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Sample records for redang island malaysia

  1. Balancing water, religion and tourism on Redang Island, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Joshua B [Environmental Change Institute, School of Geography and the Environment, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 0EZ (United Kingdom); Nawaz, Rizwan; Nawaz, Faiza [HydroRisk Ltd, Leeds University Union, Lifton Place, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Fauzi, Rosmadi [Department of Geography, Universiti Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sadek, Eran Sadek Said Md; Latif, Zulkiflee Abd [Department of Surveying Science and Geomatics, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Blackett, Matthew [Department of Geography, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: joshbfisher@gmail.com

    2008-04-15

    Redang Island (Pulau Redang) is an island off of Peninsular Malaysia that is part of a Marine Park archipelago of corals and thousands of fish and invertebrates. The relatively isolated local community is generally centered on fishing, and Islam guides daily life. Recently, the tourism industry has expanded on the island. New hotels and resorts provide jobs, but also expose the locals to western culture and touristic behavior, which may clash with deeply traditional community values. Further, the tourism industry may be putting a strain on the natural resources, especially the quantity and quality of freshwater. The island village may become divided between those who support the tourism industry and those who do not. Here we present an exploratory investigation into the development-environment-culture dynamics of tourism, water and religion on Redang Island while building collaborations between universities of this Muslim state and the West.

  2. Balancing water, religion and tourism on Redang Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joshua B.; Nawaz, Rizwan; Fauzi, Rosmadi; Nawaz, Faiza; Sadek, Eran Sadek Said Md; Abd Latif, Zulkiflee; Blackett, Matthew

    2008-04-01

    Redang Island (Pulau Redang) is an island off of Peninsular Malaysia that is part of a Marine Park archipelago of corals and thousands of fish and invertebrates. The relatively isolated local community is generally centered on fishing, and Islam guides daily life. Recently, the tourism industry has expanded on the island. New hotels and resorts provide jobs, but also expose the locals to western culture and touristic behavior, which may clash with deeply traditional community values. Further, the tourism industry may be putting a strain on the natural resources, especially the quantity and quality of freshwater. The island village may become divided between those who support the tourism industry and those who do not. Here we present an exploratory investigation into the development environment culture dynamics of tourism, water and religion on Redang Island while building collaborations between universities of this Muslim state and the West.

  3. Tree Species Composition, Diversity and Above Ground Biomass of Two Forest Types at Redang Island, Peninsula Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud KHAIRIL

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the tree species composition, diversity and above ground biomass at Redang Island, Terengganu. Two plots of 0.1 ha were established at the inland forest and coastal forest of the island. As the result, a total of 387 trees ≥ 5 diameters at breast height (DBH were recorded. The coastal forest recorded 167 individuals representing 48 species from 37 genera and 26 families while the inland forest had 220 individuals representing 50 species from 43 genera and 25 families. Shorea glauca (Dipterocarpaceae was the most important species at the coastal forest with a Species Importance Value Index (SIVi of 10.5 % while Dipterocarpus costulatus (Dipterocarpaceae was the most important species at the inland forest with 13.8 %. Dipterocarpaceae was the most important family in both forest plots with FIVi at 20.4 % in the coastal and 21.5 % in the inland forest. The Shannon-Weiner Diversity Index (H’ was considered high in both forest plots with 3.4 (H’max = 3.9 at the coastal forest and 3.5 (H’max = 4.0 at the inland forest. Sorenson’s Community Similarity Coefficient (CCs showed that tree species communities between the two forest plots had moderate similarity with CC = 0.5. The Shannon Evenness Index (J’ in the two forest plots was 0.89. The total above ground biomass at the coastal forest was 491 t/ha and at the inland forest it was 408 t/ha. From all the species recorded in this study, 11 species were listed as threatened species by IUCN Red Data Book, of which four were listed as endangered and critically endangered, six were listed as lower risk and one species was listed as vulnerable.

  4. Eco Awareness among Hotels in Terengganu: Cases of Redang Island

    OpenAIRE

    Sairah Saien; Khazainah Khalid; Mushaireen Musa; Faliza Mahamed Ali; Jazira Anuar

    2012-01-01

    This study looks into the environmental management practices among hotels operating in Terengganu specifically in Redang Island. Hospitality industry nowadays has gained significant momentum in going green. Hotels and resorts around the world are going green and becoming more environmentally friendly because customers are seeking it and even requiring it. An investigation of the interest, understanding and perceived opportunities and barriers to the adoption of such practices was carried out ...

  5. Eco Awareness among Hotels in Terengganu: Cases of Redang Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sairah Saien

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study looks into the environmental management practices among hotels operating in Terengganu specifically in Redang Island. Hospitality industry nowadays has gained significant momentum in going green. Hotels and resorts around the world are going green and becoming more environmentally friendly because customers are seeking it and even requiring it. An investigation of the interest, understanding and perceived opportunities and barriers to the adoption of such practices was carried out through in-depth interviews with management staff of the hotels, with a census of 14 hotels. From this study, authors believed that hotels should be more proactive in their response concerning environmental performance. This research implies that eco awareness hotels can attract eco-concerned consumers and boost overall customer loyalty. It can also be seen as enhancing perceptions of hotels and their brands. In terms of practical implications, hotels by their very nature of transient guests, groups, excess consumption and housekeeping demands are inherently an impact on the environment. It is believed that green meetings can save money by conserving resources, create and enhance competitive advantage and reputation and present opportunities for marketing and public relations.

  6. Locals' perceptions towards the impacts of tourism and the importance of local engagement: A comparative study of two islands in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Nejati, Mehran; Badaruddin MOHAMED; Omar, Shida Irwana

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the perception of locals residing on two touristic islands in Malaysia about the economic, social, environmental and cultural impacts of tourism development. Additionally, the importance of local engagement in tourism development was also investigated from the perspective of residents. A total of 371 responses were collected (183 local residents on Perhentian island and 188 local residents on Redang island). Results of the study reveal that while residents on both isla...

  7. FORECASTING TOURIST ARRIVALS TO LANGKAWI ISLAND MALAYSIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamarul Ariffin MANSOR; Wan Irham ISHAK

    2015-01-01

    ..., food and services industries and their best shape. This study focuses on tourist arrivals in Langkawi Island as one of the major tourist attractions situated in the northerly region of Peninsular Malaysia. Importantly, this paper attempts to measure and compare the performance of forecasting with Exponential Smoothing, ARIMA and ARFIMA models using the R software package.

  8. FORECASTING TOURIST ARRIVALS TO LANGKAWI ISLAND MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarul Ariffin MANSOR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is the act of travelling for a person or group of people from their own locality to a specific destination in a short term or long term period either for leisure or business purposes. Tourism is an important sector in the Malaysian economy where tourism development will lead to the positive economic development of the country and in general improve the quality of life for all citizens. Therefore, forecasting tourist arrivals with high accuracy becomes important since it may ensure the development and the readiness of all tourism related industries such as hotels, transportation, food and services industries and their best shape. This study focuses on tourist arrivals in Langkawi Island as one of the major tourist attractions situated in the northerly region of Peninsular Malaysia. Importantly, this paper attempts to measure and compare the performance of forecasting with Exponential Smoothing, ARIMA and ARFIMA models using the R software package.

  9. Jellyfish stings on Langkawi Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Suan, M A; Tan, W L; Soelar, S A; Cheng, H P; Osman, M

    2016-08-01

    Jellyfish stings are the most frequently reported marine animal envenomation worldwide. However, data on jellyfish sting from Malaysia remains obscure due to inadequate research. We investigated the epidemiology, clinical features and treatment of patients presenting at the emergency department of Langkawi Hospital between January 2012 and December 2014. Secondary data on the nature of the incident, patient demographics, clinical presentation, and treatment were retrieved from the patients' medical records. Descriptive statistics were presented for all patient variables. A total of 759 patients presented with jellyfish stings during the 3-year study period, with highest number of visits in July, October, November, and December. The mean patient age was 26.7 years (SD: 12.14), 59.4% were men, 68.1% were foreigners or international tourists, and 40.4% were stung between 12.00 p.m. and 6:59 p.m. At least 90 patients presented with mild Irukandji or Irukandji-like syndromes. Most of the jellyfish stings occurred at Chenang Beach (590 reported cases), followed by Tengah Beach and Kok Beach. Most patients were treated symptomatically, and no deaths following a jellyfish sting was reported during the study period. There is a need for public health interventions for both local and international tourists who visit Langkawi Island. Preventive steps and education on initial treatment at the incident site could elevate public awareness and decrease the adverse effects of jellyfish stings.

  10. Fuzzy weighted average based on left and right scores in Malaysia tourism industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis, Nor Hanimah; Abdullah, Kamilah; Zulkifli, Muhammad Hazim; Sahlan, Shahrazali; Mohd Yunus, Syaizzal

    2013-04-01

    Tourism is known as an important sector to the Malaysian economy including economic generator, creating business and job offers. It is reported to bring in almost RM30 billion of the national income, thanks to intense worldwide promotion by Tourism Malaysia. One of the well-known attractions in Malaysia is our beautiful islands. The islands continue to be developed into tourist spots and attracting a continuous number of tourists. Chalets, luxury bungalows and resorts quickly develop along the coastlines of popular islands like Tioman, Redang, Pangkor, Perhentian, Sibu and so many others. In this study, we applied Fuzzy Weighted Average (FWA) method based on left and right scores in order to determine the criteria weights and to select the best island in Malaysia. Cost, safety, attractive activities, accommodation and scenery are five main criteria to be considered and five selected islands in Malaysia are taken into accounts as alternatives. The most important criteria that have been considered by the tourist are defined based on criteria weights ranking order and the best island in Malaysia is then determined in terms of FWA values. This pilot study can be used as a reference to evaluate performances or solving any selection problems, where more criteria, alternatives and decision makers will be considered in the future.

  11. Spatial Model of Sky Brightness Magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzuan Tahar, Mohammad; Kamarudin, Farahana; Umar, Roslan; Khairul Amri Kamarudin, Mohd; Hazmin Sabri, Nor; Ahmad, Karzaman; Rahim, Sobri Abdul; Sharul Aikal Baharim, Mohd

    2017-03-01

    Sky brightness is an essential topic in the field of astronomy, especially for optical astronomical observations that need very clear and dark sky conditions. This study presents the spatial model of sky brightness magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia. Two types of Sky Quality Meter (SQM) manufactured by Unihedron are used to measure the sky brightness on a moonless night (or when the Moon is below the horizon), when the sky is cloudless and the locations are at least 100 m from the nearest light source. The selected locations are marked by their GPS coordinates. The sky brightness data obtained in this study were interpolated and analyzed using a Geographic Information System (GIS), thus producing a spatial model of sky brightness that clearly shows the dark and bright sky areas in Langkawi Island. Surprisingly, our results show the existence of a few dark sites nearby areas of high human activity. The sky brightness of 21.45 mag arcsec{}-2 in the Johnson-Cousins V-band, as the average of sky brightness equivalent to 2.8 × {10}-4{cd} {{{m}}}-2 over the entire island, is an indication that the island is, overall, still relatively dark. However, the amount of development taking place might reduce the number in the near future as the island is famous as a holiday destination.

  12. Spatial Model of Sky Brightness Magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzuan Tahar, Mohammad; Kamarudin, Farahana; Umar, Roslan; Khairul Amri Kamarudin, Mohd; Sabri, Nor Hazmin; Ahmad, Karzaman; Rahim, Sobri Abdul; Sharul Aikal Baharim, Mohd

    2017-03-01

    Sky brightness is an essential topic in the field of astronomy, especially for optical astronomical observations that need very clear and dark sky conditions. This study presents the spatial model of sky brightness magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia. Two types of Sky Quality Meter (SQM) manufactured by Unihedron are used to measure the sky brightness on a moonless night (or when the Moon is below the horizon), when the sky is cloudless and the locations are at least 100 m from the nearest light source. The selected locations are marked by their GPS coordinates. The sky brightness data obtained in this study were interpolated and analyzed using a Geographic Information System (GIS), thus producing a spatial model of sky brightness that clearly shows the dark and bright sky areas in Langkawi Island. Surprisingly, our results show the existence of a few dark sites nearby areas of high human activity. The sky brightness of 21.45 mag arcsec{}-2 in the Johnson-Cousins V-band, as the average of sky brightness equivalent to 2.8 × {10}-4{cd} {{{m}}}-2 over the entire island, is an indication that the island is, overall, still relatively dark. However, the amount of development taking place might reduce the number in the near future as the island is famous as a holiday destination.

  13. Probabilistic landslide hazards and risk mapping on Penang Island, Malaysia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saro Lee; Biswajeet Pradhan

    2006-12-01

    This paper deals with landslide hazards and risk analysis of Penang Island, Malaysia using Geographic Information System (GIS) and remote sensing data. Landslide locations in the study area were identified from interpretations of aerial photographs and field surveys. Topographical/ geological data and satellite images were collected and processed using GIS and image processing tools. There are ten landslide inducing parameters which are considered for landslide hazard analysis. These parameters are topographic slope, aspect, curvature and distance from drainage, all derived from the topographic database; geology and distance from lineament, derived from the geologic database; landuse from Landsat satellite images; soil from the soil database; precipitation amount, derived from the rainfall database; and the vegetation index value from SPOT satellite images. Landslide susceptibility was analyzed using landslide-occurrence factors employing the probability–frequency ratio model. The results of the analysis were verified using the landslide location data and compared with the probabilistic model. The accuracy observed was 80.03%. The qualitative landslide hazard analysis was carried out using the frequency ratio model through the map overlay analysis in GIS environment. The accuracy of hazard map was 86.41%. Further, risk analysis was done by studying the landslide hazard map and damageable objects at risk. This information could be used to estimate the risk to population, property and existing infrastructure like transportation network.

  14. Fatty acid profiles of fin fish in Langkawi Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Farida; Jaswir, Irwandi; Khaza'ai, Huzwah; Hashim, Ridzwan

    2007-01-01

    Total lipid contents and fatty acid composition of 13 marine fish species namely, "jenahak" (Lutianus agentimaculatus), "kebasi" (Anadontostoma chacunda), "duri" (Arius cumatranus), "tenggiri batang" (Scomberomorus commersoni), "kembong" (Rastrelliger kanagurta), "kintan" or "sebalah" (Psettodes crumei), "kerisi" (Pristipomodes typus), "kerapu" (Epinephelus sexfasciatus), "gelama kling" (Sciaena dussumieri), "malong" (Congresax talabon), "laban" (Cynoglossus lingua), "yu 9" (Scolidon sorrakowah) and "bagi" (Aacnthurs nigrosis) commonly found in Pulau Tuba, one of the islands surrounding the popular tourist destination Langkawi in Malaysia were determined. All fish showed a considerable amount of unsaturated fatty acids particularly those with 4, 5 and 6 double bonds. Two physiologically important n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), i.e. eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docasahaexaenoic acid (DHA), made up of more than 50% of the total PUFAs. For saturated fatty acids, palmitic was found to be the major one in all types of fish studied. Based on DHA, EPA and arachidonic acid (AA) contents, "gelama kling" was found to be the best source (23, 11 and 7%, respectively) followed by "kerapu" (21, 10, 9%) and "sebalah" (19, 14, 4%).

  15. Suspected new wave of muscular sarcocystosis in travellers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, May 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappe, D; Stich, A; Langeheinecke, A; von Sonnenburg, F; Muntau, B; Schäfer, J; Slesak, G

    2014-05-29

    In May 2014, six patients presented in Germany with a Sarcocystis-associated febrile myositis syndrome after returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia. During two earlier waves of infections, in 2011 and 2012, about 100 travellers returning to various European countries from the island were affected. While the first two waves were associated with travel to Tioman Island mostly during the summer months, this current series of infections is associated with travel in early spring, possibly indicating an upcoming new epidemic.

  16. Muscular Sarcocystosis in travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia — 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    In October 2011, the GeoSentinel global surveillance system for travel-related morbidity detected an unusual cluster of illnesses among travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia. Complete information was received for 17 of 32 (53%) patients reported to GeoSentinel; 9 probable and 1 confirmed ...

  17. Contribution of public places in proliferation of dengue vectors in Penang Island, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhaji Hamisu Maimusa

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: It was concluded that public places are good sources of potential container habitats of Aedes mosquitoes in Penang Island, Malaysia and Ae. albopictus has exclusively replaced the home-grown Ae. aegypti even in urban areas. Therefore, treatment of artificial containers in such locations is critical in Aedes mosquito control campaigns during dengue outbreaks.

  18. Integrated Models for Solid Waste Management in Tourism Regions: Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Elmira Shamshiry; Behzad Nadi; Mazlin Bin Mokhtar; Ibrahim Komoo; Halimaton Saadiah Hashim; Nadzri Yahaya

    2011-01-01

    The population growth, changing consumption patterns, and rapid urbanization contribute significantly to the growing volumes of solid waste that are generated in urban settings. As the rate of urbanization increases, demand on the services of solid waste management increases. The rapid urban growth in Langkawi Island, Malaysia, co...

  19. Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normi Idris Azrul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical models are capable of simulating various groundwater scenarios and relate it towards groundwater management. A mesh based density dependent flow model, FEFLOW is used to simulate groundwater flow and transport for a coastal island aquifer in Kg. Salang, Tioman Island, Malaysia. FEFLOW is designed to simulate 2D and 3D, variable density groundwater flow and multi-species transport. The impacts of pumping and recharge rates represented by three different groundwater scenarios, which were investigated by means of hydraulic heads, TDS concentrations and water balance components. Scenario A showed the standard saturated groundwater flow and the steady state fluid flow. Over pumping and inconsistency in recharge rate are the stresses shown in Scenarios B and C. Scenario B involved in the maximum pumping rate of 96m3 per day and recharge rate of 300mm per year has shown a drawdown of 1.5 m. Scenario C showed the extreme pumping rate of 1000m3 per day and without recharge has shown a decrease in groundwater levels of 6.3 m.and groundwater storage (50%. Scenario B presented the most promising finding compared with Scenario C. Highest hydraulic heads, lowest mass concentration and positive groundwater storage (2578.6m3/day were obtained in Scenario B. Additionally, and further progress is needed in obtaining the water usage data from each part to determine the best pumping rate. A sustainable groundwater management plan is crucial to maintain the natural resources and social benefits as well as to protect the ecological balance.

  20. Morphological and Molecular Identification of Holothuria (Merthensiothuria) leucospilota and Stichopus horrens from Pangkor Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, Kamarul Rahim; Rehan, Maryam Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    This preliminary study aimed to identify a commercial gamat species, Stichopus horrens Selenka, 1867, and a timun laut species, Holothuria (Mertensiothuria) leucospilota (Brandt, 1835), from Pangkor Island, Perak, Malaysia, employing morphological techniques based on the shape of the ossicles and molecular techniques based on the cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene. In Malaysia, a gamat is defined as a sea cucumber species of the family Stichopodidae with medicinal value, and timun laut refers to non-gamat species. S. horrens is very popular on Pangkor Island as a main ingredient in the traditional production of air gamat and minyak gamat, while H. leucospilota is the most abundant species in Malaysia. In contrast to previous studies, internal body parts (the respiratory tree and gastrointestine) were examined in this study to obtain better inferences based on morphology. The results showed that there were no ossicles present in the gastrointestine of H. leucospilota, and this characteristic is suggested as a unique diagnostic marker for the timun laut species. In addition, the presence of Y-shaped rods in the respiratory tree of S. horrens subsequently supported the potential to use internal body parts to identify the gamat species. Phylogenetic analysis of the COI mtDNA gene of the sea cucumber specimens using the neighbour-joining method and maximum likelihood methods further confirmed the species status of H. leucospilota and S. horrens from Pangkor Island, Perak, Malaysia. The COI mtDNA gene sequences were registered with GenBank, National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), US National Library of Medicine (GenBank accession no.: KC405565-KC405568). Although additional specimens from various localities will be required to produce more conclusive results, the current findings provide better insight into the importance of complementary approaches involving morphological and molecular techniques in the identification of the two

  1. A new species of Simulium (Gomphostilbia) (Diptera: Simuliidae) from Langkawi Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, H; Sofian-Azirun, M; Ya'cob, Z

    2013-07-01

    ABSTRACT A new black fly species, Simulium (Comphostilbia) langkawiense, is described based on adult female, adult male, pupal, and larval specimens collected from Langkawi Island, Malaysia. This new species is similar in the configuration of the pupal gill to Simulium (Comphostilbia) gombakense Takaoka & Davies, 1995, originally described from Peninsular Malaysia, but differs from the latter species by the female genital fork with an anterolaterally angulated plate on each arm, the female tarsal claw tooth shorter than one half of the claw, the small number of male upper-eye large facets, the ventral plate with its ventral margin nearly flat in the middle when viewed posteriorly, and the inflated structure of the pupal gill with a less produced middle portion (width of middle inflated portion: length of inflated structure = 0.24). Taxonomic notes are also given to separate this new species from two other related species from Nepal and India. This represents another example of a unique species of black fly on one of the continental islands of Peninsular Malaysia.

  2. Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    In this discussion of Malaysia, attention is directed to the following: geography; the people; history; government; political conditions; the economy; defense; foreign relations; and relations between the US and Malaysia. In 1987 Malaysia's population was estimated to be 16.5 million with an annual growth rate of 2.6%. The infant mortality rate is 25/1000 with a life expectancy of 66 years. Peninsular Malaysia borders Thailand in the north and is separated from Singapore in the south by the narrow Johore Strait. About 50% of the area is covered by tropical jungle. The population distribution is uneven, with some 13.5 of the 16.5 million residents concentrated on the Peninsular Malaysia lowlands. The Malays, the largest population group, make up 49%. Nearly 1/3 of the Malaysians are Chinese, and Malaysians of Indian descent comprise slightly over 9% of the population. The early Buddhist Malay kingdom of Srivijaya, based at what currently is Palembang, Sumatra, dominated much of the Malay Peninsula from the 9th to the 13th centuries A.D. Full European control over the sultanates of the Malay Peninsula, Sabah, and Sarawak was not achieved until the latter half of the 19th century. During British control, a well-ordered system of public administration was created, public services were extended, and large-scale rubber and tin production was developed. Colonial rule was interrupted by the Japanese invasion and occupation from 1942-45. Malaysia achieved independence on August 31, 1957, and is a constitutional monarchy, nominally headed by the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, or paramount ruler. The ruler also is the leader of the Islamic faith in Malaysia. Executive power is vested in the Cabinet, led by the prime minister. The Malaysian legal system is based on English common law. The currently ruling Barisan Nasional, formed in 1973, includes 13 parties, among them the chief components of the former Alliance, a coalition of community-based parties. Malaysia's economic record is 1

  3. Assessing the Social Carrying Capacity of Diving Sites in Mabul Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liye; Chung, ShanShan

    2015-12-01

    This study has explored social carrying capacity of an underwater environment based on divers' perceived crowding. Two dimensions were assessed, the number of divers seen and the proximity of diver. Data were obtained from a survey of 132 divers dived in Mabul Island, Malaysia during 2013-2014. Photographs depicting four levels of diver number and four levels of diver proximity in different combinations were shown to the respondents for assessing their acceptability. Between the two variables, the "number of divers" was the most influential factor for divers' perceived crowding. Divers would start to feel unacceptably crowded if 8-9 divers were visible to them at one time. Based on this, it is likely that the use level of diving sites in Mabul Island has already exceeded its social carrying capacity. Implications for future research and diving tourism management for Mabul Island are also discussed in the paper.

  4. Assessing the Social Carrying Capacity of Diving Sites in Mabul Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liye; Chung, ShanShan

    2015-12-01

    This study has explored social carrying capacity of an underwater environment based on divers' perceived crowding. Two dimensions were assessed, the number of divers seen and the proximity of diver. Data were obtained from a survey of 132 divers dived in Mabul Island, Malaysia during 2013-2014. Photographs depicting four levels of diver number and four levels of diver proximity in different combinations were shown to the respondents for assessing their acceptability. Between the two variables, the "number of divers" was the most influential factor for divers' perceived crowding. Divers would start to feel unacceptably crowded if 8-9 divers were visible to them at one time. Based on this, it is likely that the use level of diving sites in Mabul Island has already exceeded its social carrying capacity. Implications for future research and diving tourism management for Mabul Island are also discussed in the paper.

  5. A new species of Simulium (Simulium) (Diptera: Simuliidae) from Langkawi Island, Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd; Ya'cob, Zubaidah

    2012-11-01

    Simulium (Simulium) kisapense sp. nov. is described on the basis of reared adult, pupal, and larval specimens collected from Langkawi Island, Peninsular Malaysia, and placed in the multi-striatum species-group in the subgenus Simulium. This new species is characterized by the bare basal section of the female radial vein, the male ventral plate with setae, the eight pupal gill filaments divergent at an angle of >90 degrees, and the shoe-shaped cocoon with small lateral window(s). Taxonomic notes are given to separate this new species from S. (S.) hirtinervis Edwards and S. (S.) malayense Takaoka and Davies, both from Peninsular Malaysia, and several other known species from Bhutan, India, Nepal, and Thailand.

  6. ROAD TRAFFIC NUISANCE IN RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL AREAS IN MALAYSIA: A CASE STUDY IN PINANG ISLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDELNASR OMRAN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Developing cities often face critical air pollution problems due to the rapid growth of transportation and industry sources. Some centers in Pinang Island are currently facing high levels of air pollution as a result of economic and industrial growth. Decisions with regard to industry, transportation, and development will affect air pollution and health both in the short-term and in the far future through climate change. Thus, this paper is investigated the road traffic nuisance in residential and commercial areas within Pinang Island (Malaysia. Information and Data were collected through questionnaire surveys on 50 residents within the selected major areas in the Island which is located in the north part of Malaysia. As results, it has proven that traffic caused air pollution especially in commercial and business areas. The environment in these areas has worsened due toexhaust emissions from motor vehicles. The traffic nuisance in the survey areas showed that the food and beverage outlets are mostly affected by the air pollution compared to other type of business.

  7. Impact of coastal development on mangrove cover in Kilim river,Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Shahbudin; A.Zuhairi; B.Y.Kamaruzzaman

    2012-01-01

    We examined the impact of various coastal developments on mangrove cover along the Kilim River,Langkawi Island,Malaysia between 1996 and 2008.We analysed images from Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Tarre (SPOT) of Kilim River using supervised classification and Principal Component Analysis (PCA).Over 8% (176.83 ha) of mangrove cover was degraded along the Kilim River from its total area of 2153.07 ha during the past 14 years.We identified several causes of mangrove degradation,including mangrove clearing (38%),mangrove conversion to commercial area (21%),residential area (19%),agriculture (12%),aquaculture (12%) and wake current (6%).Langkawi is one of the main tourism islands in Malaysia.Tthe pace of coastal development throughout the entire island including Kilim River had suppressed the mangroves propagation over the years.Long term monitoring of mangrove ecosystems is essentials to ensure the survival and sustainability of mangrove associated biodiversity.

  8. INVESTIGATING THE STANDARD PROCESS OF INCINERATION IN LANGKAWI ISLAND, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shamshiry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Development activities and increasing urbanization have direct impact on solid waste generation, especially in municipalities of the developing countries, which poses a major challenge to the authorities. Many various technologies and strategies can be used in the field of garbage procedures. Incineration is a well-organized approach and tool to decrease the volume of waste and insist for additional landfill area. One of the important benefits of using the incineration is its ability to decrease a significant amount of waste combustibles by 80 to 95%. Controlling air pollution in the process of using the incineration poses a challenge for solid waste disposal. The data utilized in this article include personal interview of the experts handling the incineration process in Langkawi and personal observation. Secondary data obtained from the Ministry of Housing and Local Government was used to investigate the external air pollution from using the incinerator in Langkawi. The results showed, through the analysis of raw data with SPSS IBM 19 and Pearson correlation analysis and identify cluster of dendrogram generated by UPGMA, an external pollution minimum (p<0.05 between sampling sites inside the incinerator. The reasons for the difference are related to untimely and inappropriate opening of the combustion chamber door, exorbitance blowing and improper use of the installed air pollution control devices. The proper treatment of solid waste is very crucial, especially in Langkawi Island which is a tourist destination. The use of incinerator can enhance solid waste treatment, but only when the standard operating procedure is observed. Without properly observing the procedure, the use of an incinerator can cause more environmental and personal health issues like air pollution and the releasing of hazardous waste and clinical waste s into the landfill. These are some of the reasons that motivated this study to investigate the use of incineration in

  9. Hydrogeochemistry Characteristics in Kampong Salang, Tioman Island, Pahang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, A. N.; Aris, A. Z.; Praveena, S. M.; Suratman, S.; Tawnie, I.; Samsuddin, M. K. N.; Sefei, A.

    2016-07-01

    The constituents of major ions of groundwater samples has been used to identify the chemical characteristics and the type of groundwater in the low lying area in Kampong Salang located at north-west of Tioman Island in Pahang state. This study aimed to identify the groundwater quality with some geochemical process and to understand groundwater characteristics in the low-lying aquifer of the study area. From that, fourty two (42) groundwater samples were collected and analysed for various parameters. Physical and chemical parameters of groundwater such as pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS), Ca, Na, Mg, K, HCO3, Cl, SO4, NO3, CO3, were determined. TDS did not exceed 1,000 mg/l with a maximum of 359 mg/l for sampling activities. Generally, groundwater in the study area is fresh, based on the analytical results. Hydrochemical facies of groundwater in the study area are dominated by Ca-HCO3 and Ca-Mg-HCO3 water type. A software known as PHREEQC was used to calculate the saturation indices for the main mineral phases with respect to carbonate and sulphate minerals. Most of the minerals were saturated to undersaturated with respect to carbonate minerals and undersaturated with respect to sulphate minerals composition. Maximum ionic strength in the study area is 0.009 which was found 90 m from the sea. Mostly minerals from calcite and dolomite precipitation are from bedrock of pyroxene hornfel.

  10. Integrated Models for Solid Waste Management in Tourism Regions: Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmira Shamshiry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The population growth, changing consumption patterns, and rapid urbanization contribute significantly to the growing volumes of solid waste that are generated in urban settings. As the rate of urbanization increases, demand on the services of solid waste management increases. The rapid urban growth in Langkawi Island, Malaysia, combined with the increasing rates of solid waste production has provided evidence that the traditional solid waste management practices, particularly the methods of waste collection and disposal, are inefficient and quite nonsustainable. Accordingly, municipal managers and planners in Langkawi need to look for and adopt a model for solid waste management that emphasizes an efficient and sustainable management of solid wastes in Langkawi Island. This study presents the current practices of solid waste management in Langkawi Island, describes the composition of the solid waste generated in that area, and presents views of local residents and tourist on issues related to solid waste management like the aesthetic value of the island environment. The most important issue of this paper is that it is the first time that integrated solid waste management is investigated in the Langkawi Island.

  11. Integrated Models for Solid Waste Management in Tourism Regions: Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshiry, Elmira; Nadi, Behzad; Bin Mokhtar, Mazlin; Komoo, Ibrahim; Saadiah Hashim, Halimaton; Yahaya, Nadzri

    2011-01-01

    The population growth, changing consumption patterns, and rapid urbanization contribute significantly to the growing volumes of solid waste that are generated in urban settings. As the rate of urbanization increases, demand on the services of solid waste management increases. The rapid urban growth in Langkawi Island, Malaysia, combined with the increasing rates of solid waste production has provided evidence that the traditional solid waste management practices, particularly the methods of waste collection and disposal, are inefficient and quite nonsustainable. Accordingly, municipal managers and planners in Langkawi need to look for and adopt a model for solid waste management that emphasizes an efficient and sustainable management of solid wastes in Langkawi Island. This study presents the current practices of solid waste management in Langkawi Island, describes the composition of the solid waste generated in that area, and presents views of local residents and tourist on issues related to solid waste management like the aesthetic value of the island environment. The most important issue of this paper is that it is the first time that integrated solid waste management is investigated in the Langkawi Island. PMID:21904559

  12. Evaluation of Factors Influencing the Groundwater Chemistry in a Small Tropical Island of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nura Umar Kura

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater chemistry of small tropical islands is influenced by many factors, such as recharge, weathering and seawater intrusion, among others, which interact with each other in a very complex way. In this work, multivariate statistical analysis was used to evaluate the factors controlling the groundwater chemistry of Kapas Island (Malaysia. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to 17 hydrochemical parameters from 108 groundwater samples obtained from 18 sampling sites. PCA extracted four PCs, namely seawater intrusion, redox reaction, anthropogenic pollution and weather factors, which collectively were responsible for more than 87% of the total variance of the island’s hydrochemistry. The cluster analysis indicated that three factors (weather, redox reaction and seawater intrusion controlled the hydrochemistry of the area, and the variables were allocated to three groups based on similarity. A Piper diagram classified the island’s water types into Ca-HCO3 water type, Na-HCO3 water type, Na-SO4-Cl water type and Na-Cl water type, indicating recharge, mixed, weathering and leached from sewage and seawater intrusion, respectively. This work will provide policy makers and land managers with knowledge of the precise water quality problems affecting the island and can also serve as a guide for hydrochemistry assessments of other islands that share similar characteristics with the island in question.

  13. Integrated models for solid waste management in tourism regions: Langkawi Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshiry, Elmira; Nadi, Behzad; Mokhtar, Mazlin Bin; Komoo, Ibrahim; Hashim, Halimaton Saadiah; Yahaya, Nadzri

    2011-01-01

    The population growth, changing consumption patterns, and rapid urbanization contribute significantly to the growing volumes of solid waste that are generated in urban settings. As the rate of urbanization increases, demand on the services of solid waste management increases. The rapid urban growth in Langkawi Island, Malaysia, combined with the increasing rates of solid waste production has provided evidence that the traditional solid waste management practices, particularly the methods of waste collection and disposal, are inefficient and quite nonsustainable. Accordingly, municipal managers and planners in Langkawi need to look for and adopt a model for solid waste management that emphasizes an efficient and sustainable management of solid wastes in Langkawi Island. This study presents the current practices of solid waste management in Langkawi Island, describes the composition of the solid waste generated in that area, and presents views of local residents and tourist on issues related to solid waste management like the aesthetic value of the island environment. The most important issue of this paper is that it is the first time that integrated solid waste management is investigated in the Langkawi Island.

  14. Notes from the field: acute muscular sarcocystosis among returning travelers - Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    GeoSentinel (the surveillance program of the International Society of Travel Medicine and CDC) has identified 32 cases of suspected acute muscular sarcocystosis in travelers returning from Tioman Island off the east coast of peninsular Malaysia. All the patients traveled to Tioman Island during the summer of 2011. Within days or weeks of returning home, all experienced fever and muscle pain, often severe and prolonged. All had peripheral eosinophilia, and most had elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase levels. Most were tested for acute trichinosis and toxoplasmosis by serology, and all of these tests were negative. Approximately half of the patients were identified in Germany; others were reported elsewhere in Europe, and in North America and Asia. Muscle biopsy from two patients demonstrated organisms consistent with sarcocystosis, one from a group of five ill travelers and one from a group of three.

  15. Landslide hazard mapping with selected dominant factors: A study case of Penang Island, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, Lea Tien; Alkhasawneh, Mutasem Sh.; Ngah, Umi Kalthum [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Lateh, Habibah [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11600 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Landslide is one of the destructive natural geohazards in Malaysia. In addition to rainfall as triggering factos for landslide in Malaysia, topographical and geological factors play important role in the landslide susceptibility analysis. Conventional topographic factors such as elevation, slope angle, slope aspect, plan curvature and profile curvature have been considered as landslide causative factors in many research works. However, other topographic factors such as diagonal length, surface area, surface roughness and rugosity have not been considered, especially for the research work in landslide hazard analysis in Malaysia. This paper presents landslide hazard mapping using Frequency Ratio (FR) and the study area is Penang Island of Malaysia. Frequency ratio approach is a variant of probabilistic method that is based on the observed relationships between the distribution of landslides and each landslide-causative factor. Landslide hazard map of Penang Island is produced by considering twenty-two (22) landslide causative factors. Among these twenty-two (22) factors, fourteen (14) factors are topographic factors. They are elevation, slope gradient, slope aspect, plan curvature, profile curvature, general curvature, tangential curvature, longitudinal curvature, cross section curvature, total curvature, diagonal length, surface area, surface roughness and rugosity. These topographic factors are extracted from the digital elevation model of Penang Island. The other eight (8) non-topographic factors considered are land cover, vegetation cover, distance from road, distance from stream, distance from fault line, geology, soil texture and rainfall precipitation. After considering all twenty-two factors for landslide hazard mapping, the analysis is repeated with fourteen dominant factors which are selected from the twenty-two factors. Landslide hazard map was segregated into four categories of risks, i.e. Highly hazardous area, Hazardous area, Moderately hazardous area

  16. Mosquito Biology and Mosquito-Borne Disease Awareness Among Island Communities In Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafie, Aziz; Roslan, Muhammad Aidil; Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian; Sulaiman, Wan Yusoff Wan

    2016-12-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases have been increasing at an alarming rate over the past decades. In Malaysia, one finds several important mosquito-borne diseases such as Japanese encephalitis, dengue, malaria, and chikungunya. Mosquito surveillance and control programs are the most effective way of detecting and controlling mosquito-borne diseases, but these programs are less effective without an aware and well-informed general public. In 2014 we used a questionnaire to evaluate the extent of awareness of basic mosquito biology and mosquito-borne diseases in 6 villages, Kampung Masjid, Kampung Teluk Gedung, Kampung Teluk Dalam, Kampung Ujung Kelawai, Kampung Sungai Pinang Besar, and Kampung Sungai Pinang Kechil on Pangkor Island, Malaysia. A total of 1,012 individuals responded to the questionnaire, consisting of 790 Malay (78.1%), 164 Chinese (16.2%), and 58 Indian (5.7%). More than 60% (Malay = 73.7%, Chinese = 64.0%, Indian = 79.3%) of the respondents were familiar with basic mosquito biology and practiced personal protection against mosquito bites, and the association was statistically significant (P = 0.02). However, the majority of the respondents had limited knowledge on mosquito-borne diseases, and this varied significantly among the 3 ethnic groups (P = 0.0001). Our recommendations are to improve and intensify public health education outreach programs to the island residents and to encourage community participation in vector control programs.

  17. Ongoing outbreak of an acute muscular Sarcocystis-like illness among travellers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, D H; Freedman, D O; Neumayr, A; Parola, P

    2012-11-08

    As of 4 November, 2012, 100 patients with an acute muscular Sarcocystis-like illness associated with travel to Tioman Island, Malaysia, have been identified. Thirty-five travelled there mostly during July and August 2011 and 65 mostly during July and August 2012, suggesting an ongoing outbreak. Epidemiological investigations are ongoing. Public health agencies and practicing clinicians should be aware of this rarely-reported disease in humans and consider it as differential diagnosis in travellers returning from Tioman Island.

  18. The earwig fauna (Insecta: Dermaptera) of Penang Island, Malaysia, with descriptions of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Yoshitaka; Nishikawa, Masaru; Lee, Chow-Yang

    2016-02-25

    The earwig (Dermaptera) fauna of Penang Island, Malaysia, was evaluated by means of an extensive field survey together with revision of the few published data. Based on the results of the field survey, 31 species are recognized (2 Diplatyidae, 3 Pygidicranidae, 5 Anisolabididae, 2 Labiduridae, 14 Spongiphoridae, 4 Chelisochidae, 1 Forficulidae). Fifteen of these taxa are new to Peninsular Malaysia (=West Malaysia): Diplatys annandalei Burr, 1911, Diplatys mutiara n. sp., Euborellia philippinensis Srivastava, 1979, Metisolabis punctata (Dubrony, 1879), Pseudovostox brindlei Srivastava, 2003, Chaetospania anderssoni Brindle, 1971, Chaetospania javana Borelli, 1926, Chaetospania huisiangi n. sp., Paralabellula boettcheri (Borelli, 1923), Paralabellula rotundifrons (Hincks, 1954), Nesogaster amoenus (Stål, 1855), Hamaxas crassus Borelli, 1926, Proreus coalescens (Borelli, 1927), Hypurgus humeralis (Kirby, 1891), and an unidentified Echinosoma sp. Species composition of the island are compared with the dermapteran fauna of Thailand. Descriptions of females (or female genitalia) are given for some species for the first time.

  19. Ecological carrying capacity assessment of diving site: A case study of Mabul Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Ye; Chung, Shan-Shan; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2016-12-01

    Despite considered a non-consumptive use of the marine environment, diving-related activities can cause damages to coral reefs. It is imminent to assess the maximum numbers of divers that can be accommodated by a diving site before it is subject to irreversible deterioration. This study aimed to assess the ecological carrying capacity of a diving site in Mabul Island, Malaysia. Photo-quadrat line transect method was used in the benthic survey. The ecological carrying capacity was assessed based on the relationship between the number of divers and the proportion of diver damaged hard corals in Mabul Island. The results indicated that the proportion of diver damaged hard corals occurred exponentially with increasing use. The ecological carrying capacity of Mabul Island is 15,600-16,800 divers per diving site per year at current levels of diver education and training with a quarterly threshold of 3900-4200 per site. Our calculation shows that management intervention (e.g. limiting diving) is justified at 8-14% of hard coral damage. In addition, the use of coral reef dominated diving sites should be managed according to their sensitivity to diver damage and the depth of the reefs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    The 1984 Current Population Estimates on 2 Malaysian states, Sabah and Sarawak, has just been published by the Department of Statistics. This report, which describes population trends between 1980-84, is part of a new series aimed at providing information on current population estimates. The population of Sabah grew at an annual rate of 3.7% in 1980-84, while growth rates were 2.4% for Sarawak and 2.5% for Peninsular Malaysia. Of sabah's 1984 population of 1.2 million, 1 million were classified as indigenous persons and .2 million were Chinese. In Sarawak the population was 1.4 million, 1 million of whom were indigenous and .4 million were Chinese. 39% of Sarawak's 1984 population consisted of persons below 15 years of age and 4% were age 65 years or over. In Sabah, these proportions were 44% and 2%, respectively. Also recently published is a population report for the state of Melake based on data from the 1980 Census. According to the Census, Melaka had a population of 464,754 persons, representing 3.4% of Malaysia's total population of 13.7 million. The Census enumerated 81,102 households, with an average of 5.4 persons in each. During the 1970-80 intercensal period, Melaka's annual growth rate was 1%. About 23% of the population lived in urban areas. The median age of the population was 19.4 years in 1980, which is 2.9 years older than in 1970. The total fertility rate was 4/woman in 1980. 65% of those aged 12 years and over had completed a primary education, and 77% of those aged 10 years and over were literate.

  1. Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    The official government policy in Malaysia is to reduce the rate of population growth through decreasing fertility levels and a program of economic and social restructuring. Population policy was conceived as encompassing wider dimensions than family planning, with emphasis on spatial distribution policies. The first Population and Housing Census was undertaken by the government in 1970. Regular decennial census taking occurred between 1891 and 1957. Birth and death registrations are considered incomplete. Population issues are integrated by various organizations into their ongoing programs such as those of the Ministries of Health, Education or Agriculture. The National Family Planning Board, an interministerial body in the Prime Minister's Department, has input from development planning units. A population studies group was established within the Economic Planning Unit. The total 1980 population was 13,640,000; the rate of population growth was 2.6 from 1975-80. Life expectancy was 61.3. Morbidity and mortality rates have dropped because of disease control and malnutrition reduction. 7.4% of the population are foreign born. Spatial distribution is to be adjusted through rural land development and resettlement; promotion of industrial development in low-income states; development of new growth centers and towns; and, urban development and renewal.

  2. Hydrochemical changes in a small tropical island's aquifer: Manukan Island, Sabah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aris, A. Z.; Abdullah, M. H.; Kim, K. W.; Praveena, S. M.

    2009-02-01

    Small islands groundwater are often exposed to heavy pumpings as a result of high demand for freshwater consumption. Intensive exploitation of groundwater from Manukan Island’s aquifer has disturbed the natural equilibrium between fresh and saline water, and has resulted increase the groundwater salinity and leap to the hydrochemical complexities of freshwater-seawater contact. An attempt was made to identify the hydrochemical processes that accompany current intrusion of seawater using ionic changes and saturation indices. It was observed that the mixing between freshwater-seawater created diversity in geochemical processes of the Manukan Island’s aquifer and altered the freshwater and seawater mixture away from the theoretical composition line. This explained the most visible processes taking place during the displacement.

  3. Dive Tourism and Local Communities: Active Participation or Subject to Impacts?Case Studies from Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Daldeniz, Bilge; Hampton, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Dive tourism impacts were examined in three Malaysian islands: Perhentian(backpackers), Redang (package tourism) and Mabul (upmarket dive tourism). Qualitative local participation approaches were applied to investigate whether host communities were merely reactive to dive tourism’s impacts. Dive tourism affected many aspects of community life. Besides physical/environmental impacts (new infrastructure), research found varied economic impacts including employment/business opportunities and dif...

  4. Temporal and spatial distribution of dengue vector mosquitoes and their habitat patterns in Penang Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifur, Rahman G M; Hassan, Ahmad Abu; Dieng, Hamady; Salmah, Md Rawi Che; Saad, Ahmad Ramli; Satho, Tomomitsu

    2013-03-01

    We studied the diversity of Aedes breeding sites in various urban, suburban, and rural areas over time between February 2009 and February 2010 in the dengue endemic areas of Penang Island, Malaysia. We categorized the breeding sites and efficiency, and identified the key breeding containers. Among the 3 areas, the rural areas produced the highest container index (55), followed by suburban (42) and urban (32) areas. The numbers of key premises and containers were significantly higher (P < 0.000) in rural areas. The class 1 containers were identified as the key containers with higher productivity and efficiency, although class 2 and class 4 are the highest in numbers. Aedes aegypti immatures were found mostly in drums, water reservoirs, and polyethylene sheets, while mixed breeding was more common in buckets and empty paint cans in urban and suburban areas. Aedes albopictus was found mainly in miscellaneous containers such as drums, empty paint cans, and covers in all areas. The main potential containers indoors were drums, water reservoirs, and empty paint cans, and containers outdoors included empty paint cans, drums, and polyethylene sheets.

  5. Haze event monitoring and investigation in Penang Island, Malaysia using a ground-based backscatter Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, W. S.; Tan, F.; Lim, H. S.; Matjafri, M. Z.

    2014-06-01

    During 24th July 2013 to 1st August 2013, a haze event struck Penang Island, causing the visibility to decrease and increase in Air Pollution Index (API). A ground-based backscatter Lidar, operate at 355 nm which was setup at the roof top of the School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia. It was used to monitor and investigate the haze event. For this work, we studied the daytime variation of the aerosol intensity, distribution, planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) values during these days. We found that the aerosol are very intense during the first two days of the haze event and slowly decline as time passed. Finally the haze event died off on 1st August 2013. As for daily aerosol distribution, aerosols are generally more intense during the afternoon. Its intensity is slightly lower in the morning and evening. Similar trends were observed for AOD values as they increase from morning to afternoon and slowly decrease in the evening. Most aerosols are found contained below the PBL which generally found at around 1000 - 2000 m in height.

  6. Long-Term Assessment of an Innovative Mangrove Rehabilitation Project: Case Study on Carey Island, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Motamedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wave energy and storm surges threaten coastal ecology and nearshore infrastructures. Although coastal structures are conventionally constructed to dampen the wave energy, they introduce tremendous damage to the ecology of the coast. To minimize environmental impact, ecofriendly coastal protection schemes should be introduced. In this paper, we discuss an example of an innovative mangrove rehabilitation attempt to restore the endangered mangroves on Carey Island, Malaysia. A submerged detached breakwater system was constructed to dampen the energy of wave and trap the sediments behind the structure. Further, a large number of mangrove seedlings were planted using different techniques. Further, we assess the possibility of success for a future mangrove rehabilitation project at the site in the context of sedimentology, bathymetry, and hydrogeochemistry. The assessment showed an increase in the amount of silt and clay, and the seabed was noticeably elevated. The nutrient concentration, the pH value, and the salinity index demonstrate that the site is conducive in establishing mangrove seedlings. As a result, we conclude that the site is now ready for attempts to rehabilitate the lost mangrove forest.

  7. Using satellite remote sensing to monitor the total suspended solids (TSS) over Penang Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, K.; Mohd. Saleh, N.

    2008-10-01

    Total suspended solid (TSS) is a major factor affecting water quality in aquatic ecosystem. An investigation has been conducted to test the feasibility of using SPOT 5 data for estimating TSS in the coastal waters of Penang Island, Malaysia. Atmospheric correction of the satellite measurements is critical for aquatic remote sensing. Atmospheric correction of the remotely sensed image was performed using the ENVI FLAASH. Water samples were collected simultaneously with the satellite image acquisition and later analyzed in the laboratory. The digital numbers for each band corresponding to the sea-truth locations were extracted and then converted into reflectance values. The variables of the reflectance were used for calibration of the water quality algorithm. Regression technique was employed to calibrate the algorithm using the SPOT multispectral signals. An algorithm was developed based on the reflectance model, which is a function of the inherent optical properties of water that can be related to the concentration of its constituents. Spatial distribution map of the water quality parameter was produced using the calibrated algorithm. The efficiency of the present algorithm, in comparison to other forms of algorithm, was also investigated. Finally, the TSS map was generated using the proposed algorithm.

  8. Application of THEOS for PM10 mapping over Penang Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, K.

    2010-11-01

    We had explored the relationship between particulate matters of size less than 10 micron (PM10) derived from the THEOS using regression technique over Penang Island, Malaysia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the high spatial resolution satellite data for air quality mapping. The development of the algorithm was based on the optical aerosol characteristic in the atmosphere. PM10 measurements were collected simultaneously with the image acquisition using a DustTrak Aerosol Monitor 8520. The station locations of the PM10 measurements were determined using a handheld GPS. The retrieval of surface reflectance is important to obtain the atmospheric reflectance in remotely sensed data and later used for algorithm calibration. In this study, ACTOR3 was used to retrieve the surface reflectance values from remotely sensed data. The surface reflectance values for the visible wavelengths of THEOS data was determined based on the Landsat TM data that acquired same date, nearly same time with the THEOS data. The relationship between the image reflectance values and the corresponding air quality data was determined using regression analysis. Various forms of algorithms were tested and their accuracies were noted. The algorithm that produced the highest correlation coefficient (R) and lowest root-mean-square error (RMS) was used for further analysis. Results show that the digital camera imageries can be used for estimating PM10 accurately. This study shows the potential of using the THEOS data for air quality mapping.

  9. Permian ultrafelsic A-type granite from Besar Islands group, Johor, peninsular Malaysia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Azman A Ghani; Fatin Izzani Hazad; Azmiah Jamil; Quek Long Xiang; Wan Nur Atiqah Wan Ismail; Sun-Lin Chung; Yu-Ming Lai; Muhammad Hatta Roselee; Nur Islami; Kyaw Kyaw Nyein; Meor Hakif Amir Hassan; Mohd Farid Abu Bakar; Mohd Rozi Umor

    2014-12-01

    The granitic rocks of the peninsula have traditionally been divided into two provinces, i.e., Western and Eastern provinces, corresponding to S- and I-type granite respectively. The Western Province granite is characterised by megacrystic and coarse-grained biotite, tin-mineralised, continental collision granite, whereas, the Eastern Province granite is bimodal I-type dominated by granodiorite and associated gabbroic of arc type granite. This paper reports the occurrence of an A-type granite from peninsular Malaysia. The rocks occur in the Besar, Tengah, and Hujung islands located in the southeastern part of the peninsula. The granite is highly felsic with SiO2 ranging from 75.70% to 77.90% (differentiation index = 94.2–97.04). It is weakly peraluminous (average ACNK=1.02), has normative hypersthene (0.09–2.19%) and high alkali content (8.32–8.60%). The granites have many A-type characteristics, among them are shallow level of emplacement, high Ga, FeT/MgO and low P, Sr, Ti, CaO and Nb. Calculated zircon saturation temperatures for the Besar magma ranging from 793° to 806°C is consistent with high temperature partial melting of a felsic infracrustal source which is taken as one of the mechanisms to produce A-type magma. The occurrence of the A-type granite can be related to the extensional back arc basin in the Indo-China terrane during the earliest Permian.

  10. Acute muscular sarcocystosis: an international investigation among ill travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Douglas H; Stich, August; Epelboin, Loïc; Malvy, Denis; Han, Pauline V; Bottieau, Emmanuel; da Silva, Alexandre; Zanger, Philipp; Slesak, Günther; van Genderen, Perry J J; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Cramer, Jakob P; Visser, Leo G; Muñoz, José; Drew, Clifton P; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Steiner, Florian; Wagner, Noémie; Grobusch, Martin P; Plier, D Adam; Tappe, Dennis; Sotir, Mark J; Brown, Clive; Brunette, Gary W; Fayer, Ronald; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Neumayr, Andreas; Kozarsky, Phyllis E

    2014-11-15

    Through 2 international traveler-focused surveillance networks (GeoSentinel and TropNet), we identified and investigated a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS), a rarely reported zoonosis caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Sarcocystis, associated with travel to Tioman Island, Malaysia, during 2011-2012. Clinicians reporting patients with suspected AMS to GeoSentinel submitted demographic, clinical, itinerary, and exposure data. We defined a probable case as travel to Tioman Island after 1 March 2011, eosinophilia (>5%), clinical or laboratory-supported myositis, and negative trichinellosis serology. Case confirmation required histologic observation of sarcocysts or isolation of Sarcocystis species DNA from muscle biopsy. Sixty-eight patients met the case definition (62 probable and 6 confirmed). All but 2 resided in Europe; all were tourists and traveled mostly during the summer months. The most frequent symptoms reported were myalgia (100%), fatigue (91%), fever (82%), headache (59%), and arthralgia (29%); onset clustered during 2 distinct periods: "early" during the second and "late" during the sixth week after departure from the island. Blood eosinophilia and elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were observed beginning during the fifth week after departure. Sarcocystis nesbitti DNA was recovered from 1 muscle biopsy. Clinicians evaluating travelers returning ill from Malaysia with myalgia, with or without fever, should consider AMS, noting the apparent biphasic aspect of the disease, the later onset of elevated CPK and eosinophilia, and the possibility for relapses. The exact source of infection among travelers to Tioman Island remains unclear but needs to be determined to prevent future illnesses. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Acute Muscular Sarcocystosis: An International Investigation Among Ill Travelers Returning From Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Douglas H.; Stich, August; Epelboin, Loïc; Malvy, Denis; Han, Pauline V.; Bottieau, Emmanuel; da Silva, Alexandre; Zanger, Philipp; Slesak, Günther; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Rosenthal, Benjamin M.; Cramer, Jakob P.; Visser, Leo G.; Muñoz, José; Drew, Clifton P.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Steiner, Florian; Wagner, Noémie; Grobusch, Martin P.; Plier, D. Adam; Tappe, Dennis; Sotir, Mark J.; Brown, Clive; Brunette, Gary W.; Fayer, Ronald; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Neumayr, Andreas; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Through 2 international traveler-focused surveillance networks (GeoSentinel and TropNet), we identified and investigated a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS), a rarely reported zoonosis caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Sarcocystis, associated with travel to Tioman Island, Malaysia, during 2011–2012. Methods Clinicians reporting patients with suspected AMS to GeoSentinel submitted demographic, clinical, itinerary, and exposure data. We defined a probable case as travel to Tioman Island after 1 March 2011, eosinophilia (>5%), clinical or laboratory-supported myositis, and negative trichinellosis serology. Case confirmation required histologic observation of sarcocysts or isolation of Sarcocystis species DNA from muscle biopsy. Results Sixty-eight patients met the case definition (62 probable and 6 confirmed). All but 2 resided in Europe; all were tourists and traveled mostly during the summer months. The most frequent symptoms reported were myalgia (100%), fatigue (91%), fever (82%), headache (59%), and arthralgia (29%); onset clustered during 2 distinct periods: “early” during the second and “late” during the sixth week after departure from the island. Blood eosinophilia and elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were observed beginning during the fifth week after departure. Sarcocystis nesbitti DNA was recovered from 1 muscle biopsy. Conclusions Clinicians evaluating travelers returning ill from Malaysia with myalgia, with or without fever, should consider AMS, noting the apparent biphasic aspect of the disease, the later onset of elevated CPK and eosinophilia, and the possibility for relapses. The exact source of infection among travelers to Tioman Island remains unclear but needs to be determined to prevent future illnesses. PMID:25091309

  12. Intercomparison of two haze events observed using a ground-based backscatter lidar in Penang Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Wan Shen; Khor, Wei Ying; Lim, Hwee San; Jafri, Mohamad Zubir Mat

    2015-04-01

    A ground-based backscatter Lidar, operating at 355nm was setup at the roof top of School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia to study the aerosol content around Penang Island. During the operation of the Lidar, it had successfully obtained information on two haze events that struck Penang Island, which occurred during the month of July 2013 and March 2014, respectively. It was found that these two haze events showed different characteristics, such as the numbers and thickness of the aerosol layers. Multiple layers of aerosol were found in haze event during March 2014 and the aerosol layers were very thick. In contrast, only a single layer of aerosol was found in the haze event during July 2013 and the aerosol layer was relatively thin. Columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) of these two haze events also showed some differences. Columnar AOD for the haze event occurred in July 2013 varied between 1.00±0.11 to 1.82±0.01, while columnar AOD for haze event occurred during March 2014 varied between 0.47±0.15 to 3.03±0.05. Finally, by combining HYSPLIT backtrajectories and MODIS satellite data, the possible origin of the haze aerosol was determined. It was found that the haze aerosol is either produced inside Malaysia or by neighboring countries which was later brought to Penang by monsoon wind.

  13. Spectral and spatial resolution analysis of multi sensor satellite data for coral reef mapping: Tioman Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet; Kabiri, Keivan

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes an assessment of coral reef mapping using multi sensor satellite images such as Landsat ETM, SPOT and IKONOS images for Tioman Island, Malaysia. The study area is known to be one of the best Islands in South East Asia for its unique collection of diversified coral reefs and serves host to thousands of tourists every year. For the coral reef identification, classification and analysis, Landsat ETM, SPOT and IKONOS images were collected processed and classified using hierarchical classification schemes. At first, Decision tree classification method was implemented to separate three main land cover classes i.e. water, rural and vegetation and then maximum likelihood supervised classification method was used to classify these main classes. The accuracy of the classification result is evaluated by a separated test sample set, which is selected based on the fieldwork survey and view interpretation from IKONOS image. Few types of ancillary data in used are: (a) DGPS ground control points; (b) Water quality parameters measured by Hydrolab DS4a; (c) Sea-bed substrates spectrum measured by Unispec and; (d) Landcover observation photos along Tioman island coastal area. The overall accuracy of the final classification result obtained was 92.25% with the kappa coefficient is 0.8940. Key words: Coral reef, Multi-spectral Segmentation, Pixel-Based Classification, Decision Tree, Tioman Island

  14. Species composition, diversity and relative abundance of amphibians in forests and non-forest habitats on Langkawi Island, Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur Johana, J.; Muzzneena, A. M.; Grismer, L. L.; Norhayati, A.

    2016-11-01

    Anurans on Langkawi Island, Peninsular Malaysia exhibit variation in their habits and forms, ranging from small (SVL 150 mm), and occupy a range of habitats, such as riverine forests, agricultural fields, peat swamps, and lowland and upland dipterocarp forests. These variations provide a platform to explore species diversity, distribution, abundance, microhabitat, and other ecological parameters to understand the distribution patterns and to facilitate conservation and management of sensitive or important species and areas. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diversity and distribution of anuran species in different types of habitat on Langkawi Island. Specimens were collected based on active sampling using the Visual Encounter Survey (VES) method. We surveyed anuran species inhabiting seven types of habitat, namely agriculture (AG), coastal (CL), forest (FT), pond (PD), mangrove (MG), riparian forest (RF) and river (RV). A total of 775 individuals were sampled from all localities, representing 23 species from 12 genera and included all six families of frogs in Malaysia. FT and RF showed high values of Shannon Index, H', 2.60 and 2.38, respectively, followed by the other types of habitat, CL (1.82), RV (1.71), MG (1.56), PD (1.54), and AG (1.53). AG had the highest abundance (156 individuals) compared to other habitat types. Based on Cluster Analysis by using Jaccard coefficient (UPGMA), two groups can be clearly seen and assigned as forested species group (FT and RF) and species associating with human activity (AG, CL, PD, MG and RV). Forest species group is more diverse compared to non-forest group. Nevertheless, non-forest species are found in abundance, highlighting the relevance of these disturbed habitats in supporting the amphibians.

  15. Technical Study of a Standalone Photovoltaic-Wind Energy Based Hybrid Power Supply Systems for Island Electrification in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahidul Hoque Samrat

    Full Text Available Energy is one of the most important factors in the socioeconomic development of a country. In a developing country like Malaysia, the development of islands is mostly related to the availability of electric power. Power generated by renewable energy sources has recently become one of the most promising solutions for the electrification of islands and remote rural areas. But high dependency on weather conditions and the unpredictable nature of these renewable energy sources are the main drawbacks. To overcome this weakness, different green energy sources and power electronic converters need to be integrated with each other. This study presents a battery storage hybrid standalone photovoltaic-wind energy power supply system. In the proposed standalone hybrid system, a DC-DC buck-boost bidirectional converter controller is used to accumulates the surplus hybrid power in the battery bank and supplies this power to the load during the hybrid power shortage by maintaining the constant dc-link voltage. A three-phase voltage source inverter complex vector control scheme is used to control the load side voltage in terms of the voltage amplitude and frequency. Based on the simulation results obtained from MATLAB/Simulink, it has been found that the overall hybrid framework is capable of working under variable weather and load conditions.

  16. Technical Study of a Standalone Photovoltaic–Wind Energy Based Hybrid Power Supply Systems for Island Electrification in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrat, Nahidul Hoque; Ahmad, Norhafizan; Choudhury, Imtiaz Ahmed; Taha, Zahari

    2015-01-01

    Energy is one of the most important factors in the socioeconomic development of a country. In a developing country like Malaysia, the development of islands is mostly related to the availability of electric power. Power generated by renewable energy sources has recently become one of the most promising solutions for the electrification of islands and remote rural areas. But high dependency on weather conditions and the unpredictable nature of these renewable energy sources are the main drawbacks. To overcome this weakness, different green energy sources and power electronic converters need to be integrated with each other. This study presents a battery storage hybrid standalone photovoltaic-wind energy power supply system. In the proposed standalone hybrid system, a DC-DC buck-boost bidirectional converter controller is used to accumulates the surplus hybrid power in the battery bank and supplies this power to the load during the hybrid power shortage by maintaining the constant dc-link voltage. A three-phase voltage source inverter complex vector control scheme is used to control the load side voltage in terms of the voltage amplitude and frequency. Based on the simulation results obtained from MATLAB/Simulink, it has been found that the overall hybrid framework is capable of working under variable weather and load conditions. PMID:26121032

  17. Technical Study of a Standalone Photovoltaic-Wind Energy Based Hybrid Power Supply Systems for Island Electrification in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrat, Nahidul Hoque; Ahmad, Norhafizan; Choudhury, Imtiaz Ahmed; Taha, Zahari

    2015-01-01

    Energy is one of the most important factors in the socioeconomic development of a country. In a developing country like Malaysia, the development of islands is mostly related to the availability of electric power. Power generated by renewable energy sources has recently become one of the most promising solutions for the electrification of islands and remote rural areas. But high dependency on weather conditions and the unpredictable nature of these renewable energy sources are the main drawbacks. To overcome this weakness, different green energy sources and power electronic converters need to be integrated with each other. This study presents a battery storage hybrid standalone photovoltaic-wind energy power supply system. In the proposed standalone hybrid system, a DC-DC buck-boost bidirectional converter controller is used to accumulates the surplus hybrid power in the battery bank and supplies this power to the load during the hybrid power shortage by maintaining the constant dc-link voltage. A three-phase voltage source inverter complex vector control scheme is used to control the load side voltage in terms of the voltage amplitude and frequency. Based on the simulation results obtained from MATLAB/Simulink, it has been found that the overall hybrid framework is capable of working under variable weather and load conditions.

  18. Assessing the Ecological Risk of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Sediments at Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Essam Nasher; Lee Yook Heng; Zuriati Zakaria; Salmijah Surif

    2013-01-01

    Tourism-related activities such as the heavy use of boats for transportation are a significant source of petroleum hydrocarbons that may harm the ecosystem of Langkawi Island. The contamination and toxicity levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in the sediments of Langkawi were evaluated using sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) and toxic equivalent factors. Ten samples were collected from jetties and fish farms around the island in December 2010. A gas chromatography/flame ionizatio...

  19. Social Identity and Community Resilience towards Tourism Development in Mabul Island, Semporna Sabah, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhaya Hanum Mohamad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mabul Island is a small isolated island located in the east of Semporna, Sabah. The island is inhabited by refugees from southern Philippines, which consist of few ethnics such as Suluk, Bajau, Bisayak, and so on. The communities in small islands are usually late in the development process. They often face problems of adapting to the development and they are commonly left behind in many things. With low population density, many of these communities receive little attention from the government. This resulted in insufficient support and poor basic infrastructure and services. However, Mabul Island is a very popular tourist destination for diving activities after Sipadan Island in Sabah. Tourism development and the impacts on local community have been widely discussed in the literature. However, the role of local communities in the tourism from the perspective of identity is rarely emphasized. Tajfel (1972 defined social identity as “that part of an individual’s self-concept which derives from his knowledge of his membership of a social group together with the value and emotional significance attached to that membership”. Based on the conceptual framework introduced by Palme, Koenig-Lewis, and Jones, this study applied the theory of social identity in examining the differences between two major communities in Mabul Island; Suluk and Bajau communities. The objectives of this study were to study the relationships that existed within the groups and to investigate the impacts of tourism development on social identity of local communities. This study also examined to what extent the social identities can adapt to the tourism booming in Mabul Island.

  20. Epidemiological Characteristics of Strongyloidiasis in Inhabitants of Indigenous Communities in Borneo Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngui, Romano; Halim, Noor Amira Abdul; Rajoo, Yamuna; Lim, Yvonne AL; Ambu, Stephen; Rajoo, Komalaveni; Chang, Tey Siew; Woon, Lu Chan; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological study on strongyloidiasis in humans is currently lacking in Malaysia. Thus, a cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infection among the inhabitants of longhouse indigenous communities in Sarawak. A single stool and blood sample were collected from each participant and subjected to microscopy, serological and molecular techniques. Five species of intestinal parasites were identified by stool microscopy. None of the stool samples were positive for S. stercoralis. However, 11% of 236 serum samples were seropositive for strongyloidiasis. Further confirmation using molecular technique on stool samples of the seropositive individuals successfully amplified 5 samples, suggesting current active infections. The prevalence was significantly higher in adult males and tended to increase with age. S. stercoralis should no longer be neglected in any intestinal parasitic survey. Combination of more than 1 diagnostic technique is necessary to increase the likelihood of estimating the ‘true’ prevalence of S. stercoralis. PMID:27853126

  1. Age-Stage, Two-Sex Life Table Characteristics of Aedes albopictus and Aedes Aegypti in Penang Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimusa, Hamisu A; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Kassim, Nur Faeza A; Rahim, Junaid

    2016-03-01

    The life table developmental attributes of laboratory colonies of wild strains of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti were analyzed and compared based on the age-stage, two-sex life table. Findings inclusive in this study are: adult preoviposition periods, total preoviposition period, mean intrinsic rate of increase (r), mean finite rate of increase (λ), net reproductive rates (R0), and mean generation time (T). The total preadult development time was 9.47 days for Ae. albopictus and 8.76 days for Ae. aegypti. The life expectancy was 19.01 days for Ae. albopictus and 19.94 days for Ae. aegypti. Mortality occurred mostly during the adult stage. The mean development time for each stage insignificantly correlated with temperature for Ae. albopictus (r  =  -0.208, P > 0.05) and (r  =  -0.312, P > 0.05) for Ae. aegypti. The population parameters suggest that Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti populations are r-strategists characterized by a high r, a large R0, and short T. This present study provides the first report to compare the life parameters of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti strains from Penang island, Malaysia.

  2. ROAD TRAFFIC NUISANCE IN RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL AREAS IN MALAYSIA: A CASE STUDY IN PINANG ISLAND

    OpenAIRE

    ABDELNASR OMRAN,

    2010-01-01

    Developing cities often face critical air pollution problems due to the rapid growth of transportation and industry sources. Some centers in Pinang Island are currently facing high levels of air pollution as a result of economic and industrial growth. Decisions with regard to industry, transportation, and development will affect air pollution and health both in the short-term and in the far future through climate change. Thus, this paper is investigated the road traffic nuisance in residentia...

  3. Borderlands and Tourism Development in Kalimantan Island: Kalimantan Barat, Indonesia - Sarawak, Malaysia 'Head to Head'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syaiful Muazir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of the regions that share lands and boundaries, Sarawak-Malaysia and Kalimantan Barat-Indonesia have respective characteristics in the borderlands treatment. This paper aims to explore and compare the border areas between two nations, ranging from the borderlands profiles, (tourism development and planning, and their opportunities. Besides, this paper also wants to highlight tourism development as one of the strategies. This paper uses documentary research to seek 'text and context' by narratively describing and compiling the documents. From the discussion, it can be seen that both regions have different characteristics of conditions and problems. For tourism development, different approaches are also 'colored' with timing, momentum, and priorities; as influenced and supported by the national plans. Tourism in the borderlands is the impetus in which each regions has already been aware of this potential because of the traction of informal flow, accessibility, supply, and demand. Furthermore, we argue that if tourism has exist at the first place, in the future, by its backward linkages, it will encourage more physical and economic development and cooperation between nations.

  4. Metal concentrations in sediments from tourist beaches of Miri City, Sarawak, Malaysia (Borneo Island).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, R; Jonathan, M P; Roy, Priyadarsi D; Wai-Hwa, L; Prasanna, M V; Sarkar, S K; Navarrete-López, M

    2013-08-15

    Forty-three sediment samples were collected from the beaches of Miri City, Sarawak, Malaysia to identify the enrichment of partially leached trace metals (PLTMs) from six different tourist beaches. The samples were analyzed for PLTMs Fe, Mn, Cr, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn. The concentration pattern suggest that the southern side of the study area is enriched with Fe (1821-6097 μg g(-1)), Mn (11.57-90.22 μg g(-1)), Cr (51.50-311 μg g(-1)), Ni (18-51 μg g(-1)), Pb (8.81-84.05 μg g(-1)), Sr (25.95-140.49 μg g(-1)) and Zn (12.46-35.04 μg g(-1)). Compared to the eco-toxicological values, Cr>Effects range low (ERL), Lowest effect level (LEL), Severe effect level (SEL); Cu>Unpolluted sediments, ERL, LEL; Pb>Unpolluted sediments and Ni>ERL and LEL. Comparative results with other regions indicate that Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn are higher, indicating an external input rather than natural process.

  5. Assessing the Ecological Risk of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Sediments at Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Nasher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism-related activities such as the heavy use of boats for transportation are a significant source of petroleum hydrocarbons that may harm the ecosystem of Langkawi Island. The contamination and toxicity levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH in the sediments of Langkawi were evaluated using sediment quality guidelines (SQGs and toxic equivalent factors. Ten samples were collected from jetties and fish farms around the island in December 2010. A gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID was used to analyse the 18 PAHs. The concentration of total PAHs was found to range from 869 ± 00 to 1637 ± 20 ng g−1 with a mean concentration of 1167.00 ± 24 ng g−1, lower than the SQG effects range-low (3442 ng g−1. The results indicated that PAHs may not cause acute biological damage. Diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis suggested that the PAHs were likely to originate from pyrogenic and petrogenic sources. The toxic equivalent concentrations of the PAHs ranged from 76.3 to 177 ng TEQ/g d.w., which is lower compared to similar studies. The results of mean effects range-median quotient of the PAHs were lower than 0.1, which indicate an 11% probability of toxicity effect. Hence, the sampling sites were determined to be the low-priority sites.

  6. Assessing the Ecological Risk of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Sediments at Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasher, Essam; Heng, Lee Yook; Zakaria, Zuriati; Surif, Salmijah

    2013-01-01

    Tourism-related activities such as the heavy use of boats for transportation are a significant source of petroleum hydrocarbons that may harm the ecosystem of Langkawi Island. The contamination and toxicity levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in the sediments of Langkawi were evaluated using sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) and toxic equivalent factors. Ten samples were collected from jetties and fish farms around the island in December 2010. A gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) was used to analyse the 18 PAHs. The concentration of total PAHs was found to range from 869 ± 00 to 1637 ± 20 ng g−1 with a mean concentration of 1167.00 ± 24 ng g−1, lower than the SQG effects range-low (3442 ng g−1). The results indicated that PAHs may not cause acute biological damage. Diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis suggested that the PAHs were likely to originate from pyrogenic and petrogenic sources. The toxic equivalent concentrations of the PAHs ranged from 76.3 to 177 ng TEQ/g d.w., which is lower compared to similar studies. The results of mean effects range-median quotient of the PAHs were lower than 0.1, which indicate an 11% probability of toxicity effect. Hence, the sampling sites were determined to be the low-priority sites. PMID:24163633

  7. Assessing the ecological risk of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments at Langkawi Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasher, Essam; Heng, Lee Yook; Zakaria, Zuriati; Surif, Salmijah

    2013-01-01

    Tourism-related activities such as the heavy use of boats for transportation are a significant source of petroleum hydrocarbons that may harm the ecosystem of Langkawi Island. The contamination and toxicity levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in the sediments of Langkawi were evaluated using sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) and toxic equivalent factors. Ten samples were collected from jetties and fish farms around the island in December 2010. A gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) was used to analyse the 18 PAHs. The concentration of total PAHs was found to range from 869 ± 00 to 1637 ± 20 ng g⁻¹ with a mean concentration of 1167.00 ± 24 ng g⁻¹, lower than the SQG effects range-low (3442 ng g⁻¹). The results indicated that PAHs may not cause acute biological damage. Diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis suggested that the PAHs were likely to originate from pyrogenic and petrogenic sources. The toxic equivalent concentrations of the PAHs ranged from 76.3 to 177 ng TEQ/g d.w., which is lower compared to similar studies. The results of mean effects range-median quotient of the PAHs were lower than 0.1, which indicate an 11% probability of toxicity effect. Hence, the sampling sites were determined to be the low-priority sites.

  8. Concentrations and Sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Seawater around Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Nasher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in the water around the Island and their probable sources. Water samples were collected from four jetties and three marine fish farms around the main Langkawi Island and analysed for 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in December 2010. The total PAH concentrations ranged from 6.1 ± 0.43 to 46 ± 0.42 μgL−1, which exceed the maximum admissible concentrations of PAHs (0.20 μgL−1 for the water standard of European Union. The calculated diagnostic benzo[a]anthracene : benzo[a]anthracene + chrysene ratio of between 0.52 and 1.0 suggests that the sources of PAHs at the majority of the stations studied are derived primarily from pyrogenic sources, from incomplete fuel combustion of the boats and vehicle engines, with lesser amounts of PAHs contributed from petrogenic sources. Some stations displayed mixed sources. A significant positive correlation was found between total organic carbon (TOC and the concentrations of the high-molecular-weight PAHs (r2=0.86, P<0.05, which suggests significant secondary sources of PAHs, such as those from atmospheric deposition.

  9. Genotoxicity following Organophosphate Pesticides Exposure among Orang Asli Children Living in an Agricultural Island in Kuala Langat, Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutris, J M; How, V; Sumeri, S A; Muhammad, M; Sardi, D; Mohd Mokhtar, M T; Muhammad, H; Ghazi, H F; Isa, Z M

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture is an important sector for the Malaysian economy. The use of pesticides in agriculture is crucial due to its function in keeping the crops from harmful insects. Children living near agricultural fields are at risk of pesticide poisoning. To evaluate the genotoxic risk among children who exposed to pesticides and measure DNA damage due to pesticides exposure. In a cross-sectional study 180 Orang Asli Mah Meri children aged between 7 and 12 years were studied. They were all living in an agricultural island in Kuala Langat, Selangor, Malaysia. The data for this study were collected via modified validated questionnaire and food frequency questionnaire, which consisted of 131 food items. 6 urinary organophosphate metabolites were used as biomarkers for pesticides exposure. For genotoxic risk or genetic damage assessment, the level of DNA damage from exfoliated buccal mucosa cells was measured using the comet assay electrophoresis method. Out of 180 respondents, 84 (46.7%) showed positive traces of organophosphate metabolites in their urine. Children with detectable urinary pesticide had a longer tail length (median 43.5; IQR 30.9 to 68.1 μm) than those with undetectable urinary pesticides (median 24.7; IQR 9.5 to 48.1 μm). There was a significant association between the extent of DNA damage and the children's age, length of residence in the area, pesticides detection, and frequency of apple consumption. The organophosphate genotoxicity among children is associated with the amount of exposure (detectability of urinary pesticide) and length of residence in (exposure) the study area.

  10. Genotoxicity following Organophosphate Pesticides Exposure among Orang Asli Children Living in an Agricultural Island in Kuala Langat, Selangor, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Sutris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Agriculture is an important sector for the Malaysian economy. The use of pesticides in agriculture is crucial due to its function in keeping the crops from harmful insects. Children living near agricultural fields are at risk of pesticide poisoning. Objective: To evaluate the genotoxic risk among children who exposed to pesticides and measure DNA damage due to pesticides exposure. Methods: In a cross-sectional study 180 Orang Asli Mah Meri children aged between 7 and 12 years were studied. They were all living in an agricultural island in Kuala Langat, Selangor, Malaysia. The data for this study were collected via modified validated questionnaire and food frequency questionnaire, which consisted of 131 food items. 6 urinary organophosphate metabolites were used as biomarkers for pesticides exposure. For genotoxic risk or genetic damage assessment, the level of DNA damage from exfoliated buccal mucosa cells was measured using the comet assay electrophoresis method. Results: Out of 180 respondents, 84 (46.7% showed positive traces of organophosphate metabolites in their urine. Children with detectable urinary pesticide had a longer tail length (median 43.5; IQR 30.9 to 68.1 μm than those with undetectable urinary pesticides (median 24.7; IQR 9.5 to 48.1 μm. There was a significant association between the extent of DNA damage and the children's age, length of residence in the area, pesticides detection, and frequency of apple consumption. Conclusion: The organophosphate genotoxicity among children is associated with the amount of exposure (detectability of urinary pesticide and length of residence in (exposure the study area.

  11. EFFECTS OF SEASONALITY ON STREAMFLOW AND WATER QUALITY OF THE PINANG RIVER IN PENANG ISLAND, MALAYSIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmad Jailani Muhamed YUNUS; Nobukazu NAKAGOSHI

    2004-01-01

    For the Pinang River, originating in the western highlands of Penang Island, the nature, sources and extent of pollution were studied. The river water samples collected at five selected sites were analyzed for various physical and chemical parameters, namely temperature, DO, BOD, COD, SS, pH, ammoniac nitrogen (AN), and conductance. Long-term data of rainfall and temperature were analyzed to determine the seasonal variations of the streamflow.The streamflow during the dry season is extremely Iow compared to the wet season, thus concentrations of contaminants derived from point pollution source increase due to lack of rainfall and runoff events. On the contrary, in the predominantly urban and agricultural catchments, non-point pollution source increases during rainy season through seepage and runoff. Effects of seasonal variations consequently determine the quantity and quality of the water parameters.The Jelutong River, the Dondang River and the Air Itam River carry the seepage from widely urban and residential arcas to the main Pinang River systems. Water quality of the Pinang River at different points assessed by the water quality indices was compared. According to the quality indices during the study period, water quality in the upper reaches of the river is medium to good. It dwindled in the plains, due to the seepage from urban areas and discharges from the industrial and agricultural lands.

  12. Remote sensing retrievals from SPOT measurements of aerosol over Penang Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, K.; Tan, K. C.; Wong, C. J.; Mohd. Saleh, N.

    2008-10-01

    Traditional air pollution monitoring by using ground based instruments cannot provides air pollution over a large spatial scale. Aerosol over Penang Island was mapped with SPOT satellite image in this study. The objective of this study is to evaluate the relationship between SPOT satellite observation and particulate matter of size less than 2.5 micron (PM2.5) parameter. It is based on detection of dark surface targets in the blue band. Only one visible wavelength band were used in this study. The surface reflectance values for the only one visible wavelength were determined based on the information given by using ATCOR2 image processing technique. The atmospheric components were then estimated from the image. A total of 25 ground truth PM2.5 data were collected simultaneously with the acquired satellite image by using a hand held DustTrak Meter and their locations were determined using a hand held Global Positioning System (GPS). The digital numbers of the corresponding in situ data were converted into irradiance and then reflectance. The atmospheric reflectance values was extracted from the satellite observation reflectance values subtrated by the amount given by the surface reflectance. The atmospheric reflectance values were later used for PM2.5 mapping using the calibrated algorithm. An algorithm was developed based on the atmospheric optical characteristic. The developed algorithm was used to correlate the digital signal and the PM2.5 concentration. A good linear correlation between the satellite signal and PM2.5 parameter was found in this study (R > 0.8). Finally, a PM2.5 map was generated using the proposed algorithm. This study indicates that the feasibility of using the visible band from SPOT for PM2.5 mapping.

  13. Dragons in the mist: three new species of Pseudocalotes Fitzinger (Squamata: Agamidae) from the sky island archipelago of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grismer, L Lee; Quah, Evan S H; Wood, Perry L Jr; Anuar, Shahrul; Muin, Abdul; Davis, Hayden R; Murdoch, Matthew L; Grismer, Jesse L; Cota, Michael; Cobos, Anthony J

    2016-07-07

    An integrative taxonomic analysis is used to delimit and describe three new species of Pseudocalotoes from the sky island archipelago of the Banjaran (=mountain range) Titiwangsa of Peninsular Malaysia. Pseudocalotes drogon sp. nov., from Fraser's Hill, Pahang is basal to the sister species P. larutensis from Bukit Larut, Perak in the Banjaran Bintang and the new species P. rhaegal sp. nov. from Cameron Highlands, Pahang. Pseudocalotes drogon sp. nov. is differentiated from all other species of Psuedocalotes by having the combination of a flat rostrum; seven postrostrals; an interparietal; 11 circumorbitals; five canthals; 7-10 superciliaries; one scale between the rostral and nasal; nine supralabials; eight infralabials; 10 postnasal-suborbital scales; four postmentals; five or six sublabials; five or six chinshields; 47 smooth, wide, gular scales; weak transverse gular and antehumeral folds; two enlarged scales between the ear and eye; enlarged upper and lower posttemporals; a single enlarged supratympanic; no enlarged postrictals; three large scales bordering the dorsal margin of the ear opening; large pretympanic scales; eight scales in the nuchal crest not separated by a gap; enlarged vertebral scales extending to the tip of the tail; keeled and non-plate-like scales on flanks; 51 midbody scales; midventrals smaller than dorsals; 19 subdigital lamellae on the fourth finger; 23 subdigital lamellae on the fourth toe; preaxial scales on third toe enlarged and spinose; subdigital lamellae not unicarinate; HW/HL 0.52; HL/SVL 0.31; no elbow or knee patches; and a male dewlap color of lime-green bearing a central yellow spot. Pseudocalotes rhaegal sp. nov. is differentiated from all other Psuedocalotes by having the combination of a convex rostrum; 6-8 postrostrals; an interparietal; nine or 10 circumorbitals; five canthals; 7-10 superciliaries; one or two scales between the rostral and nasal scales; eight or nine supralabials; seven or eight infralabials; 11 or 12

  14. Composition and sources of aliphatic lipids and sterols in sediments of a tropical island, southern South China Sea: preliminary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Tahir, N; Pang, S Y; Abdullah, N A; Suratman, S

    2013-12-01

    Near-shore surface sediment was collected from five stations off Redang Island located on the eastern coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Freeze-dried sediments were Soxhlet extracted and then fractionated using column chromatography into aliphatic and polar fractions. Determination of these fractions was carried out using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The concentration of total resolved aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediments ranged from 157 to 308 ng/g. The distribution of aliphatic fraction showed the presence of n-alkanes ranging from nC15 to nC33 with a minor odd-to-even predominance exhibiting carbon maximum, depending on station, at nC17, nC26, nC29 or nC31. Calculation of Carbon Preference Index (CPI) for CPI(15-33) gave values ranging from 1.09 to 1.46. n-Alkanol in all sediment exhibits even-to-odd carbon predominance ranging from nC16 to nC28 and maximising at nC22. n-Fatty acids distribution ranged from nC14 to nC24 with a dominant maximum at nC16 and exhibiting high values of short chain fatty acids (≤nC20) to long chain fatty acids (>nC20) ratios. Unsaturated fatty acids, particularly nC16:1 and nC18:1 is also ubiquitous in all samples. Cholesterol is the most abundant compound amongst the sterol group ranging from 42.8 to 62.6% of the total sterols. β-Sitosterol, brassicasterol and stigmasterol, are also present but of relatively lower amount. These observations suggest that the aliphatic lipids and sterols in the study area originate, mainly, from biogenic sources of marine microbial with minor contribution from epiticular waxes of terrestrial plants.

  15. Land cover/use mapping using multi-band imageries captured by Cropcam Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Autopilot (UAV) over Penang Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuyi, Tan; Boon Chun, Beh; Mat Jafri, Mohd Zubir; Hwee San, Lim; Abdullah, Khiruddin; Mohammad Tahrin, Norhaslinda

    2012-11-01

    The problem of difficulty in obtaining cloud-free scene at the Equatorial region from satellite platforms can be overcome by using airborne imagery. Airborne digital imagery has proved to be an effective tool for land cover studies. Airborne digital camera imageries were selected in this present study because of the airborne digital image provides higher spatial resolution data for mapping a small study area. The main objective of this study is to classify the RGB bands imageries taken from a low-altitude Cropcam UAV for land cover/use mapping over USM campus, penang Island, Malaysia. A conventional digital camera was used to capture images from an elevation of 320 meter on board on an UAV autopilot. This technique was cheaper and economical compared with other airborne studies. The artificial neural network (NN) and maximum likelihood classifier (MLC) were used to classify the digital imageries captured by using Cropcam UAV over USM campus, Penang Islands, Malaysia. The supervised classifier was chosen based on the highest overall accuracy (statistic (<0.8). The classified land cover map was geometrically corrected to provide a geocoded map. The results produced by this study indicated that land cover features could be clearly identified and classified into a land cover map. This study indicates the use of a conventional digital camera as a sensor on board on an UAV autopilot can provide useful information for planning and development of a small area of coverage.

  16. Acute Muscular Sarcocystosis: an international investigation among ill travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two provider-based traveler-focused networks allowed for the detection of a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS). Clinicians evaluating travelers returning ill from Malaysia with fever and myalgia noted the biphasic aspect of the disease, the later onset of elevated CPK and eosinophi...

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of geckos of the Hemiphyllodactylus harterti group, a new species from Penang Island, Peninsular Malaysia, and a likely case of true cryptic speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Anthony; Grismer, L Lee; Wood, Perry L; Quah, Evan S H; Anuar, Shahrul; Muin, Mohd Abdul

    2016-05-03

    An integrative taxonomic analysis based on the mitochondrial gene ND2 and its flanking tRNAs, morphology, and color pattern indicates that a newly discovered gecko described herein as Hemiphyllodactylus cicak sp. nov. from Penang Hill on the Island of Penang, Peninsular Malaysia is a member of the H. harterti group. Hemiphyllodactylus cicak sp. nov. is most closely related to the clade composed of the sister species H. harterti from Bukit Larut, Perak in the Bintang Mountain Range and H. bintik from Gunung Tebu, Terengganu from the Timur Mountain Range. These three allopatric species form a monophyletic group that extends approximately 270 km across three isolated mountain ranges in northern Peninsular Malaysia. The molecular analysis also indicates that H. titiwangsaensis from the Titiwangsa Mountain Range is composed of three genetically distinct allopatric populations. The southern two populations from Fraser's Hill and Genting Highlands, Pahang have an uncorrected pairwise sequence divergence of 3.5% whereas these two populations have 12.4 and 12.8 % sequence divergences, respectively, from the northern population at Cameron Highlands, Pahang. Although the high sequence divergence clearly distinguishes the southern two populations from the former as a different species, all three populations are morphologically indistinguishable, leading to the hypothesis of a true, cryptic speciation event.

  18. Soil erosion assessment and its correlation with landslide events using remote sensing data and GIS: a case study at Penang Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet; Chaudhari, Amruta; Adinarayana, J; Buchroithner, Manfred F

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to assess, prognosis and observe dynamism of soil erosion by universal soil loss equation (USLE) method at Penang Island, Malaysia. Multi-source (map-, space- and ground-based) datasets were used to obtain both static and dynamic factors of USLE, and an integrated analysis was carried out in raster format of GIS. A landslide location map was generated on the basis of image elements interpretation from aerial photos, satellite data and field observations and was used to validate soil erosion intensity in the study area. Further, a statistical-based frequency ratio analysis was carried out in the study area for correlation purposes. The results of the statistical correlation showed a satisfactory agreement between the prepared USLE-based soil erosion map and landslide events/locations, and are directly proportional to each other. Prognosis analysis on soil erosion helps the user agencies/decision makers to design proper conservation planning program to reduce soil erosion. Temporal statistics on soil erosion in these dynamic and rapid developments in Penang Island indicate the co-existence and balance of ecosystem.

  19. A baseline measure of tree and gastropod biodiversity in replanted and natural mangrove stands in malaysia: langkawi island and sungai merbok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hookham, Brenda; Shau-Hwai, Aileen Tan; Dayrat, Benoit; Hintz, William

    2014-08-01

    THE DIVERSITIES OF MANGROVE TREES AND OF THEIR ASSOCIATED GASTROPODS WERE ASSESSED FOR TWO MANGROVE REGIONS ON THE WEST COAST OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA: Langkawi Island and Sungai Merbok. The mangrove area sampled on Langkawi Island was recently logged and replanted, whereas the area sampled in Sungai Merbok was part of a protected nature reserve. Mangrove and gastropod diversity were assessed in four 50 m(2) (10 × 5 m) sites per region. The species richness (S), Shannon Index (H') and Evenness Index (J') were calculated for each site, and the mean S, H' and J' values were calculated for each region. We report low tree and gastropod S, H' and J' values in all sites from both regions. For Langkawi Island, the mean S, H' and J' values for mangrove trees were S = 2.00±0, H' = 0.44±0.17 and J' = 0.44±0.17; the mean S, H' and J' values for gastropods were S = 4.00±1.63, H' = 0.96±0.41 and J' = 0.49±0.06. In Sungai Merbok, the mean S, H' and J' values for mangrove trees were S = 1.33±0.58, H' = 0.22±0.39 and J' = 0.22 ±0.39; the mean S, H' and J' values for gastropods were S = 4.75±2.22, H' = 1.23±0.63 and J' = 0.55±0.12. This study emphasises the need for baseline biodiversity measures to be established in mangrove ecosystems to track the impacts of anthropogenic disturbances and to inform management and restoration efforts.

  20. Assessment of natural radioactivity and gamma-ray dose in monazite rich black Sand Beach of Penang Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaibu, Hauwau Kulu; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Alrefae, Tareq; Bradley, D A

    2017-06-15

    Activity concentrations of primordial radionuclides in sand samples collected from the coastal beaches surrounding Penang Island have been measured using conventional γ-ray spectrometry, while in-situ γ-ray doses have been measured through use of a portable radiation survey meter. The mean activity concentrations for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K at different locations were found to be less than the world average values, while the Miami Bay values for (226)Ra and (232)Th were found to be greater, at 1023±47 and 2086±96Bqkg(̶ 1) respectively. The main contributor to radionuclide enrichment in Miami Bay is the presence of monazite-rich black sands. The measured data were compared against literature values and also recommended limits set by the relevant international bodies. With the exception of Miami Bay, considered an elevated background radiation area that would benefit from regular monitoring, Penang island beach sands typically pose no significant radiological risk to the local populace and tourists visiting the leisure beaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sustained turbidity currents and their interaction with debrite-related topography; Labuan Island, offshore NW Borneo, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Johnson, Howard D.

    2009-07-01

    The Temburong Fm (Early Miocene), Labuan Island, offshore NW Borneo, was deposited in a lower-slope to proximal basin-floor setting, and provides an opportunity to study the deposits of sustained turbidity currents and their interaction with debrite-related topography. Two main gravity-flow facies are identified; (i) slump-derived debris-flow deposits (debrites) — characterised by ungraded silty mudstones in beds 1.5 to > 60 m thick which are rich in large (> 5 m) lithic clasts; and (ii) turbidity current deposits (turbidites) — characterised by medium-grained sandstone in beds up to 2 m thick, which contain structureless (T a) intervals alternating with planar-parallel (T b) and current-ripple (T c) laminated intervals. Laterally discontinuous, cobble-mantled scours are also locally developed within turbidite beds. Based on these characteristics, these sandstones are interpreted to have been deposited by sustained turbidity currents. The cobble-mantled scours indicate either periods of intense turbidity current waxing or individual flow events. The sustained turbidity currents are interpreted to have been derived from retrogressive collapse of sand-rich mouth bars (breaching) or directly from river effluent (hyperpycnal flow). Analysis of the stratal architecture of the two facies indicates that routing of the turbidity currents was influenced by topographic relief developed at the top of the underlying debrite. In addition, turbidite beds are locally eroded at the base of an overlying debrite, possibly due to clast-related substrate 'ploughing' during the latter flow event. This study highlights the difficulty in constraining the origin of sustained turbidity currents in ancient sedimentary sequences. In addition, this study documents the importance large debrites may have in generating topography on submarine slopes and influencing routing of subsequent turbidity currents and the geometry of their associated deposits.

  2. Malaysia; Malaisie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    This document presents the energy profile of Malaysia: national organizations and energy policy (Economic Planning Unit (EPU), Ministry of Energy, Communication and Multi-media, Energy Commission); electric power companies: Tenaga National Brhd (TNB), Sarawak Electricity Supply Corporation (SESCO) and Sabah Electricity Sdn Bhd (SESB); petroleum companies: Petronas and Petronas Carigali; natural gas companies: Petronas Gas Sdn Bhd (PGSB), Malaysia LNG Ltd, Gas Malaysia Sdn Bhd and Sabah Energy Corporation (SEC) as public utility; supplies (resources, electric power, oil and gas); prices; consumption; stakes and perspectives (combined cycle power plants, Trans Thai Malaysia pipeline, refineries, Asean Grid Power project of interconnected power grids, Trans Asean Gas Pipeline (TAGP) project of interconnected gas networks, Bakun dam). (J.S.)

  3. Human Invasive Muscular Sarcocystosis Induces Th2 Cytokine Polarization and Biphasic Cytokine Changes, Based on an Investigation among Travelers Returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappe, Dennis; Slesak, Günther; Pérez-Girón, José Vicente; Schäfer, Johannes; Langeheinecke, Andreas; Just-Nübling, Gudrun; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Püllmann, Kerstin

    2015-06-01

    Sarcocystis nesbitti is a parasite responsible for a biphasic eosinophilic febrile myositis syndrome in two recent outbreaks in Malaysia. We demonstrate Th2 cytokine polarization in infected travelers, an overall cytokine production decrease in the early phase of the disease suggestive of initial immunosuppression, and elevated levels of proinflammatory and chemotactic cytokines in the later myositic phase. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Malaysia; Malaisie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    This economic analysis provides information on Malaysia energy policy. The energy policy and the associated organizations, the enterprises in the electric power petroleum and gas, the supplying, the prices, the energy consumption, the stakes and forecasts are discussed. Tables and energy data illustrate the analysis. (A.L.B.)

  5. Corporate governance in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SINGAM, Kamini

    2003-01-01

    ... governance in Malaysia - the ownership structure, composition and operation of Malaysian companies in Malaysia - the nature of shareholder control and protection made available in the Malaysian corporate...

  6. Distribution of Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse) in small towns and villages of Penang Island, Malaysia--an ovitrap survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, H H

    1975-12-01

    An ovitrap survey was carried out in April and May of 1975 at twenty-one locations scattered throughout Penang Island excluding the City of Georgetown. The results showed the ubiquitous presence of Ae. albopictus. Ae. aegypti was recorded only in Tanjung Tokong Lama, an area adjacent to the City of Georgetown. In the survey, Ae. albopictus females were found to prefer the outdoor ovitraps than indoor ones. The effectiveness of ovitrap in Aedes survey was discussed.

  7. Modeling, Control, and Simulation of Battery Storage Photovoltaic-Wave Energy Hybrid Renewable Power Generation Systems for Island Electrification in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahidul Hoque Samrat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, the whole world faces a great challenge to overcome the environmental problems related to global energy production. Most of the islands throughout the world depend on fossil fuel importation with respect to energy production. Recent development and research on green energy sources can assure sustainable power supply for the islands. But unpredictable nature and high dependency on weather conditions are the main limitations of renewable energy sources. To overcome this drawback, different renewable sources and converters need to be integrated with each other. This paper proposes a standalone hybrid photovoltaic- (PV- wave energy conversion system with energy storage. In the proposed hybrid system, control of the bidirectional buck-boost DC-DC converter (BBDC is used to maintain the constant dc-link voltage. It also accumulates the excess hybrid power in the battery bank and supplies this power to the system load during the shortage of hybrid power. A three-phase complex vector control scheme voltage source inverter (VSI is used to control the load side voltage in terms of the frequency and voltage amplitude. Based on the simulation results obtained from Matlab/Simulink, it has been found that the overall hybrid framework is capable of working under the variable weather and load conditions.

  8. Modeling, control, and simulation of battery storage photovoltaic-wave energy hybrid renewable power generation systems for island electrification in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrat, Nahidul Hoque; Bin Ahmad, Norhafizan; Choudhury, Imtiaz Ahmed; Bin Taha, Zahari

    2014-01-01

    Today, the whole world faces a great challenge to overcome the environmental problems related to global energy production. Most of the islands throughout the world depend on fossil fuel importation with respect to energy production. Recent development and research on green energy sources can assure sustainable power supply for the islands. But unpredictable nature and high dependency on weather conditions are the main limitations of renewable energy sources. To overcome this drawback, different renewable sources and converters need to be integrated with each other. This paper proposes a standalone hybrid photovoltaic- (PV-) wave energy conversion system with energy storage. In the proposed hybrid system, control of the bidirectional buck-boost DC-DC converter (BBDC) is used to maintain the constant dc-link voltage. It also accumulates the excess hybrid power in the battery bank and supplies this power to the system load during the shortage of hybrid power. A three-phase complex vector control scheme voltage source inverter (VSI) is used to control the load side voltage in terms of the frequency and voltage amplitude. Based on the simulation results obtained from Matlab/Simulink, it has been found that the overall hybrid framework is capable of working under the variable weather and load conditions.

  9. Malaysia and forced migration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arzura Idris

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the phenomenon of "forced migration" in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants...

  10. Malaysia and forced migration

    OpenAIRE

    Arzura Idris

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the phenomenon of “forced migration” in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants. It considers forced migration as an event hosting multifaceted issues related and relevant to forced migrants and suggests that Malaysia has been preoccupied with the issue of forced migration movements. This is largely seen in various responses invoked from Malaysi...

  11. Malaysia and forced migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzura Idris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the phenomenon of “forced migration” in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants. It considers forced migration as an event hosting multifaceted issues related and relevant to forced migrants and suggests that Malaysia has been preoccupied with the issue of forced migration movements. This is largely seen in various responses invoked from Malaysia due to “south-south forced migration movements.” These responses are, however, inadequate in terms of commitment to the international refugee regime. While Malaysia did respond to economic and migration challenges, the paper asserts that such efforts are futile if she ignores issues critical to forced migrants.

  12. Medical Virology in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaw Bing Chua

    2009-01-01

    Virology is a branch of biological science dealing with the study of viruses, and medical virology focuses on the study and control of diseases due to viruses that is of medical importance. The development of medical virology in Malaysia has its beginning in the Institute for Medical Research (IMR), following the establishment of the Division of Medical Zoology and Virus Research in the institute on 23 March 1953. The second institution in the country to establish diagnostic and research work in medical virology was Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya. This was followed by University Kebangsaan Malaysia, University Sains Malaysia and University of Sarawak Malaysia. The National Public Health Laboratory (NPHL) is the latest institution to establish a laboratory in 2003 for virus isolation and services to support country surveillance and outbreak investigation of infectious diseases due to viruses. In the field of medical virology, Malaysia contributed substantially in the areas of virus diagnostic services, development and research ranging from survey and documentation on the existence and prevalence of viruses causing diseases in Malaysia, clinical presentation and epidemiological features of virus diseases, evaluation of new diagnostic tests to pathogenesis of viral diseases. Malaysia contributed to the discoveries of at least 12 new viruses in the world. ASEAN plus Three (China, Japan, Republic of Korea) Emerging Infectious Programme was established to overcome the challenges and impact of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in this region. Malaysia as the co-ordinator of the laboratory component of the programme, contributed to strengthen the regional laboratory capability, capacity, laboratory-based surveillance and networking. The future of medical virology in Malaysia in terms of integration of diagnostic, reference and research to support the country's need will be enhanced and strengthened with the on

  13. Malaysia; Background Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1996-01-01

    This Background Paper on Malaysia examines developments and trends in the labor market since the mid-1980s. The paper describes the changes in the employment structure and the labor force. It reviews wages and productivity trends and their effects on unit labor cost. The paper highlights that Malaysia’s rapid growth, sustained since 1987, has had a major impact on the labor market. The paper outlines the major policy measures to address the labor constraints. It also analyzes Malaysia’s r...

  14. Older Consumers in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sim Ong, Fon; Phillips, David R

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to understand the concerns and problems faced by older people in an industrializing middle-income country, Malaysia, in their process of acquiring products to meet...

  15. Perceptions of Local Communities on the Economic Impacts of Tourism Development in Langkawi, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Bakri Norjanah; Jaafar Mastura; Mohamad Diana

    2014-01-01

    The Langkawi Island is a popular tourist destination in Malaysia, which development started in the 1990s. To date, it is among the ten islands most visited by local and foreign tourists. The development of Langkawi Island has influenced the economic structure of local community, of which, envisaged as a symbol to help the community especially in the changing economic environment due to its ability to generate income, employment and raise living standards. Therefore, this study aimed to examin...

  16. Malaysia Promotes Excellence in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Vinodini

    2003-01-01

    Highlights the role of English in Malaysia, English in the education system, students learning English, English teachers, instruction and the syllabus, inservice support, private English education, English in tertiary education, and opportunities for teachers in Malaysia. (VWL)

  17. Ergonomics Issues in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Loo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Ergonomics so far has had little impact in Malaysia. For most Malaysian managers, ergonomics is not considered to be associated with performance, but rather with occupational health and safety and legislation. Approach: This study reviews the development of ergonomics in Malaysia and the underlying issues related to national development. Results: Many changes need to be made within the ergonomics research, education and practice community by integrating concepts from the social sciences with technological advances into Malaysian culture to enhance productivity and sustainable improvements in the quality of life, while achieving essential health and safety goals. Conclusion/Recommendation: Ergonomics helps to improve performance besides enhancing workplace OSH. It is essential to promote ergonomics concepts and practice to various industries in Malaysia. More effort and skills are required to compensate for the lack of infrastructure in providing a framework within which ergonomics recommendations can be disseminated and realized.

  18. Dental education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people.

  19. Mercury pollution in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to

  20. Manufacturing halal in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In Arabic, halal literally means ‘permissible’ or ‘lawful’. Halal is no longer an expression of an esoteric form of production, trade and consumption, but part of a huge and expanding globalized market in which certification, standards and technoscience play important roles. Over the past three decades, Malaysia has become a world leader in the global expansion of halal markets. This has come about in large part because the state and government of Malaysia have taken on the role of halal-cert...

  1. Marine Pollution at Northeast of Penang Island

    OpenAIRE

    H.A. Gasim; Hashim, A. M.; P.Z.M. Bakri; M.Z. Samsuri; N.L.A. Rais; N.D.M. Noor

    2013-01-01

    Oceans cover large area of earth surface and it is important for humans to protect from pollution. Malaysia has large marine areas which consist of islands, coastal and sea areas which are facing pollution problem due to the rapid urbanization and industrialization. This study investigated sources of marine pollution occurred at area near a reclamation project at the northeast of Penang Island. Three locations were chosen for water sampling which included Sg. Fetes, North Tanjung Tokong and G...

  2. Competition Law in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Anand Raj; Cynthia Lian; Wen-Ly Chin

    2015-01-01

    There is still some way for Malaysia to go and the lack of merger control (for the foreseeable future) remains a significant shortcoming in the Malaysian competition law regime at this stage. Anand Raj, Cynthia Lian, & Wen-Ly Chin (Shearn Delamore & Co., Kuala Lumpur)

  3. Manufacturing halal in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    production, trade and consumption. Based on fieldwork in Malaysia, this article explores how manufacturing companies understand and practise halal certification, standards and technoscience. I argue that while existing studies of halal overwhelmingly explore micro-social aspects such as the everyday...

  4. Financial Sector Assessment : Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia, as many of its Asian neighbors, experienced significant macro/financial distress in the late 1990s. The transformed and strengthened financial sector has been able to weather the recent global financial crisis well. Financial market intermediaries reliance on cross-border and interbank funding remains limited. Banking institutions are well capitalized and are expected to be able...

  5. Education Reforms in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Aida Suraya Muhammad

    Malaysia's agenda in the late 1990s involved making the transition from an industrial economy to a knowledge-based economy. Thus, the more traditional purpose of education, that is, to produce an educated person, needs to be reevaluated. If the nation's Vision 2020 is to become a reality, the educational program needs to make a fundamental shift…

  6. Print Advertisements in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Azirah

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines print advertisements in Malaysia to determine how advertisers seek to achieve their primary goal of persuading or influencing an audience by the use of both language and visuals. It describes the main component moves and rhetorical strategies used by writers to articulate the communicative purpose of the genre and the language…

  7. Print Advertisements in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Azirah

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines print advertisements in Malaysia to determine how advertisers seek to achieve their primary goal of persuading or influencing an audience by the use of both language and visuals. It describes the main component moves and rhetorical strategies used by writers to articulate the communicative purpose of the genre and the language…

  8. Country Profiles, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzuki, Ariffin Bin; Peng, J. Y.

    A profile of Malaysia is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  9. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  10. Malaysia; 2012 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund.

    2013-01-01

    This report discusses Malaysia’s economic accomplishment and other economic reforms. Malaysia has attained a strong growth in 2012, and a robust growth is expected in the next term. The financial position of Malaysia is sound and supported by a strong regulatory framework with high bank capitals, international reserves, and refined monetary and financial policies. Fiscal policies need to be restructured, and public financial management needs to be strengthened to deal with risks. The author...

  11. Corporate Governance Disclosure in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    ONG, Wei Jiin

    2006-01-01

    This research provides evidence on corporate governance disclosure in Malaysia based on a sample of 25 Malaysian public listed companies on the Kuala Lumpur Composite Index (KLCI) in the year 1998 and 2005 that are listed on the Bursa Malaysia. The purpose of this dissertation is to examine whether after the launch of the Malaysian Code on Corporate Governance (HLFC, 2000) following the 1997/98 financial crisis, corporate governance in Malaysia has improved in terms of disclosure information ...

  12. Regional air pollution over Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysztofiak, G.; Catoire, V.; Dorf, M.; Grossmann, K.; Hamer, P. D.; Marécal, V.; Reiter, A.; Schlager, H.; Eckhardt, S.; Jurkat, T.; Oram, D.; Quack, B.; Atlas, E.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2012-12-01

    , indicating possible volcanic emissions from the Indonesian islands to the South and East and the Philippines to the North East. The regional pollution seems to be influenced by emissions from Singapore, Philippines, Indonesia and Peninsula Malaysia, and on occasion by anthropogenic emissions from Thailand, Vietnam, Australia, and China.

  13. Motorcycle fatalities in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Marizwan Abdul Manan; András Várhelyi

    2012-01-01

    Malaysia has the highest road fatality risk (per 100,000 population) among the ASEAN countries and more than 50% of the road accident fatalities involve motorcyclists. This study has collected and analysed data from the police, government authorities, and national and international research institutes. Only fatality data are used due to the severe underreporting of severe injuries (up to 600%) and slight injuries (up to 1400%). The analysis reveals that the highest numbers of motorcycle fatal...

  14. Internetcensur i Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This project examines the background of the implementation of the Internet censorship legislation in Malaysia in 2012 by the Malaysian government. This is illustrated by an empirical analysis of the two largest pro-government Malaysian newspapers New Straits Times and The Stars coverage of the need for Internet censorship between the two parliamentary elections in 2008 and the recent one in 2013. The government suffered its worst-ever election performance in these elections, and this project ...

  15. Older Consumers in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Phillips

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to understand the concerns and problems faced by older people in an industrializing middle-income country, Malaysia, in their process of acquiring products to meet their everyday needs. Respondents aged 55 and over were interviewed in eight states throughout Peninsular Malaysia providing 1356 usable questionnaires; two-thirds from urban and one-third from rural areas. Education, health status, and life satisfaction were recorded. Service patronage behaviour was examined for four main categories of commonly-sought consumer goods: groceries, health supplements, apparel, eating outlets, plus selected services (public transport, vacation packages and financial services. The findings showed that older adults in Malaysia are rather discerning consumers. Many respondents are price conscious and have developed consumer attitudes with regard to attitude of staff and assistance rendered. Many display a good ability to discriminate and to select, especially on the basis of price and durability of products and many appear to be acting as effectively as consumers in any other age group.

  16. Islands, Island Studies, Island Studies Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Baldacchino

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Islands are sites of innovative conceptualizations, whether of nature or human enterprise, whether virtual or real. The study of islands on their own terms today enjoys a growing and wide-ranging recognition. This paper celebrates the launch of Island Studies Journal in the context of a long and thrilling tradition of island studies scholarship.

  17. 78 FR 50381 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Malaysia: Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ....; Gulf Fish Inc.; Gulf Island Shrimp & Seafood, LLC; Gulf Pride Enterprises, Inc.; Hi-Seas of Dulac, Inc... and Processing); Ocean Springs Seafood Market, Inc.; Paul Piazza & Sons, Inc.; R.A. Lesso Brokerage Co... from Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, People's Republic of China, Thailand, and Socialist...

  18. Global update: Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Malaysia produces more condoms than any other country in the world, yet it has one of the lowest per capita condom usage rates. The official number of HIV-infected persons and of persons with AIDS in Malaysia is 5140 and 72, respectively. People working in AIDS prevention efforts believe the actual number of HIV-infected people is closer to 50,000 and climbing. People working in AIDS prevention efforts believe the actual number of HIV-infected people is closer to 50,000 and climbing. Public health officials report that AIDS is spreading rapidly through Malaysia's relatively large population of IV drug users. The Ministry of Health wants to introduce comprehensive and pragmatic efforts to stem the AIDS epidemic. They include sex education in schools, ways to prevent IV drug users from sharing needles, promotion of condoms among high risk groups, and screening to monitor HIV transmission. Islamic and Catholic groups oppose these program and policy measures, however. The new director of the Ministry's AIDS prevention unit announced during a meeting of health officials that a return to the teaching of Islam and adoption of Islamic values are the means to deal with AIDS. He suggested that boys and girls be separated, television be rigorously censored, and that Muslim scholars not be limited to mosques to do their teaching. The government has greatly increased the 1993 AIDS budget with all of the funds dedicated to blood screening, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and health education. The deputy health minister noted that the NGOs are supposed to address the more sensitive issues. The government does not allow any of the funds to directly go to condom promotion or programs for IV drug users, however.

  19. Dispute Resolution through Third Party Mediation: Malaysia and Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asri Salleh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Since independence, Malaysia has been involved in territorial disputes and overlapping maritime claims with almost all its neighbours. Some of these disputes were resolved through bilateral and multilateral treaties. However, Malaysia and Indonesia settled the dispute over Sipadan-Ligitan islands by referring the issue to the International Court of Justice (ICJ. This high sense of civility shown by the two countries need to be analysed and appreciated. Documentary analysis shows that the consideration of the geopolitical conditions, the state of bilateral relations the disputing countries were enjoying, security problems, the lack of progress in settling disputes through the bilateral efforts and the weaknesses inherent in ASEAN’s dispute settlement mechanism made the two parties to refer their dispute to the ICJ rather than to the ASEAN High Council (AHC. The ICJ’s decision, delivered in 2002, was accepted by the two parties as stipulated in the referral agreement.

  20. Vascular plant diversity of the Paracel Islands, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Tong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Paracel Islands (Xisha Islands comprise a group of tropical islands that are located south of mainland China and have a particular natural flora. Based on a literature search and our own investigations, we present here a checklist of plants for 24 of the Paracel Islands. We also report an analysis of plant diversity, its distribution and relationship with that of neighboring regions. A total of 396 vascular plants were recorded which belonged to 262 genera and 85 families. Of these, 220 were wild species and 176 were cultivated. As a whole, the islands do not possess a rich flora; however, there are major differences in plant diversity among islands. The flora consists in large part of tropical elements, typical of tropical coral islands of China. The flora is most closely connected to that of Hainan Island, and closely related to those of Taiwan of China, Indochina, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.

  1. Malaysia-China Friendship Evening 2009”Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Our Staff Reporter

    2009-01-01

    <正>The CPAFFC, the Embassy of Malaysia in China, the Malaysia-China Friendship Association and the Malaysia-China Business Council jointly hosted the "Malaysia-China Friendship Evening 2009"at the Conference Hall of the Chi-

  2. CULTURAL TOURISM IN MALAYSIA IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF INDIAN TOURISTS: A STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. BABU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is one of the economic superpowers in South East Asia, prospering at a fast pace as tourism is becoming one of the most important sectors of its economy. Areas like entertainment; beach and island tourism has become some of the major determinants of Malaysia’s phenomenal progress in tourism in the last few years. Yet one area that seems to get less attention is its cultural resources. Recently, Malaysia has turned out as one of the major destinations for the Indian Outbound Tourism market. This study looks into the situation that prevails in the area of cultural tourism in Malaysia and how are cultural as well as historical attractions of Malaysia viewed from the perspective of international tourists from India. With the help of descriptive analysis the study probes into the significance of Malaysia’s historical tourism and the awareness and perception about it among Indian visitors. Based on the study it is revealed that Malaysia’s cultural tourism resources are not promoted to the extent to which it becomes a significant part of the nation’s destination image. Lack of promotion and information available makes international visitors unaware about the potential of Malaysia as a cultural tourism destination. However, most of the tourists were satisfied with the cultural sites/attractions and think Malaysia is a reasonably good cultural destination.

  3. CULTURAL TOURISM IN MALAYSIA IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF INDIAN TOURISTS: A STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Sarkar SUDIPTA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is one of the economic superpowers in South East Asia, prospering at a fast pace as tourism is becoming one of the most important sectors of its economy. Areas like entertainment; beach and island tourism has become some of the major determinants of Malaysia’s phenomenal progress in tourism in the last few years. Yet one area that seems to get less attention is its cultural resources. Recently, Malaysia has turned out as one of the major destinations for the Indian Outbound Tourism market. This study looks into the situation that prevails in the area of cultural tourism in Malaysia and how are cultural as well as historical attractions of Malaysia viewed from the perspective of international tourists from India. With the help of descriptive analysis the study probes into the significance of Malaysia’s historical tourism and the awareness and perception about it among Indian visitors. Based on the study it is revealed that Malaysia’s cultural tourism resources are not promoted to the extent to which it becomes a significant part of the nation’s destination image. Lack of promotion and information available makes international visitors unaware about the potential of Malaysia as a cultural tourism destination. However, most of the tourists were satisfied with the cultural sites/attractions and think Malaysia is a reasonably good cultural destination.

  4. Telecommunication Value Network in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Business network is believed to offer a superior way of managing the challenges related to the uncertainty and complexity of the contemporary business environment in Malaysia telecommunication industry. This study strives to analyze the value business network in Malaysia telecommunication industry with emphasize on the market leader, Maxis Communication Bhd in its mobile content services. The business network represents the form of organization where the focal company focuses on certain key a...

  5. Radioisotope production in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Anuar Wan Awang [Medical Technology Div., Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) (Malaysia)

    1998-10-01

    Production of Mo-99 by neutron activation of Mo-99 in Malaysia began as early as 1984. Regular supply of the Tc-99m extracted from it to the hospitals began in early 1988 after going through formal registration with the Malaysian Ministry of Health. Initially, the weekly demand was about 1.2 Ci of Mo-99 which catered the needs of 3 nuclear medicine centres. Sensitive to the increasing demand of Tc-99m, we have producing our own Tc-99m generator from imported TeO{sub 2} because irradiation TeO{sub 2} with our reactor give low yield of I-131. We have established the production of radioisotope for industrial use. By next year, Sm-153 EDTMP will be produce after we have license from our competent authority. (author)

  6. Medical education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Victor K E

    2008-01-01

    Malaysia has a long history of medical education, with Singapore becoming the first medical school to serve the region after its foundation in 1905. The first school to be established in Kuala Lumpur after independence from the British was the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Malaya in 1963. Whilst today there are 21 public and private medical schools, all offering a 5 year undergraduate programme, some private schools have diversified by developing international collaboration and conduct twinning or credit-transfer programmes. All medical schools require accreditation by the National Accreditation Board and the Malaysian Medical Council. Although the criteria for accreditation is comprehensive and covers a broad range of areas of assessment, it is debatable whether it always matches the needs of the country. The dramatic increase in medical schools in the last two decades has posed challenges in terms of maintenance of quality, physical infrastructure and suitably qualified faculty.

  7. Dental health in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Z A

    1984-12-01

    Three epidemiological surveys have been carried out in Malaysia since 1971. All showed a high level of caries prevalence. Ninety per cent of school children between the ages of 6 and 18 suffered from dental caries, with a DMFT of approximately 3 and a dft of approximately 2. Ninety-five per cent of the adult population had caries experience, with the mean DMFT being 13.2. Approximately 55 per cent of children showed the presence of gingivitis with the mean number of inflamed gingival units per child ranging from 1.9 to 2.8, while 72.4 per cent of adults had some form of periodontal disease with 29 per cent having pockets deeper than 3 mm. The OHI-S score for adults was 2.2 and 81 per cent used toothbrushes to clean their teeth. A further 5.1 per cent used twigs and fingers with powdered charcoal or salt. One-third of the child population needed orthodontic treatment, with 0.3 per cent examined in peninsular Malaysia having cleft lip or palate or both. In the adult population 10.4 per cent of those examined required some form of orthodontic treatment. Twenty per cent of the children in the survey were in need of dentures; 54.7 per cent of the adults were either in need of dentures or were wearing dentures. Of these 25 per cent had complete dentures. The smoking habit was most commonly associated with pre-cancerous/cancerous lesions with alcohol consumption a close competitor; 114 adults, that is 1.3 per cent of those examined, suffer from leukoplakia but only one case of oral cancer was detected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Dialysis provision in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, T O; Lee, D G; Zaki, M

    2000-06-01

    We determined the provision for dialysis treatment in Malaysia. There were 181 dialysis centres as at 1st June 1999 (161 Haemodialysis (HD) and 20 Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD) centres), providing treatment for 5614 patients. This is equivalent to an estimated prevalence rate of 253 patients per million population (pmp) and new dialysis acceptance rate of 49 patients pmp. Dialysis facilities were widely distributed throughout the country though rather unevenly among states. Penang, Selangor/KL, Malacca led with number of dialysis patients pmp ranging from 417 to 480. Kelantan and Sabah had the lowest provision with 51 and 64 patients pmp respectively. There were more centres and HD capacity in the private sector while the Non-Government Organisation and public sectors had about the same capacity. However the public sector had more patients on account of availability of CAPD and home HD services, as well as low HD capacity to patient ratio. The number ofcentres, HD capacity and patients have increased rapidly especially since 1991; the estimated growth rates were 16.5 centres/year, 658 capacity/year, and 392 patients/year respectively. There was also a trend toward increasing over-capacity in the private and NGO sectors. In conclusion, the level of dialysis provision is increasing, indicating increasing accessibility of dialysis treatment in Malaysia. Over-capacity is a concern in the private and NGO sectors. Thus funding agencies should be encouraged to source provision from those sectors. The public sector still has the crucial role of providing for under-served areas in the country.

  9. Motorcycle fatalities in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Marizwan Abdul Manan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia has the highest road fatality risk (per 100,000 population among the ASEAN countries and more than 50% of the road accident fatalities involve motorcyclists. This study has collected and analysed data from the police, government authorities, and national and international research institutes. Only fatality data are used due to the severe underreporting of severe injuries (up to 600% and slight injuries (up to 1400%. The analysis reveals that the highest numbers of motorcycle fatalities occur in rural locations (61%, on primary roads (62% and on straight road sections (66%. The majority are riders (89%, 16 to 20 years old (22.5%, and 90% of the motorcycles are privately owned. Of those involved in fatal accidents, 75% of the motorcyclists wear helmets, and 35% do not have proper licences. The highest number of fatalities by type of collision is ‘angular or side’ (27.5%. Although fatal motorcyclist crashes mostly involve ‘passenger cars’ (28%, motorcyclists are responsible for 50% of the collisions either by crashing singly (25% or with other motorcyclists (25%. While male motorcyclists predominate (94% of fatalities, female motorcyclists aged 31 to 70, possessing ‘no licence’, not wearing helmets and travelling during the day, account for a higher percentage than male motorcyclists. Malaysia must acquire more motorcycle exposure data and establish an injury recording system and database based on hospital-records. To reduce motorcycle fatalities, it first has to understand why young male motorcyclists are prone to fatal crashes in the evenings and on weekends on rural primary roads, especially on straight road sections.

  10. Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lisbet

    2015-01-01

    An update introduction including recent legislative changes on the Folkchurch of the Faroe Islands......An update introduction including recent legislative changes on the Folkchurch of the Faroe Islands...

  11. Rove Beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae of Lanjak Entimau, Sarawak, East Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauziah Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A study to determine the abundance of rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae was conducted from 15 to 28 June, 2008 at the dipterocarp forest of Lanjak Entimau, Sarawak, Malaysia. Collections were made at five sites namely Kawi River, Menyaring II, Satap, Begua and Joh River. A total of 175 rove beetles comprising of 17 species were sampled from all 5 sites of Lanjak Entimau. There was a high abundance (Margalef index, 3.097 and moderate diversity (Simpson diversity index, 0.798 of rove beetles at Lanjak Entimau. Four species were identified to species level, Orphnebius bakerianus Motschulscky, 1858, Eleusis kraatzi LeConte, 1863, Belonuchus quadratu Nordman, 1837, Bledius gracilicornis Casey, 1889. Seven species were identified to genus level Orphnebius sp., Coproporus sp., Paederus sp1, Paederus sp2, Hesperus sp., Lispinus sp., Bledius sp. and six species could not be identified even to genus level. Six unidentified species probably new for Science. Moderate diversity and high abundance of rove beetles at Lanjak Entimau are due to diverse habitats. Some differences in species sampled from peninsular Malaysia is explained in terms of isolation between Sarawak in Borneo island with peninsular Malaysia.

  12. Focus on Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, L T

    1979-01-01

    Prospects for a stable, prospering economy in Malaysia appear threatened by an uneven distribution of wealth among non-Malay, particularly Chinese, residents. Native Malays, Bumiputra, have benefitted from the government's 20 year New Economic Policy, a system of subsidies to correct economic imbalances among the races. Malay corporate ownership has increased from 2.4% in 1970 to 28% in 1979. However, equity must increase by 26% annually to meet NEP targets. Without the GNP expanding 7-8% yearly, the government will be tempted to acquire assets at low prices. 70% of the total Malay ownership was held by public enterprises holding equity in trust. An elite group of Bumiputra will own a fair number of shares reserved by 1970. 1/5 of the population of Kuala Lumpur are squatters. Among these groups, communal tension is high. The Chinese businessmen are most resistant to native management. Since they control private domestic investment, they have political power. The Industrial Coordination Act (ICA), which gives power to civil servants through a licensing system, protects the system. The Asian Foundation supports management training, business development, and university demonstration projects in legal aid, solar energy, and community psychiatry. Malaysian competence in English enables widespread distribution of the Books for Asia program.

  13. Yaws in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, E K

    1985-01-01

    In 1954, with the assistance of the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, a campaign against yaws was initiated in Malaysia with the formation of a yaws elimination unit in the Ministry of Health. Between 1954 and 1975, the reported annual incidence of yaws fell from 140.85 to 1.25 per 100,000 population. When rates dropped to less than two per 100,000, the program was merged with the general health services. Currently when cases are reported, contacts are traced, school and village surveys are carried out, and appropriate treatment is given. The major problems facing the control program today are a loss of interest in control activities; a smaller number of health workers experienced in the diagnosis, management, and control of the disease; and a growing reluctance to treat asymptomatic contacts with penicillin for fear of anaphylactoid reactions. Despite these problems, it is not an unreasonable expectation that, with continued stimulation from the individuals responsible for infectious disease control, yaws will eventually be eliminated.

  14. Burden of stroke in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Keat Wei; Gan, Siew Hua

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is one of the top five leading causes of death and one of the top 10 causes for hospitalization in Malaysia. Stroke is also in the top five diseases with the greatest burden of disease, based on disability-adjusted life years. However, prospective studies on stroke in Malaysia are limited. To date, neither the prevalence of stroke nor its incidence nationally has been recorded. Hypertension is the major risk factor for stroke. The mean age of stroke patients in Malaysia is between 54.5 and 62.6 years. Traditional medicine is commonly practiced. With the increasing number of stroke cases annually, more government and nongovernment organizations should be involved in primary and secondary prevention strategies.

  15. Developing a Malaysia flood model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseldine, Lucy; Baxter, Stephen; Wheeler, Phil; Thomson, Tina

    2014-05-01

    Faced with growing exposures in Malaysia, insurers have a need for models to help them assess their exposure to flood losses. The need for an improved management of flood risks has been further highlighted by the 2011 floods in Thailand and recent events in Malaysia. The increasing demand for loss accumulation tools in Malaysia has lead to the development of the first nationwide probabilistic Malaysia flood model, which we present here. The model is multi-peril, including river flooding for thousands of kilometres of river and rainfall-driven surface water flooding in major cities, which may cause losses equivalent to river flood in some high-density urban areas. The underlying hazard maps are based on a 30m digital surface model (DSM) and 1D/2D hydraulic modelling in JFlow and RFlow. Key mitigation schemes such as the SMART tunnel and drainage capacities are also considered in the model. The probabilistic element of the model is driven by a stochastic event set based on rainfall data, hence enabling per-event and annual figures to be calculated for a specific insurance portfolio and a range of return periods. Losses are estimated via depth-damage vulnerability functions which link the insured damage to water depths for different property types in Malaysia. The model provides a unique insight into Malaysian flood risk profiles and provides insurers with return period estimates of flood damage and loss to property portfolios through loss exceedance curve outputs. It has been successfully validated against historic flood events in Malaysia and is now being successfully used by insurance companies in the Malaysian market to obtain reinsurance cover.

  16. Galapagos Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of the Galapagos Islands was acquired on March 12, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The Galapagos Islands, which are part of Ecuador, sit in the Pacific Ocean about 1000 km (620 miles) west of South America. As the three craters on the largest island (Isabela Island) suggest, the archipelago was created by volcanic eruptions, which took place millions of years ago. Unlike most remote islands in the Pacific, the Galapagos have gone relatively untouched by humans over the past few millennia. As a result, many unique species have continued to thrive on the islands. Over 95 percent of the islands' reptile species and nearly three quarters of its land bird species cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Two of the more well known are the Galapagos giant tortoise and marine iguanas. The unhindered evolutionary development of the islands' species inspired Charles Darwin to begin The Origin of Species eight years after his visit there. To preserve the unique wildlife on the islands, the Ecuadorian government made the entire archipelago a national park in 1959. Each year roughly 60,000 tourists visit these islands to experience what Darwin did over a century and a half ago. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  17. Migrant labor absorption in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, J

    1992-01-01

    The use of migrant workers to ease labor shortages caused by rapid industrialization in Malaysia during the twentieth century is examined. "This paper will focus on: (1) the extent, composition and distribution of migrant workers; (2) the labor shortage and absorption of migrant workers; and (3) the role of migrant workers in the government's economic restructuring process."

  18. Anurans Collected in West Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1997-01-01

    Distributional records and natural history noles are given for anurans collected in West Malaysia 1976. Rano baramica was observed when it was caught by an Ahaetulfa nasula (Serpentes: Colubridae). Rhacophorus leucomystax, Limnonectes limnociulris and Microhyla heymonsi were all found al night on...

  19. Proton - Malaysia's national car project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    The rise and development of the Malaysian national car project. How this project has become an esential part of the industrial development in Malaysia and how it has underpinned a growing middle class consumption culture with house and car as it pivotal goods....

  20. Primary Teacher Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Chin Phoi; Yee, Chin Peng

    2012-01-01

    In Malaysia the training of primary school teachers is solely carried out by teacher training institutes which offer the Bachelor of Teaching with Honors (Primary education) program and was first launched in 2007. This program prepares primary school teachers specializing in various subjects or major and is carried out in 27 teacher training…

  1. Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) in Peninsular Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiew, R.; Rafidah, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Three species of Daphniphyllum occur in Peninsular Malaysia: D. glaucescens Blume var. lancifolium (Hook.f.) T.C.Huang, D. laurinum (Benth.) Baill. and D. scortechinii Hook.f. Daphniphyllum glaucescens var. glaucescens and var. blumeanum (Baill. ex Müll.Arg.) J.J.Sm. do not occur in Peninsular Malay

  2. Die Parlamentswahlen 2008 in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reher, Stefanie; Knirsch, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Nach den Parlamentswahlen vom März 2008 in Malaysia deutet manches auf einen politischen Umbruch hin: Die regierende Barisan Nasional (BN), die sich bislang einer komfortablen Zweidrittelmehrheit von 91,4 Prozent der Sitze im Parlament des Landes erfreut hatte, rutschte auf 63,1 Prozent ab und das...

  3. Malaysia Economic Monitor, December 2015

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    Growth moderated throughout 2015, affected by a slowdown in private consumption and weak export growth. The authorities have generally managed the downturn in commodity prices and the financial market volatility with a reasonable mix of macro policies. Heightened external volatility calls for prudent macro policies and acceleration of structural reforms. The eleventh Malaysia plan stresses...

  4. Malaysia Economic Monitor, December 2015

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    Growth moderated throughout 2015, affected by a slowdown in private consumption and weak export growth. The authorities have generally managed the downturn in commodity prices and the financial market volatility with a reasonable mix of macro policies. Heightened external volatility calls for prudent macro policies and acceleration of structural reforms. The eleventh Malaysia plan stresses...

  5. The Winter Rainfall of Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Tsay, Jenq-Dar; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Matsumoto, Jun

    2013-01-01

    .... The major cause of the rainfall maximum of Peninsular Malaysia is cold surge vortices (CSVs) and heavy rainfall/flood (HRF) events propagating from the Philippine area and Borneo. In contrast, the major cause of the rainfall maximum of Borneo is these rain-producing disturbances trapped in Borneo. Disturbances of the former group are formed by the cold sur...

  6. Quantitative Study of Green Area for Climate Sensitive Terraced Housing Area Design in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, O. T. S.; Saito, K.; Said, I.

    2014-02-01

    Neighbourhood plays a significant role in peoples' daily lives. Nowadays, terraced housing is common in Malaysia, and green areas in the neighborhood are not used to their maximum. The aim of the research is to quantify the types of green area that are most efficient for cooling the environment for thermal comfort and mitigation of Urban Heat Island. Spatial and environmental inputs are manipulated for the simulation using Geographic Information System (GIS) integrated with computational microclimate simulation. The outcome of this research is a climate sensitive housing environment model framework on the green area to solve the problem of Urban Heat Island.

  7. Population trends in Malaysia: 1970-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Saharani Abdul; Ghani, Puzziawati Ab; Daud, Noorizam

    2014-12-01

    The size of population in Malaysia had reached 28.3 million in 2010 and is expected to increase to 38.6 million in the next 30 years. This demographic milestone that is causing renewed attention to the challenges caused by population growth. This paper looks at the last 40 years of changes in Malaysia population structure due to the changes in demographic phenomenon using data obtained from the Department of Statistics Malaysia. The principal finding of this research indicates that population structure in Malaysia had changed dramatically from the year 1970 to 2010. At the same time, Malaysia has completed its demographic transition in less than four decades. The fall in fertility and mortality rates have led to an improvement in the life expectancy of the population which has resulted an ageing population in Malaysia.

  8. Obesity in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M N; Chee, S S; Nawawi, H; Yusoff, K; Lim, T O; James, W P T

    2002-08-01

    significantly higher in Chinese and urban subjects. Men were moderately active with the exception of the Dayaks. Chinese women were considerably less active than Chinese men. Chinese and Dayak women were less active than Malay and Indian women. In both men and women, Indians recorded the highest PALs. Hence, current nutrition and health surveys reveal that Malaysians are already affected by western health problems. The escalation of obesity, once thought to be an urban phenomenon, has now spread to the rural population at an alarming rate. As Malaysia proceeds rapidly towards a developed economy status, the health of its population will probably continue to deteriorate. Therefore, a national strategy needs to be developed to tackle both dietary and activity contributors to the excess weight gain of the Malaysian population.

  9. Made-in-China Brands Favor Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yun

    2004-01-01

    @@ As an important part of celebrating the 30th anniversary of Sino-Malaysia relations, "Chinese Export Commodities Exhibition &Investment Conference (Malaysia)2004" was held in Putra World TradeCenter, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia during December 16-19, 2004. This fair was sponsored by the Ministry of Commerce of the People's Republic of China, organized by China Foreign Trade Center, and supported by the Economic and Commercial Counselor's Offices of the Embassies of China inASEAN and by Malaysia-China Chamber of Commerce.

  10. Debris flow study in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrin Jaafar, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon of debris flow occurs in Malaysia occasionally. The topography of Peningsular Malysia is characterized by the central mountain ranges running from south to north. Several parts of hilly areas with steep slopes, combined with high saturation of soil strata that deliberately increase the pore water pressure underneath the hill slope. As a tropical country Malaysia has very high intensity rainfall which is triggered the landslide. In the study area where the debris flow are bound to occur, there are a few factors that contribute to this phenomenon such as high rainfall intensity, very steep slope which an inclination more than 35 degree and sandy clay soil type which is easily change to liquidity soil. This paper will discuss the study of rainfall, mechanism, modeling and design of mitigation measure to avoid repeated failure in future in same area.

  11. Electricity energy outlook in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C. S.; Maragatham, K.; Leong, Y. P.

    2013-06-01

    Population and income growth are the key drivers behind the growing demand for energy. Demand for electricity in Malaysia is always growing in tandem with its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth. The growth for electricity in Malaysia forecasted by Economic Planning Unit (EPU) has shown an increase of 3.52% in 2012 compared to 3.48% in 2011. This growth has been driven by strong demand growth from commercial and domestic sectors. The share of electricity consumption to total energy consumption has increased from 17.4% in 2007 to 21.7% in 2012. The total electricity production was reported at 122.12TWh in 2012, where gas is still the major fuel source contributing to 52.7% of the total generation fuel mix of electricity followed by Coal, 38.9%, hydro, 7.3%, oil, 1% and others, 0.2%. This paper aims to discuss the energy outlook particularly the electricity production and ways toward greener environment in electricity production in Malaysia

  12. Island Armor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new law has been enacted to protect China’s islands from destruction After three rounds of deliberations that began in June 2009, the National People’s Congress (NPC) Standing Committee endorsed the Law of Sea

  13. Malaysia (country/area statements).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    According to this statement presented to the Committee on Population of the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, Malaysia by 1984 achieved a crude death rate of 5.3/1000, an infant mortality rate of 17/1000 live births, and a 1983 life expectancy at birth of 67.6 for males and 72.3 for females due primarily to socioeconomic development, better nutrition, and a health system covering 95% of the rural population. Substantial mortality differentials still exist between Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak, between urban and rural areas, and among ethnic groups. Differences in the coverage and quality of mortality statistics also exist. 83.2% of Malaysia's total population of 15.5 million is in Peninsular Malaysia, 7.3% in Sabah, and 9.5% in Sarawak. In Peninsular Malaysia, 55.1% are Malays, 33.9% Chinese, and 10.3% Indians. About 40% of the population is urban, and 39% is under age 15. The average annual rate of growth declined from 2.6% in the 1960s to 2.3% in the 1970s. The total fertility rate fell from 5.1 children in 1970 to 4.1 in 1980. A rise in age at 1st marriage and reduction in marital fertility have been partly offset by an increase in the proportion of women of childbearing age. The population is projected to grow to about 22 million by the year 2000. Chinese and Indians are expected to approach replacement level fertility by that year, but Malay fertility is expected to remain high for some time. Internal migration, 45% of which is intrarural, increased markedly in the 1970s, probably due to rapid modernization, industrialization, land development, and regional imbalances in economic development. In absolute terms a total of 410,000 persons moved from rural to urban areas during the 1970s. Important progress has been made in regional development programs, but further regional development requires resolution of problems related to internal migration and greater efforts to relocate industries in the less developed areas. The

  14. Students Awareness towards Traditional Cultural Dances in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad R. Albattat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia has many ethnic groups, and each ethnic group has own custom and tradition that most Malaysians are not aware, especially traditional dances. Among the Malaysian states, Sabah and Sarawak, situated in the Borneo Island have the most diverse ethnic groups in Sarawak. It has more than 30 ethnic groups. Each of the ethnic groups has its own language, cultures and lifestyle. In this regards, this research focuses on the main ethnic groups of Sarawak which are Orang Ulu, Malays, Melanau, Bidayuh, Chinese and Ibans. The aim of this study is to investigate the level of awareness among the Management and Science University (MSU students regarding their level of awareness and knowledge about traditional dances of Sarawak. The data were gathered by distributing questionnaires among MSU students. The data were then analysed using SPSS system version 18.0. Results concluded that, most of MSU students have limited knowledge about Sarawak traditional dances. Interests, internet, performing arts clubs and family background are the independent variable factors to learn and gain knowledge about Sarawak traditional dances. The level of awareness among MSU students towards Sarawak traditional dances can be enhanced through events and special occasions to increase level of awareness towards Sarawak cultures. The government plays a major role in introducing Sarawak cultures to the whole of Malaysia. Future studies could focus on factors that influence the level of awareness towards Sarawak traditional dances, and the contribution of Sarawak’s traditional dances to Malaysia’s cultural and heritage tourism.

  15. Economic Education in Malaysia: A Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    This report provides a brief description of economic education in Malaysia and indicates interest, on the part of various Asian countries, i.e., Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines, in the establishment of economic education programs. (Editor/RK)

  16. The Evolution of Special Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lay Wah; Low, Hui Min

    2014-01-01

    This article traces the evolution of special education in Malaysia across four chronological stages: before and during the early colonial period (before 1900), pre-independence (1900-1957), post-independence (1957-1990) and modern Malaysia (1990 to the present), through document analysis. By placing current issues and trends within a historical…

  17. Homeschool in Malaysia: A Foresight Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Soon, Ng; Rahman Bin Ahmad, Abd; Bin Sulaiman, Muhammad Ibrahim; Sirisa, Ng Mei Xin

    2015-01-01

    Homeschooling in Malaysia is a form of alternative education that emphasizes quality education based on moral values and beliefs while strengthening family bonds. This alternative form of education is being practiced by a growing number of families in Malaysia. As such, the Ministry of Education has given the green light for intending parents who…

  18. Notes on the Lecythidaceae of Peninsular Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prance, G.T.

    2010-01-01

    In preparation for the account of Lecythidaceae for the Flora of Peninsular Malaysia some changes involving new names are needed. The genus Abdulmajidia is reduced to synonymy with Barringtonia and the necessary new combinations are made. Three new species of Barringtonia from Malaysia are described

  19. The Evolution of Special Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lay Wah; Low, Hui Min

    2014-01-01

    This article traces the evolution of special education in Malaysia across four chronological stages: before and during the early colonial period (before 1900), pre-independence (1900-1957), post-independence (1957-1990) and modern Malaysia (1990 to the present), through document analysis. By placing current issues and trends within a historical…

  20. An Exploration of African Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Irene Tan Ai

    2011-01-01

    The exploratory study is an attempt to understand the reasons that prompted African students to study in Malaysia, the challenges encountered and the coping strategies used. The research on such topics among international students is well documented, but studies on international students in Malaysia are scarce. The sample included 155 African…

  1. Information Policies in Saudi Arabia and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Abdus Sattar

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of national information policy focuses on Saudi Arabia and Malaysia. Documents from the two countries that were reviewed to examine policy provisions related to library and information services are listed, and Malaysia's national policy on library and information services is presented as a model for other developing countries. (Contains…

  2. Economic Education in Malaysia: A Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    This report provides a brief description of economic education in Malaysia and indicates interest, on the part of various Asian countries, i.e., Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines, in the establishment of economic education programs. (Editor/RK)

  3. TOWARDS A SUSTAINABLE TOURISM MANAGEMENT IN MALAYSIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siti Nabiha AK; N Abdul Wahid; A Amran; H Che Haat; I Abustan

    2008-01-01

    .... Protection of the environment is vital in ensuring the sustainability of the industry. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the issues pertaining to sustainable tourism development in Malaysia. In so doing, policies, regulations and strategies to achieve sustainable tourism will be examined. The paper concludes with the arguments for having local agenda for sustainable tourism in Malaysia.

  4. Malaysia mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameshvara Deva, M

    2004-01-01

    Malaysia is a tropical country in the heart of south east Asia with a population of 24 million people of diverse ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds living in harmony in 330,000 km(2) of land on the Asian mainland and Borneo. Malaysia, which lies on the crossroads of trade between east and west Asia, has an ancient history as a centre of trading attracting commerce between Europe, west Asia, India and China. It has had influences from major powers that dominated the region throughout its history. Today the country, after independence in 1957, has embarked on an ambitious development project to make it a developed country by 2020. In this effort the economy has changed from one producing raw material to one manufacturing consumer goods and services and the colonial health system has been overhauled and social systems strengthened to provide better services for its people. The per capita income, which was under 1,000 US dollars at independence, has now passed 4,000 US dollars and continues to grow, with the economy largely based on strong exports that amount to over 100 billion US dollars. The mental health system that was based on institutional care in four mental hospitals at independence from British colonial rule in 1957 with no Malaysian psychiatrists is today largely based on over 30 general hospital psychiatric units spread throughout the country. With three local postgraduate training programmes in psychiatry and 12 undergraduate departments of psychiatry in the country--all started after independence--there is now a healthy development of mental health services. This is being supplemented by a newly established primary care mental health service that covers community mental health by integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental health care at the level of psychiatrists rests with about 140 psychiatrists most of whom had undertaken a four-year masters course in postgraduate psychiatry in Malaysia since 1973. However, there continues to be

  5. A new species of insular Rock Gecko (Genus Cnemaspis Strauch, 1887) from the Bidong Archipelago, Terengganu, Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grismer, L Lee; Wood, Perry L; Ahmad, Amirrudin B; Sumarli, Alexandra S-I; Vazquez, Jessika J; Ismail, Lukman H B; Nance, Ronald; Mohd-Amin, Muhammad Afif B; Othman, Mohamad N A B; Rizaijessika, Syed A; Kuss, Maria; Murdoch, Matthew; Cobos, Anthony

    2014-01-24

    A new insular species Cnemaspis bidongensis sp. nov. (Squamata: Gekkonidae), is described from Pulau Bidong, Terengganu, Peninsular Malaysia and bears a unique suite of morphological and color pattern characters that differentiate it from all other congeners. Cnemaspis bidongensis sp. nov. is the sister species to C. kendallii (Gray) and represents the fifth insular endemic species of Cnemaspis on archipelagos along the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. This species survived massive deforestation of the small island of Bidong (260 ha) from the mid 1970s to the early 1990s when the island served as a Vietnamese refugee camp and harbored as many as 40,000 people at one time. We hypothesize that this species' generalized lifestyle contributed to its survival, allowing it to seek refuge in rocky microhabitats.

  6. Medical Tourism in Malaysia: Prospect and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Abdullah

    2013-08-01

    Tourism, combined with the phrase medical, seems to be a new form of tourism which has gained huge popularity in recent decades. Though, a number of literatures available with regard to the tourism industry and the competitiveness of the destination, however, the major aspects which determine the satisfaction of medical tourists are hardly focused specifically on Malaysia. There is a lack of empirical evidence in this area of study which needs to be bridged. Hence, this study aimed at investigating the various factors contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia. As the purpose of the research was to find out various factors contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia, so this study used Structural Equation modeling (SEM) for data analysis. The target population for this study consisted of the medical tourists coming to Malaysia with the primary intension of seeking medical procedures other than sightseeing. A total sample size of 266 was collected through non-probability judgment sampling during the period between December 2012 and February 2013. The result confirms that destination competitiveness and service quality play an important role in the medical tourist's mind towards medical tourism aspect in Malaysia. Thus, Malaysia need to promote various medical success stories together with the services they offer to attract more foreign patients. This study contributes to the theoretical development in the tourism industry by offering the structured relationship among various aspects contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia.

  7. Revision of the Euagathis species (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Bassinae) from the Sunda Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simbolotti, G.; Achterberg, van C.

    1994-01-01

    The species of the genus Euagathis Szépligeti, 1900 (Braconidae: Bassinae (= Agathidinae)) from the Greater and Lesser Sunda Islands (including West Malaysia) are revised and keyed. The subfamily name Bassinae Nees, 1812, is used because it is senior to the commonly used subfamily name Agathidinae

  8. Green commercial building insurance in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu Xin Ou; Chew, Boon Cheong; Loo, Heoy Shin; Tan, Lay Hong

    2017-03-01

    Green building construction is growing tremendously globally even in Malaysia. Currently, there are approximate 636 buildings have registered and to be certified with Green Building Index. Among these buildings, 45 buildings have already fulfilled the requirements and fully certified. The other buildings still under provisional certification stage. Malaysia had adopted Green Building Index in 2009 to support a move to promote green building concept. Malaysia starts to move towards green building because Malaysian construction and building industry realizes that both energy consumed and waste produced are reduced without irreversible impacts to ecosystems. Consequently, insurance companies such as Fireman's Fund from America has started the green building insurance policies for their green building in the year of 2006, while Malaysia still remain the coverage for green buildings using conventional property insurance. There are lacks of efforts to be seen from insurance companies to propose green building insurance for these green buildings. There are a few factors which can take into consideration for insurance companies to start the very first green building insurance in Malaysia. Although there are challenges, some efficient strategies have been identified to overcome the problems. The methods used in this research topic is qualitative research. The results obtained shows that green commercial building insurance has a huge business opportunity in Malaysia because the number of green commercial buildings are increasing tremendously in Malaysia. It is a favor to implement green building insurance in Malaysia. Furthermore, insurance companies can consider to add in extra coverage in standard building policy to provide extra protection for non-certified green buildings which have the intention to rebuilt in green when damage happens. Generally, it is very important to introduce green commercial buildings insurance into Malaysia so that all of the green commercial

  9. Overview of the Sustainable Uses of Peat Soil in Malaysia with Some Relevant Geotechnical Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashidah Adon

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Peat soil is an important ecosystem that provides a significant contribution to the global climate stability. In Malaysia, peat soils are considered as a soil with little economic benefit, apart from it being used for agricultural activity. The total world coverage of peat soil is about thirty million hectares with Canada and Russia having the largest distribution of peat (Zainorabiddin,2010. More than sixty percent of the world’s tropical peat lands are found in South-East Asia (Lette,2006. Most notable are the large peat land on the islands of Borneo (belonging to Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei and Sumatra (Indonesia. However, there are also significant occurrences in other parts of Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, Thailand and the Philippines. The main contributory functions and benefits of peat soil are within the engineering disciplines of hydrology, agriculture, social-economics, biodiversity habitats and carbon sequestration. Peat was used in temperate climates (especially in Finland, Ireland, Sweden and UK as a fuel to generate electricity and heat. Therefore peat can be considered as a renewable energy source but this will be very detrimental to the market of genuine renewables. The western coastal lowlands of Malaysia (such as Kukup are mangroves that represent the initiation of peat soil formation. Such areas provide the natural habitat of mangrove forests. It also fixes more carbon from the atmosphere than is released and approximately one-quarter of the carbon stored in land plants and soils. On the other hand, peat is one of the problematic or challenging foundation soil of poor quality due to it’s very high water content, high compressibility and low shear strength. Peat consists of decomposed plant fragments and the unfavourable characteristics of peat soil deposits make them unsuitable for making sustainable infrastructure development for varied engineering projects. This paper therefore gives an overview of the pros and cons

  10. Sustainable development and construction industry in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suliman L. Kh. M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable construction is a way for the building and infrastructure industry to move towards achieving sustainable development, taking into account environmental, socioeconomic and cultural issues. Differing approaches and differing economic markets lead to different priorities. This paper presents the construction scenario of Malaysia and the developments in sustainable construction taking place in this country. Barriers to the implementation of sustainable construction are discussed. A list of recommendation was proposed to drive sustainable construction in this country. In conclusion, the status of sustainable construction in Malaysia is still in its infancy. The lack of awareness, training and education, ineffective procurement systems, existing public policies and regulatory frameworks are among the major barriers for sustainable construction in Malaysia. Besides the needs for capacities, technologies and tools, total and ardent commitment by all players in the construction sectors including the governments and the public atlarge are required in order to achieve sustainable construction in Malaysia.

  11. Middle-class projects in modern Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fischer, Johan

    2017-01-01

    .... This is also the case with the Malay Muslim middle class in Malaysia, but how this class is developing over time is not well understood even if the Malays constitute the largest and fastest growing...

  12. Feed-in tariff outlook in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chua, Shing Chyi; Oh, Tick Hui [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia); Goh, Wei Wei [Foundation Studies and Extension Education, Multimedia University, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2011-01-15

    This paper aims to present the feed-in tariff (FiT) outlook in Malaysia, which is in the process of being enacted through a Renewable Energy (RE) Policy by the Government of Malaysia (GoM). A brief in policies leading towards the RE policy and the potential of each RE sources under FiT mechanism have been discussed. The successful utilisation of RE source in electricity generation and the FiT implementation globally are positive indicators to implement FiT in Malaysia. Potentials of FiT on biomass, biogas and solid waste energy are currently very promising in Malaysia, but it is solar energy which is predicted to be the main RE of the future, surpassing all other REs. (author)

  13. Factor Affecting Mobile Adoption Companies in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murat Mahad; Shahimi Mohtar; Rushami Zein Yusoff; Abdul Aziz Othman

    2015-01-01

    .... The low penetration of mobile banking in Malaysia, especially in terms of adoption patterns is becoming the research interest, especially when compared to the total number of cellular telephone...

  14. Chinese Youth Dance Delegation in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the China-Malaysia Friendship Association, a 96-member Chi- nese youth dance delegation organized by the CPAFFC and the Chinese Dancers Association, went to Pinang, a famous tourist

  15. Foreign Students’ Motivation for Studying In Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Muh. Amin; Sugiyanto; Keppi Sukesi; Ismadi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – With the recognition of the importance of education in economy different countries are responding with changes within their education systems. Education is recognized as a foundation to the continued growth of a country but with the globalization of business, is education becoming a commodity?Objective - This paper examines international students’ motivation for studying in Malaysia. The second objective is to analyze educational policies and their implementation within Malaysia.Des...

  16. The economic burden of schizophrenia in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Teoh SL; Chong HY; Abdul Aziz S; Chemi N; Othman AR; Md Zaki N; Vanichkulpitak P; Chaiyakunapruk N

    2017-01-01

    Siew Li Teoh,1 Huey Yi Chong,1 Salina Abdul Aziz,2 Norliza Chemi,2 Abdul Razak Othman,2 Nurzuriana Md Zaki,2 Possatorn Vanichkulpitak,3 Nathorn Chaiyakunapruk1,4–6 1School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, 2Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, 4Center of Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research (CPOR), Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sc...

  17. Efficiency of Commercial Banks in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd. Azmi Omar; Abdul Rahim Abdul Rahman; Rosylin Mohd. Yusof; M Shabri Abd Majid; Mohd. Eskandar Shah Mohd. Rasid

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the change in the productivity of banking industry during the period of 2000 to 2004. The data consists of a panel of 11 commercial banks in Malaysia namely Malayan Banking, Bumiputra-Commerce, Public Bank, RHB Bank, Hong Leong Berhad, EON Bank, Affin Bank, Southern Bank Berhad, Bank Islam Malaysia Berhad (BIMB), Ambank and Bank Muamalat. Productivity is measured by the Malmquist index, using a Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) technique. The Malmquist productivity measu...

  18. Brand Awareness and Consumer Loyalty in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Firend, A.R; Alvandi, S.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study is to evaluate consumer's awareness of brand by studying the relationship between brand awareness and variables such as customer loyalty, customer satisfaction, customer trust and quality of services. The study examines the relationship through a quantitative research methodology conducted in main peninsula Malaysia. The examined brand Air Asia airline's services in Malaysia. This study finds the existence of crucial association between customer loyalty, trust, sa...

  19. Management of Waqf Assets in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Zunaidah Ab Hasan; Azhana Othman; Khalilah Ibrahim; Mohd Ab Malek Md Shah; Abd Halim Mohd Noor

    2015-01-01

    Waqf is one of the main mechanism in providing support for the development to all levels of the ummah more so for the underprivileged. Waqf institutions in Malaysia are under the jurisdiction of the 14 states rather than the Federal government. This paper reviews the development of waqf in Melaka, one of the states in Malaysia. It discusses a brief historical background, function and legal aspects of waqf matters. A brief information on the structure and administration of waqf in Melaka, Bait...

  20. MARITIME VIOLENCE : IMPLICATIONS TO MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurulizwan Ahmad Zubir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maritime Piracy has been a serious threat to the international community especially in the SoutheastAsia region. This threat has caused tremendous implications towards the world economy, environment,political stability of the nations involved because 45% of the shipping company passes through theSoutheast Asia. The worrying fact is that these attacks were committed by terrorists as well as traditionalmaritime pirates. This paper examines on the implications of maritime crime in Malaysia and discusseswhether the definition of piracy under the International Law could be applied to these attacks. Thispaper concludes that cooperation between the region’s states and the enhancement of a good securitysystem of one state are needed to combat maritime violence. Thus it is imperative that the internationallaw need to be changed in order to enhance the meaning of piracy and also to include sea terrorism. Key words: piracy, maritime, terrorist

  1. Epidemiology of cancer in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, E K

    1985-12-01

    Some information on cancer in Malaysia are available, and its epidemiology is described. There is a need for systematic and coordinated collection of cancer statistics which are essential to patient management, cancer control programme formulation, implementation and evaluation. The decision of the Ministry of Health to introduce National Cancer Registry and to encourage epidemiological studies, which will ultimately lead to the utilization of data and introduction of control and preventive activities for cancers are positive steps in the right direction. Meanwhile, curative and palliative treatment is available from the existing hospital facilities, and preventive activities such as actions on smoking and health will be continued until such time when a comprehensive prevention and control programme for cancers in the country is evolved.

  2. Federation of Malaysia. Country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, L

    1985-01-01

    The 1984 population of Malaysia has been estimated at 14.7 million and the population growth rate averaged 2.3% in 1970-80. Population growth is officially encouraged to form a substantial home market for economic development. Toward this end, the 1985 budget has increased tax deductions for families with 5 children. The capital city of Kuala Lumpur is the largest metropolitan area (1 million population) and the Federal Territory is the most densely populated region. Immigration is strictly controlled by the government, and the percentage of foreign-born citizens was 5% in 1980. China, India, and Pakistan are decreasing in importance as countries of origin. Internal mobility, however, is increasing. Rural-rural migration accounted for 45% of internal migration in 1970-80 and was largely motivated by family reasons. Only 7% of Malaysians are estimated to move in search of work. Racial tensions led the government to grant special economic privileges to native-born Islamic Malays. The greatest proportion of the population is centered in the lowest age groups. The percentage of females 15-29 years of age rose from 26% in 1970 to 30% in 1980 and is expected to continue to rise. Fertility is on the decline. The majority of households in the country involve nuclear families. There has been an increase in the number of men and women who delay marriage or remain single. Education is widely available for children aged 6-15 years and those who meet certain academic standards receive free education up to age 19 years. The current labor force is estimated at 5.4 million, with an annual growth rate of 3.1%. Malaysia's per capita income (US $1860 in 1982) is among the highest in Southeast Asia and the gross national product increased by an average annual rate of 8% in 1970-81. The government plans to move toward the development of heavier industries and more manufacturing concerns.

  3. A new Vitex from Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, H.J.; Meeuse, A.D.J.

    1939-01-01

    In 1919 Dr C. A. BACKER collected a plant in the Kangean Archipelago which had the appearance of a Cymaria so that the collector provisionally called it ”Cymaria triphylla BACKER“ (MS.). The same species was also collected by KARTA on the Island of Bawean in 1928. Some other sheets already extant in

  4. Visitor Perceptions on the Impacts of Tourism Activities, Development and Infrastructure on the Environment of Perhentian Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramdas M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is one of the leading contributors to service industry in Malaysia and is gradually growing. The growth of this industry brings impact towards the environment, specifically islands. This study views into the tourists’ perception on the impact of tourism activities, development and infrastructure to the environment of Perhentian Islands. A total number of 258 questionnaires were distributed to tourists in Perhentian Islands which is a popular tourist island destination in Malaysia. The results indicate that there is a significant number of moderate and high level of agreement that tourism activities, development and infrastructure are effecting the island’s environment. It was also found that foreign tourist had significantly higher level of agreement for both variables than local tourist. However, it was found that there was no significant difference among gender for both variables. Establishing carrying capacity and embedding environmental education in sustainable tourism management would help broaden the perception of tourists.

  5. Health profiles of foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ab Rahman, Norazida; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Mohamad Noh, Kamaliah; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2016-01-01

    .... Little is known about the health profiles of foreign population in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed description of the health problems presented by foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia...

  6. Malaysia. Valget handler om vækst og ulighed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Corruption, growth and increasing inequality are some of main theme at the election in Malaysia today.......Corruption, growth and increasing inequality are some of main theme at the election in Malaysia today....

  7. Pulmonary function studies in young healthy Malaysians of Kelantan, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    ... (64 males, 64 females) non-smoking healthy young subjects were randomly sampled for the study from the Kelantanese students' population of the University Sains Malaysia, Kota Bharu Campus, Kelantan, Malaysia...

  8. Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program: Malaysia 1995. Participants' Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaysian-American Commission on Educational Exchange, Kuala Lumpur.

    These reports and lesson plans were developed by teachers and coordinators who traveled to Malaysia during the summer of 1995 as part of the U.S. Department of Education's Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program. Sections of the report include: (1) "Gender and Economics: Malaysia" (Mary C. Furlong); (2) "Malaysia: An Integrated,…

  9. Inter-Religious Dialogue Models in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Sabri Wan Yusof

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, many organizations have involved in the implementation of inter-religious dialogue in Malaysia. However, there are stillthose who doubt the role and purpose of interreligious dialogue. This might be due to lack of information and understanding regardingthe methodology of dialogue and also about different types that it may take. The present study is aimed at exploring a few models ofinter-religious dialogue that have been practised by some organizations that actively involved in dialogue. The study focuses on a review of selected organizational or institutional dialoguemodels such as Center for Civilizational Dialogue (CCD, Students Representative Council of Malaysia Science University (HealthCampus and Inter-faith Spiritual Fellowship (INSaF. This study provides information concerning the various designs of inter-religiousdialogue model in Malaysia and proposes that different designs of inter-religious dialogue rely on its different types and goals. It is found that, the commonly practiced type of dialogue in Malaysia is educational type which focuses on exploring inter-religious commonalities as well as differences which consequently willincrease understanding and foster meaningful engagement between people of different ethnic and religious background in Malaysia. Thistype of dialogue is distinguished from conflict resolution types of dialogue which aims at identifying issues and generating action plansto conflicts or disputes.

  10. Beautiful hainan island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪伦

    2002-01-01

    Hainan Island is the second largest island in China. It is situated on the Nanhai Sea(South China Sea) and faces Guangdong Province across Qiongzhou Strait (海峡).Hainan Province was established (建立)in 1988. It consists of Hainan Island, Xisha Islands, Zhongsha Islands, Nansha Islands and the vast sea areas around them.Its total area is 340,000 km2.

  11. FY 1999 report of the project on the waste-fueled power generation in the north area of Malaysia; 1999 nendo Malaysia hokubu chiiki gomi hatsuden project seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Penang Island, in the northern part of Malaysia, where the urbanization is well advanced and sites for waste disposal are scarce, was selected as a target area for the research on introduction of solid waste (henceforth called reuse) power generation system. About 500 tons of refuse are generated daily in Penang Island, and are disposed of in a coastal landfill site at Jelutong near the center of George Town, the state capital. Although the landfill site is already beyond its capacity, it is still in use because there are no other disposal sites in the island. For this reason, there is widespread concern about coastal environmental pollution. Therefore, the Municipal Council of Penang Island has studied feasibility of transferring refuse to a new landfill site at the peninsula side of Penang State across the Penang Bridge over the sea channel which separates the island and the peninsula. However, this transfer and landfill method has not been realized yet. In view of improvement of these situations regarding solid waste management is Penang Island, it is proposed in this report, as the result of the research, introduction of power generation system fueled already-accumulated refuse in this disposal site together with refuse to be collected every day. The study was started in September 1999 and was completed in March 2000. Japan Environmental Consultants, Ltd. investigated the present situation of solid waste management in Penang Island, analyzed refuse properties, and studied the refuse fueled power generation technology with the cooperation of SIRIM (Environmental and Energy Technology Centre) and PTM (Pusat Tenaga Malaysia, Malaysia Energy Centre) in Malaysia. In concrete, the research team established a scheme of an integrated system most suitable for the refuse treatment including refuse power generation in Penang Island, the famous resort of northern Malaysia, and studied its feasibility. The proposed system is combination of selective pulverizing classifiers

  12. Antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, Zaleha Abdullah; Basri, Hashimah; Md Isa, Zaleha; Ahmad, Shuhaila; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Mohd Amin, Rahmah

    2014-04-01

    To determine the adequacy of antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia, and the influencing factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among postnatal women who delivered in two tertiary hospitals. Data were collected from antenatal cards, hospital documents and diet recall on daily milk and calcium intake during pregnancy. SPSS version 19.0 was used for statistical analyses. A total of 150 women were studied. The total daily calcium intake was 834 ± 43 mg (mean ± standard error of the mean), but the calcium intake distribution curve was skewed to the right with a median intake of 725 mg daily. When calcium intake from milk and calcium supplements was excluded, the daily dietary calcium intake was only 478 ± 25 mg. Even with inclusion of milk and calcium supplements, more than a third (n=55 or 36.7%) of the women consumed less than 600 mg calcium in their daily diet. The adequacy of daily calcium intake was not influenced by maternal age, ethnicity, income or maternal job or educational status as well as parity. The daily dietary calcium intake of the Malaysian antenatal population is far from adequate without the addition of calcium supplements and milk. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. Overview of cancer in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Gerard Chin Chye

    2002-03-01

    The problem of cancer in Malaysia is a growing one. It is now the fourth leading cause of death among medically certified deaths. Cancer of the lung is the most common killer among malignancies. It is estimated that the annual incidence of cancer is 30 000. The majority of patients are found at a late stage of the disease. The National Cancer Control Program aims to reduce the incidence and mortality of cancer and to improve the quality of life of cancer patients. Policies encompass prevention, early diagnosis, treatment, palliative care and rehabilitation. The program for prevention includes an anti-smoking campaign and immunization of babies against hepatitis B. Papanicolaou's smear and breast self-examination are among efforts for the early detection of cancer. Public education and the promotion of healthy lifestyles have been actively carried out. Facilities for treatment and palliative care are being developed further. Networks between the public and private sectors and non-governmental organizations have been on-going. Apart from the establishment and upgrading of treatment facilities, the need for training of skilled staff in the treatment of cancer is highlighted.

  14. Exploring factors influencing smoking behaviour in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Yong Kang; Naidu, Balkish Mahadir

    2012-01-01

    The objective of present study is to investigate the determinants of smoking behaviour among adults in Malaysia. Findings of the Third National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS-3) by the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, were used. The sample consisted of 34,539 observations. A logistic regression model was thus applied to estimate the probability to participate in smoking. Age, income, gender, marital status, ethnicity, employment status, residential area, education, lifestyle and health status were statistically significant in affecting the likelihood of smoking. Specifically, youngsters, low income earners, males, unmarried individuals, Malays, employed individuals, rural residents and primary educated individuals were more likely to smoke. In conclusion, socio-demographic, lifestyle and health factors have significant impacts on smoking participation in Malaysia. Based on these empirical findings, several policy implications are suggested.

  15. Modeling of gold production in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Nora; Ainuddeen, Nasihah Rasyiqah; Ismail, Hamizun; Umor, Mohd Rozi

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to identify the main factors that contribute to the gold production and hence determine the factors that affect to the development of the mining industry in Malaysia. An econometric approach was used by performing the cointegration analysis among the factors to determine the existence of long term relationship between the gold prices, the number of gold mines, the number of workers in gold mines and the gold production. The study continued with the Granger analysis to determine the relationship between factors and gold production. Results have found that there are long term relationship between price, gold production and number of employees. Granger causality analysis shows that there is only one way relationship between the number of employees with gold production in Malaysia and the number of gold mines in Malaysia.

  16. Middle-class projects in modern Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Within the last two decades or so there has been increased scholarly focus on the emergence, consolidation and future of the middle class in developing Asia. This is also the case with the Malay Muslim middle class in Malaysia, but how this class is developing over time is not well understood even...... if the Malays constitute the largest and fastest growing section of the middle class in Malaysia. Based on research projects I have carried out from the mid-1990s to the present, this article argues that an unpacking of the Malay Muslim middle class over time is important in order to understand the broader...... picture surrounding this class and its relationship to Malaysian national repertoires such as Islamic revivalism, politics, consumer culture, social mobility and the state-market nexus. I understand middle-class projects to be the making of local class culture in Malaysia and explore these in four...

  17. Radiation exposure during travelling in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, M; Hassan, A; Sulaiman, I

    2006-01-01

    Absorbed dose rates in vehicles during travelling by different modes of transport in Malaysia were measured. Radiation levels measured on roads in Peninsular Malaysia were within a broad range, i.e. between 36 and 1560 nGy h(-1). The highest reading, recorded while travelling near monazite and zircon mineral dumps, was 13 times the mean environmental radiation level of Malaysia. It is evident that radioactive material dumps on the roadsides can influence the radiation level on the road. The absorbed dose rates measured while travelling on an ordinary train were between 60 and 350 nGy h(-1). The highest reading was measured when the train passed a tunnel built through a granite rock hill. The measurement during sea travelling by ferries gave the lowest radiation level owing to merely cosmic radiation at the sea level.

  18. TOWARDS A SUSTAINABLE TOURISM MANAGEMENT IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nabiha AK

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Tourism industry is a key foreign exchange earner for Malaysia, contributing to over 40% of the country’s balance of payment in 2005 (EPU, 2006. The industry provides an important source of income, employment and wealth to the country. Thus, there is a need to ensure that the tourism industry remains both environmentally and economically sustainable. However massive influx of tourists can also cause a detrimental environmental impact. Industry players and improper strategies in attracting more tourists could also add further destruction to the environment. Protection of the environment is vital in ensuring the sustainability of the industry. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the issues pertaining to sustainable tourism development in Malaysia. In so doing, policies, regulations and strategies to achieve sustainable tourism will be examined. The paper concludes with the arguments for having local agenda for sustainable tourism in Malaysia.

  19. Assessment of Outdoor Thermal Comfort and Wind Characteristics at Three Different Locations in Peninsular Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanipah Mohd Hafizal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization and rapid growth in construction have led to the problems of global warming and urban heat island throughout the world. In order to reduce these problems particularly in hot and humid climatic region, a research on current level of outdoor thermal comfort and wind characteristics based on the local weather conditions around Malaysia should be conducted. This paper reports on the analysis of outdoor thermal comfort level at hottest temperatures and wind characteristics at three locations in Peninsular Malaysia by using hourly climatic data recorded by Malaysian Meteorological Department (MetMalaysia. The level of outdoor thermal comfort was assessed based on the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI. The results showed extreme heat stress conditions have occurred at Alor Setar, Kuantan, and Subang with UTCI values of 51.2°C, 49.7°C, and 49.0°C respectively taking into account only temperature data from the year 2012 to 2014. However, for 20 years data from 1994 to 2014, the calculated UTCI also showed extreme heat stress conditions with their respective values of 49.6°C, 43.8°C, and 49.7°C for Alor Setar, Kuantan, and Subang respectively. Meanwhile, the hourly mean wind speed for three years data at Alor Setar, Kuantan, and Subang, were 1.70m/s, 1.69m/s, and 1.63m/s respectively. The highest mean wind speed of 11.6m/s was observed at Subang, while no wind movement (i.e. 0m/s was considered to be the lowest hourly wind speed for all three locations. The observed prevailing wind direction for all the three locations was from the north (0°. It can be concluded that Peninsular Malaysia is generally facing extreme heat stress problem due to unfavourable climatic conditions.

  20. TRAFFIC LIGHT VIOLATION AMONG MOTORISTS IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    S. KULANTHAYAN

    2007-01-01

    Road crashes in Malaysia in 2006 stood at 341,232. This resulted in 6,287 deaths among road users giving an index of 23.5 road fatalities per 100,000 inhabitants. One of the possible reasons for the high number of crashes and injuries is due to beating traffic lights. Thus there is a need to investigate this alarming problem. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Selangor, Malaysia to identify road traffic-light violations. Traffic light violations are believed to be rising and resulted in...

  1. The economic burden of schizophrenia in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teoh SL

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Siew Li Teoh,1 Huey Yi Chong,1 Salina Abdul Aziz,2 Norliza Chemi,2 Abdul Razak Othman,2 Nurzuriana Md Zaki,2 Possatorn Vanichkulpitak,3 Nathorn Chaiyakunapruk1,4–6 1School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, 2Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, 4Center of Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research (CPOR, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand; 5School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA; 6Health and Well-being Cluster, Global Asia in the 21st Century (GA21 Platform, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, MalaysiaIntroduction: Schizophrenia (SCZ is a highly debilitating disease despite its low prevalence. The economic burden associated with SCZ is substantial and mainly attributed to productivity loss. To improve the understanding of economic burden of SCZ in the low- and middle-income country regions, we aimed to determine the economic burden of SCZ in Malaysia.Methods: A retrospective study was conducted using a prevalence-based approach from a societal perspective in Malaysia with a 1 year period from 2013. We used micro-costing technique with bottom-up method and included direct medical cost, direct non-medical cost, and indirect cost. The main data source was medical chart review which was conducted in Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL. The medical charts were identified electronically by matching the unique patient’s identification number registered under the National Mental Health Schizophrenia Registry and the list of patients in HKL in 2013. Other data sources were government documents, literatures, and local websites. To ensure robustness of result, probabilistic sensitivity analysis was conducted.Results: The total estimated number of treated SCZ cases in Malaysia in 2015 was 15,104 with the total economic burden of USD 100 million

  2. Infant feeding practices in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S T

    1978-12-01

    Retrospective nutritional data on 100 children, aged 6 months to 2 1/2 years, who were admitted to the University Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, was obtained by interviewing the mothers of the children. Analysis of the data revealed that 1) only 49% of the children were breast-fed as infants; 2) 50% of the mothers who did breast-feed discontinued breast-feeding before the children were 3 months old; and 3) the weaning diet of at least 1/3 of the children was inadequate. 18% of the children were Malays, 49% were Chinese, and 33% were Indian. The proportion of breast-fed children was highest among the Malays and lowest among the Chinese. Mothers with higher incomes tended to stop breast-feeding earlier than mothers with lower incomes. 67% of the women said they stopped breast-feeding due to inadequate lactation. Most of the children received supplementary foods at relatively early ages. 50% of the infants received starchy foods by the time they were 3 1/2 months old, and 50% received fruit or fruit juice by the time they were 3 1/2 months old. Vegetable products, meat, fish, and eggs were not added to the diet until the children were considerably older. Recommendations, based on the study findings, were 1) hospitals should discontinue the practice of deferring breast-feeding initiation for 24 hours after delivery; 2) mothers should be encouraged to breast-feed fully; and 3) health personnel should discourage the widespread use of costly precooked cereals for supplementary feeding. Tables depicted 1) the frequency distribution of the 100 children by income and by milk feeding patterns according to ethnic affiliation and 2) the cost of serving precooked cereals as compared to the cost of serving home cooked meals.

  3. Problems of Boarding Students at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Malaysia: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Imtiaz Ahmed Chandio; Mir Aftab Hussain Talpur; Shabir Hussain Khahro

    2012-01-01

    This study is carried out to determine the problems of transportation service and canteen facility available to the students of kolej-15-16 (hostels) at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Malaysia. A set of questionnaire was designed and distributed randomly to the selected respondents of the study area. The collected data was analyzed in the “Statistical Programme for Social Sciences (SPSS)”. Simple frequency distribution analysis and chi-square t-test analysis are applied to study the lev...

  4. Deforestation and avian extinction on tropical landbridge islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Navjot S; Wilcove, David S; Lee, Tien Ming; Sekercioglu, Cagan H; Subaraj, R; Bernard, Henry; Yong, Ding Li; Lim, Susan L H; Prawiradilaga, Dewi M; Brook, Barry W

    2010-10-01

    There are few empirical data, particularly collected simultaneously from multiple sites, on extinctions resulting from human-driven land-use change. Southeast Asia has the highest deforestation rate in the world, but the resulting losses of biological diversity remain poorly documented. Between November 2006 and March 2008, we conducted bird surveys on six landbridge islands in Malaysia and Indonesia. These islands were surveyed previously for birds in the early 1900 s, when they were extensively forested. Our bird inventories of the islands were nearly complete, as indicated by sampling saturation curves and nonparametric true richness estimators. From zero (Pulau Malawali and Pulau Mantanani) to 15 (Pulau Bintan) diurnal resident landbird species were apparently extirpated since the early 1900 s. Adding comparable but published extinction data from Singapore to our regression analyses, we found there were proportionally fewer forest bird extinctions in areas with greater remaining forest cover. Nevertheless, the statistical evidence to support this relationship was weak, owing to our unavoidably small sample size. Bird species that are restricted to the Indomalayan region, lay few eggs, are heavier, and occupy a narrower habitat breadth, were most vulnerable to extinction on Pulau Bintan. This was the only island where sufficient data existed to analyze the correlates of extinction. Forest preservation and restoration are needed on these islands to conserve the remaining forest avifauna. Our study of landbridge islands indicates that deforestation may increasingly threaten Southeast Asian biodiversity.

  5. Marine Pollution at Northeast of Penang Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Gasim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Oceans cover large area of earth surface and it is important for humans to protect from pollution. Malaysia has large marine areas which consist of islands, coastal and sea areas which are facing pollution problem due to the rapid urbanization and industrialization. This study investigated sources of marine pollution occurred at area near a reclamation project at the northeast of Penang Island. Three locations were chosen for water sampling which included Sg. Fetes, North Tanjung Tokong and Gurney Drive. Experiments were conducted to investigate the parameters namely Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, pH, Dissolved Oxygen (DO, the presence of Coliform and E. coli, nitrate nitrogen, Total Phosphorus (TP and turbidity. Visual observation during the site visit was also recorded. Laboratory results show that Gurney Drive is the most polluted location compared to other sampling points as it received flows from the existing island. The highest COD was 550 mg/L recorded at Gurney Drive followed by 290 mg/L at Sg. Fetes and 187 mg/L at North Tanjung Tokong. This study shows that the marine pollution was contributed from various sources with different impacts and resulted from the discharge from the existing mainland itself. Thus, pollution input should be controlled and mitigated for better water quality in the future.

  6. Hawaiian Island Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The entire Hawaiian Island Archipelago (21.5N, 158.0W) is seen in this single view. The islands are a favorite international resort and tourist attraction drawing visitors from all over the world to enjoy the tropical climate, year round beaches and lush island flora. Being volcanic in origin, the islands' offer a rugged landscape and on the big island of Hawaii, there is still an occasional volcanic eruption of lava flows and steam vents.

  7. Nickel biopathways in tropical nickel hyperaccumulating trees from Sabah (Malaysia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ent, Antony; Callahan, Damien L.; Noller, Barry N.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J.; Barnabas, Alban; Harris, Hugh H.

    2017-02-01

    The extraordinary level of accumulation of nickel (Ni) in hyperaccumulator plants is a consequence of specific metal sequestering and transport mechanisms, and knowledge of these processes is critical for advancing an understanding of transition element metabolic regulation in these plants. The Ni biopathways were elucidated in three plant species, Phyllanthus balgooyi, Phyllanthus securinegioides (Phyllanthaceae) and Rinorea bengalensis (Violaceae), that occur in Sabah (Malaysia) on the Island of Borneo. This study showed that Ni is mainly concentrated in the phloem in roots and stems (up to 16.9% Ni in phloem sap in Phyllanthus balgooyi) in all three species. However, the species differ in their leaves – in P. balgooyi the highest Ni concentration is in the phloem, but in P. securinegioides and R. bengalensis in the epidermis and in the spongy mesophyll (R. bengalensis). The chemical speciation of Ni2+ does not substantially differ between the species nor between the plant tissues and transport fluids, and is unambiguously associated with citrate. This study combines ion microbeam (PIXE and RBS) and metabolomics techniques (GC-MS, LC-MS) with synchrotron methods (XAS) to overcome the drawbacks of the individual techniques to quantitatively determine Ni distribution and Ni2+ chemical speciation in hyperaccumulator plants.

  8. The 2004 tsunami in Penang, Malaysia: early mental health intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Saroja; Subramaniam, Kavitha; Indran, Tishya; Low, Wah-Yun

    2012-07-01

    Disasters, natural or man-made, bring numerous health care challenges. In any crisis, mental health programs are a requirement during both the acute and postemergency phases. In the Asian tsunami on December 26, 2004, some of the northwestern coastal areas of Malaysia, particularly the island of Penang, were affected with devastating effects on the residents. Such disasters can predispose to mental health problems among the affected people. An early mental health intervention program was carried out in Balik Pulau, Penang, an area badly affected by the tsunami. The objective of the intervention program was to identify the victims, counsel them, make referrals if necessary, and provide help and resources to prevent the development of mental health problems. Penang residents identified as tsunami victims by the local health authorities were recruited. A group of health care workers, school teachers, village authorities, and volunteers were trained to carry out the crisis intervention program by health care workers experienced in crisis interventions. A total of 299 adults participated in the crisis intervention program, with follow-up assessments being made 4 to 6 weeks later. At the follow-up assessment, 1% of the victims had a problem and they were then referred for further medical assessment. This indicates that the intervention program in the first 2 weeks after the tsunami disaster with referrals to medical services may have helped stabilize the victims.

  9. Mass Communication in Malaysia: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Lim Huck, Comp; Sarachandran, V.V., Comp.

    This bibliography lists published and unpublished material relating to mass communications in Malaysia, 1945 to 1973. Most of the items listed are written in English and Malay, and a limited number are in Chinese. The bibliography is divided into 21 sections: bibliography and reference material; communication theory, research methods;…

  10. Ethnicity, Communal Relations, and Education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C. L.

    Communal life in Malaysia is characterized by discords, tensions, and strife, especially between the Malays and Chinese. By and large, Malays are educationally and economically backward in comparison to non-Malays. Malays seek to redress what they consider racial imbalances through use of their political power. Constitutionally, certain privileges…

  11. The Law of Student Discipline in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Tie Fatt

    2008-01-01

    Judicial review of decisions on student discipline is limited in Malaysia. This arises because of the general presumption that in the enforcement of school discipline, educators are able to act in the best interest of the student to maintain a safe learning environment. This article examines the range of disciplinary measures in Malaysian schools…

  12. Islam and Economic Growth in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    other beneficial expenses, to enable Muslims, through the use of their savings, to partake in capital investments actively, which are halal ...by the year 2020. Currently, this vision was reflected in the efforts to make Malaysia a center for tourism , education, IT, and knowledge-based

  13. Father Involvement among Malay Muslims in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhari, Rumaya; Yaacob, Siti Nor; Talib, Mansor Abu

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on findings from a study of 989 fathers of school-going children aged 10 through 16 from intact families in rural and urban areas in Selangor, Malaysia. The study aims to explore the factors that affect father involvement among Malay Muslims. Results indicate that fathers' education, marital quality, and number of…

  14. Inclusive Education in Malaysia: Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelas, Zalizan M.; Ali, Manisah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia's move towards inclusion was given impetus by its participation in workshops and conferences set up under the auspices of the United Nations (UNESCO 1990; UN 1993; UNESCO 1994). Inclusive education was introduced in the Education Act 1996 as part of the continuum of services available for children with special needs. The purpose of this…

  15. Privatization of Higher Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, G.

    2007-01-01

    The study will trace the external factors influencing the liberalization, deregulation and privatization of higher education in Malaysia from 1970 to the present and to analyze the effects of liberalization, deregulation and privatization on the modes of privatization and the internal restructuring of institutions of higher learning to increase…

  16. Teacher Preparation in Malaysia: Needed Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Pauline Swee Choo; Blake, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The article attempts to present personal views of some changes that are needed to be made within teacher education in Malaysia. It uses one teacher education university as a point of reference to forward concerns. The university remains anonymous as it is not the intent of the article to critique the university but rather to highlight the more…

  17. Inclusive Education in Malaysia: Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelas, Zalizan M.; Ali, Manisah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia's move towards inclusion was given impetus by its participation in workshops and conferences set up under the auspices of the United Nations (UNESCO 1990; UN 1993; UNESCO 1994). Inclusive education was introduced in the Education Act 1996 as part of the continuum of services available for children with special needs. The purpose of this…

  18. Teacher Preparation in Malaysia: Needed Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Pauline Swee Choo; Blake, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The article attempts to present personal views of some changes that are needed to be made within teacher education in Malaysia. It uses one teacher education university as a point of reference to forward concerns. The university remains anonymous as it is not the intent of the article to critique the university but rather to highlight the more…

  19. LEPTOSPIROSIS INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY IN MALAYSIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Leong; Soelar, Shahrul Aiman; Mohd Suan, Mohd Azri; Hussin, Narwani; Cheah, Wee Kooi; Verasahib, Khebir; Goh, Pik Pin

    2016-05-01

    Leptospirosis is endemic in Southeast Asia, Central and South America, the Caribbean, and Oceania. Malaysia was categorized as a probable endemic country without any available data. Thus, this study was conducted to determine incidence, case fatality rate and mortality rate of leptospirosis. Leptospirosis is a notifiable disease in Malaysia since 2010 whereby probable or confirmed cases must be notified to relevant health district office. There were 3,665 and 4,457 probable and laboratory confirmed leptospirosis cases notified in 2012 and 2013, respectively. In the 2-year period, the most common age group of patients was 19 years old or less (23.3%) with male:female ratio of 2.61:1. Students consisted about 16.9% of patients, followed by agriculture-based or plantation workers (14.7%). Overall age-standardized incidence rate of leptospirosis in Malaysia for 2012 and 2013 was 29.02 per 100,000. Overall case fatality rate was 1.47% for 2-year period and overall age-standardized mortality rate was 0.45 per 100,000. Leptospirosis is an emerging public health concern in Malaysia and may pose a significant health impact and burden to the nation in the coming years if not well controlled.

  20. OUTLINE OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING IN MALAYSIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Dept. of Labour and National Service, Perth.

    THE FEDERATION OF MALAYSIA HAD A 1964 POPULATION OF 9,000,000. SPECIALIZATION IN A FEW EXPORT PRODUCTS, NOTABLY RUBBER AND TIN, HAS BEEN THE BASIS OF THE ECONOMY. EDUCATION IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION AND EFFORT IS BEING MADE TO ESTABLISH MALAY AS THE NATIONAL LANGUAGE. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION EXTENDS FOR 6 YEARS TO THE LOWER…

  1. Middle-class projects in modern Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fischer, Johan

    2017-01-01

    ... section of the middle class in Malaysia. Based on research projects I have carried out from the mid-1990s to the present, this article argues that an unpacking of the Malay Muslim middle class over time is important in order to understand...

  2. Knowledge Management in University Administration in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad, Roshayu; Manning, Karen; Tatnall, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Part 2: What Issues Do Those Developing New Educational Management Information System Face?; International audience; Knowledge management is important to both business and government organisations as a means of improving their operations. This research project investigated cultural factors affecting knowledge management in higher education administrative departments in Malaysia. It considered strategic decisions made by university administrations and adoption decisions made by individual staf...

  3. The biotechnology and bioeconomy landscape in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arujanan, Mahaletchumy; Singaram, Muthu

    2017-06-28

    Since 1990s Malaysia aspired to make biotechnology and bioeconomy as her engines of economic growth to utlise the abundance of natural resources and biodiversity. The public sector plays an integral role in developing the sector and various incentives are in place for the private sector to be actively involved and to forge collaboration with the public sector. The country launched its National Biotechnology Policy in 2005 and later launched its National Bioeconomy Programme in 2010 to become the first country in South East Asia and second in Asia after China to have such an initiative. Malaysia is also very proactive in its biosafety law and regulations and has most of the related legal instrument in place. A lot of success has been recorded since the inception of the National Biotechnology Policy in terms of job creation, contribution to GDP through biobusinesses and investment from foreign companies, but the sector is not spared from challenges too. Due to the nature of the discipline that is multidisciplinary and that requires huge amount of investment, expertise and political will, there are a lot of barriers before the country emerges as a bioeconomy player. This paper discusses the public policies, initiatives and funding mechanisms in place in Malaysia that drive its research, development and commercialisation in the area of biotechnology and bioeconomy. The authors also discuss the challenges faced in Malaysia in implementing the policies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Burnout among Female Teachers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Ahour, Touran

    2011-01-01

    This study is an attempt to survey the burnout level of female teachers in Malaysia and determine the likely factors that are associated with this phenomenon. The subjects of the study were 437 female teachers from primary, secondary, and tertiary levels. A demographic questionnaire was used to collect the data regarding the individual…

  5. Burnout among English Language Teachers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Khandehroo, Koroush

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of burnout has always been under scrutiny, especially with reference to the teachers and their demographics. This study has deliberately focused on the English teachers' burnout and its relation with their demographics of age and workload in Malaysia. The findings showed that burnout is evident at high levels in all dimensions. In…

  6. MALAYSIA Hidden Paradise of Southeast Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Remaining as one of the most pleasant and hassle-free countries in Southeast Asia, Malaysia attracts a huge number of tourists from around the world every year due to its splendid tropical beach resorts,golden sandy beaches, magnificent rainforests pluralist culture and brilliant shopping bargains.

  7. Malaysia - Productivity and Investment Climate Assessment Update

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2009-01-01

    In the decades prior to the Asian financial crisis, the Malaysian economy experienced rapid growth and a significant structural transformation. It went from an economy that relied on agriculture and commodities to one dominated by manufacturing and services. Since then, however, Malaysia's growth has slowed to a level well below its key competitors in Asia, including the large labor-surplu...

  8. Malaysia and the Frontiers of Growth Trilogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    I wrote this trilogy about the growth challenges facing Malaysia while I was setting up a School of Economics for University of Nottingham on their beautiful campus on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur. Even driving can inspire economists as they move between countries and I find this the most...

  9. Sphagnum bogs of Kelantan, Peninsular Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, T.L.; Kamarudin, S.; Chew, M.Y.; Kiew, R.

    2009-01-01

    Sphagnum bog, a unique plant community for Peninsular Malaysia was encountered on Padang Ragut, Kelantan. Its topographical features and flora are described, and compared with padang and upper montane floras. It is postulated that the community is derived from upper montane forest and is the result

  10. Leptospirosis in Northeastern Malaysia: Misdiagnosed or Coinfection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Noor Rafizah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the past decade leptospirosis has been re-emerging as an important disease and can be a serious public health issue in a humid tropical and subtropical country such as Malaysia. Leptospirosis also known as “the Great Mimicker” and may be overlooked and under diagnosed due to its varied clinical presentations. Objective: Since leptospirosis is a significant cause of undifferentiated fever and frequently not recognized, this study was conducted to determine the prevalence of this disease among febrile patients in northeastern Malaysia hospitals. Design: A hospital-based cross sectional study was conducted among 999 of febrile patients admitted in 10 hospitals in northeastern Malaysia. Materials and methods: An interviewer-guided proforma sheet on sociodemographic and final hospital diagnosis data was distributed to all adult patients with fever on admission. Serum sample for leptospirosis was screened by IgM Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay test (IgM ELISA and confirmed by Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT. The cut-off point for positive MAT was ≥1:400 titre in single acute specimen. Results: The seroprevalence of leptospirosis was 8.4% (95% CI: 6.8, 10.3 (n=84 by MAT. In our study, only 31.0% of the confirmed leptospirosis cases by MAT in northeastern Malaysia hospitals were diagnosed as leptospirosis for the final diagnosis on discharge. About 38.1%, 14.3% and 7.1% of the confirmed leptospirosis cases by MAT were diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever, pneumonia and typhoid fever respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of leptospirosis is probably high among febrile patients in northeastern Malaysia hospitals. Awareness and knowledge regarding this disease should be strengthened, especially among public and health care personnel due to the clinical symptoms of leptospirosis mimicking other tropical diseases.

  11. The genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhalifah, Hanim Kamis; Syaza, Fatnin Hisham; Chambers, Geoffrey Keith; Edinur, Hisham Atan

    2016-07-15

    This article explores the genetic history of the various sub-populations currently living in Peninsular Malaysia. This region has received multiple waves of migrants like the Orang Asli in prehistoric times and the Chinese, Indians, Europeans and Arabs during historic times. There are three highly distinct lineages that make up the Orang Asli; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. The Semang, who have 'Negrito' characteristics, represent the first human settlers in Peninsular Malaysia arriving from about 50,000ya. The Senoi later migrated from Indochina and are a mix between an Asian Neolithic population and the Semang. These Asian genomes probably came in before Austroasiatic languages arrived between 5000 and 4000years ago. Semang and Senoi both now speak Austro-Asiatic languages indicative of cultural diffusion from Senoi to Semang. In contrast, the Proto-Malays who came last to the southern part of this region speak Austronesian language and are Austronesians with some Negrito admixture. It is from this group that the contemporary Malays emerged. Here we provide an overview of the best available genetic evidences (single nucleotide polymorphisms, mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosome, blood groups, human platelet antigen, human leukocyte antigen, human neutrophil antigen and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) supporting the complex genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia. Large scale sampling and high throughput genetic screening programmes such as those using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analyses have provided insights into various ancestral and admixture genetic fractions in this region. Given the now extensive admixture present in the contemporary descendants of ancient sub-populations in Peninsular Malaysia, improved reconstruction of human migration history in this region will require new evidence from ancient DNA in well-preserved skeletons. All other aspects of the highly diverse and complex genetic makeup in Peninsular Malaysia should be

  12. Existing Noise Level at Railway Stations in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahidan Shahiron

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Railway transportation known as one of the most environmental friendly transportation mode. However, the significance problems of railway transportation are noise pollution and negatively impact the wellbeing of the whole community. Unfortunately, there has been lack of public awareness about the noise level produce by the railway transportation in Malaysia. This study investigates the noise level produced by railway transportation in Malaysia specifically by Keretapi Tanah Melayu Berhad (KTMB. Methods of collecting existing noise level at railway stations in Malaysia are briefly discussed in this study. The finding indicates that the noise level produced by the railway transportation in Malaysia which is by KTMB is considered as dangerous to human being and also exceed the noise limit that has been assigned by Department of Environment Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of Malaysia. A better noise barrier and improved material should be developed to mitigate the existing noise level produced by railway transportations in Malaysia.

  13. Internet use and addiction among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haque, Mainul; A. Rahman, Nor; Azim Majumder, Md. Anwarul; Haque, Seraj Zohurul; Kamal, Zubair M; Islam, Zakirul; Haque, ATM Emdadul; Rahman, Nor Azlina A; Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi

    2016-01-01

    ... of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 2Department of Biomedical Science, Kulliyyah of Allied Health Sciences, Kuantan, Malaysia...

  14. Critical Success Factors for Limited Service Hotels in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Chee Keng

    2015-01-01

    Critical success factors were used originally in Information technology areas when it was first introduced but has since been applied generically in other industries. This study explores the critical success factors for limited service hotels in Malaysia from both customer and hotel operator/ business owners’ perspective. The literature presents information from tourism in general and in Malaysia, definition of limited service hotels and its relevance to the hospitality industry in Malaysia, ...

  15. Establishing in Malaysia : The Impact of Cultural Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Dohlnér, Lisa; Grom, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Malaysia is one of the developing countries in the world that is on the verge to become de-veloped (Internationella Programkontoret, 2003). In 2004, Malaysia had a growth rate around 7% (United Nation Statistic Division, 2005) and it is implied that the Malaysian market is continuously growing. One factor that can increase the growth rate in Malaysia is foreign direct investments (FDI), which is, according to Chino (2004), one factor of sus-tainable growth. It has been noticed that the world ...

  16. Geographical distribution of Musa gracilis Holttum in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfazlina, B.; Wickneswari, R.; Choong, C. Y.

    2016-11-01

    Musa gracilis (Musaceae) is placed under section Callimusa and was considered endemic to Peninsular Malaysia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current occurrence of Musa gracilis in Peninsular Malaysia. The coordinates of each population was recorded using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and mapped to show the geographical distribution of Musa gracilis. This study revealed that Musa gracilis exhibits specific pattern of distribution, which exists only in a lowland areas on the eastern and southern part of Peninsular Malaysia.

  17. LEGAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE SHARIAH ADVISORY COUNCIL IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Norhashimah Mohd Yasin

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia has always aspired to be the hub for Islamic banking and finance. Various measures have been, and are being, carried out to promote Malaysia as an international Islamic banking and financial centre. As the backbone for this, the national Shariah Advisory Council (SAC) has been established under the auspices of the Central Bank of Malaysia Act 1958 (CBMA). Under the CBMA, the SAC has been conferred a statutory function as the authority for the ascertainment of Islamic law for the purp...

  18. LEGAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE SHARIAH ADVISORY COUNCIL IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Norhashimah Mohd Yasin

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia has always aspired to be the hub for Islamic banking and finance. Various measures have been, and are being, carried out to promote Malaysia as an international Islamic banking and financial centre. As the backbone for this, the national Shariah Advisory Council (SAC) has been established under the auspices of the Central Bank of Malaysia Act 1958 (CBMA). Under the CBMA, the SAC has been conferred a statutory function as the authority for the ascertainment of Islamic law for the purp...

  19. How to Avoid Middle Income Traps : Evidence from Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Flaaen, Aaron; Ghani, Ejaz; Mishra, Saurabh

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia's structural transformation from low to middle income is a success story, making it one of the most prominent manufacturing exporters'in the world. However, like many other middle income economies, it is squeezed by the competition from low-wage economies on the one hand, and more innovative advanced economies on the other. What can Malaysia do? Does Malaysia need a new growth strategy? This paper emphasizes the need for broad structural transformation; that is, moving to higher prod...

  20. Sprouting Buds of Zebrafish Research in Malaysia: First Malaysia Zebrafish Disease Model Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Kazuhide Shaun; Tan, Pei Jean; Patel, Vyomesh

    2016-04-01

    Zebrafish is gaining prominence as an important vertebrate model for investigating various human diseases. Zebrafish provides unique advantages such as optical clarity of embryos, high fecundity rate, and low cost of maintenance, making it a perfect complement to the murine model equivalent in biomedical research. Due to these advantages, researchers in Malaysia are starting to take notice and incorporate the zebrafish model into their research activities. However, zebrafish research in Malaysia is still in its infancy stage and many researchers still remain unaware of the full potential of the zebrafish model or have limited access to related tools and techniques that are widely utilized in many zebrafish laboratories worldwide. To overcome this, we organized the First Malaysia Zebrafish Disease Model Workshop in Malaysia that took place on 11th and 12th of November 2015. In this workshop, we showcased how the zebrafish model is being utilized in the biomedical field in international settings as well as in Malaysia. For this, notable international speakers and those from local universities known to be carrying out impactful research using zebrafish were invited to share some of the cutting edge techniques that are used in their laboratories that may one day be incorporated in the Malaysian scientific community.

  1. Lessons from the Nipah virus outbreak in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, Lai-Meng; Chua, Kaw-Bing

    2007-12-01

    The Nipah virus outbreak in Malaysia (September 1998 to May 1999) resulted in 265 cases of acute encephalitis with 105 deaths, and near collapse of the billion-dollar pig-farming industry. Because it was initially attributed to Japanese encephalitis, early control measures were ineffective, and the outbreak spread to other parts of Malaysia and nearby Singapore. The isolation of the novel aetiological agent, the Nipah virus (NiV), from the cerebrospinal fluid of an outbreak victim was the turning point which led to outbreak control 2 months later. Together with the Hendra virus, NiV is now recognised as a new genus, Henipavirus (Hendra + Nipah), in the Paramyxoviridae family. Efforts of the local and international scientific community have since elucidated the epidemiology, clinico-pathophysiology and pathogenesis of this new disease. Humans contracted the infection from close contact with infected pigs, and formed the basis for pig-culling that eventually stopped the outbreak. NiV targeted medium-sized and small blood vessels resulting in endothelial multinucleated syncytia and fibrinoid necrosis. Autopsies revealed disseminated cerebral microinfarctions resulting from vasculitis-induced thrombosis and direct neuronal involvement. The discovery of NiV in the urine and saliva of Malaysian Island flying foxes (Pteropus hypomelanus and Petropus vampyrus) implicated these as natural reservoir hosts of NiV. It is probable that initial transmission of NiV from bats to pigs occurred in late 1997/early 1998 through contamination of pig swill by bat excretions, as a result of migration of these forest fruitbats to cultivated orchards and pig-farms, driven by fruiting failure of forest trees during the El Nino-related drought and anthropogenic fires in Indonesia in 1997-1998. This outbreak emphasizes the need for sharing information of any unusual illnesses in animals and humans, an open-minded approach and close collaboration and co-ordination between the medical

  2. Sustainability of Three Recreational Forest Landscape Management in Selangor, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohd Kher Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Different stakeholders managed recreational forests in Selangor, Malaysia. These stakeholders' involvements have risen a question whether their development have fulfilled the sustainable landscape requirement...

  3. Spatial patterns of seaweed distribution in Malaysia using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Du Hai; Sim, Jillian Ooi Lean; Fauzi, Rosmadi; Moi, Phang Siew

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this article is to represent spatial patterns of seaweed distribution in Malaysia. Seaweeds have been collected since 1984 along coastlines of 4675 km of peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak. However, there is no seaweed database and they cannot be displayed in a geographic view. Therefore, a database with 805 georeferenced observations was setup and GIS is used to analyze seaweed diversity based on this database. The highest number of observations is 94 which occur along east coastline of peninsular Malaysia. The highest number of species richness is 82 which are also along east coastline of peninsular Malaysia. Rhodophyta has the highest species richness while Chlorophyta has the least species richness.

  4. Shemya Island prehistory

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 752 artifacts described in this paper are from 5 sites on Shemya Island. Artifactual evidence suggests the island had a small resident population and was...

  5. and Prince Edward Island

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    -nesting seabirds of the Prince Edward Islands into the 21st century, but only providing the effects of .... too penguins resulted in high losses of eggs and chicks ... Marion Island base. ..... which comes into force three months after five Parties.

  6. Classifying Pacific islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Patrick D.; Kumar, Lalit; Eliot, Ian; McLean, Roger F.

    2016-12-01

    An earth-science-based classification of islands within the Pacific Basin resulted from the preparation of a database describing the location, area, and type of 1779 islands, where island type is determined as a function of the prevailing lithology and maximum elevation of each island, with an island defined as a discrete landmass composed of a contiguous land area ≥1 ha (0.01 km2) above mean high-water level. Reefs lacking islands and short-lived (ocean setting as well as the biological attributes of Pacific islands. It may also be used in spatial assessments of second-order phenomena associated with the islands, such as their vulnerability to various disasters, coastal erosion, or ocean pollution as well as human populations, built infrastructure and natural resources.

  7. Supply of Rubber Wood Log in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Noraida

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Issue on shortage of raw material for wood processing solved by discovery of rubber wood log as one of the substitutes the natural log. This paper examines the supply of rubber wood log in Malaysia. We employ ARDL Bound Approach Test and time series data from 1980 to 2010 which represented the whole Malaysia are used to achieve the established objectives. The result shown, in the long run harvested area and wages have 1% and 10% significant level respectively. While in the short run, there was only harvested area having an impact with 1% significant level. This result indicates that, the harvested area become the most impact towards supply of rubber wood log either in short run or in the long run. While wages as input cost gave less impact in another word it become unburden to the producers.

  8. Cofiring biomass with coal: Opportunities for Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A. A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Malaysia generated 108,175 GWh of electricity in 2010 where 39.51 % was sourced from coal. Coal power generation is also planned to overtake natural gas as the main fuel for electricity generation within the next two decades. Malaysia also has a vast biomass resource that is currently under-utilised for electricity generation. This paper studies the option of cofiring biomass in existing Malaysian coal power plants to increase the nation's renewable energy mix as well as to reduce its power sector carbon dioxide emission. Benefits of cofiring to the nation were discussed and agricultural residues from palm oil and paddy was identified as a potential source of biomass for cofiring. It was also found that there is a willingness for cofiring by stakeholders but barriers existed in the form of technical issues and lack of clear direction and mechanism.

  9. Gambling participation and policies in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine M. Y. Loo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regulatory policies for responsible gambling practices in Asia are constantly evolving as the gambling industry and technological landscape change over time. Malaysia makes an interesting case study for a commentary on gambling participation and policies, as this country has a unique dual justice system with religious and ethnic diversity that may impact on the way in which gambling activities are regulated. This regulatory ecosystem has important consequences on behaviour change, treatment approaches and recovery processes involved in gambling disorder. This commentary will discuss evidence for Malaysian gambling antecedents, public policy and socioeconomic impacts of gambling, possible costs and benefits of gambling legalization, and issues pertinent to regulating gambling activities in Malaysia.

  10. Public Perception of Forestry Practices in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegatheswaran RATNASINGAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article endeavours to assess public perceptions about the importance of forests for young people in the age group of 21-35 years in Malaysia based on 1,503 reliably answered interviews. Overall patterns show that timber production and environment protection are very important attributes among this age group. The interviews indicated high awareness of negative environmental impacts of deforestation, with high levels of concern over higher temperatures, air pollution and loss of clean water sources. Large-scale deforestation (e.g., for industrial oil palm plantations and political interference appeared to be more context-dependent, with most respondents considering it to have on overall negative impact on sustainable forestry in Malaysia. Increasing information accessibility, awareness and experience in the forest of the young people could ultimately result in positive processes.

  11. PRESS FREEDOM IN SINGAPORE AND MALAYSIA: DEFAMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Kate Chapman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the arguments around restriction on freedom of the press in the Strong States of Singapore and Malaysia. It assesses the presence of constraints on press freedoms in democratic western countries imposed by corporation rather than state and the similar effects that these constraints may have on bias present in publicly accessible news reporting. It argues that independence of the press does not just require protection from legal and executive regulation, but also protection from large media corporations and their political alignments. This report will assess the bias of reporting and news media publication that exists in Malaysia and Singapore due to legislative and regulatory constraints as opposed to bias that exist in the western liberal democratic nations of the United Kingdom (UK and the United States of America (USA due to Media Organisation control.

  12. Holistic BIM Adoption and Diffusion in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamter Shahela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Building Information Modeling is modeling technology and associated set of processes to produce, communicate and analyze digital information models for construction life cycle. Although many benefits can gain by the implementation of BIM, the pace adoption of BIM in Malaysia is still slow. There is an abundance of theories and models purporting to describe the drivers and mechanisms of how new technologies are adopted or diffused into a particular section of society or by individuals or stake players. In addition, many acceptance theories, which imply the adoption of new technologies and can be applied in every sector. This paper aims to present a review of the existing literature of BIM adoption and diffusion theory/model/framework in Malaysia. Researcher revealed the list of driven factors of Holistic BIM Adoption. In addition, it will deal with how to work effectively with groups that initially are relatively

  13. Arctic ice islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  14. Researching Pacific island livelihoods:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund Christensen, Andreas; Mertz, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Small island literature is vast in focus and aim, and is rooted in many different disciplines. The challenge is to find common grounds for researching small islands conceptually and theoretically. The aim of this article is to comment on how to research small islands, including a discussion on co...... and interdisciplinary in focus and link socio-economic and ecological processes of small island societies at temporal and analytical scales....

  15. Islamist Civil Society Activism Malaysia Abdullah: Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM Darul Arqam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fauzi Abdul Hamid

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Without discounting the relevance of such a framework, this article seeks to look at the phenomenon of Islamism in Malaysia from the angle of Islamist civil society movements that are not directly involved in the domain of electoral politics, but that have nonetheless significantly in fenced political behavior of especially the majority Malay-Muslim population of Malaysia. The provisional impact of these new groupings form the main thread in our discussion, which narrows down to an investigation into the metamorphoses that have a?ected and transpired in two of the most influential civil society movements in contemporary Islamism in Malaysia, viz. ABIM and Darul Arqam.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v16i3.475

  16. e-Waste Management Scenarios in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Fatihah Suja; Rakmi Abdul Rahman; Arij Yusof; Mohd Shahbudin Masdar

    2014-01-01

    e-Waste, or electronic waste, disposal that is uncontrolled can be harmful to human health and the environment because e-waste contains toxic substances and heavy metals. However, if the waste is properly managed, it can become a business opportunity that produces high returns because e-waste also contains valuable materials, such as gold, silver, platinum, and palladium. The government of Malaysia wants to ensure the safe, effective, and economically beneficial management of e-waste in Malay...

  17. Mercury Concentration in Environmental Samples of Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    SAKAMOTO, Hayao; Ichikawa, Toshihiro; TOMIYASU, Takashi; SATO, Masanori

    2004-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of mercury in environmental samples (sea water, rock, sea sand, sediment, soil, fish and etc.) taken from various coastal sea areas and its ambient area in Malaysia were investigated. Mercury in environmental samples was subjected to the reduction-vaporization using of tin (II) chloride and heating-vaporization method. The mercury vapor was concentrated with a porous gold collector. Afterwards, mercury vapor evolved from the heated collector was determined b...

  18. Tourism, Health and Income in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheah Chan-Fatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study employed the ARDL bounds test and Granger causality test to investigate long- and the short-run relationships among economic development, tourism sector development, and health care sector development in Malaysia. Annual time series data from 1981–2011 also were employed in this study. Based on our tests, there is a long-run relationship from economic development to health care sector development and from tourism development to health care sector development.

  19. State of the Coral Triangle: Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia has made a firm commitment to sustainable management and conservation of its coastal and marine resources, helping formulate and implement the Sulu–Sulawesi Marine Ecoregion Initiative and the Coral Triangle Initiative. Rapid economic growth, uncontrolled tourism development, unregulated fishing, and unsustainable use of marine resources have depleted the country’s fish stocks, lost nearly 36% of its mangrove forests, and increased the number of endangered species. Despite impressive...

  20. PERBANDINGAN PENDIDIKAN ISLAM DI INDONESIA DAN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Haryanto, Budi

    2016-01-01

    Islamic education as a subsystem which cannot be separated from national education, because it not only serves as a complement but also as the foundation stone for the formulation of national education goals. This is true in Indonesia and Malaysia. Islamic education in both countries, also affected the national struggle journey, to the efforts to maintain and develop its existence after the independence so as to have a clear role in mental strengthen human resources in their respective countr...

  1. Strategies of Indian University Students in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Christian Franklin

    2014-01-01

    Through an analysis of the connection between the social backgrounds of the students and societal inclusion and exclusion, Svensson demonstrates how globalization has produced major changes in relations between the economy and class structures, stressing that the emergence of cosmopolitan elites...... can challenge existing conceptions of the role of the nation-state, cultural mechanisms and hierarchies. He further contributes to the debate by demonstrating how social imagination evolves from the Indian students’ contested social position as a minority group in Malaysia....

  2. The current biotechnology outlook in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Khairiah Salwa MOKHTAR; Mahalingam, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Blessed with extremely rich biodiversity, Malaysia is all geared up to explore new high technology to utilize the advantage it possesses whilst to protect its environment. Biotechnology has been identified as an appropriate driver that can deliver economic gains through research and development, improvement of food security, creation of entrepreneurial opportunities for industrial growth, health and environmental sustainability. This paper attempts to address the evolution of biotechnology in...

  3. Modeling Malaysia's Energy System: Some Preliminary Results

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad M. Yusof

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The current dynamic and fragile world energy environment necessitates the development of new energy model that solely caters to analyze Malaysias energy scenarios. Approach: The model is a network flow model that traces the flow of energy carriers from its sources (import and mining) through some conversion and transformation processes for the production of energy products to final destinations (energy demand sectors). The integration to the economic sectors is done exogene...

  4. Infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Salmi; Kirkman, Maggie; Ahmad, S Hassan; Fisher, Jane

    2014-10-01

    Infant abandonment and infanticide are poorly understood in Malaysia. The information available in the public arena comes predominantly from anecdotal sources. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia and to estimate annual rates for the most recent decade. Summaries of data about infanticide and illegal infant abandonment were gathered from police records; the annual number of live births was ascertained from the national registry. The estimated inferred infanticide rates for Malaysia were compared with the infanticide rates among countries of very high, high, medium, and low rankings on the Human Development, Gender Inequality, and Gini indices. From 1999 to 2011, 1,069 cases of illegal infant abandonment were recorded and 1,147 people were arrested as suspected perpetrators. The estimated inferred infanticide rate fluctuated between 4.82 and 9.11 per 100,000 live births, a moderate rate relative to the infanticide rates of other countries. There are substantial missing data, with details undocumented for about 78-87% of cases and suspected perpetrators. Of the documented cases, it appeared that more boys than girls were victims and that suspected perpetrators were predominantly Malays who were women, usually mothers of the victim; the possibility of arrest bias must be acknowledged. Economic and social inequality, particularly gender inequality, might contribute to the phenomena of infanticide and abandonment. Strategies to reduce rates of infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia will require strengthening of the surveillance system and attention to the gender-based inequalities that underpin human development.

  5. Atopic eczema in a multiracial country (Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, R B; Pettit, J H

    1993-11-01

    A total of 14,342 patients with skin diseases who had attended either the National University of Malaysia skin clinic or a private dermatological office were analysed. Five hundred and thirty-four cases (3.7%) had atopic eczema, the prevalence being highest among the Malays (4.3%). The prevalence of atopic eczema among clinic attenders is lower in all three major Malaysian races when compared with studies from England.

  6. Integration in an international university in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta, Enakshi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of the current study is to investigate the relationship between experiences with diversity offered in an international university in Malaysia and the ways students and staff view integration. The problem that promoted this study arose from the researcher’s own experience of being an international student with difficulties in integrating in a multi-cultural environment in the university. Two outcomes are investigated in this study, the meaning of the term ‘integration’ ...

  7. Demand analyses of rice in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Tey, (John) Yeong-Sheng; Shamsudin, Mad Nasir; Mohamed, Zainalabidin; Abdullah, Amin Mahir; Radam, Alias

    2008-01-01

    As a typical developing Asian county, the growth in per capita income generally brings to diversification in Malaysians food basket. The most significant observation is the falling in per capita consumption of rice with continuous growth of demand for wheat based products. The objective of this study is to estimate the demand elasticities of rice in Malaysia, focusing whether rice is an inferior good. By using data from Household Expenditure Survey 2004/2005, this study obtains demand elastic...

  8. Occupational rehabilitation in Singapore and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kay-Fei; Tan, Charlie W C; Yeo, Doreen S C; Tan, Heidi S K; Tan, F L; Tan, E W; Szeto, Grace P Y; Cheng, Andy S K

    2011-03-01

    Asia is the new and favored magnet of economic attention and foreign investments after it made an almost uneventful rebound from the depths of financial crisis of 2008/2009. Not many Western observers fully understand the diversity that is Asia other than perhaps its 2 growing economic giants of China and India. Indeed many smaller countries like Singapore and Malaysia in South East Asia along with Australia and Hong Kong (a Special Administrative Region within China) look to symbiotic relationships with these two economic giants. The purpose of this discussion paper is to examine the current issues related to the development and provision of occupational rehabilitation services in Singapore and Malaysia with a forward-looking view of how Asia's different developing societies could potentially benefit from better alignment of occupational rehabilitation practices and sharing of expertise through international collaboration and dialogue platforms. Seven therapists and one physician who are frequently involved in occupational rehabilitation services in their home countries critically reviewed the current issues in Singapore and Malaysia which included analysis of the prevalence and cost of occupational injury; overview of workers' compensation system; current practices, obstacles, and challenges in providing occupational rehabilitation and return to work practices. They also offered opinions about how to improve the occupational rehabilitation programs of their two home countries. Even though Malaysia and Singapore are two different countries, in many ways their current provision of occupational rehabilitation services and the problems they face with are very similar. There is a lot of room for systemic improvements that require government support and action. Most prominently, the training of more healthcare professionals in the assessment and rehabilitation of the injured worker should be encouraged. There could be better liaison between the many stakeholders and

  9. Assimilation of Baba and Nyonya in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Razaleigh Muhamat Kawangit

    2015-01-01

    This research set outs to explore the exact level of the social aspect of assimilation between Baba and Nyonya and their Malay counterparts in Malaysia. It was sure that assimilation in social aspect is a dilemma which Baba and Nyonya face when they interact with Malays as a dominant ethnic group. It suggests that when the process of interaction, their behavior changes in line with the identity of the Malays. This is because the majority influenced the minority in the Malaysian context. Whils...

  10. e-Waste Management Scenarios in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Fatihah Suja; Rakmi Abdul Rahman; Arij Yusof; Mohd Shahbudin Masdar

    2014-01-01

    e-Waste, or electronic waste, disposal that is uncontrolled can be harmful to human health and the environment because e-waste contains toxic substances and heavy metals. However, if the waste is properly managed, it can become a business opportunity that produces high returns because e-waste also contains valuable materials, such as gold, silver, platinum, and palladium. The government of Malaysia wants to ensure the safe, effective, and economically beneficial management of e-waste in Malay...

  11. Sustainable development and construction industry in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Sustainable construction is a way for the building and infrastructure industry to move towards achieving sustainable development, taking into account environmental, socioeconomic and cultural issues. Differing approaches and differing economic markets lead to different priorities. This paper presents the construction scenario of Malaysia and the developments in sustainable construction taking place in this country. Barriers to the implementation of sustainable construction are discussed. A li...

  12. The 1995 Parliamentary Elections in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rashid Moten

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The parliamentary elections in Malaysia have brought about a significant change in the distribution of partisanship in the electorate. It redefined the relationships between social groups and party support and have enhanced the political stability of the country. The Barisan Nasional's victory, attributable to a booming economy, full employment, and superior organization and finance, signalled a vote of confidence in the politics of accommodation characterised by tolerance, mutual cooperation, and compromise.

  13. Public Perception of Forestry Practices in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Florin IORAS; Ratnasingam, Jega; Vacalie, Claudia Christina; Sestras, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    This article endeavours to assess public perceptions about the importance of forests for young people in the age group of 21-35 years in Malaysia based on 1,503 reliably answered interviews. Overall patterns show that timber production and environment protection are very important attributes among this age group. The interviews indicated high awareness of negative environmental impacts of deforestation, with high levels of concern over higher temperatures, air pollution and loss of clean wate...

  14. Empirical Evaluation On External Debt Of Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Nor’Aznin Abu Bakar; Sallahuddin Hassan

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the effects of external debts on economic growth in Malaysia. The analysis is conducted both at aggregate and disaggregate levels. The empirical results are based on VAR estimates using GDP, external debts, capital accumulation, labor force and human capital. Estimation results at the aggregate level indicate that total external debts affect economic growth positively. In particular, one percentage point increase in total external debts generates 1.29 percentage point of e...

  15. PRESS FREEDOM IN SINGAPORE AND MALAYSIA: DEFAMATION

    OpenAIRE

    Georgia Kate Chapman

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the arguments around restriction on freedom of the press in the Strong States of Singapore and Malaysia. It assesses the presence of constraints on press freedoms in democratic western countries imposed by corporation rather than state and the similar effects that these constraints may have on bias present in publicly accessible news reporting. It argues that independence of the press does not just require protection from legal and executive regulation, but also protecti...

  16. Labor markets and economic development in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J P

    1991-01-01

    A researcher analyzed data on male workers from 1262 households from Peninsular Malaysia (1976-1977 Malaysian Family Life Survey) to identify the leading effects of economic development for earnings and employment patterns within labor markets. All 3 major ethnic groups in Malaysia profited from the increasing levels of real income over time. The relative income of ethnic Malays, the poorest socioeconomic class, increased more so than the Chinese and Indians. Yet the income of Chinese was 108% higher than Malays and that of Indians was 60%. The difference between Malays and Chinese grew considerably as men aged. Further economic growth resulted in higher earnings for young men than for older men. In addition, the more educated men were the higher their earnings. In fact, education was the most significant determinant of time related growth in incomes. Further, income of men who participated in job training programs grew 2 times as fast than that of men who did not participate in job training programs. Lastly, economic growth increased earnings of men in urban areas more so than those in rural areas. Malaysia had put a lot of time and resources in research and development in rubber and rice production which has resulted in continual introduction of new varieties of rubber trees and rice. These new varieties have increased production considerably. In conclusion, Malaysia was able to experience economic growth because it invested in education and job training for male workers and in research and development to advance production of its 2 most important commodities--rubber and rice.

  17. The Politics of Meritocracy in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    Historical Background The History of Malaysia can be traced back to the 15th century when the Malacca ( Melaka ) Sultanate became a great inter-port city...known as the Federated Malay States while Kelantan, Trengganu, Perlis, Kedah and Johor were known as Unfederated Malay States. Penang, Melaka and...86 A. J. Williams Myers, Biological Differences, Social Inequality and Distributive Goods- An Exploratory Argument, Journal of Black

  18. Human infection with Dirofilaria repens in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, K C; Pathmanathan, R; Krishnan, R

    1996-09-01

    Human dirofilariasis is a rare infection in Malaysia. Thus far, only two human cases have been reported viz. Dirofilaria immitis and D. (Nochtiella) repens and in both instances, adult worms were recovered from infected patients. The two cases reported in the present study, one from Melaka and the other from Penang, were diagnosed histologically. Based on the diagnostic criteria for identifying Dirofilaria in tissue sections, the parasites were identified as D. (Nochtiella) repens.

  19. Maritime Security: Malaysia’s Persistent Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Malaysian Maritime Zone is safe and peaceful to maritime communities. To minimize loss of lives and properties at sea based on a set standard. To...navies, and air forces of the littoral states.”20 In his keynote address at the 2011 Shangri-La Dialogue, Prime Minister Dato ’ Sri Najib Tun Razak...Monitor, Vol. 4 No. 3, 2006. Razak, Dato ’ Sri Najib Tun, Prime Minister Malaysia. Keynote Address. Shangri-La Dialogue. Singapore, June 3, 2011

  20. The Islands, Barbados

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drieman, R.; Hinborch, M.; Monden, M.; Vendrik, E.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Master project report. In Barbados the problem arose of lack of space for development on the existing shoreline. Therefore the project "The Islands" has been conceptualized. In front of the west coast of Barbados, a group of artificial islands will be created. On the islands there will be space for

  1. Aging in Multi-ethnic Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Nai Peng; Siraj, Saedah Binti; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah Binti; Chin, Ai Vyrn; Tan, Maw Pin; Sinnappan, Glaret Shirley; Müller, Andre Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Multiethnic Malaysia provides a unique case study of divergence in population aging of different sociocultural subgroups within a country. Malaysia represents 3 major ethnicities in Asia-the Malay, Chinese, and Indian. The 3 ethnic groups are at different stages of population aging, as they have undergone demographic transition at different pace amidst rapid social and economic changes. Between 1991 and 2010, the Malaysian population aged 60 and over has more than doubled from about 1 million to 2.2 million, and this is projected to rise to about 7 million or 17.6% of the projected population of 40 million by 2040. In 2010, the aging index ranged from 22.8% among the Bumiputera (Malays and other indigenous groups), to 31.4% among the Indians and 55.0% among the Chinese. Population aging provides great challenges for Malaysia's social and economic development. The increasing prevalence of noncommunicable diseases in older adults, coupled with the erosion of the traditional family support system has increased demands on health care services with an overwhelming need for multidisciplinary and specialized geriatric care. Following the adoption of the National Policy for the Elderly in 1995, issues of population aging have gained increasing attention, especially among researchers. There is an urgent need to increase public awareness, develop infrastructure, as well as support action oriented research that will directly translate to comprehensive and cohesive social strategies, policies, and legislation to protect not just the current older Malaysians but the future of all Malaysians.

  2. Corporate Governance & Auditor Choice in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nasrudin Wan Asma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the determinants of firm’s auditor choice in Malaysia in respect of their corporate governance mechanisms. A logit regression model was developed to test the impact of firms’ internal corporate governance mechanism on auditor choice decisions made by public listed companies listed on main board of Bursa Malaysia from year 2006 to 2015. Five variables are used to proxy for firm’s internal corporate mechanism which are the ownership concentration, the duality of CEO and chairman of BOD, the size of audit committee, the size of BOD and the number of independent directors on the board. All auditors in Malaysia were classified into Big Four and non-Big Four, assuming Big Four auditors can provide higher quality audit services. The final result show that firms with less concentrated ownership, with larger size of audit committee, larger size of the BOD, with lower proportion of independent directors on the board, or in which CEO and BOD’s chairman are not the same person are more likely to hire a high-quality auditor. Hence, it suggests that when benefits from lowering capital raising costs are trivial, firms with good corporate governance mechanism are prone to choose a high-quality auditor.

  3. Zakat Institution in Malaysia: Problems and Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ab Rahman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Zakat administration in Malaysia is a State matter in particular relating to the passing of regulations and statutes. The respective Heads of States (the rulers are heads of Islam as enshrined in the Federal Constitution. This paper gives a chronicle of the transformation and phases of development of zakat institution in Malaysia. Zakat institution can play an important role in complementing the Government’s poverty eradication effort although its scope is for the poor and needy Muslims only. Besides the poorand needy, there are other beneficiaries allowed by the Syariah. Its success would also help to buffer the effects of recession of the economy on the poor through capacity building and mindsettransformation. The effectiveness of the zakat institution in carrying out its duties would depend on a number of factors viz. expansionof new resources for zakat, the collection of zakat from tangible and intangible properties, systematic zakat management, efficientzakat distribution and the thoroughness of implementation of Islamic rules. The article would discuss on matters that should be dealtwith in order to improve zakat institutions in Malaysia in terms of the inefficiency issue, prospective payers, and capacity building.

  4. Micronutrient status and intervention programs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Geok Lin

    2005-06-01

    Approximately 70% of the world's malnourished children live in Asia, giving that region the highest concentration of childhood malnutrition worldwide. Prevalence of stunting and underweight are high especially in south Asia where one in every two preschool children is stunted. Iron-deficiency anemia affects 40%-50% of preschool and primary schoolchildren. Nearly half of all vitamin A deficiency and xerophthalmia in the world occurs in south and southeast Asia. Iodine deficiency disorders have resulted in high goiter rates in India, Pakistan, and parts of Indonesia. Compared with other developing countries in Asia, the nutrition situation in Malaysia is considerably better, owing to rapid economic and socioeconomic development that has occurred since Malaysia gained its independence in 1957. Prevalence of undernutrition and micronutrient deficiency is markedly lower in Malaysian children. Nonetheless, undernutrition in the form of underweight, stunting, and anemia can be found in poor communities throughout the country. A prevalence of 25% underweight and 35% stunting is reported among young children from poor rural households. Anemia and subclinical forms of vitamin A deficiency were reported in children under 5 years old. Typical of a country in nutrition transition, Malaysia faces the dual burden of malnutrition in children, with the persistence of under-nutrition problems especially among the poor and the emerging overweight problem especially in urban areas. Since 1996, nutrition programs of the government sector are coordinated under the National Plan of Action for Nutrition. These activities and other nutrition intervention efforts by other agencies are discussed in this paper.

  5. Rethinking health care commercialization: evidence from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwagbara, Vitalis Chukwudi; Rasiah, Rajah

    2015-11-19

    Against the backdrop of systemic inefficiency in the public health care system and the theoretical claims that markets result in performance and efficiency improvement, developing countries' governments have been rapidly commercializing health care delivery. This paper seeks to determine whether commercialization through an expansion in private hospitals has led to performance improvements in public hospitals. Inpatient utilization records of all public hospitals in Peninsular Malaysia over the period 2006-2010 were used in this study. These records were obtained from the Ministry of Health. The study relied on utilization ratios, bed occupancy rates (BOR), bed turnover rates (BTR) and average length of stay (ALOS). The data were analyzed using SPSS 22 Statistical Software and the Pabon Lasso technique. Over 60 % of public hospitals in Malaysia are inefficient and perform sub-optimally. Average BOR among the public hospitals was 56 % in 2006 and 61 % in 2010. There was excessive BTR of 65 and 73 times within the period. Overall, the ALOS was low, falling from 3.4 days in 2006 to 3.1 days in 2010. This study demonstrates that commercialization has not led to performance improvements in the public health care sector in Malaysia. The evidence suggests that efforts to improve performance will require a focus directly on public hospitals.

  6. e-Waste Management Scenarios in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatihah Suja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available e-Waste, or electronic waste, disposal that is uncontrolled can be harmful to human health and the environment because e-waste contains toxic substances and heavy metals. However, if the waste is properly managed, it can become a business opportunity that produces high returns because e-waste also contains valuable materials, such as gold, silver, platinum, and palladium. The government of Malaysia wants to ensure the safe, effective, and economically beneficial management of e-waste in Malaysia. Management approaches have included law enforcement and regulation and the promotion of e-waste recovery activities. e-Waste of no commercial value must be disposed of at sites/premises licensed by the Department of Environment (DOE, Malaysia. To date, 18 full recovery facilities and 128 partial recovery facilities that use various available technologies have been designated for the segregation, dismantling, and treatment of e-waste. However, there are issues faced by the recovery facilities in achieving the goal of converting e-waste into a source material. The issues include the e-waste supply, the importation of e-waste derived products and coding, and finally the need to develop the criteria for e-waste processing technologies to ensure the safety and the sustainability of the facilities.

  7. Improving cancer pain management in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Within Malaysia's otherwise highly accessible public healthcare system, palliative medicine is still an underdeveloped discipline. Government surveys have shown that opioid consumption in Malaysia is dramatically lower than the global average, indicating a failure to meet the need for adequate pain control in terminally ill patients. Indeed, based on daily defined doses, only 24% of patients suffering from cancer pain receive regular opioid analgesia. The main barriers to effective pain control in Malaysia relate to physicians' and patients' attitudes towards the use of opioids. In one survey of physicians, 46% felt they lacked knowledge to manage patients with severe cancer pain, and 64% feared effects such as respiratory depression. Fear of addiction is common amongst patients, as is confusion regarding the legality of opioids. Additional barriers include the fact that no training in palliative care is given to medical students, and that smaller clinics often lack facilities to prepare and stock cheap oral morphine. A number of initiatives aim to improve the situation, including the establishment of palliative care departments in hospitals and implementation of post-graduate training programmes. Campaigns to raise public awareness are expected to increase patient demand for adequate cancer pain relief as part of good care.

  8. Demand analysis of tobacco consumption in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Hana; Al-Sadat, Nabilla A M

    2007-11-01

    We estimated the price and income elasticity of cigarette demand and the impact of cigarette taxes on cigarette demand and cigarette tax revenue in Malaysia. The data on cigarette consumption, cigarette prices, and public policies between 1990 and 2004 were subjected to a time-series regression analysis applying the error-correction model. The preferred cigarette demand model specification resulted in long-run and short-run price elasticities estimates of -0.57 and -0.08, respectively. Income was positively related to cigarette consumption: A 1% increase in real income increased cigarette consumption by 1.46%. The model predicted that an increase in cigarette excise tax from Malaysian ringgit (RM) 1.60 to RM2.00 per pack would reduce cigarette consumption in Malaysia by 3.37%, or by 806,468,873 cigarettes. This reduction would translate to almost 165 fewer tobacco-related lung cancer deaths per year and a 20.8% increase in the government excise tax revenue. We conclude that taxation is an effective method of reducing cigarette consumption and tobacco-related deaths while increasing revenue for the government of Malaysia.

  9. Has Malaysia's antidrug effort been effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorzelli, J F

    1992-01-01

    It is a common belief that a massive effort in law enforcement, preventive education and rehabilitation will result in the elimination of a country's drug problem. Based on this premise. Malaysia in 1983 implemented such a multifaceted anti-drug strategy, and the results of a 1987 study by the author suggested that Malaysia's effort had begun to contribute to a steady decrease in the number of identified drug abusers. Although the number of drug-addicted individuals declined, the country's recidivism rates were still high. Because of this high relapse rate, Malaysia expanded their rehabilitation effort and developed a community transition program. In order to determine the impact of these changes on the country's battle against drug abuse, a follow-up study was conducted in 1990. The results of this study did not clearly demonstrate that the Malaysian effort had been successful in eliminating the problem of drug abuse, and raised some questions concerning the effectiveness of the country's drug treatment programs.

  10. DESKRIPSI TIPOLOGI, KLASIFIKASI DAN ANALISIS PERANCANGAN MASJID DI MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Tajuddin Mohamad Rasdi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available As one of the countries with the largest muslim communities in Southeast Asia, the study of Islamic architecture, especially the architecture of  modern mosques in Malaysia, has not yet been done intensively. Most of the  studies and documentation carried out were more focused in the study of old  mosques which were considered as more valuable historically with a more unique  traditional architecture. This paper will attempt to describe the typology of form  and visual style of the mosques (as the main building of Islamic architecture  developed in Malaysia, ranging from traditional mosques in the area of  remote villages to modern mosques in urban areas. This study is very  important in  recognizing aspects of morphology, the influence, and the development of mosque  design in Malaysia which will become a reference in designing the mosque,  especially in this country in the future. The discussion itself will consists of the Traditional Vernacular Mosque Architecture of Malaysia, a Sino Eclectic Mosques in Malaysia, the European Classical Mosque in Malaysia, the  North Indian Mosque in Malaysia, the Malaysia’s Vernacular Mo  dern Mosque, the Modern Expressionism Revivalism Mosque in Malaysia and the Post-Modern Mosque in Malaysia. It is expected that this  study would give an idea of the various approaches and the development  of mosque design in Malaysia in order to recognize the ideas and thoughts of Islamic architecture in Malaysia.

  11. Trend analysis and change point detection of annual and seasonal temperature series in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaila, Jamaludin; Yusop, Zulkifli

    2017-06-01

    Most of the trend analysis that has been conducted has not considered the existence of a change point in the time series analysis. If these occurred, then the trend analysis will not be able to detect an obvious increasing or decreasing trend over certain parts of the time series. Furthermore, the lack of discussion on the possible factors that influenced either the decreasing or the increasing trend in the series needs to be addressed in any trend analysis. Hence, this study proposes to investigate the trends, and change point detection of mean, maximum and minimum temperature series, both annually and seasonally in Peninsular Malaysia and determine the possible factors that could contribute to the significance trends. In this study, Pettitt and sequential Mann-Kendall (SQ-MK) tests were used to examine the occurrence of any abrupt climate changes in the independent series. The analyses of the abrupt changes in temperature series suggested that most of the change points in Peninsular Malaysia were detected during the years 1996, 1997 and 1998. These detection points captured by Pettitt and SQ-MK tests are possibly related to climatic factors, such as El Niño and La Niña events. The findings also showed that the majority of the significant change points that exist in the series are related to the significant trend of the stations. Significant increasing trends of annual and seasonal mean, maximum and minimum temperatures in Peninsular Malaysia were found with a range of 2-5 °C/100 years during the last 32 years. It was observed that the magnitudes of the increasing trend in minimum temperatures were larger than the maximum temperatures for most of the studied stations, particularly at the urban stations. These increases are suspected to be linked with the effect of urban heat island other than El Niño event.

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) populations in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, Sonia; Tan, Soon Guan; Yong Seok Yien, Christina; Ng, Jillian; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Khan, Razib; Rovie-Ryan, Jeffrine J; Valdiani, Alireza; Khajeaian, Parastoo; Kanthaswamy, Sree

    2014-12-01

    The genetic diversity and structure of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Peninsular Malaysia, a widely used non-human primate species in biomedical research, have not been thoroughly characterized. Thirteen sites of wild populations of long-tailed macaques representing six states were sampled and analyzed with 18 STR markers. The Sunggala and Penang Island populations showed the highest genetic diversity estimates, while the Jerejak Island population was the most genetically discrete due to isolation from the mainland shelf. Concordant with pairwise F(st) estimates, STRUCTURE analyses of the seven PCA-correlated clusters revealed low to moderate differentiation among the sampling sites. No association between geographic and genetic distances exists, suggesting that the study sites, including island study sites, are genetically if not geographically contiguous. The status of the genetic structure and composition of long-tailed macaque populations require further scrutiny to develop this species as an important animal model in biomedical research. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Perceptions of Local Communities on the Economic Impacts of Tourism Development in Langkawi, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Bakri Norjanah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Langkawi Island is a popular tourist destination in Malaysia, which development started in the 1990s. To date, it is among the ten islands most visited by local and foreign tourists. The development of Langkawi Island has influenced the economic structure of local community, of which, envisaged as a symbol to help the community especially in the changing economic environment due to its ability to generate income, employment and raise living standards. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the local community’s involvement and perceptions on changes in employment pattern and incomes stimulated by the tourism development in Langkawi. This study conducted a self-administered household survey and had successfully retrieved 398 respondents. From the findings, results showed that local community experienced employment opportunities which in return contributed to an increase in household income. It is therefore, notable investment on tourism development should be of interests to the government as this helps in ensuring the local community’s economic benefits.

  14. A Phenomenology of Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pete Hay

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The question is posed: is a coherent theory of islandness – nissology – possible? Faultlines within constructions of islands and islandness are noted. Some of these axes of contestation have remained latent but have the potential to be sharply divisive. Three of the identified faultlines are examined – the nature of the island ‘edge’, the import for questions of island memory and identity of massive inward and outward movements of people, and the appropriation of island ‘realness’ by those for whom ‘island’ best functions as metaphor. A case is made for the excision of the latter from the purview of island studies. Despite apparent irreconcilability within island studies’ emerging faultlines, it is argued that place theory does constitute a theoretical framing that can work for island studies. Following a brief overview of the faultlines that also exist within place studies, it is noted that the difference-respecting and identity focused nature of phenomenology of place is particularly apposite for island studies, and the paper concludes with a consideration of what a phenomenology of islands might look like.

  15. Pattern of homicidal deaths autopsied at Penang Hospital, Malaysia, 2007-2009: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhupinder, S; Kumara, T K; Syed, A M

    2010-12-01

    This article describes the homicide pattern in Penang Island, Malaysia over a three-year period (2007-2009). 65 homicide autopsies were performed at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Penang Hospital over the study period. The homicide rates ranged from 0.01 to 0.09/1000 population, the highest being in the Indian ethnic group. The majority (37%) of victims were in the 20-39 years age group. The male: female ratio was 3:1. The majority of deaths were caused by blunt instruments (46%), followed by stab/slash wounds (25%) and asphyxiation (12%). 63% of homicides occurred in areas served by the police stations at Jalan Patani (23.1%), Sg. Nibong (16.9%), Central (12.3%) and Bayan Lepas (10.9%). 56 (86%) victims were brought in dead to the hospital, while 9 (14%) died after admission. Most (39%) incidences occurred in the morning. The methods of homicide were different from Kuala Lumpur, another highly urbanised area of Malaysia.

  16. Pusat Tenaga Malaysia's Zero Energy Office (ZEO) Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, C.K.; Reimann, Gregers Peter; Kristensen, Poul Erik

    Technical Review of the Zero Energy Office building in Malaysia. The building, which has an energy index of 50 kWh/m2/year, reaches a net annual energy of zero through the use of building integrated photovoltaic panels. For reference, ordinary offices in Malaysia consume 200 - 300 kWh/m2/year...

  17. Innovation Management and Performance Framework for Research University in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowang, Tan Owee; Long, Choi Sang; Rasli, Amran

    2015-01-01

    Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL) in Malaysia are recognized as the core of new innovation development. This paper empirically studies one of IHLs in Malaysia with the objectives to gauge the perceived important level of success factors for innovation management, and to examine the relationship between innovation management success factors…

  18. Household Expenditures on Private Tutoring: Emerging Evidence from Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring has been a burgeoning phenomenon in Malaysia for decades. This study examines the determinants of private tutoring expenditures in Malaysia using the 2004/2005 Household Expenditures Survey and applies hurdle regression models to the data. The results indicate that total household expenditures, household head's level of…

  19. Malaysia - Insurance Core Principles : Detailed Assessment of Observance

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    This assessment provides an understanding of the significant regulatory and supervisory framework for the insurance sector of Malaysia. The assessment was conducted by Mark Causevic (external expert from OSFI Canada) during April 2012. Malaysia is undertaking the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) for the first time, and it includes a formal assessment of its observance with the In...

  20. Trade in Higher Education Services in Malaysia: Key Policy Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Siew Yean

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, Malaysia has emerged as an unexpected contender in the world market for international students in higher education. Recognizing this sector as a potential new source of growth and export revenue, Malaysia aims to become a regional hub for higher education. In view of this, the objectives of this paper are to profile the pattern of…

  1. Beginning Teachers as Policy Workers in Malaysia and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vivienne Ruth; Young, Sharon; Blanch, Keely; Smith, Lee

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the Malaysia government initiated twinned primary teacher education arrangements with five Southern Hemisphere higher education institutions (HEIs). Participating students completed their teacher education in both Malaysia and a partner HEI. In this paper, we consider the preliminary findings of a comparative study tracking the beginning…

  2. Thinking Skill Education and Transformational Progress in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Nooraini; Mohamad, Khairul Azmi

    2014-01-01

    This paper intends to highlight the issues in thinking skills development and efforts made in addressing these issues in Malaysia. The education system in Malaysia has undergone a huge transformational progress particularly in the field related to the development of thinking skill. Traditionally, thinking skill was not specifically cultivated in…

  3. A Model of Homeschooling Based on Technology in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, Norlidah; Rahman, Mohd. Nazri Abdul; Siraj, Saedah; Ibrahim, Ruslina

    2013-01-01

    Homeschooling in Malaysia is a form of alternative education that emphasizes quality education based on moral values and belief in strengthening family ties. The purpose of this study is to produce a model of homeschooling technology-based learning activities in Malaysia as a guideline to improve the quality of education, curriculum and organize…

  4. 78 FR 57620 - Trade Mission to Philippines and Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... International Trade Administration Trade Mission to Philippines and Malaysia AGENCY: International Trade... FR 22237, April 15, 2013, regarding the education industry trade mission to Manila, Philippines and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia scheduled for October 23-October 30, 2013, to revise the mission description from...

  5. Beginning Teachers as Policy Workers in Malaysia and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vivienne Ruth; Young, Sharon; Blanch, Keely; Smith, Lee

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the Malaysia government initiated twinned primary teacher education arrangements with five Southern Hemisphere higher education institutions (HEIs). Participating students completed their teacher education in both Malaysia and a partner HEI. In this paper, we consider the preliminary findings of a comparative study tracking the beginning…

  6. A Visual Analysis of Festive Television Commercials in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lean Mei

    2011-01-01

    Malaysia is a multiracial country with a diverse range of religions, leading to a broad range of religious festivals throughout the year. In recent years, corporate giants such as Petronas, Telekom Malaysia (TM), Tenaga and Astro have taken to airing television commercials (TVCs) that contain a local touch when greeting their customers. Perhaps…

  7. Satisfaction from Academic Activities among Medical Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of data about the levels of satisfaction among medical students in regards to their academic activities in Malaysia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to fill the gap in the existing knowledge. A cross sectional study was carried out at the International medical school, the Management and Science University of Malaysia,…

  8. Household Expenditures on Private Tutoring: Emerging Evidence from Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring has been a burgeoning phenomenon in Malaysia for decades. This study examines the determinants of private tutoring expenditures in Malaysia using the 2004/2005 Household Expenditures Survey and applies hurdle regression models to the data. The results indicate that total household expenditures, household head's level of education,…

  9. Counseling in Malaysia: History, Current Status, and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Ching Mey; Ng, Kok-Mun

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the history of counseling in Malaysia, provides an update of its current status, and discusses some anticipated future trends for the profession in light of recent developments in the country. Counseling in Malaysia began with school guidance in the 1960s and has now achieved recognition as a profession in…

  10. War Against Terrorism: Malaysia’s Experience in Defeating Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-19

    Internal security in Malaysia has been based in the Legislative Acts , that is, the Internal Security Act and the Sedition Act . The Internal Security Act ...11 SEDITION ACT ...............................................................................................................................11...manner prejudicial to the security of Malaysia ”. • The Act also allows for restrictions on freedom of assembly, association, and expression, freedom

  11. Ecology and distribution of Lycopodiaceae Mirbel in Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusea, G.; Claysius, K.; Runi, S.; Joanes, U.; Haja Maideen, K.M.; Latiff, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the first account to discuss the distribution, ecology and habitats of the Lycopodiaceae in Malaysia. Lycopodiaceae are widely distributed throughout Malaysia with respect to altitudes and environmental conditions but most abundantly found in hill forest and lower montane forest,

  12. Household Expenditures on Private Tutoring: Emerging Evidence from Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring has been a burgeoning phenomenon in Malaysia for decades. This study examines the determinants of private tutoring expenditures in Malaysia using the 2004/2005 Household Expenditures Survey and applies hurdle regression models to the data. The results indicate that total household expenditures, household head's level of education,…

  13. Italian in the Linguistic Landscape of Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    This article looks at the presence of Italian in the linguistic landscape (LL) of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Rather surprisingly, Italian is quite visible, and it might even be the most used European language after English. After a general introduction on the Italian language and Malaysia, including the latter's LL, the article goes on to outline the…

  14. Combining Education and Work; Experiences in Asia and Oceania: Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugasu, V.

    Work oriented education has been tied to national development in Malaysia since the 1960's. Increasing population, unemployment, and shortages of skilled manpower led the government to relate education more closely to work and develop technical and vocational education. Malaysia extended basic education to lower secondary manpower needs; and…

  15. Malaysia's Multimedia Super Corridor and Roles of Information Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Edna

    In Malaysia, the government is supporting the diffusion of the Internet and is spearheading a project to bring Malaysia into the information age, by helping to design a smart city called the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC). The MSC is being planned as a high-technology center where world-class multimedia companies can develop state-of-the-art…

  16. A Visual Analysis of Festive Television Commercials in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lean Mei

    2011-01-01

    Malaysia is a multiracial country with a diverse range of religions, leading to a broad range of religious festivals throughout the year. In recent years, corporate giants such as Petronas, Telekom Malaysia (TM), Tenaga and Astro have taken to airing television commercials (TVCs) that contain a local touch when greeting their customers. Perhaps…

  17. Trade in Higher Education Services in Malaysia: Key Policy Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Siew Yean

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, Malaysia has emerged as an unexpected contender in the world market for international students in higher education. Recognizing this sector as a potential new source of growth and export revenue, Malaysia aims to become a regional hub for higher education. In view of this, the objectives of this paper are to profile the pattern of…

  18. Students' Biotechnology Literacy: The Pillars of STEM Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Nurnadiah Mohamed; Suryawati, Evi; Osman, Kamisah

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology has been widely applied in various products throughout the 21st century. Malaysia selected the biotechnology sector as one of the key strategic technologies that would enable Malaysia to transform into a fully developed nation by the year 2020. However, to date, there has been very little research on the level of biotechnology…

  19. Students' Biotechnology Literacy: The Pillars of STEM Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Nurnadiah Mohamed; Suryawati, Evi; Osman, Kamisah

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology has been widely applied in various products throughout the 21st century. Malaysia selected the biotechnology sector as one of the key strategic technologies that would enable Malaysia to transform into a fully developed nation by the year 2020. However, to date, there has been very little research on the level of biotechnology…

  20. Treatment of wastewater from rubber industry in Malaysia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of wastewater from rubber industry in Malaysia. ... Discharge of untreated rubber effluent to waterways resulted in water pollution that affected the human health. ... waste minimization, utilization of waste, resource recovery and recycling of ... Key words: Rubber industry, effluent, waste management, Malaysia.

  1. An Analysis of Globalization and Higher Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arokiasamy, Anantha Raj A.

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to examine the impact of globalization on private higher education in Malaysia. The impact of globalization and the development of knowledge-based economy have caused much dramatic change to the character and functions of higher education in Malaysia. The major trend is the reforming and restructuring of private higher education in…

  2. Multicultural Early Childhood Education: Practices and Challenges in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoon, Hooi San; Abdullah, Melissa Ng Lee Yen; Abdullah, Anna Christina

    2013-01-01

    Multicultural early childhood education is necessary in a culturally diverse country like Malaysia. Preschool teachers play an important role in implementing multicultural education in the classroom. This paper reports the findings of a self-report questionnaire involving 854 preschool teachers in Malaysia. The preschool teachers disclosed their…

  3. Contemporary Challenges and Changes: Principals' Leadership Practices in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michelle; Adams, Donnie; Joo, Mabel Tan Hwee; Muniandy, Vasu; Perera, Corinne Jaqueline; Harris, Alma

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the findings from a contemporary study of principals' leadership practices in Malaysia as part of the 7 System Leadership Study. Recent policy developments within Malaysia have increased principals' accountability and have underlined the importance of the role of the principals in transforming school performance and student…

  4. The Flora Malesiana Project and its relevance to Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saw, L.G.; Soepadmo, E.

    2002-01-01

    In a developing country like Malaysia, it is becoming difficult to attract funds to do basic taxonomic work. Taxonomic research must be made relevant to national needs. Among the increasing needs for indigenous plants and their environment in Malaysia are their conservation and determining the

  5. Effectiveness of soap formulations containing deet and permethrin as personal protection against outdoor mosquitoes in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, H H

    1986-03-01

    Two soap formulations, both containing 20% deet and one each containing permethrin at 0.5 and 1.0%, respectively, were applied to exposed arms and legs of volunteers as personal protection against outdoor human biting mosquitoes in six locations on Penang Island, Malaysia. The predominant mosquito species collected from these locations were Aedes albopictus, Mansonia uniformis, Culex gelidus, Anopheles lesteri and Armigeres subalbatus. Efficacy and residual effects up to 4 hours indicated good protection against these species. Reduction in mosquito landing-biting rates in treated groups ranged from 83.8 to 100.0%. At high densities, small percentages of Ma. uniformis and An. lesteri landed or bit on treated skin. Use of the soap formulations in terms of cost-effectiveness, safety and overall vector control strategy for some tropical diseases is discussed.

  6. Palaeomagnetic evidence from the Ordovician and Silurian of northwest Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, N. S.

    1980-06-01

    The Ordovician and Silurian Setul Limestone of the Langkawi Islands, northwest Peninsular Malaysia, has a mean magnetic vector of D = 338°, I = 62° after cleaning and correction for tilt. This is equivalent to a palaeolatitude of 43°, and a palaeomagnetic pole at 46°N, 76°E. The Silurian part of the Setul limestone also shows a similar direction. The Ordovician results are equivalent to a palaeolatitude of 43°, N or S. Recent reconstructions, based on palaeontology, place Indochina and China in the northern hemisphere in the Ordovician; if this is correct, a palaeolatitide of 43° for Langkawi would imply that Malaya-Indochina was the most northerly continental fragment at that time.

  7. Diplectanids (Monogenea) on the archerfish Toxotes jaculatrix (Pallas) (Toxotidae) off Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, L H S

    2006-05-01

    Two new and two previously described species of diplectanid monogeneans (Heteroplectanum flabelliforme n. sp., Diplectanum sumpit n. sp., D. jaculator Mizelle & Kritsky, 1969 and D. toxotes Mizelle & Kritsky, 1969) were collected from archerfish Toxotes jaculatrix off the Island of Langkawi, Kedah and off Perak, Malaysia. The reproductive systems and squamodiscs of D. jaculator and D. toxotes are described for the first time. D. sumpit n. sp. differs from D. toxotes and D. jaculator in a having a small curved copulatory tube with a distinct accessory piece, compared to the long, tubular copulatory tube of D. jaculator and the slender tube of D. toxotes. D. sumpit n. sp. also differs from D. toxotes in having a larger ventral bar and larger squamodiscs. H. flabelliforme n. sp. differs from all known Heteroplectanum species in the shape and size of the squamodiscs, the arrangement of the sclerites in the squamodiscs, the extremely large ventral bar and the short, curved, non-spinous copulatory tube.

  8. A new insular species of Rock Gecko (Cnemaspis Boulenger) from Pulau Langkawi, Kedah, Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grismer, L Lee; Wood, P L Jr; Quah, Evan S H; Anuar, Shahrul; Ngadi, Ehwan; Ahmad, Norhayati

    2015-07-10

    A new, diminutive species of Rock Gecko Cnemaspis mahsuriae sp. nov. of the affinis group, is described from Gunung Raya on Pulau Langkawi, Kedah, Peninsular Malaysia and is differentiated from all other species in the affinis group by having a unique combination of characters including a maximum SVL of 36.6 mm; keeled subtibials and ventrals; 21-24 paravertebral tubercles; no tubercles in the lateral caudal furrows; caudal tubercles not encircling tail; no precloacal pores; 23-26 subdigital lamellae on the fourth toe; no white ocelli in the shoulder region; no yellow postscapular band; and faint yellow bars on the flanks. Cnemaspis mahsuriae sp. nov. is a forest-dwelling species living in close sympatry or paraptry with the insular endemic C. roticanai Grismer & Chan. The Langkawi Archipelago harbors a unique mix of Malaysian and Indochinese taxa and the frequency of new discoveries from this group of islands is increasing.

  9. HIZBUT TAHRIR MALAYSIA: the Emergence of a New Transnational Islamist Movement in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Nawab Mohamed Osman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the Hizbut Tahrir of Malaysia and places it in the context of the wider and deeper development of Muslim politics and mass mobilisation across Asia and the world at large. While much has been written about the Hizbut Tahrir of Indonesia (HTI, little is known about the HTM. This paper traces the initial arrival of the HT to Malaysia, via the network of Malaysian students and activists who were educated abroad and who have managed to build their own inter-personal networks and relationships outside the parameters of mainstream political Islam and the state apparatus in the country. Furthermore it is interesting to note that HTM in Malaysia takes its own unique stand on Islamic issues with relation to the mainstream Islamic party PAS and the Malay-Muslim UMNO party. The paper therefore attempts to locate the ideological positioning of the HTM in the wider context of Islamist politics in contemporary Malaysia and to analyse its relationship to the wider currents of ethno-communal as well as religious politics in the country as a whole. 

  10. Birds observed at Shemya Island, Aleutian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers Shemya Island bird surveys. The reports outline migrant bird activity during August 31 to October 3, 1977. The purpose of the study was to survey...

  11. Paradise Islands? Island States and Environmental Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverker C. Jagers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Island states have been shown to outperform continental states on a number of large-scale coordination-related outcomes, such as levels of democracy and institutional quality. The argument developed and tested in this article contends that the same kind of logic may apply to islands’ environmental performance, too. However, the empirical analysis shows mixed results. Among the 105 environmental outcomes that we analyzed, being an island only has a positive impact on 20 of them. For example, island states tend to outcompete continental states with respect to several indicators related to water quality but not in aspects related to biodiversity, protected areas, or environmental regulations. In addition, the causal factors previously suggested to make islands outperform continental states in terms of coordination have weak explanatory power in predicting islands’ environmental performance. We conclude the paper by discussing how these interesting findings can be further explored.

  12. Electrochemical island growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lian

    The ability to independently dictate the shape and crystal orientation of islands in electrocrystallization remains a significant challenge. The main reason for this is that the complex interplay between the substrate, nucleation, and surface chemistry are not fully understood. Here the kinetics of 3D island growth for copper on ruthenium oxide is studied. The small nucleation overpotential leads to enhanced lateral growth and the formation of hexagonal, disk-shaped islands. The amorphous substrate allows the nuclei to achieve the thermodynamically favorable orientation, i.e. a surface normal. Island growth follows power law kinetics in both lateral and vertical directions. At shorter times, the two growth exponents are equal to 1/2 whereas at longer times lateral growth slows down while vertical growth speeds up. Accordingly, a growth mechanism is proposed, wherein the lateral growth of disk-shaped islands is initiated by attachment of Cu adatoms on the ruthenium oxide surface onto the island periphery while vertical growth is initiated by 2D nucleation on the top terrace and followed by lateral step propagation. These results indicate three criteria for enhanced lateral growth in electrodeposition: (i) a substrate that leads to a small nucleation overpotential, (ii) fast adatom surface diffusion on substrate to promote lateral growth, and (iii) preferential anion adsorption to stabilize the basal plane. The surface roughness evolution, during isolated island growth, island coalescence, and continuous film growth, has also been studied as a function of island shape and island density. It is shown that the surface width wsat(l,t) initially follows anomalous scaling in the isolated island growth regime but exhibits normal scaling during the early stages of continuous film growth. Furthermore, the short length scale roughness is dependent primarily on island shape while the long length scale roughness is dependent on island density. Electrochemical deposition of

  13. [Muscular sarcocystosis after travel to Malaysia: a case series from Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesak, G; Tappe, D; Keller, C; Cramer, J; Güthoff, W; Zanger, P; Frank, M; Ernestus, K; Rauthe, S; Stich, A; Schäfer, J

    2014-05-01

    Since 2011, about 100 travellers to the island of Tioman, Malaysia, have been diagnosed worldwide with suspected muscular sarcocystosis, a previously only sporadically observed parasitic disease. Source of infection and therapy remain unclear. Final diagnosis requires microscopic identification of cysts in muscle biopsies. The study objective was a systematic description of characteristic symptoms, laboratory investigations and treatment response. Systematic case series. The 26 cases of 5 centers for tropical medicine in Germany showed a characteristic biphasic development: symptoms began in general 2 weeks after mid-holidays (min. 7.5, max. 22 days) with unspecific fever and headaches lasting for almost 1 week. After an asymptomatic period of 2 weeks, severe myalgia (6.5, scale 0-10) and fever developed and lasted for about 6 weeks (min. 7, max. 207 days), accompanied by creatin-phosphokinase(CK)-elevation (up to 3.5 times), and eosinophilia (2.9 times). One out of two muscle biopsies revealed a cyst typical for sarcocystosis. In 6 out of 7 patients an increase in Sarcocystis-specific antibody concentration could be demonstrated by ELISA. Treatment with systemic steroids and albendazole, or ivermectin resulted in significant symptomatic improvement in most of the patients. One patient was treated early with cotrimoxazole and subsequently did not develop a second phase of the disease. All patients had stayed in the North-West of the island Tioman. Muscular sarcocystosis develops in a biphasic pattern with initial fever and later prolonged myalgia, eosinophilia, and CK-elevation. Steroids achieve symptomatic relief in the late phase. Early cotrimoxazole-therapy could possibly prevent parasitic muscle invasion. In fever after travel to Malaysia differential diagnosis should include sarcocystosis. The source of infection appears to be located in North-West of Tioman. Further studies are needed, including addressing early diagnosis and treatment. © Georg Thieme

  14. Zoonotic parasites from exotic meat in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazly, Z A; Nurulaini, R; Shafarin, M S; Fariza, N J; Zawida, Z; Muhamad, H Y; Adnan, M; Premaalatha, B; Erwanas, A I; Zaini, C M; Ong, C C; Chandrawathani, P

    2013-09-01

    Four zoonotic parasites, Sarcocystis spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp were screened in exotic meats. A total of forty-six (n=46) meat samples from various species of exotic animals were received from all the 14 states in Malaysia from January 2012 to April 2012. All exotic meat samples were examined macroscopically and histologically for the four zoonotic parasites. Results by histological examination of exotic meats showed the presence of Sarcocystis and Toxoplasma cysts at 8.7% (n=4) and 4.3% (n=2) respectively. No Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp. were found.

  15. Odonata of Maludam National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory A. Dow

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents records of Odonata collected in July 2012 in Maludam National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia. A total of 48 species from nine families were collected. Three species were new to science, one of which has already been described as Prodasineura yulan Dow & Ngiam, which may be endemic to Maludam. In addition, Maludam is only the second locality recorded in Sarawak for four poorly known species: Pachycypha aurea, Macrogomphus decemlineatus, Brachygonia ophelia and Brachygonia puella. Two of these species, Macrogomphus decemlineatus and Brachygonia ophelia, are recorded for the first time in Sarawak in more than 100 years. 

  16. Nationalizing Rituals? The Ritual Economy in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Starting in the 1970s, the wave of Islamic revivalism in Malaysia has revitalized ritual life among many Malay Muslims. In the same period, the country has witnessed steady economic growth, an emerging Malay middle class and the formation of an Islamic state bureaucracy that attempts to transform...... the understanding and practice of Islamic ritual. Building on fieldwork in a suburb outside Malaysia’s capital city, Kuala Lumpur, this article explores this ritual economy i.e. ways in which economic processes are driven by and integrated with religious ritual. I shall show how the question of Islamic rituals...

  17. An Examination of Customer Misbehaviour in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Wai Yip

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the research is to identify the common traits of customer misbehaviour and the motives behind such deviant acts in Malaysia. It is also aims to find out which service industries are prone to customer misbehaviour. Services have become part of everyone’s life, be it going to the cinema, taking a train, or dining in the restaurant. Customers that are physically present in the service area for consumption of goods and services are given the opportunity to misbehave, be it in the form ...

  18. The burden of terrorism in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abul Aziz, Azhar

    2003-01-01

    In the peace-loving, moderate and progressive country of Muslim-dominated Malaysia, violence generally is alien to the culture. Terrorism initially took shape during the post-independence, communist era by jungle recalcitrant actions. In recent years, this has been superceded by a more internationally related trend of violence. Only very few incidents were based locally, while the majority were linked to international groups or organizations abroad, including the Kumpulan Mujahidin Malaysia (KMM), Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), and the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG). Kidnapping with ransom seemed to have been the most commone modus operandi, while killing and robbery accounted for very few of these incidents. The number of victims in each event so far has been small, and smaller for those physically harmed or killed. This pattern of terrorist attacks suggests that the current level of provision of emergency medical services is sufficient to handle such incidents. Recent advances in local emergency medicine also have witnessed the establishment of various teaching and training modules, a pivotal role played by university hospitals and supported by the Ministry of Health. However, the spate of ongoing events of mass destruction such as the conflict in Israel/Palestine, wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the World Trade Center and Pentagon tragedies of 11 September 2001, and the Bali bombing in Indonesia, remain as great concerns to Malaysians. Both the government and the people of Malaysia abhor such unjustified uses of terror, and take every measure to curtail them. The National Security Council policies of Arahan No. 18 and Arahan No. 20 detail specific roles and responsibilities of various agencies in managing terrorism and disasters respectively, while the use of the stern Internal Security Act that allows indefinite detention without trial, evidently has been an efficient intelligence and security apparatus. With more recent developments of terrorist events regionally and globally

  19. Nuclear energy in Malaysia - closing the gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    >Malaysian Nuclear Society (Mns,

    2013-06-01

    This article is prepared by the Malaysian Nuclear Society (MNS) to present the views of the Malaysian scientific community on the need for Malaysia to urgently upgrade its technical know-how and expertise to support the nuclear energy industry for future sustainable economic development of the country. It also present scientific views that nuclear energy will bring economic growth as well as technically sound industry, capable of supporting nuclear energy industry needs in the country, and recommend action items for timely technical upgrading of Malaysian expertise related to nuclear energy industry.

  20. Codonoboea (Gesneriaceae Sections in Peninsular Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Lu Lim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Codonoboea is the largest genus of Gesneriaceae in Peninsular Malaysia with 92 species. Nine sections,   Boeopsis, Codonoboea, Didymanthus, Glossadenia, Heteroboea, Pectinati, Reptantes, Salicini and Venusti, have been erected based on morphological characters, such as habit, leaf arrangement and shape, type of inflorescence, number of flowers, corolla type and nectary type. Recent molecular phylogenetic study using ITS and trnL-F sequences show that only section Heteroboea is monophyletic. While the sections of Codonoboea can no longer be maintained as   formal taxonomic taxa, as informal groupings they are useful in identification and in constructing keys.

  1. Islamic Mobility : Car Culture in Modern Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In a modern and respectable middle-class suburb outside Kuala Lumpur, the overtness of cars evokes intense speculation about the nature of the make-up of covert middle-class homes and the formation of Malay Muslim identities more generally. I argue that the more ‘Islamic’ cultures of consumption assert themselves in modern Malaysia, the more the growing Malay Muslim middle class is split between desiring cars as positional commodities, on the one hand, and claims for piety through consumption...

  2. Applications of electron accelerator in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khairul Zaman Hj. Mohd Dahlan [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2003-02-01

    Current status of radiation processing, as one of the core research programs of the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), is presented. Industrial applications of six electron accelerators from 150 kV up to 3 MV in Malaysia now in operation are mainly for curing of surface coatings, crosslinking of tubes, heat shrinkable tubes and packaging films, crosslinking of wire insulation. Their performances are listed. New technology now in R and D stage includes natural rubber, sago starch and chitosan for biomedical applications, and radiation curable materials from oil palm for pressure sensitive adhesive and printing ink. (S. Ohno)

  3. Cheilostome Bryozoa from Penang and Langkawi, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Paul D.; Shau-Hwai Aileen Tan

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-three species of cheilostome bryozoans are described from the Malaysian islands of Penang and Langkawi based on a brief reconnaisance survey of shore localities. These are the first bryozoans to be formally described from either island and they demonstrate the potential for further research on these neglected suspension feeders. Of the 23 species recorded, 12 are anascans, half of which are malacostegines, and 11 are ascophorans. The new combinations Acanthodesia falsitenuis (Liu, 1992...

  4. Tanzania - Mafia Island Airport

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The evaluation design and subsequent data gathering activities will address the following key research questions: a) Has the Mafia Island Airport Upgrade Project...

  5. Tectonic Motion of Malaysia: Analysis from Years 2001 TO 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J.; Shariff, N. S.; Omar, K.; Amin, Z. M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the tectonic motion of Malaysia using the Malaysian Active GPS Station (MASS) and Malaysia Realtime Kinematic GNSS Network (MyRTKnet) data from years 2001 to 2013. GNSS data were processed using Bernese 5.0, and plotted as a time series; whereby the period before and after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman mega earthquake are plotted separately. From the time series, episodic events and stable inter-seismic deformation period are analysed. The results indicate that the 2001- 2004 and 2008-2011 periods were free from episodic events; hence, chosen to depict the tectonic motion of Malaysia before and after 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, respectively. The motion had a major change in direction and rate, especially for East Malaysia and South Peninsular Malaysia. This indicates there exist a long-term post-seismic deformation due to the 2004 mega earthquake. Nonetheless, the 2008-2011 inter-seismic period is stable, and suitable to represent the current long-term tectonic motion of Malaysia: Peninsular and East Malaysia moves south-east, at an average velocity of 0.89 ±0.01 cm/yr south and 1.70 ±0.02 cm/yr east, and 1.06 ±0.01 cm/yr south and 2.50 ±0.02 cm/yr east, respectively. In addition, the co-seismic motion for the 2005 Nias, 2007 Bengkulu and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake are relatively small, indicating these three earthquakes have no significant contribution to the long-term tectonic motion of Malaysia. Overall, this paper aims to provide a general insight into the tectonic motion of Malaysia which, expectedly, may benefit other scientific fields.

  6. Management of Waqf Assets in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunaidah Ab Hasan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Waqf is one of the main mechanism in providing support for the development to all levels of the ummah more so for the underprivileged. Waqf institutions in Malaysia are under the jurisdiction of the 14 states rather than the Federal government. This paper reviews the development of waqf in Melaka, one of the states in Malaysia. It discusses a brief historical background, function and legal aspects of waqf matters. A brief information on the structure and administration of waqf in Melaka, Baitulmal is responsible for the sake of administering and managing such waqf assets in Melaka is also presented. This study is also concerned with examining of the current situation of development waqf asset; which is known as waqf saham in Melaka through the record by Majlis Agama Islam Melaka (MAIM. Yet, it is undeniably true that some challenges and impediments pertaining to the issues of developing waqf assets; inter alia, lack of fund and expertise, poor documentation and the record value of waqf property and others.

  7. Women and the media in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, M H

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of and portrayal of women in the Malaysian media are summarized here in detail. Women's access to training in journalism and education is on average better than that of men. There are 3 communications departments in institutions of higher learning in Malaysia, and all enroll more women than men, probably because of women's better language skills and desire to enter a "glamourous" profession. Women's participation in journalism, except for women's magazines, is much more limited, especially at higher levels. Women's abilities are not lacking, as shown by the number of awards Malaysian women journalists have won, but it is felt that women are not assertive, cannot work late or night shifts, cannot be transferred, because of family and domestic obligations. Perhaps journalism curricula should offer women extra courses in effective family management, public speaking or human relations, or assign cadet journalists women mentors. In Malaysia women are generally portrayed in print, electronic and advertising media as either decorative, foolish, consumption driven, or sex objects. Exploitative poses predominate in ads for male markets, such as automobiles and liquor. Sexual roles for women and girls are depicted as those of subservient or silly housewife or in other negative or traditional roles.

  8. A review of schizophrenia research in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, K Y; Salina, A A

    2014-08-01

    Research in schizophrenia has advanced tremendously. One hundred and seventy five articles related to Schizophrenia were found from a search through a database dedicated to indexing all original data relevant to medicine published in Malaysia between the years 2000-2013. This project aims to examine published research articles, in local and international journals in order to provide a glimpse of the research interest in Malaysia with regards to schizophrenia. Single case study, case series report, reviews and registry reports were not included in this review. Medication trial, unless it concerned a wider scope of psychopharmacology was also excluded from this review. A total of 105 articles were included in this review. Despite numerous genetics studies conducted and published, a definitive conclusion on the aetiology or mechanism underlying schizophrenia remains elusive. The National Mental Health - Schizophrenia Registry (NMHR) proved to be an important platform for many studies and publications. Studies stemmed from NMHR have provided significant insight into the baseline characteristic of patients with schizophrenia, pathway to care, and outcomes of the illness. International and regional collaborations have also encouraged important work involving stigma and discrimination in schizophrenia. Ministry of Health's hospitals (MOH) are the main research sites in the country with regards to schizophrenia research. Numbers of schizophrenia research are still low in relation to the number of universities and hospitals in the country. Some of the weaknesses include duplication of studies, over-emphasising clinical trials and ignoring basic clinical research, and the lack of publications in international and regional journals.

  9. Tsunami risk mapping simulation for Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, S.Y.; Koh, H. L.; Moh, Y.T.; De Angelis, D. L.; Jiang, J.

    2011-01-01

    The 26 December 2004 Andaman mega tsunami killed about a quarter of a million people worldwide. Since then several significant tsunamis have recurred in this region, including the most recent 25 October 2010 Mentawai tsunami. These tsunamis grimly remind us of the devastating destruction that a tsunami might inflict on the affected coastal communities. There is evidence that tsunamis of similar or higher magnitudes might occur again in the near future in this region. Of particular concern to Malaysia are tsunamigenic earthquakes occurring along the northern part of the Sunda Trench. Further, the Manila Trench in the South China Sea has been identified as another source of potential tsunamigenic earthquakes that might trigger large tsunamis. To protect coastal communities that might be affected by future tsunamis, an effective early warning system must be properly installed and maintained to provide adequate time for residents to be evacuated from risk zones. Affected communities must be prepared and educated in advance regarding tsunami risk zones, evacuation routes as well as an effective evacuation procedure that must be taken during a tsunami occurrence. For these purposes, tsunami risk zones must be identified and classified according to the levels of risk simulated. This paper presents an analysis of tsunami simulations for the South China Sea and the Andaman Sea for the purpose of developing a tsunami risk zone classification map for Malaysia based upon simulated maximum wave heights. ?? 2011 WIT Press.

  10. TRAFFIC LIGHT VIOLATION AMONG MOTORISTS IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KULANTHAYAN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Road crashes in Malaysia in 2006 stood at 341,232. This resulted in 6,287 deaths among road users giving an index of 23.5 road fatalities per 100,000 inhabitants. One of the possible reasons for the high number of crashes and injuries is due to beating traffic lights. Thus there is a need to investigate this alarming problem. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Selangor, Malaysia to identify road traffic-light violations. Traffic light violations are believed to be rising and resulted in 136 motorist fatalities and 155 injuries in 2002. Near-miss incidents could be higher as they go unreported. This study was conducted through observations from 14 December 2005 until 22 January 2006. Four locations were chosen to represent Selangor: Kajang, Kelang, Utara Subang Jaya (USJ and Bangi. During this 5-week period a total of 3,471 vehicles were observed. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13.0. A bivariate analysis (logistic regression was applied to determine any relationship between traffic light violation and five identified variables. The results showed traffic light violation has a relationship with all five factors: day (weekday or weekend, camera enforcement, type of vehicle (two-wheel vehicles or four-wheel vehicles, traffic light cycle time (long or short and type of traffic lights (timer or normal.

  11. Prehospital emergency medical services in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamuddin, N A R Nik; Hamzah, M Shah; Holliman, C James

    2007-05-01

    Once a very slowly developing country in a Southeast Asia region, Malaysia has undergone considerable change over the last 20 years after the government changed its focus from agriculture to developing more industry and technology. The well-known "Vision 2020," introduced by the late Prime Minister, set a target for the nation to be a developed country in the Asia region by the year 2020. As the economy and standard of living have improved, the demand from the public for a better health care system, in particular, emergency medical services (EMS), has increased. Despite the effort by the government to improve the health care system in Malaysia, EMS within the country are currently limited, best described as being in the "developing" phase. The Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education, Civil Defense, and non-governmental organizations such as Red Crescent and St. John's Ambulance, provide the current ambulance services. At the present time, there are no uniform medical control or treatment protocols, communication systems, system management, training or education, or quality assurance policies. However, the recent development of and interest in an Emergency Medicine training program has gradually led to improved EMS and prehospital care.

  12. Modeling Malaysia's Energy System: Some Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Yusof

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The current dynamic and fragile world energy environment necessitates the development of new energy model that solely caters to analyze Malaysia’s energy scenarios. Approach: The model is a network flow model that traces the flow of energy carriers from its sources (import and mining through some conversion and transformation processes for the production of energy products to final destinations (energy demand sectors. The integration to the economic sectors is done exogeneously by specifying the annual sectoral energy demand levels. The model in turn optimizes the energy variables for a specified objective function to meet those demands. Results: By minimizing the inter temporal petroleum product imports for the crude oil system the annual extraction level of Tapis blend is projected at 579600 barrels per day. The aggregate demand for petroleum products is projected to grow at 2.1% year-1 while motor gasoline and diesel constitute 42 and 38% of the petroleum products demands mix respectively over the 5 year planning period. Petroleum products import is expected to grow at 6.0% year-1. Conclusion: The preliminary results indicate that the model performs as expected. Thus other types of energy carriers such as natural gas, coal and biomass will be added to the energy system for the overall development of Malaysia energy model.

  13. Child-to-Child programme in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, M S; Abraham, S

    1982-09-01

    Even though Malaysia is a relatively prosperous country amongst the developing nations, it is still be set by problems of a rapidly increasing population. The economic cake is also unevenly distributed and there are pockets of poverty in the slums surrounding the towns as well as in the rural areas. Added to that is the problem of ignorance and superstition especially amongst its adult population. It is due to these problems that the Child-to-Child programme has found special application in Malaysia. The Child-to-Child has been introduced through either the government agencies or the voluntary organizations. Through the Ministry of Education, the concept has found its ways through the schools and the state department of education. The Ministry of Information and Broadcasting has also introduced the concept of Child-to-Child in the media. The voluntary organizations have also introduced the concept of Child-to-Child in their projects. The Sang Kancil project has to some extent used the idea in the running of its activities. The Health and Nutrition Education House have found that by applying the concept and using older children to help in running its activities, its over all objective which is the improvement of the health of the children in the slums could be reached more easily.

  14. Pedestrian Crossing Speed: The Case of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Hoe Goh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrians are vulnerable road users, and they are always at risk when making their daily trips. Hence, roadway design and traffic’ control devices need to consider pedestrians’ safety. Pedestrian walking speed is fundamental to any roadway and traffic’ control design. Unfortunately, no specific guidelines exist for pedestrian crossing speed in Malaysia. The ultimate goals of this research are to establish the local pedestrian crossing speed and to identify the contributing factors. A total of 1579 samples on pedestrian crossing speed were collected at signalized and non-signalized crosswalks. The Bi-variate analysis (chi-square test was carried out to study statistically the association of the contributing factors. The Bi-variate analysis shows that crosswalk type, age and gender significantly contribute to pedestrian speed in Malaysia. However, lighting (daytime and night-time and race are not contributing to the pedestrians’ speed. Besides, pedestrians at non-signalized crosswalk have significantly faster crossing speed than at signalized crosswalk. Chi-square test also showed that children pedestrians are the fastest group, and elderly pedestrians are the slowest group in terms of pedestrian crossing speed. Moreover, male pedestrians have significantly faster crossing speed than female pedestrians do.

  15. Thorium: Issues and prospects in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M.; Majid, Amran Ab.; Sarmani, Sukiman; Bahri, Che Nor Aniza Che Zainul

    2015-04-01

    In Malaysia, thorium exists in minerals and rare earth elements production residue. The average range of thorium content in Malaysian monazite and xenotime minerals was found about 70,000 and 15,000 ppm respectively. About 2,636 tonnes of Malaysian monazite was produced for a period of 5 years (2006-2010) and based on the above data, it can be estimated that Malaysian monazite contains about 184.5 tonnes of thorium. Although thorium can become a major radiological problem to our environment, but with the significant deposit of thorium in Malaysian monazite, it has a prospect as a future alternative fuel in nuclear technology. This paper will discuss the thorium issues in Malaysia especially its long term radiological risks to public health and environment at storage and disposal stages, the prospect of exploring and producing high purity thorium from our rare earth elements minerals for future thorium based reactor. This paper also highlights the holistic approach in thorium recovery from Malaysian rare earth element production residue to reduce its radioactivity and extraction of thorium and rare earth elements from the minerals with minimum radiological impact to health and environment.

  16. Proximate determinants of fertility in peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Nai Peng; Ng, Sor Tho; Yew, Siew Yong

    2012-05-01

    The continuing decline in fertility despite a contraction in contraceptive use in Peninsular Malaysia since the mid-1980s has triggered considerable interest in the reasons behind this phenomenon, such as increase in abortion, sterility, and out-of-wedlock pregnancy. Fertility decline has been attributed to rapid socioeconomic development, which can only influence fertility through the intermediate variables. Application of vital statistics, population census, and survey data of Peninsular Malaysia on Bongaarts's model vindicates that marriage postponement and contraceptive use are the 2 most important proximate determinants of fertility, but the effects are not uniform across the ethnic groups. For instance, the predicted total fertility rate for Chinese and Malays are 2.9 and 1.6, respectively, compared with the observed level of 3.0 and 1.9. Postpartum infecundability and abortion also play a part in explaining ethnic fertility differentials. The fertility inhibiting effects of these proximate determinants have significant implications on reproductive health and future population growth.

  17. Macroeconomic Determinants of Skilled Labour Migration: The Case of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuie Hong; Solucis Santhapparaj, A.

    In this study, macroeconomic determinants of immigration are analysed with pooled cross-country and time series data on skilled immigration into Malaysia from 39 countries during 1998-2004. Results demonstrate clearly that both high frequency (such as differences in cyclical economic conditions) and low frequency determinants (such as differences in levels of economic development) have been important for determinants of immigration into Malaysia. Immigration is determined by the income growth of Malaysia, change in Malaysian unemployment rate and population of the source countries. Year-to-year changes in skilled immigration flows are dominated by economic fluctuation.

  18. Sustainable River Water Quality Management in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mamun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ecological status of Malaysia is not as bad as many other developing nations in the world. However, despite the enforcement of the Environmental Quality Act (EQA in 1974, the water quality of Malaysian inland water (especially rivers is following deteriorating trend. The rivers are mainly polluted due to the point and non-point pollution sources. Point sources are monitored and controlled by the Department of Environment (DOE, whereas a significant amount of pollutants is contributed by untreated sullage and storm runoff. Nevertheless, it is not too late to take some bold steps for the effective control of non-point source pollution and untreated sullage discharge, which play significant roles on the status of the rivers. This paper reviews the existing procedures and guidelines related to protection of the river water quality in Malaysia.  There is a good possibility that the sewage and effluent discharge limits in the Environmental Quality Act (EQA may pose hindrance against achieving good quality water in the rivers as required by the National Water Quality Standards (NWQS. For instance, Ammoniacal Nitrogen (NH3-N is identified as one of the main pollutants to render many of the rivers polluted but it was not considered in the EQA as a monitoring parameter until the new regulations published in 2009.  Surprisingly, the new regulation for sewage and industrial effluent limits set allowable NH3-N concentration quite high (5 mg/L, which may result in low Water Quality Index (WQI values for the river water. The water environment is a dynamic system. Periodical review of the monitoring requirements, detecting emerging pollutants in sewage, effluent and runoff, and proper revision of water quality standards are necessary for the management of sustainable water resources in the country. ABSTRAK: Satus ekologi Malaysia tidak seburuk kebanyakan negara membangun lain di dunia. Walaupun Akta Kualiti Alam Sekitar (EQA dikuatkuasakan pada tahun 1974

  19. St. Vincent Island Tour

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This letter, written by Charles Marks who lived on St. Vincent Island as a child, notes the changes he saw in the island when he visited in 1981. He notes that the...

  20. Marine and Island Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Lawrence J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes an ecology course which provides students with an opportunity to observe aquatic and terrestrial life in the Bahamas. States that students learn scientific methodology by measuring physical and chemical aspects of the island habitats. Provides information on the island, course description and objectives, transportation, facilities, and…

  1. Malaysia -U.S. Relations: Influencing Factors and its Impact on Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    For example, the occasion of the non- import of palm oil by the U.S. from Malaysia had strained the economic relations of both the countries. (At...began lobbying against palm cooking oils on the basis that they were unhealthy, these were not a welcome actions or Malaysian growers and producers...the territorial integrity of Indonesia . Fourth, Malaysia’s Prime Minister Najib as a statesman and Muslim leader lends a credible voice of reason

  2. MALAYSIA'S GENERAL ELECTIONS AMIDST THE SHADOW OF RE-MAHATHIRISATION

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmad Fauzi Abdul Hamid; Muhamad Takiyuddin Ismail

    2014-01-01

    ...) coalition and its main component party, the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO). Re-Mahathirisation refers to the increase in attachment towards the legacy of Malaysia's fourth Prime Minister, Dr. Mahathir Mohamad (1981-2003...

  3. Challenges in Implementing Engineering Technology Education in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmah Ali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.As Malaysia races against time to achieve Vision 2020 to be a developed nation, there is an urgent need for highly-skilled human resources to fulfill the requirements of the industry. This calls for an expansion of the engineering technology program to increase the number of technical graduates.  However, various challenges are faced by the institutions in the implementation of the Engineering Technology programs, which have significant negative impact on the nation in general and in particular the graduates from the programs. Data was collected from a brainstorming session between six organizations involved in providing engineering technology education in Malaysia and the UniversitiTeknologi Malaysia (UTM and a convention on Engineering Technology Future in Malaysia. These challenges are categorized into four and discussed in this paper.Keywords: Accreditation, Challenges, Engineering technology; Human resources, Technical graduates.

  4. Greenspace planning and management in Klang Valley, Peninsular Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Aziz, Nor Akmar Binti; Konijnendijk, Cecil Cornelis; Sreetheran, M.

    2011-01-01

    In rapidly developing countries such as Malaysia, the importance of urban greenspaces is recognized, but due to rapid industrialization and urbanization, maintaining and developing greenspace is a major challenge. This paper analyzes the status of urban greenspace policy, planning, and management...... in Malaysia. For this purpose, information was collected about urban greenspaces and their governance, planning, and management, both at the national level and in six representative case cities in the most urbanized part of Malaysia, the Klang Valley. Data was compiled by means of a literature review......, document analysis, and expert interviews with municipal officers in the selected cities. Results show the greenspace discourse in Malaysia has shifted its focus from one dominated by beautification to one concentrated on regarding greenspace as an essential part of the urban infrastructure. In spite...

  5. Minority Language Education in Malaysia: Four Ethnic Communities' Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karla J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses minority language education in Malaysia, a multilingual and multicultural country. Looks at four language minority groups and what they have done to to provide beginning education programs for their children that use the children's native languages. (Author/VWL)

  6. Sexuality education in Malaysia: perceived issues and barriers by professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Zahra Fazli; Low, Wah Yun; Merghati-Khoei, Effat; Ghorbani, Behzad

    2014-07-01

    This research explored the perspectives of Malaysian professionals on the issues and barriers affecting the implementation of sexuality education in Malaysia. This qualitative study involved in-depth interviews with 15 key professionals working in the field of sexuality and reproductive health in Malaysia. Thematic analysis was selected to analyze data. Barriers to sexuality education were perceived from 5 aspects: feasibility, acceptability, accountability, strategies, and community unawareness. Respondents believed that implementing national sexuality education is a time-consuming project. They regarded Malaysian multicultural society as a barrier to national sexuality education, and they believed that school-based sexuality education is not easily accomplished in Malaysia; also abstinence-only policy restricts the access of young people to accurate information. Lack of community involvement was perceived as a key concern to sexuality education. Campaigning to promote awareness of families, teachers, community leaders, and policy makers are recommended to help establishing national sexuality education in Malaysia. © 2014 APJPH.

  7. PAST WINDSTORM OCCURRENCE TREND, DAMAGE, AND LOSSES IN PENANG, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Windstorm occurrence in several parts of Malaysia, particularly in the northern region, has severely affected humans, causing damage to property as well as fatality. This study aims to investigate the past windstorm occurrence trend, including damage and losses, in Penang districts from 2010 to 2013. Data on windstorm occurrence and on damages and losses from districts were collected from the Land and District office and Social Welfare Department of Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia. The monthly windstorm occurrences in the districts were compared. Windstorm likely occurs in during March, May, and November annually. This windstorm occurrence indirectly contributes to the damage and losses in that particular area. Therefore, this phenomenon must not be neglected in Malaysia. The negative effects of this phenomenon become more severe with increasing incidence. Therefore, disaster mitigation efforts should be exerted to reduce the disastrous consequences of windstorm.

  8. Intersite epibiosis characterization on dominant mangrove crustacean species from Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Leborans, G.; Hanamura, Y.; Siow, R.; Chee, P.-E.

    2009-01-01

    Epibiosis was studied in dominant mangrove crustacean species in several areas in Malaysia. The observed basibionts were the crustaceans Mesopodopsis orientalis, Acetes japonicus, Acetes sibogae, Acetes indicus and Fenneropenaeus merguiensis and the epibionts found were the protozoan ciliates Acinet

  9. Governance and Risk Management: Empirical Evidence from Malaysia and Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rashidah Abdul Rahman; Siti Balqis Noor; Tariq Ismail

    2013-01-01

    ... management practices of Islamic banks in Malaysia and Egypt. The findings of this study identified that the Islamic banks in the selected countries are somewhat efficient in their risk management process...

  10. Web Document Analysis for Companies Listed in Bursa Malaysia

    CERN Document Server

    Othman, Mohd Shahizan; Salim, Juhana

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses a research on web document analysis for companies listed on Bursa Malaysia which is the forerunner of financial and investment center in Malaysia. Data set used in this research are from the company web documents listed in the Main Board and Second Board on Bursa Malaysia. This research has used the Web Resources Extraction System which was developed by the research group mainly to extract information for the web documents involved. Our research findings have shown that the level of website usage among the companies on Bursa Malaysia is still minimal. Furthermore, research has also found that 60.02 percent of the image files are utilized making it the most used type of file in creating websites.

  11. Options for Greenhouse Horticulture in Malaysia : trip report March 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elings, A.; Hemming, S.

    2008-01-01

    Protected greenhouse horticulture is a growing activity in Malaysia that has been prioritized by the Malaysian government as an area of cooperation with The Netherlands. Also, the private sector sees business opportunities and initiates modernization. Traditional horticultural production takes place

  12. THE PROCESS AND EFFECTS OF DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION IN PENANG, MALAYSIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Usman Haji Yaakob; Nik Norliati Fitri Md Nor

    2013-01-01

      This article describes the demographic transition in Penang, Malaysia based on the demographic transition theory, which explains the decline of birth and death rates in European countries during the 18th century...

  13. Codonoboea personatiflora (Gesneriaceae), a new species from Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiew, Ruth; Sam, Yen-Yen

    2012-01-01

    Codonoboea personatiflora Kiew & Y.Y.Sam, sp. nov., is described from lowland forest in the foothills in Terengganu, Peninsular Malaysia. It is unique in the genus in its personate flower. Its conservation status falls within the IUCN Endangered category.

  14. Malaysia as the Archetypal Garden in the British Creative Imagination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siti Nuraishah Ahmad

    2014-01-01

      [...]this paper reads images of Malaysia in British fiction through the framework of archetypal literary criticism and theories of colonial representations of space to reveal the production of a specific...

  15. Supporting Effective Feed-in Tariff Development in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    Since 2011, Malaysia's overarching policy framework for clean energy development, the New Energy Policy, has led to significant deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency. Building on the New Energy Policy, Malaysia mandated adoption of a renewable energy feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism under the 2011 Renewable Energy Act. In 2013, Malaysia's Sustainable Energy Development Authority partnered with the Clean Energy Solutions Center and the Clean Energy Regulators Initiative (CERI), via the Ask an Expert service, to implement FiT policies and expand renewable energy development. Through collaboration between the government of Malaysia and the Clean Energy Solutions Center, concrete policy action was supported and implemented, building a strong framework to expand and catalyze clean energy development.

  16. Factors Affecting Fertility – New Evidence from Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atif Awad; Ishak Yussof

    2017-01-01

    This research paper investigates long and short term determinants of fertility rates in Malaysia based on basic macroeconomic variables for the period 1980-2014 using Auto Regressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) method...

  17. Intersite epibiosis characterization on dominant mangrove crustacean species from Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Leborans, G.; Hanamura, Y.; Siow, R.; Chee, P.-E.

    2009-01-01

    Epibiosis was studied in dominant mangrove crustacean species in several areas in Malaysia. The observed basibionts were the crustaceans Mesopodopsis orientalis, Acetes japonicus, Acetes sibogae, Acetes indicus and Fenneropenaeus merguiensis and the epibionts found were the protozoan ciliates

  18. China's Investments in Malaysia: Choosing the "Right" Partners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guanie Lim

    2015-01-01

      This paper examines China's outward foreign direct investment into Malaysia by analysing the major coalition partners of mainland Chinese firms that have invested into the country, a relatively underexplored topic...

  19. Factors Determining Mergers of Banks in Malaysia's Banking Sector Reform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rubi Ahmad; Mohamed Ariff; Michael Skully

    2007-01-01

    What was termed government-guided merger was a unique banking sector reform implemented in 2002 by the central bank of Malaysia guiding a larger number of depository institutions to form 10 large banks...

  20. ISLAM AND MINORITIES: Managing Identity in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Suaedy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Malaysian general election in March 2008 raised an interesting and new phenomenon. For the first time since independence in 1957, the ruling alliance known as the National Front (Barisan Nasional, BN failed to secure two thirds of seats in parliament and lost control of five of Malaysia’s 13 states. This was due to the challenge presented by the new opposition alliance known as the Alternative Front (Barisan Alternatif, BA or the People’s Alliance (Pakatan Rakyat, PK which won more than 36% of seats in parliament and gained control of the five states. In the 2004 election, BN secured the largest ever percentage of seats in parliament with 91%. What is interesting is that it seems that this significant increase in support for the opposition is  due to their offer to change the way minorities and ethnicity is managed. They  propose a move from “Bumiputera Supremacy”, or affirmative action for the approximately 65% of “Bumiputera” Malaysians (the rest being largely of Chinese or Indian ethnicity, to “The People’s Supremacy”, which involves eradicating affirmative action based on ethnicity, basing it instead on need, for  instance need due to poverty. This would potentially increase the likelihood  of justice and equality for all ethnic or racial groups. This paper connects the phenomenon of change, as seen in the about turn in the results between the  2004 and 2008 elections, to the more global trend in which minorities are standing up to demand their rights in this era of globalization, and to the challenge multiculturalism presents to parts of the Muslim world such as Malaysia. Malaysia, a Muslim majority nation that has formally declared Islam the official state religion with Yang di-Pertuan Agong (the King as  Head of the State and symbol of Islam, is one example, though not necessarily  representative, of how Islam and Muslims manage minorities and identity or  multiculturalism within the process of globalization

  1. DETERMINANTS OF LEISURE-TIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: EVIDENCE FROM MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    YONG KANG CHEAH; Andrew K.G. Tan

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how socio-demographic and health-lifestyle factors determine participation and duration of leisure-time physical activity in Malaysia. Based on the Malaysia Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance-1 data, Heckman's sample selection model is employed to estimate the probability to participate and duration on physical activity. Results indicate that gender, age, years of education and family illness history are significant in explaining participation probability in leisure-tim...

  2. Trends in sustainable landfilling in Malaysia, a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauziah, S H; Agamuthu, P

    2012-07-01

    In Malaysia, landfills are being filled up rapidly due to the current daily generation of approximately 30,000 tonnes of municipal solid waste. This situation creates the crucial need for improved landfilling practices, as sustainable landfilling technology is yet to be achieved here. The objective of this paper is to identify and evaluate the development and trends in landfilling practices in Malaysia. In 1970, the disposal sites in Malaysia were small and prevailing waste disposal practices was mere open-dumping. This network of relatively small dumps, typically located close to population centres, was considered acceptable for a relatively low population of 10 million in Malaysia. In the 1980s, a national programme was developed to manage municipal and industrial wastes more systematically and to reduce adverse environmental impacts. The early 1990s saw the privatization of waste management in many parts of Malaysia, and the establishment of the first sanitary landfills for MSW and an engineered landfill (called 'secure landfill' in Malaysia) for hazardous waste. A public uproar in 2007 due to contamination of a drinking water source from improper landfilling practices led to some significant changes in the government's policy regarding the country's waste management strategy. Parliament passed the Solid Waste and Public Cleansing Management (SWPCM) Act 2007 in August 2007. Even though the Act is yet to be implemented, the government has taken big steps to improve waste management system further. The future of the waste management in Malaysia seems somewhat brighter with a clear waste management policy in place. There is now a foundation upon which to build a sound and sustainble waste management and disposal system in Malaysia.

  3. Malaysia; Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund.

    2013-01-01

    This report is an assessment of the state of compliance with the Basel Core Principles (BCPs) in Malaysia. Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) employs a well-developed risk-focused regulatory and supervisory system, consisting of a hands-on and comprehensive program of onsite supervision and extensive offsite macroeconomic and microeconomic surveillance supervision. The assessment has revealed several opportunities for improvement of the regulatory and supervisory framework. The Executive Board recomm...

  4. The Evolution of Malaysias Immigration Policy Since 1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    administration. D. PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF IMMIGRANTS Why would immigrants flock to Malaysia? Malaysia was the premier exporter of rubber, palm oil , tin, and...itself in a quandary. Its irmnigra.tion policy was promoting economic grov.rth, but also generating opposition from society. Public opinion about...both effects of immigration policy --economic grov.rth and public opposition~ould determine political outcomes. In response to public pressure, the

  5. Sustainability of Three Recreational Forest Landscape Management in Selangor, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Kher Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Different stakeholders managed recreational forests in Selangor, Malaysia. These stakeholders' involvements have risen a question whether their development have fulfilled the sustainable landscape requirement. The aim of this study was to understand and generate more comprehensive knowledge on the recreational forest landscape management towards forest sustainability. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the management of recreational forest in Selangor, Malaysia that affect landscap...

  6. CAPITAL ACCOUNT LIBERALIZATION AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    SIONG HOOK LAW; Azman-Saini, W.N.W.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the impact of capital account liberalization on economic growth in Malaysia from 1970 to 2004. It uses two measures of capital account openness, namely de jure (an index of liberalization) and de facto (the volume of capital flows). The empirical results based on the modified growth model demonstrate that the de jure measure of capital account liberalization shows an adverse effect on growth in Malaysia. However, the de facto measure shows a robust positive effect on econo...

  7. Malaysia as the Archetypal Garden in the British Creative Imagination

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Nuraishah Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    European travel writing (1512–1984) represented Malaysia as a tropical Garden of Eden, an image that has also percolated into literary texts concerning the region. This article examines spatial images in British fiction through the framework of archetypal literary criticism and theories of colonial representations of space to reveal the worlding (Spivak 1999) of Malaysia as a garden. In order to ascertain the ways in which the garden archetype has been deployed by the British creative imagina...

  8. Trade and Investment Linkages in Higher Education Services in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Tham Siew Yean; Andrew Kam Jia Yi

    2007-01-01

    In the Third Industrial Master Plan, several service sub-sectors were identified as new sources of growth for the country, including education services. Apart from this sector’s contribution towards growth, private higher education institutions (PHEIs) can also contribute towards increasing access to education and equity. Malaysia aims to be a global education hub by 2010. In view of the above, this study aims to explore the trade and investment links in private higher education in Malaysia. ...

  9. Entrepreneurial Attitude Orientation and Market Orientation in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Meisam Karami; Tayebeh Khademi; Dauda Muhammad Atiyaye; Nur Naha Abu Mansor

    2014-01-01

    In Malaysia Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) are a significant part of the nation wealth creation and economic. In Malaysia, majority of established businesses are small and medium enterprises with high employment share. The Malaysian government is definite that the framework of the economic transformation plan can raise the small and medium enterprises in developing countries. Therefore, the objective of this study is to thoroughly exploring the predictor which encourages the market orien...

  10. Forms of Corporate Social Responsibility Practices of Companies in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Neoh, Sher Lyn

    2015-01-01

    This management project seeks to explore the corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices of companies in Malaysia. To do this, the first part of the study looks into the general views of CSR along with its drivers and enablers before going into the collaboration patterns and drivers of companies and non-governmental organisation. In addition, some findings of multi-national corporations and CSR in Malaysia is also brought forward in this study. The companies selected for this study will t...

  11. Cultural Heritage Tourism in Malaysia: Issues and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail Norhasimah; Masron Tarmiji; Ahmad Azizul

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia is experiencing an incredible pace of tourism development and heritage tourism is one of the tourism branches that have long contributed to appeal the tourist destination and acts as important marketing tool to attract tourist especially with special interests in heritage and arts. Cultural heritage tourism has emerged as a potential form of alternative tourism among both international tourists as well as Malaysian domestic travelers. The difference of ethnics present in Malaysia bro...

  12. Economic implications of ASEAN integration for Malaysia's labour market

    OpenAIRE

    Rasiah, Rajah

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the implications of the formation of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Economic Community (AEC) in 2015 on Malaysia’s labour market. The discussion centres on the nature of the structural change that Malaysia has experienced, especially since the 1980s, and how that has impacted on its labour market. Integration into ASEAN markets has obviously helped Malaysia enjoy the synergies of regional coordination. Although Malaysia’s economic growth has been steady...

  13. TOURISM DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA. A REVIEW ON FEDERAL GOVERNMENT POLICIES

    OpenAIRE

    Marzuki, Azizan

    2010-01-01

    Tourism development in Malaysia began since 1960s. Embarking on the strategy to develop rural areas and provide diversity in national economy, tourism industry drastically become as the second most important sector after petroleum. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the progress of tourism development in Malaysia from the period of the First Malaysian Plan (1966-1970) until the Ninth Malaysian Plan (2006-2010). This paper is also discussed several approaches related to tourism ad...

  14. Family Support and Loneliness among Older Persons in Multiethnic Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Kimm Lii Teh; Nai Peng Tey; Sor Tho Ng

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates factors affecting older persons’ state of loneliness in multiethnic Malaysia using data from the 2004 Malaysian Population and Family Survey, the first nationally representative sample in Malaysia. The study sample was extracted to include Malays, Chinese, Indians and other Indigenous groups aged 60 and above, and who had children (n = 1791). Cross tabulations and ordinal logistic regression methods were used in the analysis. Among the ethnic groups, older Malays were ...

  15. Motorcycle safety programmes in Malaysia: how effective are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin Umar, R S

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents the approach taken by the Malaysian Government to contain motorcycle casualties in Malaysia. It involves the exposure control, crash prevention, behaviour modification and injury control related to humans, vehicles and the environment based on pre-crash, crash and post-crash scenarios of motorcycle accidents. These initiatives emanated mainly from the research and development carried out by the Road Safety Research Centre at Universiti Putra Malaysia. Recent outcomes from these initiatives are presented and their impact is highlighted.

  16. Myanmar's Rohingya Refugees in Malaysia: Education and the Way Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Hema Letchamanan

    2013-01-01

    The Rohingya, a persecuted minority, has faced decades of harsh treatment and made stateless by the military government in Myanmar. To escape from this severe repression, most Rohingya flee to Bangladesh, Thailand or Malaysia. In Malaysia, this community has been living invisibly for more than three decades. Just like other refugees, the Rohingya are not allowed to work legally and do not have access to free healthcare and education in this country. Many of these refugee children learn in the...

  17. TOURISM DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA. A REVIEW ON FEDERAL GOVERNMENT POLICIES

    OpenAIRE

    Marzuki, Azizan

    2010-01-01

    Tourism development in Malaysia began since 1960s. Embarking on the strategy to develop rural areas and provide diversity in national economy, tourism industry drastically become as the second most important sector after petroleum. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the progress of tourism development in Malaysia from the period of the First Malaysian Plan (1966-1970) until the Ninth Malaysian Plan (2006-2010). This paper is also discussed several approaches related to tourism ad...

  18. Human rights and internal security in Malaysia rhetoric and reality

    OpenAIRE

    Rahim, Noor Hishmuddian

    2006-01-01

    Since 1957, Malaysia has faced external and internal security threats. Over time, Malaysia has succeeded in solving the external threats but internal threats remained. The internal threats have come in many forms, including ethnic conflict, religious extremism and deviationism, and terrorism. Since the safety of the public lies in the hands of the government, measures have been taken to ensure the nation's stability and security, including restriction on civil and political liberties. This th...

  19. Analysis of Fade Dynamic at Ku-Band in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates fade dynamics of satellite communication systems in equatorial heavy rain region based on a one year of Ku-band propagation measurement campaign carried out in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor, Malaysia. First order statistics of rain attenuation are deduced and the results are found to be in good agreement with those obtained from other beacon measurements gathered within the same area (Kuala Lumpur). Moreover, the fade duration and slope statistics of the sa...

  20. The Microeconomics of Changing Income Distribution in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Gary S. Fields; Sergei Soares

    2002-01-01

    This study uses data from Malaysia's Household Income and Expenditure Surveys to quantify the importance of different factors in accounting for the changes in Malaysia's income distribution between 1984 and 1989 ("Period 1") and between 1989 and 1997 ("Period 2"). The analysis is therefore divided into these two periods, in order to be able to assess the factors responsible for the falling inequality in the first period and the rising inequality in the second. The authors also look at the fac...

  1. Corporate Governance and Firm Value: Empirical Evidence in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Mabel Yunn Ru

    2009-01-01

    Well governed firms have been noted to have higher firm performance. However, this is still an empirical question in the context of Malaysia. This paper aims to examine the effect of corporate governance practices on firm value among 151 public listed companies on Bursa Malaysia Main Board between 2006 and 2008. We use the overall governance practice scores (CGS) to measure the level of compliance carried out by the sample firms. The results find that better corporate governance is highly cor...

  2. Foreign Direct Investment in Manufacturing Sector in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Karim, Noor Al-Huda; Winters, Paul C.; Coelli, Tim J.; Fleming, Euan M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyses the determinants of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the manufacturing sector in Malaysia from eleven countries during the period 1988 to 2000. The empirical results indicate that gross domestic product, lending interest rate, labour productivity, exports to home country and imports from home country significantly influenced the level of FDI inflows into Malaysia. However, exchange rate, exchange rate variation, wage and openness index were not important in influencing FDI.

  3. Reducing Urban Heat Island Effect with Thermal Comfort Housing and Honeycomb Townships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Mohd. Peter; Reimann, Gregers Peter; Ghazali, Mazlin

    2005-01-01

    Serious mistakes have been made in Malaysia’s otherwise highly successful urbanisation over the last 50 years. Urban houses are too hot on about half the days of the year and Kuala Lumpur has become the world’s worse urban heat island on record. However, these problems are not the inevitable...... consequences of urbanisation and can be corrected in Malaysia and avoided by other developing countries with a sensible application of the technologies outlined in this paper which prevent the thermal mass of houses and roads from absorbing solar radiation. ‘Cool House’ technology, developed at Universiti...... Putra Malaysia can achieve almost passive thermal comfort without air-conditioning, even on the hottest days of the year. ‘Honeycomb townships’, a recent architectural invention by one of the authors, is a new method of subdividing land which saves greatly on roads, thereby permitting larger gardens...

  4. Island-trapped Waves, Internal Waves, and Island Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Island-trapped waves , internal waves , and island circulation T. M. Shaun Johnston Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California...topography. As strong flows encounter small islands, points, and submarine ridges, it is expected that wakes, eddies, and arrested internal lee waves ...form drag, lee waves , eddy generation) over small-scale topographic features and (ii) fundamentally nonlinear processes (turbulent island wakes

  5. Alternative, complementary and traditional medicine in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, N

    2006-09-01

    This paper sets out the practice of traditional, alternative and/or complementary medicine in Malaysia. It gives an overview of the types of alternative medicine available, and the legal regulation, or lack of it within the current setting. The relevant policies and governmental action in this area are highlighted. Relevant case law decisions in this area are also included. The practice of spiritual healing as one form of traditional medicine, and its role within the spectrum of alternative medicine is dealt with briefly. The significant question of integration of alternative medicine within the existing allopathic system is addressed. The paper concludes that as interest in, and usage of alternative medicine is not likely to decrease, certain measures must be taken by the relevant authorities to ensure among others, the safety and efficacy of these medicines.

  6. Perception towards Public Amenities in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozmi Ismail

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The environment where a person lives has a significant impact on his or her development. The objective of the study is to determine the person's perception and satisfaction towards safety and public amenity nearby. Purposive sampling method was utilized to collect data in Selangor and Kelang Vally, Malaysia. Data were collected through interview using a set of questionnaire and analyzed using the SPSS program. The results of the study showed that in terms of public amenities and physical surroundings, the most persons used own car to attend personal and family matters such as clinic and programme. On the other hand, the most safety elements which persons employed to protect their house and family were installing door and window grilles, lights on and informing neighbor when going out for the whole night or longer.

  7. International Women's Day observed in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    On the eve of International Women's Day, 80 women representing five women's groups in Malaysia, including Persatuan Sahabat Wanita, CAW's network member, marched from Petaling Jaya to Penang to attend the Women's Day celebration. The group had organized the visitation in order to strengthen its networking. During their meeting with some reporters before their departure to Penang, they demanded that the women's groups be consulted before any guideline on the prevention and handling of sexual harassment at the workplace is drawn up. They said that they have been handling several complaints and their input would help the Human Resource Ministry formulate a comprehensive set of guidelines. This demand by the women's group was in response to the announcement by the Human Resource Minister Datuk Lim Ah Lek that in a month time a code would be ready on guidelines about the establishment and implementation of in-house preventive and redress mechanisms for dealing with sexual harassment. full text

  8. The current biotechnology outlook in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairiah Salwa MOKHTAR

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Blessed with extremely rich biodiversity, Malaysia is all geared up to explore new high technology to utilize the advantage it possesses whilst to protect its environment. Biotechnology has been identified as an appropriate driver that can deliver economic gains through research and development, improvement of food security, creation of entrepreneurial opportunities for industrial growth, health and environmental sustainability. This paper attempts to address the evolution of biotechnology institutions and the stumbling blocks in developing the Malaysian biotechnology industry. This paper identifies three main impediments in the current Malaysian biotechnology, namely lack of skilled human capital; weak industrial base; and lack of commercialization effort. Besides, a set of strategies are discussed with aim to further improve and strengthen the Malaysian biotechnology industry. In general, the arguments are presented by mapping out the symbiotic relationship between data from elite interviews, archival data and observations.

  9. Zakat di Malaysia dalam Perspektif Ekonomi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhasanah Nurhasanah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Zakah is the implications of the high level of practice Muslims toward the teachings of Islam in Malaysia. It has been carried out since the pre-colonial, colonial times, post-independence, 1957, 80s, and 90s to the present. Regulatory changes are not necessarily  set zakat source in accordance with the economic development and professional management. In zakah management, government noted that the potential fellowship zakah increased in accordance with the economic progress of the Muslim community. To foster public confidence in the management of zakat, government through the Majelis Islam Wilayah Persekutuan (MAIWIP established the Center Levy Zakat (PPZ in 1991 in order to create a profesional zakah management by implementing corporate systems.DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v4i1.2084

  10. ZAKAT DI MALAYSIA DALAM PERSPEKTIF EKONOMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhasanah Nurhasanah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Zakâh is the implications of the high level of practice Muslims toward the teachings of Islam in Malaysia. It has been carried out since the pre-colonial, colonial times, post-independence, 1957, 80s, and 90s to the present. Regulatory changes are not necessarily set zakat source in accordance with the economic development and professional management. In zakâh  management, government noted that the potential fellowship zakâh increased in accordance with the economic progress of the Muslim community. To foster public confidence in the management of zakâh, government through the Majelis Islam Wilayah  Persekutuan (MAIWIP established the Center levy zakâh (PPZ in 1991 in order to create a professional zakâh management by implementing corporate systems.DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v4i1.2540

  11. Accident characteristics of injured motorcyclists in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, T Y; Umar, R S; Azhar, A A; Ahmad, M M; Nasir, M T; Harwant, S

    2000-03-01

    This study examines the accident characteristics of injured motorcyclists in Malaysia. The aim of this study is to identify the characteristics of motorcyclists who are at higher fatality risk and subsequently be the targeted group for the fatality-reduction countermeasures. A total of 412 motorcycle crash victims with serious or fatal injuries were analysed. The results showed that the injured motorcyclists were predominant young, novice riders of less than 3 years licensure and male. A fatal outcome was more likely to be associated with a larger engine capacity motorcycle, collision with a heavy vehicle, head on collision, and collision at a non-junction road. In contrast, a non-fatal outcome was more likely to be associated with a small engine capacity motorcycle, collision with another motorcycle or passenger car, junction accidents, and side or rear collisions.

  12. Surveying Ethnical Policies in Iran and Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Wendt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available On the bases of culture and ethnic nowadays the world is a plural world, in way that it’s reasonable to say nowhere could be exempted fro this classification. Researches conducted in this field have classified all countries whether developed or developing into lingual, religion, racial and cultural classes.As result of religious, cultural and ethnical overlapping between the countries and cases of unsatisfied needs and request by such group, local, national and even disputes between theses group and their governments is a common case through the ages.this study was conducted while having a historical look on the issue of ethnics in two countries including Iran and Malaysia and also surveying current situation and place of this challenge in the two countries, and also determining courses of ethnical and tradition reconstruction.

  13. Bedload transport of small rivers in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra ZANGENEH SIRDARI; Aminuddin AB GHANI; Zorkeflee Abu HASSAN

    2014-01-01

    Numerous time-consuming equations, based on the relationship between the reliability and representativeness of the data utilized in defining variables and constants, require complex parameters to estimate bedload transport. In this study the easily accessible data including flow discharge, water depth, water surface slope, and surface grain diameter (d50) from small rivers in Malaysia were used to estimate bedload transport. Genetic programming (GP) and artificial neural network (ANN) models are applied as complementary tools to estimate bed load transport based on a balance between simplicity and accuracy in small rivers. The developed models demonstrate higher performance with an overall accuracy of 97% and 93% for ANN and GP, respectively compared with other traditional methods and empirical equations.

  14. Reptiles of Lata Bukit Hijau, Kedah, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriza Shahrudin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lata Bukit Hijau is located within the Banjaran Bintang Ranges on the west coast of northern Peninsular Malaysia. The reptile fauna in this pristine area was intensively investigated from 2008 to 2011 on 10 consecutive visits. A total 37 species of reptiles from 31 genera and 10 families were recorded to inhabit this area. Out of this number, 17 species were lizards (13 genera and four families, 17 species were snakes (15 genera and four families and three species were freshwater turtles (three genera and two families. These preliminary data increased the number of lizards, snakes and freshwater turtles reported from Banjaran Bintang from 31 to 41, 30 to 44 and three to five species, respectively

  15. Engineering Geology of Limestone in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the engineering geology of limestone. Limestone is of rather wide occurrence in Malaysia. It is interesting in view of the unique landforms and karstic features that are encountered in limestone terrains, e.g. steep, subvertical limestone cliffs rising abruptly and majestically above the ground surface and highly variable and pinnacled subterranean limestone bedrock. The karstic features and associated engineering geological problems of both the limestone hills and the bedrock are discussed in the paper. Rockfalls, sinkholes, cavities, etc. are some of the common engineering geological problems associated with limestone terrains. Some local case studies are provided as illustrations. Finally the rock mechanical properties of limestone is discussed at the end of the paper.``

  16. Determinant of securitization asset pricing in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, M. H.; Ali, R.; Ismail, S.; Sufian, F.; Baharom, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Malaysian firms have been reported involve in Asset Back Securities since 1986s where Cagamas is a pioneer. This research aims to examine the factor influencing primary market spread. Least square method and regression analysis are applied for the study period 2004-2012. The result shows one determinants in internal regression model and three determinants in external regression influence or contribute to the primary market spread and are statistically significant in developing the securitization in Malaysia. It can be concluded that transaction size significantly contribute to the determinant primary market spread in internal regression model while liquidity, transaction size and crisis is significant in both regression model. From five hypotheses, three hypotheses support that the determinants have a relationship with primary market spread.

  17. Molecular typing of Sporothrix schenckii isolates from cats in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Rui; Okubo, Miki; Siew, Han Hock; Kamata, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiological data on the aetiologic agents of feline sporotrichosis in Malaysia have not been reported, though human sporotrichosis in Malaysia is reported to be transmitted primarily via cat scratch. To the best of our knowledge, the present report is the first study of the molecular epidemiology of Sporothrix schenckii isolates from cats with sporotrichosis in Malaysia. In the present work, we characterised 18 clinical isolates from cats in Malaysia based on molecular properties, including sequence analyses of the calmodulin gene and the rDNA ITS region and selective PCR of mating type (MAT) loci. In this study, isolates from feline sporotrichosis were identified as a S. schenckii sensu stricto by sequence analyses of the calmodulin gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. Notably, phylogenetic analysis of the ITS confirmed assignment to clinical clade D (and not C) of S. schenckii sensu stricto. Therefore, clinical clade D of S. schenckii sensu stricto appeared to be the prevailing source of feline sporotrichosis in Malaysia. The ratio of MAT1-1-1:MAT1-2-1 in these Malaysian isolates was found to be 1 : 0. This result suggested that a clonal strain of S. schenckii is the prevailing causative agent of feline sporotrichosis in Malaysia.

  18. PENGIRIMAN TENAGA KERJA INDONESIA (TKI KE MALAYSIA MELALUI KOTA SEMARANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Pasetia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discussing about Indonesian’s labor. Many out of workersused the special way that was supplied by Government; the legalization ofrequirement agency was showed by Government. It was called the servicemobilization of Indonesian’s labor (Pengerah Jasa Tenaga Kerja Indonesia. Butthe requirement process and the place process of Indonesian’s labor were alwaysas disadvantages side. Many problems of the cost that have to be guaranteed byIndonesian’s labor candidates before they went to abroad. The law of enforcementto guarantee safety of Indonesian’s labor has not been priority yet. According tothe quantity, Semarang city sent many Indonesian’s labor to Malaysia. Thispurposes of this article are; 1 to describe the processing of sending managementIndonesian’s labor to Malaysia by Semarang’s PJTKI.2 to explain Indonesian’slabor interaction toward PJTKI and Government sent Indonesian’s labor toMalaysia by Semarang City. 3 To know the sending effects of Indonsian’s laborto Malaysia by Semarang’s PJTKI. According to the article result could beconcluded that Indonesian’s labor of Semarang has ever worked or will work toMalaysia that the age and education were contradiction to Government rule.Beside that, the sending process of Indonesian’s labor to Malaysia, either predeparture,placement, or return. It was still difficult and the deflection. BeingLegal Indonesian’s labor was more difficult and very bureaucratic that illegal –way.

  19. Cultural Heritage Tourism in Malaysia: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Norhasimah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is experiencing an incredible pace of tourism development and heritage tourism is one of the tourism branches that have long contributed to appeal the tourist destination and acts as important marketing tool to attract tourist especially with special interests in heritage and arts. Cultural heritage tourism has emerged as a potential form of alternative tourism among both international tourists as well as Malaysian domestic travelers. The difference of ethnics present in Malaysia brought different local knowledge discipline ranging from its architecture, handicrafts, traditional attire, music and dance, which reflects a colorful heritage and an amalgamated culture. There are arise of conflict in management of cultural heritage tourism in Malaysia face by tourism managers, stakeholders, governments, cultural heritage managers and local community itself. In order to maintain, conserve and preserve the resources and assets of cultural heritage in Malaysia, a system or management need to be develop that take into consideration on every issues and challenge, so that the decision making process is reliable to optimize the value of cultural heritage tourism industry in Malaysia. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview and discuss the status, issues and challenge of cultural heritage tourism in Malaysia.

  20. Review of air pollution and health impacts in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, Rafia; Hassan, Mohd Nasir; Ibrahim, Noor Akma

    2003-06-01

    In the early days of abundant resources and minimal development pressures, little attention was paid to growing environmental concerns in Malaysia. The haze episodes in Southeast Asia in 1983, 1984, 1991, 1994, and 1997 imposed threats to the environmental management of Malaysia and increased awareness of the environment. As a consequence, the government established Malaysian Air Quality Guidelines, the Air Pollution Index, and the Haze Action Plan to improve air quality. Air quality monitoring is part of the initial strategy in the pollution prevention program in Malaysia. Review of air pollution in Malaysia is based on the reports of the air quality monitoring in several large cities in Malaysia, which cover air pollutants such as Carbon monoxide (CO), Sulphur Dioxide (SO2), Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2), Ozone (O3), and Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM). The results of the monitoring indicate that Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) and Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) are the predominant pollutants. Other pollutants such as CO, O(x), SO2, and Pb are also observed in several big cities in Malaysia. The air pollution comes mainly from land transportation, industrial emissions, and open burning sources. Among them, land transportation contributes the most to air pollution. This paper reviews the results of the ambient air quality monitoring and studies related to air pollution and health impacts.

  1. Malaysia Youth Council (MBM and its Relevance to Youth Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzuhailmi Dahalan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Malaysia Youth Council (MBM which is also known as National Youth Council is a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO accredited to represent the voice of youth generation in Malaysia. Its’ main aim is to boost and motivate youth organizations to play a positive and effective role towards society and country. However, does MBM currently being transformed holistically in the true sense as the catalyst of Malaysian youth development? Does MBM’s presence being felt by youth in Malaysia completely? Approach: Data for this study were collected based on literature analysis, random observations on the scenario that happened, discussion among fellow researchers in the field of youth development and selective and informal feedback from a number of fellow practitioners that are active in youth work in Malaysia. Results: Analysis found that there are still several outdated issues that need to be resolved especially related to the weakness of the youth organizations in Malaysia, whereby this not reflect the acknowledgement of MBM as the body that fight for the youth concerns in Malaysia. Conclusion: The findings provide space for further research on issues raised from various perspectives apart from empowering Malaysian youth in the near future.

  2. Variations in government contract in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspal Singh Nachatar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of construction works means that it is hardly possible to complete a project without changes to the plans or the construction process itself. There can only be a minority of contracts of any size in which the subject matter when completed is identical in every respect with what was contemplated at the outset. As such, variations are inevitable in even the best-planned contracts. This study is attempted to examine the ways a variation was formed in law and project, in finding out whether the Standard Form of Contract used in Malaysia particularly the government Public Works Department (PWD form has been utilized to the best level in variation cases. Additionally, this study examined the benefits of variations to parties in contract and also provides suggestions and assumptions in an effort to contribute solutions to issues and problem detected. The research methodology used in this study was an extensive review of relevant literature, case study, empirical questionnaires and structured interviews and general observations based on experience and surroundings. The academic study approach incorporated stages such as initial understanding, data and information gathering, analysis of data, findings and conclusion and general suggestions in the study. The major findings of this study, among others, revealed that the existences of variations are common in projects. The main cause of variations was due to client request because of inadequate project objectives for the designer to develop comprehensive design. Besides, the analysis pointed out that the government form of contract the Public Works Department (PWD 203/203A can help in overcoming projects with variation because of the clear defined procedure. This study also found that proper planning and coordination at tender stage can minimize the risk of ‘unwanted’ variations. In conclusion, this study recommended that future research should be done in design and build based contract

  3. Economic burden of cervical cancer in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifa E.W. Puteh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancers form the second highest number of female cancers in Malaysia, imposing a substantial amount of cost burden on its management. However, an estimation of cost burden of abnormal smears, cervical pre-invasive and invasive diseases needs to be done to show how much spending has been allocated to the problem. An expert panel committee came up with the clinical pathway and management algorithm of  cervical pre invasive and invasive diseases from July-December 2006 Malaysia. An activity based costing for each clinical pathway was done. Results were converted to USD. The cost of managing pre-invasive cervical cancers stage is USD 420,150 (Range: USD 197,158-879,679. Management of invasive cancer (new cases costs USD 51,533,233.44 (Range: USD 32,405,399.69 - USD 129,014,768.40. The cost of managing existing cases is USD 17,005,966.87 (Range: USD 10,693,781.90 - USD  28,901,587.12. The total cost of managing cervical cancers by health care providers in a public setting is around USD 75,888,329.45 (Range: USD 48,083,804.60 - USD 48,083,804.60. The outcome of this study has shown that preventive modalities such as screening have only contributed to 10.3 % of the total management cost of cervical cancer. The major cost contribution (67% came from treatment of invasive cancer especially at more advanced stages of cancer, followed by treatment of existing cases (22% and lastly on pre-invasive disease (0.6%. This study revealed that proportion of preventive modality in this country was still low, and the major cost came from actual treatment cost of cervical cancer. Therefore, heightened public cervical cancer screening in the country is needed. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 272-80Keywords: cervical cancers, pre invasive disease, HPV vaccination

  4. The medical auxiliary in rural Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P C

    1973-05-05

    One of the steps taken by the government to break the cycle of poverty and ill-health in rural Malaysia is the establishment of a rural health service. Initially, the health unit served 50,000 people; it consisted of 1 main health center; 4 health subcenters, and 20 midwife stations. By the end of 1970, 44 main health centers, 180 health subcenters, and 943 midwife stations were in operation, creating a great demand for all types of health personnel: professional, paramedical, and auxiliary. Doctors are unevenly distributed in West Malaysia: in urban areas, the ratio of doctors to population is 1 to 1500; in rural areas, the ratio is 1 to 25,000. Paramedicals are unevenly distributed too. The scarcity of professionals in rural areas is attributed to professionals' demand for high salaries and the corresponding requirement of professional and social settings which rural areas cannot provide. The rural health unit utilized the tiered pyramidal system for staffing, with heavy reliance on auxiliary personnel. This system enabled the rapid expansion of rural health services, helping reach over a third of the population in just 15 years. As a consequence, infant, toddler and maternal mortality rates declined substantially. Traditional birth attendants, or kampong bidans, are currently being trained, on an experimental basis, simple principles of hygiene and family planning. With the enforcement of the Midwives Act in 1971, indigenous midwives have not been permitted to register as legitimate midwives and are now subject to supervision by health authorities. Future plans include retraining single-purpose midwives in child health and nursing, and giving all assistant nurses midwifery training. The aim is to make these 2 auxiliaries multipurpose community nurse-midwives. Experiences of developed countries show that demand for auxiliaries will continue to increase with the growth of professional personnel.

  5. Water security and its challenges for Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, M. A.; Nor, M. A. M.; P, Leong Y.

    2013-06-01

    Water Security in Malaysia is a national issue. The Malaysian water services industry faces issues which need to be tackled immediately for it to be viable and sustainable. Among them are the decentralized water services sector, ineffective governance structure, unsustainable tariffs, huge investments required to develop the water supply and sewerage infrastructure, inefficient operation by the operators and high non-revenue water (NRW) losses. In Malaysia, the "Sectorial" approach embedded in the present water management system and its transformation towards "Integrated Water Resources Management" (IWRM), is still in a state of inertia. This paper presents the need to transform, from a "Supply" Management mode (a characteristic of a developing country) to a "Water Demand" Management mode (a characteristic of a developed country). Issues on "Water Demand" Management for the Environment which can be a threat to the need for sustainable development for biodiversity are highlighted here. Reliable water accounting systems are found still lacking in this country, especially in the Agriculture and Environmental Sectors, where figures are still highly based on "traditional" assumptions. Water Quality deterioration remains an issue especially for the Water Supply and Environment Sectors. Available surface water resource is depleting in many regions and states in the Peninsular. Apart from the Reduce, Reuse and Recycle (3R) option for surface water, another option would be to begin a concerted effort for groundwater exploitation. However there are still grey areas of knowledge in the groundwater resources in this country for affirmative decisions and development of appropriate policies. It is also found that, there are no concerted plans to prepare the public for the change from "Supply" Management to "Demand" Management. In a developed nation, this change is through stakeholder platforms and supported by appropriate policies, rules and regulations that are based on

  6. Editorial : islands : objects of representation

    OpenAIRE

    Baldacchino, Godfrey

    2005-01-01

    In this article, Baldacchino tries to define what is an island and what makes an island. Insularity is a diverse experience ranging from the remoteness of Easter Island in the Pacific to the more international and globalized islands of the Western world.

  7. Recharge and Aquifer Response: Manukan Island’s Aquifer, Sabah, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarva Mangala Praveena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Manukan Island is a small island located in North-West of Sabah, Malaysia was used as a case study area for numerical modeling of an aquifer response to recharge and pumping rates. The results in this study present the variations of recharge into the aquifer under the prediction simulations. The recharge rate increases the water level as indicated by hydraulic heads. This shows that it can alter groundwater of Manukan Island which has been suffering from an overexploration in its unconfined the aquifer. The increase in recharge rate (from 600 mm/year to 750 mm/year increases the water level indicated by hydraulic heads. A reduction in pumping rate (from 0.072 m3/day to 0.058 m3/day not only increases the amount of water levels in aquifer but also reduces the supply hence a deficit in supply. The increase in hydraulic heads depends on the percentage reduction of pumping and recharges rates. The well water has 1978.3 mg/L chloride with current pumping (0.072 m3/day and recharge rates (600 mm/year. However, with an increased of recharge rate and current pumping rate it has decreased about 1.13%. In addition, reduction in pumping rate made the chloride concentration decreased about 2.8%. In general, a reduction in pumping with an increase in recharge rate leads to a decreased in chloride concentrations within the vicinity of cone of depression. Next, to further develop the numerical model, the model should focus on climate change variables such as consequences of climate change are increase in air temperature, increase in sea surface temperature, and more extreme weather conditions. These parameters are considered critical parameters for climate change impact modeling in aquifers. The behavior of the aquifer and its sustainable pumping rate can be done by applying a computer modeling component.

  8. A new technique for islanding operation of distribution network connected with mini hydro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.A.LAGHARI; H MOKHLIS; M KARIMI; A.H.A BAKAR; Hasmaini MOHAMAD

    2015-01-01

    An islanding operation of a distribution network is a topic of interest due to the significant penetration of distributed generation (DG) in a power system network. However, controlling the frequency of an islanded distribution system remains an unresolved issue, especially when the load exceeds the generation. This paper presents a new technique for a successful islanding operation of a distribution network connected with multiple mini hydro based DGs. The proposed technique is based on three main parts. The first part uses an islanding detection technique to detect the islanding event correctly. The second part consists of a power imbalance estimation module (PIEM), which determines the power imbalance between the generation and load demand. The third part consists of a load shedding controller, which receives the power imbalance value and performs load shedding according to load priority. The proposed technique is validated on an 11 kV existing Malaysia distribution network. The simulation results show that the proposed technique is effective in performing a successful islanding operation by shedding a significant number of loads.

  9. Persistence of Traditional Retailing in an Island Town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Selvadurai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The convergence of modern retail formats in the developing world is resisted by the persistence of traditional retail formats. The issue of lower-circuit and middle-circuit in traditional retail trade in the modernizing urban arena has raise debates about its co-existence in different cultural and geographical settings. The aim of this study is to examine the persisting organizational features of sundry and general store retail trade in Labuan town, East Malaysia. Approach: A descriptive design using qualitative approach is utilized. Data is collected from a series of recursive informal interview from a total of 14 sundry and general retailers. Data is analyzed from themes derived from narrative account. Results: The findings reveal that the persistence of traditional retailing can be characterized by family business and the stability of sole proprietorship, coupled with the prevalence of independent outlets. The reasons attributed to the persistence of traditional retailing are a combination of organizational capacity factors of the retail traders and the situational context of the island economy. Conclusion: Island towns have a unique capacity to preserve certain retail trades that are under threat in conventional geographical context. This implies that the island with porous borders, not only have a confluence of external influence, but can sustain economic cultures. Future research can explore the persistence of cultural goods in these sundry and general stores to see the extent to which diverse socio-economic market structures are served.

  10. Heat Island Compendium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat islands can be mitigated through measures like planting trees and vegetation, installing green roofs and cool roofs, and using cool pavements. The compendium describes all of these strategies and shows how communities around the country are being used

  11. Nunivak Island muskox studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the Nunivak Island muskox, summarizing the carrying capacity and age and sex ratios. Recommendations are attached for muskox management.

  12. Melville Island, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Melville Island, just off the coast of Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia (11.5S, 131.0E) is a sparsely inhabited tropical island with heavy woodland concentrations. The widespread and prominant smoke plumes were most likely set to renew pasture under open canopy woodland. Soil erosion is almost non- existant as can be seen by the clear and clean river flow. The offshore sediments are coastal current borne deposits from King Sound to the west.

  13. A Study on Factors Influencing Muslim’s Consumers Preferences Towards Takaful Products In Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamarul Ariffin Mansor; Raden Mohd Ngisomuddin Masduki; Masilah Mohamad; Nursidrah Zulkarnain; Nor Atikah Aziz

    2015-01-01

    ... industry’s rapid development, Malaysian government through Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM), invites financial institution across the world to establish Takaful and re-takaful operations in Malaysia to conduct foreign currency business. Nowadays...

  14. Bahasa Indonesia and Bahasa Malaysia--Parallel Development of Language Siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, William

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of Bahasa Indonesia, the official language of the Republic of Indonesia, and Bahasa Malaysia, the official language of the Federation of Malaysia. (30 references) (Author/CK)

  15. Challenges of deploying nuclear energy for power generation in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Mohd Zamzam; Nazaruddin, Nurul Huda; Lye, Jonathan Tan Thiam

    2017-01-01

    Under the 10th Malaysia Plan (2010-2015) and the Economic Transformation Programme (ETP), nuclear energy was identified as a potential long-term option to be explored for electricity generation in Peninsular Malaysia. The energy sector in Malaysia currently faces several concerns including depleting domestic gas supply which will affect security and reliability of supply as well as overdependance on fossil fuels - mainly gas and imported coal, and nuclear energy may offer a possible solution to these issues as well as global climate change concern. Pursuing the nuclear option, Malaysia Nuclear Power Corporation (MNPC) is undertaking a series of comprehensive studies to facilitate an informed Government decision on the matter. This paper aims to discuss the many challenges towards the peaceful use of nuclear energy for electricity generation in the context of the New Energy Policy 2010 to achieve a balanced and sustainable energy mix. This effort will continue in the 11th Malaysia Plan (2016-2020) with emphasis on implementing a comprehensive communications plan and public awareness programme for the potential use of nuclear energy in the future. In analysing the challenges for the development of nuclear energy in Malaysia, the traditional triple bottom line (TBL) framework for sustainability, encompassing economic, social and environmental objectives is utilized. An additional factor, technical, is also included in the analysis to provide a more holistic view. It is opined that the main challenges of developing nuclear energy for electricity generation in a newcomer country like Malaysia can be attributed primarily to domestic non-technical factors compared to the technical factor.

  16. Ar-rahnu as a Source of Financial Sustainability for Women Micro-Entrepreneurs in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Nik Hadiyan Nik Azman; Salina Hj. Kassim

    2017-01-01

    Muslims in Malaysia had practiced ar-rahnu for fulfilling their financial need, especially for emergency purposes since early 1990s. The pioneer of ar-rahnu in Malaysia is Muassasah Gadaian Islam Terengganu (MGIT) in January 1992, followed by the Kelantan Capitalization Berhad (PKB) in March 1992. Both of these Islamic pawn centres are among the earliest exponents to the Islamic pawn scheme in Malaysia. Ar-rahnu is an increasingly popular financing option among micro-entrepreneurs in Malaysia...

  17. Rural poverty and development in West Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, F

    1981-07-01

    Rural poverty in West Malaysia during the 1957-1970 period is examined. The period covered was 1 of a high rate of growth combined with an increasing inequality of income and worsening poverty. During the 1955-1970 period, a large amount of development funds, manpower, and expertise was directed towards a reduction of West Malaysia's rural poverty. Despite these efforts, rural poverty increased. Over the period under review, the share of income going to the richest 20% of the population increased from 50% to 56%; the share going to the middle 20% of the population remained constant at 20%; the poorest 60% of the population saw their share of income decline from 30% to 24%. The poorest 40% of the population received only 11.6% of income in 1970. They were predominantly rural, with this sector accounting for 87% of all poverty. The 3 development plans of this period set high aggregate growth rates as the primary targets and emphasized productivity and income in the rural sector. Rural development has not been sold short; the total funding figure of $2,209.46 million represents 40% of all development spending between 1956 and 1970. The money funded 3 broad areas of rural development: replanting of smallholder rubber with high-yielding clones; increasing rice production; and opening new land. The strategy has been to concentrate upon raising the yields from existing farmland and expanding into new areas of settlement. The problem of dealing with poverty in West Malaysia was made worse by the rapid rate of population increase. The population increase of 1,657,000 was absorbed into the traditional smallholder sector, very largely in exisitng areas of settlement. Over the same period, the modern sector of agriculture, the rubber estates, reduced their labor force by 30,000 as they moved into the cultivation of oil palm, a crop requiring less labor. Some of the additional agricultural workers were placed on new land under government land-development and resettlement

  18. A review of Lower and Middle Palaeozoic biostratigraphy in west peninsular Malaysia and southern Thailand in its context within the Sibumasu Terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, L. R. M.; Fortey, R. A.; Lee, C. P.

    2005-03-01

    Fossils from the Cambrian to Devonian rocks of southern Thailand, the Langkawi Islands, mainland Kedah, Perlis, north Perak and central West Peninsular Malaysia are listed and reviewed, and their stratigraphy and correlation reassessed. The hitherto anomalous record of the trilobite Dalmanitina from Malaysia is reviewed and found to be of latest Ordovician (Hirnantian) age, rather than Lower Silurian age as previously reported, and is considered a probable synonym of the widespread Mucronaspis mucronata. A new stratigraphical nomenclature is erected for part of the Langkawi, mainland Kedah and Perlis area successions, in which the term Setul Limestone (which stretched from the Ordovician to the Devonian) is abandoned and replaced by the Middle Ordovician Kaki Bukit Limestone, the late Ordovician and early Silurian Tanjong Dendang Formation, the Silurian Mempelam Limestone, and the early Devonian Timah Tasoh Formation, all underlying the paraconformity with the late Devonian Langgun Red Beds. There was a single depositional basin in the generally shallow-water and cratonic areas of southern Thailand, Langkawi, and mainland Kedah and Perlis, in contrast to the deeper-water basin of north Perak. Only Silurian rocks are dated with certainty within another basin in central West Malaysia, near Kuala Lumpur, which were also cratonic and shallow-water, although to the east in west Pahang there are basal Devonian deeper-water sediments with graptolites. The area is reviewed in its position within the Sibumasu Terrane, which, in the Palaeozoic, also included central and northern Thailand, Burma (Myanmar) and southwest China (part of Yunnan Province).

  19. Changing State-University Relations: The Experiences of Japan and Lessons for Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirat, Morshidi; Kaur, Sarjit

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the changing state-university relations in Japan and Malaysia. Its main objective is to identify and examine possible lessons for Malaysia, based on the Japanese experience. Notably, since the late 1970s, Malaysia has been looking towards Japan as a model for socio-economic development (the "look-east" Policy)…

  20. Changing State-University Relations: The Experiences of Japan and Lessons for Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirat, Morshidi; Kaur, Sarjit

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the changing state-university relations in Japan and Malaysia. Its main objective is to identify and examine possible lessons for Malaysia, based on the Japanese experience. Notably, since the late 1970s, Malaysia has been looking towards Japan as a model for socio-economic development (the "look-east" Policy) and this…

  1. A View into Successful Teaching Techniques: Teaching Malay Language as a Foreign Language in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharudin, Mazlina; Sadik, Azlina Md

    2016-01-01

    This paper will highlight successful teaching techniques used in class in teaching the Malay Language 1 course in Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). The course is to equip foreign students for their studies and also as means of basic communication with the locals in Malaysia. In Malaysia, the emphasis in Malay language teaching are focused to…

  2. Impacts of Institutional Characteristics on International Students' Choice of Private Higher Education Institutions in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migin, Melissa W.; Falahat, Mohammad; Yajid, Mohd Shukri Ab; Khatibi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Malaysia has witnessed an influx of foreign students in the local higher education institutions with the aggressive support from the Malaysian government to build Malaysia as the educational hub within the region. This is in line with Malaysia's aspiration to be a global education hub by year 2020. Besides the country level…

  3. 77 FR 39735 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ...)] Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines Determination On the basis..., Malaysia, and the Philippines would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to... Pipe Fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines: Inv. Nos. 731-TA-865-867 (Second...

  4. 78 FR 58520 - Extruded Rubber Thread From Malaysia; Notice of Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... unliquidated entries of certain extruded rubber thread from Malaysia produced and/or exported by Heveafil, and... International Trade Administration Extruded Rubber Thread From Malaysia; Notice of Amended Final Results of... review of the antidumping duty order on extruded rubber thread from Malaysia.\\1\\ The period of review...

  5. Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Counseling: Mental Health Conceptions in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Othman

    The general societal pattern in Malaysia is reflected by the distinct multi-racial composition of the population, comprised of Malays, Chinese, and Indians. In Malaysia, ethnicity determines the varied differences in the socio-cultural and religious diversity of the population. Organized modern medical services have existed in Malaysia since…

  6. Reducing Income Disparity for Stability and Development: Malaysia’s Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    in mind, Malaysia lifted the ban in 2001. The current fixed rate of the Ringgit to the dollar (1USD= 3.8 Ringgits ) was hurting Malaysia’s...race relations in Malaysia remained stable and peaceful. An open economy and structural weakness in the economy caused the Asian crisis in Malaysia ...

  7. Changing State-University Relations: The Experiences of Japan and Lessons for Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirat, Morshidi; Kaur, Sarjit

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the changing state-university relations in Japan and Malaysia. Its main objective is to identify and examine possible lessons for Malaysia, based on the Japanese experience. Notably, since the late 1970s, Malaysia has been looking towards Japan as a model for socio-economic development (the "look-east" Policy)…

  8. Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Counseling: Mental Health Conceptions in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Othman

    The general societal pattern in Malaysia is reflected by the distinct multi-racial composition of the population, comprised of Malays, Chinese, and Indians. In Malaysia, ethnicity determines the varied differences in the socio-cultural and religious diversity of the population. Organized modern medical services have existed in Malaysia since…

  9. Identifying the Need for Counseling Services in Organization and Industry in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Othman

    Studies on the need for counseling services were conducted at three separate corporate settings in Malaysia. The three organizations were the National Institute of Public Administration Malaysia; Syarikat Telekom Malaysia Berhad; and the Johor Port Authority. Subjects included 129 supervisory officers and 135 supervisees at the National Institute…

  10. A Review of Development and Adoption of Internet and ICT in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Lee GOI

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to review the development and adoption of Internet and ICT in Malaysia. The adoption of ICT already introduced in Malaysia in 1960s. Refer to 21st century, number of studies shows that development and adoption of Internet and ICT in Malaysia is among the highest in the ASEAN countries

  11. Four new species of Cephennomicrus Reitter (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae) from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałoszyński, Paweł

    2015-01-19

    Four new species of Cephennomicrus are described from Malaysia: C. curvidens sp. n., C. gentingensis sp. n. (both from the Genting Highlands, West Malaysia), C. santubongensis sp. n. and C. muluensis sp. n. (both from Sarawak, East Malaysia). Male genitalia of all new taxa are illustrated and diagnostic characters are discussed. 

  12. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the... injured by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure pipe... pipe from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam. Accordingly, effective May 16, 2013, the...

  13. History of neurosciences at the School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Badrisyah; Sayuti, Sani; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2007-02-01

    Universiti Sains Malaysia is the only institution in Malaysia which incorporates all fields of the neurosciences under one roof. The integration of basic and clinical neurosciences has made it possible for this institution to become an excellent academic and research centre. This article describes the history, academic contributions and scientific progress of neurosciences at Universiti Sains Malaysia.

  14. Smoking in Malaysia: promotion and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon Kee Teoh

    1984-01-01

    This discussion of the promotion and control of smoking in Malaysia covers: tobacco cultivation; cigarette manufacture, advertising, and smoking; action against smoking; smoking in public; price increases; and future targets. About 62,000 families (120,000 people) of Malaysia's 14 million population are involved in tobacco farming, and 360 independent curers employ about 25,000 workers. Tobacco output has increased from 1.82 million kilograms in 1970 to a peak of 9.4 million kilograms in 1982, worth $38 million. Tobacco manufacturers have direct interest in tobacco growing. 60% of the tobacco required for cigarette manufacturing is locally produced and is expected to increase to 65-70% by 1985. The industry, unable to deny the harmful effects of cigarette smoking, is now exploiting the economy of the tobacco farmers to justify their business and to influence the government from taking any action against smoking. The government still provides technical expertise, guarantees purchase of tobacco, and provides almost 75% of the fertilizers used. There are 7 cigarette manufacturing companies. Cigarette sales in 1982 totaled nearly $460 million. The government received over $210 million or 47% of the total sales in various forms of taxes, a factor which influenced government handling of the smoking issue. Cigarettes were the most advertised product in 1981 when $9 million was spent. In 1982, all cigarette ads were banned from television and radio and in all government publications. The government stated that the revenue could be replaced. The number of cigarette smokers increased from 5 to 7% over the last decade. Recent studies of secondary school children showed a smoking incidence of about 20%; about half were habitual smokers and about 1% had smoked for over 3 years. Except for elderly villagers, few women smoke. After 7 years of lobbying by the Malaysian Medical Association and the Ministry of Health, the Cabinet approved legislation in 1977 requiring all cigarette

  15. Population and economic development in Sarawak, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Furuoka, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    This paper chooses a Malaysian state in Borneo Island, Sarawak, as the case study to examine the relationship between population growth and economic development. The findings imply that there is no statistically significant long-run relationship, but a causal relationship between population growth and economic development in Sarawak. In other words, the empirical findings indicate that population can have neither positive nor negative impact on economic development. The findings also indicate...

  16. Challenges to Malaysia’s National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-09

    royal regatta escorted by loyal Chinese warriors and accompanied by charming maids.4 This event was the beginning of the present " Baba and Nyonya ...Century there were two distinct groups of Chinese in Malaya. One consisted of the Baba - Nyonya or Straits Chinese, born and lived for the most part in...the Straits Settlements of Melaka and Penang Island, where their ancestors had come to enjoy the British law and order. The Babas (males) and the

  17. Sustainable WEE management in Malaysia: present scenarios and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaul Hasan Shumon, Md; Ahmed, S.

    2013-12-01

    Technological advances have resulted development of a lot of electronic products for continuously increasing number of customers. As the customer taste and features of these products change rapidly, the life cycles have come down tremendously. Therefore, a large volume of e-wastes are now emanated every year. This scenario is very much predominant in Malaysia. On one hand e-wastes are becoming environmental hazards and affecting the ecological imbalance. On the other, these wastes are remaining still economically valuable. In Malaysia, e-waste management system is still in its nascent state. This paper describes the current status of e-waste generation and recycling and explores issues for future e-waste management system in Malaysia from sustainable point of view. As to draw some factual comparisons, this paper reviews the e-waste management system in European Union, USA, Japan, as a benchmark. Then it focuses on understanding the Malaysian culture, consumer discarding behavior, flow of the materials in recycling, e-waste management system, and presents a comparative view with the Swiss e-waste system. Sustainable issues for e-waste management in Malaysia are also presented. The response adopted so far in collection and recovery activities are covered in later phases. Finally, it investigates the barriers and challenges of e-waste system in Malaysia.

  18. Review on the Implementation of Mobile Commerce in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Lee GOI

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is the second highest mobile penetration in South East Asia after Singapore. Althoug h M - Commerce still at infancy stage, Malaysia has already embarked on the adoption of M - Commerce. As the communications and multimedia industry evolves towards convergence, licences under the Communications and Multimedia Act 1998 are formulated to be both technology and service neutral. This creates opportunities for expansion into the industry particularly in the area of applications service providers and provides for a more effective utilisation of network infrastructure. To help future applications and technologies handle M - Commerce, Varshney and Vetter (2002 proposed four levels of M - Commerce framework: M - Commerce applications, user infrastructure, middleware, and network infrastructure. Mohd and Osman (2005 have adapting this model into M - Commerce ap plications in Malaysia. M - Commerce does have a bright future in Malaysia. To achieve this objective, mobile users expect an improvement in charges access fee, network quality, accessibility and speed. Other issues need to be considered are security and cus tomer customisation. With government support, M - Commerce in Malaysia has a very promising future and moves forward in sectors that are clearly going to be the engines of growth worldwide over the next few years.

  19. ANALISIS HADITS DALAM PERMASALAHAN PERANCANGAN MASJID MODERN DI MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nangkula Utaberta, Hafsah Othman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to make a documentation and analysis based on the second source of Islam which is Prophetic traditions in providing an alternative approach for the design of modern mosques in Malaysia. This research is done by gathering traditions from the compilation of al-Bukhari and Muslim which are then being interpreted and used as a framework to answer different type of problem, issue, crisis in mosque design in Malaysia. The study is divided into two main sections. The first section contains issues and problems in mosque design in Malaysia while the second  section try to analyze the compilation of hadith in attempt to view issue and problems in mosque design in Malaysia. It is expected that through this paper we can understand the use of Prophetic traditions as one of the main foundations and framework for the present and the  future modern mosque designs in Malaysia.   Keyword: Prophetic tradition, modern mosque design, Islamic architecture

  20. Analysis of lead content in herbal preparations in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, H H; Lee, E L; Matsumoto, K

    2003-08-01

    In Malaysia, the phase 3 registration for traditional medicines was implemented on 1 January 1992 under the Control of Drugs and Cosmetics Regulation 1984, emphasizing quality, efficacy and safety (including the detection of the presence of heavy metals) in all pharmaceutical dosage forms of traditional medicine preparations. Therefore, a total of 100 products in various pharmaceutical dosage forms of a herbal preparation, were analysed for lead content using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results showed that 8% (eight products) possessed 10.64-20.72 ppm of lead, and therefore, do not comply with the quality requirement for traditional medicines in Malaysia. One of these products, M-Tongkat Ali (exhibited 10.64 +/-0.37 ppm of lead), was in fact already registered with the DCA Malaysia. The rest, Sukarno Tongkat Ali, Eurycoma Madu, Super Pill Tongkat Ali, Force Pill Tongkat Ali, Tender Pill Tongkat Ali, Super Pill Tongkat Ali Plus and Great Pill Tongkat Ali Plus have not registered with the DCA Malaysia and exhibited 12.24-20.72 ppm of lead. Although this study showed that only 92% of the products complied with the quality requirement for traditional medicines in Malaysia, however, they cannot be assumed safe from lead contamination because of batch-to-batch inconsistency.

  1. Disaster Waste Management in Malaysia: Significant Issues, Policies & Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusof Nor Syazwani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disaster Waste Management in Malaysia is still at the early stage of its research. Disaster can create large volumes of debris and waste and mismanagement of disaster waste can affect both the response and long term recovery of disaster affected area. The government of Malaysia is taking serious about this issue. This paper is aim to explore the issues, policies and strategies regarding disaster waste management in Malaysia. The objectives were to investigate the extent of disaster waste effects on the environment and to provide a basis from which the needs of waste management could be evaluated in disaster management guidelines. Qualitative method of data collection has been adopted in this study. The respondent are among the local authority and organization that involved in managing wastes. The finding shows that many of the policies regarding waste management in Malaysia has not been well implemented. The purpose of this paper is expected to improve the method of managing disaster waste in Malaysia.

  2. A nonlinear model of gold production in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Norashikin; Muda, Nora; Umor, Mohd Rozi

    2014-06-01

    Malaysia is a country which is rich in natural resources and one of it is a gold. Gold has already become an important national commodity. This study is conducted to determine a model that can be well fitted with the gold production in Malaysia from the year 1995-2010. Five nonlinear models are presented in this study which are Logistic model, Gompertz, Richard, Weibull and Chapman-Richard model. These model are used to fit the cumulative gold production in Malaysia. The best model is then selected based on the model performance. The performance of the fitted model is measured by sum squares error, root mean squares error, coefficient of determination, mean relative error, mean absolute error and mean absolute percentage error. This study has found that a Weibull model is shown to have significantly outperform compare to the other models. To confirm that Weibull is the best model, the latest data are fitted to the model. Once again, Weibull model gives the lowest readings at all types of measurement error. We can concluded that the future gold production in Malaysia can be predicted according to the Weibull model and this could be important findings for Malaysia to plan their economic activities.

  3. Performance Assessment Framework for Private Finance Initiative Projects in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lop Nor Suzila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Private Finance Initiative (PFI is viewed as restructuring the previous privatisation concept in delivering value for money for the Malaysian public infrastructure. Among the restructuring efforts in the privatisation is specifying the standard assessment of private concessionaires’ performance through the execution of key performance indicators (KPIs where the private concessionaires’ performance is benchmarked against the government’s standard. KPIs have served as useful tools in assessing performance of PFI projects. However, there is still lacking on determination methods performed to define and measure this KPIs and the absence of guidelines or a framework is also an issue in the implementation of the PFI procurement in Malaysia. Therefore, the objectives of this paper is to investigate the notion of performance assessment model approaches globally (i.e. UK, China, Australia, Serbia and Malaysia and to identify direction for PFI performance assessment tools (KPIs to be practiced in Malaysia. Based on the consideration of these models, this research paper propose an initial framework of performance assessment for PFI projects in Malaysia. The framework is deliberate to cover the performance of PFI at the operation and maintenance phase. The outcomes of this paper can serve as a theoretical base for the development of comprehensive and effective performance assessment for PFI projects in Malaysia.

  4. The Lived Experiences of Mentoring Nurses in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noraini Binti Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Being a nursing mentor is not an entirely new concept in nursing. However, it is a new phenomenon in the nursing profession in Malaysia. The nursing administration and the senior nurses in Malaysia have claimed that they have started a mentorship program by having senior nurses shadow new graduate nurses for the past two to three years ago. With no study found in Malaysia investigating the lived experiences of mentors mentoring new registered nurses, it led the researcher to develop this research that explores the real life experiences of these senior Malaysian nurses who mentor neophyte nurses.Objectives: This research explores and describes the lived experiences of nurses mentoring neophyte or new registered nurses at one of the major hospital in the Malaysia Borneo and how such experiences influence their daily routine as a nurse and also as a mentor. The research will also attaches meaning to these experiences and identifies both positive and negative experiences as a mentor to neophyte.Methods: The experiences of nurses mentoring the neophyte in the clinical area were captured using a qualitative approach to research and further viewed through methods informed by phenomenology, which used interpretive and descriptive semi-structured interviews. Hermeneutic interpretive phenomenology was used in the focus to analyze interview transcript into textual expression of the mentors. Three main themes emerge from this study are being unprepared and challenged, perceptions of mentees, mentor hope and desire.Key words: nursing mentor, phenomenon, neophyte, Malaysia.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Evacuation Process in Malaysia By Using Distinct-Element-Method Based Multi-Agent Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abustan, M. S.; Rahman, N. A.; Gotoh, H.; Harada, E.; Talib, S. H. A.

    2016-07-01

    In Malaysia, not many researches on crowd evacuation simulation had been reported. Hence, the development of numerical crowd evacuation process by taking into account people behavioral patterns and psychological characteristics is crucial in Malaysia. On the other hand, tsunami disaster began to gain attention of Malaysian citizens after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami that need quick evacuation process. In relation to the above circumstances, we have conducted simulations of tsunami evacuation process at the Miami Beach of Penang Island by using Distinct Element Method (DEM)-based crowd behavior simulator. The main objectives are to investigate and reproduce current conditions of evacuation process at the said locations under different hypothetical scenarios for the efficiency study of the evacuation. The sim-1 is initial condition of evacuation planning while sim-2 as improvement of evacuation planning by adding new evacuation area. From the simulation result, sim-2 have a shorter time of evacuation process compared to the sim-1. The evacuation time recuded 53 second. The effect of the additional evacuation place is confirmed from decreasing of the evacuation completion time. Simultaneously, the numerical simulation may be promoted as an effective tool in studying crowd evacuation process.

  6. Measuring Sustainable Indigenous Tourism Indicators: A Case of Mah Meri Ethnic Group in Carey Island, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvaneswaran Kunasekaran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable tourism emphasises responsible utilisation of economic, socio-cultural and environmental resources for tourism development. Extant literature in sustainable tourism leans towards subjective and qualitative description in explaining the dynamic nature of the trans-disciplinary indicators of sustainability. However, few mechanisms have been proposed or developed to quantify the indicators measuring sustainable tourism in an indigenous ethnic context. The current study measures 61 sustainable indigenous tourism indicators of the Mah Meri ethnic group that comprise three constructs, namely, community resources, community development and sustainable tourism. Simple random sampling was employed for data elicitation and a weighted average score using R software as the basis of analysis was used to produce a sustainable indigenous tourism barometer (SITB. The study identifies 11 sustainability dimensions from the initial three main constructs that are treated as the relationship aspects in this study. Based on the Sustainable Indigenous Tourism Barometer (SITB, community participation, empowerment, economic and socio-cultural sustainability are found to be the main influencing dimensions of sustainability of the Mah Meri ethnic group. However, natural resources, financial resources and environmental sustainability indicated weaker relationships in explaining sustainability of the Mah Meri ethnic group. Based on the SITB, the results demonstrate that the Mah Meri ethnic group are a “potential sustainable” tourism stakeholder.

  7. Measuring Sustainable Indigenous Tourism Indicators: A Case of Mah Meri Ethnic Group in Carey Island, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Puvaneswaran Kunasekaran; Sarjit S. Gill; Sridar Ramachandran; Ahmad Shuib; Tom Baum; Syamsul Herman Mohammad Afandi

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable tourism emphasises responsible utilisation of economic, socio-cultural and environmental resources for tourism development. Extant literature in sustainable tourism leans towards subjective and qualitative description in explaining the dynamic nature of the trans-disciplinary indicators of sustainability. However, few mechanisms have been proposed or developed to quantify the indicators measuring sustainable tourism in an indigenous ethnic context. The current study measures 61 su...

  8. On the parasitic fauna of two species of anurans collected from Sungai Pinang, Penang Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, A R; Andy Tan, W A; Intan, S

    2008-08-01

    A total of fifty anurans, comprising of Rana limnocharis and Bufo melanostictus were collected from Sungai Pinang, Balik Pulau, Penang. The prevalence, mean intensity and distribution of parasite species along the digestive tract were reported. Seven species of parasites were recorded. Blood parasites recovered were trypansomes and microfilariae.

  9. Measuring Sustainable Indigenous Tourism Indicators: A Case of Mah Meri Ethnic Group in Carey Island, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Puvaneswaran Kunasekaran; Sarjit S Gill; Sridar Ramachandran; Ahmad Shuib; Tom Baum; Syamsul Herman Mohammad Afandi

    2017-01-01

    .... The current study measures 61 sustainable indigenous tourism indicators of the Mah Meri ethnic group that comprise three constructs, namely, community resources, community development and sustainable tourism...

  10. Assessing dengue outbreak areas using vector surveillance in north east district, Penang Island, Malaysia

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    Ahmad Mohiddin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the efficacy of ovitrap surveillance and its implementation on monitoring reflection upon case occurrence in relation to climate variables. Methods: We used routinely setup ovitrap surveillance to monitor the mosquito populations in previous outbreak areas. Ovitraps were installed weekly at three localities that experienced high number of dengue cases (Flat Hamna, Kampung Sungai Gelugor and Kampung Tanjung Tokong from January 2010 to February 2011. Ovitraps and paddles were brought back to the laboratory and all of the water contents were poured into an enamel pan. Aged tap water was added into the enamel pan and eggs were allowed to hatch. The hatching larvae were counted after 3 days. The hatched larvae were identified at the 3rd instar larval stage. The ovitrap indices and mean number of larvae were analyzed using student t-test and One-way ANOVA. Spearmen’s rank correlation coefficient was used to determine the relation between meteorology variables and dengue fever cases. Results: Aedes albopictus was found as dominant species followed by Aedes aegypti recorded in all three study areas. Aedes aegypti preferred to breed outdoor with larvae collection, which was higher than indoor (72.37%. There was a positive correlation between the ovitrap index with the rainfall and humidity except in Kampung Tanjung Tokong. Our result also showed negative correlation between temperature and ovitrap index in all localities. Conclusions: This study provides useful data to be adapted in dengue vector management. It is very important to understand the fluctuation of vector population according to the seasonal activity, which can help us to improve our control programs. However, other factors might also contribute to the increment of dengue outbreak such as the number of available breeding sites, behavior of the vector against environmental factors and the cleanliness of the environment.

  11. Dragonflies of Polillo Island, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Villanueva, Reagan Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    Polillo is a small group of island (27 islands in total) east of central Luzon (Figure 1). It is made up of four main island viz. Polillo I, Patnanungan I, Jomalig I and Palasan I and several islets. This island group has relatively flat to gentle sloping terrain and the highest point is only 300 m asl (Mt. Maluhod) in Polillo Island (ca 700 km²) which is the largest in the group and the third largest island in greater Luzon biogeographic region.

  12. Problems of Boarding Students at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM, Malaysia: A Case Study

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    Imtiaz Ahmed Chandio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is carried out to determine the problems of transportation service and canteen facility available to the students of kolej-15-16 (hostels at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM, Malaysia. A set of questionnaire was designed and distributed randomly to the selected respondents of the study area. The collected data was analyzed in the “Statistical Programme for Social Sciences (SPSS”. Simple frequency distribution analysis and chi-square t-test analysis are applied to study the level of problem. The hypothesis is tested in chi-square. The findings and results of chi-square analysis indicated that hypothesis can not be rejected during weekend, short semester and holidays between these variables i.e. waiting time on bus stop and general satisfaction of transportation service, canteen facility and general satisfaction of canteen service and transportation service and general satisfaction of transportation. The hypothesis rejects the two variables concerning canteen facility and general satisfaction of canteen service during weekend. The main purpose of this study was to investigate problems of transportation service and food around study area. The overall findings of the study indicated that students are facing the problems of transportation service and food during weekend and holidays.

  13. Temporal changes in the abundance of Musca domestica Linn (Diptera: Muscidae) in poultry farms in Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bong Lee; Jaal, Zairi

    2009-08-01

    Changes in the abundance of the house fly, Musca domestica, was studied for a period of one year in two poultry farms in Penang, Malaysia: one in Balik Pulau, located in Penang island, and the other in Juru, located on mainland Penang. The sampling of house flies were carried out from March 2007 to April 2008 using the Scudder grill, and the correlation with meteorological conditions particularly rainfall, relative humidity and temperature were observed. In Balik Pulau, the fly abundance showed an inverse relationship to relative humidity and total rainfall. However, no significant correlations were found between the abundance of flies and the above mentioned climatic factors. In contrast, the occurrence of flies in Juru showed strong correlation indices with relative humidity (r=0.803, p<0.05) and total rainfall (r=0.731, p<0.05). Temperature had no significant effect on the abundance of flies in both poultry farms due to imperceptible changes in monthly temperature.

  14. Consolidated Checklist of Hard Corals of the Genus Acropora Oken, 1815 (Scleractinia: Acroporidae) in North Borneo, East Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Rolando; Lee, Dexter Jiunn Herng; Rodrigues, Kenneth Francis; Hussein, Muhammad Ali Syed; Waheed, Zarinah; Kumar, S Vijay

    2016-11-29

    Acropora is the most biologically diverse group of reef-building coral, and its richness peaks at the Indo-Malay-Philippine Archipelago, the centre of global coral reef biodiversity. In this paper, we describe the species richness of Acropora fauna of North Borneo, East Malaysia, based on review of literature and as corroborated by voucher specimens. Eighty-three species of Acropora are reported here; four species are literature based and 79 are supported by voucher specimens that were subsequently photographed. New records for North Borneo were recorded for 12 species, including Acropora suharsonoi Wallace 1994 that was previously thought to be confined to a few islands along Lombok Strait, Indonesia. The diversity of Acropora in North Borneo is comparable to that of Indonesia and the Philippines, despite the area's smaller reef areas. This further reinforces its inclusion as part the global hotspot of coral biodiversity.

  15. Lay beliefs about smoking in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alison A; Manan, Wan A; Gani, Abdullah S; Carter, Yvonne H

    2004-09-01

    Studies have shown that smokers rationalize smoking by self-exempting beliefs. This study explored lay beliefs about smoking in Kelantan, Malaysia, using focus groups among outpatients, medical students and staff, and a questionnaire survey of 193 male smokers. In focus groups, patients said they could do something to make smoking safe. When asked, 'Do you think there are any safe ways to smoke?' 132/193 (68%) male smokers described at least one way. The commonest were 'drink water' (69/193, 36%), 'use a filter' (60/193, 31%), 'smoke after food' (27/193, 14%), and 'take sour fruit' (21/193, 11%). At three- or six-month follow-up, numbers agreeing with these beliefs were: for 'drink water' 67/115 (58%), for 'take sour fruit' 61/115 (53%), and for 'smoke after food' 38/115 (33%), with 88/115 (77%) supporting at least one. The main explanations for water were that it cleaned or moistened the lungs or throat. Sour fruit was described as cleaning, and sometimes as 'sharp', able to scrape out the essence of cigarettes. The conclusion is that self-exempting false beliefs about smoking are widespread, and here they probably represent an extension of the traditional humoral system. Anti-smoking campaigns and health workers in smoking cessation services should address these beliefs.

  16. CLINICAL WASTE HANDLING AND OBSTACLES IN MALAYSIA

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    Shaidatul Shida Razali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As in many other developing countries, the generation of clinical waste in Malaysia has increased significantly over the last few decades. Even though the serious impact of the clinical waste on human beings and the environment is significant, only minor attention is directed to its proper handling and legal aspects. This study seeks to examine the management of clinical waste in Selangor’s government hospitals as well as problems that arise from the current practice of clinical waste management. A depth interview with the responsible concession who handles the clinical waste management in those hospitals also has been taken. In general, it was found that the consortium’s administration was reasonably aware of the importance of clinical waste management. However, significant voids were presented that need to be addressed in future including efficient segregation, better handling and transfer means, as well as the need for training and awareness programs for the personnel. Other obstacles faced by consortiums were to handle the clinical waste including the operational costs. Waste minimizing and recycling, as well as the alternative treatment methods for incineration are regarded to be major challenges in the future.

  17. Malaysia urges ASEAN to tackle AIDS crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-07

    Urgent action is needed to fight the alarming spread of HIV/AIDS that infected 1.3 million people in Southeast Asia last year alone, Malaysia's foreign minister said July 24, 2000. Syed Hamid said the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) should tackle at regional and national level an epidemic that was taking its most drastic toll among the region's youth. "HIV/AIDS not only represents a major public health and social problem but is a serious challenge to development as well," Syed Hamid told the opening ceremony of ASEAN's 33rd annual foreign ministers' meeting. The crisis requires commitment at the "highest political level," he said, warning that HIV/AIDS could become a transnational problem within the 10-member group. Foreign ministers have recommended their leaders discuss the crisis later this year at an informal summit in Singapore and hold a summit on HIV/AIDS in conjunction with the 7th ASEAN Summit in Brunei next year. "I think people recognized the importance and the adverse impacts on our social development," Syed Hamid told reporters later. "I think it is a real issue that we cannot run away from." Among ASEAN members, Thailand, Cambodia, and Myanmar have some of the highest infection rates in Asia of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

  18. Sustainability of the Rubberwood Sector in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegatheswaran RATNASINGAM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hevea brasiliensis (popularly known as rubber tree was introduced to Malaya almost a century ago. The wood from the tree has been traditionally regarded as a waste, but since the 1980s’ it has found widespread utilization in the wood industry. The total export value of rubberwood products had grown by 39.44% in 2009 compared to 2000 [Malaysian Ringgit (RM 5100.4 million]. However, the Malaysian export of rubberwood sawn timber declined since 1990, after the imposition of sawn timber export levy. On the other hand, the biggest export proportion of rubberwood products is represented by furniture. Rubberwood furniture accounted for 80% of the total export value of wooden furniture. Meanwhile, the contribution of panel products, such as MDF and particleboard is also substantial. Rubberwood is referred as an environmental friendly material with a low price, but issues related to its sustainable supply are becoming a major concern nowadays. The total area of rubber plantation has been steadily declining over the years as planters claimed less profit and shifted to oil palm cultivation. In this context, unless the profitability of rubber growers is ensured by increasing the net value of the wood resource, the future sustainability of rubberwood in Malaysia will remain debatable.

  19. Exploratory Study on Malaysia Construction Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasaruddin Nur Ain Ngah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an exploratory study on insight issues of leadership quality in Malaysia construction industry. It was conducted using an open interview session which focussed on three main elements which are challenges faced by construction leaders, leader’s role to sustain organization’s competitiveness and qualities to be an outstanding construction leader. Even though only four senior construction leaders were selected for this qualitative study, but the selection was properly scrutinised based on their expertise as construction leader. During the interview session, leaders were given ample time to express their opinions on the elements with minimum interference. Information revealed was recorded, analysed and synthesized to deduce findings of the study. It was found that significant challenges faced by construction leaders are ensuring project runs smoothly, managing cash flow and ability to manage large number of worker. For ensuring their organization remains competitive, leaders must be creative and persistence in handling construction project and not merely completing the task. To be outstanding, leaders should possess good leadership attributes as problem solver, communicator and motivator in their organizations. This study forms a basis for further exploration on leadership quality for construction industry.

  20. Sexual education in malaysia: accepted or rejected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Mutalip, Siti Syairah; Mohamed, Ruzianisra

    2012-01-01

    Introduction to sexual education in schools was suggested by the Malaysian government as one of the effort taken in the aim to reduce the sexual-related social problems among Malaysian teenagers nowadays. This study was proposed in the aim to determine the rate of acceptance among adolescents on the implementation of sexual education in schools. This study was conducted using questionnaires distributed to 152 pre-degree students in Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Kampus Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia. Obtained data were statistically analyzed. Almost half (49.3%) of the respondents agreed that sexual education might help to overcome the social illness among school teenagers. Besides, a large number (77.6%) of respondents also agreed that this module should be incorporated with other core subjects compare to the feedback received on the implementation of this module on its own (28.9%). These results have provided some insight towards the perception of sexual education among the teenagers. Since most of the respondents agreed with this idea, so it might be a sign that the implementation of sexual education is almost accepted by the adolescents.

  1. PAEDIATRIC OCULAR TRAUMA IN KUCHING, SARAWAK, MALAYSIA

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    INTAN G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the demography, aetiology, type and outcome of paediatric ocular trauma in tertiary centre in Malaysia. Method: We retrospectively studied 118 eyes from 117 patients over a period of 36 months (January 2006 to December 2008. All ocular injuries in patients aged 12 and below seen in the Ophthalmology Department for the first time were included in thisstudy. Results: Mean age of patients was 6.1±3.0 years. 68 cases (58.2% occurred in pre-school children, whereas 49 (41.9% in school-aged children. Boys accounted for 65.8% of cases. There was no predilection for either right or the left eye. 47% of cases (56 patients occurred in Malay. Most of the injuries took place at home when the children were alone (p<0.05. Sharp objects were the commonest cause (45 cases, 38.1%. The majority of cases (103, 87.3% were considered preventable. The frequency of open and closed globe injury was similar. Hyphema was more common in closed globe injury compared to open globe injury (p<0.05. Other associated injuries such as cataract, vitreous hemorrhage and retinal hemorrhage are similar between the two groups. Visual outcome is generally poor with only 34 eyes (28.8% had no visual impairment. Conclusion: Ocular trauma in children is an important cause of visual loss. Most cases occurred at home and were preventable. Prevention through education is the best approach.

  2. Prediction of Traveling Behavior in Putrajaya, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Nazri Borhan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Putrajaya as a new federal administrative of Malaysia has led to a further increase in private car ownership and much higher land prices in the city centre. With jobs concentrated in the city centre, the commuting patterns of the trip makers tend to be that of morning/evening peak hours and this has led to congestion on some of the major highways leading into and out of the city. One possible way to reduce the use of cars is to replace commuter trips by car with other modes of transport, such as a combination of car and public transport called Park & Ride (P&R. The preliminary observation and survey has been carried out among of private car users in Putrajaya. The observations of P&R users show that only two percents parking lots were occupied from 320 parking lots were provided. A random of 50 respondents were interviewed. The findings were discussed about the reason why the car users are refused to use P&R facilities. Analyses about relation between factors such as bus frequency and parking fees at worksite have been made to answer research questions. Logistic regression has been used to analyse the factors that influence users to switch their trips mode to shift to P&R.

  3. Radiological study of Mersing District, Johor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Alajerami, Yasser; Aliyu, Abubakar Sadiq; Bt Basri, Nor Afifah

    2013-04-01

    A potential site has been selected for a nuclear power plant (NPP) in Mersing District of Malaysia. This study aims at providing the base line data of this district for the first time, in line with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for NPP sitting criteria. The mean dose rate, mean population weighted dose rate and annual effective dose are found to be 140 nGy h-1, 0.836 mSv y-1 and 0.857 mSv, respectively. A hyper Purity Germanium Detector (HPGe) is used in determining the activity concentrations of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K. The activity concentration ranges from 16±1 to 410±15 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, 17±1 to 271±8 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra and 13±3 to 1434±57 Bq kg-1 for 40K. In addition, a Low Background Alpha Beta Series 5 XLB Automatic was used in the determination of gross alpha and gross beta activity. The result ranges from 202±50 to 2325±466 Bq kg-1 for gross alpha and 164±17 to 2447±103 Bq kg-1 for gross beta. Contour maps were produced for isodose, activity concentration of 232Th, 226Ra, 40K, gross alpha and gross beta for the study area. The results are compared with UNSCEAR (2000).

  4. THE GENUS VIBURNUM (CAPRIFOLIACEAE IN MALAYSIA

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    J. H. KERN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available 1. In the following pages an account of the genus Viburnum in Malaysia is presented. 2. The distribution of its species is briefly discussed and a map relating to it added. 3. The main part of the present paper consists of keys to the sections and species, followed by a systematic treatment of the 16 species admitted for the region. 4. Three new subsections are proposed, viz. Viburnum subsect. Punctata Kern, subsect. Sambucina Kern, and subsect. Lutescentia Kern. Viburnum subseries Coriacea Maxim, is reduced to the rank of a subsection. 5. Three species and two varieties are described as new, viz. Viburnum ampli- ficatum Kern, V. clemensae Kern, V. hispidulum Kern, V. coriaceum, var. longiflorutn Kern, and V. sambucinum var. subglabrum Kern. 6. The following species are reduced to the rank of varieties: Viburnum flori- bundum Merr. has become V. luzonicum var. floribundum (Merr. Kern, and V. sinu- atum Merr. has become V. luzonicum var. sinuatum (Merr. Kern. 7. The following reductions'to synonymy are made: Viburnum longistamineum Ridl. to V. sambucinum- var. subglabrum Kern; V. sumatranum Miq., V.villosum Ridl., and V. inopinatum Craib all to V. sambucinum var. tovientosum Hallier f.; V. forbesii Fawc. partly to V. sambucimim Bl., partly to V. coriaceum BL; and V. zippelii Miq. to V. japonicum (Thunb. Spr. 8. Emended descriptions of Viburnum beccarii Gamble and of V. junghuhnii Miq. are given.

  5. East Asia review 1978-79. Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, N L; Tey, N P; Ramli, O

    1980-11-01

    While Malaysia's National Family Planning Board is primarily responsible for family planning activities, several organizations and ministries, both governmental and voluntary, participate in various service programs. Current population policy attempts to go beyond family planning. Population education, treatment of infertility, and cancer screening are offered as well as family planning, to make the program more useful to greater numbers of people. The government also wishes to improve the status of women thereby giving them alternative choices of lifestyle. Rural women are reached through the Ministry of Agriculture's community development program. While the National Family Planning Board receives only 0.12% of the national budget, this figure is not expected to increase. Tables giving vital rates show that population fell below the 30 per 1000 mark for the first time in 1977. A higher rate of fertility decline has taken place between 1967 - 1977 than occurred from 1957 - 1967. Current demographic objectives are to reduce crude birthrate to 28.2 per 1000 by 1980. This goal would require 817,963 new acceptors. While the pill accounts for 80% of acceptor's choice, the proportion using condoms has increased from 1.4% during 1969 - 1970 to 11.4% in 1979. Despite reported side effects with the pill and the illegality of induced abortions, virtually all acceptors are well satisfied with the program in its current form.

  6. BILATERAL COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGES: INDONESIA AND MALAYSIA CASE

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    Ni Putu Wiwin Setyari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This studytried tolook more closely at market integration, through export prices channel, inIndonesiaandMalaysia. Severalpreviousstudiestendtorejectthe existence oflawofoneprice(LOP. The law of one price (LOP states that price a given product should be the same in different parts of the world if valued in common currency. However, empirical studies uniformly shows LOP does not describe most markets. Someimportantfactorsthat are consideredinstrumentalin this regardaretransportation costsandprice stickiness. However, there isone characteristicthat is oftenoverlookedin the discussion ofLOP, namelychanges incomparative advantage. The specific objectiveofthispaperis to look atcomparative advantagecorrelationbetween the two countriesandtheir effect onpriceconvergence. Correlationof both selected commodities –using therankspearman's test -indicates the nature ofthemutualsubstitutionof productsthatcarrythe possibility of"price competition" so thatthe pricepointtoconvergeto one another. Tests on theexportprice ofsomeselected productsinboth countriesindicatedthe occurrence ofpriceconvergence, seen from thetwoanalytical techniques: σconvergenceandco-integrationusingJohansen's test. This conclusion is generated by attempted to control the "identical assumption" is to examines prices for similar products (homogeneous using SITC 3-digit, which is produced from the "same" or close locations, with the export destination to the same trading partner

  7. Emerging Drug Use Trends in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Alethea; Chooi, Weng-Tink; Zaharim, Norzarina Mohd; Ahmad, Imran; Mohd Yasin, Mohd Azhar; Syed Jaapar, Sharifah Z; Schottenfeld, Richard S; Vicknasingam, Balasingam; Chawarski, Marek C

    2016-01-01

    The primarily rural and agrarian Kelantan province of Malaysia has high rates of drug use and is characterized by unique sociocultural factors. Combining qualitative and ethnographic methods, we investigated drug use and treatment needs of people who use drugs (PWUD) in rural areas of Kelantan. In February 2014, field visits, participant observation, and focus group discussions (FGDs) with 27 active PWUD were conducted in rural areas surrounding the capital city of Kelantan. The findings indicate a high prevalence of opiate and amphetamine type stimulants (ATS) use in these areas. FGD participants reported initiating drug use at early ages due to peer influences, to relieve boredom, to cope with problems, and a high saturation of villages with other PWUD was reported as a major contributor to their own continued drug use. They reported a trend of drug use initiation at younger ages and increased drug use among females. Participants were interested in treatment; however, their limited knowledge about treatment options and perceived limited availability of services were barriers to treatment seeking. Easy access to drugs, primarily from Thailand and facilitated by the use of mobile phones, resulted in an expanding prevalence of drug use that underscores the need to bolster education and prevention efforts and accessibility of treatment services in Kelantan.

  8. The Malaysia DREEM: perceptions of medical students about the learning environment in a medical school in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Naggar RA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Redhwan A Al-Naggar,1 Mahfoudh Abdulghani,2,14 Muhamed T Osman,3 Waqar Al-Kubaisy,1 Aqil Mohammad Daher,15 Khairun Nain Bin Nor Aripin,4 Ali Assabri,5 Dawood A Al-Hidabi,6 Mohamed Izham B Mohamed Ibrahim,7 Ahmed Al-Rofaai,8 Hisham S Ibrahim,9 Hassanain Al-Talib,10 Alyaa Al-Khateeb,11 Gamil Qasem Othman,6 Qaid Ali Abdulaziz,6 Karuthan Chinna,12 Yuri V Bobryshev131Population Health and Preventive Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 2Pharmacology Department, International Medical School, Management and Science University, 3Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine & Defence Health, National Defence University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 4Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Islamic Science University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 5Community Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Sana'a University, 6University of Science and Technology, Sana'a, Yemen; 7College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 8School of Biological Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden, Penang, Malaysia, 9Physiology Discipline-Faculty Of Medicine and Health Sciences-Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Terengganu, Malaysia, 10Laboratory Medical Science Cluster, Drug Discovery & Health Community of Research, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 11Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine Discipline, Drug Discovery & Health Community of Research, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 12Social and Preventive Medicine, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 13Faculty of Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 14Pharmacology Department, Unaizah College of Pharmacy (UCP, Qassim University, Al Qassim, Saudi Arabia; 15Department of Community medicine, Faculty of Medicine & Defence Health, National Defence University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaBackground: Students’ perceptions of their learning environment, by defining its

  9. Seal Island and Franklin Island National Wildlife Refuges Trip Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of visits to both Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge and Franklin Island National Wildlife Refuge on August 14, 15, 16, 1982.

  10. Health care delivery in Malaysia: changes, challenges and champions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Susan; Beh, LooSee; Nordin, Rusli Bin

    2011-09-05

    Since 1957, there has been major reorganization of health care services in Malaysia. This article assesses the changes and challenges in health care delivery in Malaysia and how the management in health care processes has evolved over the years including equitable health care and health care financing. The health care service in Malaysia is changing towards wellness service as opposed to illness service. The Malaysian Ministry of Health (MOH), being the main provider of health services, may need to manage and mobilize better health care services by providing better health care financing mechanisms. It is recommended that partnership between public and private sectors with the extension of traditional medicine complementing western medicine in medical therapy continues in the delivery of health care.

  11. Simulation of Andaman 2004 tsunami for assessing impact on Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hock Lye; Teh, Su Yean; Liu, Philip Li-Fan; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md.; Lee, Hooi Ling

    2009-09-01

    Mistakenly perceived as safe from the hazards of tsunami, Malaysia faced a rude awakening by the 26 December 2004 Andaman tsunami. Since the event, Malaysia has started active research on some aspects of tsunami, including numerical simulations of tsunami and the role of mangrove as a mitigation measure against tsunami hazards. An in-house tsunami numerical simulation model TUNA has been developed and applied to the 26 December 2004 Andaman tsunami to simulate the generation, propagation and inundation processes along affected beaches in Malaysia. Mildly nonlinear bottom friction term in the deeper ocean is excluded, as it is insignificant to the simulation results, consistent with theoretical expectation. On the other hand, in regions with shallow depth near the beaches, friction and nonlinearity are significant and are included in TUNA. Simulation results with TUNA indicate satisfactory performance when compared with COMCOT and on-site survey results.

  12. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis in dogs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Mojgan; Lim, Sue Yee; Watanabe, Mahira; Sharma, Reuben S K; Cheng, Nadzariah A B Y; Watanabe, Malaika

    2013-01-01

    An epidemiological study of Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs in Peninsular Malaysia was carried out using molecular detection techniques. A total of 500 canine blood samples were collected from veterinary clinics and dog shelters. Molecular screening by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed using genus-specific primers followed by PCR using E. canis species-specific primers. Ten out of 500 dogs were positive for E. canis. A phylogenetic analysis of the E. canis Malaysia strain showed that it was grouped tightly with other E. canis strains from different geographic regions. The present study revealed for the first time, the presence of genetically confirmed E. canis with a prevalence rate of 2.0% in naturally infected dogs in Malaysia.

  13. Greenspace planning and management in Klang Valley, Peninsular Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Aziz, Nor Akmar Binti; Konijnendijk, Cecil Cornelis; Sreetheran, M.

    2011-01-01

    In rapidly developing countries such as Malaysia, the importance of urban greenspaces is recognized, but due to rapid industrialization and urbanization, maintaining and developing greenspace is a major challenge. This paper analyzes the status of urban greenspace policy, planning, and management...... in Malaysia. For this purpose, information was collected about urban greenspaces and their governance, planning, and management, both at the national level and in six representative case cities in the most urbanized part of Malaysia, the Klang Valley. Data was compiled by means of a literature review...... of similarities in municipal greenspace management organization and legislation, each city has its own approach in terms of prioritized greenspace functions, greenspace planning, and collaboration with different actors and stakeholders. A shift is occurring toward greater involvement of nongovernment actors...

  14. Health care delivery in Malaysia: changes, challenges and champions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Since 1957, there has been major reorganization of health care services in Malaysia. This article assesses the changes and challenges in health care delivery in Malaysia and how the management in health care processes has evolved over the years including equitable health care and health care financing. The health care service in Malaysia is changing towards wellness service as opposed to illness service. The Malaysian Ministry of Health (MOH, being the main provider of health services, may need to manage and mobilize better health care services by providing better health care financing mechanisms. It is recommended that partnership between public and private sectors with the extension of traditional medicine complementing western medicine in medical therapy continues in the delivery of health care.

  15. Diagnosis of an imported Plasmodium ovale wallikeri infection in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Jonathan Wee Kent; Mahmud, Rohela; Tan, Lian Huat; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-01-06

    Plasmodium ovale is rare and not exactly known to be autochthonous in Malaysia. There are two distinct forms of the parasite, namely P. ovale curtisi (classic form) and P. ovale wallikeri (variant form). Here, the first sequence confirmed case of an imported P. ovale wallikeri infection in Malaysia is presented. Microscopy found Plasmodium parasites with morphology similar to P. ovale or Plasmodium vivax in the blood films. Further confirmation using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the small-subunit rRNA gene of the parasite was unsuccessful. Genus-specific PCR was then performed and the product was sequenced and analysed. Sequence analyses confirmed the aetiological agent as P. ovale wallikeri. New species-specific primers (rOVA1v and rOVA2v) were employed and P. ovale wallikeri was finally confirmed. The findings highlight the need to look out for imported malaria infections in Malaysia and the importance of a constantly updated and validated diagnostic technique.

  16. Current perspective of the renewable energy development in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Salsabila [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Electrical System Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 02000 Kuala Perlis, Perlis (Malaysia); Kadir, Mohd Zainal Abidin Ab [Alternative and Renewable Energy Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Shafie, Suhaidi [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    It is estimated that oil reserves will not last very much longer; thus, a switch to alternative energy solutions is crucial. The Malaysian government has already prepared to face the situation decades before. Many policies have been implemented, as well as programmes and initiative. Now, Malaysia is waiting for the ultimate solutions, the Malaysian Fit-in Tariff (FiT), which is scheduled to be implemented second quarter of 2011. This paper presents the main sources of alternative renewable energy in Malaysia and its potential as well as the main reasons Malaysia is turning to alternative energy solutions; to fully utilize its renewable energy (RE) resources, fulfill the energy demand in the future and to reduce carbon emissions. This paper also discusses the steps taken by the government in preparation for FiT and overcoming the barriers in RE development. (author)

  17. A Review on Assessment and Treatment for Depression in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdaus Mukhtar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to review the literature on depression that focused on its assessment and treatment in Malaysia. PsycINFO, Medline, local journals were searched, and 18 published articles were included in this paper. Results indicate that research on depression in Malaysia, particularly validation studies and psychotherapy research, was weak and fragmented, with minimal empirical evidence available. Pharmacotherapy still dominated the treatment for depression, and, in terms of psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT was recently practiced, but only a few studies have reported on the treatment efficacy of CBT. Major limitations of studies were noted, and, consequently, the problems that are associated with the implementation and future direction of clinical and research on depression in Malaysia were discussed. In short, the contribution of empirical research on the assessment and treatment for depression remained inconsistent and fragmented and urgently in need of further empirical investigation.

  18. Treatment of drug abusers in Malaysia: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S H

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare two forms of treatment for heroin abusers in Malaysia--traditional medicine and institutional--and to evaluate which form of treatment the drug abusers consider more effective. The study involved interviewing 100 male drug abusers in Malaysia who had had treatment from an institution and from a traditional healer. The data revealed that traditional medicine was better for some abusers, but institutional treatment was better for others, depending upon an individual's own needs and personality. Advantages and disadvantages of both forms of treatment were given by those interviewed. The data can be used as guidelines for the development of a more flexible, individualized program within an institutional setting in Malaysia.

  19. Issues and framework of environmental health in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Mazlin Bin; Murad, Wahid

    2010-04-01

    Environmental health problems in Malaysia are mostly attributed to atmospheric pollution, water pollution, climate change, ozone depletion, and solid waste management, as well as toxic, chemical, and hazardous waste management. The Ministry of Health, Malaysia, has been vigorously pursuing the environmental health agenda by collaborating with other agencies at district, state, national, and international levels. This article discusses the issues and management framework of environmental health in Malaysia. Some issues requiring further investigation in order to clearly understand the trade-off between atmospheric change and environmental health are suggested. These suggestions are developed with particular reference to appraisals concerned with the development and implementation of environmental policy, programs, and practice. Research on the relevant issues is discussed and a framework is built involving a comprehensive review of the literature and existing framework of Malaysian environmental health.

  20. Myanmar's Rohingya Refugees in Malaysia: Education and the Way Forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Letchamanan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Rohingya, a persecuted minority, has faced decades of harsh treatment and made stateless by the military government in Myanmar. To escape from this severe repression, most Rohingya flee to Bangladesh, Thailand or Malaysia. In Malaysia, this community has been living invisibly for more than three decades. Just like other refugees, the Rohingya are not allowed to work legally and do not have access to free healthcare and education in this country. Many of these refugee children learn in the learning centres run by the community with the help of UNHCR and local NGOs and in madrasah1 after school hours. Nevertheless there is a huge gap in education for these children, especially for girls and boys over 15 years old. This paper addresses the gap, discusses the teaching and learning provided in the refugee learning centres and the future of these refugee children in Malaysia.