelling approaches based on Monod kinetic growth models to represent the complex suite of anaerobic processes have been developed and these models are able to reproduce the evolving biogeochemistry and gas generation of large scale and long term (10 year) experiments on cellulose waste degradation. In the case of geological disposal of medium activity long-lived nuclear waste (MAVL) microbial processes have the potential to exploit metabolic energy sources present in the waste, engineered barriers and host geological formation and as a consequence influence redox potential. Several electron donors and electron acceptors may be present in MAVL. Electron donors include; hydrogen (resulting from radiolysis and anaerobic corrosion of metals), and hydrolysis products of organic waste materials. Sulphate, nitrate and Fe(III) containing minerals and corrosion products are examples of electron acceptors present in intermediate level wastes. Significant amounts of organic matter, sulphate and iron minerals may also be present in host geological formations and have the potential to act as microbial energy sources once the system is perturbed by electron donors/acceptors from the waste. The construction of a geological disposal facility will physically disturb the host formation, potentially causing fracturing of the excavation damage zone (EDZ). The EDZ may thus provide environmental conditions, such as space and free water that together with nutrient and energy sources to promote microbial activity. In this study the Generalised Repository Model (GRM) developed to simulate the coupled microbiological, chemical and transport processes in near

  18. Reversible Capture and Release of Cl2 and Br2 with a Redox-Active Metal-Organic Framework.

    Tulchinsky, Yuri; Hendon, Christopher H; Lomachenko, Kirill A; Borfecchia, Elisa; Melot, Brent C; Hudson, Matthew R; Tarver, Jacob D; Korzyński, Maciej D; Stubbs, Amanda W; Kagan, Jacob J; Lamberti, Carlo; Brown, Craig M; Dincă, Mircea

    2017-04-26

    Extreme toxicity, corrosiveness, and volatility pose serious challenges for the safe storage and transportation of elemental chlorine and bromine, which play critical roles in the chemical industry. Solid materials capable of forming stable nonvolatile compounds upon reaction with elemental halogens may partially mitigate these challenges by allowing safe halogen release on demand. Here we demonstrate that elemental halogens quantitatively oxidize coordinatively unsaturated Co(II) ions in a robust azolate metal-organic framework (MOF) to produce stable and safe-to-handle Co(III) materials featuring terminal Co(III)-halogen bonds. Thermal treatment of the oxidized MOF causes homolytic cleavage of the Co(III)-halogen bonds, reduction to Co(II), and concomitant release of elemental halogens. The reversible chemical storage and thermal release of elemental halogens occur with no significant losses of structural integrity, as the parent cobaltous MOF retains its crystallinity and porosity even after three oxidation/reduction cycles. These results highlight a material operating via redox mechanism that may find utility in the storage and capture of other noxious and corrosive gases.

  19. Electron and Oxygen Atom Transfer Chemistry of Co(II) in a Proton Responsive, Redox Active Ligand Environment.

    Cook, Brian J; Pink, Maren; Pal, Kuntal; Caulton, Kenneth G

    2018-05-21

    The bis-pyrazolato pyridine complex LCo(PEt 3 ) 2 serves as a masked form of three-coordinate Co II and shows diverse reactivity in its reaction with several potential outer sphere oxidants and oxygen atom transfer reagents. N-Methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMO) oxidizes coordinated PEt 3 from LCo(PEt 3 ) 2 , but the final cobalt product is still divalent cobalt, in LCo(NMO) 2 . The thermodynamics of a variety of oxygen atom transfer reagents, including NMO, are calculated by density functional theory, to rank their oxidizing power. Oxidation of LCo(PEt 3 ) 2 with AgOTf in the presence of LiCl as a trapping nucleophile forms the unusual aggregate [LCo(PEt 3 ) 2 Cl(LiOTf) 2 ] 2 held together by Li + binding to very nucleophilic chloride on Co(III) and triflate binding to those Li + . In contrast, Cp 2 Fe + effects oxidation to trivalent cobalt, to form (HL)Co(PEt 3 ) 2 Cl + ; proton and the chloride originate from solvent in a rare example of CH 2 Cl 2 dehydrochlorination. An unexpected noncomplementary redox reaction is reported involving attack by 2e reductant PEt 3 nucleophile on carbon of the 1e oxidant radical Cp 2 Fe + , forming a P-C bond and H + ; this reaction competes in the reaction of LCo(PEt 3 ) 2 with Cp 2 Fe + .

  20. Terminal uranium(V/VI) nitride activation of carbon dioxide and carbon disulfide. Factors governing diverse and well-defined cleavage and redox reactions

    Cleaves, Peter A.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kefalidis, Christos E.; Maron, Laurent [LPCNO, CNRS and INSA, Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J.L. [School of Chemistry and Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Lewis, William [School of Chemistry, The University of Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-24

    The reactivity of terminal uranium(V/VI) nitrides with CE{sub 2} (E=O, S) is presented. Well-defined C=E cleavage followed by zero-, one-, and two-electron redox events is observed. The uranium(V) nitride [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(N)][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (1, Tren{sup TIPS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiiPr{sub 3}){sub 3}; B15C5=benzo-15-crown-5) reacts with CO{sub 2} to give [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(O)(NCO)][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (3), whereas the uranium(VI) nitride [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(N)] (2) reacts with CO{sub 2} to give isolable [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(O)(NCO)] (4); complex 4 rapidly decomposes to known [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(O)] (5) with concomitant formation of N{sub 2} and CO proposed, with the latter trapped as a vanadocene adduct. In contrast, 1 reacts with CS{sub 2} to give [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(κ{sup 2}-CS{sub 3})][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (6), 2, and [K(B15C5){sub 2}][NCS] (7), whereas 2 reacts with CS{sub 2} to give [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(NCS)] (8) and ''S'', with the latter trapped as Ph{sub 3}PS. Calculated reaction profiles reveal outer-sphere reactivity for uranium(V) but inner-sphere mechanisms for uranium(VI); despite the wide divergence of products the initial activation of CE{sub 2} follows mechanistically related pathways, providing insight into the factors of uranium oxidation state, chalcogen, and NCE groups that govern the subsequent divergent redox reactions that include common one-electron reactions and a less-common two-electron redox event. Caution, we suggest, is warranted when utilising CS{sub 2} as a reactivity surrogate for CO{sub 2}. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Chloroplast Redox Poise

    Steccanella, Verdiana

    the redox status of the plastoquinone pool and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Furthermore, in the plant cell, the equilibrium between redox reactions and ROS signals is also maintained by various balancing mechanisms among which the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin system (TR-Trx) stands out as a mediator......The redox state of the chloroplast is maintained by a delicate balance between energy production and consumption and is affected by the need to avoid increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox power and ROS generated in the chloroplast are essential for maintaining physiological...... metabolic pathways and for optimizing chloroplast functions. The redox poise of photosynthetic electron transport components like plastoquinone is crucial to initiate signaling cascades and might also be involved in key biosynthetic pathways such as chlorophyll biosynthesis. We, therefore, explored...

  2. Understanding controls on redox processes in floodplain sediments of the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Noël, Vincent; Boye, Kristin; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Bone, Sharon; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Cardarelli, Emily; Janot, Noémie; Fendorf, Scott; Williams, Kenneth H.; Bargar, John R.

    2017-12-15

    River floodplains, heavily used for water supplies, housing, agriculture, mining, and industry, may have water quality jeopardized by native or exogenous metals. Redox processes mediate the accumulation and release of these species in groundwater. Understanding the physicochemical, hydrological, and biogeochemical controls on the distribution and variability and variability of redox conditions is therefore critical to developing conceptual and numerical models of contaminants transport within floodplains. The distribution and intensity of redox activity at the Rifle, CO, site within the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), are believed to be controlled by textural and compositional heterogeneities. Regionally, the UCRB is impacted by former uranium and vanadium ore processing, resulting in contaminations by U, Mo, V, As, Se, and Mn. Floodplains throughout the UCRB share sediment and groundwater characteristics, making redox activity regionally important to metal and radionuclide mobility. In this study, Fe and S speciation were used to track the distribution and stability of redox processes in sediment cores from three floodplain sites covering a 250 km range in the central portion of the UCRB. The results of the present study support the hypothesis that Fe(III) and sulfate reducing sediments are regionally important in the UCRB. The presence of organic carbon together with pore saturation were the key requirements for reducing conditions, dominated by sulfate-reduction. Sediment texture moderated the response of the system to external forcing, such as oxidant infusion, making fine-grain sediments resistant to change in comparison to coarser-grained sediments. Exposure to O2 and NO3- mediates the reactivity and longevity of freshly precipitated sulfides creating the potential for release of sequestered radionuclides and metals. The physical and chemical parameters of reducing zones evidenced in this study are thus thought to be key parameters on the dynamic exchange

  3. Pyridine nucleotide cycling and control of intracellular redox state in relation to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and nuclear localization of glutathione during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture.

    Pellny, Till K; Locato, Vittoria; Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Markovic, Jelena; De Gara, Laura; Pallardó, Federico V; Foyer, Christine H

    2009-05-01

    Pyridine nucleotides, ascorbate and glutathione are major redox metabolites in plant cells, with specific roles in cellular redox homeostasis and the regulation of the cell cycle. However, the regulation of these metabolite pools during exponential growth and their precise functions in the cell cycle remain to be characterized. The present analysis of the abundance of ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotides during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture provides evidence for the differential regulation of each of these redox pools. Ascorbate was most abundant early in the growth cycle, but glutathione was low at this point. The cellular ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulphide ratios were high and constant but the pyridine nucleotide pools were largely oxidized over the period of exponential growth and only became more reduced once growth had ceased. The glutathione pool increased in parallel with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities and with increases in the abundance of PARP1 and PARP2 mRNAs at a time of high cell cycle activity as indicated by transcriptome information. Marked changes in the intracellular partitioning of GSH between the cytoplasm and nucleus were observed. Extension of the exponential growth phase by dilution or changing the media led to increases in the glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form (NAD)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form (NADH) pools and to higher NAD/NADH ratios but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, oxidized form (NADP)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH) pool sizes, and NAPD/NADPH ratios were much less affected. The ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotide pools and PARP activity decreased before the exponential growth phase ended. We conclude that there are marked changes in intracellular redox state during the growth cycle but that redox homeostasis is

  4. The Combination of Vitamin K3 and Vitamin C Has Synergic Activity against Forms of Trypanosoma cruzi through a Redox Imbalance Process.

    Cristina Desoti, Vânia; Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Martins Ribeiro, Fabianne; Cardoso Martins, Solange; da Silva Rodrigues, Jean Henrique; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Vataru Nakamura, Celso; Farias Ximenes, Valdecir; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2015-01-01

    Chagas' disease is an infection that is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, affecting millions of people worldwide. Because of severe side effects and variable efficacy, the current treatments for Chagas' disease are unsatisfactory, making the search for new chemotherapeutic agents essential. Previous studies have reported various biological activities of naphthoquinones, such as the trypanocidal and antitumor activity of vitamin K3. The combination of this vitamin with vitamin C exerted better effects against various cancer cells than when used alone. These effects have been attributed to an increase in reactive oxygen species generation. In the present study, we evaluated the activity of vitamin K3 and vitamin C, alone and in combination, against T. cruzi. The vitamin K3 + vitamin C combination exerted synergistic effects against three forms of T. cruzi, leading to morphological, ultrastructural, and functional changes by producing reactive species, decreasing reduced thiol groups, altering the cell cycle, causing lipid peroxidation, and forming autophagic vacuoles. Our hypothesis is that the vitamin K3 + vitamin C combination induces oxidative imbalance in T. cruzi, probably started by a redox cycling process that leads to parasite cell death.

  5. The Combination of Vitamin K3 and Vitamin C Has Synergic Activity against Forms of Trypanosoma cruzi through a Redox Imbalance Process.

    Vânia Cristina Desoti

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease is an infection that is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, affecting millions of people worldwide. Because of severe side effects and variable efficacy, the current treatments for Chagas' disease are unsatisfactory, making the search for new chemotherapeutic agents essential. Previous studies have reported various biological activities of naphthoquinones, such as the trypanocidal and antitumor activity of vitamin K3. The combination of this vitamin with vitamin C exerted better effects against various cancer cells than when used alone. These effects have been attributed to an increase in reactive oxygen species generation. In the present study, we evaluated the activity of vitamin K3 and vitamin C, alone and in combination, against T. cruzi. The vitamin K3 + vitamin C combination exerted synergistic effects against three forms of T. cruzi, leading to morphological, ultrastructural, and functional changes by producing reactive species, decreasing reduced thiol groups, altering the cell cycle, causing lipid peroxidation, and forming autophagic vacuoles. Our hypothesis is that the vitamin K3 + vitamin C combination induces oxidative imbalance in T. cruzi, probably started by a redox cycling process that leads to parasite cell death.

  6. The effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia venom proteins on TCA cycle activity and mitochondrial NAD(+)-redox state in cultured human fibroblasts.

    Ghneim, Hazem K; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A M

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1-F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50-60% of control activity) upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60-70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3-F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD(+) and NADP(+) levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels), fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60-70% of control levels) of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD(+) and NADP(+) biosynthesis.

  7. Alternative Splicing of the Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Receptor PAC1: Mechanisms of Fine Tuning of Brain Activity

    Janna eBlechman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of the precursor mRNA encoding for the neuropeptide receptor PAC1/ADCYAP1R1 generates multiple protein products that exhibit pleiotropic activities. Recent studies in mammals and zebrafish have implicated some of these splice isoforms in control of both cellular and body homeostasis. Here, we review the regulation of PAC1 splice variants and their underlying signal transduction and physiological processes in the nervous system.

  8. Polyarene mediators for mediated redox flow battery

    Delnick, Frank M.; Ingersoll, David; Liang, Chengdu

    2018-01-02

    The fundamental charge storage mechanisms in a number of currently studied high energy redox couples are based on intercalation, conversion, or displacement reactions. With exception to certain metal-air chemistries, most often the active redox materials are stored physically in the electrochemical cell stack thereby lowering the practical gravimetric and volumetric energy density as a tradeoff to achieve reasonable power density. In a general embodiment, a mediated redox flow battery includes a series of secondary organic molecules that form highly reduced anionic radicals as reaction mediator pairs for the reduction and oxidation of primary high capacity redox species ex situ from the electrochemical cell stack. Arenes are reduced to stable anionic radicals that in turn reduce a primary anode to the charged state. The primary anode is then discharged using a second lower potential (more positive) arene. Compatible separators and solvents are also disclosed herein.

  9. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  10. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Salvador Pérez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  11. Coordination polymers of Fe(iii) and Al(iii) ions with TCA ligand: distinctive fluorescence, CO2 uptake, redox-activity and oxygen evolution reaction.

    Dhara, Barun; Sappati, Subrahmanyam; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2016-04-28

    Fe and Al belong to different groups in the periodic table, one from the p-block and the other from the d-block. In spite of their different groups, they have the similarity of exhibiting a stable 3+ oxidation state. Here we have prepared Fe(iii) and Al(iii) based coordination polymers in the form of metal-organic gels with the 4,4',4''-tricarboxyltriphenylamine (TCA) ligand, namely Fe-TCA and Al-TCA, and evaluated some important physicochemical properties. Specifically, the electrical conductivity, redox-activity, porosity, and electrocatalytic activity (oxygen evolution reaction) of the Fe-TCA system were noted to be remarkably higher than those of the Al-TCA system. As for the photophysical properties, almost complete quenching of the fluorescence originating from TCA was observed in case of the Fe-TCA system, whereas for the Al-TCA system a significant retention of fluorescence with red-shifted emission was observed. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to unravel the origin of such discriminative behaviour of these coordination polymer systems.

  12. Redox regulation of cell proliferation: Bioinformatics and redox proteomics approaches to identify redox-sensitive cell cycle regulators.

    Foyer, Christine H; Wilson, Michael H; Wright, Megan H

    2018-03-29

    Plant stem cells are the foundation of plant growth and development. The balance of quiescence and division is highly regulated, while ensuring that proliferating cells are protected from the adverse effects of environment fluctuations that may damage the genome. Redox regulation is important in both the activation of proliferation and arrest of the cell cycle upon perception of environmental stress. Within this context, reactive oxygen species serve as 'pro-life' signals with positive roles in the regulation of the cell cycle and survival. However, very little is known about the metabolic mechanisms and redox-sensitive proteins that influence cell cycle progression. We have identified cysteine residues on known cell cycle regulators in Arabidopsis that are potentially accessible, and could play a role in redox regulation, based on secondary structure and solvent accessibility likelihoods for each protein. We propose that redox regulation may function alongside other known posttranslational modifications to control the functions of core cell cycle regulators such as the retinoblastoma protein. Since our current understanding of how redox regulation is involved in cell cycle control is hindered by a lack of knowledge regarding both which residues are important and how modification of those residues alters protein function, we discuss how critical redox modifications can be mapped at the molecular level. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Diurnal and seasonal trends and source apportionment of redox-active metals in Los Angeles using a novel online metal monitor and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF)

    Mousavi, Amirhosein; Sowlat, Mohammad H.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, we identified the sources of four redox-active metals, including Iron (Fe), Chromium (Cr), Cupper (Cu), and Manganese (Mn) and quantified the contribution of these sources to PM2.5 concentrations in central Los Angeles, California, by employing time-resolved measurements (i.e., a time resolution of 2 h) with a recently developed online metal monitor and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). Size distribution of ambient PM (14 nm-10 μm) was measured using the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and Optical Particle Sizer (OPS). Auxiliary variables were also collected, including elemental (EC) and organic carbon (OC), gaseous pollutants (NO2 and O3), meteorological parameters (including relative humidity (RH) and temperature), and traffic data (for heavy- (HDVs) and light-duty vehicles (LDVs)). A 4-factor solution was found to be optimum for the chemically-speciated dataset, whereas a 5-factor solution appeared to be most plausible for the size distribution data. The factors included fresh traffic, soil/road dust, urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and nucleation (only resolved for the size distribution data). Fresh traffic was the major contributor to Fe and Cu concentrations, whereas Cr was mostly found in the urban background aerosol (reflecting a mixture of small local sources as well as aged traffic emissions), and Mn mostly came from both soil/road dust and was to a lesser degree found in urban background aerosol. Secondary aerosol did not contribute to the concentrations of any of these metals, but was associated with very high loading of OC, as expected. Even though the urban background aerosol and secondary aerosol appeared to be characterized by "aged" particles and have a rather homogeneous spatial distribution, the reactions and processes involved in their formation are entirely different. Our results provide insights into the sources of redox-active metals in central Los Angeles. They also underscore the benefits of

  14. Redox regulation of antioxidant enzymes: post-translational modulation of catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity by resveratrol in diabetic rat liver.

    Sadi, Gökhan; Bozan, Davut; Yildiz, Huseyin Bekir

    2014-08-01

    Resveratrol is a strong antioxidant that exhibits blood glucose-lowering effects, which might contribute to its usefulness in preventing complications associated with diabetes. The present study aimed to investigate resveratrol effects on catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) gene and protein expression, their phosphorylation states and activities in rat liver of STZ-induced diabetes. Diabetes increased the levels of total protein phosphorylation and p-CAT, while mRNA expression, protein levels, and activity were reduced. Although diabetes induced transcriptional repression over GPx, it did not affect the protein levels and activity. When resveratrol was administered to diabetic rats, an increase in activity was associated with an increase in p-GPx levels. Decrease in Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) gene expression in diabetes were associated with a decrease in CAT and GPx mRNA expression. A possible compensatory mechanism for reduced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes is proved to be nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2 and NFκB in diabetes which is confirmed by the increase in nuclear and decrease in cytoplasmic protein levels of Nrf2 and NFκB. Taken together, these findings revealed that an increase in the oxidized state in diabetes intricately modified the cellular phosphorylation status and regulation of antioxidant enzymes. Gene regulation of antioxidant enzymes was accompanied by nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and NFκB. Resveratrol administration also activated a coordinated cytoprotective response against diabetes-induced changes in liver tissues.

  15. Effect of long-term fertilization on humic redox mediators in multiple microbial redox reactions.

    Guo, Peng; Zhang, Chunfang; Wang, Yi; Yu, Xinwei; Zhang, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongdong

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of different long-term fertilizations on humic substances (HSs), humic acids (HAs) and humins, functioning as redox mediators for various microbial redox biotransformations, including 2,2',4,4',5,5'- hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153 ) dechlorination, dissimilatory iron reduction, and nitrate reduction, and their electron-mediating natures. The redox activity of HSs for various microbial redox metabolisms was substantially enhanced by long-term application of organic fertilizer (pig manure). As a redox mediator, only humin extracted from soils with organic fertilizer amendment (OF-HM) maintained microbial PCB 153 dechlorination activity (1.03 μM PCB 153 removal), and corresponding HA (OF-HA) most effectively enhanced iron reduction and nitrate reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens. Electrochemical analysis confirmed the enhancement of their electron transfer capacity and redox properties. Fourier transform infrared analysis showed that C=C and C=O bonds, and carboxylic or phenolic groups in HSs might be the redox functional groups affected by fertilization. This research enhances our understanding of the influence of anthropogenic fertility on the biogeochemical cycling of elements and in situ remediation ability in agroecosystems through microorganisms' metabolisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prospective associations between measures of gross and fine motor coordination in infants and objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior in childhood.

    Sánchez, Guillermo F López; Williams, Genevieve; Aggio, Daniel; Vicinanza, Domenico; Stubbs, Brendon; Kerr, Catherine; Johnstone, James; Roberts, Justin; Smith, Lee

    2017-11-01

    One important determinant of childhood physical activity and sedentary behavior may be that of motor development in infancy. The present analyses aimed to investigate whether gross and fine motor delays in infants were associated with objective and self-reported activity in childhood. Data were from the UK Millennium Cohort Study, a prospective cohort study, involving UK children born on or around the millennium (September 2000 and January 2002). When children were 9 months old, parents reported children's fine and gross motor-coordination, and at 7 years, sports club attendance and daily TV viewing time. Children's physical activity was measured using accelerometers at 7 years. Adjusted regression models were used to examine associations between delayed motor development and accelerometry measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary behavior, and parent-reported sport club attendance and TV viewing time. In this sample (n = 13,021), gross motor delay in infancy was associated with less time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (B -5.0 95% confidence interval [CI] -6.8, -3.2) and more time sedentary (B 13.5 95% CI 9.3, 17.8) in childhood. Gross and fine motor delays during infancy were associated with a reduced risk of having high attendance at sports clubs in childhood (both relative risk [RR] 0.7, 95% CI 0.6, 0.9). Fine motor delays, but not gross delays, were also associated with an increased risk of having high TV viewing time (RR 1.3 95% CI 1.0, 1.6). Findings from the present study suggest that delays in motor development in infancy are associated with physical activity and sedentary time in childhood.

  17. Fine chemistry

    Laszlo, P.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Fine Chemistry laboratory (Polytechnic School, France) is presented. The research programs are centered on the renewal of the organic chemistry most important reactions and on the invention of new, highly efficient and highly selective reactions, by applying low cost reagents and solvents. An important research domain concerns the study and fabrication of new catalysts. They are obtained by means of the reactive sputtering of the metals and metal oxydes thin films. The Monte Carlo simulations of the long-range electrostatic interaction in a clay and the obtention of acrylamides from anhydrous or acrylic ester are summarized. Moreover, the results obtained in the field of catalysis are also given. The published papers and the congress communications are included [fr

  18. Redox activity distinguishes solid-state electron transport from solution-based electron transfer in a natural and artificial protein: cytochrome C and hemin-doped human serum albumin.

    Amdursky, Nadav; Ferber, Doron; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2013-10-28

    Integrating proteins in molecular electronic devices requires control over their solid-state electronic transport behavior. Unlike "traditional" electron transfer (ET) measurements of proteins that involve liquid environments and a redox cycle, no redox cofactor is needed for solid-state electron transport (ETp) across the protein. Here we show the fundamental difference between these two approaches by macroscopic area measurements, which allow measuring ETp temperature dependence down to cryogenic temperatures, via cytochrome C (Cyt C), an ET protein with a heme (Fe-porphyrin) prosthetic group as a redox centre. We compare the ETp to electrochemical ET measurements, and do so also for the protein without the Fe (with metal-free porphyrin) and without porphyrin. As removing the porphyrin irreversibly alters the protein's conformation, we repeat these measurements with human serum albumin (HSA), 'doped' (by non-covalent binding) with a single hemin equivalent, i.e., these natural and artificial proteins share a common prosthetic group. ETp via Cyt C and HSA-hemin are very similar in terms of current magnitude and temperature dependence, which suggests similar ETp mechanisms via these two systems, thermally activated hopping (with ~0.1 eV activation energy) >190 K and tunneling by superexchange Fe(3+) + e(-)), measured by electrochemistry of HSA-hemin are only 4 times lower than those for Cyt C. However, while removing the Fe redox centre from the porphyrin ring markedly affects the ET rate, it hardly changes the ETp currents through these proteins, while removing the macrocycle (from HSA, which retains its conformation) significantly reduces ETp efficiency. These results show that solid-state ETp across proteins does not require the presence of a redox cofactor, and that while for ET the Fe ion is the main electron mediator, for ETp the porphyrin ring has this function.

  19. Bifunctional redox flow battery

    Wen, Y.H.; Cheng, J.; Xun, Y.; Ma, P.H.; Yang, Y.S.

    2008-01-01

    A new bifunctional redox flow battery (BRFB) system, V(III)/V(II)-L-cystine(O 2 ), was systematically investigated by using different separators. It is shown that during charge, water transfer is significantly restricted with increasing the concentration of HBr when the Nafion 115 cation exchange membrane is employed. The same result can be obtained when the gas diffusion layer (GDL) hot-pressed separator is used. The organic electro-synthesis is directly correlated with the crossover of vanadium. When employing the anion exchange membrane, the electro-synthesis efficiency is over 96% due to a minimal crossover of vanadium. When the GDL hot-pressed separator is applied, the crossover of vanadium and water transfer are noticeably prevented and the electro-synthesis efficiency of over 99% is obtained. Those impurities such as vanadium ions and bromine can be eliminated through the purification of organic electro-synthesized products. The purified product is identified to be L-cysteic acid by IR spectrum. The BRFB shows a favorable discharge performance at a current density of 20 mA cm -2 . Best discharge performance is achieved by using the GDL hot-pressed separator. The coulombic efficiency of 87% and energy efficiency of about 58% can be obtained. The cause of major energy losses is mainly associated with the cross-contamination of anodic and cathodic active electrolytes

  20. Functional properties of the two redox-active sites in yeast protein disulphide isomerase in vitro and in vivo

    Westphal, V; Darby, N J; Winther, Jakob R.

    1999-01-01

    to that of human PDI, both in rearrangement and oxidation reactions. However, while the a domain active site of the human enzyme is more active than the a'-site, the reverse is the case for yPDI. This prompted us to set up an assay to investigate whether the situation would be different with a native yeast......-site to be most important. We furthermore show that the apparent difference between in vivo and in vitro activities is not due to catalytic contributions from the other PDI homologues found in yeast....

  1. Lycopene inhibits ICAM-1 expression and NF-κB activation by Nrf2-regulated cell redox state in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Yang, Po-Min; Wu, Zhi-Zhen; Zhang, Yu-Qi; Wung, Being-Sun

    2016-06-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the most common diseases leading to blindness in elderly people. The progression of AMD may be prevented through anti-inflammation and antioxidation in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Lycopene, a carotenoid, has been shown to possess both antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. This research was conducted to detail the mechanisms of these effects of lycopene-treated RPE cells. We exposed ARPE-19 cells to TNFα after pretreatment with lycopene, and measured monocyte adhesion, ICAM-1 expression, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and transcriptional activity. Cell viability was assayed with Alamar Blue. The cell redox state was tested by glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. The importance of the Nrf2 pathway was tested in nuclear translocation, promoter reporter assay, and siRNA. Lycopene could reduce TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion and H2O2- induced cell damage in RPE cells. Furthermore, lycopene inhibits ICAM-1 expression and abolishes NF-κB activation for up to 12h in TNFα-treated RPE cells. Lycopene upregulates Nrf2 levels in nuclear extracts and increases the transactivity of antioxidant response elements. The use of Nrf2 siRNA blocks the inhibitory effect of lycopene in TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression and NF-κB activation. Glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of GSH. We found that lycopene increases intracellular GSH levels and GCL expression. Following lycopene treatment, TNF-α-induced ROS production was abolished. The Nrf2-regulated antioxidant property plays a pivotal role in the anti-inflammatory mechanism underlying the inhibition of NF-κB activation in lycopene-treated ARPE-19 cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Thiol/disulfide redox states in signaling and sensing

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in redox systems biology are creating new opportunities to understand complexities of human disease and contributions of environmental exposures. New understanding of thiol-disulfide systems have occurred during the past decade as a consequence of the discoveries that thiol and disulfide systems are maintained in kinetically controlled steady-states displaced from thermodynamic equilibrium, that a widely distributed family of NADPH oxidases produces oxidants that function in cell signaling, and that a family of peroxiredoxins utilize thioredoxin as a reductant to complement the well-studied glutathione antioxidant system for peroxide elimination and redox regulation. This review focuses on thiol/disulfide redox state in biologic systems and the knowledge base available to support development of integrated redox systems biology models to better understand the function and dysfunction of thiol-disulfide redox systems. In particular, central principles have emerged concerning redox compartmentalization and utility of thiol/disulfide redox measures as indicators of physiologic function. Advances in redox proteomics show that, in addition to functioning in protein active sites and cell signaling, cysteine residues also serve as redox sensors to integrate biologic functions. These advances provide a framework for translation of redox systems biology concepts to practical use in understanding and treating human disease. Biological responses to cadmium, a widespread environmental agent, are used to illustrate the utility of these advances to the understanding of complex pleiotropic toxicities. PMID:23356510

  3. Bipolar Mass Spectrometry of Labile Coordination Complexes, Redox Active Inorganic Compounds, and Proteins Using a Glass Nebulizer for Sonic-Spray Ionization

    Antonakis, Manolis M.; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Kanaki, Katerina; Milios, Constantinos J.; Pergantis, Spiros A.

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we report on the development of a novel nebulizer configuration for sonic-spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (MS), more specifically for a version of SSI that is referred to as Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization (V-EASI) MS. The developed nebulizer configuration is based on a commercially available pneumatic glass nebulizer that has been used extensively for aerosol formation in atomic spectrometry. In the present study, the nebulizer was modified in order to achieve efficient V-EASI-MS operation. Upon evaluating this system, it has been demonstrated that V-EASI-MS offers some distinct advantages for the analysis of coordination compounds and redox active inorganic compounds over the predominantly used electrospray ionization (ESI) technique. Such advantages, for this type of compounds, are demonstrated here for the first time. More specifically, a series of labile heptanuclear heterometallic [CuII 6LnIII] clusters held together with artificial amino acid ligands, in addition to easily oxidized inorganic oxyanions of selenium and arsenic, were analyzed. The observed advantages pertain to V-EASI appearing to be a "milder" ionization source than ESI, not requiring electrical potentials for gas phase ion formation, thus eliminating the possibility of unwanted redox transformations, allowing for the "simultaneous" detection of negative and positive ions (bipolar analysis) without the need to change source ionization conditions, and also not requiring the use of syringes and delivery pumps. Because of such features, especially because of the absence of ionization potentials, EASI can be operated with minimal requirements for source parameter optimization. We observed that source temperature and accelerating voltage do not seem to affect labile compounds to the extent they do in ESI-MS. In addition, bipolar analysis of proteins was demonstrated here by acquiring both positive and negative ion mass spectra from the same protein solutions

  4. MECHANISMS OF THE COMPLEX FORMATION BY d-METALS ON POROUS SUPPORTS AND THE CATALYTIC ACTIVITY OF THE FORMED COMPLEXES IN REDOX REACTIONS

    T. L. Rakitskaya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of supported complexes of d metals in redox reactions with participation of gaseous toxicants, PH3, CO, O3, and SO2, depends on their composition. Owing to the variety of physicochemical and structural-adsorption properties of available supports, their influence on complex formation processes, the composition and catalytic activity of metal complexes anchored on them varies over a wide range. The metal complex formation on sup-ports with weak ion-exchanging properties is similar to that in aqueous solutions. In this case, the support role mainly adds up to the ability to reduce the activity of water adsorbed on them. The interaction between a metal complex and a support surface occurs through adsorbed water molecules. Such supports can also affect complex formation processes owing to protolytic reactions on account of acidic properties of sorbents used as supports. The catalytic activity of metal complexes supported on polyphase natural sorbents considerably depends on their phase relationship. In the case of supports with the nonsimple structure and pronounced ion-exchanging properties, for instance, zeolites and laminar silicates, it is necessary to take into account the variety of places where metal ions can be located. Such location places determine distinctions in the coordination environment of the metal ions and the strength of their bonding with surface adsorption sites and, therefore, the catalytic activity of surface complexes formed by theses metal ions. Because of the energy surface inhomogeneity, it is important to determine a relationship between the strength of a metal complex bonding with a support surface and its catalytic activity. For example, bimetallic complexes are catalytically active in the reactions of oxidation of the above gaseous toxicants. In particular, in the case of carbon monoxide oxidation, the most catalytic activity is shown by palladium-copper complexes in which copper(II is strongly

  5. Mitochondrial targeted curcumin exhibits anticancer effects through disruption of mitochondrial redox and modulation of TrxR2 activity.

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Pal, Debojyoti; Singh, Babita; Sharma, Deepak; Kutala, Vijay Kumar; Sandur, Santosh Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Mitocurcumin is a derivative of curcumin, which has been shown to selectively enter mitochondria. Here we describe the anti-tumor efficacy of mitocurcumin in lung cancer cells and its mechanism of action. Mitocurcumin, showed 25-50 fold higher efficacy in killing lung cancer cells as compared to curcumin as demonstrated by clonogenic assay, flow cytometry and high throughput screening assay. Treatment of lung cancer cells with mitocurcumin significantly decreased the frequency of cancer stem cells. Mitocurcumin increased the mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), decreased the mitochondrial glutathione levels and induced strand breaks in the mitochondrial DNA. As a result, we observed increased BAX to BCL-2 ratio, cytochrome C release into the cytosol, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased caspase-3 activity suggesting that mitocurcumin activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Docking studies using mitocurcumin revealed that it binds to the active site of the mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase (TrxR2) with high affinity. In corroboration with the above finding, mitocurcumin decreased TrxR activity in cell free as well as the cellular system. The anti-cancer activity of mitocurcumin measured in terms of apoptotic cell death and the decrease in cancer stem cell frequency was accentuated by TrxR2 overexpression. This was due to modulation of TrxR2 activity to NADPH oxidase like activity by mitocurcumin, resulting in higher ROS accumulation and cell death. Thus, our findings reveal mitocurcumin as a potent anticancer agent with better efficacy than curcumin. This study also demonstrates the role of TrxR2 and mitochondrial DNA damage in mitocurcumin mediated killing of cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Redox biotransformation and delivery of anthracycline anticancer antibiotics: How interpretable structure-activity relationships of lethality using electrophilicity and the London formula for dispersion interaction work.

    Pang, Siu-Kwong

    2017-03-30

    Quantum chemical methods and molecular mechanics approaches face a lot of challenges in drug metabolism study because of their either insufficient accuracy or huge computational cost, or lack of clear molecular level pictures for building computational models. Low-cost QSAR methods can often be carried out even though molecular level pictures are not well defined; however, they show difficulty in identifying the mechanisms of drug metabolism and delineating the effects of chemical structures on drug toxicity because a certain amount of molecular descriptors are difficult to be interpreted. In order to make a breakthrough, it was proposed that mechanistically interpretable molecular descriptors were used to correlate with biological activity to establish structure-activity plots. The mechanistically interpretable molecular descriptors used in this study include electrophilicity and the mathematical function in the London formula for dispersion interaction, and they were calculated using quantum chemical methods. The biological activity is the lethality of anthracycline anticancer antibiotics denoted as log LD50, which were obtained by intraperitoneal injection into mice. The results reveal that the plots for electrophilicity, which can be interpreted as redox reactivity of anthracyclines, can describe oxidative degradation for detoxification and reductive bioactivation for toxicity induction. The plots for the dispersion interaction function, which represent the attraction between anthracyclines and biomolecules, can describe efflux from and influx into target cells of toxicity. The plots can also identify three structural scaffolds of anthracyclines that have different metabolic pathways, resulting in their different toxicity behavior. This structure-dependent toxicity behavior revealed in the plots can provide perspectives on design of anthracycline anticancer antibiotics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Standardized extracts of Bacopa monniera protect against MPP+- and paraquat-induced toxicity by modulating mitochondrial activities, proteasomal functions, and redox pathways.

    Singh, Manjeet; Murthy, Ven; Ramassamy, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common age-related neurodegenerative diseases and affects millions of people worldwide. Strong evidence supports the role of free radicals, oxidative stress, mitochondrial, and proteasomal dysfunctions underlying neuronal death in PD. Environmental factors, especially pesticides, represent one of the primary classes of neurotoxic agents associated with PD, and several epidemiological studies have identified the exposure of the herbicide paraquat (PQ) as a potential risk factor for the onset of PD. The objective of our study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of the standardized extracts of Bacopa monniera (BM) against PQ-induced and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium iodide (MPP(+))-induced toxicities and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this protection. Our results show that a pretreatment with the BM extract from 50 μg/ml protected the dopaminergic SK-N-SH cell line against MPP(+)- and PQ-induced toxicities in various cell survival assays. We demonstrate that BM pretreatment prevented the depletion of glutathione (GSH) besides preserving the mitochondrial membrane potential and maintaining the mitochondrial complex I activity. BM pretreatment from 10.0 μg/ml also prevented the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and decreased the mitochondrial superoxide level. BM treatment activated the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway by modulating the expression of Keap1, thereby upregulating the endogenous GSH synthesis. The effect of BM on the phosphorylation of Akt further strengthens its role in the promotion of cell survival. By preserving the cellular redox homeostasis and mitochondrial activities and by promoting cell survival pathways, BM extract may have therapeutic uses in various age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as PD.

  8. 3D Microstructure Effects in Ni-YSZ Anodes: Prediction of Effective Transport Properties and Optimization of Redox Stability

    Pecho, Omar M.; Stenzel, Ole; Iwanschitz, Boris; Gasser, Philippe; Neumann, Matthias; Schmidt, Volker; Prestat, Michel; Hocker, Thomas; Flatt, Robert J.; Holzer, Lorenz

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of microstructure on the effective ionic and electrical conductivities of Ni-YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) anodes. Fine, medium, and coarse microstructures are exposed to redox cycling at 950 °C. FIB (focused ion beam)-tomography and image analysis are used to quantify the effective (connected) volume fraction (Φeff), constriction factor (β), and tortuosity (τ). The effective conductivity (σeff) is described as the product of intrinsic conductivity (σ0) and the so-called microstructure-factor (M): σeff = σ0 × M. Two different methods are used to evaluate the M-factor: (1) by prediction using a recently established relationship, Mpred = εβ0.36/τ5.17, and (2) by numerical simulation that provides conductivity, from which the simulated M-factor can be deduced (Msim). Both methods give complementary and consistent information about the effective transport properties and the redox degradation mechanism. The initial microstructure has a strong influence on effective conductivities and their degradation. Finer anodes have higher initial conductivities but undergo more intensive Ni coarsening. Coarser anodes have a more stable Ni phase but exhibit lower YSZ stability due to lower sintering activity. Consequently, in order to improve redox stability, it is proposed to use mixtures of fine and coarse powders in different proportions for functional anode and current collector layers. PMID:28793523

  9. 3D Microstructure Effects in Ni-YSZ Anodes: Prediction of Effective Transport Properties and Optimization of Redox Stability

    Omar M. Pecho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the influence of microstructure on the effective ionic and electrical conductivities of Ni-YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes. Fine, medium, and coarse microstructures are exposed to redox cycling at 950 °C. FIB (focused ion beam-tomography and image analysis are used to quantify the effective (connected volume fraction (Φeff, constriction factor (β, and tortuosity (τ. The effective conductivity (σeff is described as the product of intrinsic conductivity (σ0 and the so-called microstructure-factor (M: σeff = σ0*M. Two different methods are used to evaluate the M-factor: (1 by prediction using a recently established relationship, Mpred = εβ0.36/τ5.17, and (2 by numerical simulation that provides conductivity, from which the simulated M-factor can be deduced (Msim. Both methods give complementary and consistent information about the effective transport properties and the redox degradation mechanism. The initial microstructure has a strong influence on effective conductivities and their degradation. Finer anodes have higher initial conductivities but undergo more intensive Ni coarsening. Coarser anodes have a more stable Ni phase but exhibit lower YSZ stability due to lower sintering activity. Consequently, in order to improve redox stability, it is proposed to use mixtures of fine and coarse powders in different proportions for functional anode and current collector layers.

  10. Nanostructured Electrocatalysts for All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Park, Minjoon; Ryu, Jaechan; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-10-01

    Vanadium redox reactions have been considered as a key factor affecting the energy efficiency of the all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). This redox reaction determines the reaction kinetics of whole cells. However, poor kinetic reversibility and catalytic activity towards the V(2+)/V(3+) and VO(2+)/VO2(+) redox couples on the commonly used carbon substrate limit broader applications of VRFBs. Consequently, modified carbon substrates have been extensively investigated to improve vanadium redox reactions. In this Focus Review, recent progress on metal- and carbon-based nanomaterials as an electrocatalyst for VRFBs is discussed in detail, without the intention to provide a comprehensive review on the whole components of the system. Instead, the focus is mainly placed on the redox chemistry of vanadium ions at a surface of various metals, different dimensional carbons, nitrogen-doped carbon nanostructures, and metal-carbon composites. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Coordinate Activation of Redox-Dependent ASK1/TGF-β Signaling by a Multiprotein Complex (MPK38, ASK1, SMADs, ZPR9, and TRX) Improves Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in Mice.

    Seong, Hyun-A; Manoharan, Ravi; Ha, Hyunjung

    2016-03-10

    To explore the molecular connections between redox-dependent apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathways and to examine the physiological processes in which coordinated regulation of these two signaling pathways plays a critical role. We provide evidence that the ASK1 and TGF-β signaling pathways are interconnected by a multiprotein complex harboring murine protein serine-threonine kinase 38 (MPK38), ASK1, Sma- and Mad-related proteins (SMADs), zinc-finger-like protein 9 (ZPR9), and thioredoxin (TRX) and demonstrate that the activation of either ASK1 or TGF-β activity is sufficient to activate both the redox-dependent ASK1 and TGF-β signaling pathways. Physiologically, the restoration of the downregulated activation levels of ASK1 and TGF-β signaling in genetically and diet-induced obese mice by adenoviral delivery of SMAD3 or ZPR9 results in the amelioration of adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and impaired ketogenesis. Our data suggest that the multiprotein complex linking ASK1 and TGF-β signaling pathways may be a potential target for redox-mediated metabolic complications.

  12. An all-organic rechargeable battery using bipolar polyparaphenylene as a redox-active cathode and anode.

    Zhu, L M; Lei, A W; Cao, Y L; Ai, X P; Yang, H X

    2013-01-21

    An all-organic rechargeable battery is realized by use of polyparaphenylene as both cathode- and anode-active material. This new battery can operate at a high voltage of 3.0 V with fairly high capacity, offering a renewable and cheaper alternative to conventional batteries.

  13. Exercise redox biochemistry: Conceptual, methodological and technical recommendations

    James N. Cobley

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Exercise redox biochemistry is of considerable interest owing to its translational value in health and disease. However, unaddressed conceptual, methodological and technical issues complicate attempts to unravel how exercise alters redox homeostasis in health and disease. Conceptual issues relate to misunderstandings that arise when the chemical heterogeneity of redox biology is disregarded: which often complicates attempts to use redox-active compounds and assess redox signalling. Further, that oxidised macromolecule adduct levels reflect formation and repair is seldom considered. Methodological and technical issues relate to the use of out-dated assays and/or inappropriate sample preparation techniques that confound biochemical redox analysis. After considering each of the aforementioned issues, we outline how each issue can be resolved and provide a unifying set of recommendations. We specifically recommend that investigators: consider chemical heterogeneity, use redox-active compounds judiciously, abandon flawed assays, carefully prepare samples and assay buffers, consider repair/metabolism, use multiple biomarkers to assess oxidative damage and redox signalling. Keywords: Exercise, Oxidative stress, Free radical, Antioxidants, Redox signalling

  14. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living.

    Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde; Forman, Henry Jay

    2016-08-01

    The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve "reactive oxygen species" rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles (parahormesis). In summary

  15. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living

    Fulvio Ursini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve “reactive oxygen species” rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles

  16. Redox Buffer Strength

    de Levie, Robert

    1999-04-01

    The proper functioning of enzymes in bodily fluids requires that the pH be maintained within rather narrow limits. The first line of defense against large pH fluctuations in such fluids is the passive control provided by the presence of pH buffers. The ability of pH buffers to stabilize the pH is indicated by the buffer value b introduced in 1922 by van Slyke. It is equally important for many enzymes that the redox potential is kept within a narrow range. In that case, stability of the potential is most readily achieved with a redox buffer. In this communication we define the redox buffer strength by analogy with acid-base buffer strength.

  17. Tuning the Stability of Organic Active Materials for Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries via Reversible, Electrochemically Mediated Li + Coordination

    Carino, Emily V.; Staszak-Jirkovsky, Jakub; Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Markovic, Nenad M.; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-24

    We describe an electrochemically mediated interaction between Li+ and a promising active material for nonaqueous redox flow batteries (RFBs), 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-1,1,4,4-tetramethylnaphthalene (TDT), and the impact of this structural interaction on material stability during voltammetric cycling. TDT could be an advantageous organic positive electrolyte material for nonaqueous RFBs due to its high oxidation potential, 4.21 V vs Li/Li+, and solubility of at least 1.0 M in select electrolytes. Although results from voltammetry suggest TDT displays Nernstian reversibility in many nonaqueous electrolyte solutions, bulk electrolysis reveals significant degradation in all electrolytes studied, the extent of which depends on the electrolyte solution composition. Results of subtractively normalized in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (SNIFTIRS) confirm that TDT undergoes reversible structural changes during cyclic voltammetry in propylene carbonate and 1,2-dimethoxyethane solutions containing Li+ electrolytes, but irreversible degradation occurs when tetrabutylammonium (TBA+) replaces Li+ as the electrolyte cation in these solutions. By combining the results from SNIFTIRS experiments with calculations from density functional theory, solution-phase active species structure and potential-dependent interactions can be determined. We find that Li+ coordinates to the Lewis basic methoxy groups of neutral TDT and, upon electrochemical oxidation, this complex dissociates into the radical cation TDT•+ and Li+. The improved cycling stability in the presence of Li+ relative to TBA+ suggests that the structural interaction reported herein may be advantageous to the design of energy storage materials based on organic molecules.

  18. Redox-active cytotoxic diorganotin(IV) cycloalkylhydroxamate complexes with different ring sizes: reduction behaviour and theoretical interpretation.

    Shang, Xianmei; Alegria, Elisabete C B A; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Li, Qingshan; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2012-12-01

    Two series of new diorganotin(IV) cycloalkylhydroxamate complexes with different ring sizes (cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl and cyclohexyl), formulated as the mononuclear [R(2)Sn(HL)(2)] (1:2) (a, R=(n)Bu and Ph) and the polymeric [R(2)SnL](n) (1:1) (b, R=(n)Bu) compounds, were prepared and fully characterized. Single crystal X-ray diffraction for [(n)Bu(2)Sn{C(5)H(9)C(O)NHO}(2)] (3a) discloses the cis geometry and strong intermolecular NH⋯O interactions. The in vitro cytotoxic activities of the complexes were evaluated against HL-60, Bel-7402, BGC-823 and KB human tumour cell lines, the greater activity concerning [(n)Bu(2)Sn(HL)(2)] [HL=C(3)H(5)C(O)NHO (1a), C(6)H(11)C(O)NHO (4a)] towards BGC-823. The complexes undergo, by cyclic voltammetry and controlled-potential electrolysis, one irreversible overall two-electron cathodic process at a reduction potential that does not appear to correlate with the antitumour activity. The electrochemical behaviour of [R(2)Sn{C(5)H(9)C(O)NHO}(2)] [R=(n)Bu (3a), Ph (7a)] was also investigated using density functional theory (DFT) methods, showing that the ultimate complex structure and the mechanism of its formation are R dependent: for the aromatic (R=Ph) complex, the initial reduction step is centred on the phenyl ligands and at the metal, being followed by a second reduction with SnO and SnC ruptures, whereas for the alkyl (R=(n)Bu) complex the first reduction step is centred on one of the hydroxamate ligands and is followed by a second reduction with SnO bond cleavages and preservation of the alkyl ligands. In both cases, the final complexes are highly coordinative unsaturated Sn(II) species with the cis geometry, features that can be of biological significance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Photo-redox activated drug delivery systems operating under two photon excitation in the near-IR.

    Guardado-Alvarez, Tania M; Devi, Lekshmi Sudha; Vabre, Jean-Marie; Pecorelli, Travis A; Schwartz, Benjamin J; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Mongin, Olivier; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2014-05-07

    We report the design and synthesis of a nano-container consisting of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with the pore openings covered by "snap-top" caps that are opened by near-IR light. A photo transducer molecule that is a reducing agent in an excited electronic state is covalently attached to the system. Near IR two-photon excitation causes inter-molecular electron transfer that reduces a disulfide bond holding the cap in place, thus allowing the cargo molecules to escape. We describe the operation of the "snap-top" release mechanism by both one- and two-photon activation. This system presents a proof of concept of a near-IR photoredox-induced nanoparticle delivery system that may lead to a new type of photodynamic drug release therapy.

  20. A p-nitroaniline redox-active solid-state electrolyte for battery-like electrochemical capacitive energy storage combined with an asymmetric supercapacitor based on metal oxide functionalized β-polytype porous silicon carbide electrodes.

    Kim, Myeongjin; Yoo, Jeeyoung; Kim, Jooheon

    2017-05-23

    A unique redox active flexible solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor with ultra-high capacitance and energy density was fabricated using a composite comprising MgCo 2 O 4 nanoneedles and micro and mesoporous silicon carbide flakes (SiCF) (SiCF/MgCo 2 O 4 ) as the positive electrode material. Due to the synergistic effect of the two materials, this hybrid electrode has a high specific capacitance of 516.7 F g -1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 in a 1 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. To obtain a reasonable matching of positive and negative electrode pairs, a composite of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and SiCF (SiCF/Fe 3 O 4 ) was synthesized for use as a negative electrode material, which shows a high capacitance of 423.2 F g -1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 . Therefore, by pairing the SiCF/MgCo 2 O 4 positive electrode and the SiCF/Fe 3 O 4 negative electrode with a redox active quasi-solid-state PVA-KOH-p-nitroaniline (PVA-KOH-PNA) gel electrolyte, a novel solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor device was assembled. Because of the synergistic effect between the highly porous SiCF and the vigorous redox-reaction of metal oxides, the hybrid nanostructure electrodes exhibited outstanding charge storage and transport. In addition, the redox active PVA-KOH-PNA electrolyte adds additional pseudocapacitance, which arises from the nitro-reduction and oxidation and reduction process of the reduction product of p-phenylenediamine, resulting in an enhancement of the capacitance (a specific capacitance of 161.77 F g -1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 ) and energy density (maximum energy density of 72.79 Wh kg -1 at a power density of 727.96 W kg -1 ).

  1. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  2. Impact of the redox-cycling herbicide diquat on transcript expression and antioxidant enzymatic activities of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    Bouetard, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.bouetard@rennes.inra.fr [INRA, UMR INRA-Agrocampus Ouest ESE 0985, Equipe Ecotoxicologie et Qualite des Milieux Aquatiques, 65 rue de Saint-Brieuc, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Besnard, Anne-Laure; Vassaux, Daniele; Lagadic, Laurent; Coutellec, Marie-Agnes [INRA, UMR INRA-Agrocampus Ouest ESE 0985, Equipe Ecotoxicologie et Qualite des Milieux Aquatiques, 65 rue de Saint-Brieuc, 35042 Rennes cedex (France)

    2013-01-15

    The presence of pesticides in the environment results in potential unwanted effects on non-target species. Freshwater organisms inhabiting water bodies adjacent to agricultural areas, such as ditches, ponds and marshes, are good models to test such effects as various pesticides may reach these habitats through several ways, including aerial drift, run-off, and drainage. Diquat is a non-selective herbicide used for crop protection or for weed control in such water bodies. In this study, we investigated the effects of diquat on a widely spread aquatic invertebrate, the holarctic freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Due to the known redox-cycling properties of diquat, we studied transcript expression and enzymatic activities relative to oxidative and general stress in the haemolymph and gonado-digestive complex (GDC). As diquat is not persistent, snails were exposed for short times (5, 24, and 48 h) to ecologically relevant concentrations (22.2, 44.4, and 222.2 {mu}g l{sup -1}) of diquat dibromide. RT-qPCR was used to quantify the transcription of genes encoding catalase (cat), a cytosolic superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-sod), a selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (gpx), a glutathione reductase (gred), the retinoid X receptor (rxr), two heat shock proteins (hsp40 and hsp70), cortactin (cor) and the two ribosomal genes r18S and r28s. Enzymatic activities of SOD, Gpx, Gred and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were investigated in the GDC using spectrophoto/fluorometric methods. Opposite trends were obtained in the haemolymph depending on the herbicide concentration. At the lowest concentration, effects were mainly observed after 24 h of exposure, with over-transcription of cor, hsp40, rxr, and sod, whereas higher concentrations down-regulated the expression of most of the studied transcripts, especially after 48 h of exposure. In the GDC, earlier responses were observed and the fold-change magnitude was generally much higher: transcription of all target genes increased

  3. Fenton Redox Chemistry : Arsenite Oxidation by Metallic Surfaces

    Borges Freitas, S.C.; Van Halem, D.; Badruzzaman, A.B.M.; Van der Meer, W.G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-oxidation of As(III) is necessary in arsenic removal processes in order to increase its efficiency. Therefore, the Fenton Redox Chemistry is defined by catalytic activation of H2O2 and currently common used for its redox oxidative properties. In this study the effect of H2O2 production catalysed

  4. Silver nanoparticle catalysed redox reaction: An electron relay effect

    Mallick, Kaushik; Witcomb, Mike; Scurrell, Mike

    2006-01-01

    A silver cluster shows efficient catalytic activity in a redox reaction because the cluster acts as the electron relay centre behaving alternatively as an acceptor and as a donor of electrons. An effective transfer of electrons is possible when the redox potential of the cluster is intermediate between the electron donor and electron acceptor system

  5. Disruption of redox homeostasis in liver function and activation of apoptosis on consumption of aspartame in folate deficient rat model

    Ashok Iyaswamy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the effect of long-term intake of aspartame on liver function and apoptosis signaling pathway in the Wistar albino rats. Several reports have suggested that methanol is one of the major metabolites of Aspartame. Non-primate animals are usually resistant to methanol-induced metabolic acidosis due to high levels of hepatic folate content; hence a folate deficiency model was induced by treating animals with methotrexate (MTX prior to aspartame exposure. The aspartame treated MTX animals exhibited a marked significant increase in hepatic alanine transaminase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH activity compared to controls. Aspartame treated MTX animals additionally exhibited down-regulation of genes namely B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2 expression and up-regulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax, Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD and Caspase 3, 9 genes and apoptotic protein expression, indicating the augmentation of hepatic apoptosis. Nuclear condensation, micro vacuole formation in the cytoplasm and necrosis were observed in the liver of the aspartame treated animals on histopathology evaluation. Additionally, Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a significant increase in positive cells expressing Fas, FADD, Bax and Caspase 9 protein, indicating an increase in apoptotic protein expression in the liver. Thus, Aspartame may act as a chemical stressor which alters the functional status of liver, leading to hepatotoxicity.

  6. Extraction and recovery of mercury and lead from aqueous waste streams using redox-active layered metal chalcogenides. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    Dorhout, P.K.; Strauss, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    'The authors have begun to examine the extraction and recovery of heavy elements from aqueous waste streams using redox-active metal chalcogenides. They have been able to prepare extractants from known chalcogenide starting materials, studied the efficacy of the extractants for selective removal of soft metal ions from aqueous phases, studied the deactivation of extractants and the concomitant recovery of soft metal ions from the extractants, and characterized all of the solids and solutions thus far in the study. The study was proposed as two parallel tasks: Part 1 and Part 2 emphasize the study and development of known metal chalcogenide extractants and the synthesis and development of new metal chalcogenide extractants, respectively. The two tasks were divided into sub-sections that study the extractants and their chemistry as detailed below: Preparation and reactivity of metal chalcogenide host solids Extraction of target waste (guest) ions from simulated waste streams Examination of the guest-host solids recovery of the guest metal and reuse of extractant Each section of the two tasks was divided into focused subsections that detail the specific problems and solutions to those problems that were proposed. The extent to which those tasks have been accomplished and the continued efforts of the team are described in detail below. (b) Progress and Results. The DOE-supported research has proceeded largely as proposed and has been productive in its first 12 months. Two full-paper manuscripts were submitted and are currently under peer review. A third paper is in preparation and will be submitted shortly. In addition, 5 submitted or invited presentations have been made.'

  7. Thorium and uranium redox-active ligand complexes; reversible intramolecular electron transfer in U(dpp-BIAN)2/ U(dpp-BIAN)2(THE)

    Schelter, Eric John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Ruilian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Actinide complexes of the redox-active ligand dpp-BIAN{sup 2-} (dpp-BIAN = bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)acenaphthylene), An(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} (An = Th, n = 1; An = U, n = 0, 1) have been prepared. Solid-state magnetic and single-crystal X-ray data for U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} show when n = 0, the complex exists in an f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} configuration; whereas an intramolecular electron transfer occurs for n = 1, resulting in an f{sup 3}-{pi}*{sup 3} ground configuration. The magnetic data also indicate that interconversion between the two forms of the complex is possible, limited only by the ability of THF vapor to penetrate the solid on cooling of the sample. Spectroscopic data indicate the complex exists solely in the f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} form in solution, evidenced by the appearance of only small changes in the electronic absorption spectra of the U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2} complex on titration with THF and by measurement of the solution magnetic moment m d{sub 8}-tetrahydrofuran using Evans method. Electrochemistry of the complexes is reported, with small differences observed in wave potentials between metals and in the presence of THF. These data represent the first example of a well-defined, reversible intramolecular electron transfer in an f-element complex and the second example of oxidation state change through dative interaction with a metal ion.

  8. New redox-active layer create via epoxy-amine reaction - The base of genosensor for the detection of specific DNA and RNA sequences of avian influenza virus H5N1.

    Malecka, Kamila; Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka; Zagórski-Ostoja, Włodzimierz; Dehaen, Wim; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2015-03-15

    This paper concerns the development of a redox-active monolayer and its application for the construction of an electrochemical genosensor designed for the detection of specific DNA and RNA oligonucleotide sequences related to the avian influenza virus (AIV) type H5N1. This new redox layer was created on a gold electrode surface step by step. Cyclic Voltammetry, Osteryoung Square-Wave Voltammetry and Differential Pulse Voltammetry were used for its characterization. This new redox-active layer was applied for the construction of the DNA biosensor. The NH2-NC3 probe (20-mer) was covalently attached to the gold electrode surface via a "click" reaction between the amine and an epoxide group. The hybridization process was monitored using the Osteryoung Square-Wave Voltammetry. The 20-mer DNA and ca. 280-mer RNA oligonucleotides were used as the targets. The constructed genosensor was capable to determine complementary oligonucleotide sequences with a detection limit in the pM range. It is able to distinguish the different position of the part RNA complementary to the DNA probe. The genosensor was very selective. The 20-mer DNA as well as the 280-mer RNA oligonucleotides without a complementary sequence generated a weak signal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage is independent of nuclear calcium but dependent on redox-active ions.

    Jornot, L; Petersen, H; Junod, A F

    1998-01-01

    In cells undergoing oxidative stress, DNA damage may result from attack by .OH radicals produced by the Fenton reaction, and/or by nucleases activated by nuclear calcium. In the present study, the participation of these two mechanisms was investigated in HeLa cells. Nuclear-targeted aequorin was used for selectively monitoring Ca2+ concentrations within the nuclei ([Ca2+]n), in conjunction with the cell-permeant calcium chelator bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N', N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA/AM), the lipid-soluble broad-spectrum metal chelator with low affinity for Ca2+ and Mg2+ N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), and the high-affinity iron/copper chelator 1, 10-phenanthroline (PHE). In Ca2+-containing medium, H2O2 induced extensive DNA strand breaks and an increase in [Ca2+]n that was almost identical to that observed in the cytosol ([Ca2+]c). In cells bathed in Ca2+-free/EGTA medium, in which the increases in [Ca2+]n and [Ca2+]c due to H2O2 were significantly reduced, similar levels of DNA fragmentation also occurred. In cells preloaded with BAPTA/AM or TPEN, the small increase of [Ca2+]n normally elicited by H2O2 in Ca2+-free medium was completely buffered, and DNA damage was largely prevented. On the other hand, pretreatment with PHE did not affect the calcium response in the nuclei, but completely prevented DNA strand breakage induced by H2O2. Re-addition of 100 microM CuSO4 and 100 microM FeSO4 to TPEN- and PHE-treated cells prior to H2O2 challenge reversed the effect of TPEN and PHE, whereas 1 mM was necessary to negate the effect of BAPTA/AM. The levels of DNA strand breakage observed, however, did not correlate with the amounts of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG): H2O2 did not produce 8-OHdG, whereas PHE alone slightly increased 8-OHdG levels. CuSO4 and FeSO4 enhanced the effects of PHE, particularly in the presence of H2O2. Exposure of cells to a mixture of CuSO4/FeSO4 also resulted in a significant increase in

  11. STAT3-RXR-Nrf2 activates systemic redox and energy homeostasis upon steep decline in pO2 gradient

    Subhojit Paul

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypobaric hypoxia elicits several patho-physiological manifestations, some of which are known to be lethal. Among various molecular mechanisms proposed so far, perturbation in redox state due to imbalance between radical generation and antioxidant defence is promising. These molecular events are also related to hypoxic status of cancer cells and therefore its understanding has extended clinical advantage beyond high altitude hypoxia. In present study, however, the focus was to understand and propose a model for rapid acclimatization of high altitude visitors to enhance their performance based on molecular changes. We considered using simulated hypobaric hypoxia at some established thresholds of high altitude stratification based on known physiological effects. Previous studies have focused on the temporal aspect while overlooking the effects of varying pO2 levels during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. The pO2 levels, indicative of altitude, are crucial to redox homeostasis and can be the limiting factor during acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia. In this study we present the effects of acute (24 h exposure to high (3049 m; pO2: 71 kPa, very high (4573 m; pO2: 59 kPa and extreme altitude (7620 m; pO2: 40 kPa zones on lung and plasma using semi-quantitative redox specific transcripts and quantitative proteo-bioinformatics workflow in conjunction with redox stress assays. It was observed that direct exposure to extreme altitude caused 100% mortality, which turned into high survival rate after pre-exposure to 59 kPa, for which molecular explanation were also found. The pO2 of 59 kPa (very high altitude zone elicits systemic energy and redox homeostatic processes by modulating the STAT3-RXR-Nrf2 trio. Finally we posit the various processes downstream of STAT3-RXR-Nrf2 and the plasma proteins that can be used to ascertain the redox status of an individual. Keywords: STAT3, RXR, Nrf2, Network biology, Cytoskeleton, Redox homeostasis, Energy

  12. Fine Channel Networks

    1997-01-01

    A color image of fine channel networks on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows heavily cratered highlands dissected by dendritic open channel networks that dissect steep slopes of impact crater walls. This image is a composite of Viking high-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 9 degrees S. to 5 degrees S. and from longitude 312 degrees to 320 degrees; Mercator projection. The dendritic pattern of the fine channels and their location on steep slopes leads to the interpretation that these are runoff channels. The restriction of these types of channels to ancient highland rocks suggests that these channels are old and date from a time on Mars when conditions existed for precipitation to actively erode rocks. After the channels reach a low plain, they appear to end. Termination may have resulted from burial by younger deposits or perhaps the flows percolated into the surface materials and continued underground.

  13. Redox non-innocent ligands: versatile new tools to control catalytic reactions

    Lyaskovskyy, V.; de Bruin, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this (tutorial overview) perspective we highlight the use of "redox non-innocent" ligands in catalysis. Two main types of reactivity in which the redox non-innocent ligand is involved can be specified: (A) The redox active ligand participates in the catalytic cycle only by accepting/donating

  14. Redox regulation in cancer stem cells

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processe...

  15. Performance evaluation of the sulfur-redox-reaction-activated up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket and down-flow hanging sponge anaerobic/anoxic sequencing batch reactor system for municipal sewage treatment.

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Ohtsuki, Kota; Maharjan, Namita; Ono, Shinya; Dehama, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Takahashi, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    A sulfur-redox-reaction-activated up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) system, combined with an anaerobic/anoxic sequencing batch reactor (A2SBR), has been used for municipal sewage treatment for over 2 years. The present system achieved a removal rate of 95±14% for BOD, 74±22% for total nitrogen, and 78±25% for total phosphorus, including low water temperature conditions. Sludge conversion rates during the operational period were 0.016 and 0.218 g-VSS g-COD-removed(-1) for the UASB, and DHS, respectively, which are similar to a conventional UASB-DHS system, which is not used of sulfur-redox-reaction, for sewage treatment. Using the sulfur-redox reaction made advanced treatment of municipal wastewater with minimal sludge generation possible, even in winter. Furthermore, the occurrence of a unique phenomenon, known as the anaerobic sulfur oxidation reaction, was confirmed in the UASB reactor under the winter season. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Exercise redox biochemistry: Conceptual, methodological and technical recommendations.

    Cobley, James N; Close, Graeme L; Bailey, Damian M; Davison, Gareth W

    2017-08-01

    Exercise redox biochemistry is of considerable interest owing to its translational value in health and disease. However, unaddressed conceptual, methodological and technical issues complicate attempts to unravel how exercise alters redox homeostasis in health and disease. Conceptual issues relate to misunderstandings that arise when the chemical heterogeneity of redox biology is disregarded: which often complicates attempts to use redox-active compounds and assess redox signalling. Further, that oxidised macromolecule adduct levels reflect formation and repair is seldom considered. Methodological and technical issues relate to the use of out-dated assays and/or inappropriate sample preparation techniques that confound biochemical redox analysis. After considering each of the aforementioned issues, we outline how each issue can be resolved and provide a unifying set of recommendations. We specifically recommend that investigators: consider chemical heterogeneity, use redox-active compounds judiciously, abandon flawed assays, carefully prepare samples and assay buffers, consider repair/metabolism, use multiple biomarkers to assess oxidative damage and redox signalling. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Ferredoxin-Like Proteins HydN and YsaA Enhance Redox Dye-Linked Activity of the Formate Dehydrogenase H Component of the Formate Hydrogenlyase Complex.

    Pinske, Constanze

    2018-01-01

    Formate dehydrogenase H (FDH-H) and [NiFe]-hydrogenase 3 (Hyd-3) form the catalytic components of the hydrogen-producing formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex, which disproportionates formate to H 2 and CO 2 during mixed acid fermentation in enterobacteria. FHL comprises minimally seven proteins and little is understood about how this complex is assembled. Early studies identified a ferredoxin-like protein, HydN, as being involved in FDH-H assembly into the FHL complex. In order to understand how FDH-H and its small subunit HycB, which is also a ferredoxin-like protein, attach to the FHL complex, the possible roles of HydN and its paralogue, YsaA, in FHL complex stability and assembly were investigated. Deletion of the hycB gene reduced redox dye-mediated FDH-H activity to approximately 10%, abolished FHL-dependent H 2 -production, and reduced Hyd-3 activity. These data are consistent with HycB being an essential electron transfer component of the FHL complex. The FDH-H activity of the hydN and the ysaA deletion strains was reduced to 59 and 57% of the parental, while the double deletion reduced activity of FDH-H to 28% and the triple deletion with hycB to 1%. Remarkably, and in contrast to the hycB deletion, the absence of HydN and YsaA was without significant effect on FHL-dependent H 2 -production or total Hyd-3 activity; FDH-H protein levels were also unaltered. This is the first description of a phenotype for the E. coli ysaA deletion strain and identifies it as a novel factor required for optimal redox dye-linked FDH-H activity. A ysaA deletion strain could be complemented for FDH-H activity by hydN and ysaA , but the hydN deletion strain could not be complemented. Introduction of these plasmids did not affect H 2 production. Bacterial two-hybrid interactions showed that YsaA, HydN, and HycB interact with each other and with the FDH-H protein. Further novel anaerobic cross-interactions of 10 ferredoxin-like proteins in E. coli were also discovered and described

  18. Redox-capacitor to connect electrochemistry to redox-biology.

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-01-07

    It is well-established that redox-reactions are integral to biology for energy harvesting (oxidative phosphorylation), immune defense (oxidative burst) and drug metabolism (phase I reactions), yet there is emerging evidence that redox may play broader roles in biology (e.g., redox signaling). A critical challenge is the need for tools that can probe biologically-relevant redox interactions simply, rapidly and without the need for a comprehensive suite of analytical methods. We propose that electrochemistry may provide such a tool. In this tutorial review, we describe recent studies with a redox-capacitor film that can serve as a bio-electrode interface that can accept, store and donate electrons from mediators commonly used in electrochemistry and also in biology. Specifically, we (i) describe the fabrication of this redox-capacitor from catechols and the polysaccharide chitosan, (ii) discuss the mechanistic basis for electron exchange, (iii) illustrate the properties of this redox-capacitor and its capabilities for promoting redox-communication between biology and electrodes, and (iv) suggest the potential for enlisting signal processing strategies to "extract" redox information. We believe these initial studies indicate broad possibilities for enlisting electrochemistry and signal processing to acquire "systems level" redox information from biology.

  19. Microfluidic redox battery.

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-07

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  20. Effect of diurnal photosynthetic activity on the fine structure of amylopectin from normal and waxy barley starch

    Goldstein, Avi; Annor, George; Blennow, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    growing conditions. The amylopectin fine structures were analysed by characterizing its unit chain length profiles after enzymatic debranching as well as its φ,β-limit dextrins and its clusters and building blocks after their partial and complete hydrolysis with α-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens...... density and longer average chain lengths than clusters derived from plants grown under constant light conditions. Amylopectin clusters from diurnally grown plants also consisted of a greater number of building blocks, and shorter inter-block chain lengths compared to clusters derived from plants grown......, respectively. Regardless of lighting conditions, no structural effects were found when comparing both the amylopectin side-chain distribution and the internal chain fragments of these amylopectins. However, the diurnally grown NBS and WBS both showed larger amylopectin clusters and these had lower branching...

  1. STAT3-RXR-Nrf2 activates systemic redox and energy homeostasis upon steep decline in pO2 gradient.

    Paul, Subhojit; Gangwar, Anamika; Bhargava, Kalpana; Ahmad, Yasmin

    2018-04-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia elicits several patho-physiological manifestations, some of which are known to be lethal. Among various molecular mechanisms proposed so far, perturbation in redox state due to imbalance between radical generation and antioxidant defence is promising. These molecular events are also related to hypoxic status of cancer cells and therefore its understanding has extended clinical advantage beyond high altitude hypoxia. In present study, however, the focus was to understand and propose a model for rapid acclimatization of high altitude visitors to enhance their performance based on molecular changes. We considered using simulated hypobaric hypoxia at some established thresholds of high altitude stratification based on known physiological effects. Previous studies have focused on the temporal aspect while overlooking the effects of varying pO 2 levels during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. The pO 2 levels, indicative of altitude, are crucial to redox homeostasis and can be the limiting factor during acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia. In this study we present the effects of acute (24h) exposure to high (3049m; pO 2 : 71kPa), very high (4573m; pO 2 : 59kPa) and extreme altitude (7620m; pO 2 : 40kPa) zones on lung and plasma using semi-quantitative redox specific transcripts and quantitative proteo-bioinformatics workflow in conjunction with redox stress assays. It was observed that direct exposure to extreme altitude caused 100% mortality, which turned into high survival rate after pre-exposure to 59kPa, for which molecular explanation were also found. The pO 2 of 59kPa (very high altitude zone) elicits systemic energy and redox homeostatic processes by modulating the STAT3-RXR-Nrf2 trio. Finally we posit the various processes downstream of STAT3-RXR-Nrf2 and the plasma proteins that can be used to ascertain the redox status of an individual. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Aqueous liquid redox desulfurisation

    Reicher, M.; Niemiec, B.; Katona, T.

    1999-12-01

    The LO-CAT II process is an aqueous liquid redox process which uses ferric and ferrous iron catalysts to oxidise hydrogen sulfide (from sour gas) to elemental sulfur: the relevant chemical equations are given. Chelating agents keep the iron in solution. The system is described under the headings of (i) LO-CAT chemistry, (ii) design parameters, (iii) startup challenges, (iv) present situation and (v) anticipated future conditions. Further improvements to the system are anticipated.

  3. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  4. Pyridine nucleotides in regulation of cell death and survival by redox and non-redox reactions.

    Novak Kujundžić, Renata; Žarković, Neven; Gall Trošelj, Koraljka

    2014-01-01

    Changes of the level and ratios of pyridine nucleotides determine metabolism- dependent cellular redox status and the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and sirtuins, thereby influencing several processes closely related to cell survival and death. Pyridine nucleotides participate in numerous metabolic reactions whereby their net cellular level remains constant, but the ratios of NAD+/NADP+ and NADH/NADPH oscillate according to metabolic changes in response to diverse stress signals. In non-redox reactions, NAD+ is degraded and quickly, afterward, resynthesized in the NAD+ salvage pathway, unless overwhelming activation of PARP-1 consumes NAD+ to the point of no return, when the cell can no longer generate enough ATP to accommodate NAD+ resynthesis. The activity of PARP-1 is mandatory for the onset of cytoprotective autophagy on sublethal stress signals. It has become increasingly clear that redox status, largely influenced by the metabolism-dependent composition of the pyridine nucleotides pool, plays an important role in the synthesis of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic sphingolipids. Awareness of the involvement of the prosurvival sphingolipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, in transition from inflammation to malignant transformation has recently emerged. Here, the participation of pyridine nucleotides in redox and non-redox reactions, sphingolipid metabolism, and their role in cell fate decisions is reviewed.

  5. Development of redox stable, multifunctional substrates for anode supported SOFCS

    Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Ramos, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Redox stable solid oxide fuel cells are beneficial in many aspects such as tolerance against system failures e.g fuel cut off and emergency shut down, but also allow for higher fuel utilization, which increases efficiency. State-ofthe-art Ni-cermet based anodes suffer from microstructural changes...... with a multifunctional anode support, the development of a two layer fuel electrode based on a redox stable strontium titanate layer for the electrochemically active layer and a redox stable Ni-YSZ support was pursued. Half-cells with well adhearing strontium titante anode layers on stateof-the-art Ni-YSZ cermet...... supports have been achieved. Redox tolerance of the half-cell depends could be increased by optimizing the redox stability of the cermet support....

  6. STAT3-RXR-Nrf2 activates systemic redox and energy homeostasis upon steep decline in pO2 gradient

    Subhojit Paul; Anamika Gangwar; Kalpana Bhargava; Yasmin Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia elicits several patho-physiological manifestations, some of which are known to be lethal. Among various molecular mechanisms proposed so far, perturbation in redox state due to imbalance between radical generation and antioxidant defence is promising. These molecular events are also related to hypoxic status of cancer cells and therefore its understanding has extended clinical advantage beyond high altitude hypoxia. In present study, however, the focus was to understand and ...

  7. TiO2-photoanode-assisted direct solar energy harvesting and storage in a solar-powered redox cell using halides as active materials.

    Zhang, Shun; Chen, Chen; Zhou, Yangen; Qian, Yumin; Ye, Jing; Xiong, Shiyun; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2018-06-19

    The rapid deployment of renewable energy is resulting in significant energy security, climate change mitigation, and economic benefits. We demonstrate here the direct solar energy harvesting and storage in a rechargeable solar-powered redox cell, which can be charged solely by solar irradiation. The cell follows a conventional redox-flow cell design with one integrated TiO2 photoanode in the cathode side. Direct charging the cell by solar irradiation results in the conversion of solar energy in to chemical energy. While discharging the cell leads to the release of chemical energy in the form of electricity. The cell integrates energy conversion and storage processes in a single device, making the solar energy directly and efficiently dispatchable. When using redox couples of Br2/Br- and I3-/I- in the cathode side and anode side, respectively, the cell can be directly charged upon solar irradiation, yielding a discharge potential of 0.5V with good round-trip efficiencies. This design is expected to be a potential alternative towards the development of affordable, inexhaustible and clean solar energy technologies.

  8. Redox regulation of peroxiredoxin and proteinases by ascorbate and thiols during pea root nodule senescence.

    Groten, Karin; Dutilleul, Christelle; van Heerden, Philippus D R; Vanacker, Hélène; Bernard, Stéphanie; Finkemeier, Iris; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Foyer, Christine H

    2006-02-20

    Redox factors contributing to nodule senescence were studied in pea. The abundance of the nodule cytosolic peroxiredoxin but not the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin protein was modulated by ascorbate. In contrast to redox-active antioxidants such as ascorbate and cytosolic peroxiredoxin that decreased during nodule development, maximal extractable nodule proteinase activity increased progressively as the nodules aged. Cathepsin-like activities were constant throughout development but serine and cysteine proteinase activities increased during senescence. Senescence-induced cysteine proteinase activity was inhibited by cysteine, dithiotreitol, or E-64. Senescence-dependent decreases in redox-active factors, particularly ascorbate and peroxiredoxin favour decreased redox-mediated inactivation of cysteine proteinases.

  9. Identification of redox-sensitive cysteines in the arabidopsis proteome using OxiTRAQ, a quantitative redox proteomics method

    Liu, Pei

    2014-01-28

    Cellular redox status plays a key role in mediating various physiological and developmental processes often through modulating activities of redox-sensitive proteins. Various stresses trigger over-production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species which lead to oxidative modifications of redox-sensitive proteins. Identification and characterization of redox-sensitive proteins are important steps toward understanding molecular mechanisms of stress responses. Here, we report a high-throughput quantitative proteomic approach termed OxiTRAQ for identifying proteins whose thiols undergo reversible oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells subjected to oxidative stress. In this approach, a biotinylated thiol-reactive reagent is used for differential labeling of reduced and oxidized thiols. The biotin-tagged peptides are affinity purified, labeled with iTRAQ reagents, and analyzed using a paralleled HCD-CID fragmentation mode in an LTQ-Orbitrap. With this approach, we identified 195 cysteine-containing peptides from 179 proteins whose thiols underwent oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells following the treatment with hydrogen peroxide. A majority of those redox-sensitive proteins, including several transcription factors, were not identified by previous redox proteomics studies. This approach allows identification of the specific redox-regulated cysteine residues, and offers an effective tool for elucidation of redox proteomes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Oligo-carrageenan kappa-induced reducing redox status and activation of TRR/TRX system increase the level of indole-3-acetic acid, gibberellin A3 and trans-zeatin in Eucalyptus globulus trees.

    González, Alberto; Contreras, Rodrigo A; Zúiga, Gustavo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2014-08-20

    Eucalyptus globulus trees treated with oligo-carrageenan (OC) kappa showed an increase in NADPH, ascorbate and glutathione levels and activation of the thioredoxin reductase (TRR)/thioredoxin (TRX) system which enhance photosynthesis, basal metabolism and growth. In order to analyze whether the reducing redox status and the activation of thioredoxin reductase (TRR)/thioredoxin (TRX) increased the level of growth-promoting hormones, trees were treated with water (control), with OC kappa, or with inhibitors of ascorbate synthesis, lycorine, glutathione synthesis, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), NADPH synthesis, CHS-828, and thioredoxin reductase activity, auranofine, and with OC kappa, and cultivated for four additional months. Eucalyptus trees treated with OC kappa showed an increase in the levels of the auxin indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), gibberellin A3 (GA3) and the cytokinin trans-zeatin (t-Z) as well as a decrease in the level of the brassinosteroid epi-brassinolide (EB). In addition, treatment with lycorine, BSO, CHS-828 and auranofine inhibited the increase in IAA, GA3 and t-Z as well as the decrease in EB levels. Thus, the reducing redox status and the activation of TRR/TRX system induced by OC kappa increased the levels of IAA, GA3 and t-Z levels determining, at least in part, the stimulation of growth in Eucalyptus trees.

  11. Atypical Thioredoxins in Poplar: The Glutathione-Dependent Thioredoxin-Like 2.1 Supports the Activity of Target Enzymes Possessing a Single Redox Active Cysteine1[W

    Chibani, Kamel; Tarrago, Lionel; Gualberto, José Manuel; Wingsle, Gunnar; Rey, Pascal; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Plant thioredoxins (Trxs) constitute a complex family of thiol oxidoreductases generally sharing a WCGPC active site sequence. Some recently identified plant Trxs (Clot, Trx-like1 and -2, Trx-lilium1, -2, and -3) display atypical active site sequences with altered residues between the two conserved cysteines. The transcript expression patterns, subcellular localizations, and biochemical properties of some representative poplar (Populus spp.) isoforms were investigated. Measurements of transcript levels for the 10 members in poplar organs indicate that most genes are constitutively expressed. Using transient expression of green fluorescent protein fusions, Clot and Trx-like1 were found to be mainly cytosolic, whereas Trx-like2.1 was located in plastids. All soluble recombinant proteins, except Clot, exhibited insulin reductase activity, although with variable efficiencies. Whereas Trx-like2.1 and Trx-lilium2.2 were efficiently regenerated both by NADPH-Trx reductase and glutathione, none of the proteins were reduced by the ferredoxin-Trx reductase. Only Trx-like2.1 supports the activity of plastidial thiol peroxidases and methionine sulfoxide reductases employing a single cysteine residue for catalysis and using a glutathione recycling system. The second active site cysteine of Trx-like2.1 is dispensable for this reaction, indicating that the protein possesses a glutaredoxin-like activity. Interestingly, the Trx-like2.1 active site replacement, from WCRKC to WCGPC, suppresses its capacity to use glutathione as a reductant but is sufficient to allow the regeneration of target proteins employing two cysteines for catalysis, indicating that the nature of the residues composing the active site sequence is crucial for substrate selectivity/recognition. This study provides another example of the cross talk existing between the glutathione/glutaredoxin and Trx-dependent pathways. PMID:22523226

  12. Compromised redox homeostasis, altered nitroso-redox balance, and therapeutic possibilities in atrial fibrillation.

    Simon, Jillian N; Ziberna, Klemen; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Although the initiation, development, and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF) have been linked to alterations in myocyte redox state, the field lacks a complete understanding of the impact these changes may have on cellular signalling, atrial electrophysiology, and disease progression. Recent studies demonstrate spatiotemporal changes in reactive oxygen species production shortly after the induction of AF in animal models with an uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase activity ensuing in the presence of long-standing persistent AF, ultimately leading to a major shift in nitroso-redox balance. However, it remains unclear which radical or non-radical species are primarily involved in the underlying mechanisms of AF or which proteins are targeted for redox modification. In most instances, only free radical oxygen species have been assessed; yet evidence from the redox signalling field suggests that non-radical species are more likely to regulate cellular processes. A wider appreciation for the distinction of these species and how both species may be involved in the development and maintenance of AF could impact treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize how redox second-messenger systems are regulated and discuss the recent evidence for alterations in redox regulation in the atrial myocardium in the presence of AF, while identifying some critical missing links. We also examine studies looking at antioxidants for the prevention and treatment of AF and propose alternative redox targets that may serve as superior therapeutic options for the treatment of AF. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  13. Loss of Kdm5c Causes Spurious Transcription and Prevents the Fine-Tuning of Activity-Regulated Enhancers in Neurons

    Marilyn Scandaglia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During development, chromatin-modifying enzymes regulate both the timely establishment of cell-type-specific gene programs and the coordinated repression of alternative cell fates. To dissect the role of one such enzyme, the intellectual-disability-linked lysine demethylase 5C (Kdm5c, in the developing and adult brain, we conducted parallel behavioral, transcriptomic, and epigenomic studies in Kdm5c-null and forebrain-restricted inducible knockout mice. Together, genomic analyses and functional assays demonstrate that Kdm5c plays a critical role as a repressor responsible for the developmental silencing of germline genes during cellular differentiation and in fine-tuning activity-regulated enhancers during neuronal maturation. Although the importance of these functions declines after birth, Kdm5c retains an important genome surveillance role preventing the incorrect activation of non-neuronal and cryptic promoters in adult neurons.

  14. The Analgesic Acetaminophen and the Antipsychotic Clozapine Can Each Redox-Cycle with Melanin.

    Temoçin, Zülfikar; Kim, Eunkyoung; Li, Jinyang; Panzella, Lucia; Alfieri, Maria Laura; Napolitano, Alessandra; Kelly, Deanna L; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2017-12-20

    Melanins are ubiquitous but their complexity and insolubility has hindered characterization of their structures and functions. We are developing electrochemical reverse engineering methodologies that focus on properties and especially on redox properties. Previous studies have shown that melanins (i) are redox-active and can rapidly and repeatedly exchange electrons with diffusible oxidants and reductants, and (ii) have redox potentials in midregion of the physiological range. These properties suggest the functional activities of melanins will depend on their redox context. The brain has a complex redox context with steep local gradients in O 2 that can promote redox-cycling between melanin and diffusible redox-active chemical species. Here, we performed in vitro reverse engineering studies and report that melanins can redox-cycle with two common redox-active drugs. Experimentally, we used two melanin models: a convenient natural melanin derived from cuttlefish (Sepia melanin) and a synthetic cysteinyldopamine-dopamine core-shell model of neuromelanin. One drug, acetaminophen (APAP), has been used clinically for over a century, and recent studies suggest that low doses of APAP can protect the brain from oxidative-stress-induced toxicity and neurodegeneration, while higher doses can have toxic effects in the brain. The second drug, clozapine (CLZ), is a second generation antipsychotic with polypharmacological activities that remain incompletely understood. These in vitro observations suggest that the redox activities of drugs may be relevant to their modes-of-action, and that melanins may interact with drugs in ways that affect their activities, metabolism, and toxicities.

  15. Fine-scale assessment of home ranges and activity patterns for resident black vultures (Coragyps atratus and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura.

    Amanda E Holland

    Full Text Available Knowledge of black vulture (Coragyps atratus and turkey vulture (Cathartes aura spatial ecology is surprisingly limited despite their vital ecological roles. Fine-scale assessments of space use patterns and resource selection are particularly lacking, although development of tracking technologies has allowed data collection at finer temporal and spatial resolution. Objectives of this study were to conduct the first assessment of monthly home range and core area sizes of resident black and turkey vultures with consideration to sex, as well as elucidate differences in monthly, seasonal, and annual activity patterns based on fine-scale movement data analyses. We collected 2.8-million locations for 9 black and 9 turkey vultures from June 2013 -August 2015 using solar-powered GSM/GPS transmitters. We quantified home ranges and core areas using the dynamic Brownian bridge movement model and evaluated differences as a function of species, sex, and month. Mean monthly home ranges for turkey vultures were ~50% larger than those of black vultures, although mean core area sizes did not differ between species. Turkey vulture home ranges varied little across months, with exception to a notable reduction in space-use in May, which corresponds with timing of chick-rearing activities. Black vulture home ranges and core areas as well as turkey vulture core areas were larger in breeding season months (January-April. Comparison of space use between male and female vultures was only possible for black vultures, and space use was only slightly larger for females during breeding months (February-May. Analysis of activity patterns revealed turkey vultures spend more time in flight and switch motion states (between flight and stationary more frequently than black vultures across temporal scales. This study reveals substantive variability in space use and activity rates between sympatric black and turkey vultures, providing insights into potential behavioral mechanisms

  16. Dual-energy precursor and nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 activator treatment additively improve redox glutathione levels and neuron survival in aging and Alzheimer mouse neurons upstream of reactive oxygen species.

    Ghosh, Debolina; LeVault, Kelsey R; Brewer, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether glutathione (GSH) loss or increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) are more important to neuron loss, aging, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we stressed or boosted GSH levels in neurons isolated from aging 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those from age-matched nontransgenic (non-Tg) neurons. Here, using titrating with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (GCL), we observed that GSH depletion increased neuronal death of 3xTg-AD cultured neurons at increasing rates across the age span, whereas non-Tg neurons were resistant to GSH depletion until old age. Remarkably, the rate of neuron loss with ROS did not increase in old age and was the same for both genotypes, which indicates that cognitive deficits in the AD model were not caused by ROS. Therefore, we targeted for neuroprotection activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2) by 18 alpha glycyrrhetinic acid to stimulate GSH synthesis through GCL. This balanced stimulation of a number of redox enzymes restored the lower levels of Nrf2 and GCL seen in 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those of non-Tg neurons and promoted translocation of Nrf2 to the nucleus. By combining the Nrf2 activator together with the NADH precursor, nicotinamide, we increased neuron survival against amyloid beta stress in an additive manner. These stress tests and neuroprotective treatments suggest that the redox environment is more important for neuron survival than ROS. The dual neuroprotective treatment with nicotinamide and an Nrf2 inducer indicates that these age-related and AD-related changes are reversible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Redox chemistry and natural organic matter (NOM): Geochemists' dream, analytical chemists' nightmare

    Macalady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is an inherently complex mixture of polyfunctional organic molecules. Because of their universality and chemical reversibility, oxidation/reductions (redox) reactions of NOM have an especially interesting and important role in geochemistry. Variabilities in NOM composition and chemistry make studies of its redox chemistry particularly challenging, and details of NOM-mediated redox reactions are only partially understood. This is in large part due to the analytical difficulties associated with NOM characterization and the wide range of reagents and experimental systems used to study NOM redox reactions. This chapter provides a summary of the ongoing efforts to provide a coherent comprehension of aqueous redox chemistry involving NOM and of techniques for chemical characterization of NOM. It also describes some attempts to confirm the roles of different structural moieties in redox reactions. In addition, we discuss some of the operational parameters used to describe NOM redox capacities and redox states, and describe nomenclature of NOM redox chemistry. Several relatively facile experimental methods applicable to predictions of the NOM redox activity and redox states of NOM samples are discussed, with special attention to the proposed use of fluorescence spectroscopy to predict relevant redox characteristics of NOM samples.

  18. The Effect of Variation of Molarity of Alkali Activator and Fine Aggregate Content on the Compressive Strength of the Fly Ash: Palm Oil Fuel Ash Based Geopolymer Mortar

    Iftekhair Ibnul Bashar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of molarity of alkali activator, manufactured sand (M-sand, and quarry dust (QD on the compressive strength of palm oil fuel ash (POFA and fly ash (FA based geopolymer mortar was investigated and reported. The variable investigated includes the quantities of replacement levels of M-sand, QD, and conventional mining sand (N-sand in two concentrated alkaline solutions; the contents of alkaline solution, water, POFA/FA ratio, and curing condition remained constant. The results show that an average of 76% of the 28-day compressive strength was found at the age of 3 days. The rate of strength development from 3 to 7 days was found between 12 and 16% and it was found much less beyond this period. The addition of 100% M-sand and QD shows insignificant strength reduction compared to mixtures with 100% N-sand. The particle angularity and texture of fine aggregates played a significant role in the strength development due to the filling and packing ability. The rough texture and surface of QD enables stronger bond between the paste and the fine aggregate. The concentration of alkaline solution increased the reaction rate and thus enhanced the development of early age strength. The use of M-sand and QD in the development of geopolymer concrete is recommended as the strength variation between these waste materials and conventional sand is not high.

  19. Mitochondrial Energy and Redox Signaling in Plants

    Schwarzländer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: For a plant to grow and develop, energy and appropriate building blocks are a fundamental requirement. Mitochondrial respiration is a vital source for both. The delicate redox processes that make up respiration are affected by the plant's changing environment. Therefore, mitochondrial regulation is critically important to maintain cellular homeostasis. This involves sensing signals from changes in mitochondrial physiology, transducing this information, and mounting tailored responses, by either adjusting mitochondrial and cellular functions directly or reprogramming gene expression. Recent Advances: Retrograde (RTG) signaling, by which mitochondrial signals control nuclear gene expression, has been a field of very active research in recent years. Nevertheless, no mitochondrial RTG-signaling pathway is yet understood in plants. This review summarizes recent advances toward elucidating redox processes and other bioenergetic factors as a part of RTG signaling of plant mitochondria. Critical Issues: Novel insights into mitochondrial physiology and redox-regulation provide a framework of upstream signaling. On the other end, downstream responses to modified mitochondrial function have become available, including transcriptomic data and mitochondrial phenotypes, revealing processes in the plant that are under mitochondrial control. Future Directions: Drawing parallels to chloroplast signaling and mitochondrial signaling in animal systems allows to bridge gaps in the current understanding and to deduce promising directions for future research. It is proposed that targeted usage of new technical approaches, such as quantitative in vivo imaging, will provide novel leverage to the dissection of plant mitochondrial signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2122–2144. PMID:23234467

  20. Redox processes in radiation biology and cancer

    Greenstock, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    Free-radical intermediates, particularly the activated oxygen species OH, O - 2 , and 1 O 2 , are implicated in many types of radiation damage to biological systems. In addition, these same species may be formed, either directly or indirectly through biochemical redox reactions, in both essential and aberrant metabolic processes. Cell survival and adaptation to an environment containing ionizing radiation and other physical and chemical carcinogens ultimately depend upon the cell's ability to maintain optimal function in response to free-radical damage at the chemical level. Many of these feedback control mechanisms are redox controlled. Radiation chemical techniques using selective radical scavengers, such as product analysis and pulse radiolysis, enable us to generate, observe, and characterize individually the nature and reactivity of potentially damaging free radicals. From an analysis of the chemical kinetics of free-radical involvement in biological damage, redox mechanisms are proposed to describe the early processes of radiation damage, redox mechanisms are proposed to describe the early processes of radiation damage, its protection and sensitization, and the role of free radicals in radiation and chemical carcinogenesis

  1. Unusual thiol-based redox metabolism of parasitic flukes.

    Tripathi, Timir; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Sripa, Banchob

    2017-08-01

    Parasitic flukes are exposed to free radicals and, to a greater extent, reactive oxygen species (ROS) during their life cycle. Despite being relentlessly exposed to ROS released by activated immune cells, these parasites can survive for many years in the host. Cellular thiol-based redox metabolism plays a crucial role in parasite survival within their hosts. Evidence shows that oxidative stress and redox homeostasis maintenance are important clinical and pathobiochemical as well as effective therapeutic principles in various diseases. The characterization of redox and antioxidant enzymes is likely to yield good target candidates for novel drugs and vaccines. The absence of active catalase in fluke parasites offers great potential for the development of chemotherapeutic agents that act by perturbing the redox equilibrium of the cell. One of the redox-sensitive enzymes, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), has been accepted as a drug target against blood fluke infections, and related clinical trials are in progress. TGR is the sole enzyme responsible for Trx and GSH reduction in parasitic flukes. The availability of helminth genomes has accelerated the research on redox metabolism of flukes; however, significant achievements have yet to be attained. The present review summarizes current knowledge on the redox and antioxidant system of the parasitic flukes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals: 3. Relationships between smectite redox and structural properties.

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura E; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important redox-active species in many pristine and contaminated environments as well as in engineered systems. Understanding the extent and kinetics of redox reactions involving Fe-bearing clay minerals has been challenging due to the inability to relate structural Fe(2+)/Fe(total) fractions to fundamental redox properties, such as reduction potentials (EH). Here, we overcame this challenge by using mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO) to characterize the fraction of redox-active structural Fe (Fe(2+)/Fe(total)) in smectites over a wide range of applied EH-values (-0.6 V to +0.6 V). We examined Fe(2+)/Fe(total )- EH relationships of four natural Fe-bearing smectites (SWy-2, SWa-1, NAu-1, NAu-2) in their native, reduced, and reoxidized states and compared our measurements with spectroscopic observations and a suite of mineralogical properties. All smectites exhibited unique Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships, were redox active over wide EH ranges, and underwent irreversible electron transfer induced structural changes that were observable with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Variations among the smectite Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships correlated well with both bulk and molecular-scale properties, including Fe(total) content, layer charge, and quadrupole splitting values, suggesting that multiple structural parameters determined the redox properties of smectites. The Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships developed for these four commonly studied clay minerals may be applied to future studies interested in relating the extent of structural Fe reduction or oxidation to EH-values.

  3. Exploring Characteristics of Fine-Grained Behaviors of Learning Mathematics in Tablet-Based E-Learning Activities

    Yeung, Cheuk Yu; Shum, Kam Hong; Hui, Lucas Chi Kwong; Chu, Samuel Kai Wah; Chan, Tsing Yun; Kuo, Yung Nin; Ng, Yee Ling

    2017-01-01

    Attributes of teaching and learning contexts provide rich information about how students participate in learning activities. By tracking and analyzing snapshots of these attributes captured continuously throughout the duration of the learning activities, teachers can identify individual students who need special attention and apply different…

  4. The Redox Flow System for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    Odonnell, P.; Gahn, R. F.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The interfacing of a Solar Photovoltaic System and a Redox Flow System for storage was workable. The Redox Flow System, which utilizes the oxidation-reduction capability of two redox couples, in this case iron and titanium, for its storage capacity, gave a relatively constant output regardless of solar activity so that a load could be run continually day and night utilizing the sun's energy. One portion of the system was connected to a bank of solar cells to electrochemically charge the solutions, while a separate part of the system was used to electrochemically discharge the stored energy.

  5. Neutral Red and Ferroin as Reversible and Rapid Redox Materials for Redox Flow Batteries.

    Hong, Jeehoon; Kim, Ketack

    2018-04-17

    Neutral red and ferroin are used as redox indicators (RINs) in potentiometric titrations. The rapid response and reversibility that are prerequisites for RINs are also desirable properties for the active materials in redox flow batteries (RFBs). This study describes the electrochemical properties of ferroin and neutral red as a redox pair. The rapid reaction rates of the RINs allow a cell to run at a rate of 4 C with 89 % capacity retention after the 100 th  cycle. The diffusion coefficients, electrode reaction rates, and solubilities of the RINs were determined. The electron-transfer rate constants of ferroin and neutral red are 0.11 and 0.027 cm s -1 , respectively, which are greater than those of the components of all-vanadium and Zn/Br 2 cells. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Ruthenium nanocatalysis on redox reactions.

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Ramdass, Arumugam; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles have generated intense interest over the past 20 years due to their high potential applications in different areas such as catalysis, sensors, nanoscale electronics, fuel and solar cells and optoelectronics. As the large fractions of metal atoms are exposed to the surface, the use of metal nanoparticles as nanocatalysts allows mild reaction conditions and high catalytic efficiency in a large number of chemical transformations. They have emerged as sustainable heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports alternative to conventional materials. This review focuses on the synthesis, characterization and catalytic role of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) on the redox reactions of heteroatom containing organic compounds with the green reagent H2O2, a field that has attracted immense interest among the chemical, materials and industrial communities. We intend to present a broad overview of Ru nanocatalysts for redox reactions with an emphasis on their performance, stability and reusability. The growth in the chemistry of organic sulfoxides and N-oxides during last decade was due to their importance as synthetic intermediates for the production of a wide range of chemically and biologically active molecules. Thus design of efficient methods for the synthesis of sulfoxides and N-oxides becomes important. This review concentrates on the catalysis of RuNPs on the H2O2 oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides and amines to N-oxides. The deoxygenation reactions of sulfoxides to sulfides and reduction of nitro compounds to amines are fundamental reactions in both chemistry and biology. Here, we also highlight the catalysis of metal nanoparticles on the deoxygenation of sulfoxides and sulfones and reduction of nitro compounds with particular emphasis on the mechanistic aspects.

  7. Exercise-intensity dependent alterations in plasma redox status do not reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling.

    Parker, Lewan; Trewin, Adam; Levinger, Itamar; Shaw, Christopher S; Stepto, Nigel K

    2018-04-01

    Redox homeostasis and redox-sensitive protein signaling play a role in exercise-induced adaptation. The effects of sprint-interval exercise (SIE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMIE), on post-exercise plasma redox status are unclear. Furthermore, whether post-exercise plasma redox status reflects skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling is unknown. In a randomized crossover design, eight healthy adults performed a cycling session of HIIE (5×4min at 75% W max ), SIE (4×30s Wingate's), and CMIE work-matched to HIIE (30min at 50% of W max ). Plasma hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and catalase activity were measured immediately post, 1h, 2h and 3h post-exercise. Plasma redox status biomarkers were correlated with phosphorylation of skeletal muscle p38-MAPK, JNK, NF-κB, and IκBα protein content immediately and 3h post-exercise. Plasma catalase activity was greater with SIE (56.6±3.8Uml -1 ) compared to CMIE (42.7±3.2, pexercise plasma TBARS and SOD activity significantly (pexercise protocol. A significant positive correlation was detected between plasma catalase activity and skeletal muscle p38-MAPK phosphorylation 3h post-exercise (r=0.40, p=0.04). No other correlations were detected (all p>0.05). Low-volume SIE elicited greater post-exercise plasma catalase activity compared to HIIE and CMIE, and greater H 2 O 2 compared to CMIE. Plasma redox status did not, however, adequately reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An application of actinide elements for a redox flow battery

    Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Yamana, Hajimu; Moriyama, Hirotake

    2000-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of U, Np, Pu and Am were discussed from the viewpoint of cell active materials. From the thermodynamic properties and the kinetics of electrode reactions, it is found that neptunium in the aqueous system can be utilized as an active material of the redox flow battery for the electric power storage. A new neptunium redox battery is proposed in the present article: the galvanic cell is expressed by (-)|Np 3+ , Np 4+ |NpO 2 + , NpO 2 2+ |(+). The neptunium battery is expected to have more excellent charge and discharge performance than the current vanadium battery, whereas the thermodynamic one of the former is comparable to the latter. For the development of a uranium redox battery, the application of the redox reactions in the non-aqueous solvents is essential. (author)

  9. Control of the intracellular redox state by glucose participates in the insulin secretion mechanism.

    Eduardo Rebelato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS due to chronic exposure to glucose has been associated with impaired beta cell function and diabetes. However, physiologically, beta cells are well equipped to deal with episodic glucose loads, to which they respond with a fine tuned glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS. In the present study, a systematic investigation in rat pancreatic islets about the changes in the redox environment induced by acute exposure to glucose was carried out. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Short term incubations were performed in isolated rat pancreatic islets. Glucose dose- and time-dependently reduced the intracellular ROS content in pancreatic islets as assayed by fluorescence in a confocal microscope. This decrease was due to activation of pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP. Inhibition of PPP blunted the redox control as well as GSIS in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of low doses of ROS scavengers at high glucose concentration acutely improved beta cell function. The ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine increased the intracellular calcium response to glucose that was associated with a small decrease in ROS content. Additionally, the presence of the hydrogen peroxide-specific scavenger catalase, in its membrane-permeable form, nearly doubled glucose metabolism. Interestingly, though an increase in GSIS was also observed, this did not match the effect on glucose metabolism. CONCLUSIONS: The control of ROS content via PPP activation by glucose importantly contributes to the mechanisms that couple the glucose stimulus to insulin secretion. Moreover, we identified intracellular hydrogen peroxide as an inhibitor of glucose metabolism intrinsic to rat pancreatic islets. These findings suggest that the intracellular adjustment of the redox environment by glucose plays an important role in the mechanism of GSIS.

  10. Oriented immobilization of His-tagged kinase RIO1 protein on redox active N-(IDA-like)-Cu(II) monolayer deposited on gold electrode—The base of electrochemical biosensor

    Mielecki, Marcin; Wojtasik, Justyn; Zborowska, Magdalena; Kurzątkowska, Katarzyna; Grzelak, Krystyna; Dehaen, Wim; Radecki, Jerzy; Radecka, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The redox active N-(IDA-like)-Cu(II) monolayer is suitable for oriented and stable immobilization of His-tagged kinase Rio1. ► Cu(II) deposited onto the electrode surface play double role: immobilization sites for His-tagged proteins and transduction centres tracking the protein–small molecule interactions. ► The base of biosensor response towards target compound is the change of Rio1 conformation lading to alternation of the permeability of counter ions to Cu(II) redox centres. -- Abstract: The fabrication of electrochemical biosensor consists of the following successive steps: formation of thiol derivative of iminodiacetic acid (IDA-like/N-heterocyclic donor) and N-acetylcysteamine (NAC) self-assembled monolayer on the Au electrode, complexation of Cu(II) by N(IDA-like) attached to the surface of the Au electrode and immobilization of kinase protein Rio1 through N(IDA-like)-Cu(II)-histidine-tag covalent bond formation. Each step of modification was controlled by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. The interactions between rHis 6 -Rio1 attached to the surface of the electrode and tyrphostin inhibitor (2E)-N-Benzyl-2-cyano-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-acrylamide (AG-490) and its analogue (2-cyano-N-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-(pyridin-3-yl)prop-2-enamide) (CPE), present in aqueous solution were monitored with Osteryoung square wave voltammetry. The basis of the biosensor response was the change in the electrochemical properties of Cu(II) redox centres upon formation of the rHis 6 -Rio1-inhibitor complex. A linear responses with high reproducibility and stability were observed between 0.10 and 0.40 μM of AG-490 as well as of CPE. The interaction between rHis 6 -Rio1 and AG-490 was stronger than the interaction with its analogue CPE. Cu(II) redox current decrease of 37.9 ± 1.6% and 23.3 ± 1.0% were observed in the presence of 0.40 μM of AG-490 and CPE, respectively. The presented biosensor could be

  11. Optical imaging of neuronal activity and visualization of fine neural structures in non-desheathed nervous systems.

    Christopher John Goldsmith

    Full Text Available Locating circuit neurons and recording from them with single-cell resolution is a prerequisite for studying neural circuits. Determining neuron location can be challenging even in small nervous systems because neurons are densely packed, found in different layers, and are often covered by ganglion and nerve sheaths that impede access for recording electrodes and neuronal markers. We revisited the voltage-sensitive dye RH795 for its ability to stain and record neurons through the ganglion sheath. Bath-application of RH795 stained neuronal membranes in cricket, earthworm and crab ganglia without removing the ganglion sheath, revealing neuron cell body locations in different ganglion layers. Using the pyloric and gastric mill central pattern generating neurons in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG of the crab, Cancer borealis, we found that RH795 permeated the ganglion without major residue in the sheath and brightly stained somatic, axonal and dendritic membranes. Visibility improved significantly in comparison to unstained ganglia, allowing the identification of somata location and number of most STG neurons. RH795 also stained axons and varicosities in non-desheathed nerves, and it revealed the location of sensory cell bodies in peripheral nerves. Importantly, the spike activity of the sensory neuron AGR, which influences the STG motor patterns, remained unaffected by RH795, while desheathing caused significant changes in AGR activity. With respect to recording neural activity, RH795 allowed us to optically record membrane potential changes of sub-sheath neuronal membranes without impairing sensory activity. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable with that previously observed in desheathed preparations and sufficiently high to identify neurons in single-sweep recordings and synaptic events after spike-triggered averaging. In conclusion, RH795 enabled staining and optical recording of neurons through the ganglion sheath and is therefore both a

  12. Nutritional status modulates plasma leptin, AMPK and TOR activation, and mitochondrial biogenesis: Implications for cell metabolism and growth in skeletal muscle of the fine flounder.

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Safian, Diego; Einarsdottir, Ingibjörg Eir; Valdés, Juan Antonio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Molina, Alfredo; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur

    2013-06-01

    Insight of how growth and metabolism in skeletal muscle are related is still lacking in early vertebrates. In this context, molecules involved in these processes, such as leptin, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), target of rapamicyn (TOR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α, and oxidative phosphorylation complexes (OXPHOS), were assessed in the skeletal muscle of a fish species. Periods of fasting followed by a period of refeeding were implemented, using the fine flounder as a model (Paralichthys adspersus). This species exhibits remarkably slow growth and food intake, which is linked to an inherent growth hormone (GH) resistance and high circulating levels of leptin. Leptin increased during fasting concomitantly with AMPK activation, which was inversely correlated with TOR activation. On the other hand, AMPK was directly correlated with an increase in PGC-1α and OXPHOS complexes contents. Dramatic changes in the activation and content of these molecules were observed during short-term refeeding. Leptin, AMPK activation, and PGC-1α/OXPHOS complexes contents decreased radically; whereas, TOR activation increased significantly. During long-term refeeding these molecules returned to basal levels. These results suggest that there is a relation among these components; thus, during fasting periods ATP-consuming biosynthetic pathways are repressed and alternative sources of ATP/energy are promoted, a phenomenon that is reversed during anabolic periods. These results provide novel insight on the control of metabolism and growth in the skeletal muscle of a non-mammalian species, suggesting that both processes in fish muscle are closely related and coordinated by a subset of common molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 1,5-Diamido-9,10-anthraquinone, a Centrosymmetric Redox-Active Bridge with Two Coupled β-Ketiminato Chelate Functions: Symmetric and Asymmetric Diruthenium Complexes.

    Ansari, Mohd Asif; Mandal, Abhishek; Paretzki, Alexa; Beyer, Katharina; Fiedler, Jan; Kaim, Wolfgang; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2016-06-06

    The dinuclear complexes {(μ-H2L)[Ru(bpy)2]2}(ClO4)2 ([3](ClO4)2), {(μ-H2L)[Ru(pap)2]2}(ClO4)2 ([4](ClO4)2), and the asymmetric [(bpy)2Ru(μ-H2L)Ru(pap)2](ClO4)2 ([5](ClO4)2) were synthesized via the mononuclear species [Ru(H3L)(bpy)2]ClO4 ([1]ClO4) and [Ru(H3L)(pap)2]ClO4 ([2]ClO4), where H4L is the centrosymmetric 1,5-diamino-9,10-anthraquinone, bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, and pap is 2-phenylazopyridine. Electrochemistry of the structurally characterized [1]ClO4, [2]ClO4, [3](ClO4)2, [4](ClO4)2, and [5](ClO4)2 reveals multistep oxidation and reduction processes, which were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of paramagnetic intermediates and by UV-vis-NIR spectro-electrochemistry. With support by time-dependent density functional theory (DFT) calculations the redox processes could be assigned. Significant results include the dimetal/bridging ligand mixed spin distribution in 3(3+) versus largely bridge-centered spin in 4(3+)-a result of the presence of Ru(II)-stabilizig pap coligands. In addition to the metal/ligand alternative for electron transfer and spin location, the dinuclear systems allow for the observation of ligand/ligand and metal/metal site differentiation within the multistep redox series. DFT-supported EPR and NIR absorption spectroscopy of the latter case revealed class II mixed-valence behavior of the oxidized asymmetric system 5(3+) with about equal contributions from a radical bridge formulation. In comparison to the analogues with the deprotonated 1,4-diaminoanthraquinone isomer the centrosymmetric H2L(2-) bridge shows anodically shifted redox potentials and weaker electronic coupling between the chelate sites.

  14. Comparative analysis of dose rates in bricks determined by neutron activation analysis, alpha counting and X-ray fluorescence analysis for the thermoluminescence fine grain dating method

    Bártová, H.; Kučera, J.; Musílek, L.; Trojek, T.

    2014-11-01

    In order to evaluate the age from the equivalent dose and to obtain an optimized and efficient procedure for thermoluminescence (TL) dating, it is necessary to obtain the values of both the internal and the external dose rates from dated samples and from their environment. The measurements described and compared in this paper refer to bricks from historic buildings and a fine-grain dating method. The external doses are therefore negligible, if the samples are taken from a sufficient depth in the wall. However, both the alpha dose rate and the beta and gamma dose rates must be taken into account in the internal dose. The internal dose rate to fine-grain samples is caused by the concentrations of natural radionuclides 238U, 235U, 232Th and members of their decay chains, and by 40K concentrations. Various methods can be used for determining trace concentrations of these natural radionuclides and their contributions to the dose rate. The dose rate fraction from 238U and 232Th can be calculated, e.g., from the alpha count rate, or from the concentrations of 238U and 232Th, measured by neutron activation analysis (NAA). The dose rate fraction from 40K can be calculated from the concentration of potassium measured, e.g., by X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) or by NAA. Alpha counting and XRF are relatively simple and are accessible for an ordinary laboratory. NAA can be considered as a more accurate method, but it is more demanding regarding time and costs, since it needs a nuclear reactor as a neutron source. A comparison of these methods allows us to decide whether the time- and cost-saving simpler techniques introduce uncertainty that is still acceptable.

  15. Radical Decisions in Cancer: Redox Control of Cell Growth and Death

    Sainz, Rosa M.; Lombo, Felipe; Mayo, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Free radicals play a key role in many physiological decisions in cells. Since free radicals are toxic to cellular components, it is known that they cause DNA damage, contribute to DNA instability and mutation and thus favor carcinogenesis. However, nowadays it is assumed that free radicals play a further complex role in cancer. Low levels of free radicals and steady state levels of antioxidant enzymes are responsible for the fine tuning of redox status inside cells. A change in redox state is a way to modify the physiological status of the cell, in fact, a more reduced status is found in resting cells while a more oxidative status is associated with proliferative cells. The mechanisms by which redox status can change the proliferative activity of cancer cells are related to transcriptional and posttranscriptional modifications of proteins that play a critical role in cell cycle control. Since cancer cells show higher levels of free radicals compared with their normal counterparts, it is believed that the anti-oxidative stress mechanism is also increased in cancer cells. In fact, the levels of some of the most important antioxidant enzymes are elevated in advanced status of some types of tumors. Anti-cancer treatment is compromised by survival mechanisms in cancer cells and collateral damage in normal non-pathological tissues. Though some resistance mechanisms have been described, they do not yet explain why treatment of cancer fails in several tumors. Given that some antitumoral treatments are based on the generation of free radicals, we will discuss in this review the possible role of antioxidant enzymes in the survival mechanism in cancer cells and then, its participation in the failure of cancer treatments

  16. Exercise and Glycemic Control: Focus on Redox Homeostasis and Redox-Sensitive Protein Signaling

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S.; Stepto, Nigel K.; Levinger, Itamar

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity, excess energy consumption, and obesity are associated with elevated systemic oxidative stress and the sustained activation of redox-sensitive stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Sustained SAPK activation leads to aberrant insulin signaling, impaired glycemic control, and the development and progression of cardiometabolic disease. Paradoxically, acute exercise transiently increases oxidative stress and SAPK signaling, yet postexercise glycemic control and skeletal muscle function are enhanced. Furthermore, regular exercise leads to the upregulation of antioxidant defense, which likely assists in the mitigation of chronic oxidative stress-associated disease. In this review, we explore the complex spatiotemporal interplay between exercise, oxidative stress, and glycemic control, and highlight exercise-induced reactive oxygen species and redox-sensitive protein signaling as important regulators of glucose homeostasis. PMID:28529499

  17. Anti-sigma factor YlaD regulates transcriptional activity of sigma factor YlaC and sporulation via manganese-dependent redox-sensing molecular switch in Bacillus subtilis.

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Ryu, Han-Bong; Song, Sung-Hyun; Lee, Jin-Won; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2018-05-14

    YlaD, a membrane-anchored anti-sigma factor of Bacillus subtilis , contains a HX 3 CXXC motif that functions as a redox-sensing domain and belongs to one of the zinc-coordinated anti-sigma factor families. Despite previously showing that the YlaC transcription is controlled by YlaD, experimental evidence of how the YlaC-YlaD interaction is affected by active cysteines and/or metal ions is lacking. Here, we showed that the P yla promoter is autoregulated solely by YlaC. Moreover, reduced YlaD contained zinc and iron, while oxidized YlaD did not. Cysteine substitution in YlaD led to changes in its secondary structure; Cys3 had important structural functions in YlaD, and its mutation caused dissociation from YlaC, indicating the essential requirement of a HX 3 CXXC motif for regulating interactions of YlaC with YlaD. Analyses of the far-UV CD spectrum and metal content revealed that the addition of Mn ions to Zn-YlaD changed its secondary structure and that iron was substituted for manganese. The ylaC gene expression using βGlu activity from P yla : gusA was observed at the late-exponential and early-stationary phase and the ylaC -overexpressing mutant constitutively expressed gene transcripts of clpP and sigH , an important alternative sigma factor regulated by ClpXP. Collectively, our data demonstrated that YlaD senses redox changes and elicits increase in manganese ion concentrations and that, in turn, YlaD-mediated transcriptional activity of YlaC regulates sporulation initiation under oxidative stress and manganese-substituted conditions by regulating clpP gene transcripts. This is the first report of the involvement of oxidative stress-responsive B. subtilis extracytoplasmic function sigma factors during sporulation via a manganese-dependent redox-sensing molecular switch. ©2018 The Author(s).

  18. Aerosol-phase activity of iodine captured from a triiodide resin filter on fine particles containing an infectious virus.

    Heimbuch, B K; Harnish, D A; Balzli, C; Lumley, A; Kinney, K; Wander, J D

    2015-06-01

    To avoid interference by water-iodine disinfection chemistry and measure directly the effect of iodine, captured from a triiodide complex bound to a filter medium, on viability of penetrating viral particles. Aerosols of MS2 coli phage were passed through control P100 or iodinated High-Efficiency Particulate Air media, collected in plastic bags, incubated for 0-10 min, collected in an impinger containing thiosulphate to consume all unreacted iodine, plated and enumerated. Comparison of viable counts demonstrated antimicrobial activity with an apparent half-life for devitalization in tens of seconds; rate of kill decreased at low humidity and free iodine was captured by the bags. The results support the mechanism of near-contact capture earlier proposed; however, the disinfection chemistry in the aerosol phase is very slow on the time scale of inhalation. This study shows that disinfection by filter-bound iodine in the aerosol phase is too slow to be clinically significant in individual respiratory protection, but that it might be of benefit to limit airborne transmission of infections in enclosed areas. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Short-Term Effects of Nose-Only Cigarette Smoke Exposure on Glutathione Redox Homeostasis, Cytochrome P450 1A1/2 and Respiratory Enzyme Activities in Mice Tissues

    Haider Raza

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The components of cigarette smoke (CS have been implicated in the development of cancer as well as in cardiopulmonary diseases. We have previously reported increased oxidative stress in rat tissues induced by tobacco-specific toxins nicotine and 4-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK. Recently, we have also shown increased oxidative stress and associated inflammatory responses in various tissues after exposure to cigarette smoke. Methods: In this study, we have further investigated the effects of nose-only cigarette smoke exposure on mitochondrial functions and glutathione-dependent redox metabolism in tissues of BALB/C mice. Liver, kidney, heart and lung tissues were analyzed for oxidative stress, glutathione (GSH and cytochrome P450 dependent enzyme activities and mitochondrial functions after exposure to smoke generated by 9 cigarettes/day for 4 days. Control mice were exposed to air only. Results: An increase in oxidative stress as observed by increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and altered GSH metabolism was apparent in all the tissues, but lung and heart appeared to be the main targets. Increased expression and activity of CYP450 1A1 and 1A2 were also observed in the tissues after exposure to cigarette smoke. Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction in the tissues, as observed by alterations in the activities of Complex I and IV enzymes, was also observed after exposure to cigarette smoke. SDS-PAGE and Western blot results also indicate that alterations in the expression of enzyme proteins were in accordance with the changes in their catalytic functions. Conclusion: These results suggest that even short term exposure of cigarette smoke have adverse effects on mitochondrial functions and redox homeostasis in tissues which may progress to further complications associated with chronic smoking.

  20. SAETTA: fine-scale observation of the total lightning activity in the framework of the CORSiCA atmospheric observatory

    Coquillat, Sylvain; Defer, Eric; Lambert, Dominique; Martin, Jean-Michel; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Pont, Véronique; Prieur, Serge

    2015-04-01

    Located in the West Mediterranean basin, Corsica is strategically positioned for atmospheric studies referred by MISTRALS/HyMeX and MISTRALS/CHARMEX programs. The implementation of the project of atmospheric observatory CORSiCA (supported by the Collectivité Territoriale de Corse via CPER/FEDER funds) was an opportunity to strengthen the potential observation of convective events causing heavy rainfall and flash floods, by acquiring a total lightning activity detection system adapted to storm tracking at a regional scale. This detection system called SAETTA (Suivi de l'Activité Electrique Tridimensionnelle Totale de l'Atmosphère) is a network of 12 LMA stations (Lightning Mapping Array). Developed by New Mexico Tech (USA), the instrument allows observing lightning flashes in 3D and real time, at high temporal and spatial resolutions. It detects the radiations emitted by cloud discharges in the 60-66 MHz band, in a radius of about 300 km from the centre of the network, in passive mode and standalone (solar panel and battery). Each LMA station samples the signal at high rate (80 microseconds), records data on internal hard disk, and transmits a decimated signal in real-time via the 3G phone network. The decimated data are received on a server that calculates the position of the detected sources by the time-of-arrival method and manages a quasi real-time display on a website. The non decimated data intended for research applications are recovered later on the field. Deployed in May and June 2014, SAETTA operated nominally from July 13 to October 20, 2014. It is to be definitively re-installed in spring 2015 after a hardware updating. The operation of SAETTA is contractually scheduled until the end of 2019, but it is planned to continue well beyond to obtain longer-term observations for addressing issues related to climatic trends. SAETTA has great scientific potential in a broad range of topics: physics of discharge; monitoring and simulation of storm systems

  1. Are chronic neck pain, scapular dyskinesis and altered scapulothoracic muscle activity interrelated?: A case-control study with surface and fine-wire EMG.

    Castelein, Birgit; Cools, Ann; Parlevliet, Thierry; Cagnie, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    The function of the scapula is important in normal neck function and might be disturbed in patients with neck pain. The surrounding muscular system is important for the function of the scapula. To date, it is not clear if patients with idiopathic neck pain show altered activity of these scapulothoracic muscles. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate differences in deeper and superficial lying scapulothoracic muscle activity between patients with idiopathic neck pain and healthy controls during arm elevation, and to identify the influence of scapular dyskinesis on muscle activity. Scapular dyskinesis was rated with the yes/no method. The deeper lying (Levator Scapulae, Pectoralis Minor (Pm) and Rhomboid major) and superficial lying (Trapezius and Serratus Anterior) scapulothoracic muscles' activity was investigated with fine-wire and surface EMG, respectively, in 19 female subjects with idiopathic neck pain (age 28.3±10.1years, average duration of neck pain 45.6±36.3months) and 19 female healthy control subjects (age 29.3±11.7years) while performing scaption and towel wall slide. Possible interactions or differences between subject groups, scapular dyskinesis groups or phases of the task were studied with a linear mixed model. Higher Pm activity during the towel wallslide (p=0.024, mean difference 8.8±3.3% MVIC) was shown in patients with idiopathic neck pain in comparison with healthy controls. For the MT, a significant group∗dyskinesis interaction effect was found during scaption which revealed that patients with neck pain and scapular dyskinesis showed lower Middle Trapezius (MT) activity in comparison with healthy controls with scapular dyskinesis (p=0.029, mean difference 5.1±2.2% MVIC). In the presence of idiopathic neck pain, higher Pm activity during the towel wallslide was found. Patients with neck pain and scapular dyskinesis showed lower MT activity in comparison with healthy controls with scapular dyskinesis during scaption

  2. Mesoporous tungsten oxynitride as electrocatalyst for promoting redox reactions of vanadium redox couple and performance of vanadium redox flow battery

    Lee, Wonmi; Jo, Changshin; Youk, Sol; Shin, Hun Yong; Lee, Jinwoo; Chung, Yongjin; Kwon, Yongchai

    2018-01-01

    For enhancing the performance of vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB), a sluggish reaction rate issue of V2+/V3+ redox couple evaluated as the rate determining reaction should be addressed. For doing that, mesoporous tungsten oxide (m-WO3) and oxyniride (m-WON) structures are proposed as the novel catalysts, while m-WON is gained by NH3 heat treatment of m-WO3. Their specific surface area, crystal structure, surface morphology and component analysis are measured using BET, XRD, TEM and XPS, while their catalytic activity for V2+/V3+ redox reaction is electrochemically examined. As a result, the m-WON shows higher peak current, smaller peak potential difference, higher electron transfer rate constant and lower charge transfer resistance than other catalysts, like the m-WO3, WO3 nanoparticle and mesoporous carbon, proving that it is superior catalyst. Regarding the charge-discharge curve tests, the VRFB single cell employing the m-WON demonstrates high voltage and energy efficiencies, high specific capacity and low capacity loss rate. The excellent results of m-WON are due to the reasons like (i) reduced energy band gap, (ii) reaction familiar surface functional groups and (ii) greater electronegativity.

  3. Characterisation of the Redox Sensitive NMDA Receptor

    Alzahrani, Ohood

    2016-05-01

    Glucose entry into the brain and its subsequent metabolism to L-lactate, regulated by astrocytes, plays a major role in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. A recent study has shown that L-lactate produced by the brain upon stimulation of glycolysis, and glycogen-derived L-lactate from astrocytes and its transport into neurons, is crucial for memory formation. A recent study revealed the molecular mechanisms that underlie the role of L-lactate in neuronal plasticity and long-term memory formation. L-lactate was shown to induce a cascade of molecular events via modulation of redox-sensitive N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity that was mimicked by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydride (NADH) co-enzyme. This indicated that changes in cellular redox state, following L-lactate transport inside the cells and its subsequent metabolism, production of NADH, and favouring a reduced state are the key effects of L-lactate. Therefore, we are investigating the role of L-lactate in modulating NMDA receptor function via redox modulatory sites. Accordingly, crucial redox-sensitive cysteine residues, Cys320 and Cys87, of the NR2A NMDA receptor subunit are mutated using site-directed mutation, transfected, and expressed in HEK293 cells. This cellular system will then be used to characterise and monitor its activity upon Llactate stimulation, compared to the wild type. This will be achieved by calcium imaging, using fluorescent microscopy. Our data shows that L-lactate potentiated NMDA receptor activity and increased intracellular calcium influx in NR1/NR2A wild type compared to the control condition (WT NR1/NR2A perfused with (1μM) glutamate and (1μM) glycine agonist only), showing faster response initiation and slower decay rate of the calcium signal to the baseline. Additionally, stimulating with L-lactate associated with greater numbers of cells having high fluorescent intensity (peak amplitude) compared to the control. Furthermore, L-lactate rescued the

  4. Comparative Study of f-Element Electronic Structure across a Series of Multimetallic Actinide, Lanthanide-Actinide and Lanthanum-Actinide Complexes Possessing Redox-Active Bridging Ligands

    Schelter, Eric J.; Wu, Ruilian; Veauthier, Jacqueline M.; Bauer, Eric D.; Booth, Corwin H.; Thomson, Robert K.; Graves, Christopher R.; John, Kevin D.; Scott, Brian L.; Thompson, Joe D.; Morris, David E.; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L.

    2010-02-24

    A comparative examination of the electronic interactions across a series of trimetallic actinide and mixed lanthanide-actinide and lanthanum-actinide complexes is presented. Using reduced, radical terpyridyl ligands as conduits in a bridging framework to promote intramolecular metal-metal communication, studies containing structural, electrochemical, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy are presented for (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}An[-N=C(Bn)(tpy-M{l_brace}C{sub 5}Me4R{r_brace}{sub 2})]{sub 2} (where An = Th{sup IV}, U{sup IV}; Bn = CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; M = La{sup III}, Sm{sup III}, Yb{sup III}, U{sup III}; R = H, Me, Et) to reveal effects dependent on the identities of the metal ions and R-groups. The electrochemical results show differences in redox energetics at the peripheral 'M' site between complexes and significant wave splitting of the metal- and ligand-based processes indicating substantial electronic interactions between multiple redox sites across the actinide-containing bridge. Most striking is the appearance of strong electronic coupling for the trimetallic Yb{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Yb{sup III}, Sm{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Sm{sup III}, and La{sup III}-U{sup IV}-La{sup III} complexes, [8]{sup -}, [9b]{sup -} and [10b]{sup -}, respectively, whose calculated comproportionation constant K{sub c} is slightly larger than that reported for the benchmark Creutz-Taube ion. X-ray absorption studies for monometallic metallocene complexes of U{sup III}, U{sup IV}, and U{sup V} reveal small but detectable energy differences in the 'white-line' feature of the uranium L{sub III}-edges consistent with these variations in nominal oxidation state. The sum of this data provides evidence of 5f/6d-orbital participation in bonding and electronic delocalization in these multimetallic f-element complexes. An improved, high-yielding synthesis of 4{prime}-cyano-2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine is also reported.

  5. A study on fine motor skills of Iranian children with attention deficit/hyper activity disorder aged from 6 to 11 years.

    Lavasani, Negar Miri; Stagnitti, Karen

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fine motor skills of two groups of Iranian children. Of the 55 male Tehranian children aged 6 to 10 years, 29 children were typically developing and 26 were identified as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder. All children were assessed using the Raven Intelligence Test and nine fine motor tasks. There were no significant differences between the groups based on intelligence. In eight of the fine motor tasks, there was a significant difference between the groups. These tasks were cutting, placing dots in a grid pattern without direction, threading beads, drawing a line within 1 and 2 minutes, finger movements and Purdue pegboard. Boys who have been identified as ADHD have poorer fine motor skills compared to typically developing boys of the same age. Children aged 6 to 10 years who have been identified as ADHD will require more attention to their fine motor skill performance to enable greater participation in daily living tasks in Tehran such as writing, fine arts and dressing which require fast and quick hand motor skills. There are still limitations in this area; therefore, research in fine motor skills and ADHD children are recommended for future research. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The ABA-INSENSITIVE-4 (ABI4) transcription factor links redox, hormone and sugar signaling pathways.

    Foyer, Christine H; Kerchev, Pavel I; Hancock, Robert D

    2012-02-01

    The cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) hub processes information from metabolism and the environment and so regulates plant growth and defense through integration with the hormone signaling network. One key pathway of redox control involves interactions with ABSCISIC ACID (ABA). Accumulating evidence suggests that the ABA-INSENSITIVE-4 (ABI4) transcription factor plays a key role in transmitting information concerning the abundance of ascorbate and hence the ability of cells to buffer oxidative challenges. ABI4 is required for the ascorbate-dependent control of growth, a process that involves enhancement of salicylic acid (SA) signaling and inhibition of jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways. Low redox buffering capacity reinforces SA- JA- interactions through the mediation of ABA and ABI4 to fine-tune plant growth and defense in relation to metabolic cues and environmental challenges. Moreover, ABI4-mediated pathways of sugar sensitivity are also responsive to the abundance of ascorbate, providing evidence of overlap between redox and sugar signaling pathways.

  7. The interplay between sulphur and selenium metabolism influences the intracellular redox balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Mapelli, Valeria; Hillestrøm, Peter René; Patil, Kalpesh

    2012-01-01

    oxidative stress response is active when yeast actively metabolizes Se, and this response is linked to the generation of intracellular redox imbalance. The redox imbalance derives from a disproportionate ratio between the reduced and oxidized forms of glutathione and also from the influence of Se metabolism...

  8. Proteostasis and REDOX state in the heart

    Christians, Elisabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Force-generating contractile cells of the myocardium must achieve and maintain their primary function as an efficient mechanical pump over the life span of the organism. Because only half of the cardiomyocytes can be replaced during the entire human life span, the maintenance strategy elicited by cardiac cells relies on uninterrupted renewal of their components, including proteins whose specialized functions constitute this complex and sophisticated contractile apparatus. Thus cardiac proteins are continuously synthesized and degraded to ensure proteome homeostasis, also termed “proteostasis.” Once synthesized, proteins undergo additional folding, posttranslational modifications, and trafficking and/or become involved in protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions to exert their functions. This includes key transient interactions of cardiac proteins with molecular chaperones, which assist with quality control at multiple levels to prevent misfolding or to facilitate degradation. Importantly, cardiac proteome maintenance depends on the cellular environment and, in particular, the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) state, which is significantly different among cardiac organelles (e.g., mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum). Taking into account the high metabolic activity for oxygen consumption and ATP production by mitochondria, it is a challenge for cardiac cells to maintain the REDOX state while preventing either excessive oxidative or reductive stress. A perturbed REDOX environment can affect protein handling and conformation (e.g., disulfide bonds), disrupt key structure-function relationships, and trigger a pathogenic cascade of protein aggregation, decreased cell survival, and increased organ dysfunction. This review covers current knowledge regarding the general domain of REDOX state and protein folding, specifically in cardiomyocytes under normal-healthy conditions and during disease states associated with morbidity and mortality in humans. PMID:22003057

  9. Influence of Olea europea L. and Ficus Carrica L. fine root activity on the K biodisponibility and clay mineralogy of the rhizosphere

    Sophia Mouas-Bourbia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the effect of fine root activity of Olea europea L. and Ficus carrica L. of soil in its immediate vicinity (in the so-called rhizosphere zone. The study was conducted on two stations in Northern Algeria: Guendoul and Bouira. Olea europea L. and Ficus carrica L. roots significantly modified some chemical properties of rhizosphere soil. Increases of soil carbon, KNH4+ and KHNO3- were observed in the Olea europea L. and Ficus carrica L rhizosphere soil at both stations. Bulk and rhizosphere soil clay mineralogy was similar. Interstratified illite-smectite, smectite-illite and illite were predominant in the clay fraction. Chlorite and kaolinite were less represented. The decomposition of XRD diffractograms of two soil clay fractions using the Decomp program revealed that Olea europea L. roots promote nK+ storage in interlayer position. Indeed, the lower abscissa position of the gravity center (cg of the X-ray patterns, the peak displacement of clays populations PCI, I/S, S/I toward illite peak position indicates an increase of “illite-like” layer content in the vicinity of Olea europea L. roots. Olea europea L. roots appeared to have more influence on the rhizosphere soil than Ficus carrica L. roots probably because of its higher root biomass and the greater activity of the tree in winter (contrary to Ficus Carrica L., Olea europea L. keep their leaves in winter. The two species underground activity seems to be well reflected in their respective rhizosphere.

  10. Hydrologic influence on redox dynamics in estuarine environments

    Michael, H. A.; Kim, K. H.; Guimond, J. A.; Heiss, J.; Ullman, W. J.; Seyfferth, A.

    2017-12-01

    Redox conditions in coastal aquifers control reactions that impact nutrient cycling, contaminant release, and carbon budgets, with implications for water resources and ecosystem health. Hydrologic changes can shift redox boundaries and inputs of reactants, especially in dynamic coastal systems subject to fluctuations on tidal, lunar, and longer timescales. We present two examples of redox shifts in estuarine systems in Delaware, USA: a beach aquifer and a saltmarsh. Beach aquifers are biogeochemical hot spots due to mixing between fresh groundwater and infiltrating seawater. At Cape Henlopen, DE, geochemical measurements identified reactions in the intertidal aquifer that include cycling of carbon, nitrogen, iron, and sulfur. Measurements and modeling illustrate that redox potential as well as the locations of redox reactions shift on tidal to seasonal timescales and in response to changing beach and aquifer properties, impacting overall rates of reactions such as denitrification that reduces N loads to coastal waters. In the St. Jones National Estuarine Research Reserve, tidal fluctuations in channels cause periodic groundwater-surface water exchange, water table movement, and intermittent flooding that varies spatially across the saltmarsh. These changes create shifts in redox potential that are greatest near channels and in the top 20 cm of sediments. The magnitude of redox change depends on hydrologic setting (near channels or in marsh interior), hydrologic conditions (tidal stage, seasonal shifts), as well as prevalence of macropores created by crab burrows that change seasonally with crab activity. These shifts correspond to changes in porewater chemistry that have implications for nutrient cycling and carbon export to the ocean. Understanding hydrologic influence on redox geochemistry is critical for predicting how these systems and their ecosystem services may change in the future in response to anthropogenic and climate change.

  11. Synthesis of non-toxic As and Cr nanoparticles through redox activity of highly flexible layered coordination polymer of Ni(II).

    Agarwal, Rashmi A

    2018-03-09

    A simple method for the sequestration of As(III) and Cr(VI) from water has been demonstrated by utilizing a highly flexible porous coordination polymer (PCP) of Ni(II) in its as synthesized form or without solvent removal. This PCP reduces the high toxicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) ions into non-toxic As(0) and Cr/Cr 2 O 3 /CrO 2 (zero, tri and tetravalent) nanoparticles (NPs) within its pores, and this is characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. The high functionality of this polymer is due to the presence of monodentate carboxylate groups of a benzenetricarboxylate linker, which provide anchoring sites to the metal ions of the metal precursors. Due to the highly oxidising nature of these toxic ions, a redox reaction takes place between the framework metal ions and toxic metal ions, which is explained by an electron paramagnetic resonance study. This is the first report to synthesize non-toxic, as well as useful, NPs of As and Cr from their highly toxic ions within the cavities of a PCP for remediation of the toxic waste stream and contaminated waste water.

  12. Synthesis of non-toxic As and Cr nanoparticles through redox activity of highly flexible layered coordination polymer of Ni(II)

    Agarwal, Rashmi A.

    2018-03-01

    A simple method for the sequestration of As(III) and Cr(VI) from water has been demonstrated by utilizing a highly flexible porous coordination polymer (PCP) of Ni(II) in its as synthesized form or without solvent removal. This PCP reduces the high toxicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) ions into non-toxic As(0) and Cr/Cr2O3/CrO2 (zero, tri and tetravalent) nanoparticles (NPs) within its pores, and this is characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. The high functionality of this polymer is due to the presence of monodentate carboxylate groups of a benzenetricarboxylate linker, which provide anchoring sites to the metal ions of the metal precursors. Due to the highly oxidising nature of these toxic ions, a redox reaction takes place between the framework metal ions and toxic metal ions, which is explained by an electron paramagnetic resonance study. This is the first report to synthesize non-toxic, as well as useful, NPs of As and Cr from their highly toxic ions within the cavities of a PCP for remediation of the toxic waste stream and contaminated waste water.

  13. The Fine Structure Constant

    IAS Admin

    The article discusses the importance of the fine structure constant in quantum mechanics, along with the brief history of how it emerged. Al- though Sommerfelds idea of elliptical orbits has been replaced by wave mechanics, the fine struc- ture constant he introduced has remained as an important parameter in the field of ...

  14. Metabolic and redox barriers in the skin exposed to drugs and xenobiotics.

    Korkina, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    Growing exposure of human skin to environmental and occupational hazards, to numerous skin care/beauty products, and to topical drugs led to a biomedical concern regarding sustainability of cutaneous chemical defence that is essential for protection against intoxication. Since skin is the largest extra-hepatic drug/xenobiotic metabolising organ where redox-dependent metabolic pathways prevail, in this review, publications on metabolic processes leading to redox imbalance (oxidative stress) and its autocrine/endocrine impact to cutaneous drug/xenobiotic metabolism were scrutinised. Chemical and photo-chemical skin barriers contain metabolic and redox compartments: their protective and homeostatic functions. The review will examine the striking similarity of adaptive responses to exogenous chemical/photo-chemical stressors and endogenous toxins in cutaneous metabolic and redox system; the role(s) of xenobiotics/drugs and phase II enzymes in the endogenous antioxidant defence and maintenance of redox balance; redox regulation of interactions between metabolic and inflammatory responses in skin cells; skin diseases sharing metabolic and redox problems (contact dermatitis, lupus erythematosus, and vitiligo) Due to exceptional the redox dependence of cutaneous metabolic pathways and interaction of redox active metabolites/exogenous antioxidants with drug/xenobiotic metabolism, metabolic tests of topical xenobiotics/drugs should be combined with appropriate redox analyses and performed on 3D human skin models.

  15. Nrf2 and Redox Status in Prediabetic and Diabetic Patients

    Angélica S. Jiménez-Osorio

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The redox status associated with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 was evaluated in prediabetic and diabetic subjects. Total antioxidant status (TAS in plasma and erythrocytes, glutathione (GSH and malondialdehyde (MDA content and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured as redox status markers in 259 controls, 111 prediabetics and 186 diabetic type 2 subjects. Nrf2 was measured in nuclear extract fractions from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Nrf2 levels were lower in prediabetic and diabetic patients. TAS, GSH and activity of glutamate cysteine ligase were lower in diabetic subjects. An increase of MDA and superoxide dismutase activity was found in diabetic subjects. These results suggest that low levels of Nrf2 are involved in the development of oxidative stress and redox status disbalance in diabetic patients.

  16. Single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet tolerance and glutathione redox system significance assessment in faba bean (Vicia faba L.)

    Anjum, Naser A.; Singh, Neetu; Singh, Manoj K.; Shah, Zahoor A.; Duarte, Armando C.; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    Adsorbents based on single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet (hereafter termed “graphene oxide”) are widely used in contaminated environments cleanup which may easily open the avenues for their entry to different environmental compartments, exposure to organisms and their subsequent transfer to human/animal food chain. Considering a common food crop—faba bean (Vicia faba L.) germinating seedlings as a model plant system, this study assesses the V. faba-tolerance to different concentrations (0, 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1600 mg L −1 ) of graphene oxide (0.5–5 μm) and evaluates glutathione (γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine) redox system significance in this context. The results showed significantly increased V. faba sensitivity under three graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 1,600 > 200 > 100 mg graphene oxide L −1 ), which was accompanied by decreased glutathione redox (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione) ratio, reduced glutathione pool, as well as significant and equally elevated activities of glutathione-regenerating (glutathione reductase) and glutathione-metabolizing (glutathione peroxidase; glutathione sulfo-transferase) enzymes. Contrarily, the two graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 800 > 400 graphene oxide mg L −1 ) yielded promising results; where, significant improvements in V. faba health status (measured as increased graphene oxide tolerance) were clearly perceptible with increased ratio of the reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione, reduced glutathione pool and glutathione reductase activity but decreased activities of glutathione-metabolizing enzymes. It is inferred that V. faba seedlings-sensitivity and/or tolerance to graphene oxide concentrations depends on both the cellular redox state (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione ratio) and the reduced glutathione pool which in turn are controlled by a finely tuned modulation of the coordination between glutathione-regenerating and glutathione

  17. Single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet tolerance and glutathione redox system significance assessment in faba bean (Vicia faba L.)

    Anjum, Naser A. [University of Aveiro, Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) and Department of Chemistry (Portugal); Singh, Neetu; Singh, Manoj K. [University of Aveiro, Center for Mechanical Technology and Automation (TEMA) and Department of Mechanical Engineering (Portugal); Shah, Zahoor A. [University of Toledo, Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States); Duarte, Armando C.; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal, E-mail: ahmadr@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) and Department of Chemistry (Portugal)

    2013-07-15

    Adsorbents based on single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet (hereafter termed 'graphene oxide') are widely used in contaminated environments cleanup which may easily open the avenues for their entry to different environmental compartments, exposure to organisms and their subsequent transfer to human/animal food chain. Considering a common food crop-faba bean (Vicia faba L.) germinating seedlings as a model plant system, this study assesses the V. faba-tolerance to different concentrations (0, 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1600 mg L{sup -1}) of graphene oxide (0.5-5 {mu}m) and evaluates glutathione ({gamma}-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine) redox system significance in this context. The results showed significantly increased V. faba sensitivity under three graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 1,600 > 200 > 100 mg graphene oxide L{sup -1}), which was accompanied by decreased glutathione redox (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione) ratio, reduced glutathione pool, as well as significant and equally elevated activities of glutathione-regenerating (glutathione reductase) and glutathione-metabolizing (glutathione peroxidase; glutathione sulfo-transferase) enzymes. Contrarily, the two graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 800 > 400 graphene oxide mg L{sup -1}) yielded promising results; where, significant improvements in V. faba health status (measured as increased graphene oxide tolerance) were clearly perceptible with increased ratio of the reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione, reduced glutathione pool and glutathione reductase activity but decreased activities of glutathione-metabolizing enzymes. It is inferred that V. faba seedlings-sensitivity and/or tolerance to graphene oxide concentrations depends on both the cellular redox state (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione ratio) and the reduced glutathione pool which in turn are controlled by a finely tuned modulation of the coordination between glutathione-regenerating and

  18. High-resolution imaging of redox signaling in live cells through an oxidation-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Labate, Valentina; Mele, Marina

    2008-01-01

    We present the application of a redox-sensitive mutant of the yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP) to image, with elevated sensitivity and high temporal and spatial resolution, oxidative responses of eukaryotic cells to pathophysiological stimuli. The method presented, based on the ratiometric...... quantitation of the distribution of fluorescence by confocal microscopy, allows us to draw real-time "redox maps" of adherent cells and to score subtle changes in the intracellular redox state, such as those induced by overexpression of redox-active proteins. This strategy for in vivo imaging of redox...

  19. Arteriovenous oscillations of the redox potential: Is the redox state influencing blood flow?

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Pawlinski, Bartosz; Mazurek, Tomasz; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Gajewski, Zdzislaw; Paczek, Leszek

    2017-09-01

    Studies on the regulation of human blood flow revealed several modes of oscillations with frequencies ranging from 0.005 to 1 Hz. Several mechanisms were proposed that might influence these oscillations, such as the activity of vascular endothelium, the neurogenic activity of vessel wall, the intrinsic activity of vascular smooth muscle, respiration, and heartbeat. These studies relied typically on non-invasive techniques, for example, laser Doppler flowmetry. Oscillations of biochemical markers were rarely coupled to blood flow. The redox potential difference between the artery and the vein was measured by platinum electrodes placed in the parallel homonymous femoral artery and the femoral vein of ventilated anesthetized pigs. Continuous measurement at 5 Hz sampling rate using a digital nanovoltmeter revealed fluctuating signals with three basic modes of oscillations: ∼ 1, ∼ 0.1 and ∼ 0.01 Hz. These signals clearly overlap with reported modes of oscillations in blood flow, suggesting coupling of the redox potential and blood flow. The amplitude of the oscillations associated with heart action was significantly smaller than for the other two modes, despite the fact that heart action has the greatest influence on blood flow. This finding suggests that redox potential in blood might be not a derivative but either a mediator or an effector of the blood flow control system.

  20. Liquid Quinones for Solvent-Free Redox Flow Batteries.

    Shimizu, Akihiro; Takenaka, Keisuke; Handa, Naoyuki; Nokami, Toshiki; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Jun-Ichi

    2017-11-01

    Liquid benzoquinone and naphthoquinone having diethylene glycol monomethyl ether groups are designed and synthesized as redox active materials that dissolve supporting electrolytes. The Li-ion batteries based on the liquid quinones using LiBF 4 /PC show good performance in terms of voltage, capacity, energy efficiency, and cyclability in both static and flow modes. A battery is constructed without using intentionally added organic solvent, and its high energy density (264 W h L -1 ) demonstrates the potential of solvent-free organic redox flow batteries using liquid active materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Involvement of histone H3 phosphorylation via the activation of p38 MAPK pathway and intracellular redox status in cytotoxicity of HL-60 cells induced by Vitex agnus-castus fruit extract.

    Kikuchi, Hidetomo; Yuan, Bo; Yuhara, Eisuke; Imai, Masahiko; Furutani, Ryota; Fukushima, Shin; Hazama, Shingo; Hirobe, Chieko; Ohyama, Kunio; Takagi, Norio; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2014-08-01

    We have demonstrated that an extract from the ripe fruit of Vitex angus-castus (Vitex), might be a promising anticancer candidate. In order to further provide a molecular rationale for clinical development in anticancer therapy, a detailed mechanism underlying the efficacy of Vitex against HL-60 cells was investigated. Vitex induced a dose- and time-dependent decrease in cell viability associated with induction of apoptosis and G(2)/M cell cycle arrest, both of which were suppressed by the addition of SB203580, an inhibitor for p38 MAPK. Furthermore, SB203580 significantly suppressed Vitex-induced phosphorylation of histone H3, a downstream molecule of p38 MAPK known to be involved in apoptosis induction in tumor cells. Notably, Vitex induced upregulation of intracellular ATP, known to bind its binding pocket inside activated p38 MAPK and to be required for the activation of p38 MAPK pathway. These results, thus, suggest that upregulation of intracellular ATP and phosphorylation of histone H3 are closely associated with the activation of p38 MAPK pathway, consequently contributing to Vitex-mediated cytotoxicity. Intriguingly, a significant decrease of intracellular ROS levels and downregulation of expression level of gp91(phox), an important component of NADPH oxidase, were observed in Vitex-treated cells. A greater decline in ROS levels along with enhanced apoptosis was observed after treatment with Vitex in combination with SnPP, an inhibitor specific for HO-1. Since NADPH oxidase and HO-1 are closely correlated to redox status associated with intracellular ROS levels, the two enzymes are suggested to be implicated in Vitex-mediated cytotoxicity in HL-60 cells by regulating ROS generation. We also suggest that activation of the p38 MAPK pathway may be dependent on the alterations of intracellular ATP levels, rather than that of intracellular ROS levels. These results may have important implications for appropriate clinical uses of Vitex and provide novel insights

  2. Redox imbalance and mitochondrial abnormalities in the diabetic lung.

    Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Although the lung is one of the least studied organs in diabetes, increasing evidence indicates that it is an inevitable target of diabetic complications. Nevertheless, the underlying biochemical mechanisms of lung injury in diabetes remain largely unexplored. Given that redox imbalance, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction have been implicated in diabetic tissue injury, we set out to investigate mechanisms of lung injury in diabetes. The objective of this study was to evaluate NADH/NAD + redox status, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial abnormalities in the diabetic lung. Using STZ induced diabetes in rat as a model, we measured redox-imbalance related parameters including aldose reductase activity, level of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PAPR-1), NAD + content, NADPH content, reduced form of glutathione (GSH), and glucose 6-phophate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity. For assessment of mitochondrial abnormalities in the diabetic lung, we measured the activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes I to IV and complex V as well as dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLDH) content and activity. We also measured the protein content of NAD + dependent enzymes such as sirtuin3 (sirt3) and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Our results demonstrate that NADH/NAD + redox imbalance occurs in the diabetic lung. This redox imbalance upregulates the activities of complexes I to IV, but not complex V; and this upregulation is likely the source of increased mitochondrial ROS production, oxidative stress, and cell death in the diabetic lung. These results, together with the findings that the protein contents of DLDH, sirt3, and NQO1 all are decreased in the diabetic lung, demonstrate that redox imbalance, mitochondrial abnormality, and oxidative stress contribute to lung injury in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fine Arts Database (FAD)

    General Services Administration — The Fine Arts Database records information on federally owned art in the control of the GSA; this includes the location, current condition and information on artists.

  4. Fine motor control

    ... gross (large, general) motor control. An example of gross motor control is waving an arm in greeting. Problems ... out the child's developmental age. Children develop fine motor skills over time, by practicing and being taught. To ...

  5. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Sabloff, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  6. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  7. Radioactivity in fine papers

    Taylor, H.W.; Singh, B.

    1993-01-01

    The radioactivity of fine papers has been studied through γ-ray spectroscopy with an intrinsic Ge detector. Samples of paper from European and North American sources were found to contain very different amounts of 226 Ra and 232 Th. The processes which introduce radionuclides into paper are discussed. The radioactivity from fine papers makes only a small contribution to an individual's annual radiation dose; nevertheless it is easily detectable and perhaps, avoidable. (Author)

  8. Transport of reservoir fines

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    Modeling transport of reservoir fines is of great importance for evaluating the damage of production wells and infectivity decline. The conventional methodology accounts for neither the formation heterogeneity around the wells nor the reservoir fines’ heterogeneity. We have developed an integral...... dispersion equation in modeling the transport and the deposition of reservoir fines. It successfully predicts the unsymmetrical concentration profiles and the hyperexponential deposition in experiments....

  9. Redox Couples with Unequal Diffusion Coefficients: Effect on Redox Cycling

    Mampallil Augustine, Dileep; Mathwig, Klaus; Kang, Shuo; Lemay, Serge Joseph Guy

    2013-01-01

    Redox cycling between two electrodes separated by a narrow gap allows dramatic amplification of the faradaic current. Unlike conventional electrochemistry at a single electrode, however, the mass-transport-limited current is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of both the reduced and oxidized

  10. A fibre optic fluorescence sensor to measure redox level in tissues

    Zhang, Wen Qi; Morrison, Janna L.; Darby, Jack R. T.; Plush, Sally; Sorvina, Alexandra; Brooks, Doug; Monro, Tanya M.; Afshar Vahid, Shahraam

    2018-01-01

    We report the design of a fibre optic-based redox detection system for investigating differences in metabolic activities of tissues. Our system shows qualitative agreement with the results collected from a commercial two- photon microscope system. Thus, demonstrating the feasibility of building an ex vivo and in vivo redox detection system that is low cost and portable.

  11. Effects of ionic radius of redox-inactive bio-related metal ions on the radical-scavenging activity of flavonoids evaluated using photometric titration.

    Waki, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Nakanishi, Ikuo

    2013-10-28

    Mg(2+) enhanced the scavenging activity of (+)-catechin and quercetin against the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH˙), while Al(3+) decreased their activity. Such effects of Mg(2+) and Al(3+) were not observed for kaempferol. Na(+) and Ca(2+) with large ionic radii showed little effect on the DPPH˙-scavenging activity of these three flavonoids.

  12. Vascular remodeling: A redox-modulated mechanism of vessel caliber regulation.

    Tanaka, Leonardo Y; Laurindo, Francisco R M

    2017-08-01

    Vascular remodeling, i.e. whole-vessel structural reshaping, determines lumen caliber in (patho)physiology. Here we review mechanisms underlying vessel remodeling, with emphasis in redox regulation. First, we discuss confusing terminology and focus on strictu sensu remodeling. Second, we propose a mechanobiological remodeling paradigm based on the concept of tensional homeostasis as a setpoint regulator. We first focus on shear-mediated models as prototypes of remodeling closely dominated by highly redox-sensitive endothelial function. More detailed discussions focus on mechanosensors, integrins, extracellular matrix, cytoskeleton and inflammatory pathways as potential of mechanisms potentially coupling tensional homeostasis to redox regulation. Further discussion of remodeling associated with atherosclerosis and injury repair highlights important aspects of redox vascular responses. While neointima formation has not shown consistent responsiveness to antioxidants, vessel remodeling has been more clearly responsive, indicating that despite the multilevel redox signaling pathways, there is a coordinated response of the whole vessel. Among mechanisms that may orchestrate redox pathways, we discuss roles of superoxide dismutase activity and extracellular protein disulfide isomerase. We then discuss redox modulation of aneurysms, a special case of expansive remodeling. We propose that the redox modulation of vascular remodeling may reflect (1) remodeling pathophysiology is dominated by a particularly redox-sensitive cell type, e.g., endothelial cells (2) redox pathways are temporospatially coordinated at an organ level across distinct cellular and acellular structures or (3) the tensional homeostasis setpoint is closely connected to redox signaling. The mechanobiological/redox model discussed here can be a basis for improved understanding of remodeling and helps clarifying mechanisms underlying prevalent hard-to-treat diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  13. Quantitative proteomic characterization of redox-dependent post-translational modifications on protein cysteines

    Duan, Jicheng; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Protein cysteine thiols play a crucial role in redox signaling, regulation of enzymatic activity and protein function, and maintaining redox homeostasis in living systems. The unique chemical reactivity of thiol groups makes cysteine susceptible to oxidative modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to form a broad array of reversible and irreversible protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). The reversible modifications in particular are one of the major components of redox signaling and are involved in regulation of various cellular processes under physiological and pathological conditions. The biological significance of these redox PTMs in health and diseases has been increasingly recognized. Herein, we review the recent advances of quantitative proteomic approaches for investigating redox PTMs in complex biological systems, including the general considerations of sample processing, various chemical or affinity enrichment strategies, and quantitative approaches. We also highlight a number of redox proteomic approaches that enable effective profiling of redox PTMs for addressing specific biological questions. Although some technological limitations remain, redox proteomics is paving the way towards a better understanding of redox signaling and regulation in human health and diseases.

  14. The redox-Mannich reaction.

    Chen, Weijie; Seidel, Daniel

    2014-06-06

    A complement to the classic three-component Mannich reaction, the redox-Mannich reaction, utilizes the same starting materials but incorporates an isomerization step that enables the facile preparation of ring-substituted β-amino ketones. Reactions occur under relatively mild conditions and are facilitated by benzoic acid.

  15. Redox rhythm reinforces the circadian clock to gate immune response.

    Zhou, Mian; Wang, Wei; Karapetyan, Sargis; Mwimba, Musoki; Marqués, Jorge; Buchler, Nicolas E; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-07-23

    Recent studies have shown that in addition to the transcriptional circadian clock, many organisms, including Arabidopsis, have a circadian redox rhythm driven by the organism's metabolic activities. It has been hypothesized that the redox rhythm is linked to the circadian clock, but the mechanism and the biological significance of this link have only begun to be investigated. Here we report that the master immune regulator NPR1 (non-expressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1) of Arabidopsis is a sensor of the plant's redox state and regulates transcription of core circadian clock genes even in the absence of pathogen challenge. Surprisingly, acute perturbation in the redox status triggered by the immune signal salicylic acid does not compromise the circadian clock but rather leads to its reinforcement. Mathematical modelling and subsequent experiments show that NPR1 reinforces the circadian clock without changing the period by regulating both the morning and the evening clock genes. This balanced network architecture helps plants gate their immune responses towards the morning and minimize costs on growth at night. Our study demonstrates how a sensitive redox rhythm interacts with a robust circadian clock to ensure proper responsiveness to environmental stimuli without compromising fitness of the organism.

  16. Recent developments in organic redox flow batteries: A critical review

    Leung, P.; Shah, A. A.; Sanz, L.; Flox, C.; Morante, J. R.; Xu, Q.; Mohamed, M. R.; Ponce de León, C.; Walsh, F. C.

    2017-08-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) have emerged as prime candidates for energy storage on the medium and large scales, particularly at the grid scale. The demand for versatile energy storage continues to increase as more electrical energy is generated from intermittent renewable sources. A major barrier in the way of broad deployment and deep market penetration is the use of expensive metals as the active species in the electrolytes. The use of organic redox couples in aqueous or non-aqueous electrolytes is a promising approach to reducing the overall cost in long-term, since these materials can be low-cost and abundant. The performance of such redox couples can be tuned by modifying their chemical structure. In recent years, significant developments in organic redox flow batteries has taken place, with the introduction of new groups of highly soluble organic molecules, capable of providing a cell voltage and charge capacity comparable to conventional metal-based systems. This review summarises the fundamental developments and characterization of organic redox flow batteries from both the chemistry and materials perspectives. The latest advances, future challenges and opportunities for further development are discussed.

  17. Redox Pioneer: Professor Stuart A. Lipton

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Professor Stuart A. Lipton Stuart A. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D. is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because of his publication of four articles that have been cited more than 1000 times, and 96 reports which have been cited more than 100 times. In the redox field, Dr. Lipton is best known for his work on the regulation by S-nitrosylation of the NMDA-subtype of neuronal glutamate receptor, which provided early evidence for in situ regulation of protein activity by S-nitrosylation and a prototypic model of allosteric control by this post-translational modification. Over the past several years, Lipton's group has pioneered the discovery of aberrant protein nitrosylation that may contribute to a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). In particular, the phenotypic effects of rare genetic mutations may be understood to be enhanced or mimicked by nitrosative (and oxidative) modifications of cysteines and thereby help explain common sporadic forms of disease. Thus, Lipton has contributed in a major way to the understanding that nitrosative stress may result from modifications of specific proteins and may operate in conjunction with genetic mutation to create disease phenotype. Lipton (collaborating with Jonathan S. Stamler) has also employed the concept of targeted S-nitrosylation to produce novel neuroprotective drugs that act at allosteric sites in the NMDA receptor. Lipton has won a number of awards, including the Ernst Jung Prize in Medicine, and is an elected fellow of the AAAS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 757–764. PMID:23815466

  18. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    Ayala, Marcela; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple

  19. Redox Modulation by Amaranth Oil in Human Lung Fibroblasts

    Semen, K.O.; den Hartog, G.J.M.; Kaminsky, D.V.; Sirota, T.V.; Maij, N.G.A.A.; Yelisyeyeva, O.P.; Bast, A.

    2013-01-01

    Amaranth oil has several health benefits. It has lipid lowering, anti-diabetic, immune modulatory and cytoprotective properties, activates the function of mitochondria and improves heart rate variability. It has been suggested that the effect of amaranth oil on redox status is involved in this

  20. The Combination of Vitamin K3 and Vitamin C Has Synergic Activity against Forms of Trypanosoma cruzi through a Redox Imbalance Process

    Cristina Desoti, V?nia; Lazarin-Bid?ia, Danielle; Martins Ribeiro, Fabianne; Cardoso Martins, Solange; da Silva Rodrigues, Jean Henrique; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Vataru Nakamura, Celso; Farias Ximenes, Valdecir; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2015-01-01

    Chagas' disease is an infection that is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, affecting millions of people worldwide. Because of severe side effects and variable efficacy, the current treatments for Chagas' disease are unsatisfactory, making the search for new chemotherapeutic agents essential. Previous studies have reported various biological activities of naphthoquinones, such as the trypanocidal and antitumor activity of vitamin K3. The combination of this vitamin with vitamin C exert...

  1. Analysis of the link between the redox state and enzymatic activity of the HtrA (DegP protein from Escherichia coli.

    Tomasz Koper

    Full Text Available Bacterial HtrAs are proteases engaged in extracytoplasmic activities during stressful conditions and pathogenesis. A model prokaryotic HtrA (HtrA/DegP from Escherichia coli requires activation to cleave its substrates efficiently. In the inactive state of the enzyme, one of the regulatory loops, termed LA, forms inhibitory contacts in the area of the active center. Reduction of the disulfide bond located in the middle of LA stimulates HtrA activity in vivo suggesting that this S-S bond may play a regulatory role, although the mechanism of this stimulation is not known. Here, we show that HtrA lacking an S-S bridge cleaved a model peptide substrate more efficiently and exhibited a higher affinity for a protein substrate. An LA loop lacking the disulfide was more exposed to the solvent; hence, at least some of the interactions involving this loop must have been disturbed. The protein without S-S bonds demonstrated lower thermal stability and was more easily converted to a dodecameric active oligomeric form. Thus, the lack of the disulfide within LA affected the stability and the overall structure of the HtrA molecule. In this study, we have also demonstrated that in vitro human thioredoxin 1 is able to reduce HtrA; thus, reduction of HtrA can be performed enzymatically.

  2. Sources and oxidative potential of water-soluble humic-like substances (HULISWS in fine particulate matter (PM2.5 in Beijing

    Y. Ma

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble humic-like substances (HULISWS are a major redox-active component of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5; however, information on their sources and associated redox activity is limited. In this study, HULISWS mass concentration, various HULISWS species, and dithiothreitol (DTT activity of HULISWS were quantified in PM2.5 samples collected during a 1-year period in Beijing. Strong correlation was observed between HULISWS and DTT activity; both exhibited higher levels during the heating season than during the nonheating season. Positive matrix factorization analysis of both HULISWS and DTT activity was performed. Four combustion-related sources, namely coal combustion, biomass burning, waste incineration, and vehicle exhausts, and one secondary factor were resolved. In particular, waste incineration was identified as a source of HULISWS for the first time. Biomass burning and secondary aerosol formation were the major contributors ( >  59 % to both HULISWS and associated DTT activity throughout the year. During the nonheating season, secondary aerosol formation was the most important source, whereas during the heating season, the predominant contributor was biomass burning. The four combustion-related sources accounted for  >  70 % of HULISWS and DTT activity, implying that future reduction in PM2.5 emissions from combustion activities can substantially reduce the HULISWS burden and their potential health impact in Beijing.

  3. Sources and oxidative potential of water-soluble humic-like substances (HULISWS) in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in Beijing

    Ma, Yiqiu; Cheng, Yubo; Qiu, Xinghua; Cao, Gang; Fang, Yanhua; Wang, Junxia; Zhu, Tong; Yu, Jianzhen; Hu, Di

    2018-04-01

    Water-soluble humic-like substances (HULISWS) are a major redox-active component of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5); however, information on their sources and associated redox activity is limited. In this study, HULISWS mass concentration, various HULISWS species, and dithiothreitol (DTT) activity of HULISWS were quantified in PM2.5 samples collected during a 1-year period in Beijing. Strong correlation was observed between HULISWS and DTT activity; both exhibited higher levels during the heating season than during the nonheating season. Positive matrix factorization analysis of both HULISWS and DTT activity was performed. Four combustion-related sources, namely coal combustion, biomass burning, waste incineration, and vehicle exhausts, and one secondary factor were resolved. In particular, waste incineration was identified as a source of HULISWS for the first time. Biomass burning and secondary aerosol formation were the major contributors ( > 59 %) to both HULISWS and associated DTT activity throughout the year. During the nonheating season, secondary aerosol formation was the most important source, whereas during the heating season, the predominant contributor was biomass burning. The four combustion-related sources accounted for > 70 % of HULISWS and DTT activity, implying that future reduction in PM2.5 emissions from combustion activities can substantially reduce the HULISWS burden and their potential health impact in Beijing.

  4. NAD(H) and NADP(H) Redox Couples and Cellular Energy Metabolism.

    Xiao, Wusheng; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2018-01-20

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + )/reduced NAD + (NADH) and NADP + /reduced NADP + (NADPH) redox couples are essential for maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and for modulating numerous biological events, including cellular metabolism. Deficiency or imbalance of these two redox couples has been associated with many pathological disorders. Recent Advances: Newly identified biosynthetic enzymes and newly developed genetically encoded biosensors enable us to understand better how cells maintain compartmentalized NAD(H) and NADP(H) pools. The concept of redox stress (oxidative and reductive stress) reflected by changes in NAD(H)/NADP(H) has increasingly gained attention. The emerging roles of NAD + -consuming proteins in regulating cellular redox and metabolic homeostasis are active research topics. The biosynthesis and distribution of cellular NAD(H) and NADP(H) are highly compartmentalized. It is critical to understand how cells maintain the steady levels of these redox couple pools to ensure their normal functions and simultaneously avoid inducing redox stress. In addition, it is essential to understand how NAD(H)- and NADP(H)-utilizing enzymes interact with other signaling pathways, such as those regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor, to maintain cellular redox homeostasis and energy metabolism. Additional studies are needed to investigate the inter-relationships among compartmentalized NAD(H)/NADP(H) pools and how these two dinucleotide redox couples collaboratively regulate cellular redox states and cellular metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. Furthermore, recent studies suggest the utility of using pharmacological interventions or nutrient-based bioactive NAD + precursors as therapeutic interventions for metabolic diseases. Thus, a better understanding of the cellular functions of NAD(H) and NADP(H) may facilitate efforts to address a host of pathological disorders effectively. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 251-272.

  5. A fine art

    Schnabel, G.; Raaff, T. [Andritz AG (Austria)

    2006-07-15

    The paper describes a new dewatering system for coal fines which challenges established processes by using screenbowl centrifuge and hyperbaric filter combinations. Company acquisitions over the past three to four years enabled Andritz AG to develop a new system combining two technologies. The article describes the benefits of the combination process and explains the basic operation of these machines. 4 figs.

  6. Fine 5 lavastab Venemaal

    2013-01-01

    Tantsuteatru Fine 5 koreograafid Tiina Ollesk ja Rene Nõmmik toovad Jekaterinburgis välja lavastuse "... and Red", esitajaks Venemaa nimekas nüüdistantsutrupp Provintsialnõje Tantsõ. Lavastuses kõlab Taavo Remmeli kontrabassiimprovisatsioon "12.12.2006"

  7. Imeilus Fine 5

    2017-01-01

    Vaba Lava teatrikeskuse laval esineb Fine 5 oma lavastusega "Imeilus". Tiina Ollesk ja Renee Nõmmik, tantsulavastuse autorid on koreograafid, õppejõud, lavastajad ja kogemustega tantsijad. 29. jaanuaril korraldavad Tiina Ollesk ja Renee Nõmmik Tallinna Ülikoolis kaasaegse liikumismõtlemise töötoa, mis on pühendatud lavastusele "Imeilus"

  8. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  9. THE ROLE OF PROTEIN OXIDATIVE MODIFICATION IN REDOX-REGULATION OF CASPASE-3 ACTIVITY IN BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES DURING OXIDATIVE STRESS IN VITRO

    O. L. Nosareva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of oxidative stress lies at the heart of many frequent and socially-important diseases. Blood lymphocytes are the cells which provide immunological control of our organism. As a result of their function implementation blood lymphocytes contact with different endogenic and exogenic factors, which can lead to active oxygen species production activation, macromolecules oxidative modification and to cell survival alteration. At the present time it is essential to expand and deepen the fundamental knowledge of blood lymphocytes apoptosis regulation peculiarities. The research objective was to establish the interaction among alterations of glutathione system condition, carbonylation level, protein glutathionylation and caspase-3 activity in blood lymphocytes during oxidative stress in vitro.Material and Methods. The material for research was blood lymphocytes cultivated with addition of hydrogen peroxide in final concentration of 0,5 mmol and/or protein SH-group inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide – 5 mmol, protector – 5 mmol – 1,4-dithioerythritol. Reduced, oxidized and protein-bound glutathione concentration was measured by method of spectropho-tometry, additionally, the ratio size of reduced to oxidized thiol fraction was estimated. With help of enzymoimmunoassay the level of protein carbonyl derivatives was evaluated; caspase-3 activity was registered by spectrofluorometric method.Results. Protein SH-group blocking in blood lymphocytes during oxidative stress in vitro was accompanied by protein-bound glutathione concentration rapid decrease in connection with increase of protein carbonyl derivatives content and caspase-3 activity. Protein SH-group protection in blood lymphocytes during oxidative stress in vitro was accompanied by concentration increase of protein-bound glutathione and protein carbonyl derivatives under comparable values of enzyme activity under study.Conclusion. The carried out research shows that caspase-3 and protein

  10. Evaluation of in situ sulfate reduction as redox buffer capacity in groundwater flow path

    Ioka, Seiichiro; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Amano, Yuki; Furue, Ryoji

    2007-01-01

    For safety assessment of geological isolation, it is important to evaluate in situ redox buffer capacity in high-permeability zone as groundwater flow path. The study evaluated in situ sulfate reduction as redox buffer capacity in the conglomerate bedding in Toki Lignite-bearing Formation, which occurs at the lowest part of sedimentary rocks overlying basement granite. The bedding plays an important role as the main groundwater flow path. The result showed that in situ redox buffer capacity in the conglomerate bedding has been identified on first nine months, whereas in the following period the redox buffer capacity has not been identified for about fifteen months. This will be caused by the bedding became inappropriate for microbial survival as the organic matter which is needfuel for microbial activity was consumed. Thus, there will be limited redox buffer capacity in groundwater flow path even in formation including organic matter-bearing layer. (author)

  11. Cost-driven materials selection criteria for redox flow battery electrolytes

    Dmello, Rylan; Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Brushett, Fikile R.; Smith, Kyle C.

    2016-10-01

    Redox flow batteries show promise for grid-scale energy storage applications but are presently too expensive for widespread adoption. Electrolyte material costs constitute a sizeable fraction of the redox flow battery price. As such, this work develops a techno-economic model for redox flow batteries that accounts for redox-active material, salt, and solvent contributions to the electrolyte cost. Benchmark values for electrolyte constituent costs guide identification of design constraints. Nonaqueous battery design is sensitive to all electrolyte component costs, cell voltage, and area-specific resistance. Design challenges for nonaqueous batteries include minimizing salt content and dropping redox-active species concentration requirements. Aqueous battery design is sensitive to only redox-active material cost and cell voltage, due to low area-specific resistance and supporting electrolyte costs. Increasing cell voltage and decreasing redox-active material cost present major materials selection challenges for aqueous batteries. This work minimizes cost-constraining variables by mapping the battery design space with the techno-economic model, through which we highlight pathways towards low price and moderate concentration. Furthermore, the techno-economic model calculates quantitative iterations of battery designs to achieve the Department of Energy battery price target of 100 per kWh and highlights cost cutting strategies to drive battery prices down further.

  12. Electronic conductivity of Ce(0.9)Gd(0.1)O(1.95-δ) and Ce(0.8)Pr(0.2)O(2-δ): Hebb-Wagner polarisation in the case of redox active dopants and interference

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2011-01-01

    of the steady state I-V curve from the standard Hebb-Wagner equation was observed for the case of Ce(0.8)Pr(0.2)O(2-δ). It is shown that the I-V curve can be successfully reproduced when the presence of the redox active dopant, Pr(3+)/Pr(4+), is taken into account, whereas even better agreement can be reached...

  13. Redox reaction studies by nanosecond pulse radiolysis

    Moorthy, P.N.

    1979-01-01

    Free radicals are formed as intermediates in many chemical and biochemical reactions. An important type of reaction which they can undergo is a one electron or redox process. The direction and rate of such electron transfer reactions is governed by the relative redox potentials of the participating species. Because of the generally short lived nature of free radicals, evaluation of their redox potentials poses a number of problems. Two techniques are described for the experimental determination of the redox potentials of short lived species generated by either a nanosecond electron pulse or laser flash. In the first method, redox titration of the short lived species with stable molecules of known redox potential is carried out, employing the technique of fast kinetic spectrophotometry. Conversely, by the same method it is also possible to evaluate the one electron redox potentials of stable molecules by redox titration with free radicals of known redox potential produced as above. In the second method, electrochemical reduction or oxidation of the short lived species at an appropriate electrode (generally a mercury drop) is carried out at different fixed potentials, and the redox potential evaluated from the current-potential curves (polarograms). Full description of the experimental set up and theoretical considerations for interpretation of the raw data are given. The relative merits of the two methods and their practical applicability are discussed. (auth.)

  14. Dissecting Redox Biology Using Fluorescent Protein Sensors.

    Schwarzländer, Markus; Dick, Tobias P; Meyer, Andreas J; Morgan, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescent protein sensors have revitalized the field of redox biology by revolutionizing the study of redox processes in living cells and organisms. Within one decade, a set of fundamental new insights has been gained, driven by the rapid technical development of in vivo redox sensing. Redox-sensitive yellow and green fluorescent protein variants (rxYFP and roGFPs) have been the central players. Although widely used as an established standard tool, important questions remain surrounding their meaningful use in vivo. We review the growing range of thiol redox sensor variants and their application in different cells, tissues, and organisms. We highlight five key findings where in vivo sensing has been instrumental in changing our understanding of redox biology, critically assess the interpretation of in vivo redox data, and discuss technical and biological limitations of current redox sensors and sensing approaches. We explore how novel sensor variants may further add to the current momentum toward a novel mechanistic and integrated understanding of redox biology in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 680-712.

  15. Ultra-fine CuO Nanoparticles Embedded in Three-dimensional Graphene Network Nano-structure for High-performance Flexible Supercapacitors

    Li, Yanrong; Wang, Xue; Yang, Qi; Javed, Muhammad Sufyan; Liu, Qipeng; Xu, Weina; Hu, Chenguo; Wei, Dapeng

    2017-01-01

    High conductivity, large specific surface area and excellent performance redox materials are urgently desired for improving electrochemical energy storage. However, with single redox material it is hard to achieve these properties. Herein, we develop ultra-fine CuO nanoparticles embedded in three-dimensional graphene network grown on carbon cloth (CuO/3DGN/CC) to construct a novel electrode material with advantages of high conductivity, large specific area and excellent redox activity for supercapacitor application. The CuO/3DGN/CC with different CuO mass ratios are utilized to fabricate supercapacitors and the optimized mass loading achieves the high areal capacitance of 2787 mF cm"−"2 and specific capacitance of 1539.8 F g"−"1 at current density of 6 mA cm"−"2 with good stability. In addition, a high-flexible solid-state symmetric supercapacitor is also fabricated by using this CuO/3DGN/CC composite. The device shows excellent electrochemical performance even at various bending angles indicating a promising application for wearable electronic devices, and two devices with area 2 × 4 cm"2 in series can light nine light emitting diodes for more than 3 minutes.

  16. Noncanonical SQSTM1/p62-Nrf2 pathway activation mediates proteasome inhibitor resistance in multiple myeloma cells via redox, metabolic and translational reprogramming

    Riz, Irene; Hawley, Teresa S.; Marsal, Jeffrey W.; Hawley, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a B-cell malignancy characterized by the accumulation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow, with drug resistance being a major cause of therapeutic failure. We established a carfilzomib-resistant derivative of the LP-1 MM cell line (LP-1/Cfz) and found that the transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2; gene symbol NFE2L2) contributes to carfilzomib resistance. The mechanism of Nrf2 activation involved enhanced translation of Nrf2 as well as its posit...

  17. Quantitative redox imaging biomarkers for studying tissue metabolic state and its heterogeneity

    He N. Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available NAD+/NADH redox state has been implicated in many diseases such as cancer and diabetes as well as in the regulation of embryonic development and aging. To fluorimetrically assess the mitochondrial redox state, Dr. Chance and co-workers measured the fluorescence of NADH and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp including flavin–adenine–dinucleotide (FAD and demonstrated their ratio (i.e. the redox ratio is a sensitive indicator of the mitochondrial redox states. The Chance redox scanner was built to simultaneously measure NADH and Fp in tissue at submillimeter scale in 3D using the freeze-trap protocol. This paper summarizes our recent research experience, development and new applications of the redox scanning technique in collaboration with Dr. Chance beginning in 2005. Dr. Chance initiated or actively involved in many of the projects during the last several years of his life. We advanced the redox scanning technique by measuring the nominal concentrations (in reference to the frozen solution standards of the endogenous fluorescent analytes, i.e., [NADH] and [Fp] to quantify the redox ratios in various biological tissues. The advancement has enabled us to identify an array of the redox indices as quantitative imaging biomarkers (including [NADH], [Fp], [Fp]/([NADH]+[Fp], [NADH]/[Fp], and their standard deviations for studying some important biological questions on cancer and normal tissue metabolism. We found that the redox indices were associated or changed with (1 tumorigenesis (cancer versus non-cancer of human breast tissue biopsies; (2 tumor metastatic potential; (3 tumor glucose uptake; (4 tumor p53 status; (5 PI3K pathway activation in pre-malignant tissue; (6 therapeutic effects on tumors; (7 embryonic stem cell differentiation; (8 the heart under fasting. Together, our work demonstrated that the tissue redox indices obtained from the redox scanning technique may provide useful information about tissue metabolism and physiology status in normal

  18. High-energy-density, aqueous, metal-polyiodide redox flow batteries

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2017-08-29

    Improved metal-based redox flow batteries (RFBs) can utilize a metal and a divalent cation of the metal (M.sup.2+) as an active redox couple for a first electrode and electrolyte, respectively, in a first half-cell. For example, the metal can be Zn. The RFBs can also utilize a second electrolyte having I.sup.-, anions of I.sub.x (for x.gtoreq.3), or both in an aqueous solution, wherein the I.sup.- and the anions of I.sub.x (for x.gtoreq.3) compose an active redox couple in a second half-cell.

  19. Redox Control of Antioxidant and Antihepatotoxic Activities of Cassia surattensis Seed Extract against Paracetamol Intoxication in Mice: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Herbal Green Antioxidant

    U. Seeta Uthaya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic potential of Cassia surattensis in reducing free radical-induced oxidative stress and inflammation particularly in hepatic diseases was evaluated in this study. The polyphenol rich C. surattensis seed extract showed good in vitro antioxidant. C. surattensis seed extract contained total phenolic content of 100.99 mg GAE/g dry weight and there was a positive correlation (r>0.9 between total phenolic content and the antioxidant activities of the seed extract. C. surattensis seed extract significantly (p<0.05 reduced the elevated levels of serum liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and ALP and relative liver weight in paracetamol-induced liver hepatotoxicity in mice. Moreover, the extract significantly (p<0.05 enhanced the antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH contents in the liver tissues, which led to decrease of malondialdehyde (MDA level. The histopathological examination showed the liver protective effect of C. surattensis seed extract against paracetamol-induced histoarchitectural alterations by maximum recovery in the histoarchitecture of the liver tissue. Furthermore, histopathological observations correspondingly supported the biochemical assay outcome, that is, the significant reduction in elevated levels of serum liver enzymes. In conclusion, C. surattensis seed extract enhanced the in vivo antioxidant status and showed antihepatotoxic activities, which is probably due to the presence of phenolic compounds.

  20. Molecular analysis of Ku redox regulation

    Shatilla Andrea

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs can occur in response to ionizing radiation (IR, radiomimetic agents and from endogenous DNA-damaging reactive oxygen metabolites. Unrepaired or improperly repaired DSBs are potentially the most lethal form of DNA damage and can result in chromosomal translocations and contribute to the development of cancer. The principal mechanism for the repair of DSBs in humans is non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ. Ku is a key member of the NHEJ pathway and plays an important role in the recognition step when it binds to free DNA termini. Ku then stimulates the assembly and activation of other NHEJ components. DNA binding of Ku is regulated by redox conditions and evidence from our laboratory has demonstrated that Ku undergoes structural changes when oxidized that results in a reduction in DNA binding activity. The C-terminal domain and cysteine 493 of Ku80 were investigated for their contribution to redox regulation of Ku. Results We effectively removed the C-terminal domain of Ku80 generating a truncation mutant and co-expressed this variant with wild type Ku70 in an insect cell system to create a Ku70/80ΔC heterodimer. We also generated two single amino acid variants of Cys493, replacing this amino acid with either an alanine (C493A or a serine (C493S, and over-expressed the variant proteins in SF9 insect cells in complex with wild type Ku70. Neither the truncation nor the amino acid substitutions alters protein expression or stability as determined by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. We show that the C493 mutations do not alter the ability of Ku to bind duplex DNA in vitro under reduced conditions while truncation of the Ku80 C-terminus slightly reduced DNA binding affinity. Diamide oxidation of cysteines was shown to inhibit DNA binding similarly for both the wild-type and all variant proteins. Interestingly, differential DNA binding activity following re-reduction was observed for the Ku70/80

  1. Engineering redox balance through cofactor systems.

    Chen, Xiulai; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-01

    Redox balance plays an important role in the production of enzymes, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals. To meet the demands of industrial production, it is desirable that microbes maintain a maximal carbon flux towards target metabolites with no fluctuations in redox. This requires functional cofactor systems that support dynamic homeostasis between different redox states or functional stability in a given redox state. Redox balance can be achieved by improving the self-balance of a cofactor system, regulating the substrate balance of a cofactor system, and engineering the synthetic balance of a cofactor system. This review summarizes how cofactor systems can be manipulated to improve redox balance in microbes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radii of Redox Components from Absolute Redox Potentials Compared with Covalent and Aqueous Ionic Radii

    Heyrovská, Raji

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 9 (2010), s. 903-907 ISSN 1040-0397 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Electrochemistry * Absolute redox potentials * Radii of redox components Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  3. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods

    Verhagen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain information about the kinetics of electron transfer between proteins and about the dynamic behaviour of redox cofactors in proteins. This thesis describes the results of a study, initiated to get a ...

  4. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. Th...

  5. Polyphenol-Protein Complexes and Their Consequences for the Redox Activity, Structure and Function of Honey. A Current View and New Hypothesis – a Review

    Brudzynski Katrina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that protein complexation by honey polyphenols is changing honey structure and function. This relatively less investigated filed of honey research is presented in a context of known mechanism of formation of the stable polyphenol-protein complexes in other foods. At a core of these interactions lies the ability of polyphenols to form non-covalent and covalent bonds with proteins leading to transient and/or irreversible complexes, respectively. Honey storage and thermal processing induces non-enzymatic oxidation of polyphenols to reactive quinones and enables them to form covalent bonds with proteins. In this short review, we present data from our laboratory on previously unrecognized types of protein-polyphenol complexes that differed in size, stoichiometry, and antioxidant capacities, and the implications they have to honey antioxidant and antibacterial activities. Our intent is to provide a current understanding of protein-polyphenol complexation in honey and also some new thoughts /hypotheses that can be useful in directing future research.

  6. Tributyltin chloride induced testicular toxicity by JNK and p38 activation, redox imbalance and cell death in sertoli-germ cell co-culture.

    Mitra, Sumonto; Srivastava, Ankit; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2013-12-06

    The widespread use of tributyltin (TBT) as biocides in antifouling paints and agricultural chemicals has led to environmental and marine pollution. Human exposure occurs mainly through TBT contaminated seafood and drinking water. It is a well known endocrine disruptor in mammals, but its molecular mechanism in testicular damage is largely unexplored. This study was therefore, designed to ascertain effects of tributyltin chloride (TBTC) on sertoli-germ cell co-culture in ex-vivo and in the testicular tissue in-vivo conditions. An initial Ca(2+) rise followed by ROS generation and glutathione depletion resulted in oxidative damage and cell death. We observed p38 and JNK phosphorylation, stress proteins (Nrf2, MT and GST) induction and mitochondrial depolarization leading to caspase-3 activation. Prevention of TBTC reduced cell survival and cell death by Ca(2+) inhibitors and free radical scavengers specify definitive role of Ca(2+) and ROS. Sertoli cells were found to be more severely affected which in turn can hamper germ cells functionality. TBTC exposure in-vivo resulted in increased tin content in the testis with enhanced Evans blue leakage into the testicular tissue indicating blood-testis barrier disruption. Tesmin levels were significantly diminished and histopathological studies revealed marked tissue damage. Our data collectively indicates the toxic manifestations of TBTC on the male reproductive system and the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The titanium tris-anilide cation [Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3](+) stabilized as its perfluoro-tetra-phenylborate salt: structural characterization and synthesis in connection with redox activity of 4,4'-bipyridine dititanium complexes.

    Spinney, Heather A; Clough, Christopher R; Cummins, Christopher C

    2015-04-21

    This work explores the reduction of 4,4'-bipyridine using two equivalents of the titanium(iii) complex Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3 resulting in formation of a black, crystalline complex, (4,4'-bipy){Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}2, for which an X-ray structure determination is reported. The neutral, black, 4,4'-bipyridine-bridged bimetallic was found to be redox active, with mono- and di-anions being accessible electrochemically, and with the mono- and di-cations also being accessible chemically, and isolable, at least when using the weakly coordinating anion [B(C6F5)4](-) as the counter-ion. It proved possible to crystallize the salt [(4,4'-bipy){Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}2][B(C6F5)4]2 for a single-crystal X-ray structure investigation; in this instance it was revealed that the aromaticity of the 4,4'-bipyridine ligand, that had been disrupted upon reduction, had been regained. A rare cationic d(0) metal tris-amide complex, shown by X-ray crystallography to contain an intriguing pyramidal TiN3 core geometry, namely {Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}(+), could also be isolated when using [B(C6F5)4] as the essentially non-interacting counter-ion. This highly reactive cation should be considered as a potential intermediate in the plethora of reactions wherein Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3 has been shown to effect the reduction of substrates including halogenated organic molecules, carbonyl compounds, organic nitriles, and metal complexes.

  8. Redox signaling during hypoxia in mammalian cells

    Kimberly A. Smith

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia triggers a wide range of protective responses in mammalian cells, which are mediated through transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Redox signaling in cells by reactive oxygen species (ROS such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 occurs through the reversible oxidation of cysteine thiol groups, resulting in structural modifications that can change protein function profoundly. Mitochondria are an important source of ROS generation, and studies reveal that superoxide generation by the electron transport chain increases during hypoxia. Other sources of ROS, such as the NAD(PH oxidases, may also generate oxidant signals in hypoxia. This review considers the growing body of work indicating that increased ROS signals during hypoxia are responsible for regulating the activation of protective mechanisms in diverse cell types.

  9. Hybrid anodes for redox flow batteries

    Wang, Wei; Xiao, Jie; Wei, Xiaoliang; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-12-15

    RFBs having solid hybrid electrodes can address at least the problems of active material consumption, electrode passivation, and metal electrode dendrite growth that can be characteristic of traditional batteries, especially those operating at high current densities. The RFBs each have a first half cell containing a first redox couple dissolved in a solution or contained in a suspension. The solution or suspension can flow from a reservoir to the first half cell. A second half cell contains the solid hybrid electrode, which has a first electrode connected to a second electrode, thereby resulting in an equipotential between the first and second electrodes. The first and second half cells are separated by a separator or membrane.

  10. pH and redox effects of building materials

    Van der Sloot, H.A.; Van Zomeren, A.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; De Nie, D.S.

    2007-11-01

    The application of relatively fine grained industrial slags as fill material in industrial terrains and parking lots has led to unacceptably elevated pH values and imposed reducing conditions in ground- and surface water. Based on the Dutch Building Materials Decree the materials applied were classified as category 1 materials (free use). There are no limits set to pH and redox in this regulation. In itself a lower or higher pH and a low redox potential are not necessarily critical. Only when the buffer capacity of the surroundings is exceeded, undesirable situations may develop. In this work, the release of alkaline and reducing substances has been studied to assess if regulatory controls are needed and how such controls could be implemented practically. Both pH and redox potential are unsuitable properties for this purpose as it is the buffer capacity of the releasing material and the buffer capacity of the receiving soil and water bodies that determine whether unacceptable conditions develop. As pH and redox are also affected by gas reactions (O2 and CO2), the evaluation becomes relatively complex. Using the chemical speciation-transport model ORCHESTRA, a scenario description has been developed to assess the release of alkaline and reducing species from slag by infiltration under unsaturated conditions. Proper acid neutralization and redox buffering data for the materials were determined. Based on the sophisticated model results, a simplified model description was applied to link observations to impact. Decision schemes for applications above groundwater and in surface water have been developed based on the buffer capacity and particle size distribution of the material to be used, the infiltration rate, the degree of exposure to O2 and CO2 from the atmosphere or from soil air and the dimensions of the application. This has led to a preliminary guidance on implementing rules for acceptance of materials in specific applications. The modeled release predictions

  11. Redox homeostasis: the linchpin in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation.

    Wang, Kui; Zhang, Tao; Dong, Qiang; Nice, Edouard Collins; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-03-14

    Stem cells are characterized by their unique ability of self-renewal to maintain the so-called stem cell pool. Over the past decades, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as toxic aerobic metabolism byproducts that are harmful to stem cells, leading to DNA damage, senescence or cell death. Recently, a growing body of literature has shown that stem cells reside in redox niches with low ROS levels. The balance of Redox homeostasis facilitates stem cell self-renewal by an intricate network. Thus, to fully decipher the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of stem cell self-renewal, it is critical to address the important role of redox homeostasis in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. In this regard, we will discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved in the subtly orchestrated balance of redox status in stem cells by scavenger antioxidant enzyme systems that are well monitored by the hypoxia niches and crucial redox regulators including forkhead homeobox type O family (FoxOs), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1), nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We will also introduce several pivotal ROS-sensitive molecules, such as hypoxia-inducible factors, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) and p53, involved in the redox-regulated stem cell self-renewal. Specifically, all the aforementioned molecules can act as 'redox sensors' by virtue of redox modifications of their cysteine residues, which are critically important in the control of protein function. Given the importance of redox homeostasis in the regulation of stem cell self-renewal, understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms involved will provide important new insights into stem cell biology.

  12. Redox reactions in food fermentations

    Hansen, Egon Bech

    2018-01-01

    involves oxidative steps in the early part of the pathways whereas a multitude of different reactions are used as compensating reductions. Much of the diversity seen between food fermentations arise from the different routes and the different electron acceptors used by microorganisms to counterbalance...... and this contributes to the diversity in flavor, color, texture, and shelf life. The review concludes that these reactions are still only incompletely understood and that they represent an interesting area for fundamental research and also represent a fertile field for product development through a more conscious use...... of the redox properties of strains used to compose food cultures....

  13. Method for producing redox shuttles

    Pupek, Krzysztof Z.; Dzwiniel, Trevor L.; Krumdick, Gregory K.

    2015-03-03

    A single step method for producing a redox shuttle having the formula 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-phenylene tetraethyl bis(phosphate) is provided, the method comprising phosphorylating tert butyl hydroquinone with a phosphate-containing reagent. Also provided is method for producing 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-phenylene tetraethyl bis(phosphate), the method comprising solubilizing tert-butyl hydroquinone and tetrabutylammonium bromide with methyltetrahydrofuran to create a mixture; heating the mixture while adding base to the mixture in an amount to turn the mixture orange; and adding diethyl chlorophosphate to the orange mixture in an amount to phosphorylate the hydroquinone.

  14. Vanadium and Chromium Redox Behavior in borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glasses

    McKeown, D.; Muller, I.; Gan, H.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; Pegg, I.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to characterize vanadium (V) and chromium (Cr) environments in low activity nuclear waste (LAW) glasses synthesized under a variety of redox conditions. V 2 O 5 was added to the melt to improve sulfur incorporation from the waste; however, at sufficiently high concentrations, V increased melt foaming, which lowered melt processing rates. Foaming may be reduced by varying the redox conditions of the melt, while small amounts of Cr are added to reduce melter refractory corrosion. Three parent glasses were studied, where CO-CO 2 mixtures were bubbled through the corresponding melt for increasing time intervals so that a series of redox-adjusted-glasses was synthesized from each parent glass. XAS data indicated that V and Cr behaviors are significantly different in these glasses with respect to the cumulative gas bubbling times: V 4+ /V total ranges from 8 to 35%, while Cr 3+ /Cr total can range from 15 to 100% and even to population distributions including Cr 2+ . As Na-content decreased, V, and especially, Cr became more reduced, when comparing equivalent glasses within a series. The Na-poor glass series show possible redox coupling between V and Cr, where V 4+ populations increase after initial bubbling, but as bubbling time increases, V 4+ populations drop to near the level of the parent glass, while Cr becomes more reduced to the point of having increasing Cr 2+ populations.

  15. Connecting Biology to Electronics: Molecular Communication via Redox Modality.

    Liu, Yi; Li, Jinyang; Tschirhart, Tanya; Terrell, Jessica L; Kim, Eunkyoung; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Kelly, Deanna L; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2017-12-01

    Biology and electronics are both expert at for accessing, analyzing, and responding to information. Biology uses ions, small molecules, and macromolecules to receive, analyze, store, and transmit information, whereas electronic devices receive input in the form of electromagnetic radiation, process the information using electrons, and then transmit output as electromagnetic waves. Generating the capabilities to connect biology-electronic modalities offers exciting opportunities to shape the future of biosensors, point-of-care medicine, and wearable/implantable devices. Redox reactions offer unique opportunities for bio-device communication that spans the molecular modalities of biology and electrical modality of devices. Here, an approach to search for redox information through an interactive electrochemical probing that is analogous to sonar is adopted. The capabilities of this approach to access global chemical information as well as information of specific redox-active chemical entities are illustrated using recent examples. An example of the use of synthetic biology to recognize external molecular information, process this information through intracellular signal transduction pathways, and generate output responses that can be detected by electrical modalities is also provided. Finally, exciting results in the use of redox reactions to actuate biology are provided to illustrate that synthetic biology offers the potential to guide biological response through electrical cues. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Evaluation of electrolytes for redox flow battery applications

    Chakrabarti, M.H.; Dryfe, R.A.W.; Roberts, E.P.L.

    2007-01-01

    A number of redox systems have been investigated in this work with the aim of identifying electrolytes suitable for testing redox flow battery cell designs. The criteria for the selection of suitable systems were fast electrochemical kinetics and minimal cross-contamination of active electrolytes. Possible electrolyte systems were initially selected based on cyclic voltammetry data. Selected systems were then compared by charge/discharge experiments using a simple H-type cell. The all-vanadium electrolyte system has been developed as a commercial system and was used as the starting point in this study. The performance of the all-vanadium system was significantly better than an all-chromium system which has recently been reported. Some metal-organic and organic redox systems have been reported as possible systems for redox flow batteries, with cyclic voltammetry data suggesting that they could offer near reversible kinetics. However, Ru(acac) 3 in acetonitrile could only be charged efficiently to 9.5% of theoretical charge, after which irreversible side reactions occurred and [Fe(bpy) 3 ](ClO 4 ) 2 in acetonitrile was found to exhibit poor charge/discharge performance

  17. Enhanced microbial decolorization of methyl red with oxidized carbon fiber as redox mediator

    Emilia Rios-Del Toro, E. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Celis, Lourdes B. [División de Geociencias Aplicadas, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Rangel-Mendez, J. Rene, E-mail: rene@ipicyt.edu.mx [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) act as redox mediator. • Electron accepting capacity increased with oxidation time of ACF. •ACFs increased 8-fold the reduction of methyl red in biological assays. •Biofilm formed on the ACFs partly blocked their redox mediator capacity. -- Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions is possible but at a slow rate. Redox mediators (quinones, activated carbon) are used to improve the reduction rate. The aim of this work was to use activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a redox mediator for the anaerobic reduction of the azo dye methyl red. ACF was chemically modified with 8 M HNO{sub 3} to increase its redox-mediating capacity and used in chemical and anaerobic biological batch assays for the reduction of methyl red. ACF increased its redox-mediating capacity up to 3-fold in chemical assays; in biological assays ACF increased the reduction rate up to 8-fold compared to controls without ACF. However, since the ACF served as support for biomass, a biofilm formed on the fiber significantly reduced its redox-mediating capacity; substrate consumption suggested that the electron transport from ACF to methyl red was the rate-limiting step in the process. These results are the first evidence of the role of ACF as a redox mediator in the reductive decolorization of methyl red, in addition to the effect of biofilm attached to ACF on methyl red reduction. Due to the versatile characteristics of ACF and its redox-mediating capacity, carbon fibers could be used in biological wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the reductive transformation of pollutants commonly found in industrial effluents.

  18. Redox properties of iron-bearing clays and MX-80 bentonite – Electrochemical and spectroscopic characterization

    Hofstetter, Th. B.; Sosedova, Y.; Gorski, C.; Voegelin, A.; Sander, M.

    2014-03-15

    The characterization of the redox properties of Fe-bearing minerals in the presence and absence of dissolved Fe{sup 2+} is of major relevance for the assessment of redox reactions in natural and engineered environments such as radioactive waste repositories. In this study, we developed an electrochemical approach based on the use of soluble organic electron transfer mediators, which enabled us to quantify the redox properties of Fe-bearing clay minerals, MX- 80 bentonite and combinations of clay minerals, Fe oxides and dissolved Fe{sup 2+}. Using mediated electrochemical oxidation and reduction, we quantified the electron accepting and donating capacities of ferrous smectite SWa-1, Wyoming montmorillonite SWy-2 and MX-80 bentonite at pH 7.5. All structural Fe in clay minerals was redox-active in contrast to that present in other, not further defined phases of MX-80. The materials investigated were redoxactive over a very wide range of Eh-values, that is the Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sub total} ratio of the minerals changed from 0 to 100 % between +600 and -600 mV (vs. SHE). Redox properties were highly path-dependent due to structural changes of the minerals as revealed from the study of native and redox-cycled clay minerals after repeated reduction and re-oxidation cycles. Irreversible alteration of the mineral structure, however, was less obvious for materials with lower total Fe content such as MX-80 bentonite and SWy-2. Systems containing native montmorillonites (SWy-2 or MX-80), goethite and dissolved Fe{sup 2+} were also able to buffer the reduction potential E{sub H} between 0 and -300 mV. Regardless of their Fe oxidation state, Fe-bearing minerals are redox-active over a wide potential range and therefore very relevant as redox buffers determining the fate of redox-active radionuclides and metals in waste repositories. (authors)

  19. Redox properties of iron-bearing clays and MX-80 bentonite – Electrochemical and spectroscopic characterization

    Hofstetter, Th. B.; Sosedova, Y.; Gorski, C.; Voegelin, A.; Sander, M.

    2014-03-01

    The characterization of the redox properties of Fe-bearing minerals in the presence and absence of dissolved Fe"2"+ is of major relevance for the assessment of redox reactions in natural and engineered environments such as radioactive waste repositories. In this study, we developed an electrochemical approach based on the use of soluble organic electron transfer mediators, which enabled us to quantify the redox properties of Fe-bearing clay minerals, MX- 80 bentonite and combinations of clay minerals, Fe oxides and dissolved Fe"2"+. Using mediated electrochemical oxidation and reduction, we quantified the electron accepting and donating capacities of ferrous smectite SWa-1, Wyoming montmorillonite SWy-2 and MX-80 bentonite at pH 7.5. All structural Fe in clay minerals was redox-active in contrast to that present in other, not further defined phases of MX-80. The materials investigated were redoxactive over a very wide range of Eh-values, that is the Fe"2"+/Fe_t_o_t_a_l ratio of the minerals changed from 0 to 100 % between +600 and -600 mV (vs. SHE). Redox properties were highly path-dependent due to structural changes of the minerals as revealed from the study of native and redox-cycled clay minerals after repeated reduction and re-oxidation cycles. Irreversible alteration of the mineral structure, however, was less obvious for materials with lower total Fe content such as MX-80 bentonite and SWy-2. Systems containing native montmorillonites (SWy-2 or MX-80), goethite and dissolved Fe"2"+ were also able to buffer the reduction potential E_H between 0 and -300 mV. Regardless of their Fe oxidation state, Fe-bearing minerals are redox-active over a wide potential range and therefore very relevant as redox buffers determining the fate of redox-active radionuclides and metals in waste repositories. (authors)

  20. Enhanced microbial decolorization of methyl red with oxidized carbon fiber as redox mediator

    Emilia Rios-Del Toro, E.; Celis, Lourdes B.; Cervantes, Francisco J.; Rangel-Mendez, J. Rene

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) act as redox mediator. • Electron accepting capacity increased with oxidation time of ACF. •ACFs increased 8-fold the reduction of methyl red in biological assays. •Biofilm formed on the ACFs partly blocked their redox mediator capacity. -- Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions is possible but at a slow rate. Redox mediators (quinones, activated carbon) are used to improve the reduction rate. The aim of this work was to use activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a redox mediator for the anaerobic reduction of the azo dye methyl red. ACF was chemically modified with 8 M HNO 3 to increase its redox-mediating capacity and used in chemical and anaerobic biological batch assays for the reduction of methyl red. ACF increased its redox-mediating capacity up to 3-fold in chemical assays; in biological assays ACF increased the reduction rate up to 8-fold compared to controls without ACF. However, since the ACF served as support for biomass, a biofilm formed on the fiber significantly reduced its redox-mediating capacity; substrate consumption suggested that the electron transport from ACF to methyl red was the rate-limiting step in the process. These results are the first evidence of the role of ACF as a redox mediator in the reductive decolorization of methyl red, in addition to the effect of biofilm attached to ACF on methyl red reduction. Due to the versatile characteristics of ACF and its redox-mediating capacity, carbon fibers could be used in biological wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the reductive transformation of pollutants commonly found in industrial effluents

  1. Hourly and daily variation of sediment redox potential in tidal wetland sediments

    Catallo, W. James

    1999-01-01

    Variation of electrochemical oxidation-reduction (redox) potential was examined in surface salt march sediments under conditions of flooding and tidal simulation in mesocosms and field sites. Time series were generated of redox potential measured in sediment profiles at 2-10 cm depth using combination Pt-Ag/AgCl (ORP) electrodes. Redox potential data were acquired at rapid rates (1-55 samples/h) over extended periods (3-104 days) along with similar times series of temperature (water, air, soil) and pH. It was found that redox potential vaired as a result of water level changes and was unrelated to diurnal changes in temperature or pH, the latter of which changed by 370 mV redox potential decrease in under 48 hours). Attenuatoin of microbial activity by [gamma] y-radiation and toxic chemicals elimintated this response. In tidal salt marsh mesocosms where the sediment-plant assemblages were exposed to a simulated diurnal tide, redox potenial oscillations of 40-300 mV amplitude were recoded that has the same periodicity as the flood-drain cycle. Periodic redoc potential time series were observed repeatedly in sediments receiving tidal pulsing but not in those sediments exposed to static hydrological conditions. Data collected over 12 days from a coastal marsh site experiencing diurnal tides showed similar fluctuations in redox potential. Data from the experimentents indicated that (a) redox potential can be a dynamic, nonlinear variable in coastal and estuarine wetland sediments over hourly and daily scales, and the designs of biogeochemical experiments should reflect this, (b) redox potential can change rapidly and signigicantly in coastal wetland sediments in response of flooding and draining, (c) microbial community processes are primarily determinants of the time course of redox potential in wetland sediments, and elimination of inhibition of microbial activity (e.g. by pollutants) can significantly alter that behavior, and (d) fast redox potential dynamics appear

  2. Dopant activation mechanism of Bi wire-δ-doping into Si crystal, investigated with wavelength dispersive fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory.

    Murata, Koichi; Kirkham, Christopher; Shimomura, Masaru; Nitta, Kiyofumi; Uruga, Tomoya; Terada, Yasuko; Nittoh, Koh-Ichi; Bowler, David R; Miki, Kazushi

    2017-04-20

    We successfully characterized the local structures of Bi atoms in a wire-δ-doped layer (1/8 ML) in a Si crystal, using wavelength dispersive fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure at the beamline BL37XU, in SPring-8, with the help of density functional theory calculations. It was found that the burial of Bi nanolines on the Si(0 0 1) surface, via growth of Si capping layer at 400 °C by molecular beam epitaxy, reduced the Bi-Si bond length from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] Å. We infer that following epitaxial growth the Bi-Bi dimers of the nanoline are broken, and the Bi atoms are located at substitutional sites within the Si crystal, leading to the shorter Bi-Si bond lengths.

  3. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    Jason eBenzine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ i-chip enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria and six Fe(II phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8, Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5, and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31 were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  4. Fine target of deuterium

    Diaz Diaz, J.; Granados Gonzalez, C. E.; Gutierrez Bernal, R.

    1959-01-01

    A fine target of deuterium on a tantalum plate by the absorption method is obtained. In order to obtain the de gasification temperature an induction generator of high frequency is used and the deuterium pass is regulated by means of a palladium valve. Two vacuum measures are available, one to measure the high vacuum in the de gasification process of the tantalum plate and the other, for low vacuum, to measure the deuterium inlet in the installation and the deuterium pressure change in the installation after the absorption in the tantalum plate. A target of 48 μ gr/cm 2 thick is obtained. (Author) 1 refs

  5. Titanium nitride as an electrocatalyst for V(II)/V(III) redox couples in all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    Yang, Chunmei; Wang, Haining; Lu, Shanfu; Wu, Chunxiao; Liu, Yiyang; Tan, Qinglong; Liang, Dawei; Xiang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiN NPs) are proposed as a novel catalyst towards the V(II)/V(III) redox pair for the negative electrode in vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB). Electrochemical properties of TiN NPs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that TiN NPs demonstrate better electrochemical activity and reversibility for the processes of V(II)/V(III) redox couples as compared with the graphite NPs. TiN NPs facilitate the charge transfer in the V(II)/V(III) redox reaction. Performance of a VRFB using a TiN NPs coated carbon paper as a negative electrode is much higher than that of a VRFB with a raw carbon paper electrode. The columbic efficiency (CE), the voltage efficiency (VE) and the energy efficiency (EE) of the VRFB single cell at charge-discharge current density of 30 mA/cm 2 are 91.74%, 89.11% and 81.74%, respectively. During a 50 charge-discharge cycles test, the CE values of VRFB with TiN NPs consistently remain higher than 90%.

  6. Fine motor skills in children with Down syndrome

    Memišević Haris; Mačak Amra

    2014-01-01

    Fine motor skills are very important for children's overall functioning. Their development is necessary for many everyday activities such as dressing, feeding, holding objects, etc. Moreover, fine motor skills are also correlated to the children's academic success at school. Recent research suggests a close relationship between motor skills and intelligence. Given the relative paucity of literature on fine motor skills in different etiological groups of children with intellectual disability (...

  7. Redox Cycling, pH Dependence, and Ligand Effects of Mn(III) in Oxalate Decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis.

    Twahir, Umar T; Ozarowski, Andrew; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2016-11-29

    This contribution describes electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments on Mn(III) in oxalate decarboxylase of Bacillus subtilis, an interesting enzyme that catalyzes the redox-neutral dissociation of oxalate into formate and carbon dioxide. Chemical redox cycling provides strong evidence that both Mn centers can be oxidized, although the N-terminal Mn(II) appears to have the lower reduction potential and is most likely the carrier of the +3 oxidation state under moderate oxidative conditions, in agreement with the general view that it represents the active site. Significantly, Mn(III) was observed in untreated OxDC in succinate and acetate buffers, while it could not be directly observed in citrate buffer. Quantitative analysis showed that up to 16% of the EPR-visible Mn is in the +3 oxidation state at low pH in the presence of succinate buffer. The fine structure and hyperfine structure parameters of Mn(III) are affected by small carboxylate ligands that can enter the active site and have been recorded for formate, acetate, and succinate. The results from a previous report [Zhu, W., et al. (2016) Biochemistry 55, 429-434] could therefore be reinterpreted as evidence of formate-bound Mn(III) after the enzyme is allowed to turn over oxalate. The pH dependence of the Mn(III) EPR signal compares very well with that of enzymatic activity, providing strong evidence that the catalytic reaction of oxalate decarboxylase is driven by Mn(III), which is generated in the presence of dioxygen.

  8. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  9. Redox properties of small semiconductor particles

    Liver, N.; Nitzan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The size dependence of electrical and thermodynamic quantities of intermediate-sized semiconductor particles in an electrolyte solution with a given redox pair are studied. The equilibrium constant for this system is then derived based on the relationship of the electrolytic redox components to the size, charges, and concentration of the semiconductor particles. 25 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  10. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods

    Verhagen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain

  11. Chemistry and Redox Biology of Mycothiol.

    Reyes, Aníbal M; Pedre, Brandán; De Armas, María Inés; Tossounian, Maria-Armineh; Radi, Rafael; Messens, Joris; Trujillo, Madia

    2018-02-20

    Mycothiol (MSH, AcCys-GlcN-Ins) is the main low-molecular weight (LMW) thiol of most Actinomycetes, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis that affects millions of people worldwide. Strains with decreased MSH content show increased susceptibilities to hydroperoxides and electrophilic compounds. In M. tuberculosis, MSH modulates the response to several antituberculosis drugs. Enzymatic routes involving MSH could provide clues for specific drug design. Recent Advances: Physicochemical data argue against a rapid, nonenzymatic reaction of MSH with oxidants, disulfides, or electrophiles. Moreover, exposure of the bacteria to high concentrations of two-electron oxidants resulted in protein mycothiolation. The recently described glutaredoxin-like protein mycoredoxin-1 (Mrx-1) provides a route for catalytic reduction of mycothiolated proteins, protecting critical cysteines from irreversible oxidation. The description of MSH/Mrx-1-dependent activities of peroxidases helped to explain the higher susceptibility to oxidants observed in Actinomycetes lacking MSH. Moreover, the first mycothiol-S-transferase, member of the DinB superfamily of proteins, was described. In Corynebacterium, both the MSH/Mrx-1 and the thioredoxin pathways reduce methionine sulfoxide reductase A. A novel tool for in vivo imaging of the MSH/mycothiol disulfide (MSSM) status allows following changes in the mycothiol redox state during macrophage infection and its relationship with antibiotic sensitivity. Redundancy of MSH with other LMW thiols is starting to be unraveled and could help to rationalize the differences in the reported importance of MSH synthesis observed in vitro versus in animal infection models. Future work should be directed to establish the structural bases of the specificity of MSH-dependent enzymes, thus facilitating drug developments. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 487-504.

  12. NGST fine guidance sensor

    Rowlands, Neil; Hutchings, John; Murowinski, Richard G.; Alexander, Russ

    2003-03-01

    Instrumentation for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) is currently in the Phase A definition stage. We have developed a concept for the NGST Fine Guidance Sensor or FGS. The FGS is a detector array based imager which resides in the NGST focal plane. We report here on tradeoff studies aimed at defining an overall configuration of the FGS which will meet the performance and interface requirements. A key performance requirement is a noise equivalent angle of 3 milli-arcseconds to be achieved with 95% probability for any pointing of the observatory in the celestial sphere. A key interface requirement is compatibility with the architecture of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). The concept developed consists of two independent and redundant FGS modules, each with a 4' x 2' field of view covered by two 2048 x 2048 infrared detector arrays, providing 60 milli-arcsecond sampling. Performance modeling supporting the choice of this architecture and the trade space considered is presented. Each module has a set of readout electronics which perform star detection, pixel-by-pixel correction, and in fine guiding mode, centroid calculation. These readout electronics communicate with the ISIM Command &Data Handling Units where the FGS control software is based. Rationale for this choice of architecture is also presented.

  13. Preservation of organic matter in nontronite against iron redox cycling.

    Zeng, Q.

    2015-12-01

    It is generally believed that clay minerals can protect organic matter from degradation in redox active environments, but both biotic and abiotic factors can influence the redox process and thus potentially change the clay-organic associations. However, the specific mechanisms involved in this process remain poorly understood. In this study, a model organic compound, 12-Aminolauric acid (ALA) was selected to intercalate into the structural interlayer of nontronite (an iron-rich smectite, NAu-2) to form an ALA-intercalated NAu-2 composite (ALA-NAu-2). Shawanella putrefaciens CN32 and sodium dithionite were used to reduce structural Fe(III) to Fe(II) in NAu-2 and ALA-NAu-2. The bioreduced ALA-NAu-2 was subsequently re-oxidized by air. The rates and extents of bioreduction and air re-oxidation were determined with wet chemistry methods. ALA release from ALA-NAu-2 via redox process was monitored. Mineralogical changes after iron redox cycle were investigated with X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. At the beginning stage of bioreduction, S. putrefaciens CN32 reduced Fe(III) from the edges of nontronite and preferentially reduced and dissolved small and poorly crystalline particles, and released ALA, resulting a positive correlation between ALA release and iron reduction extent (80%). Because bacteria are the principal agent for mediating redox process in natural environments, our results demonstrated that the structural interlayer of smectite can serve as a potential shelter to protect organic matter from oxidation.

  14. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H., E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2012-01-15

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  15. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2012-01-01

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  16. Enhanced performance of ultracapacitors using redox additive-based electrolytes

    Jain, Dharmendra; Kanungo, Jitendra; Tripathi, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    Different concentrations of potassium iodide (KI) as redox additive had been added to 1 M sulfuric acid (H2SO4) electrolyte with an aim of enhancing the capacitance and energy density of ultracapacitors via redox reactions at the interfaces of electrode-electrolyte. Ultracapacitors were fabricated using chemically treated activated carbon as electrode with H2SO4 and H2SO4-KI as an electrolyte. The electrochemical performances of fabricated supercapacitors were investigated by impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge techniques. The maximum capacitance ` C' was observed with redox additives-based electrolyte system comprising 1 M H2SO4-0.3 M KI (1072 F g- 1), which is very much higher than conventional 1 M H2SO4 (61.3 F g- 1) aqueous electrolyte-based ultracapacitors. It corresponds to an energy density of 20.49 Wh kg- 1 at 2.1 A g- 1 for redox additive-based electrolyte, which is six times higher as compared to that of pristine electrolyte (1 M H2SO4) having energy density of only 3.36 Wh kg- 1. The temperature dependence behavior of fabricated cell was also analyzed, which shows increasing pattern in its capacitance values in a temperature range of 5-70 °C. Under cyclic stability test, redox electrolyte-based system shows almost 100% capacitance retention up to 5000 cycles and even more. For comparison, ultracapacitors based on polymer gel electrolyte polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (10 wt%)—{H2SO4 (1 M)-KI (0.3 M)} (90 wt%) have been fabricated and characterized with the same electrode materials.

  17. Shedding light on disulfide bond formation: engineering a redox switch in green fluorescent protein

    Østergaard, H.; Henriksen, A.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2001-01-01

    To visualize the formation of disulfide bonds in living cells, a pair of redox-active cysteines was introduced into the yellow fluorescent variant of green fluorescent protein. Formation of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines was fully reversible and resulted in a >2-fold decrease...... in the intrinsic fluorescence. Inter conversion between the two redox states could thus be followed in vitro as well as in vivoby non- invasive fluorimetric measurements. The 1.5 Angstrom crystal structure of the oxidized protein revealed a disulfide bond- induced distortion of the beta -barrel, as well...... the physiological range for redox-active cysteines. In the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli, the protein was a sensitive probe for the redox changes that occur upon disruption of the thioredoxin reductive pathway....

  18. The SAMHD1 dNTP Triphosphohydrolase Is Controlled by a Redox Switch.

    Mauney, Christopher H; Rogers, LeAnn C; Harris, Reuben S; Daniel, Larry W; Devarie-Baez, Nelmi O; Wu, Hanzhi; Furdui, Cristina M; Poole, Leslie B; Perrino, Fred W; Hollis, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Proliferative signaling involves reversible posttranslational oxidation of proteins. However, relatively few molecular targets of these modifications have been identified. We investigate the role of protein oxidation in regulation of SAMHD1 catalysis. Here we report that SAMHD1 is a major target for redox regulation of nucleotide metabolism and cell cycle control. SAMHD1 is a triphosphate hydrolase, whose function involves regulation of deoxynucleotide triphosphate pools. We demonstrate that the redox state of SAMHD1 regulates its catalytic activity. We have identified three cysteine residues that constitute an intrachain disulfide bond "redox switch" that reversibly inhibits protein tetramerization and catalysis. We show that proliferative signals lead to SAMHD1 oxidation in cells and oxidized SAMHD1 is localized outside of the nucleus. Innovation and Conclusions: SAMHD1 catalytic activity is reversibly regulated by protein oxidation. These data identify a previously unknown mechanism for regulation of nucleotide metabolism by SAMHD1. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1317-1331.

  19. An assessment of the role of redox cycling in mediating the toxicity of paraquat and nitrofurantoin

    Adam, A.; Cohen, G.M. (Univ. of London (England)); Smith, L.L. (Imperial Chemical Industries plc, Cheshire (England))

    1990-04-01

    The abilities of paraquat, diquat, and nitrofurantoin to undergo cyclic oxidation and reduction with rat microsomal systems have been assessed and compared to that of the potent redox cycler, menadione. Diquat and menadione were found to be potent redox cyclers with comparable abilities to elicit a nonstoichiometric increase in both the consumption of O{sub 2} and the oxidation of NADPH, compared to the amounts of substrate added. In contrast, paraquat and nitrofurantoin redox cycled poorly, being an order of magnitude less potent than either diquat or menadione. This was reflected in kinetic studies using lung and liver microsomes. In order to assess redox cycling of the substrates in an intact lung system, the O{sub 2} consumption of rat lung slices was measured in the presence of all four compounds. A small increase in lung slice O{sub 2} uptake was observed with paraquat in the first 2.5 hr of incubation, possibly because of redox cycling of a high intracellular concentration of paraquat resulting from active accumulation into target cells. This stimulation in O{sub 2} uptake was no longer observed when slices were incubated for a longer period or with higher paraquat concentrations (10{sup {minus}4}M), possibly because of toxic effects in target cells. These results together with the poor ability to redox cycle with microsomes and the absence of a specific uptake system highlight the problem of associating redox cycling and oxidative stress in the mechanism of nitrofurantoin toxicity.

  20. Redox Signaling Mediated by Thioredoxin and Glutathione Systems in the Central Nervous System.

    Ren, Xiaoyuan; Zou, Lili; Zhang, Xu; Branco, Vasco; Wang, Jun; Carvalho, Cristina; Holmgren, Arne; Lu, Jun

    2017-11-01

    The thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione (GSH) systems play important roles in maintaining the redox balance in the brain, a tissue that is prone to oxidative stress due to its high-energy demand. These two disulfide reductase systems are active in various areas of the brain and are considered to be critical antioxidant systems in the central nervous system (CNS). Various neuronal disorders have been characterized to have imbalanced redox homeostasis. Recent Advances: In addition to their detrimental effects, recent studies have highlighted that reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) act as critical signaling molecules by modifying thiols in proteins. The Trx and GSH systems, which reversibly regulate thiol modifications, regulate redox signaling involved in various biological events in the CNS. In this review, we focus on the following: (i) how ROS/RNS are produced and mediate signaling in CNS; (ii) how Trx and GSH systems regulate redox signaling by catalyzing reversible thiol modifications; (iii) how dysfunction of the Trx and GSH systems causes alterations of cellular redox signaling in human neuronal diseases; and (iv) the effects of certain small molecules that target thiol-based signaling pathways in the CNS. Further study on the roles of thiol-dependent redox systems in the CNS will improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of many human neuronal disorders and also help to develop novel protective and therapeutic strategies against neuronal diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 989-1010.

  1. [Effect of the medium redox potential on the growth and metabolism of anaerobic bacteria].

    Vasilian, A; Trchunian, A

    2008-01-01

    Based on the available literature data on a decrease in the redox potential of medium to low negative values and a decrease in pH during the growth of sugar-fermenting anaerobic bacteria, it was concluded that these processes cannot be described by the theory of redox potential. A theory was developed according to which the regulation of bacterial metabolism is accomplished through changes in the redox potential. The theory considers the redox potential as a factor determining the growth of anaerobic bacteria, which is regulated by oxidizers and reducers. The assumption is put forward that, under anaerobic conditions, bacteria are sensitive to changes in the redox potential and have a redox taxis. The effect of the redox potential on the transport of protons and other substances through membranes and the activity of membrane-bound enzymes, including the proton F1-F0-ATPase, whose mechanisms of action involve changes in the proton conductance of the membrane, the generation of proton-driving force, and dithiol-disulfide transitions in proteins was studied.

  2. Assessment of redox conditions based on fracture mineralogy

    Tullborg, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    The frequency and distribution of fracture minerals like calcite, Fe-oxides/hydroxides, and sulphides can be used in performance assessment since their presence reflects the redox processes that are active or have been active in the fractures. The advantage in using fracture minerals is that they undoubtedly represent conditions prior to disturbances caused by drilling or tunnel excavations. In addition, they give a continuous record from the surface to great depth. On the other hand the disadvantage is that the fracture mineral distribution is a result of both past and present processes such that the mineral distribution alone can not discriminate between old and recent processes. Nevertheless it is suggested that the fracture mineral distribution provides important information about the redox capacity in the fracture system. (author)

  3. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  4. Sahara Coal: the fine art of collecting fines for profit

    Schreckengost, D.; Arnold, D.

    1984-09-01

    A considerable increase in the volume of fines in rom coal caused Sahara Coal in Illinois to redesign the fine coal system in their Harrisburg preparation plant. Details of the new design, and particularly the fine refuse system which dewaters and dries 28 mesh x O clean coal, are given. Results have exceeded expectations in reducing product losses, operating costs and slurry pond cleaning costs.

  5. Chloroplasts as source and target of cellular redox regulation: a discussion on chloroplast redox signals in the context of plant physiology.

    Baier, Margarete; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2005-06-01

    During the evolution of plants, chloroplasts have lost the exclusive genetic control over redox regulation and antioxidant gene expression. Together with many other genes, all genes encoding antioxidant enzymes and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of low molecular weight antioxidants were transferred to the nucleus. On the other hand, photosynthesis bears a high risk for photo-oxidative damage. Concomitantly, an intricate network for mutual regulation by anthero- and retrograde signals has emerged to co-ordinate the activities of the different genetic and metabolic compartments. A major focus of recent research in chloroplast regulation addressed the mechanisms of redox sensing and signal transmission, the identification of regulatory targets, and the understanding of adaptation mechanisms. In addition to redox signals communicated through signalling cascades also used in pathogen and wounding responses, specific chloroplast signals control nuclear gene expression. Signalling pathways are triggered by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool, the thioredoxin system, and the acceptor availability at photosystem I, in addition to control by oxolipins, tetrapyrroles, carbohydrates, and abscisic acid. The signalling function is discussed in the context of regulatory circuitries that control the expression of antioxidant enzymes and redox modulators, demonstrating the principal role of chloroplasts as the source and target of redox regulation.