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Sample records for recurrent pancreatitis caused

  1. Eosinophilic Pancreatitis: A Rare Cause of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis

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    Jennifer Reppucci

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic pancreatitis is a rare form of recurrent acute pancreatitis that demonstrates distinct histologic features, including diffuse, periductal, acinar, and septal inflammatory infiltrates comprised of a pure or predominant population of eosinophils, eosinophilic phlebitis and arteritis, and localized eosinophilic infiltrates with pseudocyst formation. It is associated with elevated serum immunoglobulin E levels, an elevated eosinophil count with systemic manifestations, and eosinophilic infiltrates in other organs of the gastrointestinal tract. We present a case of eosinophilic pancreatitis in a 44-year-old man who was diagnosed after pancreatic resection for recurrent bouts of acute pancreatitis. While the gross and histologic evaluations matched other reported cases of eosinophilic pancreatitis, our patient had only minimal peripheral eosinophilia, no reported history of symptoms related to elevated eosinophilia or immunoglobulin E, and only mild eosinophilic infiltrates in his gallbladder.

  2. The role of intraductal US in the management of idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis without a definite cause on ERCP.

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    Kim, Hyun Su; Moon, Jong Ho; Choi, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jong Chan; Han, Seung Hyo; Hong, Su Jin; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cheon, Young Koog; Cho, Young Deok; Park, Sang-Heum; Lee, Moon Sung

    2011-06-01

    The cause of pancreatitis is unknown in as many as 30% of cases of recurrent acute pancreatitis, even after ERCP. To investigate the role of intraductal US (IDUS) for managing idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis (IRP). Prospective study. Tertiary referral hospital. Thirty-one patients with suspicious IRP with negative findings on ERCP. IDUS during ERCP. IDUS findings showing any possible cause of pancreatitis. IDUS revealed small bile duct stones (≤3 mm) in 5 patients (16.1%) and sludge in 3 patients (9.7%). The detection rate for a bile duct stone and sludge was significantly higher in patients with a dilated CBD than a nondilated CBD on ERCP (71.4 vs 12.5%; P < .05). Recurrent pancreatitis did not develop in 7 of 8 patients with biliary stones or sludge after an endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST). Two patients (6.5%) demonstrated a small polypoid lesion on the distal end of the pancreatic duct. One patient underwent surgery for intra-ampullary cancer, and another one underwent EST without another attack of pancreatitis. Three patients (9.7%) showed evidence of chronic pancreatitis with small pancreatic stones and/or calcifications on IDUS. Small number of patients. IDUS results were not compared with those of conventional EUS. There was no reference standard for chronic pancreatitis as diagnosed by IDUS. IDUS identified a possible cause of idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis in 42% of patients with negative findings on ERCP. The IDUS-guided approach combined with ERCP and EST may be useful for decreasing recurring attacks of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hyperparathyroidism as a cause of recurrent acute pancreatitis: A case report

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    Tešić-Rajković Snežana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the more uncommon etiological factors responsible for the development of acute pancreatitis (AP is hypercalcemia. Hyperparathyroidism (HPT, as a cause of hypercalcemia, is responsible for 1.5–13% of AP according to a number of studies. A mechanism of the development of AP in hyperparathyroidism is still unclear. Case report. We presented a 47-year-old female patient, who had five episodes of AP in total before the etiological factors were finally determined. The patient had certain comorbidities which were considered to be potential causes of AP. She had chronic renal insufficiency (she was on a regular hemodialysis program, systemic lupus erythematosus and mioma uteri. She used to regularly take an antiepileptic drug (combination of sodium valproate and valproic acid. During the fifth episode of AP, the serum calcium level was for the first time elevated to twice the normal value. Level of parathyroid hormone was several times higher. A static scintigraphy found hyperplasia or hyperfunctional adenoma of the right inferior and superior parathyroid glands. Abdominal multislice computed tomography (MSCT scan verified the enlargement of the entire pancreas, as well as the presence of heterogeneous structures with diffuse amorphous calcifications. The lytic lesions in the pelvic bones could be seen in both sides. Parathyroidectomy was being postponed by an endocrine surgeon because of the poor overall condition of the patient. In the next period the patient had five more episodes of AP. The condition was significantly contributed by increasingly more frequent and longer episodes of metrorrhagia. Despite all therapeutic measures that were taken, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS developed, and fatal outcome occurred. Conclusion. In case of recurrent pancreatitis, hyperparathyroidism is to be considered even if a significant elevation of serum calcium is not present. This is especially the case for patients with

  4. Hyperparathyroidism as a cause of recurrent acute pancreatitis: A case report.

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    Tešić-Rajković, Snežana; Radovanović-Dinić, Biljana; Mitić, Branka; Dinić-Radović, Violeta; Jovanović, Maja

    2016-11-01

    One of the more uncommon etiological factors responsible for the development of acute pancreatitis (AP) is hypercalcemia. Hyperparathyroidism (HPT), as a cause of hypercalcemia, is responsible for 1.5–13% of AP according to a number of studies. A mechanism of the development of AP in hyperparathyroidism is still unclear. We presented a 47-year-old female patient, who had five episodes of AP in total before the etiological factors were finally determined. The patient had certain comorbidities which were considered to be potential causes of AP. She had chronic renal insufficiency (she was on a regular hemodialysis program), systemic lupus erythematosus and mioma uteri. She used to regularly take an antiepileptic drug (combination of sodium valproate and valproic acid). During the fifth episode of AP, the serum calcium level was for the first time elevated to twice the normal value. Level of parathyroid hormone was several times higher. A static scintigraphy found hyperplasia or hyperfunctional adenoma of the right inferior and superior parathyroid glands. Abdominal multislice computed tomography (MSCT) scan verified the enlargement of the entire pancreas, as well as the presence of heterogeneous structures with diffuse amorphous calcifications. The lytic lesions in the pelvic bones could be seen in both sides. Parathyroidectomy was being postponed by an endocrine surgeon because of the poor overall condition of the patient. In the next period the patient had five more episodes of AP. The condition was significantly contributed by increasingly more frequent and longer episodes of metrorrhagia. Despite all therapeutic measures that were taken, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) developed, and fatal outcome occurred. In case of recurrent pancreatitis, hyperparathyroidism is to be considered even if a significant elevation of serum calcium is not present. This is especially the case for patients with chronic renal insufficiency or impaired vitamin D

  5. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

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    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term “idiopathic” is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  6. Is idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis attributed to small stones?

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    Chow, Wai-Keung; Peng, Yen-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis remains a clinical challenge. Intraductal ultrasonography in the management of idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis may be a new strategy for undetermined causes after initial diagnostic approaches, including endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP). However, no definite cause after ERCP should be defined under optimal settings and with experienced technique.

  7. Duodenal duplication cyst (DDC) communicating with the pancreatobiliary duct--a rare cause of recurrent acute pancreatitis in adults.

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    Bong, Jan Jin; Spalding, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Duodenal duplication cysts (DDC) are rare congenital anomalies that usually present in infancy and childhood. Acute presentation in adults is even rarer. We report a case of a 34-year-old man who presented with recurrent acute pancreatitis and was found to have a cystic lesion in the second part of his duodenum. Further investigations revealed communication between the cystic lesion and the distal common bile duct. We describe the details of the operative approach taken to resect the DDC. We describe the differential diagnoses and the criteria for diagnosing DDC. Management options for DDC are discussed along with our recommendations.

  8. Extrahepatic portal venous system thrombosis in recurrent acute and chronic alcoholic pancreatitis is caused by local inflammation and not thrombophilia.

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    Rebours, Vinciane; Boudaoud, Larbi; Vullierme, Marie-Pierre; Vidaud, Dominique; Condat, Bertrand; Hentic, Olivia; Maire, Frédérique; Hammel, Pascal; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Lévy, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Extrahepatic portal venous system thrombosis (EPVST) occurs in 13% of patients with either recurrent acute (AP) or chronic (CP) alcoholic pancreatitis. The role of thrombophilia has never been assessed in this entity. All consecutive patients with alcoholic AP or CP were included in a prospective study. All patients underwent a computerized tomography (CT) scan of the pancreas to evaluate EPVST as well as thorough testing for thrombophilia (protein C, S, and antithrombin deficiency, factor II, factor V, and JAK2 gene mutations, homocystein, biological antiphospholipid syndrome). A total of 119 patients (male, n=100 (84%); smokers, n=110 (92%)) were included. EPVST was found in 41 patients (35%). The portal, superior mesenteric, or splenic veins were involved in 34%, 24%, and 93% of patients, respectively. Thrombophilia was identified in 18% (n=22), including the biological antiphospholipid syndrome, factor V Leiden mutation, and factor II G20210A gene mutation in 21 (17.6%), 2 (1.6%), and 1 patient (0.8%), respectively. On univariate analysis, the factors associated with EPVST were smoking (RR=1.6 (1.38-1.85), P=0.03), pseudocysts (RR=2.91 (1.29-6.56), P=0.008), a pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail (P=0.03), a high CT severity index for AP (P=0.007), and pancreatic parenchymal necrosis (P=0.02). The presence of hemostatic risk factors was not associated with an increased risk of EPVST. On multivariate analysis, only pseudocysts were associated with EPVST (hazard ratio: 6.402; 95% confidence interval (1.59-26.54), P=0.009). EPVST is found in 35% of patients with acute/chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. Local inflammation appears to be the major predisposing condition. The presence of some form of thrombophilia does not increase the risk of EPVST and should not be systematically searched for in case of EPVST.

  9. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W. Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch

  10. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C; Bakker, Olaf J; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; Bollen, Thomas L; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J; Brink, Menno A; Schaapherder, Alexander F; Dejong, Cornelis H; Spanier, B W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H; Besselink, Marc G; Gooszen, Hein G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Boermeester, Marja A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch hospitals from December 2003 through March 2007. We collected information on disease course, outpatient visits, and hospital readmissions, as well as results from imaging, laboratory, and histology studies. Standardized follow-up questionnaires were sent to all available patients to collect information on hospitalizations and interventions for pancreatic disease, abdominal pain, steatorrhea, diabetes mellitus, medications, and alcohol and tobacco use. Patients were followed up for a median time period of 57 months. Primary end points were recurrent pancreatitis and CP. Risk factors were evaluated using regression analysis. The cumulative risk was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Recurrent pancreatitis developed in 117 patients (17%), and CP occurred in 51 patients (7.6%). Recurrent pancreatitis developed in 12% of patients with biliary disease, 24% of patients with alcoholic etiology, and 25% of patients with disease of idiopathic or other etiologies; CP occurred in 3%, 16%, and 10% of these patients, respectively. Etiology, smoking, and necrotizing pancreatitis were independent risk factors for recurrent pancreatitis and CP. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores at admission also were associated independently with recurrent pancreatitis. The cumulative risk for recurrent pancreatitis over 5 years was highest among smokers at 40% (compared with 13% for nonsmokers). For alcohol abusers and current smokers, the cumulative risks for CP were similar-approximately 18%. In contrast, the cumulative risk of CP increased to 30% in patients who smoked and abused alcohol. Based on a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to Dutch hospitals, a first

  11. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  12. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, U.A.; Issa, Y.; Hagenaars, J.C.; Bakker, O.J.; Goor, H. van; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Bollen, T.L.; Ramshorst, B. van; Witteman, B.J.; Brink, M.A.; Schaapherder, A.F.; Dejong, C.H.; Spanier, B.W.; Heisterkamp, J.; Harst, E. van der; Eijck, C.H. van; Besselink, M.G.; Gooszen, H.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Boermeester, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  13. Etiology, Severity and Recurrence of Acute Pancreatitis in Southern Taiwan

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    Chun-Hao Chen

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Alcoholic pancreatitis was the major etiology of acute pancreatitis in southern Taiwan, exhibiting a strong male predominance and higher risk of severe CT grading. Abnormal serum triglyceride was independently associated with the severity of acute pancreatitis. Alcoholic pancreatitis had a higher risk of recurrence than other etiologies.

  14. Evaluation of unusual causes of pancreatitis: Role of cross-sectional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Sang Wook; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Yi, Mi Seon; Kim, Gwang Ha; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2009-01-01

    There are widely diverse causes of pancreatitis. Gallstone and alcohol have been recognized as the most common causes of pancreatitis accounting for 90% of cases. However, acute and chronic pancreatitis may also result from a variety of uncommon causes. The determination of the etiology is important for patient management and prevention of recurrence. Sludge is the most common cause of idiopathic or recurrent acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasonography is considered as the most accurate diagnostic test for this abnormality. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have only a limited role in the diagnosis of sludge. However, papillitis observed on the contrast-enhanced CT and MR may provide clues to the detection of pancreatitis secondary to sludge, a small stone or a recently passed stone. Radiological studies, clinical presentation and laboratory data can be helpful in determining the etiology of unusual causes of pancreatitis such as anatomic anomalies, autoimmune pancreatitis, groove pancreatitis, and traumatic pancreatitis.

  15. Evaluation of unusual causes of pancreatitis: Role of cross-sectional imaging

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    Kwak, Sang Wook [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kimsuk@medigate.net; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Yi, Mi Seon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwang Ha; Kang, Dae Hwan [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    There are widely diverse causes of pancreatitis. Gallstone and alcohol have been recognized as the most common causes of pancreatitis accounting for 90% of cases. However, acute and chronic pancreatitis may also result from a variety of uncommon causes. The determination of the etiology is important for patient management and prevention of recurrence. Sludge is the most common cause of idiopathic or recurrent acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasonography is considered as the most accurate diagnostic test for this abnormality. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have only a limited role in the diagnosis of sludge. However, papillitis observed on the contrast-enhanced CT and MR may provide clues to the detection of pancreatitis secondary to sludge, a small stone or a recently passed stone. Radiological studies, clinical presentation and laboratory data can be helpful in determining the etiology of unusual causes of pancreatitis such as anatomic anomalies, autoimmune pancreatitis, groove pancreatitis, and traumatic pancreatitis.

  16. Recurrent pancreatitis in a patient with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia treated successfully with cinacalcet

    OpenAIRE

    Gunganah, Kirun; Grossman, Ashley; Druce, Maralyn

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 22-year-old female student presented with a history of recurrent pancreatitis. The commonest causes of pancreatitis, including drugs, gallstones, corticosteroids, excess alcohol and hypertriglyceridaemia, were excluded. She was found to have an elevated serum calcium level that was considered to be the cause of her pancreatitis, with a detectable serum parathyroid hormone (PTH). An initial diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism was made. However, two neck explorations failed to re...

  17. Surgical management of malignant bowel obstruction in recurrent pancreatic cancer

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    Hyung Sun Kim

    2017-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: Palliative surgery improves quality of life in recurrent pancreatic cancer patients and can continue patient’s palliative management. In selected patients, palliative surgery may effective management for progress of survival and quality of life.

  18. Recurrent pancreatitis in pregnancy after preconception Whipple for pseudopapillary pancreatic tumor.

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    Dray, Danielle; Dahlke, Joshua D; Rouse, Dwight J

    2014-08-01

    Solid pseudopapillary pancreatic tumor is a rare tumor affecting young women. Case reports have presented pregnancy outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) in pregnancy for this neoplasm. We report a case of a woman who underwent a preconception Whipple procedure for a solid pseudopapillary pancreatic tumor who experienced recurrent pancreatitis confined to pregnancy. A 28-year-old gravida 2 para 1 woman with a history of a Whipple procedure for a solid pseudopapillary pancreatic tumor 2 years prior had three episodes of severe pancreatitis in pregnancy. She was managed conservatively with each episode. She delivered at term and did not have a recurrence in the 8 months since her delivery. Recurrent pancreatitis in pregnancy after a preconception Whipple procedure can be managed conservatively without surgical intervention.

  19. Recurrent acute pancreatitis: an approach to diagnosis and management.

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    Kedia, Saurabh; Dhingra, Rajan; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is defined as more than two attacks of acute pancreatitis (AP) without any evidence of underlying chronic pancreatitis (CP). As the known causes of AP are generally taken care of, RAP usually occurs in the idiopathic group, which forms 20%-25% of cases of AP. The causes of idiopathic RAP (IRAP) can be mechanical, toxic-metabolic, anatomical, or miscellaneous. Microlithiasis commonly reported from the West is not a common cause of IRAP among Indian patients. Pancreas divisum (PD) is now believed as a cofactor, the main factor being associated genetic mutations. The role of Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) as a cause of IRAP remains controversial. Malignancy should be ruled out in any patient with IRAP > 50 years of age. Early CP can present initially as RAP. The work-up of patients with IRAP includes a detailed history and investigations. Primary investigations include liver function tests (LFT), serum calcium and triglyceride, abdominal ultrasonography (USG) and contrast-ehhanced computed tomography (CECT) abdomen. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and possibly endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) are indicated in the secondary phase if the work-up is negative after the primary investigations. EUS is advised usually 6-8 weeks after an acute episode. Treatment of patients with IRAP is aimed at the specific aetiology. In general, empirical cholecystectomy should be discouraged with the availability and widespread use of EUS. Endoscopic sphincterotomy is advised if there is strong suspicion of SOD. Minor papilla sphincterotomy should be carried out in those with PD but with limited expectations. Regular follow-up of patients with IRAP is necessary because most patients are likely to develop CP in due course.

  20. Targeted Gene Next-Generation Sequencing in Chinese Children with Chronic Pancreatitis and Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis.

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    Xiao, Yuan; Yuan, Wentao; Yu, Bo; Guo, Yan; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinqiong; Yu, Yi; Yu, Yi; Gong, Biao; Xu, Chundi

    2017-12-01

    To identify causal mutations in certain genes in children with acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). After patients were enrolled (CP, 55; ARP, 14) and their clinical characteristics were investigated, we performed next-generation sequencing to detect nucleotide variations among the following 10 genes: cationic trypsinogen protease serine 1 (PRSS1), serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR), chymotrypsin C (CTRC), calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), cathepsin B (CTSB), keratin 8 (KRT8), CLAUDIN 2 (CLDN2), carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1), and ATPase type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1). Mutations were searched against online databases to obtain information on the cause of the diseases. Certain novel mutations were analyzed using the SIFT2 and Polyphen-2 to predict the effect on protein function. There were 45 patients with CP and 10 patients with ARP who harbored 1 or more mutations in these genes; 45 patients had at least 1 mutation related to pancreatitis. Mutations were observed in the PRSS1, SPINK1, and CFTR genes in 17 patients, the CASR gene in 5 patients, and the CTSB, CTRC, and KRT8 genes in 1 patient. Mutations were not found in the CLDN, CPA1, or ATP8B1 genes. We found that mutations in SPINK1 may increase the risk of pancreatic duct stones (OR, 11.07; P = .003). The patients with CFTR mutations had a higher level of serum amylase (316.0 U/L vs 92.5 U/L; P = .026). Mutations, especially those in PRSS1, SPINK1, and CFTR, accounted for the major etiologies in Chinese children with CP or ARP. Children presenting mutations in the SPINK1 gene may have a higher risk of developing pancreatic duct stones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pancreatitis caused by Clostridium perfringens infection with extensive retropneumoperitoneum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchante, E.; Garcia, F. J.; Perez, H.; Marquez, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    We present a case of primary emphysematous pancreatitis caused by Clostridium perfringens infection (also Known as spontaneous pancreatic gas gangrene) in a 66-year-old man with diabetes and a history of recurrent pancreatitis. One notable feature is the absence of a focal distribution, which is seen on radiological studies to be accompanied by extensive retropneumoperitoneum, with dissemination of the gas toward the mesenteric root and pelvic extra peritoneal spaces. This wide diffusion is aided by the C. perfringens toxins and the pancreatic enzymes released, leading to a fulminate course, an elevated rate of early mortality among the cases reviewed. The early diagnosis of this disease is fundamental, enabling aggressive medical treatment and emergency surgery. Diabetes is a known risk factor for anaerobic infection, including C. perfringens, as in the case of emphysematous cholecystitis. A diseased pancreas or pancreatic duct facilitates the development of infections since it eliminates poorly the microorganisms that reach it from the duodenum. Gas gangrene secondary to necrosis-related super infection or pancreatic collections is uncommon, and spontaneous or primary cases are exceptionally are. (Author) 13 refs

  2. Long-term recurrence and death rates after acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Helle; Tønnesen, Hanne; Tønnesen, Maja Hanne

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare long-term recurrence and death rates after a first episode of acute pancreatitis in patients with and without gallstones. Additionally, it was of interest to find out if there were factors predictive of readmission or death.......The aim of this study was to compare long-term recurrence and death rates after a first episode of acute pancreatitis in patients with and without gallstones. Additionally, it was of interest to find out if there were factors predictive of readmission or death....

  3. Recurrent acute pancreatitis in anorexia and bulimia.

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    Morris, Luc G; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Herring, Sharon; Marti, Jennifer L

    2004-07-01

    Mild pancreatitis has been reported as a consequence of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or what has been termed the "dietary chaos syndrome". Either chronic malnutrition, or refeeding after periods of malnutrition, may precipitate acute pancreatitis through several pathogenetic mechanisms. A 26-year-old woman with a ten-year history of anorexia and bulimia presented with a third episode of acute pancreatitis in three months. The patient had been abstinent from alcohol for many years. Imaging studies during all three admissions failed to identify any biliary disease, including gallstones or biliary sludge. A cholecystectomy was performed, with a normal intraoperative cholangiogram, and no abnormalities on pathologic examination of the gallbladder and bile. The patient was discharged on hospital day 10 with no pain, and she has begun to return to regular eating habits. Pancreatitis has not recurred after 6 months of follow up. We have identified 14 cases in the literature of acute pancreatitis associated with anorexia or bulimia. In the absence of evidence for gallstone, alcohol or metabolic etiologies, eating disorders may contribute to the pathophysiology of some idiopathic cases of pancreatitis.

  4. Etiology, clinical features and management of acute recurrent pancreatitis.

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    Deng, Yi Yun; Wang, Rui; Wu, Hao; Tang, Cheng Wei; Chen, Xin Zu

    2014-10-01

    To study the etiology and clinical features of acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) and to determine its optimal management and outcomes. ARP cases among acute pancreatitis patients who were admitted to the West China Hospital, Sichuan University from January 2008 to December 2012 were retrospectively collected. Their etiology, clinical features, treatments and outcomes were analyzed. Of all pancreatitis patients, 8.9% were classified as ARP. The proportions of mild and severe diseases were 85.7% and 14.3%, respectively. The common etiological factors were biliogenic (31.0%), alcohol (26.2%), hyperlipidemia (21.4%) and pancreaticobiliary malformation (15.4%). At first 46 cases were cryptogenic and among them 36 were subsequently confirmed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Among the hyperlipidemic ARP patients, 72.2% failed to routinely monitor and control serum lipids. ERCP was performed in 88 cases, and 48 also required an endoscopic sphincterotomy or calculus removal. Twenty-two patients underwent cholangiopancreatic duct stent placement, and pancreatic necrosectomy was performed on eight severe cases. The overall outcomes indicate that 8.3% of the cases progressed to chronic pancreatitis and 33.3% of the cases receiving etiological treatment were recurrence-free. There were no deaths in this study. The etiological factors of ARP are similar to those of acute pancreatitis at the first attack. The management of ARP should be fully considered based on etiological investigation. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Recurrent pancreatitis in a patient with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia treated successfully with cinacalcet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunganah, Kirun; Grossman, Ashley; Druce, Maralyn

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old female student presented with a history of recurrent pancreatitis. The commonest causes of pancreatitis, including drugs, gallstones, corticosteroids, excess alcohol and hypertriglyceridaemia, were excluded. She was found to have an elevated serum calcium level that was considered to be the cause of her pancreatitis, with a detectable serum parathyroid hormone (PTH). An initial diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism was made. However, two neck explorations failed to reveal a parathyroid adenoma. She was referred to our unit three years later as her episodes of pancreatitis were becoming more frequent and her calcium level remained persistently elevated. Her investigations were as follows: elevated adjusted calcium level of 2.79 mmol/l (2.2-2.58), PTH level of 4.2 pmol/l (0.6-6.0), low 24 h urine calcium of 0.3 mmol/l and a urine calcium:creatinine ratio of A mutation in the calcium-sensing receptor gene. Although the hypercalcaemia of FHH is usually without sequelae due to the generalised changes in calcium sensing, in the presence of this complication she was started on cinacalcet 30 mg daily. She had one further episode of pancreatitis with calcium levels ranging between 2.53 and 2.66 mmol/l. Her cinacalcet was gradually increased to 30 mg three times daily, maintaining her calcium levels in the range of 2.15-2.20 mmol/l. She has not had a further episode of pancreatitis for more than 2 years. FHH is usually a benign condition with minimal complications from hypercalcaemia. Pancreatitis has been reported rarely, and no clear management strategy has been defined in these cases. Cinacalcet was successfully used in treating recurrent pancreatitis in a patient with FHH by maintaining calcium levels in the lower part of the reference range. Whether or not this is an effective long-term treatment remains yet to be seen. FHH is an important differential diagnosis for hypercalcaemia.FHH can rarely cause pancreatitis.No clear strategy is

  6. Embolization of gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm caused by chronic pancreatitis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Se Jong; Ko, Kang Seok; Park, Byung Lan; Kim, Byong Geun; Kim, Jae Kyu

    1993-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm due to chronic pancreatitis is uncommon, but it can cause recurrent and massive hemorrhage. Because of high morbidity and mortality associated with the pseudoaneurysm, early detection and treatment is essential. Surgical ligation or resection of the aneurysm has a high mortality and therefore, transcatheter embolization is preferably carried out. We report a case in which gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm caused by chronic pancreatitis was successfully treated by transcatheter embolization using Gelfoam and Gianturco spring coils

  7. Embolization of gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm caused by chronic pancreatitis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Se Jong; Ko, Kang Seok; Park, Byung Lan; Kim, Byong Geun [Kwangju Christian Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Kyu [College of Medicine, Chonnam National Univrsity, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-15

    Pseudoaneurysm due to chronic pancreatitis is uncommon, but it can cause recurrent and massive hemorrhage. Because of high morbidity and mortality associated with the pseudoaneurysm, early detection and treatment is essential. Surgical ligation or resection of the aneurysm has a high mortality and therefore, transcatheter embolization is preferably carried out. We report a case in which gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm caused by chronic pancreatitis was successfully treated by transcatheter embolization using Gelfoam and Gianturco spring coils.

  8. Solitary main pancreatic ductal calculus of possible biliary origin causing acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparala, Ramakrishna Prasad Chowdary; Patel, Rafiuddin; Guthrie, James Ahsley; Davies, Mervyn Huw; Guillou, Pierre J; Menon, Krishna V

    2005-09-10

    Pancreatic ductal calculi are most often associated with chronic pancreatitis. Radiological features of chronic pancreatitis are readily evident in the presence of these calculi. However, acute pancreatitis due to a solitary main pancreatic ductal calculus of biliary origin is rare. A 59-year-old man presented with a first episode of acute pancreatitis. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CT) scan and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) revealed a calculus in the main pancreatic duct in the head of the pancreas causing acute pancreatitis. There were no features suggestive of chronic pancreatitis on CT scanning. The episode acute pancreatitis was managed conservatively. ERCP extraction of the calculus failed as the stone was impacted in the main pancreatic duct resulting in severe acute pancreatitis. Once this resolved, a transduodenal exploration and extraction of the pancreatic ductal calculus was performed successfully. Crystallographic analysis revealed the composition of the calculus was different to that seen in chronic pancreatitis, but more in keeping with a calculus of biliary origin. This could be explained by migration of the biliary calculus via the common channel into the main pancreatic duct. Following the operation the patient made an uneventful recovery and was well at two-year follow up. Acute pancreatitis due to a solitary main pancreatic ductal calculus of biliary origin is rare. Failing endoscopic extraction, transduodenal exploration and extraction is a safe option after resolution of acute pancreatitis.

  9. Recurrent LDL-receptor mutation causes familial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1995-05-05

    May 5, 1995 ... 3. eaudet . New. Recurrent LDL-receptor mutation causes familial hypercholesterolaemia in ... amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)" and single- strand conformation .... Location. Afrikaner. Mixed race. ApaLl.

  10. Colopancreatic Fistula: An Uncommon Complication of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhanna Abu Ghanimeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic complications, including colopancreatic fistulas (CPFs, are uncommon after acute and chronic pancreatitis. However, they have been reported and are serious. CPFs are less likely to close spontaneously and are associated with a higher risk of complications. Therefore, more definitive treatment is required that includes surgical and endoscopic options. We present a case of a 62-year-old male patient with a history of heavy alcohol intake and recurrent acute pancreatitis who presented with a 6-month history of watery diarrhea and abdominal pain. His abdominal imaging showed a possible connection between the colon and the pancreas. A further multidisciplinary workup by the gastroenterology and surgery teams, including endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and colonoscopy, resulted in a diagnosis of CPF. A distal pancreatectomy and left hemicolectomy were performed, and the diagnosis of CPF was confirmed intraoperatively. The patient showed improvement afterward.

  11. PEDIATRIC ACUTE RECURRENT AND CHRONIC PANCREATITIS: LESSONS FROM INSPPIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Soma; Ooi, Chee Y.; Werlin, Steven; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Barth, Bradley; Bellin, Melena D.; Durie, Peter R.; Fishman, Douglas S.; Freedman, Steven D.; Gariepy, Cheryl; Giefer, Matthew J.; Gonska, Tanja; Heyman, Melvin B.; Himes, Ryan; Husain, Sohail Z.; Lin, Tom K.; Lowe, Mark E.; Morinville, Veronique; Palermo, Joseph J.; Pohl, John F.; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Troendle, David; Wilschanski, Michael; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Uc, Aliye

    2017-01-01

    Importance Pediatric acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are poorly understood. Objective To characterize and identify risk factors associated with ARP and CP in childhood. Design A multinational cross-sectional study of children with ARP or CP at the time of enrollment to INSPPIRE (International Study Group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In Search for a CuRE) study. Setting Participant institutions of the INSPPIRE Consortium. Participants From September 2012 to February 2015, 155 children with ARP and 146 with CP (≤ 19 years of age) were enrolled. Their demographic and clinical information were entered into the REDCap database at fifteen centers. Interventions None. Main Outcomes and Measures A cross-sectional study of the cohort was performed to assess demographics, risk factors, abdominal pain and disease burden. Differences were analyzed using two-sample t-test or Wilcoxon-rank sum test for the continuous variables, and Pearson Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test for categorical variables. Disease burden variables (pain variables, hospital/ER visits, missed school days) were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results The majority of children with CP reported prior recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis. Gender distribution was similar between the groups. ARP was more common in Hispanics, CP in non-Hispanics. Forty-eight percent of patients with ARP versus 73% of patients with CP had at least one gene mutation in pancreatitis-related genes (p=0.0002). Children with PRSS1 or SPINK1 mutations were more likely to present with CP compared with ARP (ptoxic/metabolic risk factors (~20% of patients) did not differ between children with ARP or CP. Pancreatitis-related abdominal pain was a major complaint in 81% of children with ARP or CP within the last year. The disease burden was higher in CP compared with ARP (more ER visits, hospitalizations, missed school days, medical, endoscopic and surgical interventions). Conclusions and

  12. Haemorrhagic pseudocyst of the pancreatic tail causing acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemorrhagic pseudocyst of the pancreatic tail causing acute abdominal pain in a 12-year-old girl. Rolf P. Dahmen a,c. , Gerhard Stuhldreier b. , Hartmut Bindewald c and Malte Weinrich a,c. Pancreatic disorders are a relatively uncommon event in children, particularly the development of pancreatic pseudocysts. The most ...

  13. Application of molecular imaging combined with genetic screening in diagnosing MELAS, diabetes and recurrent pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiping, W; Quwen, L; Hai, Z; Jian, Z; Peiyi, G

    2016-01-01

    We report molecular imaging combined with gene diagnosis in a family with 7 members who carried an A3243G mutation in mitochondrial tRNA and p.Thr 137 Met in cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene presented with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes, and recurrent pancreatitis. DNA sequencing was used to detect and validate mitochondrial DNA and PRSS1. We also verified that mitochondrial heterozygous mutations and c.410 C>T mutation causing p.Thr 137 Met could be detected in oral epithelial cells or in urine sediment cells. In addition, molecular imaging was carried out in the affected family members. In this pedigree, MELAS syndrome accompanied by pancreatitis was an important clinical feature, followed by diabetes. Heteroplasmy of the mtDNA A3243G and c.410 C>T mutation of PRSS1 was found in all tissue samples of these patients, but no mutations were found in 520 normal control and normal individuals of the family. However, based on molecular imaging observations, patients with relatively higher lactate/pyruvate levels had more typical and more severe symptoms, particularly those of pancreatic disease (diabetes or pancreatitis). MELAS syndrome may be associated with pancreatitis. For the diagnosis, it is more reasonable to perform molecular imaging combined with gene diagnosis.

  14. Influence of delayed cholecystectomy after acute gallstone pancreatitis on recurrence: consequences of lack of resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Bejarano-González

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute pancreatitis is often a relapsing condition, particularly when its triggering factor persists. Our goal is to determine the recurrence rate of acute biliary pancreatitis after an initial episode, and the time to relapse, as well as to identify the risk factors for recurrence. Material and method: We included all patients admitted for a first acute gallstone pancreatitis event during four years. Primary endpoints included readmission for recurrence and time to relapse. Results: We included 296 patients admitted on a total of 386 occasions. The incidence of acute biliary pancreatitis in our setting is 17.5/100,000 population/year. In all, 19.6% of pancreatitis were severe (22.6% of severe acute pancreatitis for first episodes versus 3.6% for recurring pancreatitis, with an overall mortality of 4.4%. Overall recurrence rate was 15.5%, with a median time to relapse of 82 days. In total, 14.2% of patients relapsed after an acute pancreatitis event without cholecystectomy or endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Severe acute pancreatitis recur in 7.2% of patients, whereas mild cases do so in 16.3%, this being the only risk factor for recurrence thus far identified. Conclusions: Patients admitted for pancreatitis should undergo cholecystectomy as soon as possible or be guaranteed priority on the waiting list. Otherwise, endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography with sphincterotomy may be an alternative to surgery for selected patients.

  15. Genetic Analysis of Japanese Children With Acute Recurrent and Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Nobutomo; Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sakurai, Yumiko; Nakano, Satoshi; Naritaka, Nakayuki; Minowa, Kei; Sai, Jin K; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    Causes of acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP) are sometimes difficult to determine in children. In such patients, genetic analysis may prove helpful. The present study analyzed mutations of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), chymotrypsin C (CTRC), and carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) and investigated the clinical features of children with these mutations. Genetic analyses of mutations in these 4 genes were conducted in 128 patients with ARP or CP. Characteristics of the patients showing mutations were investigated using medical records. Fifty of the 128 (39.1%) subjects had at least 1 mutation (median age at onset, 7.6 years). Abdominal pain was the presenting symptom of pancreatitis in 48 of the 50 patients (96%). Fifteen of those 50 patients (30.0%) had a family history of pancreatitis. Gene mutations were present in PRSS1 in 26 patients, SPINK1 in 23, CTRC in 3, and CPA1 in 5. In the 31 patients with mutations in SPINK1, CTRC, or CPA1, 16 (51.6%) had homozygous or heterozygous mutations with other mutations. Three patients underwent surgery and another 4 patients underwent endoscopy to manage ARP or CP. Although 3 of the 7 patients complained of mild abdominal pain, none of those 7 patients experienced any obvious episode of ARP after treatment. In pediatric patients with idiopathic ARP and CP, genetic analysis is useful for identifying the cause of pancreatitis. Early endoscopic or surgical treatment prevents ARP by extending the interval between episodes of pancreatitis in this population.

  16. Yersiniosis as a possible cause of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J; Teglgaard Hansen, P

    1985-01-01

    In some cases of acute pancreatitis no cause can be identified. An etiologic role of Yersinia enterocolitica type 3 was suggested in two previous reports. A case is now presented which supports this hypothesis by simultaneity of reactive phase of yersiniosis and an acute attack of pancreatitis...... of otherwise unknown cause. Although the coincidence may have been fortuitous, the pattern common to this and the earlier published cases suggests that it may yield a further clue to an etiologic understanding of acute pancreatitis....

  17. Computed tomography-guided cryoablation of local recurrence after primary resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pusceddu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimal management of local recurrences after primary resection of pancreatic cancer still remains to be clarified. A 58-yearold woman developed an isolated recurrence of pancreatic cancer six year after distal pancreatectomy. Re-resection was attempted but the lesion was deemed unresectable at surgery. Then chemotherapy was administrated without obtaining a reduction of the tumor size nor an improvement of the patient’s symptoms. Thus the patient underwent percutaneous cryoablation under computed tomography (CT-guidance obtaining tumor necrosis and a significant improvement in the quality of life. A CT scan one month later showed a stable lesion with no contrast enhancement. While the use of percutaneous cryoblation has widened its applications in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, it has never been described for the treatment of local pancreatic cancer recurrence after primary resection. Percutaneous cryoablation deserves further studies in the multimodality treatment of local recurrence after primary pancreatic surgery.

  18. Yersiniosis as a possible cause of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J; Teglgaard Hansen, P

    1985-01-01

    In some cases of acute pancreatitis no cause can be identified. An etiologic role of Yersinia enterocolitica type 3 was suggested in two previous reports. A case is now presented which supports this hypothesis by simultaneity of reactive phase of yersiniosis and an acute attack of pancreatitis...

  19. [The causes of recurrent ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnitsky, E M; Alekberzade, A V; Gasanov, M R

    To explore microcirculatory changes within the first 48 hours after admission, to compare them with clinical manifestations of bleeding and to define the dependence of recurrent bleeding from the therapy. The study included 108 patients with ulcerative gastroduodenal bleeding who were treated at the Clinical Hospital #71 for the period 2012-2014. There were 80 (74.1%) men and 28 (25.9%) women. Age ranged 20-87 years (mean 54.4±16.8 years). Patients younger than 45 years were predominant (33.4%). J. Forrest classification (1974) was used in endoscopic characterization of bleeding. Roccal Prognostic Scale for gastroduodenal bleeding was applied in all patients at admission to assess the risk of possible recurrence. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 included 53 (49.1%) patients without recurrent bleeding; group 2-55 (50.1%) patients who had recurrent bleeding within the first two days of treatment. Investigation of microcirculation showed the role of vegetative component including blood circulation centralization, blood flow slowing, blood cells redistribution providing sufficient blood oxygenation. By the end of the first day we observed pronounced hemodilution, decreased blood oxygenation, blood flow restructuring with its acceleration above 1 ml/s, violation of tissue oxygenation, signs of hypovolemia. These changes were significantly different from group 2 and associated with circulatory decentralization with possible pulmonary microcirculation disturbances and interstitial edema. This processes contribute to disruption of tissue oxygenation. We assume that recurrent bleeding in group 2 was caused by fluid therapy in larger volumes than it was necessary in this clinical situation. Infusion therapy should be significantly reduced for the debut of gastroduodenal ulcerative bleeding. Sedative therapy is advisable to reduce the influence of central nervous system.

  20. Ansa Pancreatica: A Case Report of a Type of Ductal Variation in a Patient with Idiopathic Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hye Mi; Park, Jung Yup; Kim, Myeong Jin

    2010-01-01

    Ansa pancreatica is a rare type of pancreatic ductal variation. Recently, ansa pancreatic has been considered as a predisposing factor in patients with idiopathic acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, no previously published report in Korea has described ansa pancreatica. We report a case of acute recurrent pancreatitis with ansa pancreatica, which was revealed on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

  1. Genetic Causes of Recurrent Pregnancy Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Jessica M; Silver, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    Pregnancy loss is one of the most common obstetric complications, affecting over 30% of conceptions. A considerable proportion of losses are due to genetic abnormalities. Indeed, over 50% of early pregnancy losses have been associated with chromosomal abnormalities. Most are due to de novo nondisjunctional events but balanced parental translocations are responsible for a small but important percentage of genetic abnormalities in couples with recurrent pregnancy loss. In the past, assessment of genetic abnormalities was limited to karyotype performed on placental or fetal tissue. However, advances in molecular genetic technology now provide rich genetic information about additional genetic causes of and risk factors for pregnancy loss. In addition, the use of preimplantation genetic testing in couples undergoing in vitro fertilization has the potential to decrease the risk of pregnancy loss from genetic abnormalities. To date, efficacy is uncertain but considerable potential remains. This chapter will review what is known about genetic causes of recurrent pregnancy loss with a focus on novel causes and potential treatments. Remaining knowledge gaps will be highlighted.

  2. Diabetes due to recurrent pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcemia due to primary hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kumar Chakrabarti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia associated with hyperparathyroidism (HPT is not very common. We herein report a case of a 21-year-old woman, who presented with acute pancreatitis. She had a past history of recurrent nephrolithiasis. Subsequent evaluation revealed hypercalcemia (serum calcium: 12.6 mg/dL; low phosphate (2.9 mg/dL with elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH, 156.7 pg/mL and HbA1c (6.9%. Diagnosis of primary HPT (PHPT was made. Recurrent pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia may have resulted in diabetes mellitus.

  3. Epidemiology of Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis: Similarities and Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicado, Jorge D; Yadav, Dhiraj

    2017-07-01

    Emerging data in the past few years suggest that acute, recurrent acute (RAP), and chronic pancreatitis (CP) represent a disease continuum. This review discusses the similarities and differences in the epidemiology of RAP and CP. RAP is a high-risk group, comprised of individuals at varying risk of progression. The premise is that RAP is an intermediary stage in the pathogenesis of CP, and a subset of RAP patients during their natural course transition to CP. Although many clinical factors have been identified, accurately predicting the probability of disease course in individual patients remains difficult. Future studies should focus on providing more precise estimates of the risk of disease transition in a cohort of patients, quantification of clinical events during the natural course of disease, and discovery of biomarkers of the different stages of the disease continuum. Availability of clinically relevant endpoints and linked biomarkers will allow more accurate prediction of the natural course of disease over intermediate- or long-term-based characteristics of an individual patient. These endpoints will also provide objective measures for use in clinical trials of interventions that aim to alter the natural course of disease.

  4. Acute pancreatitis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: an unusual etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Lacasa, Teresa; Duarte Borges, María Alejandra; García Marín, Alicia; Gómez Cuervo, Covadonga

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that the most important etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and alcohol consumption. Once these causes have been ruled out, especially in young adults, it is important to consider less frequent etiologic factors such as drugs, trauma, malformations, autoimmunity or systemic diseases. Other rare and less well studied causes of this pathology are infections, among which Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been reported to cause acute pancreatitis as an unusual extrapulmonary manifestation. Here, we report the case of a 21-year-old patient who had acute idiopathic pancreatitis associated with an upper respiratory tract infection. After an in-depth study, all other causes of pancreatitis were ruled out and Mycoplasma was established as the clinical etiology.

  5. Surgical treatment of pancreas divisum causing chronic pancreatitis: the outcome benefits of duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, W; Rau, B M; Poch, B; Beger, H G

    2005-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) represents a duct anomaly in the pancreatic head ducts, leading frequently leading to recurrent acute pancreatitis (rAP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). Based on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, pancreas divisum can be found in 1% to 6% of patients with pancreatitis. The correlation of this abnormality with pancreatic disease is an issue of continuing controversy. Because of the underlying duct anomalies and major pathomorphological changes in the pancreatic head, duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) offers an option for causal treatment. Thirty-six patients with pancreatitis caused by PD were treated surgically. Thirty patients suffered from CP, 6 from rAP. The mean duration of the disease was 47.5 and 49.8 months, respectively. The age at the time of surgery was 39.2 years in the CP group, and 27.6 years in the rAP group. Median hospitalization since diagnosis was 18.8 weeks for CP patients and 24.6 weeks for rAP patients. Previous procedures performed in these patients included endoscopic papillotomy (30%), duct stenting (14%), and surgical treatment (17%). The median preoperative pain score was 8 on a visual analog scale. According to the classification of pancreas divisum, 10 patients demonstrated a complete PD, 25 had a functionally incomplete PD, and 1 had a dorsal duct type. The pain status as well as the endocrine (oral glucose tolerance test) and exocrine (pancreolauryl test) function were evaluated preoperatively and early and late postoperatively with a median follow-up time of 39.3 months. There was no operative-related mortality. The follow-up was 100%; 4 patients died (1 from suicide, 1 from cardiac arrest, and 2 from cancer of the esophagus). Fifty percent of the patients were completely pain-free, 31% had a significant reduction of pain with a median pain score of 2 (P pancreatitis with a need for hospitalization. DPPHR reduced pain and preserved the endocrine function in the majority of patients

  6. A SEVERE CASE OF ACUTE NECROTIC PANCREATITIS CAUSED BY DUODENAL CYST DUPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Constantinescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Duodenal duplication cyst (DDC is a rare congenital malformation that appears in the embryonic development of the digestive tract. It is a benign condition usually diagnosed in infancy and early childhood, being a rare and difficult diagnosis in adult population. DDC is a recognized cause of duodenal obstruction, acute pancreatitis, obstructive jaundice and even digestive hemorrhage. Case presentation. We report the case of a young adult male with abdominal pain history, who presents with recurrent episodes of acute severe necrotic pancreatitis. The abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a Balthazar C necrotic pancreatitis with partial thrombosis of the splenic vein and a cystic mass in the second part of the duodenum. The endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS established that the duodenal cystic lesion came from the second layer, meaning the submucosa. We performed endoscopic cystotomy with complete evacuation of the fluid content into the duodenum, with favorable clinical outcome. Conclusions. The particularity of the case is represented by the low incidence of this pathology and the rare form of presentation, meaning acute pancreatitis probably from pancreatic ductular hypertension caused by the DDC.

  7. Role of genetic disorders in acute recurrent pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Keim, Volker

    2008-01-01

    There was remarkable progress in the understanding of the role genetic risk factors in chronic pancreatitis. These factors seem to be much more important than thought in the past. The rare autosomal-dominant mutations N29I and R122H of PRSS1 (cationic trypsinogen) as well as the variant N34S of SPINK1 (pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor) are associated to a disease onset in childhood or youth. Compared to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis the progression is slow so that for a long time only ...

  8. Recurrent acute pancreatitis and cholangitis in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Yazdanpanah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is an inherited disorder associated with multiple cyst formation in the different organs. Development of pancreatic cyst in ADPKD is often asymptomatic and is associated with no complication. A 38-year-old man with ADPKD was presented with six episodes of acute pancreatitis and two episodes of cholangitis in a period of 12 months. Various imaging studies revealed multiple renal, hepatic and pancreatic cysts, mild ectasia of pancreatic duct, dilation of biliary system and absence of biliary stone. He was managed with conservative treatment for each attack. ADPKD should be considered as a potential risk factor for recurrent acute and/or chronic pancreatitis and cholangitis.

  9. Total pancreatectomy and autoislet transplant for chronic recurrent pancreatitis in a 5-year-old boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheed Merani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Childhood chronic pancreatitis is a rare disorder, which can lead to a chronically debilitating condition. The etiology of recurrent hereditary pancreatitis, which previously was classified as idiopathic, has now been attributed in certain cases to specific genetic mutations including abnormalities in the PRSS gene. We describe here the use of total pancreatectomy and autoislet transplant in a 5-year-old with chronic pancreatitis. This represents the youngest patient undergoing the procedure at our institution. The early successful outcomes for this patient, both of symptom relief and glycemic control are detailed.

  10. Systematic review on the treatment of isolated local recurrence of pancreatic cancer after surgery; re-resection, chemoradiotherapy and SBRT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Vincent P.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Rombouts, Steffi J. E.; Hagendoorn, Jeroen; Borel Rinkes, Inne H. M.; van Vulpen, Marco; Herman, Joseph M.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Besselink, Marc G.; Molenaar, I. Quintus

    2017-01-01

    The majority of patients who have undergone a pancreatic resection for pancreatic cancer develop disease recurrence within two years. In around 30% of these patients, isolated local recurrence (ILR) is found. The aim of this study was to systematically review treatment options for this subgroup of

  11. Systematic review on the treatment of isolated local recurrence of pancreatic cancer after surgery; re-resection, chemoradiotherapy and SBRT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Vincent P.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Rombouts, Steffi J E; Hagendoorn, Jeroen; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; van Vulpen, Marco; Herman, Joseph M.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Besselink, Marc G.; Molenaar, I. Quintus

    Background: The majority of patients who have undergone a pancreatic resection for pancreatic cancer develop disease recurrence within two years. In around 30% of these patients, isolated local recurrence (ILR) is found. The aim of this study was to systematically review treatment options for this

  12. Causal Evaluation of Acute Recurrent and Chronic Pancreatitis in Children: Consensus From the INSPPIRE Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariepy, Cheryl E; Heyman, Melvin B; Lowe, Mark E; Pohl, John F; Werlin, Steven L; Wilschanski, Michael; Barth, Bradley; Fishman, Douglas S; Freedman, Steven D; Giefer, Matthew J; Gonska, Tanja; Himes, Ryan; Husain, Sohail Z; Morinville, Veronique D; Ooi, Chee Y; Schwarzenberg, Sarah J; Troendle, David M; Yen, Elizabeth; Uc, Aliye

    2017-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) have been diagnosed in children at increasing rates during the past decade. As pediatric ARP and CP are still relatively rare conditions, little quality evidence is available on which to base the diagnosis and determination of etiology. The aim of the study was to review the current state of the literature regarding the etiology of these disorders and to developed a consensus among a panel of clinically active specialists caring for children with these disorders to help guide the diagnostic evaluation and identify areas most in need of future research. A systematic review of the literature was performed and scored for quality, followed by consensus statements developed and scored by each individual in the group for level of agreement and strength of the supporting data using a modified Delphi method. Scores were analyzed for the level of consensus achieved by the group. The panel reached consensus on 27 statements covering the definitions of pediatric ARP and CP, evaluation for potential etiologies of these disorders, and long-term monitoring. Statements for which the group reached consensus to make no recommendation or could not reach consensus are discussed. This consensus helps define the minimal diagnostic evaluation and monitoring of children with ARP and CP. Even in areas in which we reached consensus, the quality of the evidence is weak, highlighting the need for further research. Improved understanding of the underlying cause will facilitate treatment development and targeting.

  13. [Severe hypertriglyceridemia--an important cause of pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graesdal, Asgeir

    2008-05-01

    Moderate hypertriglyceridaemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and serious hypertriglyceridaemia, with triglyceride values above 10 mmol/L, increases the risk of pancreatitis. Gallstones and alcohol abuse are regarded as the two most important causes of acute pancreatitis, but the considerable risk posed by hypertriglyceridaemia has probably been underrated. It is therefore crucial to acquire updated knowledge and awareness of the fact that high levels of triglycerides can cause pancreatitis. This article is based on current literature retrieved though a search on the topic and clinical experience. Serious hypertriglyceridaemia is a relatively rare condition and its usual cause is genetic predisposition combined with obesity, diabetes or alcohol abuse. Certain types of medication, as well as pregnancy, are also well known causes. Current literature suggests that hypertriglyceridaemia is the cause of pancreatitis in 1-38% of the cases--a substantial variation. The condition is often accompanied by low amylase values and may therefore be underrated as a cause. Our case reports illustrate that the etiology is complex. Plasmapheresis or LDL-apheresis may be indicated when conservative treatment proves insufficient.

  14. Pancreatic Calculus Causing Biliary Obstruction: Endoscopic Therapy for a Rare Initial Presentation of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anurag J; Pai, C Ganesh; Shetty, Shiran; Balaraju, Girisha

    2015-09-01

    Biliary obstruction in chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) is often caused by inflammatory or fibrotic strictures of the bile duct, carcinoma of head of pancreas or less commonly by compression from pseudocysts. Pancreatic calculi causing ampullary obstruction and leading to obstructive jaundice is extremely rare. The medical records of all patients with CCP or biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) over 4 years between 2010-2014 at Kasturba Medical College, Manipal were analyzed. Five patients of CCP with impacted pancreatic calculi at the ampulla demonstrated during ERCP were identified. All 5 presented with biliary obstruction and were incidentally detected to have CCP when evaluated for the same; 3 patients had features of cholangitis. All the patients were managed successfully by endoscopic papillotomy and extraction of pancreatic calculi from the ampulla with resolution of biliary obstruction. Pancreatic calculus causing ampullary obstruction, though very rare, should be considered as a possibility in patients with CCP complicated by biliary obstruction. Endoscopic therapy is affective in the resolution of biliary obstruction in such patients.

  15. Causes of recurrent pneumonia in children in a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, M F Paulien; Brand, Paul L P

    2013-03-01

    Because the few previous studies on underlying causes of recurrent pneumonia in children have come from tertiary care referral centres where selection bias may be important, the aim of this study was to examine underlying causes of recurrent pneumonia in children in a general hospital. We performed a retrospective chart review in a general hospital of 62 children with recurrent pneumonia over a 7.5 years period. In 19 patients (30.6%), no cause was identified, commonly because favourable natural history obviated the need for a full and invasive diagnostic work-up. Other underlying causes included recurrent aspiration in 16 patients (25.7%), lung disease (airway stenosis, bronchiectasis, middle lobe syndrome or tracheooesophageal fistula) in 10 patients (16.1%) and immune deficiency in 10 patients (16.1%). In contrast to previous studies, asthma was never diagnosed as an underlying cause, but diagnostic confusion between asthma (or recurrent upper respiratory tract infections) and recurrent pneumonia was common. The cause of recurrent pneumonia in children remains elusive in almost a third of patients, partly because the favourable natural history consistent with immune system maturation eliminates the need for further diagnostic procedures. Asthma is more likely a differential diagnostic consideration than an underlying cause of recurrent pneumonia in children. A standardised diagnostic guideline is needed to improve knowledge on causes of recurrent pneumonia in children. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  16. Systematic review on the role of serum tumor markers in the detection of recurrent pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daamen, Lois A; Groot, Vincent P; Heerkens, Hanne D; Intven, Martijn P W; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Molenaar, I Quintus

    2018-04-01

    Biomarker testing can be helpful to monitor disease progression after resection of pancreatic cancer. This systematic review aims to give an overview of the literature on the diagnostic value of serum tumor markers for the detection of recurrent pancreatic cancer during follow-up. A systematic search was performed to 2 October 2017. All studies reporting on the diagnostic value of postoperatively measured serum biomarkers for the detection of pancreatic cancer recurrence were included. Data on diagnostic accuracy of tumor markers were extracted. Forest plots and pooled values of sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Four articles described test results of CA 19-9. A pooled sensitivity and specificity of respectively 0.73 (95% CI 0.66-0.80) and 0.83 (95% CI 0.73-0.91) were calculated. One article reported on CEA, showing a sensitivity of 50% and specificity of 65%. No other serum tumor markers were discussed for surveillance purposes in the current literature. Although testing of serum CA 19-9 has considerable limitations, CA 19-9 remains the most used serum tumor marker for surveillance after surgical resection of pancreatic cancer. Further studies are needed to assess the role of serum tumor marker testing in the detection of recurrent pancreatic cancer and to optimize surveillance strategies. Copyright © 2017 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Groove Pancreatitis with Biliary and Duodenal Stricture: An Unusual Cause of Obstructive Jaundice

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    Marta Gravito-Soares

    2016-05-01

    Discussion: Groove pancreatitis is a benign cause of obstructive jaundice, whose main differential diagnosis is duodenal or pancreatic neoplasia. When this condition causes duodenal or biliary stricture, surgical treatment can be necessary.

  18. Defining a Therapeutic Program for Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis Patients with Unknown Etiology

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    Vincenzo Neri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim To define a therapeutic program for mild-moderate acute pancreatitis (AP, often recurrent, which at the end of the diagnostic process remains of undefined etiology. Material and Methods In the period 2011-2012, we observed 64 cases of AP: 52 mild-moderate, 12 severe; biliary 39, biliary in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis 5, unexplained recurrent 20. The clinical and instrumental evaluation of the 20 cases of unexplained AP showed 6 patients with biliary sludge, 4 microlithiasis, 4 sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, and 6 cases that remained undefined. Results Among 20 patients with recurrent, unexplained AP at initial etiological assessment, we performed 10 video laparo cholecystectomies (VLCs, 2 open cholecystectomies and 4 endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography/endoscopic sphincterotomies (ERCP/ES in patients who had undergone previous cholecystectomy; 4 patients refused surgery. Among these 20 patients, 6 had AP that remained unexplained after second-level imaging investigations. For these patients, 4 VLCs and 2 ERCP/ES were performed. Follow-up after six months was negative for further recurrence. Conclusion The recurrence of unexplained acute pancreatitis could be treated with empirical cholecystectomy and/or ERCP/ES in cases of previous cholecystectomy.

  19. An unusual cause for recurrent chest infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lobo, Ronstan

    2012-10-01

    We present a case of an elderly non-smoking gentleman who, since 2005, had been admitted multiple times for recurrent episodes of shortness of breath, wheeze, cough and sputum. The patient was treated as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and\\/or lower respiratory tract infections. Bronchoscopy was done which revealed multiple hard nodules in the trachea and bronchi with posterior tracheal wall sparing. Biopsies confirmed this as tracheopathia osteochondroplastica (TO). He had increasing frequency of admission due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and pseudomonas infections, which failed to clear despite intravenous, prolonged oral and nebulised antibiotics. The patient developed increasing respiratory distress and respiratory failure. The patient died peacefully in 2012. This case report highlights the typical pathological and radiological findings of TO and the pitfalls of misdiagnosing patients with recurrent chest infections as COPD.

  20. Hormonal causes of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluchino, Nicola; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis; Wenger, Jean Marie; Petignat, Patrick; Streuli, Isabelle; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disorders play a major role in approximately 8% to 12% of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). Indeed, the local hormonal milieu is crucial in both embryo attachment and early pregnancy. Endocrine abnormalities, including thyroid disorders, luteal phase defects, polycystic ovary syndrome, hyperprolactinaemia and diabetes have to be evaluated in any case of RPL. Moreover, elevated androgen levels and some endocrinological aspects of endometriosis are also factors contributing to RPL. In the present article, we review the significance of endocrine disease on RPL.

  1. Recurrent pancreatitis secondary to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: case report

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    Jeannette Calzadilla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La disfunción del esfínter de Oddi es una patología poco frecuente que es causa de aproximadamente el 20% de las pancreatitis recurrentes idiopáticas. Para sospechar de su existencia es obligatorio haber descartado todas las otras causas de pancreatitis aguda. Luego, sobre la base de la historia clínica, exámenes de laboratorio y estudio con imágenes, se debe realizar una clasificación del tipo de disfunción. Según ello, es necesario llevar a cabo una manometría, considerada el gold estándar para el diagnóstico, y guiar el método de tratamiento, siendo el de elección la esfinterotomía endoscópica. En el presente artículo se discute un caso de pancreatitis recurrente, que luego de un minucioso estudio, y habiendo descartado otras etiologías, se diagnosticó como causa la disfunción del esfínter de Oddi tipo pancreática. Se resolvió mediante esfinterotomía endoscópica, presentando una evolución favorable y sin recurrencia de la sintomatología.

  2. Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis as A Manifestation of Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction

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    Ira Laurentika

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP is defined as two or more occurance of acute pancreatitis with no evidence of underlying chronic pancreatitis. Prevalence of RAP varied from 10-30%. One of the postulated mechanism of this condition is sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD which is a clinical biliary pain syndrome or acute pancreatitis (AP due to pancreatobiliary obstruction at the level of sphincter of Oddi. We reported a 29-year-old female patient who came to Cipto Mangunkusomo Hospital regarding upper quadrant abdominal pain with previously well documented history of AP in the last six months before admission. Laboratory findings showed elevated pancreatic enzyme level which was consistent with AP. The patient underwent magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS examination and both of the results showed dilatation of pancreatic duct which suggested SOD. Due to the lack of further diagnostic modality, manometry was not performed on this patient. However, after excluding other possible etiology of SOD, the patient underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pamcreatograhy (ERCP and sphincterotomy was performed. The signs and symptoms of AP was relieved after sphincterotomy and not yet recurred.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Progressive and Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer after Prior Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Sutera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionPancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive malignancy that has consistently demonstrated poor outcomes despite aggressive treatments. Despite multimodal treatment, local disease progression and local recurrence are common. Management of recurrent or progressive pancreatic carcinomas proves a further challenge. In patients previously treated with radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is a promising modality capable of delivering high dose to the tumor while limiting dose to critical structures. We aimed to determine the feasibility and tolerability of SBRT for recurrent or local pancreatic cancer in patients previously treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT.Materials and methodsPatients treated with EBRT who developed recurrent or local pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with SBRT reirradiation at our institution, from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed. Our primary endpoints included overall survival (OS, local control, regional control, and late grade 3+ radiation toxicity. Endpoints were analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method. The association of these survival endpoints with risk factors was studied with univariate Cox proportional hazards models.ResultsWe identified 38 patients with recurrent/progressive pancreatic cancer treated with SBRT following prior radiation therapy. Prior radiation was delivered to a median dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. SBRT was delivered to a median dose of 24.5 Gy in 1–3 fractions. Surgical resection was performed on 55.3% of all patients. Within a median follow-up of 24.4 months (inter-quartile range, 14.9–32.7 months, the median OS from diagnosis for the entire cohort was 26.6 months (95% CI: 20.3–29.8 with 2-year OS of 53.0%. Median survival from SBRT was 9.7 months (95% CI, 5.5–13.8. The 2-year freedom from local progression and regional progression was 58 and 82%, respectively. For the entire cohort, 18.4 and 10.5% experienced late grade 2

  4. Mesenteric lipoma causing recurrent intestinal obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-12

    Jan 12, 2013 ... vomiting, constipation, and central abdominal mass. ... Mesenteric lipoma may cause abdominal pain by complete intestinal .... Kaniklides C, Frykberg T, Lundkvist K. Pediatric mesenteric lipoma: An unusual cause of repeated ...

  5. Sjogren's Syndrome: Can It Cause Recurrent UTIs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sjogren's syndrome last year, I've had three urinary tract infections. Is there any evidence that Sjogren's syndrome causes ... cause symptoms that you might mistake for a urinary tract infection (UTI). Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disorder in ...

  6. Dual-energy perfusion-CT in recurrent pancreatic cancer. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, F.; Skornitzke, S.; Kauczor, H.U.; Stiller, W.; Klauss, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Clinic of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Hackert, T. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Clinic of Surgery; Grenacher, L. [Diagnostik Muenchen (Germany). Diagnostic Imaging Center

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of dual energy (DE) perfusion-CT for the differentiation between postoperative soft-tissue formation and tumor recurrence in patients after potentially curative pancreatic cancer resection. 24 patients with postoperative soft-tissue formation in the conventional regular follow-up CT acquisition after pancreatic cancer resection with curative intent were included prospectively. They were examined with a 64-row dual-source CT using a dynamic sequence of 34 DE acquisitions every 1.5 s (80 ml of iodinated contrast material, 370 mg/ml, flow rate 5 ml/s). Weighted average (linearly blended M0.5) 120 kVp-equivalent dual-energy perfusion image data sets were evaluated with a body-perfusion CT tool for estimating blood flow, permeability, and blood volume. Diagnosis was confirmed by histological study (n=4) and by regular follow-up. Final diagnosis was local recurrence of pancreatic cancer in 15 patients and unspecific postoperative tissue formation in 9 patients. The blood-flow values for recurrence tissue trended to be lower compared to postoperative tissue formation with 16.6 ml/100 ml/min and 24.7 ml/100 ml/min, respectively for weighted average 120 kVp-equivalent image data, which was not significant (n.s.) (p=0.06, significance level 0.05). Permeability- and blood-volume values were only slightly lower in recurrence tissue (n.s.). DE perfusion-CT is feasible in patients after pancreatic cancer resection and a promising functional imaging technique. As only a trend for lower perfusion values in local recurrence compared to unspecific postoperative alterations was found, the perfusion differences are not yet sufficient to differentiate between malignancy and unspecific postoperative alterations for this new technique. Further studies and technical improvements are needed to generate reliable data for this clinically highly relevant differentiation.

  7. Mutations of the cystic fibrosis gene, but not cationic trypsinogen gene, are associated with recurrent or chronic idiopathic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockenga, J; Stuhrmann, M; Ballmann, M; Teich, N; Keim, V; Dörk, T; Manns, M P

    2000-08-01

    We investigated whether mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and cationic trypsinogen gene are associated with recurrent acute, or chronic idiopathic pancreatitis. Twenty patients with idiopathic pancreatitis (11 women, nine men; mean age, 30 yr) were studied for the presence of a CFTR mutation by screening the genomic DNA for more than 30 mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. Selected mutations of the cationic trypsinogen gene were screened by Afl III restriction digestion or by a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In each patient exons 1, 2, and 3 of the cationic trypsinogen gene were sequenced. Patients with a CFTR mutation underwent evaluation of further functional electrophysiological test (intestinal current measurement). No mutation of the cationic trypsinogen gene was detected. A CFTR mutation was detected in 6/20 (30.0%) patients. Three patients (15.0%) had a cystic fibrosis (CF) mutation on one chromosome (deltaF508, I336K, Y1092X), which is known to cause phenotypical severe cystic fibrosis. One patient was heterozygous for the 5T allele. In addition, two possibly predisposing CFTR variants (R75Q, 1716G-->A) were detected on four patients, one of these being a compound heterozygous for the missense mutation I336K and R75Q. No other family member (maternal I336K; paternal R75Q; sister I1336K) developed pancreatitis. An intestinal current measurement in rectum samples of patients with a CFTR mutation revealed no CF-typical constellations. CFTR mutations are associated with recurrent acute, or chronic idiopathic pancreatitis, whereas mutations of the cationic trypsinogen mutation do not appear to be a frequent pathogenetic factor.

  8. An unusual cause of recurrent bloody tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasneem F Alhaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a female patient who presented with watering followed by swelling in the left infraorbital area of 5 years duration. She had previously been prescribed topical antibiotics on several occasions with no improvement. On pressure over the swelling, there was blood-tinged discharge from the left eye and nostril. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing, well-defined mass lesion in the inferomedial aspect of the left orbit, likely of nasolacrimal origin. Computed tomography dacryocystogram with three-dimensional reconstruction showed a well-circumscribed mass with an irregular surface, originating from the lacrimal sac. Gram staining and potassium hydroxide mount from the regurgitant fluid revealed thick-walled cysts with sporangia suggestive of Rhinosporidium seeberi infection. Excision biopsy of the lesion confirmed R. seeberi as the causative agent. The patient has been put on long-term dapsone therapy to prevent a recurrence and has been asked to follow-up 6 months later.

  9. Total pancreatectomy for recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis: a critical review of patient selection criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghih, Mahya; Gonzalez, Francisco Garcia; Makary, Martin A.; Singh, Vikesh K.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review Critical review of the indications for total pancreatectomy and highlight limitations in current diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Recent findings The diagnosis of noncalcific chronic pancreatitis remains controversial because of an overreliance on nonspecific imaging and laboratories findings. Endoscopic ultrasound, s-magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and/or endoscopic pancreatic function testing are often used to diagnose noncalcific chronic pancreatitis despite the fact that there is no gold standard for this condition. Abdominal pain is not specific for chronic pancreatitis and is more likely to be encountered in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders based on the high incidence of these conditions. The duration of pain and opioid analgesic use results in central sensitization that adversely affects pain outcomes after total pancreatectomy. An alcoholic cause is associated with poorer pain outcomes after total pancreatectomy. Summary The lack of a gold standard for noncalcific chronic pancreatitis limits the diagnostic accuracy of imaging and laboratory tests. The pain of chronic pancreatitis is nonspecific and is affected by duration, preoperative opioid use, and cause. These factors will need to be considered in the development of future selection criteria for this morbid surgery. PMID:28700371

  10. The endoscopic ultrasound-assisted Rendez-Vous technique for treatment of recurrent pancreatitis due to pancreas divisum and ansa pancreatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio López-Durán

    Full Text Available Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic ductal malformations causing recurrent acute pancreatitis, such as pancreas divisum or ansa pancreatica, is mainly based on the sphincterotomy of the minor papilla. However, the technical complexity of conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP is increased in patients presenting anatomical variants like these and it may be unsuccessful. We report the case of a pancreas divisum combined with ansa pancreatica and describe the cannulation and sphincterotomy of the minor papilla using an ultrasound-assisted Rendez-Vous technique.

  11. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  12. Burkitt's lymphoma causing acute pancreatitis in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Akıl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 8-year-old boy admitted with abdominal pain, fever and vomiting for the previous 10 days. Sensitivity was detected in the epigastric area. There was not defense and rebond. Aspartate aminotransferase was 106 U/L, alanine aminotransferase 25 U/L, alkaline phosphatase 311 U/L, blood amylase level 748 U/L, blood lipase level 391 U/L. In thoracic CT, soft tissue with smooth contours measuring 32 mm×28 mm was identified in the posterior mediastinum. Bone marrow aspiration biopsy was normal. A mass specimen obtained from the duodenum endoscopic biopsy. This specimen was diffuse staining by leukocyte common antigen, CD10 and CD20. The patient was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis associated with stage 3 duodenal Burkitt's lymphoma. Modified LMB-98 was initiated. Burkitt's lymphoma may rarely cause acute pancreatitis.

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Arising From the Remnant Pancreas: Is It a Local Recurrence or New Primary Lesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Daisuke; Chikamoto, Akira; Masuda, Toshiro; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Imai, Katsunori; Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Reber, Howard A; Baba, Hideo

    2017-10-01

    Local recurrence of pancreatic cancer (PC) can occur in the pancreatic remnant. In addition, new primary PC can develop in the remnant. There are limited data available regarding this so-called remnant PC. The aim of this review was to describe the characteristics and therapeutic strategy regarding remnant PC. A literature search was performed using Medline published in English according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The incidence of remnant PC has been reported to be 3% to 5%. It is difficult to distinguish local recurrence from new primary PC. Genetic diagnosis such as Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog mutation may resolve this problem. For patients with remnant PC, repeated pancreatectomy can be performed. Residual total pancreatectomy is the most common procedure. Recent studies have described the safety of the operation because of recent surgical progress and perioperative care. The patients with remnant PC without distant metastasis have shown good long-term outcomes, especially those who underwent repeated pancreatectomy. Adjuvant chemotherapy may contribute to longer survival. In conclusion, this review found that both local recurrence and new primary PC can develop in the pancreatic remnant. Repeated pancreatectomy for the remnant PC is a feasible procedure and can prolong patient survival.

  14. Recurrence of Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor: A Rare Pancreatic Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Punch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas (SPTP is a rare disease of young females that does not usually recur after resection. Here we report a case of an elderly female with history of SPTP ten years ago who presented with anorexia and a palpable left lower quadrant abdominal mass. Imaging revealed metastatic disease and US-guided biopsy of the liver confirmed the diagnosis of SPTP. Due to her advanced age and comorbidities, she elected to undergo hospice care. The objective of this case report is to increase awareness of this tumor and its possibility of recurrence, necessitating further guidelines for follow-up.

  15. Analysis of cystic fibrosis gener product (CFTR) function in patients with pancreas divisum and recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelrud, Andres; Sheth, Sunil; Banerjee, Subhas; Weed, Deborah; Shea, Julie; Chuttani, Ram; Howell, Douglas A; Telford, Jennifer J; Carr-Locke, David L; Regan, Meredith M; Ellis, Lynda; Durie, Peter R; Freedman, Steven D

    2004-08-01

    The mechanism by which pancreas divisum may lead to recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis in a subset of individuals is unknown. Abnormalities of the cystic fibrosis gene product (CFTR) have been implicated in the genesis of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to determine if CFTR function is abnormal in patients with pancreas divisum and recurrent acute pancreatitis (PD/RAP). A total of 69 healthy control subjects, 12 patients with PD/RAP, 16 obligate heterozygotes with a single CFTR mutation, and 95 patients with cystic fibrosis were enrolled. CFTR function was analyzed by nasal transepithelial potential difference testing in vivo. The outcomes of the PD/RAP patients following endoscopic and surgical treatments were concomitantly analyzed. Direct measurement of CFTR function in nasal epithelium in response to isoproterenol demonstrated that the values for PD/RAP were intermediate between those observed for healthy controls and cystic fibrosis patients. The median value was 13 mV for PD/RAP subjects, which was statistically different from healthy controls (22 mV, p= 0.001) and cystic fibrosis pancreatic sufficient (-1 mV, p < 0.0001) and pancreatic insufficient (-3 mV, p < 0.0001) patients. These results suggest a link between CFTR dysfunction and recurrent acute pancreatitis in patients with pancreas divisum and may explain why a subset of patients with pancreas divisum develops recurrent acute pancreatitis. Copyright 2004 American College of Gastroenterology

  16. [Recurrent clinical mastitis in dairy cattle - importance and causes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, A-S; Zoche-Golob, V; Paduch, J-H; Hoedemaker, M; Krömker, V

    2014-01-01

    Clinical mastitis as a frequently recurrent event can cause substantive economic loss on dairy farms. The reason for recurrent mastitis can be either a persistent infection of the bovine mammary gland by a mastitis pathogen or a reinfection of a quarter or udder after bacteriological cure. The virulence properties of a mastitis pathogen and the cure odds of an individual cow determine the development of persistent infections. Clinical episodes may alternate with periods without symptoms in the course of persistent infections. Strategies to reduce cases of recurrent mastitis have to include improved treatment concepts and measures to decrease new infection rates. The present literature review summarises the knowledge of definitions, frequencies, causes and effects of recurrent mastitis.

  17. Recurrent Pregnancy Loss: Generally Accepted Causes and Their Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Jennifer; Branch, D Ware

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL), commonly defined as 3 consecutive losses causes include uterine malformation, antiphospholipid syndrome, and parental chromosomal abnormalities; however, the majority of RPL cases are idiopathic (up to 75%). This chapter covers these accepted causes of RPL and provides diagnosis and management strategies for patients falling within the above categories.

  18. Completion pancreatectomy for recurrent pancreatic cancer in the remnant pancreas: report of six cases and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Yasuo; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Kozuki, Akihito; Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Tokumaru, Teppei; Saisaka, Yuichi; Date, Keiichi; Iwata, Jun

    2015-12-01

    There are no accepted surgical strategies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer recurrence in the remnant pancreas after initial resection. We retrospectively analyzed our experiences with patients undergoing completion pancreatectomy for recurrent pancreatic cancer in the remnant pancreas. Six patients with recurrent pancreatic cancer in the remnant pancreas underwent completion pancreatectomy between March 2005 and December 2012. Operative, postoperative, and pathological data and long-term outcomes for these six patients were analyzed retrospectively. There was no operative morbidity or mortality associated with completion pancreatectomy. The median survival times were 49.0 and 27.5 months after initial resection and second pancreatectomy, respectively. However, all six patients died during follow-up. Five patients had recurrent pancreatic cancer at the time of death. One patient had no recurrence but had poor blood sugar control and eventually died after repeated bouts of cholangitis. Completion pancreatectomy is a safe and effective option in select patients with local pancreatic cancer recurrence in the remnant pancreas after initial pancreatectomy. It is essential to select patients who have a good performance status and can tolerate major surgery and the resultant apancreatic state.

  19. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeytunlu Murat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  20. Multicenter Approach to Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis in the United States: The North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, David C.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Adam, Slivka; Hawes, Robert H.; Brand, Randall E.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Money, Mary E.; Banks, Peter A.; Bishop, Michele D.; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; DiSario, James; Burton, Frank R.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Gelrud, Andres; Lo, Simon K.; DeMeo, Mark T.; Steinberg, William M.; Kochman, Michael L.; Etemad, Babak; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Elinoff, Beth; Greer, Julia B.; O’Connell, Michael; Lamb, Janette; Barmada, M. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are complex syndromes associated with numerous etiologies, clinical variables and complications. We developed the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2) to be sufficiently powered to understand the complex environmental, metabolic and genetic mechanisms underlying RAP and CP. Methods Between August 2000 and September 2006, a consortium of 20 expert academic and private sites prospectively ascertained 1,000 human subjects with RAP or CP, plus 695 controls (spouse, family, friend or unrelated). Standardized questionnaires were completed by both the physicians and study subjects and blood was drawn for genomic DNA and biomarker studies. All data were double-entered into a database and systematically reviewed to minimize errors and include missing data. Results A total of 1,000 subjects (460 RAP, 540 CP) and 695 controls who completed consent forms and questionnaires and donated blood samples comprised the final dataset. Data were organized according to diagnosis, supporting documentation, etiological classification, clinical signs and symptoms (including pain patterns and duration, and quality of life), past medical history, family history, environmental exposures (including alcohol and tobacco use), medication use and therapeutic interventions. Upon achieving the target enrollment, data were organized and classified to facilitate future analysis. The approaches, rationale and datasets are described, along with final demographic results. Conclusion The NAPS2 consortium has successfully completed a prospective ascertainment of 1,000 subjects with RAP and CP from the USA. These data will be useful in elucidating the environmental, metabolic and genetic conditions, and to investigate the complex interactions that underlie RAP and CP. PMID:18765957

  1. The epidemiology of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2013-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes of hospital admission in the United States. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients' quality of life. Pancreatic cancer is associated with a high mortality rate and is one of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect the black population more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter the progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  3. Risk Factors Associated With Pediatric Acute Recurrent and Chronic Pancreatitis: Lessons From INSPPIRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Soma; Ooi, Chee Y; Werlin, Steven; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Barth, Bradley; Bellin, Melena D; Durie, Peter R; Fishman, Douglas S; Freedman, Steven D; Gariepy, Cheryl; Giefer, Matthew J; Gonska, Tanja; Heyman, Melvin B; Himes, Ryan; Husain, Sohail Z; Lin, Tom K; Lowe, Mark E; Morinville, Veronique; Palermo, Joseph J; Pohl, John F; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Troendle, David; Wilschanski, Michael; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Uc, Aliye

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are poorly understood. To characterize and identify risk factors associated with ARP and CP in childhood. A multinational cross-sectional study of children with ARP or CP at the time of enrollment to the INSPPIRE (International Study Group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In Search for a Cure) study at participant institutions of the INSPPIRE Consortium. From August 22, 2012, to February 8, 2015, 155 children with ARP and 146 with CP (aged ≤19 years) were enrolled. Their demographic and clinical information was entered into the REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) database at the 15 centers. Differences were analyzed using 2-sample t test or Wilcoxon rank sum test for continuous variables and Pearson χ2 test or Fisher exact test for categorical variables. Disease burden variables (pain variables, hospital/emergency department visits, missed school days) were compared using Wilcoxon rank sum test. Demographic characteristics, risk factors, abdominal pain, and disease burden. A total of 301 children were enrolled (mean [SD] age, 11.9 [4.5] years; 172 [57%] female); 155 had ARP and 146 had CP. The majority of children with CP (123 of 146 [84%]) reported prior recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis. Sex distribution was similar between the groups (57% female in both). Hispanic children were less likely to have CP than ARP (17% vs 28%, respectively; odds ratio [OR] = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.29-0.92; P = .02). At least 1 gene mutation in pancreatitis-related genes was found in 48% of patients with ARP vs 73% of patients with CP (P toxic/metabolic risk factors were more common in children with ARP (21% overall; 26% in the ARP group and 15% in the CP group; OR = 0.55; 95% CI, 0.31-0.99; P = .046). Pancreatitis-related abdominal pain was a major symptom in 81% of children with ARP or CP within the last year. The disease burden was greater in the CP group compared with the ARP group

  4. Second pancreatectomy for recurrent pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in the remnant pancreas: A pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanming; Song, Ailing; Wu, Lupeng; Si, Xiaoying; Li, Yumin

    The aim of this study was to examine the outcomes of second pancreatectomy for the treatment of recurrent pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in the remnant pancreas. Search of the PubMed database was undertaken to identify relevant English language studies. Pooled individually data were examined for clinical outcomes after second pancreatectomy for recurrent PDAC. A total of 19 articles involving 55 patients were eligible for inclusion. The median disease-free interval after initial resection was 33 (range 7-143) months. Of the 55 patients reported, 52 (94.5%) patients underwent completion total pancreatectomy in the second operation for recurrences, including 15 patients who developed recurrences more than 5 years after the initial operation. There was no perioperative death. The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival rate after the second pancreatectomy was 82.2%, 49.2% and 40.6% respectively. Second pancreatectomy for recurrent PDAC can be performed safely with long-term survival in selected patients. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mutations in LPIN1 cause recurrent acute myoglobinuria in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeharia, Avraham; Shaag, Avraham; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Hindi, Tareq; de Lonlay, Pascale; Erez, Gilli; Hubert, Laurence; Saada, Ann; de Keyzer, Yves; Eshel, Gideon; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent episodes of life-threatening myoglobinuria in childhood are caused by inborn errors of glycogenolysis, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Nonetheless, approximately half of the patients do not suffer from a defect in any of these pathways. Using

  6. Pancreatic Cancer-Derived Exosomes Cause Paraneoplastic β-cell Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javeed, Naureen; Sagar, Gunisha; Dutta, Shamit K; Smyrk, Thomas C; Lau, Julie S; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Truty, Mark; Petersen, Gloria M; Kaufman, Randal J; Chari, Suresh T; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer frequently causes diabetes. We recently proposed adrenomedullin as a candidate mediator of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in pancreatic cancer. How pancreatic cancer-derived adrenomedullin reaches β cells remote from the cancer to induce β-cell dysfunction is unknown. We tested a novel hypothesis that pancreatic cancer sheds adrenomedullin-containing exosomes into circulation, which are transported to β cells and impair insulin secretion. We characterized exosomes from conditioned media of pancreatic cancer cell lines (n = 5) and portal/peripheral venous blood of patients with pancreatic cancer (n = 20). Western blot analysis showed the presence of adrenomedullin in pancreatic cancer-exosomes. We determined the effect of adrenomedullin-containing pancreatic cancer exosomes on insulin secretion from INS-1 β cells and human islets, and demonstrated the mechanism of exosome internalization into β cells. We studied the interaction between β-cell adrenomedullin receptors and adrenomedullin present in pancreatic cancer-exosomes. In addition, the effect of adrenomedullin on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response genes and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species generation in β cells was shown. Exosomes were found to be the predominant extracellular vesicles secreted by pancreatic cancer into culture media and patient plasma. Pancreatic cancer-exosomes contained adrenomedullin and CA19-9, readily entered β cells through caveolin-mediated endocytosis or macropinocytosis, and inhibited insulin secretion. Adrenomedullin in pancreatic cancer exosomes interacted with its receptor on β cells. Adrenomedullin receptor blockade abrogated the inhibitory effect of exosomes on insulin secretion. β cells exposed to adrenomedullin or pancreatic cancer exosomes showed upregulation of ER stress genes and increased reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Pancreatic cancer causes paraneoplastic β-cell dysfunction by shedding adrenomedullin(+)/CA19-9(+) exosomes into

  7. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis. Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson′s disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis.

  8. Duodenal duplication cyst and pancreas divisum causing acute pancreatitis in an adult male

    OpenAIRE

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Pleguezuelo-Díaz, Julio; de Hierro, Mercedes López; Macias-Sánchez, José F; Ubiña, Cristina Viñolo; Martín-Rodríguez, María Del Mar; Teresa-Galván, Javier De

    2010-01-01

    Duodenal duplication cysts are rare congenital abnormalities which are more commonly diagnosed in infancy and childhood. However, in rare cases, these lesions can remain asymptomatic until adulthood. The combination of duplication cyst and pancreas divisum is extremely rare and both conditions have been linked with acute recurrent pancreatitis. We present the case of a 37 years-old patient who presented with repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis. By means of magnetic resonance imaging and e...

  9. Progression of recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis: A short-term follow up study from a southern Indian centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, M Ganesh; Pai, C Ganesh; Kamath, Asha

    2016-11-01

    Little data exist on the progression of recurrent acute (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) from regions from where the entity of tropical chronic pancreatitis was originally described. The study aimed to follow up patients with RAP and CP seen at a southern Indian centre for progression of disease over time. Prospectively enrolled patients with RAP and CP were followed up, and the alcoholic and idiopathic subgroups were assessed for progression of structural and functional changes in the organ. One hundred and forty patients (RAP = 44; 31.4 %, CP = 96; 68.5 %) were followed up over a median 12.2 (interquartile range 12.0-16.8) months. The cause was alcohol in 31 (22.1 %) and not evident in 109 (77.8 %). The disease progressed from RAP to CP in 7 (15.9 %), 6 (16.2 %) out of 37 in the idiopathic and 1 (14.2 %; p = 1.00) out of 7 in the alcoholic subgroups. Three (42.8 %) and 1 (14.2 %) developed steatorrhea and diabetes mellitus (DM), respectively, and 2 (4.5 %) developed calcification. Established CP progressed in 19 (19.7 %), 1 (1.0 %), 5 (5.2 %), 2 (2.0 %) and 11 (11.4 %) newly developed DM, steatorrhea, calcification and duct dilation during follow up. Among the idiopathic and alcoholic CP, disease progression was seen in 15 (20.8 %) out of 72 and 4 (16.6 %) out of 24 respectively. Idiopathic RAP and CP progressed during the short-term follow up. This is similar to other etiological forms of pancreatitis, as described from elsewhere in the world.

  10. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-05-21

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung's and Santorini's ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct.

  12. Systematic review on the treatment of isolated local recurrence of pancreatic cancer after surgery; re-resection, chemoradiotherapy and SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Vincent P; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Rombouts, Steffi J E; Hagendoorn, Jeroen; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; van Vulpen, Marco; Herman, Joseph M; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Besselink, Marc G; Molenaar, I Quintus

    2017-02-01

    The majority of patients who have undergone a pancreatic resection for pancreatic cancer develop disease recurrence within two years. In around 30% of these patients, isolated local recurrence (ILR) is found. The aim of this study was to systematically review treatment options for this subgroup of patients. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library. Studies reporting on the treatment of ILR after initial curative-intent resection of primary pancreatic cancer were included. Primary endpoints were morbidity, mortality and survival after ILR treatment. After screening 1152 studies, 18 studies reporting on 313 patients undergoing treatment for ILR were included. Treatment options for ILR included surgical re-resection (8 studies, 100 patients), chemoradiotherapy (7 studies, 153 patients) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) (4 studies, 60 patients). Morbidity and mortality were reported for re-resection (29% and 1%, respectively), chemoradiotherapy (54% and 0%) and SBRT (3% and 1%). Most patients had a prolonged disease-free interval before recurrence. Median survival after treatment of ILR of up to 32, 19 and 16 months was reported for re-resection, chemoradiotherapy and SBRT, respectively. In selected patients, treatment of ILR following pancreatic resection for pancreatic cancer seems safe, feasible and associated with relatively good survival. Copyright © 2016 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Idiopathic fibrosing pancreatitis: a rare cause of chronic obstructive jaundice in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hye Seong; Kim, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hack Hee; Kim, Ok Hwa; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1992-01-01

    We report a 14-months-old infant who had obstructive jaundice caused by idiopathic fibrosing pancreatitis. Ultrasonography and abdominal computed tomography showed dilatation of the intrahepatic ducts, common bile duct, and the pancreatic duct. Diffuse swelling of the pancreas was also noted on CT. At laparotomy, the head portion of the pancreas revealed a stony hard consistency, and proliferation of fibrotic tissue was confirmed pathologically. Idiopathic fibrosing pancreatitis is a very rare disease entity in childhood, but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of obstructive jaundice in children who demonstrate bile duct and pancreatic duct dilatation and/or diffuse pancreas swelling

  14. Spontaneous Pancreatitis Caused by Tissue-Specific Gene Ablation of Hhex in MiceSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Perturbations in pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion cause chronic pancreatitis. The physiologic mechanism of ductal secretion is known, but its transcriptional control is not. We determine the role of the transcription factor hematopoietically expressed homeobox protein (Hhex in ductal secretion and pancreatitis. Methods: We derived mice with pancreas-specific, Cre-mediated Hhex gene ablation to determine the requirement of Hhex in the pancreatic duct in early life and in adult stages. Histologic and immunostaining analyses were used to detect the presence of pathology. Pancreatic primary ductal cells were isolated to discover differentially expressed transcripts upon acute Hhex ablation on a cell autonomous level. Results: Hhex protein was detected throughout the embryonic and adult ductal trees. Ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors resulted in postnatal ductal ectasia associated with acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a progressive phenotype that ultimately resulted in chronic pancreatitis. Hhex ablation in adult mice, however, did not cause any detectable pathology. Ductal ectasia in young mice did not result from perturbation of expression of Hnf6, Hnf1β, or the primary cilia genes. RNA-seq analysis of Hhex-ablated pancreatic primary ductal cells showed mRNA levels of the G-protein coupled receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 3 (Npr3, implicated in paracrine signaling, up-regulated by 4.70-fold. Conclusions: Although Hhex is dispensable for ductal cell function in the adult, ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors results in pancreatitis. Our data highlight the critical role of Hhex in maintaining ductal homeostasis in early life and support ductal hypersecretion as a novel etiology of pediatric chronic pancreatitis. Keywords: Npr3, Pancreatic Ducts, Primary Cilia

  15. Idiopathic fibrosing pancreatitis: A cause of obstructive jaundice in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, G.O. Jr.; Wyly, J.B.; Gay, B.B. Jr.; Ball, T.I.; Winn, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    Idiopathic fibrosing pancreatitis is a chronic process of unknown etiology characterized by extensive infiltration of the pancreatic parenchyma by fibrous tissue. This disease process is uncommon in the pediatric patient and is consequently rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain and jaundice in the child. The sonographic demonstration of a dilated biliary tree and common bile duct compressed by an enlarged pancreas may be the first suggestion of this entity. Two patients with idiopathic fibrosing pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice are reported with a review of the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings. (orig.)

  16. Idiopathic fibrosing pancreatitis: A cause of obstructive jaundice in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, G.O. Jr.; Wyly, J.B.; Gay, B.B. Jr.; Ball, T.I.; Winn, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    Idiopathic fibrosing pancreatitis is a chronic process of unknown etiology characterized by extensive infiltration of the pancreatic parenchyma by fibrous tissue. This disease process is uncommon in the pediatric patient and is consequently rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain and jaundice in the child. The sonographic demonstration of a dilated biliary tree and common bile duct compressed by an enlarged pancreas may be the first suggestion of this entity. Two patients with idiopathic fibrosing pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice are reported with a review of the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings.

  17. Early-Onset Acute Recurrent and Chronic Pancreatitis Is Associated with PRSS1 or CTRC Gene Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giefer, Matthew J; Lowe, Mark E; Werlin, Steven L; Zimmerman, Bridget; Wilschanski, Michael; Troendle, David; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Pohl, John F; Palermo, Joseph; Ooi, Chee Y; Morinville, Veronique D; Lin, Tom K; Husain, Sohail Z; Himes, Ryan; Heyman, Melvin B; Gonska, Tanja; Gariepy, Cheryl E; Freedman, Steven D; Fishman, Douglas S; Bellin, Melena D; Barth, Bradley; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Uc, Aliye

    2017-07-01

    To assess whether the age of onset was associated with unique features or disease course in pediatric acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). Demographic and clinical information on children with ARP or CP was collected at INSPPIRE (INternational Study Group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In Search for a CuRE) centers. The Cochran-Armitage trend test and Jonckheere-Terpstra test were used to examine for differences between pediatric age groups (pancreatitis, 111 (32%) were 6-11 years of age, and 102 (30%) were ≥12 years of age. Early-onset disease was associated with mutations in cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) (P pancreatitis (P = .02), family history of CP (P chronic renal failure (P = .02). Later-onset disease was more commonly present with hypertriglyceridemia (P = .04), ulcerative colitis (P = .02), autoimmune diseases (P pancreatitis is associated strongly with PRSS1 or CTRC mutations and family history of pancreatitis. Children with later-onset disease are more likely to have nongenetic risk factors. Future studies are needed to investigate whether the disease course, response to therapy, or clinical outcomes differ relative to the timing of disease onset. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Severe reaction in a child with asymptomatic codfish allergy: Food challenge reactivating recurrent pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellegrino Katia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 8-year-old child during the first year of life manifested severe atopic dermatitis and chronic diarrhea with mucorrhea and rectal bleeding; a fish-free diet was started based on weakly positive skin-prick tests to codfish extract. At the age of 4 years the child began to suffer of recurrent pancreatitis. When he came to our attention for the evaluation of his fish allergy, he was asymptomatic; a weak reactivity to codfish was observed (SPTs: cod, 4 mm, sIgE ImmunoCAP: cod, 1.30kU/l. The food challenge test with cod was negative. When the child ate cod again, within 5 minutes, developed anaphylactic reaction and complained of abdominal pain compatible with pancreatitis (enzyme serum levels risen and parenchymal oedema at ultrasonography, that resolved within 7 days after specific therapy. This case raises two issues: the elimination diet in asymptomatic food allergy on the basis only of SPT and the ethicality of food challenge in gastrointestinal chronic disease.

  19. Pancreatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Biradar, Vishnu; Ramaswamy, Ganesh; Srinivas, S; Ashish, B; Sumathi, B; Nirmala, D; Geetha, M

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic disease in children has a wide clinical spectrum and may present as Acute pancreatitis (AP), Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and Pancreatic disease without pancreatitis. This article highlights the etiopathogenesis and management of pancreatitis in children along with clinical data from five tertiary care hospitals in south India [Chennai (3), Cochin and Pune].

  20. Rate of recurrence in Indian patients presenting with acute pancreatitis and identification of chronicity on follow up: Possible risk factors for progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaria, Rishikesh; Abraham, Philip; Desai, Devendra C; Joshi, Anand; Gupta, Tarun

    2018-03-01

    To study the profile and long-term outcome of Indian patients presenting with acute pancreatitis and the possible risk factors for progression. Consecutive patients with acute or recurrent acute pancreatitis seen in our department during July 2013 to December 2014 were included. Details of past episodes were collected and patients were followed up till March 2015. In the 97 patients included (mean age 47.2 [SD 16.9] years; 74 men), gallstones (37 [38.1%]) and alcohol (19 [19.6%]) were the major identified etiologies; the idiopathic (31 [32%]) group constituted a third of patients. Recurrences were more common with idiopathic etiology (14 patients out of 30 had recurrences [46.7%]) as compared to alcoholic (5 out of 19 [26.3%]) and biliary (4 out of 37 [10.8%]) pancreatitis and with mild index episode. Following the episode of acute pancreatitis, identification of chronic pancreatitis was more common with alcoholic (6 out of 18 [33%]) and idiopathic (9 out of 30 [30%]) etiology as compared to other etiologies. Longer duration of follow up, but not number of recurrent episodes, was associated with identification of chronicity in patients presenting as acute pancreatitis. Out of 97 patients with acute pancreatitis, 27 (27.8%) developed recurrences with risk factors being idiopathic etiology and mild index episode. Eighteen of 97 (18.6%) patients had evidence of chronic pancreatitis on follow up, risk factors being the alcoholic and idiopathic varieties, and longer duration of follow up.

  1. Pancreas-specific deletion of mouse Gata4 and Gata6 causes pancreatic agenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Shouhong; Borok, Matthew J.; Decker, Kimberly J.; Battle, Michele A.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Hale, Michael A.; Macdonald, Raymond J.; Sussel, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic agenesis is a human disorder caused by defects in pancreas development. To date, only a few genes have been linked to pancreatic agenesis in humans, with mutations in pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) and pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (PTF1A) reported in only 5 families with described cases. Recently, mutations in GATA6 have been identified in a large percentage of human cases, and a GATA4 mutant allele has been implicated in a single case. In the mouse, Gata4 and Gata6 are expressed in several endoderm-derived tissues, including the pancreas. To analyze the functions of GATA4 and/or GATA6 during mouse pancreatic development, we generated pancreas-specific deletions of Gata4 and Gata6. Surprisingly, loss of either Gata4 or Gata6 in the pancreas resulted in only mild pancreatic defects, which resolved postnatally. However, simultaneous deletion of both Gata4 and Gata6 in the pancreas caused severe pancreatic agenesis due to disruption of pancreatic progenitor cell proliferation, defects in branching morphogenesis, and a subsequent failure to induce the differentiation of progenitor cells expressing carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) and neurogenin 3 (NEUROG3). These studies address the conserved and nonconserved mechanisms underlying GATA4 and GATA6 function during pancreas development and provide a new mouse model to characterize the underlying developmental defects associated with pancreatic agenesis. PMID:23006325

  2. Chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jorg; Whitcomb, David C; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Esposito, Irene; Lerch, Markus M; Gress, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rebours, Vinciane; Akisik, Fatih; Muñoz, J Enrique Domínguez; Neoptolemos, John P

    2017-09-07

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a pathological fibro-inflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathological responses to parenchymal injury or stress. Potential causes can include toxic factors (such as alcohol or smoking), metabolic abnormalities, idiopathic mechanisms, genetics, autoimmune responses and obstructive mechanisms. The pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis is fairly complex and includes acinar cell injury, acinar stress responses, duct dysfunction, persistent or altered inflammation, and/or neuro-immune crosstalk, but these mechanisms are not completely understood. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the pancreas that results in progressive loss of the endocrine and exocrine compartment owing to atrophy and/or replacement with fibrotic tissue. Functional consequences include recurrent or constant abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus (endocrine insufficiency) and maldigestion (exocrine insufficiency). Diagnosing early-stage chronic pancreatitis is challenging as changes are subtle, ill-defined and overlap those of other disorders. Later stages are characterized by variable fibrosis and calcification of the pancreatic parenchyma; dilatation, distortion and stricturing of the pancreatic ducts; pseudocysts; intrapancreatic bile duct stricturing; narrowing of the duodenum; and superior mesenteric, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment options comprise medical, radiological, endoscopic and surgical interventions, but evidence-based approaches are limited. This Primer highlights the major progress that has been made in understanding the pathophysiology, presentation, prevalence and management of chronic pancreatitis and its complications.

  3. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  4. Protozoa as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, Carolien F M; Schweizer, Joachim J; Büller, Hans A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether protozoa can be identified as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), and whether protozoan infections can be recognized by a specific clinical presentation. For 2 years, all patients (ages 4-16 years) fulfilling the Apley criteria of RAP referred to secondary care were prospectively evaluated for protozoa (Giardia lamblia, Dientamoeba fragilis, Blastocystis hominis) and treated if positive. Re-examination followed at least 10 days after treatment. Disappearance of pain with eradication and a pain-free follow-up of at least 6 months were considered to be indicative of a causal relation with RAP. The predictive value of the characteristics of the pain for protozoan infections was calculated. Of 220 included patients (92 boys, mean age 8.8 years), 215 brought a stool sample; 73 (34%) carried parasites, 10 of whom had 2 parasites, 2 had 3 parasites. Sixty-five patients were treated. Twenty-five (11%) were pain-free after eradication (21 had D fragilis, 8 B hominis, 4 G lamblia), of whom 11 had another infection (2) or constipation (9) as second diagnosis for the pain. Five had recurrence of infection with D fragilis and were again pain-free with eradication. Patients with protozoa as cause of their pain did not show differences with respect to their presentation when compared with patients with an asymptomatic infection and patients without protozoa. Protozoa were found as the cause of pain in 6% to 11% of children with RAP. These patients did not show a characteristic presentation when compared with patients with other causes of abdominal pain.

  5. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic...

  6. PANCREATIC HYPERTROPHY IN RATS CAUSED BY CHICKPEA (Cicer arietinum L. PROTEIN INTAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. TAVANO

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The objectives of this work were demonstrate the occurrence of pancreatic hypertrophy in rats, caused by chickpea protein intake, and the possible relation to the presence of trypsin inhibitors in the protein samples. The principal protein fractions of chickpea were isolated, the effect of heating was also tested (121°C/15 min. The heated chickpea diets did not cause significant pancreatic hypertrophy in rats, in relation to the casein control group. Only unheated chickpea flour and albumin diets caused pancreatic weight increases correlating to the presence of trypsin inhibitors in these samples. Apart from the trypsin inhibitor activity the other chickpea protein components appear not to exert any alteration in pancreatic weight.

  7. Mutations in PTF1A cause pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sellick, GS; Barker, KT; Stolte-Dijkstra, [No Value; Fleischmann, C; Coleman, RJ; Garrett, C; Gloyn, AL; Edghill, EL; Hattersley, AT; Wellauer, PK; Goodwin, G; Houlston, RS

    2004-01-01

    Individuals with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus usually present within the first three months of life and require insulin treatment(1,2). We recently identified a locus on chromosome 10p13-p12.1 involved in permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus associated with pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis

  8. Analysis of Surgical Success in Preventing Recurrent Acute Exacerbations in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealon, William H.; Matin, Sina

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine whether surgical intervention prevents recurrent acute exacerbations in chronic pancreatitis (CP). Summary Background Data The primary goal of surgical intervention in the treatment of CP has been relief of chronic unrelenting abdominal pain. A subset of patients with CP have intermittent acute exacerbations, often with increasing frequency and often unrelated to ongoing ethanol abuse. Little data exist regarding the effectiveness of surgery to prevent acute attacks. Methods From 1985 to 1999, all patients identified with a diagnosis of CP were recruited to participate in an ongoing program of serial clinic visits and functional and clinical evaluations. Patients were offered surgery using standard criteria. Data were gathered regarding ethanol abuse, pain, narcotic use, and recurrent acute exacerbations requiring hospital admission before and after surgery. Patients were broadly categorized as having severe unrelenting pain alone (group 1), severe pain with intermittent acute exacerbations (group 2), and intermittent acute exacerbations only (group 3). Results Two hundred fifty-nine patients were recruited. One hundred eighty-five patients underwent 199 surgical procedures (124 modified Puestow procedure [LPJ], 29 distal pancreatectomies [DP], and 46 pancreatic head resections [PHR; 14 performed after failure of LPJ]). There were no deaths. The complication rate was 4% for LPJ, 15% for DP, and 27% for PHR. Ethanol abuse was causative in 238 patients (92%). Mean follow-up was 81 months. There were 104 patients in group 1 (86 who underwent surgery), 71 patients in group 2 (64 who underwent surgery), and 84 in group 3 (49 who underwent surgery). No patient without surgery had spontaneous resolution of symptoms. Postoperative pain relief (freedom from narcotic analgesics) was achieved in 153 of 185 patients (83%) overall: 106 of 124 (86%) for LPJ, 19 of 29 (67%) for DP, and 42 of 46 (91%) for PHR. The mean rate of acute exacerbations was 6.3

  9. Molecular Alterations Associated with DNA Repair in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Are Associated with Sites of Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Margaret D; Dong, Lei; Wan, Jim; Deneve, Jeremiah L; Dickson, Paxton V; Behrman, Stephen W; Shibata, David; Martin, Mike G; Glazer, Evan S

    2018-02-10

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the deadliest malignancies with a rising incidence. Mutational analysis of PDAC has provided valuable information but has not yet dramatically changed the therapeutic landscape due to the number of variations detected in any one individual. The pattern of molecular alterations-gene mutations, variations in copy number, and changes in gene expression-has been described in the literature. The purpose of this study is to further investigate the molecular alterations in recurrent or metastatic PDAC based on the site of disease. Molecular alterations in patients with recurrent or metastatic PDAC from 2007 to 2015 were analyzed. The most common molecular alterations found in PDAC tumors from the pancreas were compared to metastatic PDAC specimens from the liver, lung, peritoneum, and other locations. Means were compared with a two-tailed Student's t test or ANOVA as appropriate. Rates of molecular alterations among the different groups were compared with Pearson's χ 2 . Two thousand five hundred fifty-two patients with PDAC were identified in a retrospective database, and the 15 most common molecular alterations were utilized for analysis. The most common alterations among all patients were mutations in KRAS and PTEN (59 and 62%, respectively), with differences in prevalence by site of metastasis (p = 0.042 and p = 0.037, respectively). KRAS mutations were more commonly found in metastasis in the lung (72%) than in other sites (59%, p = 0.042). Low expression of ERCC1 was found in 49% of lung metastases from PDAC but only 15% in PDAC in the pancreas (p molecular alterations significantly associated with site of metastatic disease were involved in DNA maintenance, repair, replication, or transcription (each p molecular alterations warrants further investigation.

  10. Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stram, Michelle; Liu, Shu; Singhi, Aatur D

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating condition often associated with severe abdominal pain and exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. The underlying cause is multifactorial and involves complex interaction of environmental, genetic, and/or other risk factors. The pathology is dependent on the underlying pathogenesis of the disease. This review describes the clinical, gross, and microscopic findings of the main subtypes of chronic pancreatitis: alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, obstructive chronic pancreatitis, paraduodenal ("groove") pancreatitis, pancreatic divisum, autoimmune pancreatitis, and genetic factors associated with chronic pancreatitis. As pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma may be confused with chronic pancreatitis, the main distinguishing features between these 2 diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Congenital skull base defect causing recurrent bacterial meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berliner, Elihay; Bar Meir, Maskit; Megged, Orli

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life threatening disease. Most patients will experience only one episode throughout life. Children who experience bacterial meningitis more than once, require further immunologic or anatomic evaluation. We report a 9 year old child with five episodes of bacterial meningitis due to a congenital defect of the skull base. A two and a half year old boy first presented to our medical center with pneumococcal meningitis. He was treated with antibiotics and fully recovered. Two months later he presented again with a similar clinical picture. Streptococcus pneumoniae grew in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture. CT scan and later MRI of the brain revealed a defect in the anterior middle fossa floor, with protrusion of brain tissue into the sphenoidal sinus. Corrective surgery was recommended but the parents refused. Three months later, a third episode of pneumococcal meningitis occurred. The child again recovered with antibiotics and this time corrective surgery was performed. Five years later, the boy presented once again with clinical signs and symptoms consistent with bacterial meningitis. CSF culture was positive, but the final identification of the bacteria was conducted by broad spectrum 16S ribosomal RNA PCR (16S rRNA PCR) which revealed a sequence of Neisseria lactamica. CT and MRI showed recurrence of the skull base defect with encephalocele in the sphenoid sinus. The parents again refused neurosurgical intervention. A year later the patient presented with bacterial meningitis. CSF culture obtained after initiation of antibiotics was negative, but actinobacillus was identified in the CSF by 16S rRNA PCR. The patient is scheduled for neurosurgical intervention. In patients with recurrent bacterial meningitis caused by organisms colonizing the oropharynx or nasopharynx, an anatomical defect should be carefully sought and surgically repaired.

  12. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour: Correlation of apparent diffusion coefficient or WHO classification with recurrence-free survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mimi; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kwon, Wooil; Ha, Sang Yun; Ji, Sang A

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the correlation between grade of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) based on the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) classification and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and to assess whether the ADC value and WHO classification can predict recurrence-free survival (RFS) after surgery for pNETs. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. The requirement for informed consent was waived. Between March 2009 and November 2014, forty-nine patients who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with diffusion-weighted image and subsequent surgery for single pNETs were included. Correlations among qualitative MR imaging findings, quantitative ADC values, and WHO classifications were assessed. An ordered logistic regression test was used to control for tumour size as a confounding factor. The association between ADC value (or WHO classification) and RFS was analysed. All tumors (n=49) were classified as low- (n=29, grade 1), intermediate- (n=17, grade 2), and high-grade (n=3, grade 3), respectively. The mean ADC of pNETs was moderately negatively correlated with WHO classification before and after adjustment for tumour size (ρ=-0.64, pcorrelated with WHO tumour grade, regardless of tumour size. However, the WHO tumour classification of pNET may be more suitable for predicting RFS than the ADC value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis Causing an Acute Scoliosis

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    Alexander Armstrong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. A Case Report. Objective. We present a 15-year-old girl with an acute atypical scoliosis secondary to chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO. Summary of Background Data. CRMO is a rare nonpyogenic inflammatory bone condition with unclear aetiology. CRMO mainly affects the metaphyses of long bones, the pelvis, shoulder girdle, and less commonly the spine. Methods. Our case presented with a 6-month history of worsening thoracic back pain, asymmetry of her shoulders and abnormal posture. Whole spine radiographs revealed a right atypical thoracic scoliosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging showed abnormal signal on the short TI inversion recovery (STIR sequences in multiple vertebrae. A bone biopsy demonstrated evidence of fibrosis and chronic inflammatory changes. Interval MRI scans revealed new oedematous lesions and disappearance of old lesions. Symptoms improved. Results. It is important to consider CRMO as an acute cause of atypical scoliosis. Malignancy, pyogenic infections and atypical presentations of juvenile arthritis need excluding. Conclusion. This 24-month follow-up describes a rare cause of an atypical scoliosis and fortifies the small amount of the currently available literature. The case highlights the relapsing and remitting nature of CRMO with new lesions developing and older lesions burning out. We advise close radiological surveillance and symptomatic management.

  14. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the abdominal lymph nodes or postoperative stump including pancreatic stump and other stump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng XL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Xian-Liang Zeng,* Huan-Huan Wang,* Mao-Bin Meng, Zhi-Qiang Wu, Yong-Chun Song, Hong-Qing Zhuang, Dong Qian, Feng-Tong Li, Lu-Jun Zhao, Zhi-Yong Yuan, Ping Wang Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin’s Clinical Research Center for Cancer and Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT using CyberKnife in the treatment of patients with recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the abdominal lymph node or stump after surgery. Patients and methods: Between October 1, 2006 and May 1, 2015, patients with recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the abdominal lymph node or stump after surgery were enrolled and treated with SBRT at our hospital. The primary end point was local control rate after SBRT. Secondary end points were overall survival, time to symptom alleviation, and toxicity, assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: Twenty-four patients with 24 lesions (17 abdominal lymph nodes and seven stumps were treated with SBRT, of which five patients presented with abdominal lymph nodes and synchronous metastases in the liver and lung. The 6-, 12-, and 24-month actuarial local control rates were 95.2%, 83.8%, and 62.1%, respectively. For the entire cohort, the median overall survival from diagnosis and SBRT was 28.9 and 12.2 months, respectively. Symptom alleviation was observed in eleven of 14 patients (78.6% within a median of 8 days (range, 1–14 days after SBRT. Nine patients (37.5% experienced Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 grade 1–2 acute toxicities; one patient experienced grade 3 acute toxicity due to thrombocytopenia. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and

  15. A Case of a Chronic Pancreatic Pseudocyst Causing Atraumatic Splenic Rupture without Evidence of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Moori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atraumatic splenic rupture is a rare complication of a pancreatic pseudocyst (PP, described in the setting of chronic pancreatitis. There is common understanding, within the literature, that an inflammatory process at the tail of the pancreas may disrupt the spleen and result in such splenic complications. The authors present a case report of a 29-year-old male with a PP, associated with chronic pancreatitis. The patient had a history of excessive alcohol intake and presented to the emergency department with a short history of abdominal pain and vomiting. He denied any significant history of trauma and serum amylase levels were normal. An admission computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen confirmed the presence of a PP in direct contact with the spleen. The CT also demonstrated a heterogenous hypodense area of the splenic hilum, along with perisplenic fluid. The patient was admitted for observation. His abdominal pain progressed, and he became haemodynamically unstable. An emergency ultrasound scan (USS at this time revealed intra-abdominal haemorrhage. A subsequent CT confirmed splenic rupture, which was managed surgically with a full recovery. Few such cases are documented within the literature and more understanding of preempting such events is needed.

  16. Heavy Smoking Is Associated With Lower Age at First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis and a Higher Risk of Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munigala, Satish; Conwell, Darwin L; Gelrud, Andres; Agarwal, Banke

    2015-08-01

    There is limited data on cigarette smoking and the risk of acute pancreatitis (AP). We evaluated the influence of cigarette smoking on AP risk and clinical presentation in a large cohort of Veteran's Administration (VA) patients. Retrospective study of VA patients from 1998 to 2007. Exclusion criteria included (1) history of chronic pancreatitis (n = 3222) or gallstones (n = 14,574) and (2) age younger than 15 years (n = 270). A 2-year washout period was used to exclude patients with pre-existing recurrent AP. The study included 484,624 patients. From 2001 to 2007, a total of 6799 (1.4%) patients had AP. Alcohol (risk ratio, 4.20) and smoking (risk ratio, 1.78) were independent significant risk factors of AP on multiple regression analysis. Smoking increased the risk of AP in both nonalcoholics (0.57% vs 1.1%) and alcoholics (2.6% vs 4.1%). Smoking was associated with younger mean age at first episode of AP and higher likelihood of recurrent AP (≥4 episodes) in both nonalcoholics and alcoholics. The interval between recurrent episodes was not altered by alcohol or smoking. In a large cohort of VA patients, smoking is an independent risk factor for AP and augmented the effect of alcohol on the risk, age of onset, and recurrence of AP.

  17. Two-stage triolein breath test differentiates pancreatic insufficiency from other causes of malabsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    In 24 patients with malabsorption, [ 14 C]triolein breath tests were conducted before and together with the administration of pancreatic enzymes (Pancrease, Johnson and Johnson, Skillman, N.J.). Eleven patients with pancreatic insufficiency had a significant rise in peak percent dose per hour 14 CO 2 excretion after Pancrease, whereas 13 patients with other causes of malabsorption had no increase in 14 CO 2 excretion (2.61 +/- 0.96 vs. 0.15 +/- 0.45, p less than 0.001). The two-stage [ 14 C]triolein breath test appears to be an accurate and simple noninvasive test of fat malabsorption that differentiates steatorrhea secondary to pancreatic insufficiency from other causes of steatorrhea

  18. Duodenal duplication cyst and pancreas divisum causing acute pancreatitis in an adult male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Pleguezuelo-Díaz, Julio; de Hierro, Mercedes López; Macias-Sánchez, José F; Ubiña, Cristina Viñolo; Martín-Rodríguez, María Del Mar; Teresa-Galván, Javier De

    2010-01-01

    Duodenal duplication cysts are rare congenital abnormalities which are more commonly diagnosed in infancy and childhood. However, in rare cases, these lesions can remain asymptomatic until adulthood. The combination of duplication cyst and pancreas divisum is extremely rare and both conditions have been linked with acute recurrent pancreatitis. We present the case of a 37 years-old patient who presented with repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis. By means of magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography we discovered a duplication cyst whose cavity received drainage from the dorsal pancreas. After opening the cyst cavity to the duodenal lumen with a needle knife the patient presented no further episodes in the clinical follow-up. Comparable literature findings and therapeutic options for these abnormalities are discussed with regard to the presented case. PMID:21160764

  19. Determining the cause of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection using whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, James Heng Chiak; Truong, Cynthia; Minot, Samuel S; Greenfield, Nick; Budvytiene, Indre; Lohith, Akshar; Anikst, Victoria; Pourmand, Nader; Banaei, Niaz

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the contribution of relapse and reinfection to recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has implications for therapy and infection prevention, respectively. We used whole genome sequencing to determine the relation of C. difficile strains isolated from patients with recurrent CDI at an academic medical center in the United States. Thirty-five toxigenic C. difficile isolates from 16 patients with 19 recurrent CDI episodes with median time of 53.5days (range, 13-362) between episodes were whole genome sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. In 84% (16) of recurrences, the cause of recurrence was relapse with prior strain of C. difficile. In 16% (3) of recurrent episodes, reinfection with a new strain of C. difficile was the cause. In conclusion, the majority of CDI recurrences at our institution were due to infection with the same strain rather than infection with a new strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recurrent rectal prolapse caused by colonic duplication in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, B P; Abraham, L A; Charles, J A; Edwards, G A

    2007-09-01

    A 9-month-old female Shar Pei cross-bred dog was presented with a history of recurrent rectal prolapse over 7 months. Repeated reduction and anal purse string sutures and subsequent incisional colopexy failed to prevent recurrent rectal prolapse. Digital rectal examination following reduction of the prolapse identified a faeces-filled sac within the ventral wall of the rectum and an orifice in the ventral colonic wall, cranial to the pubic brim. A ventral, communicating tubular colonic duplication was diagnosed by means of a barium enema. Surgical excision of the duplicated colonic tube was performed via a caudal ventral midline laparotomy. At 20 weeks post-operation, there has been no recurrence of rectal prolapse.

  1. Heterogeneity index evaluated by slope of linear regression on 18F-FDG PET/CT as a prognostic marker for predicting tumor recurrence in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong-il; Kim, Yong Joong; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Kang, Keon Wook

    2017-01-01

    18 F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has been investigated as a method to predict pancreatic cancer recurrence after pancreatic surgery. We evaluated the recently introduced heterogeneity indices of 18 F-FDG PET/CT used for predicting pancreatic cancer recurrence after surgery and compared them with current clinicopathologic and 18 F-FDG PET/CT parameters. A total of 93 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients (M:F = 60:33, mean age = 64.2 ± 9.1 years) who underwent preoperative 18 F-FDG PET/CT following pancreatic surgery were retrospectively enrolled. The standardized uptake values (SUVs) and tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were measured on each 18 F-FDG PET/CT, as metabolic parameters. Metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were examined as volumetric parameters. The coefficient of variance (heterogeneity index-1; SUVmean divided by the standard deviation) and linear regression slopes (heterogeneity index-2) of the MTV, according to SUV thresholds of 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0, were evaluated as heterogeneity indices. Predictive values of clinicopathologic and 18 F-FDG PET/CT parameters and heterogeneity indices were compared in terms of pancreatic cancer recurrence. Seventy patients (75.3%) showed recurrence after pancreatic cancer surgery (mean recurrence = 9.4 ± 8.4 months). Comparing the recurrence and no recurrence patients, all of the 18 F-FDG PET/CT parameters and heterogeneity indices demonstrated significant differences. In univariate Cox-regression analyses, MTV (P = 0.013), TLG (P = 0.007), and heterogeneity index-2 (P = 0.027) were significant. Among the clinicopathologic parameters, CA19-9 (P = 0.025) and venous invasion (P = 0.002) were selected as significant parameters. In multivariate Cox-regression analyses, MTV (P = 0.005), TLG (P = 0.004), and heterogeneity index-2 (P = 0.016) with venous invasion (P < 0.001, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively) demonstrated significant results

  2. Association of CTRC and SPINK1 Gene Variants with Recurrent Hospitalizations for Pancreatitis or Acute Abdominal Pain in Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency

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    Karine eTremblay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are important inter-individual variations in the incidence and severity of acute pancreatitis in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Several genes involved in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism or serine proteases pathways are known to influence the risk of pancreatitis. Aim: To evaluate the association between genes regulating serine proteases, chymotrypsin C (CTRC and serine peptidase inhibitor kazal type1 (SPINK1, and recurrence of hospitalizations for acute pancreatitis or severe abdominal pain in patients with Lipoprotein Lipase deficiency (LPLD, a rare and extreme monogenic model of severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis. Method: The CTRC and SPINK1 genes promoter and coding regions sequencing has been performed in a sample of 38 LPLD adults (22 men and 16 women and 100 controls (53 men and 47 women. Estimation of the association of CTRC and SPINK1 gene variants or combinations of variants with history of hospitalizations for pancreatitis or acute abdominal pain in LPLD was investigated using non parametric analyses with correction for multiple testing and logistic regression models controlling for age, gender, family history and life habits. Results: Gene sequencing followed by genotype-stratified analyses of the CTRC and SPINK1 genes in LPLD and controls revealed a positive association between recurrence of hospitalizations and the rs545634 (CTRC - rs11319 (SPINK1 combination (OR = 41.4 [CI: 2.0-848.0]; p=0.016. In all models, a positive family history of pancreatitis was a significant predictor of recurrent hospitalizations independently of the contribution of SPINK1 or CTRC (pConclusion: These results suggest that a positive family history of pancreatitis and genetic markers in the serine protease pathways could be associated with a risk of recurrent hospitalization for acute pancreatitis in severe hypertriglyceridemia due to LPLD.

  3. Nanobacteria: An Infectious Cause for Salivary Stone Formation and Recurrence

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    Amr A El Badry

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanobacteria (NB contribute to pathological calcification in the human and animal body. It has been isolated from salivary stones and suggested that it may act as a nucleus for the initiation of these stones. In the present study, we examined its role in the recurrent salivary gland stones using immunodetection with NB-specific monoclonal antibodies and scanning electron microscopy (SEM hoping to provide a method for preventing the recurrence of these stones in the patient that has suffered from salivary stones. Our study comprised 30 patients with recurrent salivary gland stones (group I and 30 patients with salivary gland stones for the first time (group II, in addition to 30 normal controls (group III. We could detect 100–500 nm nanoparticles in 24/30 (80% cases in group I with significant difference <0.05 and <0.01 when compared with group II and group III in which they were detected in 19/30 (63.3% and 6/30 (20% respectively. Also there was a significant difference <0.05 between group II and group III. We proposed that salivary stone formation is a nanobacterial disease initiated by bacterial infection. This bacteria may play an important role in the recurrence of salivary stone. So the use of calcium chelator, ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA, before or in combination with the suitable antibiotic that is given in an amount effective to inhibit or prevent the growth and development of nanobacteria may eradicate these stones and prevent their recurrence.

  4. A Mass of Pancreatic and Gastric Heterotopia Causing a Small Bowel Obstruction in a 61-Year-Old Male

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    Majd Alfrejat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic tissue is a congenital anomaly that has been previously reported. Gastric and pancreatic heterotopia are among the most studied ones. Herein, we describe a case of a combined pancreatic and gastric heterotopia that formed a mass and caused a small intestine obstruction in a 61-year-old male. We also did a brief literature review of cases with gastric and pancreatic heterotopia in adult patients.

  5. A Mass of Pancreatic and Gastric Heterotopia Causing a Small Bowel Obstruction in a 61-Year-Old Male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfrejat, Majd; Khalil, Bassem; Jackobs, Jordan; Anderson, William; Eschbacher, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Heterotopic tissue is a congenital anomaly that has been previously reported. Gastric and pancreatic heterotopia are among the most studied ones. Herein, we describe a case of a combined pancreatic and gastric heterotopia that formed a mass and caused a small intestine obstruction in a 61-year-old male. We also did a brief literature review of cases with gastric and pancreatic heterotopia in adult patients.

  6. The technical feasibility of an image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) to perform a hypofractionated schedule in terms of toxicity and local control for patients with locally advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Seok Hyun; Song, Jin Ho; Choi, Byung Ock; Kang, Young-nam; Lee, Myung Ah; Kang, Ki Mun; Jang, Hong Seok

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of an image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) using involved-field technique to perform a hypofractionated schedule for patients with locally advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer. From May 2009 to November 2011, 12 patients with locally advanced or locally recurrent pancreatic cancer received hypofractionated CCRT using TomoTherapy Hi-Art with concurrent and sequential chemotherapy at Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, the Catholic University of Korea. The total dose delivered was 45 Gy in 15 fractions or 50 Gy in 20 fractions. The target volume did not include the uninvolved regional lymph nodes. Treatment planning and delivery were performed using the IG-IMRT technique. The follow-up duration was a median of 31.1 months (range: 5.7-36.3 months). Grade 2 or worse acute toxicities developed in 7 patients (58%). Grade 3 or worse gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicity occurred in 0% and 17% of patients, respectively. In the response evaluation, the rates of partial response and stable disease were 58% and 42%, respectively. The rate of local failure was 8% and no regional failure was observed. Distant failure was the main cause of treatment failure. The progression-free survival and overall survival durations were 7.6 and 12.1 months, respectively. The involved-field technique and IG-IMRT delivered via a hypofractionated schedule are feasible for patients with locally advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer

  7. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis in children a precursor of chronic pancreatitis? A long-term follow-up study of 93 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Ujjal; Yachha, Surender K; Borkar, Vibhor; Srivastava, Anshu

    2017-07-01

    In view of paucity of literature we analyzed our experience of acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) to study clinical profile and long-term outcome. Over 13 years, 93 consecutive children (≤18 years) diagnosed to have ARP were included in this study. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography was done at baseline and on follow-up. Common mutations for serine-protease-inhibitor (SPINK1 N34S), protease inhibitor (PRSS1 R122S) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR deltaF508, 5T) were studied in 22 idiopathic cases. The median age of the children with ARP was 13 (10-14.5) years, 53 were males. Etiology included biliary in 14 (15%), pancreas divisum in 6 (7%), others in 3 (3.5%) and idiopathic in the remaining 70 (75%). SPINK1 mutation was found in 10/22 (45%) cases. Over a median follow-up of 25.5 (8.25-48) months, 37 (42%) of 88 (5 lost to follow-up) developed chronic pancreatitis (CP). On multivariate analysis idiopathic etiology (petiology and presence of genetic mutations. Hence, patients with ARP should be kept on regular follow-up to detect CP. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Severe Recurrent Pancreatitis in a Child with ADHD after Starting Treatment with Methylphenidate (Ritalin

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    Suheil Artul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 10-year-old boy, who had severe relapsing pancreatitis, three times in two months within 3 weeks after starting treatment with methylphenidate (Ritalin due to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Pancreatitis due to the use of (methylphenidate Ritalin was never published before. Attention must be made by the physicians regarding this possible complication, and this complication should be taken into consideration in every patient with abdominal pain who was newly treated with Ritalin.

  9. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure causes more severe pancreatic injury and inflammation

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    Ren, Zhenhua [Department of Anatomy, School of Basic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, China 230032 (China); Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yang, Fanmuyi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yongchao; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-ji [Department of Biochemistry, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203 (China); Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin [Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia, E-mail: jialuo888@uky.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol abuse increases the risk for pancreatitis. The pattern of alcohol drinking may impact its effect. We tested a hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption in combination with binge exposure imposes more severe damage to the pancreas. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control, chronic ethanol exposure, binge ethanol exposure and chronic plus binge ethanol exposure. For the control group, mice were fed with a liquid diet for two weeks. For the chronic ethanol exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks. In the binge ethanol exposure group, mice were treated with ethanol by gavage (5 g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 3 days. For the chronic plus binge exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks and exposed to ethanol by gavage during the last 3 days. Chronic and binge exposure alone caused minimal pancreatic injury. However, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure induced significant apoptotic cell death. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure altered the levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure caused pancreatic inflammation which was shown by the macrophages infiltration and the increase of cytokines and chemokines. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased the expression of ADH1 and CYP2E1. It also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which was demonstrated by the unfolded protein response. In addition, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure is more detrimental to the pancreas. - Highlights: • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking causes more pancreatic injury. • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking induces more pancreatic inflammation. • Chronic plus binge alcohol causes more endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress.

  10. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure causes more severe pancreatic injury and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Zhenhua; Yang, Fanmuyi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yongchao; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Ke, Zun-ji; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse increases the risk for pancreatitis. The pattern of alcohol drinking may impact its effect. We tested a hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption in combination with binge exposure imposes more severe damage to the pancreas. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control, chronic ethanol exposure, binge ethanol exposure and chronic plus binge ethanol exposure. For the control group, mice were fed with a liquid diet for two weeks. For the chronic ethanol exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks. In the binge ethanol exposure group, mice were treated with ethanol by gavage (5 g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 3 days. For the chronic plus binge exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks and exposed to ethanol by gavage during the last 3 days. Chronic and binge exposure alone caused minimal pancreatic injury. However, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure induced significant apoptotic cell death. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure altered the levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure caused pancreatic inflammation which was shown by the macrophages infiltration and the increase of cytokines and chemokines. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased the expression of ADH1 and CYP2E1. It also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which was demonstrated by the unfolded protein response. In addition, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure is more detrimental to the pancreas. - Highlights: • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking causes more pancreatic injury. • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking induces more pancreatic inflammation. • Chronic plus binge alcohol causes more endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress.

  11. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  12. Mapping Patterns of Local Recurrence After Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A New Approach to Adjuvant Radiation Field Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Kumar, Rachit [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Raman, Siva P. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Moore, Joseph A.; Ellsworth, Susannah; McNutt, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Laheru, Daniel A.; Jaffee, Elizabeth [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Cameron, John L. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hobbs, Robert F. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wolfgang, Christopher L. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To generate a map of local recurrences after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and to model an adjuvant radiation therapy planning treatment volume (PTV) that encompasses a majority of local recurrences. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with resectable PDA undergoing PD and 1 or more computed tomography (CT) scans more than 60 days after PD at our institution were reviewed. Patients were divided into 3 groups: no adjuvant treatment (NA), chemotherapy alone (CTA), or chemoradiation (CRT). Cross-sectional scans were centrally reviewed, and local recurrences were plotted to scale with respect to the celiac axis (CA), superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and renal veins on 1 CT scan of a template post-PD patient. An adjuvant clinical treatment volume comprising 90% of local failures based on standard expansions of the CA and SMA was created and simulated on 3 post-PD CT scans to assess the feasibility of this planning approach. Results: Of the 202 patients in the study, 40 (20%), 34 (17%), and 128 (63%) received NA, CTA, and CRT adjuvant therapy, respectively. The rate of margin-positive resections was greater in CRT patients than in CTA patients (28% vs 9%, P=.023). Local recurrence occurred in 90 of the 202 patients overall (45%) and in 19 (48%), 22 (65%), and 49 (38%) in the NA, CTA, and CRT groups, respectively. Ninety percent of recurrences were within a 3.0-cm right-lateral, 2.0-cm left-lateral, 1.5-cm anterior, 1.0-cm posterior, 1.0-cm superior, and 2.0-cm inferior expansion of the combined CA and SMA contours. Three simulated radiation treatment plans using these expansions with adjustments to avoid nearby structures were created to demonstrate the use of this treatment volume. Conclusions: Modified PTVs targeting high-risk areas may improve local control while minimizing toxicities, allowing dose escalation with intensity-modulated or stereotactic body radiation therapy.

  13. Mapping Patterns of Local Recurrence After Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A New Approach to Adjuvant Radiation Field Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Kumar, Rachit; Raman, Siva P.; Moore, Joseph A.; Ellsworth, Susannah; McNutt, Todd; Laheru, Daniel A.; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Cameron, John L.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hobbs, Robert F.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To generate a map of local recurrences after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and to model an adjuvant radiation therapy planning treatment volume (PTV) that encompasses a majority of local recurrences. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with resectable PDA undergoing PD and 1 or more computed tomography (CT) scans more than 60 days after PD at our institution were reviewed. Patients were divided into 3 groups: no adjuvant treatment (NA), chemotherapy alone (CTA), or chemoradiation (CRT). Cross-sectional scans were centrally reviewed, and local recurrences were plotted to scale with respect to the celiac axis (CA), superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and renal veins on 1 CT scan of a template post-PD patient. An adjuvant clinical treatment volume comprising 90% of local failures based on standard expansions of the CA and SMA was created and simulated on 3 post-PD CT scans to assess the feasibility of this planning approach. Results: Of the 202 patients in the study, 40 (20%), 34 (17%), and 128 (63%) received NA, CTA, and CRT adjuvant therapy, respectively. The rate of margin-positive resections was greater in CRT patients than in CTA patients (28% vs 9%, P=.023). Local recurrence occurred in 90 of the 202 patients overall (45%) and in 19 (48%), 22 (65%), and 49 (38%) in the NA, CTA, and CRT groups, respectively. Ninety percent of recurrences were within a 3.0-cm right-lateral, 2.0-cm left-lateral, 1.5-cm anterior, 1.0-cm posterior, 1.0-cm superior, and 2.0-cm inferior expansion of the combined CA and SMA contours. Three simulated radiation treatment plans using these expansions with adjustments to avoid nearby structures were created to demonstrate the use of this treatment volume. Conclusions: Modified PTVs targeting high-risk areas may improve local control while minimizing toxicities, allowing dose escalation with intensity-modulated or stereotactic body radiation therapy

  14. Anabolic steroid abuse causing recurrent hepatic adenomas and hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicole M; Dayyeh, Barham K Abu; Chung, Raymond T

    2008-01-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse is common among athletes and is associated with a number of medical complications. We describe a case of a 27-year-old male bodybuilder with multiple hepatic adenomas induced by anabolic steroids. He initially presented with tumor hemorrhage and was treated with left lateral hepatic segmentectomy. Regression of the remaining tumors was observed with cessation of steroid use. However, 3 years and a half after his initial hepatic segmentectomy, he presented with recurrent tumor enlargement and intraperitoneal hemorrhage in the setting of steroid abuse relapse. Given his limited hepatic reserve, he was conservatively managed with embolization of the right accessory hepatic artery. This is the first reported case of hepatic adenoma re-growth with recidivistic steroid abuse, complicated by life-threatening hemorrhage. While athletes and bodybuilders are often aware of the legal and social ramifications of steroid abuse, they should continue to be counseled about its serious medical risks. PMID:18680242

  15. Anabolic steroid abuse causing recurrent hepatic adenomas and hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicole M; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chung, Raymond T

    2008-07-28

    Anabolic steroid abuse is common among athletes and is associated with a number of medical complications. We describe a case of a 27-year-old male bodybuilder with multiple hepatic adenomas induced by anabolic steroids. He initially presented with tumor hemorrhage and was treated with left lateral hepatic segmentectomy. Regression of the remaining tumors was observed with cessation of steroid use. However, 3 years and a half after his initial hepatic segmentectomy, he presented with recurrent tumor enlargement and intraperitoneal hemorrhage in the setting of steroid abuse relapse. Given his limited hepatic reserve, he was conservatively managed with embolization of the right accessory hepatic artery. This is the first reported case of hepatic adenoma re-growth with recidivistic steroid abuse, complicated by life-threatening hemorrhage. While athletes and bodybuilders are often aware of the legal and social ramifications of steroid abuse, they should continue to be counseled about its serious medical risks.

  16. High Nuclear Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Alpha Expression Is a Predictor of Distant Recurrence in Patients With Resected Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colbert, Lauren E.; Fisher, Sarah B.; Balci, Serdar; Saka, Burcu; Chen, Zhengjia; Kim, Sungjin; El-Rayes, Bassel F.; Adsay, N. Volkan; Maithel, Shishir K.; Landry, Jerome C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate nuclear hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression as a prognostic factor for distant recurrence (DR) and local recurrence (LR) after pancreatic adenocarcinoma resection. Methods and Materials: Tissue specimens were collected from 98 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent resection without neoadjuvant therapy between January 2000 and December 2011. Local recurrence was defined as radiographic or pathologic evidence of progressive disease in the pancreas, pancreatic bed, or associated nodal regions. Distant recurrence was defined as radiographically or pathologically confirmed recurrent disease in other sites. Immunohistochemical staining was performed and scored by an independent pathologist blinded to patient outcomes. High HIF-1α overall expression score was defined as high percentage and intensity staining and thus score >1.33. Univariate analysis was performed for HIF-1α score with LR alone and with DR. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of LR and DR. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 16.3 months. Eight patients (8%) demonstrated isolated LR, 26 patients (26.5%) had isolated DR, and 13 patients had both LR and DR. Fifty-three patients (54%) had high HIF-1α expression, and 45 patients (46%) had low HIF-1α expression. High HIF-1α expression was significantly associated with DR (P=.03), and low HIF-1α expression was significantly associated with isolated LR (P=.03). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, high HIF-1α was the only significant predictor of DR (odds ratio 2.46 [95% confidence interval 1.06-5.72]; P=.03). In patients with a known recurrence, an HIF-1α score ≥2.5 demonstrated a specificity of 100% for DR. Conclusions: High HIF-1α expression is a significant predictor of distant failure versus isolated local failure in patients undergoing resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Expression of HIF-1α may have utility in determining candidates for

  17. Reirradiation with stereotactic body radiation therapy after prior conventional fractionation radiation for locally recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J. Koong

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Our report shows that SBRT for reirradiation of locally recurrent pancreas adenocarcinoma is a feasible option with good local control and acceptable toxicity rates, especially with a multifraction schedule.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Hereditary pancreatitis Hereditary pancreatitis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary pancreatitis is a genetic condition characterized by recurrent episodes ...

  19. Primary postural instability: a cause of recurrent sudden falls in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaldetti, R; Lorberboym, M; Melamed, E

    2006-12-01

    Elderly patients with recurrent falls are frequently diagnosed with an extrapyramidal syndrome. This study aims to characterise a distinct group of patients with recurrent falls and postural instability as a hallmark of the clinical examination. The study took place in the Movement Disorders Unit, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tiqva, Israel among 26 patients with recurrent falls who had no clinical evidence of a neurodegenerative disease. Medical records, neurological examination and brain imaging studies were assessed. Falls in these patients were sudden, unprovoked, with no vertigo or loss of consciousness. All had postural instability with minimal or no abnormality on the neurological examination. Brain imaging showed diffuse ischaemic changes in 65%. [(123)I]-FPCIT SPECT with the dopamine transporter ligand, performed in five patients, was normal in all. Recurrent falls might be caused by a neurological syndrome that primarily affects balance control. The importance of identifying this disorder is its distinction from other parkinsonian syndromes causing falls.

  20. Intraduodenal sarcoma recurrence of retroperitoneal origin: an unusual cause for a duodenal obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Jean J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Soft tissue sarcomas are uncommon tumors, and intraduodenal soft tissue sarcoma manifestation is even more rare. Only three cases of intraduodenal sarcomas have been reported in the literature thus far. Here, we report a case of an intraduodenal recurrence of a retroperitoneal sarcoma causing bowel obstruction. This unusual recurrence pattern likely relates to the patient’s previous resection and radiation treatment, and highlights the benefits, limitations and follow-up strategies after multimodality treatment.

  1. Effects of pancreatic digestive enzymes, sodium bicarbonate, and a proton pump inhibitor on steatorrhoea caused by pancreatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T; Takebe, K; Kudoh, K; Ishii, M; Imamura, K; Kikuchi, H; Kasai, F; Tandoh, Y; Yamada, N; Arai, Y

    1995-01-01

    Forty-five patients with pancreatic steatorrhoea (27 with calcified pancreatitis, 13 with non-calcified pancreatitis, two with pancreaticoduodenectomy, one with total pancreatectomy, and two with pancreatic cancer) were divided into four groups and given the following medication for 2 to 4 weeks: 4 to 6 g/day of sodium bicarbonate (group I); 9 g/day of high-lipase pancreatin (lipase, 56,600 U/g, Fédération Internationale Pharmaceutique (FIP); group II); 12 to 24 tablets or 9.0 g of commercial pancreatic enzyme preparations (group III); or 50 mg of omeprazole (group IV). Faecal fat excretion was evaluated before and after drug administration. Faecal fat excretion was reduced by 2.9 g (range, 1.7 to 5.0 g) in group I; 8.8 g (range, 2.9 to 39.9 g) in group II; 10.8 g (range, 2.3 to 21.8 g) in group III; and 4.3 g (range, 3.6 to 5.6 g) in group IV. The pancreatic digestive enzyme preparation was more effective than sodium bicarbonate and agents that raise the pH of the upper small intestine (such as proton-pump inhibitors) in reducing faecal fat excretion. The results indicate that all of the preparations used are effective against mild pancreatic steatorrhoea. If the condition is more advanced, however, a massive dosage of pancreatic digestive enzyme and possibly the combined use of an agent to raise the pH of the upper small intestine are likely to be effective.

  2. [Acute pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun-Abraham, Mauro Enrique; Obregón-Guerrero, Gabriela; Romero-Espinoza, Larry; Valencia-Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcaemia due to primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, with a reported prevalence of 1.5 to 8%. There is no clear pathophysiological basis, but elevated parathyroid hormone and high serum calcium levels could be responsible for calcium deposit in the pancreatic ducts and activation of pancreatic enzymes, which may be the main risk factor for developing acute pancreatitis. The aim of this report is to describe four cases. Four cases are reported of severe pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism; three of them with complications (two pseudocysts and one pancreatic necrosis). Cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, studies showed the parathyroid adenoma. Surgical resection was the definitive treatment in all four cases. None of the patients had recurrent acute pancreatitis events during follow-up. Acute pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcaemia of primary hyperparathyroidism is rare; however, when it occurs it is associated with severe pancreatitis. It is suspected in patients with elevated serum calcium and high parathyroid hormone levels. Imaging techniques such as cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, should be performed, to confirm clinical suspicion. Surgical resection is the definitive treatment with excellent results. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and validation of automatic tools for interactive recurrence analysis in radiation therapy: optimization of treatment algorithms for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kerstin A; Habermehl, Daniel; Jäger, Andreas; Floca, Ralf O; Zhang, Lanlan; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2013-06-07

    In radiation oncology recurrence analysis is an important part in the evaluation process and clinical quality assurance of treatment concepts. With the example of 9 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer we developed and validated interactive analysis tools to support the evaluation workflow. After an automatic registration of the radiation planning CTs with the follow-up images, the recurrence volumes are segmented manually. Based on these volumes the DVH (dose volume histogram) statistic is calculated, followed by the determination of the dose applied to the region of recurrence and the distance between the boost and recurrence volume. We calculated the percentage of the recurrence volume within the 80%-isodose volume and compared it to the location of the recurrence within the boost volume, boost + 1 cm, boost + 1.5 cm and boost + 2 cm volumes. Recurrence analysis of 9 patients demonstrated that all recurrences except one occurred within the defined GTV/boost volume; one recurrence developed beyond the field border/outfield. With the defined distance volumes in relation to the recurrences, we could show that 7 recurrent lesions were within the 2 cm radius of the primary tumor. Two large recurrences extended beyond the 2 cm, however, this might be due to very rapid growth and/or late detection of the tumor progression. The main goal of using automatic analysis tools is to reduce time and effort conducting clinical analyses. We showed a first approach and use of a semi-automated workflow for recurrence analysis, which will be continuously optimized. In conclusion, despite the limitations of the automatic calculations we contributed to in-house optimization of subsequent study concepts based on an improved and validated target volume definition.

  4. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants Definition & ...

  5. Recurrent epistaxis caused by an intranasal supernumerary tooth in a young adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dhafeeri, Hamed O; Kavarodi, Abdulmajid; Al Shaikh, Khalil; Bukhari, Ahmed; Al Hussain, Omair; El Baramawy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Male, 27. Recurrent epistaxis. Nasal bleeding. -. -. Pediatrics and Neonatology. Congenital defects/diseases. Recurrent epistaxis is a common disorder among children and young adults. We report an unusual cause, intranasal supernumerary tooth causing friction with Little's area of the nasal septum. A 22-year-old male presented with recurrent, mild, unilateral left-sided epistaxis once to twice per month for 3 years. This usually occurred after minor nasal trauma or rubbing his nose. The patient also suffered from recurrent tonsillitis. There was neither history of blood transfusion or nasal packing, nor a history suggestive of bleeding diathesis. Anterior rhinoscopy revealed ivory white nasal mass antero-inferiorly in the left nasal cavity touching Little's area. There was no bleeding. Nasal endoscopy showed a white cylindrical bony mass 1 cm long arising from the floor of the nose, with no attachment to the nasal septum or the lateral wall of the nose. Examination of the right nasal cavity was unremarkable. Nasal teeth result from the ectopic eruption of supernumerary teeth and may cause a variety of symptoms including recurrent epistaxis. Their clinical and radiologic presentation is so characteristic that their diagnosis is not difficult. CT scan is helpful in planning management. Early extraction prevents further complications and prevents further attacks of epistaxis.

  6. Discontinuation of antiplatelet treatment and risk of recurrent stroke and all-cause death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Kamilla; Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    use and followed them up for stroke recurrence, or all-cause death. Person-time was classified by antiplatelet drug use into current use, recent use (≤150 days after last use), and non-use (>150 days after last use). Lipid-lowering drug (LLD) use was classified by the same rules. We used Cox......BACKGROUND: We wished to examine the impact of antiplatelet drug discontinuation on recurrent stroke and all-cause mortality. METHODS: We identified a cohort of incident ischaemic stroke patients in a Danish stroke registry, 2007-2011. Using population-based registries we assessed subjects' drug...... proportional hazard models to calculate the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of recurrent stroke or death associated with discontinuation of antiplatelet or LLD drugs. RESULTS: Among 4,670 stroke patients followed up for up a median of 1.5 years, 237...

  7. A recurrent de novo mutation in KCNC1 causes progressive myoclonus epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muona, M.; Berkovic, S. F.; Dibbens, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of rare, inherited disorders manifesting with action myoclonus, tonicclonic seizures and ataxia. We sequenced the exomes of 84 unrelated individuals with PME of unknown cause and molecularly solved 26 cases (31%). Remarkably, a recurrent de novo...

  8. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: Is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwazah Ahmad K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function. The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replacement. A recurrent pannus was observed in a female patient who needed repeated surgical intervention to excise a localized pannus without re-replacement of a well functioning prosthetic valve. Management of our case presents several questions, whether recurrence of pannus is caused by sparing the prosthetic valve, is it simply an exaggeration of an inflammatory healing process in certain individuals or is it ideal to re-replace the valve despite a well preserved function.

  9. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwazah, Ahmad K

    2012-06-29

    Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function.The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replacement.A recurrent pannus was observed in a female patient who needed repeated surgical intervention to excise a localized pannus without re-replacement of a well functioning prosthetic valve.Management of our case presents several questions, whether recurrence of pannus is caused by sparing the prosthetic valve, is it simply an exaggeration of an inflammatory healing process in certain individuals or is it ideal to re-replace the valve despite a well preserved function.

  10. Issues in Hypertriglyceridemic Pancreatitis - An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, John; Singh, Vijay; Pitchumoni, C. S; Yadav, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well established but underestimated cause of acute (AP) and recurrent AP (RAP). The clinical presentation of HTG-induced pancreatitis (HTG pancreatitis) is similar to other causes. Pancreatitis secondary to HTG is typically seen in the presence of one or more secondary factors (uncontrolled diabetes, alcoholism, medications, pregnancy) in a patient with an underlying common genetic abnormality of lipoprotein metabolism (Familial combined hyperlipidemia or Familial HTG). Less commonly, a patient with rare genetic abnormality (Familial chylomicronemic syndrome) with or without an additional secondary factor is encountered. The risk of AP in patients with serum triglycerides >1000 mg/dl and >2000 mg/dl is ∼5% and 10-20% respectively. It is not clear whether HTG pancreatitis is more severe than when it is due to other causes. Clinical management of HTG pancreatitis is similar to that of other causes. Insulin infusion in diabetic patients with HTG can rapidly reduce triglyceride levels. Use of apheresis is still experimental and better designed studies are needed to clarify its role in management of HTG pancreatitis. Diet, lifestyle changes, control of secondary factors are key to the treatment and medications are useful adjuncts to long term management of triglyceride levels. Control of triglyceride levels to well below 500 mg/dl can effectively prevent recurrences of pancreatitis. PMID:24172179

  11. All-Cause and Acute Pancreatitis Health Care Costs in Patients With Severe Hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nazia; Sharma, Puza P; Scott, Ronald D; Lin, Kathy J; Toth, Peter P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess health care utilization and costs related to acute pancreatitis (AP) in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (sHTG) levels. Patients with sHTG levels 1000 mg/dL or higher were identified from January 1, 2007, to June 30, 2013. The first identified incident triglyceride level was labeled as index date. All-cause, AP-related health care visits, and mean total all-cause costs in patients with and without AP were compared during 12 months postindex. A generalized linear model regression was used to compare costs while controlling for patient characteristics and comorbidities. Five thousand five hundred fifty sHTG patients were identified, and 5.4% of these patients developed AP during postindex. Patients with AP had significantly (P < 0.05) more all-cause outpatient visits, hospitalizations, longer length of stays during the hospital visits, and emergency department visits versus patients without AP. Mean (SD) unadjusted all-cause health care costs in the 12 months postindex were $25,343 ($33,139) for patients with AP compared with $15,195 ($24,040) for patients with no AP. The regression showed annual all-cause costs were 49.9% higher (P < 0.01) for patients with AP versus without AP. Patients who developed AP were associated with higher costs; managing patients with sHTG at risk of developing AP may help reduce unnecessary costs.

  12. Retained guidewire penetrating through the aorta into the thorax: an unusual cause of recurrent bilateral pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YongHun; Yu, JunSik; Kim, YoHan; Lee, WooSurng

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous complications of the Seldinger technique have been reported in the literature, only a few complications are related to guidewires. We here report a case of a patient with a guidewire lost and retained in the aorta during vertebral artery stenting. Unfortunately, the guidewire in the aorta was not detected for 5 years, and it penetrated through the aorta into the left thorax, leading to recurrent left pneumothorax. No physician identified the wandering guidewire in the left thorax, and the recurrent left pneumothorax was only managed with closed thoracostomy drainage several times. After 4 months, the patient presented to our hospital with repeated severe chest pain, and newly developed right pneumothorax was diagnosed on chest X-rays. We meticulously evaluated the radiological findings of the other hospitals to identify the cause of the recurrent pneumothorax and discovered that the lost and wandering guidewire had crossed over from the left to the right thorax through the anterior mediastinum. The guidewire was identified as the cause of the recurrent bilateral pneumothorax, and the patient was successfully treated with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery without any events. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  13. Long-term outcomes and recurrence patterns of standard versus extended pancreatectomy for pancreatic head cancer: a multicenter prospective randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jin-Young; Kang, Jae Seung; Han, Youngmin; Heo, Jin Seok; Choi, Seong Ho; Choi, Dong Wook; Park, Sang Jae; Han, Sung-Sik; Yoon, Dong Sup; Park, Joon Seong; Yu, Hee Chul; Kang, Koo Jeong; Kim, Sang Geol; Lee, Hongeun; Kwon, Wooil; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Han, Ho-Seong; Kim, Sun-Whe

    2017-07-01

    Our previous randomized controlled trial revealed no difference in 2-year overall survival (OS) between extended and standard resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The present study evaluated the 5-year OS and recurrence patterns according to the extent of pancreatectomy. Between 2006 and 2009, 169 consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled and randomized to standard (n = 83) or extended resection (n = 86) groups to compare 5-year OS rate, long-term recurrence patterns and factors associated with long-term survival. The surgical R0 rate was similar between the standard and extended groups (85.5 vs. 90.7%, P = 0.300). Five-year OS (18.4 vs. 14.4%, P = 0.388), 5-year disease-free survival (14.8 vs. 14.0%, P = 0.531), and overall recurrence rates (74.7 vs. 69.9%, P = 0.497) were not significantly different between the two groups, although the incidence of peritoneal seeding was higher in the extended group (25 vs. 8.1%, P = 0.014). Extended pancreatectomy does not have better short-term and long-term survival outcomes, and shows similar R0 rates and overall recurrence rates compared with standard pancreatectomy. Extended pancreatectomy does not have to be performed routinely for all cases of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma, especially considering its associated increased morbidity shown in our previous study. © 2017 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  14. Rapid Evolution from the First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis to Chronic Pancreatitis in Human Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Elie Aoun; Adam Slivka; Dionysios J Papachristou; David C Whitcomb; Ferga C Gleeson; Georgios I Papachristou

    2007-01-01

    Context Growing evidence suggests that recurrent acute pancreatitis leads to chronic pancreatitis, but this sequence is seldom reported in human subjects. The sentinel acute pancreatitis event hypothesis suggests that an initial episode of acute pancreatitis is the first step in a complicated series of events ultimately leading to chronic pancreatitis. Objective To identify patients who evolved from recurrent acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Setting The Severity of Acute Pancreatit...

  15. [Recurrent epidemics of gastroenteritis caused by norovirus GI.3 in a small hotel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, Jani; Hemminki, Kaisa; Pirnes, Aija; Roivainen, Merja; Al-Hello, Haider; Maunula, Leena; Kauppinen, Ari; Miettinen, Likka; Smit, Pieter W; Huusko, Sari; Toikkanen, Salla; Rimhanen-Finne, Ruska

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent cases of gastroenteritis occurred in a small hotel. The causative agent of disease could not be detected. The cause and the source of the disease were established through epidemiological investigations and laboratory diagnosis. The causative agent of the disease was norovirus GI.3. Norovirus GI was detected in the water from the well and on surfaces at the hotel. Both epidemiological investigations and laboratory diagnostics are needed in resolving epidemics. Continuous development of laboratory methods is important.

  16. [A case of acute pancreatitis caused by 5-aminosalicylic acid suppositories in a patient with ulcerative colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kook Hyun; Kim, Tae Nyeun; Jang, Byung Ik

    2007-12-01

    Oral 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) has been known as a first-choice drug for ulcerative colitis. However, hypersensitivity reactions, including pancreatitis, hepatitis, and skin rash, have been reported with 5-ASA. Topical formulations of 5-ASA like suppositories have been rarely reported to induce adverse reactions because of their limited absorption rate. We recently experienced a case of acute pancreatitis caused by 5-ASA suppositories in a patient with ulcerative colitis. A 26-year-old male was admitted with abdominal pain and diagnosed as ulcerative colitis. Acute pancreatitis occurred soon after 24 hours of treatment with oral mesalazine. Drug-induced pancreatitis was suspected and administration of mesalazine was discontinued. Then 5-ASA suppositories were started instead of oral mesalazine. Twenty-four hours after taking 5-ASA suppositories, he experienced severe abdominal pain, fever, and elevation of amylase levels. The suppositories were immediately stopped and symptoms resolved over next 48 hours. Herein, we suggest that, in patients treated with 5-ASA suppositories who complain of severe abdominal pain, drug-induced pancreatitis should be suspected.

  17. Rapid identification of drug resistant Candida species causing recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diba, Kambiz; Namaki, Atefeh; Ayatolahi, Haleh; Hanifian, Haleh

    2012-01-01

    Some yeast agents including Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata have a role in recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. We studied the frequency of both common and recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis in symptomatic cases which were referred to Urmia Medical Sciences University related gynecology clinics using morphologic and molecular methods. The aim of this study was the identification of Candida species isolated from recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis cases using a rapid and reliable molecular method. Vaginal swabs obtained from each case, were cultured on differential media including cornmeal agar and CHROM agar Candida. After 48 hours at 37℃, the cultures were studied for growth characteristics and color production respectively. All isolates were identified using the molecular method of PCR - restriction fragment length polymorphism. Among all clinical specimens, we detected 19 ( 16 % ) non fungal agents, 87 ( 82.1 % ) yeasts and 2 ( 1.9 % ) multiple infections. The yeast isolates identified morphologically included Candida albicans ( n = 62 ), Candida glabrata ( n = 9 ), Candida tropicalis ( n = 8 ), Candida parapsilosis ( n = 8 ) and Candida guilliermondii and Candida krusei ( n = 1 each ). We also obtained very similar results for Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis as the most common clinical isolates, by using PCR - Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism. Use of two differential methods, morphologic and molecular, enabled us to identify most medically important Candida species which particularly cause recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis.

  18. Popliteal Venous Aneurysm: A Rare Cause of Recurrent Pulmonary Emboli and Limb Swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, David A.; Robinson, Graham J.; Johnson, Brian F.

    2008-01-01

    Popliteal venous aneurysm is a rare cause of recurrent pulmonary embolism, although the true incidence of aneurysm is probably underestimated. One-third of patients suffer further embolic events despite therapeutic anticoagulation. We report the case of a 59-year-old male who presented with recurrent PEs over a period of 12 years despite anticoagulation therapy. A thrombophilia screen and abdominal ultrasound were normal at that time. He reattended with recurrent pulmonary emboli, left calf swelling, and a mass in his left popliteal fossa causing limitation of knee movement. Venous duplex and MRI of his popliteal fossa demonstrated a thrombosed true popliteal venous aneurysm with popliteal and superficial femoral vein occlusion. In view of the mass effect we proceeded to surgical excision of his aneurysm after prophylactic placement of an IVC filter. The patient regained normal knee function with intensive inpatient physiotherapy. He has been recommenced on lifelong anticoagulant. The presentation, investigation, and management of the condition are briefly discussed. We suggest that a bilateral lower limb duplex is performed to exclude venous aneurysm in all patients presenting with pulmonary embolism in which an underlying source cannot otherwise be identified and no thrombophilic tendency is detected.

  19. Treatment Challenges of a Primary Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Causing Recurrent Ischemic Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Strambo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Extracranial vertebral artery aneurysms are a rare cause of embolic stroke; surgical and endovascular therapy options are debated and long-term complication may occur. Case Report. A 53-year-old man affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 came to our attention for recurrent vertebrobasilar embolic strokes, caused by a primary giant, partially thrombosed, fusiform aneurysm of the left extracranial vertebral artery. The aneurysm was treated by endovascular approach through deposition of Guglielmi Detachable Coils in the proximal segment of the left vertebral artery. Six years later the patient presented stroke recurrence. Cerebral angiography and Color Doppler Ultrasound well characterized the unique hemodynamic condition developed over the years responsible for the new embolic event: the aneurysm had been revascularized from its distal portion by reverse blood flow coming from the patent vertebrobasilar axis. A biphasic Doppler signal in the left vertebral artery revealed a peculiar behavior of the blood flow, alternately directed to the aneurysm and backwards to the basilar artery. Surgical ligation of the distal left vertebral artery and excision of the aneurysm were thus performed. Conclusion. This is the first described case of NF1-associated extracranial vertebral artery aneurysm presenting with recurrent embolic stroke. Complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the blood circulation is advisable to achieve full resolution of the embolic source.

  20. Heterogeneity index evaluated by slope of linear regression on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT as a prognostic marker for predicting tumor recurrence in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong-il [CHA University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Joong [Veterans Health Service Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June-Key [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has been investigated as a method to predict pancreatic cancer recurrence after pancreatic surgery. We evaluated the recently introduced heterogeneity indices of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT used for predicting pancreatic cancer recurrence after surgery and compared them with current clinicopathologic and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT parameters. A total of 93 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients (M:F = 60:33, mean age = 64.2 ± 9.1 years) who underwent preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT following pancreatic surgery were retrospectively enrolled. The standardized uptake values (SUVs) and tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were measured on each {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, as metabolic parameters. Metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were examined as volumetric parameters. The coefficient of variance (heterogeneity index-1; SUVmean divided by the standard deviation) and linear regression slopes (heterogeneity index-2) of the MTV, according to SUV thresholds of 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0, were evaluated as heterogeneity indices. Predictive values of clinicopathologic and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT parameters and heterogeneity indices were compared in terms of pancreatic cancer recurrence. Seventy patients (75.3%) showed recurrence after pancreatic cancer surgery (mean recurrence = 9.4 ± 8.4 months). Comparing the recurrence and no recurrence patients, all of the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT parameters and heterogeneity indices demonstrated significant differences. In univariate Cox-regression analyses, MTV (P = 0.013), TLG (P = 0.007), and heterogeneity index-2 (P = 0.027) were significant. Among the clinicopathologic parameters, CA19-9 (P = 0.025) and venous invasion (P = 0.002) were selected as significant parameters. In multivariate Cox-regression analyses, MTV (P = 0.005), TLG (P = 0.004), and heterogeneity index-2 (P = 0.016) with venous invasion (P < 0.001, 0.001, and 0

  1. A Suspicious Pancreatic Mass in Chronic Pancreatitis: Pancreatic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. de Clerck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation.

  2. Choroid Plexus in the Central Canal of the Spinal Cord Causing Recurrent Syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtaya, Anan; Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Nicoll, James A R; Nader-Sepahi, Ali

    2018-03-01

    Syringomyelia is a fluid-filled cavitation within the substance of the spinal cord. This condition usually follows a primary pathology that disrupts the normal cerebrospinal fluid circulation or disturbs the microcirculation and cytoarchitecture of the spinal cord parenchyma. However, an etiology of recurrent syringomyelia resulting from an ectopic choroid plexus (CP) has not been discussed. Ectopic CP rests may be found within the central nervous system. Although there has been a single report, describing ectopic intramedullary spinal cord CP, to our knowledge, extra-cranial nonmalignant CP in the central canal of the spinal cord has not been reported. We report CP in the central canal of the spinal cord in a 23-year-old male patient who had developmental delay and diabetes mellitus type I who presented with dissociated sensory changes and muscle wastage predominantly on the right upper and lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a multiloculated spinal cord syringomyelia stretching from cervical (C3) to the conus medullaris causing recurrent neurologic deficits. A biopsy of the central canal spinal cord lesion revealed CP. Decompression and syringosubarachnoid shunt insertion stabilized the patient's neurology. Our illustrative case reveals the presence of CP in the central canal of the spinal cord that may suggest a role in the etiology of recurrent syringomyelia. Although management poses a challenge to neurosurgeons, prompt decompression and shunting of the syringomyelia remains a favorable approach with acceptable outcomes. Further investigation into the pathophysiology of central canal CP ectopic causing recurrent syringomyelia and its correlation with spinal cord development may help future treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Analysis of the spectrum and resistance of pathogen causing sepsis in patients with severe acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H X; He, L; Cai, S W; Xin, X L; Shi, H D; Zhou, L; Shi, X J

    2017-05-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of spectrum and drug resistance of pathogens causing sepsis in patients with severe acute pancreatitis(SAP). Methods: The clinical data of 63 SAP patients with sepsis admitted in Department of Hepatobiliary, People's Liberation Army General Hospital from January 2014 to December 2015 were retrospectively studied. There were 47 males and 16 females, aged from 22 to 73 years, with an average age of (52±11)years. Samples were collected mainly from: (1)pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis and abdominal drainage; (2)bile; (3) blood or deep venous catheter; (4) sputum and tracheal catheter and thoracic drainage; (5) urine. Strain identification and drug-resistance test were preformed on positive specimens. Results: Of 244 pathogenic isolates, mainly derived from abdominal cavity(36.0%), blood stream (14.0%), central venous catheter(11.8%), necrotic tissue(9.1%) and sputum(8.1%); 154(63.1%) were gram-negative bacteria, 68 cases(27.9%) were gram-positive bacteria and 22 cases(9.0%) were fungi respectively. The top six common pathogens isolated were E . coli(16.0%), E .faecium and faecalis(15.2%), P .aeruginosa(10.7%), K .pneumonia(9.8%), Acinetobacter baumanni(8.2%), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(5.3%)respectively. The detection rate of E . coli and K . pneumonia extended-spectrum β-lactamases(ESBL) was 84.6%(33/39) and 70.8%(17/24), the resistance rate to imipeniem was 12.8% and 25.0%, to cefperazone-sulbactam was 28.2% and 29.2%. As to P . aeruginosa and Acinetobacter bacillus, the resistance rate to imipeniem was 50.0% and 75.0%, to cefperazone-sulbactam was 42.3% and 70.0%; Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was completely resistant to cefperazone-sulbactam, but sensitive to minocycline, SMZ-TMP with the resistance rate less than 40.0%. Gram-positive bacterium strains mainly included E . faecium(38.2%, 26/68), E .faecalis(16.2%, 11/68) and Staphylococcus(35.3%, 24/68) which maintained high sensitivity to vancomycin

  4. Therapeutic Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Pediatric Patients With Acute Recurrent and Chronic Pancreatitis: Data From the INSPPIRE (INternational Study group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In search for a cuRE) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troendle, David M; Fishman, Douglas S; Barth, Bradley A; Giefer, Matthew J; Lin, Tom K; Liu, Quin Y; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Bellin, Melena D; Durie, Peter R; Freedman, Steven D; Gariepy, Cheryl; Gonska, Tanja; Heyman, Melvin B; Himes, Ryan; Husain, Sohail Z; Kumar, Soma; Lowe, Mark E; Morinville, Veronique D; Ooi, Chee Y; Palermo, Joseph; Pohl, John F; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Werlin, Steven; Wilschanski, Michael; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Uc, Aliye

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize utilization and benefit of therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in children with acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). From August 2012 to February 2015, 301 children with ARP or CP were enrolled in the INSPPIRE (INternational Study group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In search for a cuRE) study. Physicians reported utilization and benefit of therapeutic ERCP at enrollment. Differences were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods. One hundred seventeen children (38.9%) underwent at least 1 therapeutic ERCP. The procedure was more commonly performed in children with CP compared with those with ARP (65.8% vs 13.5%, P < 0.0001). Utility of therapeutic ERCP was reported to be similar between ARP and CP (53% vs 56%, P = 0.81) and was found to be helpful for at least 1 indication in both groups (53/99 patients [53.5%]). Predictors for undergoing therapeutic ERCP were presence of obstructive factors in ARP and CP, Hispanic ethnicity, or white race in CP. Therapeutic ERCP is frequently utilized in children with ARP or CP and may offer benefit in selected cases, specifically if ductal obstruction is present. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the efficacy of therapeutic ERCP and to explore subgroups that might have increased benefit from such intervention.

  5. Lessons from a national audit of acute pancreatitis: A summary of the NCEPOD report 'Treat the Cause'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, D A; McPherson, S J; Sinclair, M T; Smith, N

    The National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) is an independent organisation whose remit is to review the quality of medical and surgical care provided in the United Kingdom. We undertook a review into the care provided to patients treated for acute pancreatitis during a 6 month study period between 1st January and 30th June 2014. This included assessment of care at an organisational level, clinical level within hospitals and external peer review. From a random sample, 712 patients underwent hospital clinician review and 418 patients had external peer review. Overall, we found that there was room for improvement in care in over 50% of patients with acute pancreatitis. Case reviewers felt that efforts to prevent recurrent episodes due to gallstones and alcohol were inadequate as 21% of patients in the study had one or more previous episodes of acute pancreatitis. Aspects of general care where improvements could be made include better antibiotic stewardship; as 1/5 of patients were considered to have been given antibiotics unnecessarily. Overall management of the patients' nutrition was considered adequate by the case reviewers in only 85% of cases. The use of an early warning score was omitted in 31% of emergency department admissions. Recommendations include standardised early warning scoring systems to be used throughout the hospital and commenced in the emergency department. The development of better networking arrangements and regional pancreatitis units, with shared management guidelines, is also essential to improve the coordination of care. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Non-Obstructive Middle Lobe Syndrome: An Unusual Cause of Recurrent Pneumonia in an Elderly Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Rua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An 84-year-old woman had five episodes of pneumonia in 4 months. Despite extensive comorbidities and advanced age, her health status was good and the recurrence seemed unjustified. Exhaustive background investigation revealed 14 episodes of right-sided pneumonias during the 3 previous years and an inconclusive investigation with CT of the thorax and bronchofibroscopy, despite some fibrotic and atelectasic alterations in the right middle lobe. A new right-sided x-ray showed a wedge-shaped density extending anteriorly and inferiorly from the hilum, and CT of the thorax revealed aggravated middle lobe abnormalities with thickening of the bronchial wall and segment atelectasis, without any visible airway obstruction. After extensive work-up had excluded other causes of recurrent pneumonia and immunodeficiency, a non-obstructive middle lobe syndrome (MLS was deemed responsible for the repeated episodes of pneumonia. MLS is characterised by chronic hypoventilation and atelectasis of the middle lobe, facilitating secretion accumulation, chronic inflammation and repeated infection. After treatment with bronchodilators and immunostimulants was initiated, the patient experienced no recurrences for several months.

  7. Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Recurrent Hyperthyroidism Caused by Graves' Disease: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Wang, B; Chen, S R; Hou, X; Wang, X F; Zhao, S H; Song, J Q; Wang, Y G

    2016-09-01

    The effect of selenium supplementation on recurrent hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease is unclear. Our study aimed to assess the efficacy of selenium supplementation therapy on recurrent Graves' disease. Forty-one patients with recurrent Graves' disease were enrolled in this study. All patients received the routine treatment using methimazole (MMI), while patients allocated to the selenium group received additional selenium therapy for 6 months. The influence of selenium supplementation on the concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAb), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were assessed. The remission rate was also compared between 2 groups. There was no obvious difference in the demographic data and the levels of serum FT4, FT3, TSH, and TRAb between the 2 groups at baseline. Both FT4 and FT3 decreased more at 2 months in the selenium group than the controls, while the TSH level increased more in patients receiving selenium supplementation (pGraves' disease. Randomized trials with large number of participants are needed to validate the finding above. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Disseminated Nocardia cyriacigeorgia causing pancreatitis in a haploidentical stem cell transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first published case of acute pancreatitis secondary to disseminated nocardiosis in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipient on chronic immunosuppression for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Nocardiosis in the HSCT population is relatively rare, and has not yet been described in haploidentical HSCT recipients. Our patient is a 28-year-old male with a history of haploidentical HSCT and GVHD of the skin and lung who was admitted to the hospital with acute pancreatitis. The workup for the etiology of his pancreatitis was initially unrevealing. He subsequently developed worsening sepsis and respiratory failure despite broad spectrum antimicrobials. After multiple bronchoscopies and pancreatic fluid sampling, he was found to have disseminated nocardiosis with Nocardia cyriacigeorgia.

  9. Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging detects recurrent isolated vertigo caused by cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaowei; Jiang, Li; Luo, Man; Li, Jiaoxing; Li, Weidong; Sheng, Wenli

    2015-06-01

    The etiology of isolated vertigo has been a substantial diagnostic challenge for both neurologists and otolaryngologists. This study was designed to detect recurrent isolated vertigo due to cerebral hypoperfusion using perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (PWI). We recruited isolated vertigo patients whose clinical condition was suspected to be caused by hypodynamics of the brain; these individuals formed the case group. We generated two additional groups: a negative group composed of vertigo patients whose symptoms were caused by problems associated with the ear and a healthy control group. Each subject underwent PWI, and seven regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and mean transit time (MTT) were obtained from each ROI. We further calculated the absolute difference of relative parameter values between two mirrored ROIs. The significant difference in the relative MTT from the mirrored cerebellar ROI (|rMTTleft-right|) of the case group was larger than those from the negative and healthy control groups (p = 0.026 and p = 0.038, respectively). Signal differences in |rrCBVleft-right| and |rrCBFleft-right| were not found among the three groups. In summary, disequilibrium in the rMTT of the bilateral cerebellum in the case group implied that hypoperfusion of the posterior circulation could trigger recurrent isolated vertigo and could be shown efficiently using PWI.

  10. EARS2 mutations cause fatal neonatal lactic acidosis, recurrent hypoglycemia and agenesis of corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhauser, Katharina; Haack, Tobias B; Alhaddad, Bader; Melcher, Marlen; Seibt, Annette; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Klee, Dirk; Mayatepek, Ertan; Prokisch, Holger; Distelmaier, Felix

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are essential for organelle protein synthesis. Genetic defects affecting the function of these enzymes may cause pediatric mitochondrial disease. Here, we report on a child with fatal neonatal lactic acidosis and recurrent hypoglycemia caused by mutations in EARS2, encoding mitochondrial glutamyl-tRNA synthetase 2. Brain ultrasound revealed agenesis of corpus callosum. Studies on patient-derived skin fibroblasts showed severely decreased EARS2 protein levels, elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and altered mitochondrial morphology. Our report further illustrates the clinical spectrum of the severe neonatal-onset form of EARS2 mutations. Moreover, in this case the live-cell parameters appeared to be more sensitive to mitochondrial dysfunction compared to standard diagnostics, which indicates the potential relevance of fibroblast studies in children with mitochondrial diseases.

  11. Interspecies differences of candida species causing recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis in response to fluconazole treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Naji

    2017-07-01

    Methods: The cross-sectional study was performed at Kowsar Gynecology Center, Motahhari educational hospital and Medical Mycology Center, Faculty of Medicine, Urmia, Iran, from October 2013 to July 2015. Those patients referred to the clinic with symptoms of vaginal discharge, itching or burning that swab samples from endo-exocervix and distal fornix discharge were taken. The vaginal discharge samples submitted to Medical Mycology Center, Urmia School of Medicine for the direct microscopic examination and cultures. Identification at the level of species was performed using CHROMagar Candida and Corn meal agar media. The molecular test polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP used for confirming culture results. For the susceptibility assay, disc diffusion method was performed with fluconazole and clotrimazole. Results: In these study 198 samples collected from patients with symptoms of vulvovaginal candidiasis, 77 vulvovaginal candidiasis cases were identified. Candida species are common in primary and recurrent cases in terms of frequency, Candida albicans (85.7%, Candida krusei (10.2% and Candida glabrata (4.1% were identified respectively. Total of 27 cases of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis, 10 cases were resistant to both clotrimazole and fluconazole (37% was observed that the most common species are resistant to treatment were Candida albicans by (82.1%, Candida krusei (14.3% and Candida glabrata (3.6% respectively. Drug resistance in Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata causing recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis included 69.1%, 75% and 100% respectively. Conclusion: Our findings have shown frequency of resistant non-albicans Candida species to fluconazole and clotrimazole is increasing. There is a considerable difference between Candida albicans and non-albicans species, Candida glabrata for the resistance to fluconazole and clotrimazole.

  12. What may cause fetus loss from acute pancreatitis in pregnancy: Analysis of 54 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min; Xu, Jian-Ming; Song, Sha-Sha; Mei, Qiao; Zhang, Li-Jiu

    2018-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy (APIP) poses a serious threat to the mother and her fetus, and might lead to fetal loss including miscarriage and stillbirth in certain patients. We sought to identify possible factors that affect fetal distress and evaluated outcomes of patients with APIP.We retrospectively reviewed clinical records of 54 pregnant women with APIP, who were treated at 2 tertiary clinical centers over a 6-year period. Clinical characteristics including etiology and severity of APIP, fetal monitoring data, and maternofetal outcomes were analyzed.Etiology of APIP included acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP, n = 14), hyperlipidemic pancreatitis (HLP, n = 22), and other etiologies (n = 18). Severity was classified as mild acute pancreatitis (MAP, n = 23), moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP, n = 24), and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP, n = 7). The incidence of preterm delivery, fetal distress, and fetal loss increased with the progression of severity of APIP (P < .05). The severity of HLP was significantly higher than that of ABP and APIP of other etiology (P < .01). HLP was more likely to lead to fetal distress than other APs (P < .01). Only 12 (22.2%) patients had fetal monitoring including non-stress test (NST); 1 case of SAP (14.3%) and 15 cases of MSAP (62.5%) were not transferred to intensive care unit for intensive monitoring.The incidence of fetal distress and fetal loss increased with worsening of APIP severity. HLP tends to result in worse fetal outcomes. The deficiencies of fetal state monitoring, lack of assessment, and management of pregnant women might increase the fetal loss in APIP.

  13. Recurrent furunculosis as a cause of isolated penile lymphedema: a case report

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    Sood Suneet

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated lymphedema of the penis is extremely rare: combined involvement of the scrotum and penis is the norm. Furunculosis as a cause is not, to our knowledge, previously reported. We present a case of isolated penile lymphedema that responded to excision of lymphedematous tissue and reconstruction with flaps. Case presentation A 32-year-old Arab man presented with a three-year history of a gradually increasing, painless penile swelling. Our patient's main complaint was non-erectile sexual dysfunction. The swelling was preceded by at least three prior episodes of severe furunculosis at the penile root. He had no other contributory past medical or family history. On examination there was gross penile enlargement, maximally at the mid shaft, associated with thickened skin at the sites of prior furunculosis. The glans and scrotum were normal. Both testes were palpable. Serology for filariasis, and urinary tract ultrasound and computed tomography scan were normal. The clinical diagnosis was lymphedema following recurrent penile furunculosis. At operation the lymphedematous tissues were removed. Closure of the penile shaft was accomplished by bilateral advancement of flaps from both ends of the penis. He resumed normal sexual activity one month after surgery. At 12 months, he had a good cosmetic result, with no signs of recurrence. Conclusions Furunculosis at the penile root may result in lymphedema confined to the penile shaft, sparing the scrotum. Excision of abnormal tissue and cover with a skin flap gave excellent cosmetic results, and allowed satisfactory sexual activity.

  14. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  15. Acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Vege, Santhi S

    2015-09-01

    To summarize recent data on classification systems, cause, risk factors, severity prediction, nutrition, and drug treatment of acute pancreatitis. Comparison of the Revised Atlanta Classification and Determinant Based Classification has shown heterogeneous results. Simvastatin has a protective effect against acute pancreatitis. Young black male, alcohol, smoldering symptoms, and subsequent diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis are risk factors associated with readmissions after acute pancreatitis. A reliable clinical or laboratory marker or a scoring system to predict severity is lacking. The PYTHON trial has shown that oral feeding with on demand nasoenteric tube feeding after 72 h is as good as nasoenteric tube feeding within 24 h in preventing infections in predicted severe acute pancreatitis. Male sex, multiple organ failure, extent of pancreatic necrosis, and heterogeneous collection are factors associated with failure of percutaneous drainage of pancreatic collections. The newly proposed classification systems of acute pancreatitis need to be evaluated more critically. New biomarkers are needed for severity prediction. Further well designed studies are required to assess the type of enteral nutritional formulations for acute pancreatitis. The optimal minimally invasive method or combination to debride the necrotic collections is evolving. There is a great need for a drug to treat the disease early on to prevent morbidity and mortality.

  16. Cardiac myxoma: An uncommon cause of recurrent stroke in uncommon age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cause of cardiogenic emboli in stroke, responsible for over 50% cases of total stroke patients. Myxoma is responsible only in few cases. A stroke caused by left atrial myxoma commonly occur in young females. This patient presented with the repeated attack of stroke in the age of 80 years. However, it is the most common benign cardiac tumor found more frequently. In young adults with stroke or transient ischemic attack than in older patients. Age of the patient and unusual cause of recurrent stroke make this case report interesting. An 80-year-old male with no other conventional vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia presented with left hemiparesis. Infarction over the right middle cerebral artery was disclosed on a magnetic resonance imaging study. The patient was a known case of right hemiparesis 3 years back, which was improved. The cause of repeated attack of stroke was left atrial myxoma, diagnosed by two-dimensional echocardiography.

  17. IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis and sclerosing cholangitis independent of autoimmune pancreatitis. A recurrent case after a 5-year history of spontaneous remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideaki; Miyachi, Yasutaka

    2009-07-06

    A new clinicopathological concept of IgG4-related sclerosing disease affecting various organs has recently been proposed in relation to autoimmune pancreatitis. This report describes the case of IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis and sclerosing cholangitis independent of autoimmune pancreatitis, which recurred after a long period of spontaneous remission. An 80-year-old Japanese man presented with obstructive jaundice owing to a hepatic hilum bile duct stricture. Coincidentally, a soft tissue mass surrounding the abdominal aorta, suggesting retroperitoneal fibrosis, was identified. Unexpectedly, spontaneous regression of obstructive jaundice together with retroperitoneal fibrosis occurred. The presence of high serum IgG4 concentrations measured later led us to consider a possible association with autoimmune pancreatitis; however, there were no clinical features confirming autoimmune pancreatitis. After a 5-year history of spontaneous clinical remission, there was an elevation of serum IgG4 levels and renal dysfunction owing to bilateral hydronephrosis caused by a reemergence of the retroperitoneal mass. Evaluation by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a biliary stricture, suggesting sclerosing cholangitis which was observed without the presence of any pancreatic duct abnormality. The subsequent excellent results obtained using steroid therapy, namely the decrease in serum IgG4 levels and the regression of the retroperitoneal mass, strongly suggested that the present case was an IgG4-related sclerosing disease. Aside from high serum IgG4 concentrations, markedly elevated levels of serum IgE was found retrospectively, although the clinical significance remains unknown. When we encounter fibrotic diseases of unknown etiology, we should measure serum IgG4 concentrations and monitor the disease activity over long periods even after achieving clinical remission.

  18. Delayed diagnosis of pituitary stalk interruption syndrome with severe recurrent hyponatremia caused by adrenal insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Mi Jang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS involves the occurrence of a thin or absent pituitary stalk, hypoplasia of the adenohypophysis, and ectopic neurohypophysis. Diagnosis is confirmed using magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with PSIS have a variable degree of pituitary hormone deficiency and a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. The clinical course of the disease in our patient is similar to that of a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. This is thought to be caused by failure in the suppression of vasopressin secretion due to hypocortisolism. To the best of our knowledge, there is no case report of a patient with PSIS presenting with hyponatremia as the first symptom in Korean children. Herein, we report a patient with PSIS presenting severe recurrent hyponatremia as the first symptom, during adolescence and explain the pathophysiology of hyponatremia with secondary adrenal insufficiency.

  19. Antifungal Susceptibilities of Candida Species Causing Vulvovaginitis and Epidemiology of Recurrent Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sandra S.; Galask, Rudolph P.; Messer, Shawn A.; Hollis, Richard J.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Pfaller, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    There are limited data regarding the antifungal susceptibility of yeast causing vulvovaginal candidiasis, since cultures are rarely performed. Susceptibility testing was performed on vaginal yeast isolates collected from January 1998 to March 2001 from 429 patients with suspected vulvovaginal candidiasis. The charts of 84 patients with multiple positive cultures were reviewed. The 593 yeast isolates were Candida albicans (n = 420), Candida glabrata (n = 112), Candida parapsilosis (n = 30), Candida krusei (n = 12), Saccharomyces cerevisiae ( n = 9), Candida tropicalis (n = 8), Candida lusitaniae (n = 1), and Trichosporon sp. (n = 1). Multiple species suggesting mixed infection were isolated from 27 cultures. Resistance to fluconazole and flucytosine was observed infrequently (3.7% and 3.0%); 16.2% of isolates were resistant to itraconazole (MIC ≥ 1 μg/ml). The four imidazoles (econazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, and ketoconazole) were active: 94.3 to 98.5% were susceptible at ≤1 μg/ml. Among different species, elevated fluconazole MICs (≥16 μg/ml) were only observed in C. glabrata (15.2% resistant [R], 51.8% susceptible-dose dependent [S-DD]), C. parapsilosis (3.3% S-DD), S. cerevisiae (11.1% S-DD), and C. krusei (50% S-DD, 41.7% R, considered intrinsically fluconazole resistant). Resistance to itraconazole was observed among C. glabrata (74.1%), C. krusei (58.3%), S. cerevisiae (55.6%), and C. parapsilosis (3.4%). Among 84 patients with recurrent episodes, non-albicans species were more common (42% versus 20%). A ≥4-fold rise in fluconazole MIC was observed in only one patient with C. parapsilosis. These results support the use of azoles for empirical therapy of uncomplicated candidal vulvovaginitis. Recurrent episodes are more often caused by non-albicans species, for which azole agents are less likely to be effective. PMID:15872235

  20. Gemcitabine treatment causes resistance and malignancy of pancreatic cancer stem-like cells via induction of lncRNA HOTAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Dong, Ping; Wang, Weiguo; Huang, Mingquan; Tian, Bole

    2017-01-01

    Gemcitabine is the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, despite the high risk of chemoresistance as a major disadvantage. In the past few years, significant advances have been made in the field of pancreatic cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and their critical roles in drug resistance, invasion and metastasis, which are tightly regulated by long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). The present study demonstrated that HOX antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) is not different between the pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 and its enriched CSC sub-population. However, after gemcitabine treatment, the expression levels of HOTAIR in CSCs were induced, but not in PANC-1 cells. HOTAIR induced by gemcitabine failed to cause chemoresistance, but promoted the clonogenicity, proliferation and migration of the cells. By introducing HOTAIR using lentivirus, chemoresistance was induced and the self-renewal capacity, proliferation and migration were significantly promoted. By contrast, HOTAIR knockdown in PANC-1 CSCs treated with or without gemcitabine decreased the cell proliferation, altered the cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis, demonstrating its critical roles in regulating the malignant character of PANC-1 CSCs. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that HOTAIR may be induced by gemcitabine and acts as a tumor promoter by inhibiting the chemosensitivity, and promoting the self-renewal capacity, proliferation and migration of PANC-1 CSCs, which supports its potential application as a novel therapeutic approach for pancreatic cancer. PMID:29201179

  1. Revision of anastomotic stenosis after pancreatic head resection for chronic pancreatitis: is it futile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Katherine A; Fontenot, Bennett B; Harvey, Norman R; Adams, David B

    2010-01-01

    Background: Because survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for cancer is limited, it is difficult to assess longterm pancreaticojejunal anastomotic patency. However, in patients with benign disease, pancreaticojejunal anastomotic stenosis may become problematic. What happens when pancreaticojejunal anastomosis revision is undertaken? Methods: Patients undergoing pancreatic anastomotic revision after pancreatic head resection for benign disease between 1997 and 2007 at the Medical University of South Carolina were identified. A retrospective chart review and analysis were undertaken with the approval of the Institutional Review Board for the Evaluation of Human Subjects. Longterm follow-up was obtained by patient survey at a clinic visit or by telephone. Results: During the study period, 237 patients underwent pancreatic head resection. Of these, 27 patients (17 women; median age 42 years) underwent revision of pancreaticojejunal anastomosis. Six patients (22%) had a pancreatic leak or abscess at the time of the index pancreatic head resection. The indication for revision of anastomosis was intractable pain. All patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), which indicated anastomotic stricture in 18 patients (63%). Nine other patients underwent exploration based on clinical suspicion caused by recurrent pancreatitis and stenosis was confirmed at the time of surgery. Six patients (22%) had perioperative complications after revision. The median length of stay was 12 days. There were no perioperative deaths; however, late mortality occurred in four patients (15%). Six of 23 survivors (26%) at the time of follow-up (median 56 months) reported longterm pain relief. Conclusions: Stricture of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis after pancreatic head resection presents with recurrent pancreatitis and pancreatic pain. MRCP has good specificity in the diagnosis of anastomotic obstruction, but lacks sensitivity. Pancreaticojejunal revision

  2. Laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeyer, Robert J; Fisher, William E; Salameh, Jihad R; Jeyapalan, Manjula; Sweeney, John F; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of the review was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy for operative drainage of symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy between June 1997 and July 2001 was performed. Data regarding etiology of pancreatitis, size of pseudocyst, operative time, complications, and pseudocyst recurrence were collected and reported as median values with ranges. Laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy was attempted in 6 patients. Pseudocyst etiology included gallstone pancreatitis (3), alcohol-induced pancreatitis (2), and post-ERCP pancreatitis (1). The cystogastrostomy was successfully performed laparoscopically in 5 of 6 patients. However, the procedure was converted to open after creation of the cystgastrostomy in 1 of these patients. There were no complications in the cases completed laparoscopically and no deaths in the entire group. No pseudocyst recurrences were observed with a median followup of 44 months (range 4-59 months). Laparoscopic pancreatic cystgastrostomy is a feasible surgical treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts with a resultant low pseudocyst recurrence rate, length of stay, and low morbidity and mortality.

  3. Pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis: a comprehensive update and a look into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Roland; Tingstedt, Bobby; Xia, Jinglin

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a relatively frequent condition usually caused by alcoholic abuse but also due to recurrent gallstone disease, metabolic endocrine disorders and haemochromatosis, among others. Specific types such as hereditary and autoimmune pancreatitis should be particularly kept in mind and emphasized, as they require specific treatment and attention. The possibility to identify gene mutations has also increased and this is likely to decrease the overall total number of "idiopathic" chronic pancreatitis cases. Pancreatic stellate cells have been identified as potential key players in the progression of chronic pancreatitis and the development of fibrogenesis, which are activated either during repeated attacks of necro-inflammation or directly by toxic factors. The inhibition or modulation of pancreatic stellate cells could represent a way of potential intervention in patients with chronic pancreatitis in the future.

  4. Dentigerous cyst associated with a displaced tooth in the maxillary sinus: an unusual cause of recurrent sinusitis in an adolescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Robson, Caroline D.; Padwa, Bonnie L.; Rahbar, Reza

    2009-01-01

    We report an unusual case of a displaced maxillary molar and associated dentigerous cyst within the maxillary sinus in an adolescent presenting as recurrent sinusitis. Although a rare cause of sinusitis in children, dentigerous cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis for causes of persistent or recurrent sinusitis in this age group. This report provides further evidence for obtaining imaging studies when managing pediatric sinusitis that does not respond to standard antibiotic therapy. We discuss management options for these lesions including the differential diagnoses and need for follow-up. (orig.)

  5. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  6. Acute pancreatitis in children: an experience with 50 cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pancreatitis admitted to the Pediatric Surgery Unit at the. Al-Azhar ... treatment. The most common long-term morbidity was recurrent pancreatitis [7]. The objective of this ... duct abnormalities in four patients (8%), familial chronic pancreatitis in ...

  7. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sala Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions.

  8. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis in a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varalakshmi Muthukrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this case report, we present a young patient with type 1 diabetes who had hereditary chronic pancreatitis. We evaluated him for the cause of pancreatitis, but it was inconclusive and finally the genetic testing was done for him, which revealed heterozygous missense mutation in exon 3 of the PRSS1 gene (protease serine 1 gene on chromosome 7. Hence, we were able to make the diagnosis of hereditary chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis secondary to any cause can lead to permanent diabetes, which is typically difficult to control. However, in this case, the episodes of recurrent pancreatitis were present after the onset of type 1 diabetes as compared to the usual presentation of diabetes after the advancement of chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Blade of Grass as an Unusual Cause of Recurrent Facial Cutaneous Sinus Tract: A Clinical Case

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    Resmije Ademi-Abdyli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of an embedded foreign body in the oral and maxillofacial region is not unusual, but the impaction of a foreign body with vegetative nature is rare. Prompt diagnosis and surgical removal of these foreign bodies will minimize their associated complications. This case report presents a patient with recurrent submandibular abscess and persistent facial cutaneous sinus tract caused by a retained blade of grass inside the facial soft tissue. The fact that the plain radiograph misdiagnosed the presence of a foreign body meant that the pathology persisted for about three months, and the patient underwent hospitalization, surgical procedures, and antibiotic regimens; however all of these failed until the foreign body was detected and removed. Conclusion. To avoid misdiagnosis of foreign body presence in the orofacial region, notably suspected foreign bodies with low radiopacity, the clinician must perform careful clinical examination and use the ultrasonography. Also, in the uncertain cases where the pathology persists, despite having undertaken surgical procedures and antibiotic regimens, the clinician should pay more attention to the patient’s history which may suggest the presence of the foreign body.

  10. Emergence of herpes simplex type 1 as the main cause of recurrent genital ulcerative disease in women in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, P V; O'Neill, H J; Wyatt, D E; McCaughey, C; Quah, S; McBride, M O

    2003-05-01

    Genital herpes is a common infection affecting some 20% of sexually active people. Although herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 can both establish genital latency, reactivation from the sacral ganglia favours HSV-2. Over the past decade the incidence of type 1 genital infection in women has greatly increased. To determine whether the increased prevalence of HSV-1 genital infection was benign or influencing the pattern of virus recovery in recurrent infection. A retrospective analysis of laboratory computer records was undertaken. Patients attending six genitourinary medicine (GUM) departments, over an 80 months period, were identified. Recurrent infection was confirmed where virus was recovered from at least two separate episodes of genital ulceration that were separated by an interval of 12 or more weeks. Episodes were further analysed for frequency, age, gender and virus type. Sixty nine patients with recurrent genital herpetic infection were identified. HSV-1 and HSV-2 were predominantly recovered from recurrent genital infections in females (34 HSV-1 vs. ten HSV-2) and males (one HSV-1 vs. 24 HSV-2), respectively (P>0.001). The mean age of females and males, at the initial diagnosis, was 26 and 39 years. There was no difference in the recurrence rate by type. HSV-1 has become the commonest cause of recurrent genital ulceration in Northern Ireland, almost entirely due its recent increased prevalence in women over the last decade. Women are experiencing genital herpetic infections at an earlier age than men.

  11. Pancreatic Injury Caused By A Fall From Height: Transection at the Tail

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    Cem OKTAY

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Isolated pancreatic injury due to blunt abdominal trauma is rare and may be clinically difficult to diagnose. Parenchymal injuries may not be recognized during initial evaluation. We report the case of a 30-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department (ED with the complaint of persistent abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. His medical history revealed that he fell from a height of approximately 1.5 meters 1 day ago and hit an iron block. He was presented and discharged from another hospital ED. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CECT of the abdomen was ordered during his second presentation and revealed pancreatic parenchymal contusion, laceration, and transection at the tail of pancreas. Our findings suggest that, when there is high index of suspicion for pancreatic injury, a CECT should always be ordered. ÖZET: Künt abdominal travmaya bağlı izole pankreas yaralanması nadirdir ve klinik olarak tanı konulması zordur. Parankimal yaralanmalar ilk değerlendirme sırasında ayırt edilemeyebilinir. Bu yazıda, devam eden karın ağrısı, bulantı ve kusma yakınması ile acil servise başvuran 30 yaşındaki bir hasta sunuldu. Hastanın öyküsünde bir gün önce 1.5 metre yükseklikten demir bir blok üzerine düştüğü ve başvurduğu başka bir hastanenin acil servisinden taburcu edildiği öğrenildi. ikinci başvurusu sırasında kontrastlı batın tomografisi çekildi ve pankreas parankiminde kontüzyon, laserasyon ve pankreas kuyruk kesiminde kopma tespit edildi. Pankreas yaralanmasına ait yüksek şüphe mevcut ise kontrastlı batın tomografisi her zaman istenmelidir. Key words: Abdominal trauma, computed tomography, pancreatic injury, Anahtar sözcükler: Karın travması, bilgisayarlı tomografi, pankreas yaralanması

  12. Unusual cause for recurrent Cushing syndrome and its diagnosis by computed tomography and NP-59 radiocholesterol scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.D.; Herwig, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    Cushing syndrome can recur following an adrenalectomy. One of the primary causes is recurrence of adrenal carcinoma either locally or from metastases. Hyperplasia and hyperfunction of adrenal remnants may also occur if there is pituitary stimulation. We have a patient in whom recurrent Cushing syndrome developed from small nonmalignant deposits of adrenal tissue in the perirenal adipose tissue following adrenalectomy of a benign adenoma. These deposits were identifiable by computed tomography. A false-negative NP-59 iodocholesterol scan was instructive in pointing out some problems in the interpretation of this type of scan for adrenal tissue

  13. Endogene reinfection as a possible cause of recurrent genital candidose in female patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasić Suzana A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The cause of primary, recurrent genital candidosis (RGC, that 5 % of the female population was afflicted with, is still unknown. It is not clear whether RGC is a result of reifection or infection recidive caused by Candida sp. The goal of the study is to examine Candida presence in women’s genital and intestinal tract; by resistotypization of the same isolated species of Candida fungi to prove their identity as well as the validity of the stated thesis that endogenous reinfection may be one of the possible causes of RGC. The study included 70 women (T-group afflicted with primary RGC who, at the moment of the examination, were in the phase of manifest infection. In the control group there were 70 women (C-group not afflicted with RGC. The microbiological test consisted of the microscopic and culture examination of women’s genital and intestinal material. The Candida species were differentiated according to the germination test and the biochemical activity measured by commercial Candi-Fast-test (Mycoplasma International France and Vitec-AMS-system (bioMerieux, France. Candi-Fast test examined the sensitivity of Candida species to antymicotics and determined the resistotypes of isolated species. The study did not show statistically significant difference between examined groups in terms of the Candida presence in intestinal tract. The Candida colonization of intestinal mucosa was proved in 24 women (34.28 % with RGC. Eighteen women (25.71 % of the control group, had Candida sp. in intestinal tract. The most frequent RGC agent, as well as most frequent colonizer of intestinal mucosa is Candida albicans (C. albicans - RGC - 84.28 %; T-group - intestinal tract - C. albicans - 87.50 %; C-group - intestinal tract - C. albicans - 94.44 %. In 20 women with RGC there was a presence of identical resistotypes of isolated Candida sp. Identical resistotypes of C. albicans was found in 19 women of the test group, in their genital and intestinal tract. Only

  14. Radiotherapy for patients with isolated local recurrence of primary resected pancreatic cancer. Prolonged disease-free interval associated with favorable prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akira; Itasaka, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Michio; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Kyoto University, Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Takaori, Kyoichi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Uemoto, Shinji [Kyoto University, Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko [Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes of radiotherapy and prognostic factors for recurrent pancreatic cancer. The study comprised 30 patients who developed a locoregional recurrence of primarily resected pancreatic cancer and received radiotherapy between 2000 and 2013 with a median dose of 54 Gy (range, 39-60 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy included gemcitabine for 18 patients and S-1 for seven patients. The treatment outcomes and prognostic factors were retrospectively analyzed. The median follow-up after radiotherapy was 14.6 months. The 1-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 69 %, 67 %, and 32 %, respectively. The median overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 15.9 and 6.9 months, respectively. Tumor marker reduction and ≥ 50 % reduction were observed in 18 and two patients, respectively. Of the seven patients who exhibited pain symptoms, four and two patients were partly and completely relieved, respectively. Late grade 3 ileus and gastroduodenal bleeding were observed in one patient each. Among the clinicopathological factors evaluated, only a disease-free interval of greater than 18.9 months exhibited a significant association with improved overall survival (p = 0.017). Radiotherapy for isolated locally recurrent pancreatic cancer resulted in encouraging local control, overall survival, and palliative effects with mild toxicity, particularly in patients with a prolonged disease-free interval. This treatment strategy should be prospectively evaluated. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung strahlentherapeutischer Behandlungsergebnisse und prognostischer Faktoren bei rezidivierendem Pankreaskrebs. In dieser Studie wurden 30 Patienten aufgenommen, bei denen es nach primaer reseziertem Pankreaskrebs zu lokoregionaeren Rezidiven kam und die zwischen 2000 und 2013 strahlentherapeutisch mit einer mittleren Dosis von 54 Gy (Bereich 39-60 Gy) behandelt wurden. Im Rahmen der gleichzeitig durchgefuehrten Chemotherapie wurde

  15. Fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in Wistar rats causes progressive pancreatic mitochondrial damage and beta cell dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Bruin

    Full Text Available Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT is currently recommended as a safe smoking cessation aid for pregnant women. However, fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in rats causes mitochondrial-mediated beta cell apoptosis at weaning, and adult-onset dysglycemia, which we hypothesize is related to progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in the pancreas. Therefore in this study we examined the effect of fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine on pancreatic mitochondrial structure and function during postnatal development. Female Wistar rats were given saline (vehicle control or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg/d via subcutaneous injection for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. At 3-4, 15 and 26 weeks of age, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed, and pancreas tissue was collected for electron microscopy, enzyme activity assays and islet isolation. Following nicotine exposure mitochondrial structural abnormalities were observed beginning at 3 weeks and worsened with advancing age. Importantly the appearance of these structural defects in nicotine-exposed animals preceded the onset of glucose intolerance. Nicotine exposure also resulted in significantly reduced pancreatic respiratory chain enzyme activity, degranulation of beta cells, elevated islet oxidative stress and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion compared to saline controls at 26 weeks of age. Taken together, these data suggest that maternal nicotine use during pregnancy results in postnatal mitochondrial dysfunction that may explain, in part, the dysglycemia observed in the offspring from this animal model. These results clearly indicate that further investigation into the safety of NRT use during pregnancy is warranted.

  16. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia in association with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: implications for disease progression and recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biankin, Andrew V; Kench, James G; Biankin, Sandra A; Lee, C-Soon; Morey, Adrienne L; Dijkman, Floriaan P; Coleman, Maxwell J; Sutherland, Robert L; Henshall, Susan M

    2004-09-01

    The development of pancreatic cancer (PC) several years after curative resection for noninvasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and the presence of PC distant from IPMN suggest that PC may develop independently of the IPMN. Here, we identified pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions, the putative precursors of PC, in the ducts of pancreata resected for IPMN and assessed the frequency of molecular aberrations common to PanIN and PC, within these lesions. The protein expression of p53, p21(WAF1/CIP1), cyclin D1, p16(INK4A) and DPC4/Smad4 were examined by immunohistochemistry in 267 PanIN lesions from a cohort of 23 patients with IPMN. Overexpression of p21(WAF1/CIP1) was present in PanIN-1A and -1B lesions and increased in frequency in PanIN-2 and PanIN-3. Overexpression of p53 and cyclin D1, and loss of p16(INK4A) expression were detected in PanIN-2 and PanIN-3 lesions. Loss of DPC4/Smad4 expression occurred only in the PanIN-3 lesions. PanIN lesions that were more dysplastic than the coincident IPMN were identified in 5 of 12 patients, and 2 of these contained a greater number of aberrations in protein expression than the IPMN. PanIN lesions seen in association with IPMN demonstrate molecular and histologic changes identical to PanIN lesions found in association with PC and, in some cases, are more advanced than the associated IPMN. These data suggest that PanIN lesions found in the ducts of a pancreas with IPMN may be relevant to the development of PC either coincident with IPMN or in the remnant pancreas after curative resection of IPMN.

  17. Postresection CA19-9 and margin status as predictors of recurrence after adjuvant treatment for pancreatic carcinoma: Analysis of NRG oncology RTOG trial 9704

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    William F. Regine, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: NRG Oncology RTOG 9704 was the first adjuvant trial to validate the prognostic value of postresection CA19-9 levels for survival in patients with pancreatic carcinoma. The data resulting from this study also provide information about predictors of recurrence that may be used to tailor individualized management in this disease setting. This secondary analysis assessed the prognostic value of postresection CA19-9 and surgical margin status (SMS in predicting patterns of disease recurrence. Methods and materials: This multicenter cooperative trial included participants who were enrolled as patients at oncology treatment sites in the United States and Canada. The study included 451 patients analyzable for SMS, of whom 385 were eligible for postresection CA19-9 analysis. Postresection CA19-9 was analyzed at cut points of 90, 180, and continuously. Patterns of disease recurrence included local/regional recurrence (LRR and distant failure (DF. Multivariable analyses included treatment, tumor size, and nodal status. To adjust for multiple comparisons, a P value of ≤ .01 was considered statistically significant and > .01 to ≤ .05 to be a trend. Results: For CA19-9, 132 (34% patients were Lewis antigen–negative (no CA19-9 expression, 200 (52% had levels <90, and 220 (57% had levels <180. A total of 188 patients (42% had negative margins, 152 (34% positive, and 111 (25% unknown. On univariate analysis, CA19-9 cut at 90 was associated with increases in LRR (trend and DF. Results were similar at the 180 cut point. SMS was not associated with an increase in LRR on univariate or multivariate analyses. On multivariable analysis, CA19-9 ≥ 90 was associated with increased LRR and DF. Results were similar at the 180 cut point. Conclusions: In this prospective evaluation, postresection CA19-9 was a significant predictor of both LRR and DF, whereas SMS was not. These findings support consideration of adjuvant radiation therapy dose

  18. [External pancreatic fistulas management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, E V; Ermolov, A S; Rogal', M L; Teterin, Yu S

    The main principles of treatment of external postoperative pancreatic fistulas are viewed in the article. Pancreatic trauma was the reason of pancreatic fistula in 38.7% of the cases, operations because of acute pancreatitis - in 25.8%, and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage - in 35.5%. 93 patients recovered after the treatment. Complex conservative treatment of EPF allowed to close fistulas in 74.2% of the patients with normal patency of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The usage of octreotide 600-900 mcg daily for at least 5 days to decrease pancreatic secretion was an important part of the conservative treatment. Endoscopic papillotomy was performed in patients with major duodenal papilla obstruction and interruption of transporting of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Stent of the main pancreatic duct was indicated in patients with extended pancreatic duct stenosis to normalize transport of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Surgical formation of anastomosis between distal part of the main pancreatic duct and gastro-intestinal tract was carried out when it was impossible to fulfill endoscopic stenting of pancreatic duct either because of its interruption and diastasis between its ends, or in the cases of unsuccessful conservative treatment of external pancreatic fistula caused by drainage of pseudocyst.

  19. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  20. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  1. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  2. Isolated Main Pancreatic Duct Dilatation: CT Differentiation Between Benign and Malignant Causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Woo; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Yeon Soo; Jang, Jin Young; Han, Joon Koo

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the differential CT features of isolated benign and malignant main pancreatic duct (MPD) dilatation and to investigate whether the diagnostic performance of radiologists can be improved with knowledge of these differential CT features. Forty-one patients who had isolated MPD dilatation without any visible mass on CT from January 2000 to October 2016 were retrospectively enrolled in the study. Two radiologists reviewed CT images in consensus for the location, shape (smooth vs abrupt), length of transition, dilated pancreatic duct (PD) diameter, presence of duct penetrating sign, parenchymal atrophy, attenuation difference, associated pancreatitis, calcification, PD or common bile duct (CBD) enhancement, and perilesional cyst. The chi-square test, Fisher exact test, and t test were used to find the differential CT features of benign and malignant MPD dilatation. Two successive review sessions for differentiation between the two disease entities were then independently performed by three other reviewers with differing expertise, with the use of a 5-point confidence scale. The first session provided no information for differentiation; however, reviewers were aware of the results of univariate analyses in the second session. The diagnostic performance of the radiologists was evaluated using a pairwise comparison of ROC curves. A total of 19 benign and 22 malignant MPD dilatations were identified. In patients with benign MPD dilatation, transition areas were frequently located in the head (57.9% [11/19] vs 13.6% [3/22], p = 0.003) and showed significantly shorter (< 6.1 mm) (78.9% [15/19] vs 9.1% [2/22], p < 0.0001) and smooth transition (89.5% [17/19] vs 9.1% [2/22], p < 0.0001). Duct penetrating sign was exclusively observed in patients with benign MPD dilatation (73.7% [14/19] vs 0% [0/22], p < 0.0001). In contrast, malignant MPD dilatation frequently was accompanied by attenuation difference (63.6% [14/22] vs

  3. Nuclear SREBP-1a causes loss of pancreatic β-cells and impaired insulin secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Yuko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Yatoh, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Kato, Toyonori; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Yahagi, Naoya; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing nuclear sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a under the control of the insulin promoter were generated to determine the role of SREBP-1a in pancreatic β-cells. Only low expressors could be established, which exhibited mild hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and reduced plasma insulin levels compared to C57BL/6 controls. The islets isolated from the transgenic mice were fewer and smaller, and had decreased insulin content and unaltered glucagon staining. Both glucose- and potassium-stimulated insulin secretions were decreased. The transgenic islets consistently expressed genes for fatty acids and cholesterol synthesis, resulting in accumulation of triglycerides but not cholesterol. PDX-1, ΒΕΤΑ2, MafA, and IRS-2 were suppressed, partially explaining the loss and dysfunction of β-cell mass. The transgenic mice on a high fat/high sucrose diet still exhibited impaired insulin secretion and continuous β-cell growth defect. Therefore, nuclear SREBP-1a, even at a low level, strongly disrupts β-cell mass and function.

  4. Recurrent varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rotker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicocele recurrence is one of the most common complications associated with varicocele repair. A systematic review was performed to evaluate varicocele recurrence rates, anatomic causes of recurrence, and methods of management of recurrent varicoceles. The PubMed database was evaluated using keywords "recurrent" and "varicocele" as well as MESH criteria "recurrent" and "varicocele." Articles were not included that were not in English, represented single case reports, focused solely on subclinical varicocele, or focused solely on a pediatric population (age <18. Rates of recurrence vary with the technique of varicocele repair from 0% to 35%. Anatomy of recurrence can be defined by venography. Management of varicocele recurrence can be surgical or via embolization.

  5. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  6. Biliary fascioliasis--an uncommon cause of recurrent biliary colics: report of a case and brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qurashi, Hesham; Masoodi, Ibrahim; Al Sofiyani, Mohammad; Al Musharaf, Hisham; Shaqhan, Mohammed; All, Gamal Nasr Ahmed Abdel

    2012-01-01

    Biliary parasitosis is one of the important causes of biliary obstruction in endemic areas, however due to migration and travel the disease is known to occur in non endemic zones as well. The spectrum of biliary fascioliasis ranges from recurrent biliary colics to acute cholangitis. The long term complications are gall stones, sclerosing cholangitis and biliary cirrhosis. We describe fascioliasis as a cause of recurrent biliary colics in a young male necessitating multiple hospitalizations over a period of four years. Investigative profile had been non-contributory every time he was hospitalized for his abdominal pain prior to the current presentation. He never had cholangitis due to the worm in the common bile duct. It was only at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) biliary fascioliasis was discovered to be the cause of his recurrent biliary colics. After removal of the live Fasciola hepatica from the common bile duct he became symptom free and is attending our clinic for last 11 months now. Clinical spectrum of biliary fascioliasis is discussed in this report.

  7. The evolution of the surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Dana K; Frey, Charles F

    2010-01-01

    To establish the current status of surgical therapy for chronic pancreatitis, recent published reports are examined in the context of the historical advances in the field. The basis for decompression (drainage), denervation, and resection strategies for the treatment of pain caused by chronic pancreatitis is reviewed. These divergent approaches have finally coalesced as the head of the pancreas has become apparent as the nidus of chronic inflammation. The recent developments in surgical methods to treat the complications of chronic pancreatitis and the results of recent prospective randomized trials of operative approaches were reviewed to establish the current best practices. Local resection of the pancreatic head, with or without duct drainage, and duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection offer outcomes as effective as pancreaticoduodenectomy, with lowered morbidity and mortality. Local resection or excavation of the pancreatic head offers the advantage of lowest cost and morbidity and early prevention of postoperative diabetes. The late incidences of recurrent pain, diabetes, and exocrine insufficiency are equivalent for all 3 surgical approaches. Local resection of the pancreatic head appears to offer best outcomes and lowest risk for the management of the pain of chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Recurrent pregnancy-related upper airway obstruction caused by intratracheal ectopic thyroid tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, H; Jørgensen, K E; Oster-Jørgensen, E

    1999-01-01

    An unusual case of recurrent pregnancy-related thyroid growth stimulation is reported. A 27-year-old euthyroid woman had pulmonary symptoms, thought to be asthma during her first pregnancy, that improved postpartum. Bronchodilatators had no effect and symptoms recurred from gestational week 22...... during her second pregnancy. Her 58-mL multinodular goiter (by ultrasound) was not thought to be responsible for her upper airway symptoms. Therefore, fiber laryngoscopy and computed tomographic (CT) scan were performed and revealed a 20 x 15 x 10 mm intratracheal tumor. After tracheostomy...... developed normally. We believe that this case illustrates the recurrent effect of pregnancy-related thyroid tissue stimulation by a combination of increasing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation and iodine deficiency in a borderline iodine-deficient region. This is the first report on symptomatic...

  9. Moyamoya Disease – a Vasculopahty and an Uncommon Cause of Recurrent Cerebrovascular Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin S Hamirani

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Moyamoya disease is a very rare chronic cerebrovascular disease of unknown etiology characterized by recurrent ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes. Initially diagnosed in Japan and named after finding puff of smoke like collateral blood vessels around the occluded blood vessels of circle of Willis. With increase awareness this disease is now diagnosed more often. Medical and surgical treatment have been used to treat the disease, with surgical treatment been mostly experimental. Special attention should be given to the surgical treatment which has shown to have an edge over the medical treatment in some clinical trials especially in young patients with recurrent strokes to prevent progressive cognitive decline and to improve their quality of life. In our patient, who is a young man, the diagnosis was picked up late and when surgical evaluation was performed, it was considered to be fruitless with findings of nonviable brain tissue on MRI imaging.

  10. Vaginal foreign body causing recurrent discharge and vaginal stenosis--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Geeta; Rana, Ashma; Amatya, Archana

    2007-06-01

    Chronic vaginal discharge in children and adolescents is a common gynaecological complaint which is often resistant to antibiotic treatment. We present a 14 years old, premenarcheal girl who presented to us with the complaints of recurrent, foul smelling purulent occasionally blood stained vaginal discharge for eight years, where a foreign body in the upper vagina was found after releasing a dense adhesion of the lower vagina which was unable to detect by pelvic ultrasound.

  11. A Rare Case of Foreign Body Causing Recurrent Vaginal Discharge in Prepubertal Child

    OpenAIRE

    Gobbur, Vijayalakshmi.R.; Gobbur, Raghavendra.H.; Patil, Ashwini.G; Endigeri, Preetish

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal discharge in prepubertal children is mainly due to hypoestrogenic state of vaginal mucosa making it thin and alkaline leading to mucosal invasion by pathogen. In a paediatric case with persistent foul smelling , blood stained vaginal discharge not responding to medical therapy, vaginal foreign body should always be ruled out. Here, we report a 3 -year -old girl with complaint of recurrent vaginal discharge occasionally blood stained not relieved despite few antibiotics courses. On X -...

  12. Alkaptonuria: A rare cause of recurrent severe back pain in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSeidahmed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a 45 year-old male patient who presented to the emergency department of Hamad General Hospital with recurrent severe low back pain. Clinical examination revealed characteristic deposition of blue-brownish pigment in the sclera and ear. X-ray revealed diffuse intervertebral disc calcification. Alkaptonuria was suspected and the diagnosis was confirmed by detection of high levels of homogentisic acid in the urine.

  13. Recurrent intestinal volvulus in midgut malrotation causing acute bowel obstruction: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Fayed; Balarajah, Vickna; Ayantunde, Abraham Abiodun

    2013-03-27

    Intestinal malrotation occurs when there is a disruption in the normal embryological development of the bowel. The majority of patients present with clinical features in childhood, though rarely a first presentation can take place in adulthood. Recurrent bowel obstruction in patients with previous abdominal operation for midgut malrotation is mostly due to adhesions but very few reported cases have been due to recurrent volvulus. We present the case of a 22-year-old gentleman who had laparotomy in childhood for small bowel volvulus and then presented with acute bowel obstruction. Preoperative computerised tomography scan showed small bowel obstruction and features in keeping with midgut malrotation. Emergency laparotomy findings confirmed midgut malrotation with absent appendix, abnormal location of caecum, ascending colon and small bowel. In addition, there were small bowel volvulus and a segment of terminal ileal stricture. Limited right hemicolectomy was performed with excellent postoperative recovery. This case is presented to illustrate a rare occurrence and raise an awareness of the possibility of dreadful recurrent volvulus even several years following an initial Ladd's procedure for midgut malrotation. Therefore, one will need to exercise a high index of suspicion and this becomes very crucial in order to ensure prompt surgical intervention and thereby preventing an attendant bowel ischaemia with its associated high fatality.

  14. Incidence of pancreatitis, secondary causes, and treatment of patients referred to a specialty lipid clinic with severe hypertriglyceridemia: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Gordon A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG is one cause of acute pancreatitis, yet the level of plasma triglycerides likely to be responsible for inducing pancreatitis has not been clearly defined. Methods and Results A retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients presenting non-acutely to the Healthy Heart Program Lipid Clinic at St. Paul's Hospital with a TG level > 20 mM (1772 mg/dl between 1986 and 2007. Ninety-five patients with TG > 20 mM at the time of referral were identified, in who follow up data was available for 84. Fifteen patients (15.8%, with a mean outpatient TG level of 38.1 mM, had a history of acute pancreatitis. Among 91 additional patients with less severe HTG, none had a history of pancreatitis when TG were between 10 and 20 mM. Among patients with TG > 20 mM on presentation, 8 (8.5%, with a mean TG level of 67.8 mM, exhibited eruptive xanthomata. A diet high in carbohydrates and fats (79% and obesity (47.6% were the two most frequent secondary causes of HTG at initial visit. By 2009, among patients with follow up data 53% exhibited either pre-diabetes or overt Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Upon referral only 23 patients (24% were receiving a fibrate as either monotherapy or part of combination lipid-lowering therapy. Following initial assessment by a lipid specialist this rose to 84%, and remained at 67% at the last follow up visit. Conclusions These results suggest hypertriglyceridemia is unlikely to be the primary cause of acute pancreatitis unless TG levels are > 20 mM, that dysglycemia, a diet high in carbohydrates and fats, and obesity are the main secondary causes of HTG, and that fibrates are frequently overlooked as the drug of first choice for severe HTG.

  15. Chronic pancreatitis: review and update of etiology, risk factors, and management [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Pham

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a syndrome involving inflammation, fibrosis, and loss of acinar and islet cells which can manifest in unrelenting abdominal pain, malnutrition, and exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. The Toxic-Metabolic, Idiopathic, Genetic, Autoimmune, Recurrent and Severe Acute Pancreatitis, Obstructive (TIGAR-O classification system categorizes known causes and factors that contribute to chronic pancreatitis. Although determining disease etiology provides a framework for focused and specific treatments, chronic pancreatitis remains a challenging condition to treat owing to the often refractory, centrally mediated pain and the lack of consensus regarding when endoscopic therapy and surgery are indicated. Further complications incurred include both exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency, pseudocyst formation, bile duct obstruction, and pancreatic cancer. Medical treatment of chronic pancreatitis involves controlling pain, addressing malnutrition via the treatment of vitamin and mineral deficiencies and recognizing the risk of osteoporosis, and administering appropriate pancreatic enzyme supplementation and diabetic agents. Cornerstones in treatment include the recognition of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and administration of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, support to cease smoking and alcohol consumption, consultation with a dietitian, and a systematic follow-up to assure optimal treatment effect.

  16. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in recurrent or oligometastatic pancreatic cancer. A toxicity review of simultaneous integrated protection (SIP) versus conventional SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gkika, E.; Kirste, S.; Schimek-Jasch, T. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Adebahr, S. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (partner site Freiburg) (Germany); Wiehle, R. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Claus, R. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Hematology, Oncology and Stem-Cell Transplantation, Freiburg (Germany); Wittel, U. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Nestle, U.; Grosu, A.L.; Brunner, T.B. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (partner site Freiburg) (Germany); University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Baltas, D. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (partner site Freiburg) (Germany); University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in pancreatic cancer can be limited by its proximity to organs at risk (OAR). In this analysis, we evaluated the toxicity and efficacy of two different treatment approaches in patients with locally recurrent or oligometastatic pancreatic cancer. According to the prescription method, patients were divided in two cohorts (C1 and C2). The planning target volume (PTV) was created through a 4 mm expansion of the internal target volume. In C2, a subvolume was additionally created, a simultaneous integrated protection (SIP), which is the overlap of the PTV with the planning risk volume of an OAR to which we prescribed a reduced dose. In all, 18 patients were treated (7 with local recurrences, 9 for oligometastases, 2 for both). Twelve of 23 lesions were treated without SIP (C1) and 11 with SIP (C2). The median follow-up was 12.8 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.8-14.6) months. The OS rates at 6 and 12 months were 87 and 58%, respectively. Freedom from local progression for combined cohorts at 6 and 12 months was 93 and 67% (95% CI 15-36), respectively. Local control was not statistically different between the two groups. One patient in C2 experienced grade ≥3 acute toxicities and 1 patient in C1 experienced a grade ≥3 late toxicity. The SIP approach is a useful prescription method for abdominal SBRT with a favorable toxicity profile which does not compromise local control and overall survival despite dose sacrifices in small subvolumes. (orig.) [German] Die stereotaktische Strahlentherapie (SBRT) ist bei Pankreaskarzinomen durch die enge Lagebeziehung der Risikoorgane (OAR) zum Zielvolumen erschwert. In dieser Analyse evaluierten wir die Toxizitaet und die Lokalkontrolle von zwei unterschiedlichen Therapiestrategien bei Patienten mit rezidivierendem oder oligometastatischem Pankreaskarzinom. Die Patienten wurden anhand der Verschreibungsmethode in zwei Kohorten geteilt (C1 und C2). Das

  17. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis Causing Chronic Stridor and Delayed Speech in an 18-Month-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Alharbi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is a relatively uncommon disease that presents clinically with symptoms ranging from hoarseness to severe dyspnea. Human papilloma virus types 6 and 11 are important in the etiology of papillomas and are most probably transmitted from mother to child during birth. Although spontaneous remission is frequent, pulmonary spread and/or malignant transformation resulting in death has been reported. CO2 laser evaporation of papillomas and adjuvant drug therapy using lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha are the most common treatments. However, several other treatments have been tried, with varying success. In the present report, a case of laryngeal papillomatosis presenting with chronic stridor and delayed speech is described.

  18. A rare case of foreign body causing recurrent vaginal discharge in prepubertal child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbur, Vijayalakshmi R; Gobbur, Raghavendra H; Patil, Ashwini G; Endigeri, Preetish

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal discharge in prepubertal children is mainly due to hypoestrogenic state of vaginal mucosa making it thin and alkaline leading to mucosal invasion by pathogen. In a paediatric case with persistent foul smelling , blood stained vaginal discharge not responding to medical therapy, vaginal foreign body should always be ruled out. Here, we report a 3 -year -old girl with complaint of recurrent vaginal discharge occasionally blood stained not relieved despite few antibiotics courses. On X -ray pelvis, a radioopaque foreign body hair clip was seen. Under sedation foreign body was removed by forceps following which child became asymptomatic.

  19. A Rare Case of Foreign Body Causing Recurrent Vaginal Discharge in Prepubertal Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbur, Raghavendra.H.; Patil, Ashwini.G; Endigeri, Preetish

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal discharge in prepubertal children is mainly due to hypoestrogenic state of vaginal mucosa making it thin and alkaline leading to mucosal invasion by pathogen. In a paediatric case with persistent foul smelling , blood stained vaginal discharge not responding to medical therapy, vaginal foreign body should always be ruled out. Here, we report a 3 -year -old girl with complaint of recurrent vaginal discharge occasionally blood stained not relieved despite few antibiotics courses. On X -ray pelvis, a radioopaque foreign body hair clip was seen. Under sedation foreign body was removed by forceps following which child became asymptomatic. PMID:25738041

  20. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  1. Myocardial bridging causing ischemia and recurrent chest pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdou Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial bridging is present when a segment of a major epicardial coronary artery runs intramurally through the myocardium. It usually has a benign prognosis, but in some cases myocardial ischemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death have been reported. We are here reporting a case of myocardial bridging which was complicated with recurrent chest pain and transient ST-segment elevation during exercise treadmill test. Case presentation A 40 year-old-man presented with recurrent retrosternal chest pain of 2 months duration. He had history of smoking and was obese, otherwise no physical abnormalities were detected by examination. Electrocardiogram and blood tests were normal apart from impaired glucose tolerance with elevated triglycerides and decreased level of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. While doing exercise treadmill test, the patient developed chest pain and significant ST-segment elevation in almost all precordial leads that persisted for about 15 minutes through recovery. We decided to admit the patient to the coronary care unit for further management and to perform coronary angiogram. Myocardial bridging was observed in the mid segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Medical treatment was decided. At one year follow up, our patient was healthy and had no cardiac complaints. In conclusion, myocardial bridging may predispose to coronary vasospasm that may leads to ischemic complications.

  2. Ganglioglioma aggressive and recurrent evaluation as a cause of secondary epilepsy. Apropos of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saralegui, P.; Bernanchin, J.; Spagnuolo, E.; Mañana, G.

    2004-01-01

    Ganglioglioma s correspond to the group of neuronal and mixed tumors: neuronal-glial (OMS 2000); which constitute 1% of all tumors brain. In this paper, we present the case of a young patient carrying a secondary epilepsy, which was diagnosed with a brain tumor in right temporal location. From the histopathological point this tumor initially corresponded to a Ganglioglioma with astrocytes glial components and histological neuronal low grade in 80% of the material analyzed and a focus of 20%, with changes in the sector aggressive astrocytes with mitosis and increased cellularity (mixed glial and neuronal tumor grade II-III OMS). A year later a recurrent tumor was detected and from the histopathological point it was concluded that corresponded a Ganglioglioma with major elements of atypia and cellular pleomorphism, mitosis, cellularity, vascular neo formation without necrosis. The conclusion is the presence of a malignant progression toward anaplastic Ganglioglioma. Analyzed according to the literature, the presence of tumor residual and histological grade II-III of the OMS, associated with increased risk of recurrence and progression malignant; as happened in this case

  3. Unexpected identification of a recurrent mutation in the DLX3 gene causing amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y-J; Seymen, F; Koruyucu, M; Kasimoglu, Y; Gencay, K; Shin, T J; Hyun, H-K; Lee, Z H; Kim, J-W

    2016-05-01

    To identify the molecular genetic aetiology of a family with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). DNA samples were collected from a six-generation family, and the candidate gene approach was used to screen for the enamelin (ENAM) gene. Whole-exome sequencing and linkage analysis with SNP array data identified linked regions, and candidate gene screening was performed. Mutational analysis revealed a mutation (c.561_562delCT and p.Tyr188Glnfs*13) in the DLX3 gene. After finding a recurrent DLX3 mutation, the clinical phenotype of the family members was re-examined. The proband's mother had pulp elongation in the third molars. The proband had not hair phenotype, but her cousin had curly hair at birth. In this study, we identified a recurrent 2-bp deletional DLX3 mutation in a new family. The clinical phenotype was the mildest one associated with the DLX3 mutations. These results will advance the understanding of the functional role of DLX3 in developmental processes. © 2016 The Authors. Oral Diseases Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Chronic pancreatitis diagnosed after the first attack of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojková, Martina; Dítě, Petr; Uvírová, Magdalena; Dvořáčková, Nina; Kianička, Bohuslav; Kupka, Tomáš; Svoboda, Pavel; Klvaňa, Pavel; Martínek, Arnošt

    2016-02-01

    One of the diseases involving a potential risk of developing chronic pancreatitis is acute pancreatitis. Of the overall number of 231 individuals followed with a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, 56 patients were initially treated for acute pancreatitis (24.2 %). Within an interval of 12- 24 months from the first attack of acute pancreatitis, their condition gradually progressed to reached the picture of chronic pancreatitis. The individuals included in the study abstained (from alcohol) following the first attack of acute pancreatitis and no relapse of acute pancreatitis was proven during the period of their monitoring. The etiology of acute pancreatitis identified alcohol as the predominant cause (55.3 %), biliary etiology was proven in 35.7 %. According to the revised Atlanta classification, severe pancreatitis was established in 69.6 % of the patients, the others met the criterion for intermediate form, those with the light form were not included. Significant risk factors present among the patients were smoking, obesity and 18 %, resp. 25.8 % had pancreatogenous diabetes mellitus identified. 88.1 % of the patients with acute pancreatitis were smokers. The majority of individuals with chronic pancreatitis following an attack of acute pancreatitis were of a productive age from 25 to 50 years. It is not only acute alcoholic pancreatitis which evolves into chronic pancreatitis, we have also identified this transition for pancreatitis of biliary etiology.

  5. Severe hypertriglyceridemia due to two novel loss-of-function lipoprotein lipase gene mutations (C310R/E396V) in a Chinese family associated with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Yu; Sun, Xiaofang; Wang, Ping; Chi, Jingwei; Hou, Xu; Wang, Yangang

    2017-07-18

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is widely expressed in skeletal muscles, cardiac muscles as well as adipose tissue and involved in the catabolism of triglyceride. Herein we have systematically characterized two novel loss-of-function mutations in LPL from a Chinese family in which afflicted members were manifested by severe hypertriglyceridemia and recurrent pancreatitis. DNA sequencing revealed that the proband was a heterozygote carrying a novel c.T928C (p.C310R) mutation in exon 6 of the LPL gene. Another member of the family was detected to be a compound heterozygote who along with the c.T928C mutation also carried a novel missense mutation c.A1187T (p.E396V) in exon 8 of the LPL gene. Furthermore, COS-1 cells were transfected with lentiviruses containing the mutant LPL genes. While C310R markedly reduced the overall LPL protein level, COS-1 cells carrying E396V or double mutations contained similar overall LPL protein levels to the wild-type. The specific activity of the LPL mutants remained at comparable magnitude to the wild-type. However, few LPL were detected in the culture medium for the mutants, suggesting that both mutations caused aberrant triglyceride catabolism. More specifically, E396V and double mutations dampened the transport of LPL to the cell surface, while for the C310R mutation, reducing LPL protein level might be involved. By characterizing these two novel LPL mutations, this study has expanded our understanding on the pathogenesis of familial hypertriglyceridemia (FHTG).

  6. Uterine perforation by a cystoperitoneal shunt, an unusual cause of recurrent vaginal discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poilblanc, Mathieu; Sentilhes, Loïc; Mercier, Philippe; Lefèbvre, Céline; Descamps, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We describe the first reported case of uterine perforation by a cystoperitoneal shunt. The mechanism of this unusual complication is unclear. A 17-year-old patient had a cystoperitoneal shunt for a porencephalic cyst. She presented with recurrent watery vaginal discharge. A pelvic ultrasound examination showed that the uterus had been perforated by the distal tip of the shunt. The cystoperitoneal shunt was converted to a ventriculo-atrial shunt, and the vaginal discharge subsequently resolved. The appearance of light and clear vaginal discharge in a patient with a cystoperitoneal shunt raises the possibility of uterine perforation. This can be confirmed by ultrasound and analysis of the discharge. Removal of the shunt leads to spontaneous closure of the uterine defect.

  7. A novel APOC2 gene mutation identified in a Chinese patient with severe hypertriglyceridemia and recurrent pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingjing; Wang, Yuhui; Ling, Yan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Liu, George; Gao, Xin

    2016-01-16

    The severe forms of hypertriglyceridemia are usually caused by genetic defects. In this study, we described a Chinese female with severe hypertriglyceridemia caused by a novel homozygous mutation in the APOC2 gene. Lipid profiles of the pedigree were studied in detail. LPL and HL activity were also measured. The coding regions of 5 candidate genes (namely LPL, APOC2, APOA5, LMF1, and GPIHBP1) were sequenced using genomic DNA from peripheral leucocytes. The ApoE gene was also genotyped. Serum triglyceride level was extremely high in the proband, compared with other family members. Plasma LPL activity was also significantly reduced in the proband. Serum ApoCII was very low in the proband as well as in the heterozygous mutation carriers. A novel mutation (c.86A > CC) was identified on exon 3 [corrected] of the APOC2 gene, which converted the Asp [corrected] codon at position 29 into Ala, followed by a termination codon (TGA). This study presented the first case of ApoCII deficiency in the Chinese population, with a novel mutation c.86A > CC in the APOC2 gene identified. Serum ApoCII protein might be a useful screening test for identifying mutation carriers.

  8. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: Is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    OpenAIRE

    Darwazah Ahmad K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function. The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replace...

  9. Chronic and Recurrent Subareolar Abscess of the Breast from Underlying Causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jin Kyung; Kang, Jae Hee; Kim, Eun Kyung; Hong, Young Ok

    2012-01-01

    A subareolar abscess is the most common non-puerperal abscess of the breast. The main cause of a subareolar abscess is squamous metaplasia, which obstructs the lactiferous ducts and leads to the stasis of secretions and rupture of the ducts. However, there are other causes of subareolar abscess formation

  10. Chronic and Recurrent Subareolar Abscess of the Breast from Underlying Causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Jin Kyung; Kang, Jae Hee; Kim, Eun Kyung; Hong, Young Ok [Eulji University, Eulji Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    A subareolar abscess is the most common non-puerperal abscess of the breast. The main cause of a subareolar abscess is squamous metaplasia, which obstructs the lactiferous ducts and leads to the stasis of secretions and rupture of the ducts. However, there are other causes of subareolar abscess formation

  11. Pancreatitis following Olanzapine Therapy: A Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Kerr

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Atypical antipsychotic agents (clozapine, olanzapine have been linked to metabolic effects and acute pancreatitis. Case Report: We reviewed the inpatient and outpatient records of three patients who developed acute pancreatitis while being treated with olanzapine. The mean age of the patients was 37.7 years (range 18–54 years, 2 female, 1 male. No alternative cause of acute pancreatitis was found in two of the three patients. In the remaining patient, olanzapine may have contributed to acute pancreatitis in the setting of hypertriglyceridemia. Olanzapine was discontinued in all instances. Over a mean follow-up of 14 months, one patient has had a relapsing course, but the remaining two patients have been symptom free without recurrence of acute pancreatitis. Conclusions: Our case series adds further support to the potential link between olanzapine use and acute pancreatitis. Close monitoring of metabolic parameters is suggested in patients treated with olanzapine. Alternative antipsychotic agents should be considered in patients at high risk for pancreatitis.

  12. Severe hypertriglyceridemia-related acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanutti, Claudia; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Morozzi, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially life-threatening complication of severe hypertriglyceridemia. In some cases, inborn errors of metabolism such as lipoprotein lipase deficiency, apoprotein C-II deficiency, and familial hypertriglyceridemia have been reported as causes of severe hypertriglyceridemia. More often, severe hypertriglyceridemia describes various clinical conditions characterized by high plasma levels of triglycerides (>1000 mg/dL), chylomicron remnants, or intermediate density lipoprotein like particles, and/or chylomicrons. International guidelines on the management of acute pancreatitis are currently available. Standard therapeutic measures are based on the use of lipid-lowering agents (fenofibrate, gemfibrozil, niacin, Ω-3 fatty acids), low molecular weight heparin, and insulin in diabetic patients. However, when standard medical therapies have failed, non-pharmacological approaches based upon the removal of triglycerides with therapeutic plasma exchange can also provide benefit to patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis. Plasma exchange could be very helpful in reducing triglycerides levels during the acute phase of hyperlipidemic pancreatitis, and in the prevention of recurrence. The current evidence on management of acute pancreatitis and severe hypertriglyceridemia, focusing on symptoms, treatment and potential complications is reviewed herein. © 2013 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2013 International Society for Apheresis.

  13. Genetically induced oxidative stress in mice causes thrombocytosis, splenomegaly and placental angiodysplasia that leads to recurrent abortion

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    Takamasa Ishii

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical data in the 1950s suggests that 7%, 11%, 33%, and 87% of couples were infertile by ages 30, 35, 40 and 45, respectively. Up to 22.3% of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Oxidative stress is associated with male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient evidence relating to the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. Recently, we have established Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, which can express the doxycycline-induced mutant SDHCV69E transgene and experience mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leading to intracellular oxidative stress. In this report, we demonstrate that this kind of abnormal mitochondrial respiratory chain-induced chronic oxidative stress affects fertility, pregnancy and delivery rates as well as causes recurrent abortions, occasionally resulting in maternal death. Despite this, spermatogenesis and early embryogenesis are completely normal, indicating the mutation's effects to be rather subtle. Female Tet-mev-1 mice exhibit thrombocytosis and splenomegaly in both non-pregnant and pregnant mice as well as placental angiodysplasia with reduced Flt-1 protein leading to hypoxic conditions, which could contribute to placental inflammation and fetal abnormal angiogenesis. Collectively these data strongly suggest that chronic oxidative stress caused by mitochondrial mutations provokes spontaneous abortions and recurrent miscarriage resulting in age-related female infertility.

  14. Recurrent respiratory distress and cardiopulmonary arrest caused by megaoesophagus secondary to achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Tapiwa Mabvuure

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Oesophagectomy should be considered for patients with end-stage achalasia and mega-oesophagus causing respiratory compromise to avoid potential fatal complications such as tracheal compression and subsequent respiratory arrest.

  15. Pazopanib-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumichi Kawakubo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and c-Kit approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and soft tissue sarcoma. Nonselective kinase inhibitors, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, are known to be associated with acute pancreatitis. There are few case reports of severe acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment. We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis caused by pazopanib treatment for cutaneous angiosarcoma. The patient was an 82-year-old female diagnosed with cutaneous angiosarcoma. She had been refractory to docetaxel treatment and began pazopanib therapy. Three months after pazopanib treatment, CT imaging of the abdomen showed the swelling of the pancreas and surrounding soft tissue inflammation without abdominal pain. After she continued pazopanib treatment for 2 months, she presented with nausea and appetite loss. Abdominal CT showed the worsening of the surrounding soft tissue inflammation of the pancreas. Serum amylase and lipase levels were 296 and 177 IU/l, respectively. She was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment and was managed conservatively with discontinuation of pazopanib, but the symptoms did not improve. Subsequently, an abdominal CT scan demonstrated the appearance of a pancreatic pseudocyst. She underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided pseudocyst drainage using a flared-end fully covered self-expandable metallic stent. Then, the symptoms resolved without recurrence. Due to the remarkable progress of molecular targeted therapy, the oncologist should know that acute pancreatitis was recognized as a potential adverse event of pazopanib treatment and could proceed to severe acute pancreatitis.

  16. Unusual Presentation of Recurrent Pyogenic Bilateral Psoas Abscess Causing Bilateral Pulmonary Embolism by Iliac Vein Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Ijaz, Mohsin; Sakam, Sailaja; Ashraf, Umair; Marquez, Jose Gomez

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 47 Final Diagnosis: Bilateral psoas abscess • acute lower extremity deep vein thrombosis • bilateral pulmonary embolism Symptoms: Progressive left leg swelling • productive cough with whitish sputum • right flank pain Medication: Antibiotics and anticoagulation Clinical Procedure: CT-guided percutaneous drain placement Specialty: Internal Medicine/Critical Care Objective: Unusual presentation Background: Psoas abscesses are a known cause of back pain, but they have not been rep...

  17. Nutritional advice for prevention of acute pancreatitis: review of current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowe ME

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mark E Lowe, Wednesday A SevillaDivision of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas that can be acute and self-limiting or, in a small percentage of patients, recurrent. Patients with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis (RAP often progress to chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis in all forms causes significant economic and social burdens. Prevention of RAP may decrease those burdens and halt progression to chronic disease. Unfortunately, no therapy has proven effective at altering the course of RAP. While enteral nutritional therapy plays an important role in the treatment of acute pancreatitis during episodes, nutritional advice provided to patients in an attempt to prevent recurrent episodes has not proven effective in most cases. Discontinuing alcohol consumption and treating dyslipidemia with diet and medication can help patients with these issues. In patients whose pancreatitis is associated with celiac disease or eosinophilic gastroenteritis, a gluten-free diet and avoidance of food allergens can be effective in stopping RAP. Advice to take pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, lose weight, control diabetes, decrease dietary sucrose, decrease dietary fat or avoid monosodium glutamate has little to no evidence of efficacy. Some studies suggest that an antioxidant cocktail may decrease the frequency of RAP and the intensity of chronic pain, but the evidence is weak. Nutritional therapy may have a role in the treatment of patients with RAP. At present, there are no clear guidelines for nutritional advice to give these patients. More studies are needed to identify nutritional interventions that will benefit patients with RAP.Keywords: pancreatitis, nutrition, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, antioxidants, herbal supplements

  18. Saw palmetto-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibrin, Ismaila; Erinle, Ayodele; Saidi, Abdulfattah; Aliyu, Zakari Y

    2006-06-01

    Saw palmetto is a frequently used botanical agent in benign prostatic enlargement (BPH). Although it has been reported to cause cholestatic hepatitis and many medical conditions, Saw palmetto has not been implicated in acute pancreatitis. We report a case of a probable Saw palmetto induced acute hepatitis and pancreatitis. A 55-year-old reformed alcoholic, sober for greater than 15 years, presented with severe non-radiating epigastric pain associated with nausea and vomiting. His only significant comorbidity is BPH for which he intermittently took Saw palmetto for about four years. Physical examination revealed normal vital signs, tender epigastrium without guarding or rebound tenderness. Cullen and Gray Turner signs were negative. Complete blood count and basic metabolic profile were normal. Additional laboratory values include a serum amylase: 2,152 mmol/L, lipase: 39,346 mmol/L, serum triglyceride: 38 mmol/L, AST: 1265, ALT: 1232 and alkaline phosphatase was 185. Abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance cholangiography revealed sludge without stones. A hepatic indole diacetic acid scan was negative. Patient responded clinically and biochemically to withdrawal of Saw palmetto. Two similar episodes of improvements followed by recurrence were noted with discontinuations and reinstitution of Saw Palmetto. Simultaneous and sustained response of hepatitis and pancreatitis to Saw palmetto abstinence with reoccurrence on reinstitution strongly favors drug effect. "Natural" medicinal preparations are therefore not necessarily safe and the importance of detailed medication history (including "supplements") cannot be over emphasized.

  19. Prostatic Utricle Cyst as the Most Likely Cause in a Case of Recurrent Episodes of Hematospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégoire Feutry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematospermia is a clinical symptom that raises anxiety in patients and has various causes, benign and malignant. We report a case of hematospermia for which appropriate multidisciplinary expertise favored a conservative management of a benign prostatic cyst, namely, a prostatic utricle cyst. A cystic lesion found by transrectal ultrasound in the context of hematospermia related to masturbation in a young virgin male patient was investigated with a high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and an endorectal coil. The association of high-field MRI and endorectal coil leads to high quality images.

  20. Drowning is an apparent and unexpected recurrent cause of mass mortality of Common starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Becki; Duff, J. Paul; Beckmann, Katie M.; Chantrey, Julian; Peck, Kirsi M.; Irvine, Richard M.; Robinson, Robert A.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Drowning is infrequently reported as a cause of death of wild birds and such incidents typically involve individual, rather than multiple, birds. Over a 21-year period (1993 to 2013 inclusive), we investigated 12 incidents of mortality of multiple (2 − 80+) Common starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in Great Britain that appeared to be due to drowning. More than ten birds were affected in ten of these reported incidents. These incidents always occurred during the spring and early summer months and usually involved juvenile birds. In all cases, circumstantial evidence and post-mortem examinations indicated drowning to be the most likely cause of death with no underlying disease found. A behavioural explanation seems likely, possibly related to the gregarious nature of this species combined with juvenile inexperience in identifying water hazards. A review of data from the ringed bird recovery scheme across Great Britain (1909–2013 inclusive) of both starlings and Common blackbirds (Turdus merula), also a common garden visitor, identified additional suspected drowning incidents, which were significantly more common in the former species, supporting a species predisposition to drowning. For each species there was a marked seasonal peak from April to August. Drowning should be included as a differential diagnosis when investigating incidents of multiple starling mortality, especially of juveniles. PMID:26601771

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  2. Prevention of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kuroczycki-Saniutycz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy population as well as treatment for patients already diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We found that PDA occurs quite frequently but is usually diagnosed too late, at its advanced stage. Screening for PDA is not very well defined except in subgroups of high-risk individuals with genetic disorders or with chronic pancreatitis. We present convincing, probable, and suggestive risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer, many of which are modifiable and should be introduced and implemented in our society.

  3. [A case of liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium nucleatum in a patient with recurrent periodontal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Hwan; Yoon, Hee Jung; Park, Chan Woong; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Ki Bang; Na, Dong Jib; Kim, Ji Myung

    2011-01-01

    Fusobacteria are anaerobic gram-negative, non-spore forming bacilli found in normal flora of the oral cavity, urogenital tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium nucleatum has been seldom reported as a cause of liver abscess, particularly in immunocompetent hosts. A 55-year-old man with frequent periodontal disease visited our hospital with intermittent fever and headache for 2 months. Abdominal CT scan revealed an 8.2 × 6 cm mass in the right hepatic lobe with central low density. Abscess culture revealed F. nucleatum as the causative organism. Percutaneous abscess drainage and intravenous administration of antibiotics for 4 weeks improved symptoms and decreased the abscess size. We report a rare case of liver abscess due to F. nucleatum in an immunocompetent man with periodontal disease.

  4. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa Mamoune

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  5. Recurrent recessive mutation in deoxyguanosine kinase causes idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilarinho, Sílvia; Sari, Sinan; Yilmaz, Güldal; Stiegler, Amy L; Boggon, Titus J; Jain, Dhanpat; Akyol, Gulen; Dalgic, Buket; Günel, Murat; Lifton, Richard P

    2016-06-01

    Despite advances in the diagnosis and management of idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension, its pathogenesis remains elusive. Insight may be gained from study of early-onset familial idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension, in which Mendelian mutations may account for disease. We performed exome sequencing of eight subjects from six kindreds with onset of portal hypertension of indeterminate etiology during infancy or childhood. Three subjects from two consanguineous families shared the identical rare homozygous p.N46S mutation in DGUOK, a deoxyguanosine kinase required for mitochondrial DNA replication; haplotype sharing demonstrated that the mutation in the two families was inherited from a remote common ancestor. All three affected subjects had stable portal hypertension with noncirrhotic liver disease for 6-16 years of follow-up. This mutation impairs adenosine triphosphate binding and reduces catalytic activity. Loss-of-function mutations in DGUOK have previously been implicated in cirrhosis and liver failure but not in isolated portal hypertension. Interestingly, treatment of patients with human immunodeficiency viral infection with the nucleoside analogue didanosine is known to cause portal hypertension in a subset of patients and lowers deoxyguanosine kinase levels in vitro; the current findings implicate these effects on deoxyguanosine kinase in the causal mechanism. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanisms mediating inherited and acquired noncirrhotic portal hypertension, expand the phenotypic spectrum of DGUOK deficiency, and provide a new genetic test for a specific cause of idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension. (Hepatology 2016;63:1977-1986). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Disruption of growth hormone receptor gene causes diminished pancreatic islet size and increased insulin sensitivity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Li; Coschigano, Karen T; Robertson, Katie; Lipsett, Mark; Guo, Yubin; Kopchick, John J; Kumar, Ujendra; Liu, Ye Lauren

    2004-09-01

    Growth hormone, acting through its receptor (GHR), plays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism and in promoting postnatal growth. GHR gene-deficient (GHR(-/-)) mice exhibit severe growth retardation and proportionate dwarfism. To assess the physiological relevance of growth hormone actions, GHR(-/-) mice were used to investigate their phenotype in glucose metabolism and pancreatic islet function. Adult GHR(-/-) mice exhibited significant reductions in the levels of blood glucose and insulin, as well as insulin mRNA accumulation. Immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic sections revealed normal distribution of the islets despite a significantly smaller size. The average size of the islets found in GHR(-/-) mice was only one-third of that in wild-type littermates. Total beta-cell mass was reduced 4.5-fold in GHR(-/-) mice, significantly more than their body size reduction. This reduction in pancreatic islet mass appears to be related to decreases in proliferation and cell growth. GHR(-/-) mice were different from the human Laron syndrome in serum insulin level, insulin responsiveness, and obesity. We conclude that growth hormone signaling is essential for maintaining pancreatic islet size, stimulating islet hormone production, and maintaining normal insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis.

  7. Frequent carriage of resistance mechanisms to beta-lactams and biofilm formation in Haemophilus influenzae causing treatment failure and recurrent otitis media in young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Cobos, Silvia; Moscoso, Miriam; Pumarola, Felix; Arroyo, Margarita; Lara, Noelia; Perez-Vazquez, Maria; Aracil, Belen; Oteo, Jesus; Garcia, Ernesto; Campos, Jose

    Objectives: Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae are a major cause of acute otitis media (AOM), including chronic and recurrent otitis in young children. The objective of this study was to determine whether non-typeable H. influenzae isolates causing these infections produce biofilms and carry

  8. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  9. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enzymes become prematurely active and irritate the pancreas (pancreatitis). Pseudocysts can also result from injury to the ... alcohol use and gallstones are risk factors for pancreatitis, and pancreatitis is a risk factor for pseudocysts. ...

  10. Failed Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Caused by Recurrent Candida glabrata Infection with Prior Serratia marcescens Coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Skedros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a 58-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic male patient who initially sustained a proximal humerus fracture from a fall. The fracture fixation failed and then was converted to a humeral hemiarthroplasty, which became infected with Candida glabrata and Serratia marcescens. After these infections were believed to be cured with antibacterial and antifungal treatments and two-stage irrigation and debridement, he underwent conversion to a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Unfortunately, the C. glabrata infection recurred and, nearly 1.5 years after implantation of the reverse total shoulder, he had a resection arthroplasty (removal of all implants and cement. His surgical and pharmacologic treatment concluded with (1 placement of a tobramycin-impregnated cement spacer also loaded with amphotericin B, with no plan for revision arthroplasty (i.e., the spacer was chronically retained, and (2 chronic use of daily oral fluconazole. We located only three reported cases of Candida species causing infection in shoulder arthroplasties (two C. albicans, one C. parapsilosis. To our knowledge, a total shoulder arthroplasty infected with C. glabrata has not been reported, nor has a case of a C. glabrata and S. marcescens periprosthetic coinfection in any joint. In addition, it is well known that S. marcescens infections are uncommon in periprosthetic joint infections.

  11. Recurrent Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jon; Galen, Benjamin T

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent meningitis is a rare clinical scenario that can be self-limiting or life threatening depending on the underlying etiology. This review describes the causes, risk factors, treatment, and prognosis for recurrent meningitis. As a general overview of a broad topic, the aim of this review is to provide clinicians with a comprehensive differential diagnosis to aide in the evaluation and management of a patient with recurrent meningitis. New developments related to understanding the pathophysiology of recurrent meningitis are as scarce as studies evaluating the treatment and prevention of this rare disorder. A trial evaluating oral valacyclovir suppression after HSV-2 meningitis did not demonstrate a benefit in preventing recurrences. The data on prophylactic antibiotics after basilar skull fractures do not support their use. Intrathecal trastuzumab has shown promise in treating leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from HER-2 positive breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases are new potential causes of drug-induced aseptic meningitis. Despite their potential for causing recurrent meningitis, the clinical entities reviewed herein are not frequently discussed together given that they are a heterogeneous collection of unrelated, rare diseases. Epidemiologic data on recurrent meningitis are lacking. The syndrome of recurrent benign lymphocytic meningitis described by Mollaret in 1944 was later found to be closely related to HSV-2 reactivation, but HSV-2 is by no means the only etiology of recurrent aseptic meningitis. While the mainstay of treatment for recurrent meningitis is supportive care, it is paramount to ensure that reversible and treatable causes have been addressed for further prevention.

  12. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  13. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  14. Amylase, lipase, and volume of drainage fluid in gastrectomy for the early detection of complications caused by pancreatic leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyung Won; Yoon, Ki Young; Lee, Sang Ho; Shin, Yeon Myung; Choi, Kyung Hyun; Hwang, Hyun Yong

    2011-12-01

    Pancreatic leakage is a serious complication of gastrectomy due to stomach cancer. Therefore, we analyzed amylase and lipase concentrations in blood and drainage fluid, and evaluated the volume of drainage fluid to discern their usefulness as markers for the early detection of serious pancreatic leakage requiring reoperation after gastrectomy. From January 2001 to December 2007, we retrospectively analyzed data from 24,072 patient samples. We divided patients into two groups; 1) complications with pancreatic leakage (CG), and 2) no complications associated with pancreatic leakage (NCG). Values of amylase and lipase in the blood and drainage fluid, volume of the drainage fluid, and relationships among the volumes, amylase values, and lipase values in the drainage fluid were evaluated, respectively in the two groups. The mean amylase values of CG were significantly higher than those of NCG in blood and drainage fluid (P < 0.05). For lipase, statistically significant differences were observed in drainage fluid (P < 0.05). The mean volume (standard deviation) of the drained fluid through the tube between CG (n = 22) and NCG (n = 236) on postoperative day 1 were 368.41 (266.25) and 299.26 (300.28), respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups (P = 0.298). There was a correlation between the amylase and lipase values in the drainage fluid (r = 0.812, P = 0.000). Among postoperative amylase and lipase values in blood and drainage fluid, and the volume of drainage fluid, the amylase in drainage fluid was better differentiated between CG and NCG than other markers. The volume of the drainage fluid did not differ significantly between groups.

  15. Surgical Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jens; Uhl, Waldemar; Büchler, Markus W.

    2003-10-01

    Patients with predicted severe necrotizing pancreatitis as diagnosed by C-reactive protein (>150 mg/L) and/or contrast-enhanced computed tomography should be managed in the intensive care unit. Prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce infection rates and survival in severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic sphincterotomy is a causative therapy for gallstone pancreatitis with impacted stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. Fine needle aspiration for bacteriology should be performed to differentiate between sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with sepsis syndrome. Infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with clinical signs and symptoms of sepsis is an indication for surgery. Patients with sterile pancreatic necrosis should be managed conservatively. Surgery in patients with sterile necrosis may be indicated in cases of persistent necrotizing pancreatitis and in the rare cases of "fulminant acute pancreatitis." Early surgery, within 14 days after onset of the disease, is not recommended in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. The surgical approach should be organ-preserving (debridement/necrosectomy) and combined with a postoperative management concept that maximizes postoperative evacuation of retroperitoneal debris and exudate. Minimally invasive surgical procedures have to be regarded as an experimental approach and should be restricted to controlled trials. Cholecystectomy should be performed to avoid recurrence of gallstone-associated acute pancreatitis.

  16. Lateral Pancreaticojejunostomy for Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Ductal Dilation in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adil A; Petrosyan, Mikael; Kane, Timothy D

    2018-06-06

    Pancreatic ductal obstruction leading to ductal dilation and recurrent pancreatitis is uncommon in children. Treatment is dependent upon etiology but consists of decompression of the pancreatic duct (PD) proximally, if possible, by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) intervention or surgical decompression with pancreaticojejunal anastomosis. After institutional review board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the records for 2 children who underwent lateral pancreaticojejunostomy for pancreatic ductal dilation. Data, including demographics, diagnostic studies, operative details, complications, outcomes, and follow-up, were analyzed. Case 1 was a 4-year-old female with pancreatic ductal obstruction with multiple episodes of recurrent pancreatitis and failure of ERCP to clear her PD of stones. She underwent a laparoscopic cholecystectomy with a lateral pancreaticojejunostomy (Puestow procedure). She recovered well with no further episodes of pancreatitis and normal pancreatic function 4 years later. Case 2 was a 2-year-old female who developed recurrent pancreatitis and was found to have papillary stenosis and long common bile-PD channel. Despite multiple sphincterotomies, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and laparoscopic hepaticoduodenostomy, she continued to experience episodes of pancreatitis. She underwent a laparoscopy converted to open lateral pancreaticojejunostomy. Her recovery was also smooth having had no episodes of pancreatitis or hospital admissions for over 2 years following the Puestow. Indication for lateral pancreaticojejunostomy or Puestow procedure is rare in children and even less often performed using laparoscopy. In our small experience, both patients with pancreatic ductal obstruction managed with Puestow's procedure enjoy durable symptom and pain relief in the long term.

  17. Cannabis-Induced Acute Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Jodie A; Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Saluja, Ashok K; Barkin, Jamie S

    2017-09-01

    Cannabis is the most frequently consumed illicit drug in the world, with higher prevalence under the age of 35 years. Cannabis was first reported as a possible cause of acute pancreatitis (AP) in 2004. The aim of this systematic review is to examine cannabis use as an etiology of AP. A search using PubMed/Medline, Embase, Scopus, and Cochrane was performed without language or year limitations to May 1, 2016. Search terms were "Cannabis" and "Acute Pancreatitis" with all permutations. The search yielded 239 results. Acute pancreatitis was defined by meeting 2 of 3 Revised Atlanta Classification criteria. Cannabis-induced AP was defined by preceding use of cannabis and exclusion of common causes of AP when reported. Sixteen papers met inclusion criteria dating from 2004 to 2016. There were 26 cases of cannabis-induced AP (23/26 men; 24/26 under the age of 35 y). Acute pancreatitis correlated with increased cannabis use in 18 patients. Recurrent AP related temporally to cannabis use was reported in 15 of 26. There are 13 reports of no further AP episodes after cannabis cessation. Cannabis is a possible risk factor for AP and recurrent AP, occurring primarily in young patients under the age of 35 years. Toxicology screens should be considered in all patients with idiopathic AP.

  18. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

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    Mössner Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2, the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

  19. Decreased 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1 Level and Activity in Murine Pancreatic Islets Caused by Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Overexpression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Chowdhury

    Full Text Available We have reported a high expression of IGF-I in pancreatic islet β-cells of transgenic mice under the metallothionein promoter. cDNA microarray analysis of the islets revealed that the expression of 82 genes was significantly altered compared to wild-type mice. Of these, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1, which is responsible for the conversion of inert cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone, DHC in rodents to active cortisol (corticosterone in the liver and adipose tissues, has not been identified previously as an IGF-I target in pancreatic islets. We characterized the changes in its protein level, enzyme activity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In freshly isolated islets, the level of 11β-HSD1 protein was significantly lower in MT-IGF mice. Using dual-labeled immunofluorescence, 11β-HSD1 was observed exclusively in glucagon-producing, islet α-cells but at a lower level in transgenic vs. wild-type animals. MT-IGF islets also exhibited reduced enzymatic activities. Dexamethasone (DEX and DHC inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from freshly isolated islets of wild-type mice. In the islets of MT-IGF mice, 48-h pre-incubation of DEX caused a significant decrease in insulin release, while the effect of DHC was largely blunted consistent with diminished 11β-HSD1 activity. In order to establish the function of intracrine glucocorticoids, we overexpressed 11β-HSD1 cDNA in MIN6 insulinoma cells, which together with DHC caused apoptosis and a significant decrease in proliferation. Both effects were abolished with the treatment of an 11β-HSD1 inhibitor. Our results demonstrate an inhibitory effect of IGF-I on 11β-HSD1 expression and activity within the pancreatic islets, which may mediate part of the IGF-I effects on cell proliferation, survival and insulin secretion.

  20. Labial fusion causing urinary incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infection in a postmenopausal female: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirim, Ayhan; Hasirci, Eray

    2011-01-01

    A 73-year-old postmenopausal woman was admitted with recurrent urinary tract infection and a history of incontinence. General physical examination was normal. Complete labial fusion was noticed on genital examination. Surgical intervention was performed. This therapy alleviated incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infection.

  1. Causas y tratamiento del neumotórax persistente y recidivante Causes and treatment of persistent and recurrent pneumothorax

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    Orestes Noel Mederos Curbelo

    2008-03-01

    generally caused by the rupture of a small weakened zone of the lung. A recurrent pneumothorax may cause considerable disability. METHODS. A descriptive, prospective and cross-sectional study was conducted among the patients with persistent and recurrent pneumothorax that received attention at "Comandante Manuel Fajardo" University Hospital from 1998 to 2006. The causes of the pneumothorax and the results of its treatment were analyzed. The study group was composed of all the patients with pneumothorax diagnosis (225 patients, of whom those diagnosed with persistent or recurrent pneumothorax (42 in all were selected. All the patients were attended by following a working algorithm of surgery service of the hospital. RESULTS. The bullae were the main cause of the recurrent pneumothorax, and the subpleural vesicles of the persistent. In the persistent pneumothorax, the aspiration probe was maintained until the fifth day in 71 % of the cases, from 5 to 7 in 23 %, and for more than 7 days in 6 %. The axillary route was used for the incision, and atypical or regulated resection was performed with parietal pleurotomy or abrasion, which had 100 % of effectivity. No surgical mortality was reported. CONCLUSIONS. The care of the pleurotomy catheter and the continual controlled aspiration are milestones in the primary treatment of pneumothorax. After 5 days without attaining the pulmonary reexpansion, and if there is a second pneumothorax, the definitive treatment by thoracotomy should always be assessed. Parietal pleurotomy should be considered as an elective procedure in the patients with an adequate respiratory reserve. A good drainage aspiration system prevents a second intervention and reduces the possibilities of complications

  2. A Nearly Lethal Screw: An Unusual Cause of Recurrent Bradycardia and Asystole Episodes after Fixation of the Cervical Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Frenkel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 51-year-old man who was injured in a bicycle accident. His main injury was an unstable fracture of the cervical and thoracic vertebral column. Several hours after his arrival to the hospital the patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF of the cervical and thoracic spine. The patient was hospitalized in our critical care unit for 99 days. During this time patient had several episodes of severe bradycardia and asystole; some were short with spontaneous return to sinus and some required pharmacological treatment and even Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR. Initially, these episodes were attributed to the high cervical spine injury, but, later on, CT scan suggested that a fixation screw abutted on the esophagus and activated the vagus nerve by direct pressure. After repositioning of the cervical fixation, the bradycardia and asystole episodes were no longer observed and the patient was released to a rehabilitation ward. This case is presented in order to alert practitioners to the possibility that, after operative fixation of cervical spine injuries, recurrent episodes of bradyarrhythmia can be caused by incorrect placement of the fixation screws and might be confused with the natural history of the high cervical cord injury.

  3. Inability to have children caused by recurrent HELLP syndrome in early pregnancies - implications for a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelec, Małgorzata; Karmowski, Andrzej; Karmowski, Mikołaj; Krzemieniewska, Joanna; Kulczycka, Aleksandra; Gabryś, Marian Stanisław; Koryś, Jerzy; Gworys, Bohdan

    2013-01-01

    This review is inspired by a case of two pregnancies of the same patient complicated by HELLP syndrome, which suggests that there is a predisposition for the occurrence of preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome in early pregnancy. HELLP syndrome, uncommon below the 20th week and rarer still in two consecutive pregnancies, appeared in two pregnancies of the same woman. The aim of our work is to try to understand the cause of heterogeneity of HELLP syndrome and help find a way of prolonging such pregnancies. Recurrent HELLP syndrome in early pregnancy is a form of severe, fulminant preeclampsia. The preceding symptom is a surge in blood pressure. The hypertension becomes resistant to antihypertensive drugs, which indicates that preexisting hypertension is later accompanied by other factors contributing to the rise in blood pressure. Different effects of high dosage of corticosteroids on liver and platelets show that there are different factors responsible for liver damage and for thrombocytopenia. It seems that the symptoms have various origins, so the therapy with one drug only is not sufficiently effective. Nicotine analogues or a plant extract (from rootstock of Eriosema kraussianum) used by South African traditional healers for erectile dysfunction seem to give a chance of prolonging pregnancy and, consequently, having children.

  4. Successful treatment of recurrent cholangitis by constructing a hepaticojejunostomy with long Roux-en-Y limb in a long-term surviving patient after a Whipple procedure for pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalis, Konstantinos; Antoniou, Nikolaos; Koukouritaki, Zambia; Patridas, Dimitrios; Sakkas, Leonidas; Kyziridis, Dimitrios; Lazaridis, Charalampos

    2014-08-20

    Female, 74. Recurrent cholangitis. -. -. -. Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Unusual clinical course. Cholangitis may result from biliary obstruction (e.g., biliary or anastomotic stenosis, or foreign bodies) or occur in the presence of normal biliary drainage. Although reflux of intestinal contents into the biliary tree after hepaticojejunostomy appears to be a rare complication, it is important to emphasize that there are few available surgical therapeutic techniques. A 74-year-old woman presented to our hospital after 17 years of episodes of cholangitis. The patient had undergone a pancreatoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) 18 years earlier due to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The reconstruction was achieved through the sequential placement of pancreatic, biliary, and retrocolic gastric anastomosis into the same jejunal loop. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy. Approximately 6 months after the initial operation, the patient started having episodes of cholangitis. Over the next 17 years she experienced several febrile episodes presumed to be secondary to cholangitis. A computing tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed intrahepatic bile ducts partially filled with orally administered contrast material (Gastrografin). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) showed dilatation of the left intrahepatic bile ducts. A percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography showed that the bilioenteric anastomosis was normal, without stenosis. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of a short loop between the hepaticojejunostomy and the gastrojejunostomy permitting the reflux of intestinal juice into the biliary tree was made. During the re-operation, a new hepaticojejunal anastomosis in a 100-cm long Roux-en-Y loop was performed to prevent the reflux of the intestinal fluid into the biliary tree. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 10. One year after the second procedure, the patient enjoys good health and has

  5. Chronic Continuous Exenatide Infusion Does Not Cause Pancreatic Inflammation and Ductal Hyperplasia in Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Owston, Michael; Abrahamian, Gregory; La Rosa, Stefano; Marando, Alessandro; Perego, Carla; Di Cairano, Eliana S.; Finzi, Giovanna; Capella, Carlo; Sessa, Fausto; Casiraghi, Francesca; Paez, Ana; Adivi, Ashwin; Davalli, Alberto; Fiorina, Paolo; Guardado Mendoza, Rodolfo; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Sharp, Mark; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Halff, Glenn; Dick, Edward J.; Folli, Franco

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of exenatide (EXE) treatment on exocrine pancreas of nonhuman primates. To this end, 52 baboons (Papio hamadryas) underwent partial pancreatectomy, followed by continuous infusion of EXE or saline (SAL) for 14 weeks. Histological analysis, immunohistochemistry, Computer Assisted Stereology Toolbox morphometry, and immunofluorescence staining were performed at baseline and after treatment. The EXE treatment did not induce pancreatitis, parenchymal or periductal inflammatory cell accumulation, ductal hyperplasia, or dysplastic lesions/pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. At study end, Ki-67–positive (proliferating) acinar cell number did not change, compared with baseline, in either group. Ki-67–positive ductal cells increased after EXE treatment (P = 0.04). However, the change in Ki-67–positive ductal cell number did not differ significantly between the EXE and SAL groups (P = 0.13). M-30–positive (apoptotic) acinar and ductal cell number did not change after SAL or EXE treatment. No changes in ductal density and volume were observed after EXE or SAL. Interestingly, by triple-immunofluorescence staining, we detected c-kit (a marker of cell transdifferentiation) positive ductal cells co-expressing insulin in ducts only in the EXE group at study end, suggesting that EXE may promote the differentiation of ductal cells toward a β-cell phenotype. In conclusion, 14 weeks of EXE treatment did not exert any negative effect on exocrine pancreas, by inducing either pancreatic inflammation or hyperplasia/dysplasia in nonhuman primates. PMID:25447052

  6. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  7. A single-centre prospective, cohort study of the natural history of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Leandro, Gioacchino; Di Leo, Milena; Zuppardo, Raffaella Alessia; Morrow, Olivia B; Notaristefano, Chiara; Rossi, Gemma; Testoni, Sabrina Gloria Giulia; Mazzoleni, Giorgia; Alessandri, Matteo; Goni, Elisabetta; Singh, Satish K; Giliberti, Aurore; Bianco, Margherita; Fanti, Lorella; Viale, Edi; Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio; Mariani, Alberto; Petrone, Maria Chiara; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The natural history of acute pancreatitis is based on clinical studies that aim to elucidate the course of disease on the basis of predicted risk factors. To evaluate the long-term occurrence of recurrent acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis in a cohort of patients following an initial episode of acute pancreatitis. 196 patients were enrolled consecutively and studied prospectively. Clinical characteristics, exogenously/endogenously-associated factors, and evolution to recurrent acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis were analyzed. 40 patients developed recurrent acute pancreatitis 13 of whom developed chronic pancreatitis. In a univariate analysis, recurrent acute pancreatitis was associated with an idiopathic aetiology (pChronic pancreatitis was associated with a severe first episode of acute pancreatitis (p=0.048), PD (p=0.03), and cigarette smoking (p=0.038). By multivariate analysis, pancreas divisum was an independent risk factor for recurrent acute pancreatitis (OR 11.5, 95% CI 1.6-83.3). A severe first-episode of acute pancreatitis increased the risk of progressing to chronic pancreatitis by nine-fold. Special attention should be given to patients who experience a severe first attack of acute pancreatitis as there appears to be an increased risk of developing chronic pancreatitis over the long term. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24) inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells caused by BMP-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chen-Shuang; Tian, Haijun; Zou, Min; Zhao, Ke-Wei; Li, Yawei; Lao, Lifeng; Brochmann, Elsa J.; Duarte, M. Eugenia L.; Daubs, Michael D.; Zhou, Yan-Heng; Murray, Samuel S.; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging role of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in the initiation and progression of multiple cancers has drawn great attention in cancer research. In this study, we report that BMP-2 can promote the proliferation of the pancreatic tumor cell line, PANC-1. Secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24), a BMP binding protein, did not affect the proliferation of the cells but promoted the apoptosis of the cells in vitro. In a xeneograft tumor model using PANC-1 cells, BMP-2 dramatically promoted tumor growth, while Spp24 not only abolished the effect of BMP-2, but also dramatically induced tumor shrinking when used alone. Activation of Smad1/5/8 participated in this process as demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8. We conclude that Spp24 can be developed into a therapeutic agent that could be employed in clinical situations where the inhibition of BMPs and related proteins is advantageous. - Highlights: • Spp24 effectively inhibited the in vivo tumor growth of PANC-1. • BMP-2 dramatically promoted tumor growth by promoting PANC-1 proliferation. • Spp24 abolished the tumor growth effect of BMP-2 by promoting PANC-1 apoptosis. • Spp24 may be a candidate as a therapeutic agent of pancreatic cancer.

  9. Secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24) inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells caused by BMP-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chen-Shuang [Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Tian, Haijun, E-mail: haijuntianmd@gmail.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Surgery, Bethune School of Medics, Shijiazhuang (China); Zou, Min [Department of Orthodontics, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Zhao, Ke-Wei [Research Service, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Li, Yawei; Lao, Lifeng [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Brochmann, Elsa J. [Research Service, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Duarte, M. Eugenia L. [National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Daubs, Michael D. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Zhou, Yan-Heng, E-mail: yanhengzhou@vip.163.com [Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Murray, Samuel S. [Research Service, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wang, Jeffrey C. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-10-16

    The emerging role of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in the initiation and progression of multiple cancers has drawn great attention in cancer research. In this study, we report that BMP-2 can promote the proliferation of the pancreatic tumor cell line, PANC-1. Secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24), a BMP binding protein, did not affect the proliferation of the cells but promoted the apoptosis of the cells in vitro. In a xeneograft tumor model using PANC-1 cells, BMP-2 dramatically promoted tumor growth, while Spp24 not only abolished the effect of BMP-2, but also dramatically induced tumor shrinking when used alone. Activation of Smad1/5/8 participated in this process as demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8. We conclude that Spp24 can be developed into a therapeutic agent that could be employed in clinical situations where the inhibition of BMPs and related proteins is advantageous. - Highlights: • Spp24 effectively inhibited the in vivo tumor growth of PANC-1. • BMP-2 dramatically promoted tumor growth by promoting PANC-1 proliferation. • Spp24 abolished the tumor growth effect of BMP-2 by promoting PANC-1 apoptosis. • Spp24 may be a candidate as a therapeutic agent of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Congenital varitans and anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct: Imaging by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography and multidetector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuerkvatan, Aysel; Yener, Ouzlem [Dept. of Radiology, Tuerkiye Yueksek Ihtisas Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Erden, Aysel [Dept. of Radiology, Ankara University School of Medicine, Antalya (Turkmenistan); Tuerkoglu, Mehmet Akif [Dept. of General Surgery, Antalya University School of Medicine, Antalya (Turkmenistan)

    2013-12-15

    Though congenital anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are relatively uncommon and they are often discovered as an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients, some of these anomalies may lead to various clinical symptoms such as recurrent abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Recognition of these anomalies is important because these anomalies may be a surgically correctable cause of recurrent pancreatitis or the cause of gastric outlet obstruction. An awareness of these anomalies may help in surgical planning and prevent inadvertent ductal injury. The purpose of this article is to review normal pancreatic embryology, the appearance of ductal anatomic variants and developmental anomalies of the pancreas, with emphasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography and multidetector computed tomography.

  11. Primary anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome causing recurrent venous thrombosis and thrombocytopenia in a patient with Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elebrashy, Ibrahim; Yousief, Elham; Saif, Aasem

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of Addison's disease presenting with recurrent deep venous thrombosis and thrombocytopenia and proved to have primary anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome. The case report highlights the shared autoimmune nature of both diseases.

  12. Management of acute pancreatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Lin, Tom K; Nathan, Jaimie D

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric acute pancreatitis has been on the rise in the last decades, with an incidence close to adult pancreatitis. In the majority of cases acute pancreatitis resolves spontaneously, but in a subset of children the disease progresses to severe acute pancreatitis with attendant morbidity and mortality. Pediatric acute pancreatitis in this era is recognized as a separate entity from adult acute pancreatitis given that the causes and disease outcomes are different. There are slow but important advances made in understanding the best management for acute pancreatitis in children from medical, interventional, and surgical aspects. Supportive care with fluids, pain medications, and nutrition remain the mainstay for acute pancreatitis management. For complicated or severe pancreatitis, specialized interventions may be required with endoscopic or drainage procedures. Surgery has an important but limited role in pediatric acute pancreatitis.

  13. Computed tomography, ultrasonography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, W.D.; Stewart, E.T.; Lawson, T.L.; Maher, L.; Unger, G.F.; Geenan, J.; Loguidice, J.

    1980-01-01

    A prospective study was performed comparing the sensitivity of computed tomography, ultrasonography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease. Forty patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma, acute recurrent or chronic pancreatitis, and/or jaundice were studied. CT was the most sensitive study in evaluation of pancreatitis. ERCP was most accurate in evaluation of pancreatic malignancy. Ultrasonography was the least sensitive method in detecting pancreatic disease and dilatation of the extrahepatic biliary ducts. (orig.) [de

  14. Optimal timing of cholecystectomy in children with gallstone pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badru, Faidah; Saxena, Saurabh; Breeden, Robert; Bourdillon, Maximillan; Fitzpatrick, Colleen; Chatoorgoon, Kaveer; Greenspon, Jose; Villalona, Gustavo

    2017-07-01

    Little data exist regarding the recurrence of pancreatitis in pediatric patients with gallstone pancreatitis awaiting cholecystectomy. This study evaluates the recurrence rate of pancreatitis after acute gallstone pancreatitis based on the timing of cholecystectomy in pediatric patients. A retrospective chart review of all patients admitted with gallstone pancreatitis from 2007 to 2015 was performed. Children were divided into the following five groups. Group 1 had surgery during the index admission. Group 2 had surgery within 2 wk of discharge. Group 3 had surgery between 2 and 6 wk postdischarge. Group 4 had surgery 6 wk after discharge, and group 5 patients had no surgery. The recurrence rates of pancreatitis were calculated for all groups. Forty-eight patients with gallstone pancreatitis were identified in this study. The 19 patients in group 1 had no recurrence of their pancreatitis. Of the remaining 29 patients, nine (31%) had recurrence of pancreatitis or required readmission for abdominal pain prior to their cholecystectomy. In group 2, two of the eight patients (25%) had recurrent pancreatitis. In group 3, three of eight patients (37.5%) developed recurrent pancreatitis. In group 4, three of five patients (60%), and in group 5, one of eight. No children in group 5 had demonstrable gallstones at presentation, only sludge in their gallbladder. Cholecystectomy during the index admission is associated with no recurrence or readmission for pancreatitis. Therefore, we recommend that cholecystectomy be performed after resolution of an episode of gallstone pancreatitis during index admission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  16. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed

  17. Pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail associated with chronic pancreatitis successfully treated by transpapillary cyst drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitoh, Itaru; Ohara, Hirotaka; Okayama, Yasutaka; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Ando, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Kazuki; Okumura, Fumihiro; Kitajima, Yasuhiro; Ban, Tessin; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Ueno, Koichiro; Joh, Takashi; Sano, Hitoshi

    2008-09-01

    We report a 50-year-old male with pseudocysts in the pancreatic tail associated with chronic pancreatitis successfully treated by transpapillary cyst drainage. He had previously undergone ultrasonography-guided percutaneous cyst drainage for a pancreatic pseudocyst in our hospital. He was readmitted due to abdominal pain and fever. Computed tomography showed recurrence of a pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail measuring 5 cm in diameter. Since conservative treatment failed, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography was performed. There was communication between the pseudocyst and the main pancreatic duct, and pancreatic duct stenosis proximal to the pseudocyst. First, transpapillary pancreatic duct drainage was performed using a plastic stent, but the pseudocyst did not decrease in size and became infected. After removal of the stent, a pigtail type nasocystic catheter was placed in the pseudocyst via the pancreatic duct. The pseudocyst infection immediately disappeared, and the pseudocyst gradually decreased and disappeared. After removal of the nasocystic catheter, no recurrence was observed. As transpapillary drainage of pancreatic pseudocyst, cyst drainage and pancreatic duct drainage have been reported. In our patient with pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail, duct drainage was ineffective and the pseudocyst was infected, whereas cyst drainage was very effective. We considered that cyst drainage by a nasocystic catheter was the first-line therapy as the transpapillary drainage of the pancreatic pseudocyst.

  18. Pseudocyst in the Pancreatic Tail Associated with Chronic Pancreatitis Successfully Treated by Transpapillary Cyst Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itaru Naitoh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a 50-year-old male with pseudocysts in the pancreatic tail associated with chronic pancreatitis successfully treated by transpapillary cyst drainage. He had previously undergone ultrasonography-guided percutaneous cyst drainage for a pancreatic pseudocyst in our hospital. He was readmitted due to abdominal pain and fever. Computed tomography showed recurrence of a pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail measuring 5 cm in diameter. Since conservative treatment failed, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography was performed. There was communication between the pseudocyst and the main pancreatic duct, and pancreatic duct stenosis proximal to the pseudocyst. First, transpapillary pancreatic duct drainage was performed using a plastic stent, but the pseudocyst did not decrease in size and became infected. After removal of the stent, a pigtail type nasocystic catheter was placed in the pseudocyst via the pancreatic duct. The pseudocyst infection immediately disappeared, and the pseudocyst gradually decreased and disappeared. After removal of the nasocystic catheter, no recurrence was observed. As transpapillary drainage of pancreatic pseudocyst, cyst drainage and pancreatic duct drainage have been reported. In our patient with pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail, duct drainage was ineffective and the pseudocyst was infected, whereas cyst drainage was very effective. We considered that cyst drainage by a nasocystic catheter was the first-line therapy as the transpapillary drainage of the pancreatic pseudocyst.

  19. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  20. Studies on alterations of the 86-rubidium efflux from rat pancreatic islets caused by thiol and thiol oxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The following findings were revealed by this study: 1) Oxidation-reduction (redox) of the intracellular system of glutathione influences the potassium efflux by way of an increase in the 86-rubidium efflux brought about by the oxidation of intracellular thiols. 2) The 86-rubidium efflux is not subject to change by oxidation of extracellular thiols located in the membrane, nor can it in any way be influenced by reduced glutathione of exogenous origin. 3) The potassium efflux from rat pancreatic islets, being generally known to trigger the electric activities of the beta-cell, is controlled by the oxidation-reduction of intracellular thiols rather than by that of extracellular thiols. (TRV) [de

  1. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  2. The NQO1 bioactivatable drug, β-lapachone, alters the redox state of NQO1+ pancreatic cancer cells, causing perturbation in central carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvers, Molly A; Deja, Stanislaw; Singh, Naveen; Egnatchik, Robert A; Sudderth, Jessica; Luo, Xiuquan; Beg, Muhammad S; Burgess, Shawn C; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Boothman, David A; Merritt, Matthew E

    2017-11-03

    Many cancer treatments, such as those for managing recalcitrant tumors like pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, cause off-target toxicities in normal, healthy tissue, highlighting the need for more tumor-selective chemotherapies. β-Lapachone is bioactivated by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). This enzyme exhibits elevated expression in most solid cancers and therefore is a potential cancer-specific target. β-Lapachone's therapeutic efficacy partially stems from the drug's induction of a futile NQO1-mediated redox cycle that causes high levels of superoxide and then peroxide formation, which damages DNA and causes hyperactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, resulting in extensive NAD + /ATP depletion. However, the effects of this drug on energy metabolism due to NAD + depletion were never described. The futile redox cycle rapidly consumes O 2 , rendering standard assays of Krebs cycle turnover unusable. In this study, a multimodal analysis, including metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized pyruvate, points to reduced oxidative flux due to NAD + depletion after β-lapachone treatment of NQO1+ human pancreatic cancer cells. NAD + -sensitive pathways, such as glycolysis, flux through lactate dehydrogenase, and the citric acid cycle (as inferred by flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase), were down-regulated by β-lapachone treatment. Changes in flux through these pathways should generate biomarkers useful for in vivo dose responses of β-lapachone treatment in humans, avoiding toxic side effects. Targeting the enzymes in these pathways for therapeutic treatment may have the potential to synergize with β-lapachone treatment, creating unique NQO1-selective combinatorial therapies for specific cancers. These findings warrant future studies of intermediary metabolism in patients treated with β-lapachone. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Centrally necrotizing breast carcinoma: a rare histological subtype, which was cause of misdiagnosis in an evident clinical local recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernanz Fernando

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Centrally necrotizing carcinoma is a rare subtype of breast carcinoma, which is characterized by an extensive central necrotic zone accounting for at least 70% of the cross-sectional area of the neoplasm. This central necrotic zone, in turn, is surrounded by a narrow rim of proliferative viable tumor cells. We report an unusual clinical situation in which a patient whose evident breast mass suggested an ipsilateral local recurrence and for which numerous attempts to confirm the histological diagnosis had failed. The patient was treated with a radical mastectomy based on clinical suspicion of breast cancer recurrence after an undesirable delay. In this case, the narrow rim of viable malignant tissue had a thickness of 0.5 to 8 mm, and the centrally necrotizing carcinoma had a central zone with a predominance of fibrosis. The special features of this case led to a misdiagnosis and to an evident clinical local recurrence.

  4. [Treatments for Pancreatic Cancer with Oligometastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Junji

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer, adenocarcinoma, generally rapidly progresses, and if a metastatic lesion is detected, chemotherapy is applied even in solitary metastasis. However, surgical resection for solitary metastasis have been reported to achieve long survival in some pancreatic cancer patients. In a prospective study of surgery for hepatic and lymph node oligometastasis of pancreatic cancer, long survival of 5 years or more was reported around 10%. Furthermore, longer survival and fewer rerecurrence were achieved with surgery in lung metastasis than in liver metastasis and loco-regional recurrence. Although there has been no establishment of concept or no consensus of treatment strategy for oligometastasis in pancreatic cancer, some patients with pancreatic cancer have long disease-free survival by surgery for oligometastasis. A population of pancreatic cancer patients who have benefits of surgery for oligometastasis should be identified, and it is necessary to establish treatments for oligometastasis as standard treatments in pancreatic cancer.

  5. A solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas in a man presenting with acute pancreatitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Chikuie

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We report a man with a small SPN of the pancreas presenting with acute pancreatitis and mimicking pancreatic cancer. We should be aware that this rare pancreatic tumor can become a cause of acute pancreatitis.

  6. Pectus excavatum with delayed diagnosis of implant tear on MRI apparently causing recurrent postoperative seromas: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Arti R.; Powell, Daniel K.; Irish, Robert D.; Math, Kevin R. [Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Seroma formation is the most common early postoperative complication after pectus excavatum repair, but later seromas are rare. While many seromas eventually resorb or decrease in size after aspiration, our case demonstrates recurrent seroma formation as a late complication of pectus excavatum repair in a patient with an implant tear. Postoperative seromas can result in prolonged chest wall pain, large chest wall masses, and increased mass effect on the heart with potential risk for resultant right ventricular outflow obstruction. This case report illustrates a solid silicone implant tear. Though rare, early recognition may help to decrease the likelihood of recurrent postoperative seromas. (orig.)

  7. Hypermutation in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Humphris, Jeremy L.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J.; Johns, Amber L.; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K.; Miller, David K.; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S.; Quinn, Michael C.J.; Bruxner, Timothy J.C.; Christ, Angelika N.; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechan...

  8. Current knowledge on pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eIovanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3-5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and the deregulation of many signalling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signalling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  9. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iovanna, Juan [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, Marseille (France); Mallmann, Maria Cecilia [Centre d’Investigation Clinique de Marseille, Marseille (France); Gonçalves, Anthony [Département d’Oncologie Médicale, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France); Turrini, Olivier [Département de Chirurgie Oncologique, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France); Dagorn, Jean-Charles, E-mail: juan.iovanna@inserm.fr [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, Marseille (France)

    2012-01-31

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood: an unusual cause of recurrent uncommon infections in a 61-year-old man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isman-Nelkenbaum, G.; Wolach, B.; Gavrieli, R.; Roos, D.; Sprecher, E.; Bash, E.; Gat, A.; Sprecher, H.; Ben-Ami, R.; Zeeli, T.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare congenital immunodeficiency that affects 1 : 250 000 of the population, which is characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and by granuloma formation. We investigated a 61-year-old man presented with a 20-year history of a relapsing skin

  12. Bronchial artery embolization for the treatment of hemoptysis due to pulmonary tuberculosis: its clinical effect with an analysis of the causes of recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shoumin; Li Jingying; Wang Guoxing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinical effect of bronchial artery embolization (BAE) in treating massive hemoptysis due to pulmonary tuberculosis and to analyze the causes of recurrence in order to improve the therapeutic results. Methods: A total of 39 cases of patients with recurrent massive hemoptysis due to pulmonary tuberculosis, who were encountered during the period from Oct. 2007 to Sep. 2010, were enrolled in this study. The lesions included infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (n= 28) and chronic fibrocavitary pulmonary tuberculosis (n= 11). BAE with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles only was performed in 14 cases (group A), while BAE with both PVA particles and coils was carried out in 25 cases (group B). All the patients were followed up for 12 - 48 months. The results were compared between the two groups. Results: Immediate hemostasis was obtained in 36 cases (92.3%), the clinical result was excellent in 3 cases. The complete cure or excellent result with single embolization procedure was achieved in 30 cases (76.9%). Recurrence was seen in 9 cases (23.1%). The difference in the recurrence rate between group A (42.9%) and group B (12.0%) was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The relapsing rate of patients with chronic fibrocavitary pulmonary tuberculosis was significantly higher than that of patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (45.5% vs. 14.3%, P < 0.05). Conclusion: BAE has an instant effect of hemostasis and satisfactory clinical result. Nowadays BAE has already become the treatment of first choice for hemoptysis caused by pulmonary tuberculosis. The dual embolization technique with the combination use of PVA particles and coils can effectively reduce the recurrence of' pulmonary tuberculosis hemoptysis. (authors)

  13. Drainage alone or combined with anti-tumor therapy for treatment of obstructive jaundice caused by recurrence and metastasis after primary tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuan; Huang, Xin-En; Wang, Shu-Xiang; Lv, Peng-Hua; Sun, Ling; Wang, Fu-An; Wang, Li-Fu

    2014-01-01

    To compare drainage alone or combined with anti-tumor therapy for treatment of obstructive jaundice caused by recurrence and metastasis after primary tumor resection. We collect 42 patients with obstructive jaundice caused by recurrence and metastasis after tumor resection from January 2008 - August 2012, for which percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage (pTCD)/ percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting (pTBS) were performed. In 25 patients drainage was combined with anti-tumor treatment, antineoplastic therapy including intra/postprodure local treatment and postoperative systemic chemotherapy, the other 17 undergoing drainage only. We assessed the two kinds of treatment with regard to patient prognosis. Both treatments demonstrated good effects in reducing bilirubin levels in the short term and promoting liver function. The time to reobstruction was 125 days in the combined group and 89 days in the drainage only group; the mean survival times were 185 and 128 days, the differences being significant. Interventional drainage in the treatment of the obstructive jaundice caused by recurrence and metastasis after tumor resection can decrease bilirubin level quickly in a short term and promote the liver function recovery. Combined treatment prolongs the survival time and period before reobstruction as compared to drainage only.

  14. Atrial septal defect as a cause of chronic cough and recurrent infections in a 4-year-old boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Fuss

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent infections of the respiratory system among children are the most common reason for ambulatory treatment and one of the main causes of hospitalisation. Out of many factors that can be potentially responsible for the recurrent infections in children it is necessary to consider the ones that are connected with the immaturity of the immune system of a child and ones that can disturb the proper functioning of this system. It seems that the most important observations are those pointing at links between recurrent infections of the respiratory tract and the allergic process. The present article describes a case of a boy with recurrent respiratory infections, who was diagnosed towards immune system malfunction and allergies. An echocardiographic examination revealed a major defect of the interatrial septum. This  heart condition was treated with cardiac surgery as a result of which infections occur less frequently and do not require the hospitalisation of the patient.

  15. [Current alternatives in the surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis--a review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kat'uchová, Jana; Radonak, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterized as an inflammatory process affecting the pancreas that causes progressive destruction of the gland and fibrosis, with subsequent endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. The most common cause of chronic pancreatitis is alcohol use in combination with nicotine. Manifestations are persistent or recurrent painful attacks. The only parameter of successful treatment of chronic pancreatitis is a relieve from long-lasting pain and improvement of the quality of life. Surgical treatment options include drainage operations on the pancreas, pancreatic resection or a combination of both. With optimal surgical treatment performed and good patient's compliance, operations for chronic pancreatitis have low number of post-operative complications and relatively good long-term results. The continued consumption of alcohol and drugs bring about worse outcomes, sometimes even a complete failure of therapy. Chronic pancreatitis also has considerable socio-economic consequences. Due to the persisting pain and frequent hospitalization it can lead to long-term disability and early retirement predominantly in young patients.

  16. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, R; Bhattacharya, S

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: 'pancreatic trauma', 'pancreatic duct injury', 'radiology AND pancreas injury', 'diagnosis of pancreatic trauma', and 'management AND surgery'. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important prognostic factor is pancreatic duct disruption and in these cases

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  19. Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Jeremy L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J; Johns, Amber L; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K; Miller, David K; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S; Quinn, Michael C J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Stone, Andrew; Wilson, Peter J; Anderson, Matthew; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Mead, Ronald S; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Nagrial, Adnan M; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B; McKay, Colin J; Carter, C Ross; Dickson, Euan J; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Grützmann, Robert; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Rusev, Borislav; Corbo, Vincenzo; Salvia, Roberto; Cataldo, Ivana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Hofmann, Oliver; Eshleman, James R; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Gill, Anthony J; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute and chronic pancreatitis: surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzakovic, Alexander; Superina, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis is becoming increasingly prevalent in children, posing new challenges to pediatric health care providers. Although some general adult treatment paradigms are applicable in the pediatric population, diagnostic workup and surgical management of acute and chronic pancreatitis have to be tailored to anatomic and pathophysiological entities peculiar to children. Nonbiliary causes of acute pancreatitis in children are generally managed nonoperatively with hydration, close biochemical and clinical observation, and early initiation of enteral feeds. Surgical intervention including cholecystectomy or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is often required in acute biliary pancreatitis, whereas infected pancreatic necrosis remains a rare absolute indication for pancreatic debridement and drainage via open, laparoscopic, or interventional radiologic procedure. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by painful irreversible changes of the parenchyma and ducts, which may result in or be caused by inadequate ductal drainage. A variety of surgical procedures providing drainage, denervation, resection, or a combination thereof are well established to relieve pain and preserve pancreatic function. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotna, T.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance or frank diabetes mellitus is known to occur more frequently in patients with pancreatic cancer than in the general population. At the time of the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, more than 70% of patients taking the glucose tolerance test show diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (1). Relationship among diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer is vague but sure, although neither the nature nor the sequence of the possible cause – effect relationship has been established. The reason for the high frequency of glucose intolerance in patients with pancreatic cancer remains controversial. (author)

  2. Systemic therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrezalova Vochyanova, I.; Salek, T.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth comment cause of cancer-related death in men. Most patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed at advanced, non-resectable stage. Late detection, early metastases, difficult surgical approached, cancer resistant to systemic chemo and radiotherapy - all contribute to its in faust prognosis. Only about 5 % of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Gemcitabine - based combination treatments is the standard for advanced pancreatic cancer. The combination of fluorouracil, folinic acid, irinotecan and oxaliplatin led to median survival of 11 months. No standard second-line treatment exists for pancreatic cancer. (author)

  3. Probiotics enhance pancreatic glutathione biosynthesis and reduce oxidative stress in experimental acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgendorff, Femke; Trulsson, Lena M.; van Minnen, L. Paul; Rijkers, Ger T.; Timmerman, Harro M.; Franzen, Lennart E.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Soderholm, Johan D.; Sandstrom, Per A.

    2008-01-01

    Factors determining severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) are poorly understood. Oxidative stress causes acinar cell injury and contributes to the severity, whereas prophylactic probiotics ameliorate experimental pancreatitis. Our objective was to study how probiotics affect oxidative stress,

  4. Genetic aspects of chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, M.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory disorder. A key characteristic of the condition is severe recurrent abdominal pain. The origin of CP is mixed, with about 70% of the cases being attributed to alcohol abuse even though 95% of all alcoholics never develop CP. Approximately half

  5. Pathophysiology of alcoholic pancreatitis: An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parimal Chowdhury; Priya Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Use of alcohol is a worldwide habit regardless of socioeconomic background. Heavy alcohol consumption is a potential risk factor for induction of pancreatitis. The current review cites the updated literature on the alcohol metabolism, its effects on gastrointestinal and pancreatic function and in causing pancreatic injury, genetic predisposition of alcohol induced pancreatitis. Reports describing prospective mechanisms of action of alcohol activating the signal transduction pathways, induction of oxidative stress parameters through the development of animal models are being presented.

  6. Laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy for chronic pancreatitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoichi Deie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical pancreatic duct (PD drainage for chronic pancreatitis in children is relatively rare. It is indicated in cases of recurrent pancreatitis and PD dilatation that have not responded to medical therapy and therapeutic endoscopy. We performed laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy for two paediatric patients with chronic pancreatitis. The main PD was opened easily by electrocautery after locating the dilated PD by intraoperative ultrasonography. The dilated PD was split longitudinally from the pancreatic tail to the pancreatic head by laparoscopic coagulation shears or electrocautery after pancreatography. A laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy was performed by a one-layered technique using continuous 4-0 polydioxanone (PDS sutures from the pancreatic tail to the pancreatic head. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications or recurrences. This procedure has cosmetic advantages compared with open surgery for chronic pancreatitis. Laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy in children is feasible and effective for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

  7. Drug-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Maertin, Sandrina; Scheiber, Jonas; Ritter, Christoph A; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2012-04-01

    Drugs are thought to be a rare cause for acute pancreatitis; however 525 different drugs are listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) database suspected to cause acute pancreatitis as a side effect. Many of them are widely used to treat highly prevalent diseases. The true incidence is not entirely clear since only few systematic population based studies exist. The majority of the available data are derived from case reports or case control studies. Furthermore, the causality for many of these drugs remains elusive and for only 31 of these 525 dugs a definite causality was established. Definite proof for causality is defined by the WHO classification if symptoms reoccur upon rechallenge.In the actual algorithm the diagnosis is confirmed if no other cause of acute pancreatitis can be detected, and the patient is taking one of the suspected drugs.

  8. Transarterial chemoperfusion with gemcitabine and mitomycin C in pancreatic carcinoma: Results in locally recurrent tumors and advanced tumor stages; Transarterielle Chemoperfusion mit Gemcitabine und Mitomycin C bei Pankreaskarzinom: Ergebnisse bei Rezidivtumoren und fortgeschrittenen Tumorstadien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Zangos, S.; Heller, M.; Hammerstingl, R.M.; Bauer, R.W. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, J. W. Goethe-Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Boecher, E. [Klinik Paradise, Medizinische Klinik, Soest (Germany); Jacob, U. [Leonardisklinik, Onkologische Fachklinik, Bad Heilbrunn (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate local transarterial chemoperfusion (TACP) in locally recurrent pancreatic carcinoma and advanced tumor stages which did not respond to prior systemic chemotherapy. The tumor response, survival, and pain response were retrospectively analyzed. Materials and method: Forty outpatients (median age 62 years, range 36 - 79) were treated with a minimum of 3 (mean 6, range 3 - 12) applications per patient in four-week intervals. Twenty-eight patients were in advanced tumor stages, and 12 patients had locally recurrent tumors. Gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) and mitomycin C (8.5 mg/m{sup 2}) were administered within 1 hour through a celiac trunk catheter. The tumor response (diameter, volume) was measured using MRI or CT and classified according to RECIST. The pain response was defined as a reduction of pain intensity of more than 50% on a visual analog scale, or a reduction of more than 50% in analgesics consumption, or a switch to a less potent analgesic agent. Results: The treatment was tolerated well by all patients. No clinically relevant problems or grade III or IV toxicity according to CTC (Common Toxicity Criteria) were observed. Tumor-related pain was relieved in 20/32 (62.5%) cases. Radiologically, 'complete response' was found in 3/40 (7.5%), 'partial response' in 9/40 (22.5%), 'stable disease' in 16/40 (40%), and 'progressive disease' in 12/40 (30%) of the patients. The median survival period since initial diagnosis and first TACP was 16.4 months and 8.1 months, respectively. Locally recurrent tumors showed better, but still not significant results regarding tumor response (41.7% vs. 25%) as well as survival (14.4 vs. 7 months) compared to advanced tumor stages. Responders (CR + PR) showed a significant survival advantage compared to patients with tumor progression (13.0 vs. 6.0 months; p = 0.013). (orig.)

  9. Clinical and microbiologic characteristics of adult patients with recurrent bacteraemia caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C-H; Su, L-H; Chen, F-J; Tang, Y-F; Chien, C-C; Liu, J-W

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of patients with recurrent bacteraemia caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae (EK) are rarely described. Flomoxef belongs to the cephamycins group and demonstrates in vitro activity against ESBL-producing organisms. Whether flomoxef may be used for the treatment of such infections remains controversial. This retrospective case-control study enrolled adult patients who had bacteraemia caused by ESBL-EK during 2005-2011. Case patients were those who had more than one episode of ESBL-EK bacteraemia. Controls were those who were matched for age and interval time of blood sampling and had only one episode of ESBL-EK bacteraemia with subsequent bacteraemia episodes caused by other non-ESBL-EK bacteria. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and microbiologic profiles of the initial and subsequent ESBL-EK isolates were analysed. During the study period, 424 patients were found to have at least one positive blood culture after the first ESBL-EK bacteraemia episode, and 67 (15.8%) had a second episode of ESBL-EK bacteraemia. Bacteraemia resulting from vascular catheter-related infection (odds ratio, 3.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-8.05), and definitive therapy with flomoxef (odds ratio, 2.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-8.15) were both independent risk factors for the recurrence. Among the 56 patients with available ESBL-EK isolates for analysis, 38 (67.8%) were infected by genetically similar strains. In three of these 38 recurrent ESBL-EK bacteraemia cases caused by an identical strain, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of carbapenem for the subsequent K. pneumoniae isolates were fourfold or higher than the initial isolates. Recurrent bacteraemia was not uncommon in our patients with ESBL-EK bacteraemia, and most of the episodes were caused by identical strains. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  10. A Recurrent De Novo Variant in NACC1 Causes a Syndrome Characterized by Infantile Epilepsy, Cataracts, and Profound Developmental Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Kelly; Meng, Linyan; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Bearden, David R; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjorg; Busk, Oyvind L; Stong, Nicholas; Liston, Eriskay; Cohn, Ronald D; Scaglia, Fernando; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Tarpinian, Jennifer; Skraban, Cara M; Deardorff, Matthew A; Friedman, Jeremy N; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Walley, Nicole; Mikati, Mohamad A; Kranz, Peter G; Jasien, Joan; McConkie-Rosell, Allyn; McDonald, Marie; Wechsler, Stephanie Burns; Freemark, Michael; Kansagra, Sujay; Freedman, Sharon; Bali, Deeksha; Millan, Francisca; Bale, Sherri; Nelson, Stanley F; Lee, Hane; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Goldstein, David B; Xiao, Rui; Yang, Yaping; Posey, Jennifer E; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Lupski, James R; Wangler, Michael F; Shashi, Vandana

    2017-02-02

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has increasingly enabled new pathogenic gene variant identification for undiagnosed neurodevelopmental disorders and provided insights into both gene function and disease biology. Here, we describe seven children with a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by microcephaly, profound developmental delays and/or intellectual disability, cataracts, severe epilepsy including infantile spasms, irritability, failure to thrive, and stereotypic hand movements. Brain imaging in these individuals reveals delay in myelination and cerebral atrophy. We observe an identical recurrent de novo heterozygous c.892C>T (p.Arg298Trp) variant in the nucleus accumbens associated 1 (NACC1) gene in seven affected individuals. One of the seven individuals is mosaic for this variant. NACC1 encodes a transcriptional repressor implicated in gene expression and has not previously been associated with germline disorders. The probability of finding the same missense NACC1 variant by chance in 7 out of 17,228 individuals who underwent WES for diagnoses of neurodevelopmental phenotypes is extremely small and achieves genome-wide significance (p = 1.25 × 10 -14 ). Selective constraint against missense variants in NACC1 makes this excess of an identical missense variant in all seven individuals more remarkable. Our findings are consistent with a germline recurrent mutational hotspot associated with an allele-specific neurodevelopmental phenotype in NACC1. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  11. TRAUMATIC PANCREATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Clarence J.; Walters, Robert L.

    1953-01-01

    Traumatic pancreatitis should be considered as a diagnostic possibility when trauma to the epigastrium is followed by phenomena suggestive of intra-abdominal injury. The presence or absence of hyperamylasemia should be established immediately. Even when traumatic pancreatitis is believed to exist, any suggestion of injury to other viscera should indicate laparotomy. Retroperitoneal rupture of the duodenum may simulate traumatic pancreatitis in all respects, including hyperamylasemia. X-ray studies may be of value in differentiation. Non-complicated traumatic pancreatitis is best treated conservatively. Gunshot and knife wounds of the pancreas should be drained. PMID:13094537

  12. A conservative assessment of the major genetic causes of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis: data from a comprehensive analysis of PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR genes in 253 young French patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Masson

    Full Text Available Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP has traditionally been defined as chronic pancreatitis in the absence of any obvious precipitating factors (e.g. alcohol abuse and family history of the disease. Studies over the past 15 years have revealed that ICP has a highly complex genetic architecture involving multiple gene loci. Here, we have attempted to provide a conservative assessment of the major genetic causes of ICP in a sample of 253 young French ICP patients. For the first time, conventional types of mutation (comprising coding sequence variants and variants at intron/exon boundaries and gross genomic rearrangements were screened for in all four major pancreatitis genes, PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR. For the purposes of the study, synonymous, intronic and 5'- or 3'-untranslated region variants were excluded from the analysis except where there was persuasive evidence of functional consequences. The remaining sequence variants/genotypes were classified into causative, contributory or neutral categories by consideration of (i their allele frequencies in patient and normal control populations, (ii their presumed or experimentally confirmed functional effects, (iii the relative importance of their associated genes in the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis and (iv gene-gene interactions wherever applicable. Adoption of this strategy allowed us to assess the pathogenic relevance of specific variants/genotypes to their respective carriers to an unprecedented degree. The genetic cause of ICP could be assigned in 23.7% of individuals in the study group. A strong genetic susceptibility factor was also present in an additional 24.5% of cases. Taken together, up to 48.2% of the studied ICP patients were found to display evidence of a genetic basis for their pancreatitis. Whereas these particular proportions may not be extrapolable to all ICP patients, the approach employed should serve as a useful framework for acquiring a better understanding of the

  13. Epidermal growth factor inhibits rat pancreatic cell proliferation, causes acinar cell hypertrophy, and prevents caerulein-induced desensitization of amylase release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, J; Larose, L; Korc, M

    1989-06-01

    The in vivo effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on pancreatic growth and digestive enzyme concentrations were compared with the actions of the pancreatic secretagogue caerulein in the adult rat. EGF (10 micrograms/kg BW) did not alter pancreatic weight or protein content. However, this concentration of EGF inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA by 44%, decreased DNA content by 20%, and increased the concentrations of amylase, chymotrypsinogen, and protein by 106%, 232%, and 42%, respectively. Pancreatic acini prepared from EGF-treated rats exhibited a characteristic secretory response to caerulein that was superimposable to that obtained in acini from saline-treated rats. In both groups of acini half-maximal and maximal stimulation of amylase release occurred at approximately 5 pM and 50 pM caerulein, respectively. In contrast to EGF, caerulein (1 microgram/kg BW) increased pancreatic weight by 29% and protein content by 59%, and enhanced [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA by 70%. Although caerulein increased the concentrations of pancreatic amylase and chymotrypsinogen by 38% and 297%, respectively, pancreatic acini prepared from caerulein-treated rats were less sensitive to the actions of caerulein in vitro when compared with acini from control rats. Indeed, the EC50 was shift from 4.8 pM to 9.8 pM after 4 days of treatment. EGF potentiated the actions of caerulein on pancreatic weight, protein content, and chymotrypsinogen concentration, and prevented the caerulein-induced alteration in the secretory responsiveness of the acinar cell. Conversely, caerulein reversed the inhibitory effect of EGF on thymidine incorporation. These findings suggest that EGF may modulate the trophic effects of certain gastrointestinal hormones, and may participate in the regulation of pancreatic exocrine function in vivo.

  14. Food-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok K; Upparahalli Venkateshaiah, Sathisha; Goyal, Hemant; Mishra, Anil

    2017-12-01

    Food allergy, a commonly increasing problem worldwide, defined as an adverse immune response to food. A variety of immune-related effector cells such as mast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, and T cells are involved in food-related allergic responses categorized as IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, and mixed (IgE and non-IgE) depending upon underlying immunological mechanisms. The dietary antigens mainly target the gastrointestinal tract including pancreas that gets inflamed due to food allergy and leads acute pancreatitis. Reports indicate several food proteins induce pancreatitis; however, detailed underlying mechanism of food-induced pancreatitis is unexplored. The aim of the review is to understand and update the current scenario of food-induced pancreatitis. A comprehensive literature search of relevant research articles has been performed through PubMed, and articles were chosen based on their relevance to food allergen-mediated pancreatitis. Several cases in the literature indicate that acute pancreatitis has been provoked after the consumption of mustard, milk, egg, banana, fish, and kiwi fruits. Food-induced pancreatitis is an ignored and unexplored area of research. The review highlights the significance of food in the development of pancreatitis and draws the attention of physicians and scientists to consider food allergies as a possible cause for initiation of pancreatitis pathogenesis.

  15. The Role of α-Defensins 1–3 in Antimicrobial Protection Forming in Children with Recurrent Bronchitis Caused by Bacteria of the Genus Haemophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.O. Lezhenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The level of α-defensins 1–3 (HNP 1–3 has been analyzed in the blood plasma of children with recurrent bronchitis caused by bacteria of the genus Haemophilus. It is shown that the level of HNP 1–3 in the blood plasma depends on the form of Haemophilus. Trigger of HNP 1–3 outflow for neutrophils was the presence of bacterial capsule while presence of L-forms of Haemophilus influenzae wasn’t associated with increase in synthesis of antimicrobial peptides that could be one of the factors of forming of Haemophilus antibiotic resistance.

  16. Preliminary pediatric clinical evaluation of the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 in preventing recurrent pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes and recurrent acute otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pierro F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Guido Donato,2 Federico Fomia,3 Teresa Adami,4 Domenico Careddu,5 Claudia Cassandro,6 Roberto Albera61Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milano, 2ASL 1, Cuneo, 3ASL 3, Brescia, 4Infective Diseases, Verona, 5ASL 13, Novara, 6Surgical Science Department, Università degli Studi, Torino, ItalyBackground: The oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 has been shown clearly to antagonize the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans, by releasing two bacteriocins named salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B. Unpublished observations indicate that it can also antagonize the growth of other bacteria involved in acute otitis media. Because of its ability to colonize the oral cavity and its safety profile, we have tested its efficacy in reducing the incidence of streptococcal pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis and episodes of acute otitis media.Methods: We enrolled 82 children, including 65 with and 17 without a recent diagnosis of recurrent oral streptococcal pathology. Of those with recurrent pathology, 45 were treated daily for 90 days with an oral slow-release tablet containing five billion colony-forming units of S. salivarius K12 (Bactoblis®, and the remaining 20 served as an untreated control group. The 17 children without a recent diagnosis of recurrent oral pathology were used as an additional control group. After 90 days of treatment, a 6-month follow-up period without treatment was included to evaluate a possible persistent protective role for the previously administered product.Results: The 41 children who completed the 90-day course of Bactoblis showed a reduction in their episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infection (about 90% and/or acute otitis media (about 40%, calculated by comparing infection rates in the previous year. The 90-day treatment also reduced the reported incidence of pharyngeal and ear infections by about 65% in the 6-month follow-up period

  17. Isolation of Human Islets for Autologous Islet Transplantation in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Pancreatitis

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    Rita Bottino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas that causes permanent changes in the function and structure of the pancreas. It is most commonly a complication of cystic fibrosis or due to a genetic predisposition. Chronic pancreatitis generally presents symptomatically as recurrent abdominal pain, which becomes persistent over time. The pain eventually becomes disabling. Once specific medical treatments and endoscopic interventions are no longer efficacious, total pancreatectomy is the alternative of choice for helping the patient achieve pain control. While daily administrations of digestive enzymes cannot be avoided, insulin-dependent diabetes can be prevented by transplanting the isolated pancreatic islets back to the patient. The greater the number of islets infused, the greater the chance to prevent or at least control the effects of surgical diabetes. We present here a technical approach for the isolation and preservation of the islets proven to be efficient to obtain high numbers of islets, favoring the successful treatment of young patients.

  18. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

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    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  19. A novel rasopathy caused by recurrent de novo missense mutations in PPP1CB closely resembles Noonan syndrome with loose anagen hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, Karen W; Aldinger, Kimberly A; Bennett, James T; Baker, Laura; Tusi, Jessica; Powell-Hamilton, Nina; Stabley, Deborah; Sol-Church, Katia; Timms, Andrew E; Dobyns, William B

    2016-09-01

    Noonan syndrome is a rasopathy caused by mutations in multiple genes encoding components of the RAS/MAPK pathway. Despite its variable phenotype, limited genotype-phenotype correlations exist. Noonan syndrome with loose anagen hair (NS-LAH) is characterized by its distinctive hair anomalies, developmental differences, and structural brain abnormalities and is caused by a single recurrent missense SHOC2 mutation. SHOC2 forms a complex with protein phosphatase 1 (PP1C). Protein phosphatases counterbalance kinases and control activation of signaling proteins, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinases of the RAS/MAPK pathway. Here we report four patients with de novo missense mutations in protein phosphatase one catalytic subunit beta (PPP1CB), sharing a recognizable phenotype. Three individuals had the recurrent PPP1CB c.146G>C, p.Pro49Arg mutation, the fourth had a c.166G>C, p.Ala56Pro change. All had relative or absolute macrocephaly, low-set and posteriorly angulated ears, and developmental delay. Slow growing and/or sparse hair and/or an unruly hair texture was present in all. Three individuals had feeding difficulties requiring feeding tubes. One of two males had cryptorchidism, another had pectus excavatum. Short stature was present in three. A female with the recurrent mutation had a Dandy-Walker malformation and optic nerve hypoplasia. Mild ventriculomegaly occurred in all, cerebellar tonsillar ectopia was seen in two and progressed to Chiari 1 malformation in one individual. Based on the combination of phenotypic findings and PPP1CB's effect on RAF dephosphorylation within the RAS/MAPK pathway, this novel condition can be considered a rasopathy, most similar to NS-LAH. Collectively, these mutations meet the standardized criteria for pathogenicity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN Report on the Assessment of Exocrine Pancreatic Function and Pancreatitis in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, Christopher J.; Chen, Kathy; Horvath, Karoly; Hughes, David; Lowe, Mark E.; Mehta, Devendra; Orabi, Abrahim I.; Screws, Jeremy; Thomson, Mike; Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Husain, Sohail Z.; Wilschanski, Michael

    The purpose of this clinical report is to discuss several recent advances in assessing exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and pancreatitis in children, to review the array of pancreatic function tests, to provide an update on the inherited causes of EPI, with special emphasis on newly available

  1. Recurrent microdeletion at 17q12 as a cause of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH syndrome: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novelli Antonio

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome (MRKH consists of congenital aplasia of the uterus and the upper part of vagina due to anomalous development of Müllerian ducts, either isolated or associated with other congenital malformations, including renal, skeletal, hearing and heart defects. This disorder has an incidence of approximately 1 in 4500 newborn girls and the aetiology is poorly understood. Methods and Results we report on two patients affected by MRKH syndrome in which array-CGH analysis disclosed an identical deletion spanning 1.5 Mb of genomic DNA at chromosome 17q12. One patient was affected by complete absence of uterus and vagina, with bilaterally normal ovaries, while the other displayed agenesis of the upper part of vagina, right unicornuate uterus, non cavitating rudimentary left horn and bilaterally multicystic kidneys. The deletion encompassed two candidate genes, TCF2 and LHX1. Mutational screening of these genes in a selected group of 20 MRKH females without 17q12 deletion was negative. Conclusion Deletion 17q12 is a rare albeit recurrent anomaly mediated by segmental duplications, previously reported in subjects with developmental kidney abnormalities and diabetes. The present two patients expand the clinical spectrum associated with this imbalance and suggest that this region is a candidate locus for a subset of MRKH syndrome individuals, with or without renal defects.

  2. Recurrent microdeletion at 17q12 as a cause of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Laura; Gimelli, Stefania; Gervasini, Cristina; Carella, Massimo; Baban, Anwar; Frontino, Giada; Barbano, Giancarlo; Divizia, Maria Teresa; Fedele, Luigi; Novelli, Antonio; Béna, Frédérique; Lalatta, Faustina; Miozzo, Monica; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2009-11-04

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome (MRKH) consists of congenital aplasia of the uterus and the upper part of vagina due to anomalous development of Müllerian ducts, either isolated or associated with other congenital malformations, including renal, skeletal, hearing and heart defects. This disorder has an incidence of approximately 1 in 4500 newborn girls and the aetiology is poorly understood. we report on two patients affected by MRKH syndrome in which array-CGH analysis disclosed an identical deletion spanning 1.5 Mb of genomic DNA at chromosome 17q12. One patient was affected by complete absence of uterus and vagina, with bilaterally normal ovaries, while the other displayed agenesis of the upper part of vagina, right unicornuate uterus, non cavitating rudimentary left horn and bilaterally multicystic kidneys. The deletion encompassed two candidate genes, TCF2 and LHX1. Mutational screening of these genes in a selected group of 20 MRKH females without 17q12 deletion was negative. Deletion 17q12 is a rare albeit recurrent anomaly mediated by segmental duplications, previously reported in subjects with developmental kidney abnormalities and diabetes. The present two patients expand the clinical spectrum associated with this imbalance and suggest that this region is a candidate locus for a subset of MRKH syndrome individuals, with or without renal defects.

  3. Disease progression of acute pancreatitis in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Fabao; Guo, Hongjie; Luo, Qianfu; Guo, Chunbao

    2016-05-15

    Approximately 10% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) progress to chronic pancreatitis. Little is known about the factors that affect recurrence of pancreatitis after an initial episode. We retrospectively investigated patients with AP, focusing on their outcomes and the predictors for disease progression. Between July 2003 and June 2015, we retrospectively enrolled first-time AP patients with medical records on disease etiology, severity (according to the Atlanta classifications), and recurrence of AP. Independent predictors of recurrent AP (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis were identified using the logistic regression model. Of the total 159 patients, 45 (28.3%) developed RAP, including two episodes of RAP in 19 patients, and 9 (5.7%) developed chronic pancreatitis. The median duration from the time of AP to the onset of RAP was 5.6 ± 2.3 months. RAP patients were identified as more common among patients with idiopathic first-time AP. The presence of severe ascites, pancreatic necrosis, and systemic complications was independent predictors of RAP in pediatric patients. Experiencing over two RAP episodes was the predictor for developing chronic pancreatitis. No influence of age or number of AP episodes was found on the occurrence of abdominal pain, pain severity, and the prevalence of any pain. Severity of first-time AP and idiopathic first-time AP are related to RAP. Recurrence increases risk for progression to chronic pancreatitis. The risk of recurrence increased with increasing numbers of AP episodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CT of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Toshio

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and two cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were studied by computed tomography. Fluid collection was detected by CT in 45 cases, and the common extrapancreatic sites of involvement included the lesser sac (13 cases), anterior pararenal space (9 cases), transverse mesocolon (7 cases) and posterior pararenal space (5 cases). Ten cases of spontaneous resolution of pancreatic pseudocysts were encountered. Cystojejunostomy was done on 6 patients. A 4-to-6-weeks time interval has been currently accepted as necessary for pseudocyst wall maturation. However, the surgery was not possible in two patients in this series since the cyst wall was too thin. It is considered that the time over 3 months is required for surgical anastomosis of the cyst to the gastrointestinal tract. Pancreatic abscess has become the most common cause of death from pancreatitis. In this series pancreatic abscess occurred in 8 patients. Gas collection in the pancreas was observed in only one patient. In the other patients, pseudocysts had become infected and converted to abscesses. The CT number of 4 infected pseudocysts was less than 15 HU. Thus, it was not possible to distinguish infected from noninfected pseudocysts by CT. The author studied 9 patients with focal inflammatory mass of the pancreas with histologically proved severe fibrosis. All masses were small. Angiography showed occlusion or marked stenosis of the splenic vein in 3 cases. The postcontract CT (after intravenous bolus injection) in 7 cases of focal inflammatory mass demonstrated almost equal enhanced effect of the mass as compared with the adjacent normal pancreatic parenchyma. This finding is considered to be useful in distinguishing inflammatory mass from pancreatic carcinoma. (author)

  5. Spectrum and outcome of pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantharia, Chetan V; Prabhu, R Y; Dalvi, A N; Raut, Abhijit; Bapat, R D; Supe, Avinash N

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is often difficult and surgery poses a formidable challenge. Data from 17 patients of pancreatic trauma gathered from a prospectively maintained database were analysed and the following parameters were considered: mode of injury, diagnostic modalities, associated injury, grade of pancreatic trauma and management. Pancreatic trauma was graded from I through IV, as per Modified Lucas Classification. The median age was 39 years (range 19-61). The aetiology of pancreatic trauma was blunt abdominal trauma in 14 patients and penetrating injury in 3. Associated bowel injury was present in 4 cases (3 penetrating injury and 1 blunt trauma) and 1 case had associated vascular injury. 5 patients had grade I, 3 had grade II, 7 had grade III and 2 had grade IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan was used to diagnose pancreatic trauma in all patients with blunt abdominal injury. Immediate diagnosis could be reached in only 4 (28.5%) patients. 7 patients responded to conservative treatment. Of the 10 patients who underwent surgery, 6 required it for the pancreas and the duodenum. (distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy-3, pylorus preserving pancreatoduodenectomy-1, debridement with external drainage-1, associated injuries-duodenum-1). Pancreatic fistula, recurrent pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation were seen in 3 (17.05%), 2 (11.7%) and 1 (5.4%) patient respectively. Death occurred in 4 cases (23.5%), 2 each in grades III and IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan is a useful modality for diagnosing, grading and following up patients with pancreatic trauma. Although a majority of cases with pancreatic trauma respond to conservative treatment, patients with penetrating trauma, and associated bowel injury and higher grade pancreatic trauma require surgical intervention and are also associated with higher morbidity and mortality.

  6. Metronidazole-induced pancreatitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, E

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old caucasian lady presented to the Accident & Emergency department complaining of acute onset severe epigastric pain radiating through to the back with associated nausea and vomiting. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. Symptoms commenced after the third dose of Metronidazole therapy prescribed for a recurrent periodontal abscess. The patient described a similar episode 10 months previously. On neither occasion were any other medications being taken, there was no history of alcohol abuse and no other gastro-intestinal aetiology could be identified on imaging. Symptoms resolved quickly upon discontinuation of the antibiotic agent. We conclude therefore that Metronidazole can reasonably be identified as the only potential causative agent.

  7. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Taylor M; Villafane-Ferriol, Nicole; Shah, Kevin P; Shah, Rohan M; Tran Cao, Hop S; Massarweh, Nader N; Silberfein, Eric J; Choi, Eugene A; Hsu, Cary; McElhany, Amy L; Barakat, Omar; Fisher, William; Van Buren, George

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL). The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995-2016) addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1) patients with albumin 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2) patients with albumin endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of appropriate treatment to improve the patient's quality of life.

  8. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids......Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...

  9. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases......Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion...

  10. New developments in diagnosis and non-surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Kazuo; Yoshino, Junji; Miyoshi, Hironao; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is progressive and irreversible, leading to digestive and absorptive disorders by destruction of the exocrine pancreas and to diabetes mellitus by destruction of the endocrine pancreas. When complications such as pancreatolithiasis and pseudocyst occur, elevated pancreatic ductal pressure exacerbates pain and induces other complications, worsening the patient's general condition. Combined treatment with extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy and endoscopic lithotripsy is a useful, minimally invasive, first-line treatment approach that can preserve pancreatic exocrine function. Pancreatic duct stenosis elevates intraductal pressure and favor both pancreatolithiasis and pseudocyst formation, making effective treatment vitally important. Endoscopic treatment of benign pancreatic duct stenosis stenting frequently decreases pain in chronic pancreatitis. Importantly, stenosis of the main pancreatic duct increases risk of stone recurrence after treatment of pancreatolithiasis. Recently, good results were reported in treating pancreatic duct stricture with a fully covered self-expandable metallic stent, which shows promise for preventing stone recurrence after lithotripsy in patients with pancreatic stricture. Chronic pancreatitis has many complications including pancreatic carcinoma, pancreatic atrophy, and loss of exocrine and endocrine function, as well as frequent recurrence of stones after treatment of pancreatolithiasis. As early treatment of chronic pancreatitis is essential, the new concept of early chronic pancreatitis, including characteristics findings in endoscopic ultrasonograms, is presented. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Metformin Causes G1-Phase Arrest via Down-Regulation of MiR-221 and Enhances TRAIL Sensitivity through DR5 Up-Regulation in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoichi Tanaka

    Full Text Available Although many chemotherapeutic strategies against cancer have been developed, pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and intractable types of malignancies. Therefore, new strategies and anti-cancer agents are necessary to treat this disease. Metformin is a widely used drug for type-2 diabetes, and is also known as a promising candidate anti-cancer agent from recent studies in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanisms of metformin's anti-cancer effects have not been elucidated. We demonstrated that metformin suppressed the expression of miR-221, one of the most well-known oncogenic microRNAs, in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells. Moreover, we showed that the down-regulation of miR-221 by metformin caused G1-phase arrest via the up-regulation of p27, one of the direct targets of miR-221. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is also a promising agent for cancer treatment. While recent studies showed that treatment with only TRAIL was not effective against pancreatic cancer cells, the present data showed that metformin sensitized p53-mutated pancreatic cancer cells to TRAIL. Metformin induced the expressions of death receptor 5 (DR5, a receptor for TRAIL, and Bim with a pro-apoptotic function in the downstream of TRAIL-DR5 pathway. We suggest that the up-regulation of these proteins may contribute to sensitization of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The combination therapy of metformin and TRAIL could therefore be effective in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BACK Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer Diet and Nutrition Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Ver esta página en ...

  13. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a feeding tube or an IV to prevent malnutrition and improve healing. Does my child have to ... Acute Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and ...

  14. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Natasha; Ahmed, Seema; Shaffer, Lemuel; Cavens, Paula; Blankstein, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term an...

  15. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Casari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Surgical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Dilip; Natarajan, Sathima

    2015-10-01

    Advances over the past decade have indicated that a complex interplay between environmental factors, genetic predisposition, alcohol abuse, and smoking lead towards the development of chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a complex disorder that causes significant and chronic incapacity in patients and a substantial burden on the society. Major advances have been made in the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease and the role of genetic predisposition is increasingly coming to the fore. Advances in noninvasive diagnostic modalities now allow for better diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at an early stage of the disease. The impact of these advances on surgical treatment is beginning to emerge, for example, patients with certain genetic predispositions may be better treated with total pancreatectomy versus lesser procedures. Considerable controversy remains with respect to the surgical management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern understanding of the neurobiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis suggests that a window of opportunity exists for effective treatment of the intractable pain after which central sensitization can lead to an irreversible pain syndrome in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Effective surgical procedures exist for chronic pancreatitis; however, the timing of surgery is unclear. For optimal treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis, close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team including gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pain management physicians is needed.

  17. Intestinal lymphangiectasia associated with recurrence of histiocytosis X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, C K

    2011-09-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia may occur as a primary congenital disorder or a secondary disorder. Secondary lymphangiectasia could be associated with diseases such as abdominal carcinoma, retroperitoneal fibrosis or chronic pancreatitis. This is the first reported case of intestinal lymphangiectasia associated with recurrent histiocytosis X. This case report illustrates the need for more prospective, well-designed studies to determine the natural history and outcome of intestinal lymphangiectasia in the duodenum. Hopefully, these studies will also help clinicians identify which group of patients with intestinal lymphangiectasia in the duodenum is more likely to have a secondary cause.

  18. Computed tomography findings of pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prando, Adilson

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To present computed tomography findings observed in four patients submitted to radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma who developed pancreatic metastases afterwards. Materials and methods: The four patients underwent radical nephrectomy for stage Tz1 (n=2) and stage T3a (n=2) renal cell carcinoma. The mean interval between nephrectomy and detection of pancreatic metastases was eight years. Two asymptomatic patients presented with solitary pancreatic metastases (confined to the pancreas). Two symptomatic patients presented with single and multiple pancreatic metastases, both with tumor recurrence in the contralateral kidney. Results: Computed tomography studies demonstrated pancreatic metastases as solitary (n=2), single (n=1) or multiple (n=1) hypervascular lesions. Partial pancreatectomy was performed in two patients with solitary pancreatic metastases and both are free of disease at four and two years after surgery. Conclusion: Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are rare and can occur many years after the primary tumor presentation. Multiple pancreatic metastases and pancreatic metastases associated with tumor recurrence in the contralateral kidney are uncommon. Usually, on computed tomography images pancreatic metastases are visualized as solitary hypervascular lesions, simulating isletcell tumors. Surgical management should be considered for patients with solitary pancreatic lesions. (author)

  19. Computed tomography findings of pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prando, Adilson [Hospital Vera Cruz, Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: adilson.prando@gmail.com

    2008-07-15

    Objective: To present computed tomography findings observed in four patients submitted to radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma who developed pancreatic metastases afterwards. Materials and methods: The four patients underwent radical nephrectomy for stage Tz1 (n=2) and stage T3a (n=2) renal cell carcinoma. The mean interval between nephrectomy and detection of pancreatic metastases was eight years. Two asymptomatic patients presented with solitary pancreatic metastases (confined to the pancreas). Two symptomatic patients presented with single and multiple pancreatic metastases, both with tumor recurrence in the contralateral kidney. Results: Computed tomography studies demonstrated pancreatic metastases as solitary (n=2), single (n=1) or multiple (n=1) hypervascular lesions. Partial pancreatectomy was performed in two patients with solitary pancreatic metastases and both are free of disease at four and two years after surgery. Conclusion: Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are rare and can occur many years after the primary tumor presentation. Multiple pancreatic metastases and pancreatic metastases associated with tumor recurrence in the contralateral kidney are uncommon. Usually, on computed tomography images pancreatic metastases are visualized as solitary hypervascular lesions, simulating isletcell tumors. Surgical management should be considered for patients with solitary pancreatic lesions. (author)

  20. Extraperitoneal Fluid Collection due to Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Yasuda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the investigation of abdominal fluid collection. He was pointed out to have alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Laboratory data showed inflammation and slightly elevated serum direct bilirubin and amylase. An abdominal computed tomography demonstrated huge fluid collection, multiple pancreatic pseudocysts and pancreatic calcification. The fluid showed a high level of amylase at 4,490 IU/l. Under the diagnosis of pancreatic ascites, endoscopic pancreatic stent insertion was attempted but was unsuccessful, so surgical treatment (Frey procedure and cystojejunostomy was performed. During the operation, a huge amount of fluid containing bile acid (amylase at 1,474 IU/l and bilirubin at 13.5 mg/dl was found to exist in the extraperitoneal space (over the peritoneum, but no ascites was found. His postoperative course was uneventful and he shows no recurrence of the fluid. Pancreatic ascites is thought to result from the disruption of the main pancreatic duct, the rupture of a pancreatic pseudocyst, or possibly leakage from an unknown site. In our extremely rare case, the pancreatic pseudocyst penetrated into the hepatoduodenal ligament with communication to the common bile duct, and the fluid flowed into the round ligament of the liver and next into the extraperitoneal space.

  1. Insulinoma: A rare cause of hypoglycemia in a young female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fnu Kelash

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Insulinoma is an exceedingly uncommon pancreatic islet cell neuroendocrine tumor. The estimated incidence is approximately four cases per million individuals per year and accounts for 60% of islets cell tumors. It causes glycopenic symptoms which includes headache, feeling irritable, confused, seizure or coma and leads to catecholamine excess which includes rapid heartbeat, sweating, palpitations and feelings of hunger. Early detection of the tumor prevents recurrent episodes of lethal hypoglycemia.

  2. Risk factors for and management of graft pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadalin, Silvio; Girotti, Paolo; Königsrainer, Alfred

    2013-02-01

    Systematic and detailed analysis of risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and management of graft pancreatitis in its different forms, that is acute and chronic graft pancreatitis (A-GP and C-GP), and A-GP being further distinguished into: physiological (P-AGP), early (E-AGP) and late AP (L-AGP). Graft pancreatitis is the second most-frequent complication following pancreas transplantation. P-AGP is an unavoidable entity related to ischemic reperfusion injury. It is usually clinically silent. It is a timely and prognostically self-limited process. E-AGP occurs within 3 months after pancreas transplantation (PTx) in 35% of cases and is associated with high rates of graft loss (78-91%). Clinical signs are pain, systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) and haematuria. Therapy can be medical, interventional and surgical. L-AGP occurs 3 months following PTx in 14-25% of cases and represents an uncommon cause of graft loss. Typical clinical signs are pain, abdominal tenderness and fever. Typical laboratory signs are hyperamylasaemia, hyperglycaemia and hypercreatininaemia. Therapy is usually conservative. C-GP is difficult to be distinguished from chronic rejection and is associated to graft loss in 4-10% of cases. Recurrent A-GPs and infections are the main risk factors. Specific symptoms are chronic abdominal malaise, constipation and recurrence of DM. Isolated hyperglycaemia is typical of C-GP. The therapy is usually conservative. This systematic analysis of different manifestations of graft pancreatitis provides the basis for a clinical approach to tackling this complex entity.

  3. Analysis of Transcription Factors Key for Mouse Pancreatic Development Establishes NKX2-2 and MNX1 Mutations as Causes of Neonatal Diabetes in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah E.; De Franco, Elisa; Lango Allen, Hana; Zerah, Michele; Abdul-Rasoul, Majedah M.; Edge, Julie A.; Stewart, Helen; Alamiri, Elham; Hussain, Khalid; Wallis, Sam; de Vries, Liat; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Houghton, Jayne A.L.; Edghill, Emma L.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Understanding transcriptional regulation of pancreatic development is required to advance current efforts in developing beta cell replacement therapies for patients with diabetes. Current knowledge of key transcriptional regulators has predominantly come from mouse studies, with rare, naturally occurring mutations establishing their relevance in man. This study used a combination of homozygosity analysis and Sanger sequencing in 37 consanguineous patients with permanent neonatal diabetes to search for homozygous mutations in 29 transcription factor genes important for murine pancreatic development. We identified homozygous mutations in 7 different genes in 11 unrelated patients and show that NKX2-2 and MNX1 are etiological genes for neonatal diabetes, thus confirming their key role in development of the human pancreas. The similar phenotype of the patients with recessive mutations and mice with inactivation of a transcription factor gene support there being common steps critical for pancreatic development and validate the use of rodent models for beta cell development. PMID:24411943

  4. Contemporary Management of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Ozkan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute biliary pancreatitis is one of the major causes of acute pancreatitis.Gallstones, biliary sludge and microlithiasis, especially in pancreatitis without detectable reason, can be the cause of acute pancreatitis. Acute biliary pancreatitis has many controversions in the literature, and its classification and guidelines are being updated very frequently. Atlanta classifications which determine the definitions and guidelines about acute pancreatitis were renewed and published in 2013. It has various clinical aspects, ranging from a mild form which is easily treated, to a severe form that causes complications leading to mortality. The pathogenesis of this disease has not been fully elucidated and several theories have been suggested. New scoring systems and laboratory methods such as proteomics have been suggested for both diagnosis and to predict disease severity, and research on these topics is still in progress. Novel therapeutic approaches with technological developments such as ERCP, ES, MRCP, and EUS are also suggested.

  5. EPC/HPSG evidence-based guidelines for the management of pediatric pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Párniczky, Andrea; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Husain, Sohail; Lowe, Mark; Oracz, Grzegorz; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szabó, Flóra K; Uc, Aliye; Wilschanski, Michael; Witt, Heiko; Czakó, László; Grammatikopoulos, Tassos; Rasmussen, Ib Christian; Sutton, Robert; Hegyi, Péter

    2018-03-01

    Pediatric pancreatitis is an underdiagnosed disease with variable etiology. In the past 10-15 years the incidence of pediatric pancreatitis has increased, it is now 3.6-13.3 cases per 100,000 children. Up-to-date evidence based management guidelines are lacking for the pediatric pancreatitis. The European Pancreatic Club, in collaboration with the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group organized a consensus guideline meeting on the diagnosis and management of pancreatitis in the pediatric population. Pediatric Pancreatitis was divided into three main clinical categories: acute pancreatitis, acute recurrent pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Fifteen relevant topics (acute pancreatitis: diagnosis; etiology; prognosis; imaging; complications; therapy; biliary tract management; acute recurrent pancreatitis: diagnosis; chronic pancreatitis: diagnosis, etiology, treatment, imaging, intervention, pain, complications; enzyme replacement) were defined. Ten experts from the USA and Europe reviewed and summarized the available literature. Evidence was classified according to the GRADE classification system. Within fifteen topics, forty-seven relevant clinical questions were defined. The draft of the updated guideline was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting held during the 49th Meeting of European Pancreatic Club, in Budapest, on July 1, 2017. These evidence-based guidelines provides the current state of the art of the diagnosis and management of pediatric pancreatitis. Copyright © 2018 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Pancreatic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvieux, C; Guillon, F; Létoublon, Ch; Oughriss, M

    2003-10-01

    Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma has always been challenging because of the lack of correlation between the initial clinical symptomatology, radiologic and laboratory findings, and the severity of the injury. Thanks to the improved performance of spiral CT scanning and magnetic resonance pancreatography, it is now often possible to make an early diagnosis of pancreatic contusion, to localize the site of the injury, and (most importantly) to identify injury to the main pancreatic duct which has major implications for the management of the case. When the trauma victim is unstable, radiologic work-up may be impossible and urgent laparotomy is required. Control of hemorrhage is the primary concern here and a damage control approach with packing may be appropriate; if the pancreatic head has been destroyed, a pancreaticoduodenectomy with delayed reconstruction may be required. If the trauma victim is stable, the treatment strategy will be governed by a variety of parameters--age, clinical condition, associated local anatomic findings (pancreatitis, injury to the duodenum or biliary tract), involvement of the pancreatic duct, and localization of the injury within the gland (to right or left of the mesenteric vessels).

  7. Recurrent missense mutations in TMEM43 (ARVD5) due to founder effects cause arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies in the UK and Canada

    KAUST Repository

    Haywood, Annika

    2012-11-15

    AimsAutosomal dominant arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) (in the group of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies) is a common cause of sudden cardiac death in young adults. It is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, with 12 loci (ARVC/D1-12) and eight genes identified, the majority of which encode structural proteins of cardiac desmosomes. The most recent gene identified, TMEM43, causes disease due to a missense mutation in a non-desmosomal gene (p.S358L) in 15 extended families from Newfoundland, Canada. To determine whether mutations in TMEM43 cause ARVC/D and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in other populations, we fully re-sequenced TMEM43 on 143 ARVC/D probands (families) from the UK and 55 probands (from 55 families) from Newfoundland.Methods and resultsBidirectional sequencing of TMEM43 including intron-exon boundaries revealed 33 variants, the majority located in non-coding regions of TMEM43. For the purpose of validation, families of probands with rare, potentially deleterious coding variants were subjected to clinical and molecular follow-up. Three missense variants of uncertain significance (p.R28W, p.E142K, p.R312W) were located in highly conserved regions of the TMEM43 protein. One variant (p.R312W) also co-segregated with relatives showing clinical signs of disease. Genotyping and expansion of the disease-associated haplotype in subjects with the p.R312W variant from Newfoundland, Canada, and the UK suggest common ancestry.ConclusionAlthough the p.R312W variant was found in controls (3/378), identification of an ancestral disease p R312W haplotype suggests that the p.R312W variant is a pathogenic founder mutation. © 2012 The Author.

  8. Recurrent missense mutations in TMEM43 (ARVD5) due to founder effects cause arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies in the UK and Canada

    KAUST Repository

    Haywood, Annika; Merner, Nancy D.; Hodgkinson, Kathy A.; Houston, Jim; Syrris, Petros; Booth, Valerie; Connors, Sean; Pantazis, Antonios; Quarta, Giovanni; Elliott, Perry; McKenna, William; Young, Terry Lynn

    2012-01-01

    AimsAutosomal dominant arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) (in the group of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies) is a common cause of sudden cardiac death in young adults. It is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, with 12 loci (ARVC/D1-12) and eight genes identified, the majority of which encode structural proteins of cardiac desmosomes. The most recent gene identified, TMEM43, causes disease due to a missense mutation in a non-desmosomal gene (p.S358L) in 15 extended families from Newfoundland, Canada. To determine whether mutations in TMEM43 cause ARVC/D and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in other populations, we fully re-sequenced TMEM43 on 143 ARVC/D probands (families) from the UK and 55 probands (from 55 families) from Newfoundland.Methods and resultsBidirectional sequencing of TMEM43 including intron-exon boundaries revealed 33 variants, the majority located in non-coding regions of TMEM43. For the purpose of validation, families of probands with rare, potentially deleterious coding variants were subjected to clinical and molecular follow-up. Three missense variants of uncertain significance (p.R28W, p.E142K, p.R312W) were located in highly conserved regions of the TMEM43 protein. One variant (p.R312W) also co-segregated with relatives showing clinical signs of disease. Genotyping and expansion of the disease-associated haplotype in subjects with the p.R312W variant from Newfoundland, Canada, and the UK suggest common ancestry.ConclusionAlthough the p.R312W variant was found in controls (3/378), identification of an ancestral disease p R312W haplotype suggests that the p.R312W variant is a pathogenic founder mutation. © 2012 The Author.

  9. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fisher, Iben Wendelboe; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam

    2013-11-14

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion. Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids are often prescribed as pain treatment. Opioids have intrinsic effects on gastrointestinal motility and hence can modify the absorption of other drugs taken at the same time. Furthermore, the increased fluid absorption caused by opioids will decrease water available for drug dissolution and may hereby affect absorption of the drug. As stated above many factors can influence drug absorption and metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The factors may not have clinical relevance, but may explain inter-individual variations in responses to a given drug, in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  10. A rare case of important and recurrent abnormal uterine bleeding in a post partum woman caused by cavernous hemangioma: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aka, Kacou Edele; Apollinaire Horo, Gninlgninrin; Fomba, Minata; Kouyate, Salif; Koffi, Abdoul Koffi; Konan, Seni; Fanny, Mohamed; Effi, Benjamin; Kone, Mamourou

    2017-01-01

    The cavernous hemangioma is a rare benign vascular tumor. About 50 cases of this disease were found in the literature over the last century and only 9 cases of cavernous hemangioma on the pregnant uterus were published it comes into cavernous or capillary form. The symptomatology is not unequivocal and when it occurs during pregnancy or postpartum, it causes life-threatening cataclysmic hemorrhage. Antenatal diagnosis is difficult and requires a multidisciplinary approach with pathologists, radiologists and gynecologists to avoid these complications or unnecessary hysterectomies. The diagnosis is histological. Hysterectomy is possible after failure of conservative treatment means. We report a rare case, a novel mixed cavernous hemangioma of the body associated with a capillary hemangioma of the cervix in a patient of 28 years 5th visors with recurrent genital bleeding in the postpartum period leading to a hysterectomy.

  11. Internal drainage of infected pancreatic pseudocysts: safe or sorry?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, D.; van Gulik, T. M.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: External drainage is the traditional surgical therapy for infected pancreatic pseudocyst, although associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. In this study it was determined whether internal drainage is feasible with acceptable postoperative morbidity and recurrence rates.

  12. Low concentrations of metformin selectively inhibit CD133⁺ cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer and have anticancer action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmiao Gou

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. The prognosis remains dismal with little advance in treatment. Metformin is a drug widely used for the treatment of type II diabetes. Recent epidemiologic data revealed that oral administration of metformin is associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer, suggesting its potential as a novel drug for this disease. Many studies have demonstrated the in vitro anticancer action of metformin, but the typically used concentrations were much higher than the in vivo plasma and tissue concentrations achieved with recommended therapeutic doses of metformin, and low concentrations of metformin had little effect on the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. We examined the effect of low concentrations of metformin on different subpopulations of pancreatic cancer cells and found that these selectively inhibited the proliferation of CD133⁺ but not CD24⁺CD44⁺ESA⁺ cells. We also examined the effect of low concentrations of metformin on cell invasion and in vivo tumor formation, demonstrating in vitro and in vivo anticancer action. Metformin was associated with a reduction of phospho-Erk and phospho-mTOR independent of Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. CD133⁺ pancreatic cancer cells are considered to be cancer stem cells that contribute to recurrence, metastasis and resistance to adjuvant therapies in pancreatic cancer. Our results provide a basis for combination of metformin with current therapies to improve the prognosis of this disease.

  13. Low Concentrations of Metformin Selectively Inhibit CD133+ Cell Proliferation in Pancreatic Cancer and Have Anticancer Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangsheng; Shi, Pengfei; Liu, Tao; Wang, Chunyou

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. The prognosis remains dismal with little advance in treatment. Metformin is a drug widely used for the treatment of type II diabetes. Recent epidemiologic data revealed that oral administration of metformin is associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer, suggesting its potential as a novel drug for this disease. Many studies have demonstrated the in vitro anticancer action of metformin, but the typically used concentrations were much higher than the in vivo plasma and tissue concentrations achieved with recommended therapeutic doses of metformin, and low concentrations of metformin had little effect on the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. We examined the effect of low concentrations of metformin on different subpopulations of pancreatic cancer cells and found that these selectively inhibited the proliferation of CD133+ but not CD24+CD44+ESA+ cells. We also examined the effect of low concentrations of metformin on cell invasion and in vivo tumor formation, demonstrating in vitro and in vivo anticancer action. Metformin was associated with a reduction of phospho-Erk and phospho-mTOR independent of Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. CD133+ pancreatic cancer cells are considered to be cancer stem cells that contribute to recurrence, metastasis and resistance to adjuvant therapies in pancreatic cancer. Our results provide a basis for combination of metformin with current therapies to improve the prognosis of this disease. PMID:23667692

  14. Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy, 7-year experience of a tertiary referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilallonga, Ramón; Calero-Lillo, Aránzazu; Charco, Ramón; Balsells, Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common cause of acute abdomen in pregnant women. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency at our institution and its management and outcomes. A retrospective analysis of a database of cases presented in 7 consecutive years at a tertiary center was performed. Between December 2002 and August 2009, there were 19 cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnant women, 85% with a biliary etiology. The highest frequency was in the third trimester of pregnancy (62.5% cases). In cases of gallstone pancreatitis, 43.6% of pregnant women had had previous episodes before pregnancy. A total of 52.6% of the patients were readmitted for a recurrent episode of pancreatitis during their pregnancy. Overall, 26.3% of the patients received antibiotic treatment and 26.3% parenteral nutrition. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed during the 2nd trimester in two patients (10.5%). There was no significant maternal morbidity. Acute pancreatitis in pregnant women usually has a benign course with proper treatment. In cases of biliary origin, it appears that a surgical approach is suitable during the second trimester of pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Microbicidal activity of neutrophils is inhibited by isolates from recurrent vaginal candidiasis (RVVC) caused by Candida albicans through fungal thioredoxin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratti, Bianca Altrão; Godoy, Janine Silva Ribeiro; de Souza Bonfim Mendonça, Patrícia; Bidóia, Danielle Lazarin; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Lopes Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine; Estivalet Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2015-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is characterized by an infection of the vulva and vagina, mainly caused by Candida albicans, a commensal microorganism that inhabits the vaginal, digestive, and respiratory mucosae. Vulvovaginal candidiasis affects approximately 75% of women, and 5% develop the recurrent form (RVVC). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether neutrophils microbicidal response is triggered when activated with RVVC isolates caused by C. albicans. Our results showed that RVVC isolates induced neutrophil migration but significantly decrease the microbicidal activity of neutrophils, compared with VVC and ASS isolates. The microbicidal activity of neutrophils is highly dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). However, this isolate induced detoxification of ROS/RNS produced by neutrophils, reflected by the high level of thiol groups and by the oxygen consumption. Therefore, RVVC isolates induced biochemical changes in the inflammatory response triggered by neutrophils, and these effects were mainly related to the detoxification of ROS/RNS through the thioredoxin reductase (TR), a key antioxidant enzyme in fungi. This might be one of the resistance mechanisms triggered by RVVC caused by C. albicans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The expression of dominant negative TCF7L2 in pancreatic beta cells during the embryonic stage causes impaired glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijuan Shao

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Our observations support a cell autonomous role for TCF7L2 in pancreatic β-cells suggested by most, though not all, investigations. βTCFDN is a novel model for further exploring the role of TCF7L2 in β-cell genesis and metabolic homeostasis.

  17. Juxta-Ampullary Intraluminal Diverticulum and Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Echenique-Elizondo M

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Acute pancreatitis is usually due to well-known causes, such as biliary lithiasis and alcohol consumption. Anatomic abnormalities may represent a less frequent but important etiological factor. CASE REPORT: The case of a 27 year old women complaining of acute pancreatitis associated with a large duodenal juxta-papillary diverticulum is presented. CONCLUSIONS: Anatomic causes of pancreatitis must be considered in the diagnosis of the etiology of acute pancreatitis.

  18. RISK FACTORS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: UNDERLYING MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL TARGETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKolodecik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the review:Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer.Recent Findings:Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcription factor NF-kB are important mechanisms that induce acute pancreatitis. Recurrent pancreatic injury due to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, and conditions such as obesity lead to increases in oxidative stress, impaired autophagy and constitutive activation of inflammatory pathways. These processes can stimulate pancreatic stellate cells, thereby increasing fibrosis and encouraging chronic disease development. Activation of oncogneic Kras mutations through inflammation, coupled with altered levels of tumor suppressor proteins (p53 and p16 can ultimately lead to development of pancreatic cancer. Summary:Although our understanding of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has tremendously increased over many years, much remains to be elucidated in terms of common pathways linking these conditions.

  19. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Disturbing the GTP/GDP Binding Pocket of RAB11B Cause Intellectual Disability and a Distinctive Brain Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Ideke J C; Reijnders, Margot R F; Venselaar, Hanka; Kraus, Alison; Jansen, Sandra; de Vries, Bert B A; Houge, Gunnar; Gradek, Gyri Aasland; Seo, Jieun; Choi, Murim; Chae, Jong-Hee; van der Burgt, Ineke; Pfundt, Rolph; Letteboer, Stef J F; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Dusseljee, Simone; Brunner, Han G; Doherty, Dan; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Roepman, Ronald

    2017-11-02

    The Rab GTPase family comprises ∼70 GTP-binding proteins, functioning in vesicle formation, transport and fusion. They are activated by a conformational change induced by GTP-binding, allowing interactions with downstream effectors. Here, we report five individuals with two recurrent de novo missense mutations in RAB11B; c.64G>A; p.Val22Met in three individuals and c.202G>A; p.Ala68Thr in two individuals. An overlapping neurodevelopmental phenotype, including severe intellectual disability with absent speech, epilepsy, and hypotonia was observed in all affected individuals. Additionally, visual problems, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and microcephaly were present in the majority of cases. Re-evaluation of brain MRI images of four individuals showed a shared distinct brain phenotype, consisting of abnormal white matter (severely decreased volume and abnormal signal), thin corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, optic nerve hypoplasia and mild ventriculomegaly. To compare the effects of both variants with known inactive GDP- and active GTP-bound RAB11B mutants, we modeled the variants on the three-dimensional protein structure and performed subcellular localization studies. We predicted that both variants alter the GTP/GDP binding pocket and show that they both have localization patterns similar to inactive RAB11B. Evaluation of their influence on the affinity of RAB11B to a series of binary interactors, both effectors and guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), showed induction of RAB11B binding to the GEF SH3BP5, again similar to inactive RAB11B. In conclusion, we report two recurrent dominant mutations in RAB11B leading to a neurodevelopmental syndrome, likely caused by altered GDP/GTP binding that inactivate the protein and induce GEF binding and protein mislocalization. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  20. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis: LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-11-01

    The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) in pancreatitis. We analyzed changes in LAMPs in experimental models and human pancreatitis, and the underlying mechanisms: LAMP de-glycosylation and degradation. LAMP cleavage by cathepsin B (CatB) was analyzed by mass spectrometry. We used mice deficient in LAMP-2 to assess its role in pancreatitis. Pancreatic levels of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 greatly decrease across various pancreatitis models and in human disease. Pancreatitis does not trigger LAMPs' bulk de-glycosylation, but induces their degradation via CatB-mediated cleavage of LAMP molecule close to the boundary between luminal and transmembrane domains. LAMP-2 null mice spontaneously develop pancreatitis that begins with acinar cell vacuolization due to impaired autophagic flux, and progresses to severe pancreas damage characterized by trypsinogen activation, macrophage-driven inflammation, and acinar cell death. LAMP-2 deficiency causes a decrease in pancreatic digestive enzymes content, stimulates the basal and inhibits CCK-induced amylase secretion by acinar cells. The effects of LAMP-2 knockout and acute cerulein pancreatitis overlap, which corroborates the pathogenic role of LAMP decrease in experimental pancreatitis models. The results indicate a critical role for LAMPs, particularly LAMP-2, in maintaining pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis, and provide evidence that defective lysosomal function, resulting in impaired autophagy, leads to pancreatitis. Mice with LAMP-2 deficiency present a novel genetic model of human pancreatitis caused by lysosomal/autophagic dysfunction.

  1. Recurrent hamburger thyrotoxicosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Malvinder S.; Sturge, Cecil

    2003-01-01

    RECURRENT EPISODES OF SPONTANEOUSLY RESOLVING HYPERTHYROIDISM may be caused by release of preformed hormone from the thyroid gland after it has been damaged by inflammation (recurrent silent thyroiditis) or by exogenous administration of thyroid hormone, which might be intentional or surreptitious (thyrotoxicosis factitia). Community-wide outbreaks of “hamburger thyrotoxicosis” resulting from inadvertent consumption of beef contaminated with bovine thyroid gland have been previously reported. Here we describe a single patient who experienced recurrent episodes of this phenomenon over an 11-year period and present an approach to systematically evaluating patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism. PMID:12952802

  2. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst with isolated thoracic symptoms: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drescher Robert

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts represent a rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Case presentation A 55-year-old man with a history of chronic pancreatitis was admitted with intermittent dyspnea, dysphagia and weight loss. Chest X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large paracardial pancreatic pseudocyst causing cardiac and esophageal compression. Conclusion Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts are a rare complication of chronic pancreatitis. These pseudocysts may lead to isolated thoracic symptoms. For accurate diagnostic and therapy planning, a multimodal imaging approach is necessary.

  4. Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Håkansson, Anders; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aimed to evaluate the potential relation between the incidence of (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) acute pancreatitis (AP) and alcohol consumption in the general population, and whether the occurrence of AP shows any seasonal variation, particularly in relation to periods with expected...... consumption in the general population do not appear to be related to changes in the incidence of AP and there are no significant seasonal differences in the occurrence of AP in Sweden. Short summary: The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing, and alcohol is still recognized as one of the most...

  5. Pancreatic tail pseudocyst of type II treated with resection of the tail of the pancreas and splenectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latinčić Stojan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreatic pseudocysts of type II are postnecrotic cysts that appear during an acute-on-chronic pancreatitis. In case that surgical treatment is necessary, as a rule it is performed using internal drainage operations. Pancreatic resections are rarely indicated. Case Outline. The authors present a 34 year-old man with a long-lasting history of moderate alcohol consumption in whom an episode of drinking caused an acute-on-chronic pancreatitis so that a 7 cm in diameter cyst was developed inside the tail of the pancreas causing left subcostal pain, mild pleural effusion and pain in the left shoulder. At operation almost entirely inside the tail of the pancreas a cyst of type II unsuitable for internal drainage operation was found so that a spared resection of the tail of the pancreas and splenectomy were carried out. The post-operative recovery was prolonged due to recurrent left pleural effusion requiring punctions, mild suppurative secretion from the splenic fossa and transient postsplenectomy thrombocytosis. Six months after surgery the patient is in good condition and with normal findings. Conclusion. Although rare, pancreatic cysts of type II may be unsuitable for internal drainage operations so that resection of the effected part of the pancreas could be a much better solution than external drainage.

  6. Endosonography of groove pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, T. L.; Luiken, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis. Distinction between pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is often difficult. Two cases of groove pancreatitis diagnosed by endosonography are described. A hypoechoic pattern between the duodenal wall and pancreas was clearly imaged in both

  7. Prophylactic use of octreotide for asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Sachi; Higa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Fujimura, Junya; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, we sought to evaluate the prophylactic use of octreotide for asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis. We reviewed the medical records of seven patients in two institutions who received prophylactic octreotide for re-administration of asparaginase after asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis. Three patients completed asparaginase treatment without developing pancreatitis, and four experienced recurrence of pancreatitis. A literature search using PubMed identified four additional patients in whom asparaginase was successfully re-administered with octreotide. Prophylactic use of octreotide may, thus, be warranted for patients who would benefit from re-administration of asparaginase for cancer treatment; however, careful observation is needed to monitor for breakthrough recurrence of pancreatitis.

  8. Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancur, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    It is presented a case of a man with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, whose marked dilatation of the ducts reasoned the issue. The severe untreatable pain was the surgery indication, which was practiced without complications either during or after the surgery. By the way, a shallow revision of the literature is made, by mentioning classification, physiopatholoy, clinical square, medical, surgical and endoscopic treatment

  9. Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrecka, A.; Bilicky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an ongoing inflammatory process that may over time lead to mal digestion, malabsorption and diabetic syndrome. Identification of risk (etiological) factors based on classifications TIGAR-O or later M-ANNHEIM. These factors (environmental and / or genetic) leads to failure of the stability of the digestive and lysosomal enzymes in the acinar cells, resulting in premature activation of digestive enzymes in the pancreas, and repeated nekroinflamation and fibrosis. The incidence has of the upward trend. Clinically the disease manifests itself in most cases with pain and possibly with nonspecific dyspeptic troubles. Decisive role in the diagnosis playing imaging methods, trans abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic cholangiopancretography and foremost endoscopic ultrasonography, which has the highest sensitivity and specificity. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is currently regarded as a method for therapy, not for diagnosis. Less importance is now attached to a functional test. Symptomatic treatment is usually conservative. Abstinence is necessary, easily digestible, but calorie-rich diet with reduced fat. Most patients needed treatment with analgesics. In case of insufficient effect of analgesics is necessary to consider endoscopic therapy or surgery. If the external secretory insufficiency is present are served pancreatic extracts. Diabetic syndrome requires insulin delivery. Generally, chronic pancreatitis is a disease treatable but incurable. Proportion of patients are also dying of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  10. ENDOCRINE PANCREATIC FUNCTION IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Novokhatny

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Among the organs of internal secretion pancreas has a special place thanks to active exocrine function and a wide range of physiological actions of produced hormones. Violations of endocrine pancreas arises in 6.5-38 % of patients with acute pancreatitis. However, there is still no clear understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of hormonal dysfunction of the pancreas in acute pancreatitis, there is no uniform algorithms for its correction. Aim of the research was to study the endocrine function of pancreas in acute pancreatitis. To define the role of endocrine pancreatic function in the etiology and pathogenesis of the acute pancreatitis. To assess the prospects of the use of pancreatic hormones in the treatment and predicting the outcomes of acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods of the research Survey of publications in specialized periodical medical journals, PubMed sources developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Search in PubMed was carried out in the following databases: MEDLINE, Pre MEDLINE. Results of the research. In a significant proportion of patients who recovered from acute pancreatitis, exocrine and endocrine functional impairments were found. This finding was not detected only in patients after severe acute pancreatitis. Routine evaluation of pancreatic function after acute pancreatitis should be considered. The comparative analysis of the synthetic analogues (somatostatin, calcitonin, leu-enkefalin-dalargin influence on the glucose metabolism of rats in acute pancreatitis of was made. Physiological reaction of beta-cells is preserved in infusion of somatostatin. However, infusion of calcitonin results in the distortion of counterregulatory action of insulin and glucagon. It was detected that pancreatic renin-angiotensin system is markedly activated in the experimental rat models of chronic hypoxia and acute pancreatitis. The activation of the pancreatic renin-angiotensin system by

  11. Hipertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañas García, María Dolores; Marchán Carranza, Enrique; Galiana Gómez Del Pulgar, Jesús; Fernández de Bobadilla Pascual, Belén

    Hypertrigliceridemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is 5% in healthy patients and 4% during pregnancy with triglyceride levels >1,000mg/dl. During pregnancy there are changes in the lipid profile that increase between two and four times triglyceride levels. Its increase in excessive form produces an oxidative environment with injury of the endothelium and appearance of complications such as preeclampsia or pancreatitis. We present the case of a pregnant woman with pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictive value of Escherichia coli susceptibility in strains causing asymptomatic bacteriuria for women with recurrent symptomatic urinary tract infections receiving prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerepoot, M. A. J.; den Heijer, C. D. J.; Penders, J.; Prins, J. M.; Stobberingh, E. E.; Geerlings, S. E.

    2012-01-01

    A significant proportion of women develop a recurrence following an initial urinary tract infection (UTI). In women with recurrent UTI, the predictive value of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) for the development of a subsequent UTI has not yet been established and it is not known whether information

  13. Chronic pancreatitis: diagnosis, classification, and new genetic developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, B; Whitcomb, D C

    2001-02-01

    The utilization of recent advances in molecular and genomic technologies and progress in pancreatic imaging techniques provided remarkable insight into genetic, environmental, immunologic, and pathobiological factors leading to chronic pancreatitis. Translation of these advances into clinical practice demands a reassessment of current approaches to diagnosis, classification, and staging. We conclude that an adequate pancreatic biopsy must be the gold standard against which all diagnostic approaches are judged. Although computed tomography remains the initial test of choice for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, the roles of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography, endoscopic ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are considered. Once chronic pancreatitis is diagnosed, proper classification becomes important. Major predisposing risk factors to chronic pancreatitis may be categorized as either (1) toxic-metabolic, (2) idiopathic, (3) genetic, (4) autoimmune, (5) recurrent and severe acute pancreatitis, or (6) obstructive (TIGAR-O system). After classification, staging of pancreatic function, injury, and fibrosis becomes the next major concern. Further research is needed to determine the clinical and natural history of chronic pancreatitis developing in the context of various risk factors. New methods are needed for early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, and new therapies are needed to determine whether interventions will delay or prevent the progression of the irreversible damage characterizing end-stage chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis (Chylomicronemia Syndrome Treated with Supportive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Uysal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia is a rare cause of pancreatitis. In treatment pancreatic rest, lifestyle changes, medications (fibrates, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and nicotinic acid are essential. Many experimental treatment modalities have been reported as insulin and heparin infusion and plasmapheresis. In this study we present the hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis treated with supportive care.

  15. Genetic and immunologic aspects of acute pancreatitis : An odyssey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the leading cause of acute hospitalization for gastrointestinal diseases. The course of acute pancreatitis is often mild and self-limiting, but in 15-25% of patients, pancreatitis is severe with an increased mortality risk. Infectious complications, and especially bacterial

  16. [Chronic pancreatitis: new definition and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti Bellocchi, Maria Cristina; De Pretis, Nicolò; Amodio, Antonio; Zerbi, Alessandro; Frulloni, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has been considered over the past years as a single disease, alcohol-induced and different from acute pancreatitis, in terms of etiology and prognosis. Actually, the introduction of a new concept of chronic pancreatitis, now considered as a fibroinflammatory process caused by multiple factors (toxic-metabolic, genetic, immunologic, obstructive), allow to better understand the pathogenesis of this complex disease. Furthermore, the discover of peculiar forms of chronic pancreatitis (autoimmune, paraduodenal, associated to gene mutations), different in term of clinical aspects, findings at imaging, prognosis and therapy, radically changed the concept of the disease. In this brief review, we described the impact of this new concept in the comprehension of pathogenesis, in the definition of peculiar forms of chronic pancreatitis, and in the clinical and therapeutic approach of chronic pancreatitis.

  17. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...

  18. Whole-exome sequencing reveals a recurrent mutation in the cathepsin C gene that causes Papillon–Lefevre syndrome in a Saudi family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Mohammad Alkhiary

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Papillon–Lefevre syndrome (PALS is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by periodontitis and hyperkeratosis over the palms and soles. Mutations in the cathepsin C gene (CTSC have been recognized as the cause of PALS since the late 1990s. More than 75 mutations in CTSC have been identified, and phenotypic variability between different mutations has been described. Next generation sequencing is widely used for efficient molecular diagnostics in various clinical practices. Here we investigated a large consanguineous Saudi family with four affected and four unaffected individuals. All of the affected individuals suffered from hyperkeratosis over the palms and soles and had anomalies of both primary and secondary dentition. For molecular diagnostics, we combined whole-exome sequencing and genome-wide homozygosity mapping procedures, and identified a recurrent homozygous missense mutation (c.899G>A; p.Gly300Asp in exon 7 of CTSC. Validation of all eight family members by Sanger sequencing confirmed co-segregation of the pathogenic variant (c.899G>A with the disease phenotype. This is the first report of whole-exome sequencing performed for molecular diagnosis of PALS in Saudi Arabia. Our findings provide further insights into the genotype–phenotype correlation of CTSC pathogenicity in PALS.

  19. Immunomodulators to treat recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Jelmer R.; Kieffer, Tom E.C.; Scherjon, Sicco A.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent miscarriage is a reproductive disorder affecting many couples. Although several factors are associated with recurrent miscarriage, in more than 50% of the cases the cause is unknown. Maladaptation of the maternal immune system is associated with recurrent miscarriage and could explain part

  20. Preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heek, N. T.; Busch, O. R.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    This review is to summarize the current knowledge about preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer. Most patients with pancreatic carcinoma (85%) will present with obstructive jaundice. The presence of toxic substances as bilirubin and bile

  1. Prevention and Intervention Strategies in Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, M.G.H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common, costly, potentially lethal, and poorly understood disease, mostly caused by gallstones. In the past decade the incidence of acute pancreatitis in the Netherlands increased by 50% to over 3400 admissions in 2006, most likely due to an increase of gallstone disease.

  2. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Patient Information Children/Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? Frequent or chronic abdominal pain is the most common symptom of pancreatitis. The ...

  3. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Affecting Residue Arg138 of Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase Cause a Progeroid Form of Autosomal-Dominant Cutis Laxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Ganesh, Jaya; Tan, Yu Xuan; Al Bughaili, Mohammed; Lin, Angela E; Sahai, Inderneel; Bahena, Paulina; Reichert, Sara L; Loh, Abigail; Wright, Graham D; Liu, Jaron; Rahikkala, Elisa; Pivnick, Eniko K; Choudhri, Asim F; Krüger, Ulrike; Zemojtel, Tomasz; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Mostafavi, Roya; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Symoens, Sofie; Pajunen, Leila; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Meierhofer, David; Robinson, Peter N; Mundlos, Stefan; Villarroel, Camilo E; Byers, Peter; Masri, Amira; Robertson, Stephen P; Schwarze, Ulrike; Callewaert, Bert; Reversade, Bruno; Kornak, Uwe

    2015-09-03

    Progeroid disorders overlapping with De Barsy syndrome (DBS) are collectively denoted as autosomal-recessive cutis laxa type 3 (ARCL3). They are caused by biallelic mutations in PYCR1 or ALDH18A1, encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), respectively, which both operate in the mitochondrial proline cycle. We report here on eight unrelated individuals born to non-consanguineous families clinically diagnosed with DBS or wrinkly skin syndrome. We found three heterozygous mutations in ALDH18A1 leading to amino acid substitutions of the same highly conserved residue, Arg138 in P5CS. A de novo origin was confirmed in all six probands for whom parental DNA was available. Using fibroblasts from affected individuals and heterologous overexpression, we found that the P5CS-p.Arg138Trp protein was stable and able to interact with wild-type P5CS but showed an altered sub-mitochondrial distribution. A reduced size upon native gel electrophoresis indicated an alteration of the structure or composition of P5CS mutant complex. Furthermore, we found that the mutant cells had a reduced P5CS enzymatic activity leading to a delayed proline accumulation. In summary, recurrent de novo mutations, affecting the highly conserved residue Arg138 of P5CS, cause an autosomal-dominant form of cutis laxa with progeroid features. Our data provide insights into the etiology of cutis laxa diseases and will have immediate impact on diagnostics and genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor M. Gilliland

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL. The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995–2016 addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC. We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1 patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2 patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3 enteral nutrition (EN should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN postoperatively; and, (4 a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of

  5. JPN Guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis: epidemiology, etiology, natural history, and outcome predictors in acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sekimoto, Miho; Takada, Tadahiro; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Hirata, Koichi; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Hirota, Masahiko; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Takeda, Kazunori; Isaji, Shuji; Koizumi, Masaru; Otsuki, Makoto; Matsuno, Seiki

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease with an annual incidence of between 5 and 80 people per 100 000 of the population. The two major etiological factors responsible for acute pancreatitis are alcohol and cholelithiasis (gallstones). The proportion of patients with pancreatitis caused by alcohol or gallstones varies markedly in different countries and regions. The incidence of acute alcoholic pancreatitis is considered to be associated with high alcohol consumption. Although the incidence o...

  6. The management of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Peter A; Conwell, Darwin L; Toskes, Phillip P

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatitis, which is most generally described as any inflammation of the pancreas, is a serious condition that manifests in either acute or chronic forms. Chronic pancreatitis results from irreversible scarring of the pancreas, resulting from prolonged inflammation. Six major etiologies for chronic pancreatitis have been identified: toxic/ metabolic, idiopathic, genetic, autoimmune, recurrent and severe acute pancreatitis, and obstruction. The most common symptom associated with chronic pancreatitis is pain localized to the upper-to-middle abdomen, along with food malabsorption, and eventual development of diabetes. Treatment strategies for acute pancreatitis include fasting and short-term intravenous feeding, fluid therapy, and pain management with narcotics for severe pain or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories for milder cases. Patients with chronic disease and symptoms require further care to address digestive issues and the possible development of diabetes. Dietary restrictions are recommended, along with enzyme replacement and vitamin supplementation. More definitive outcomes may be achieved with surgical or endoscopic methods, depending on the role of the pancreatic ducts in the manifestation of disease.

  7. Radiologic evaluation of pancreatic pseudocyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, T. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Hong, I. S.; Kim, M. S.; Sung, K. J. [Yeonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-12-15

    Pancreatic pseudocyst is a collection of necrotic tissue, old blood and secretions that escaped from the pancreas damaged by pancreatitis, trauma and chronic alcoholism. There is no epithelial cell lining the cystic wall. With the advent of ultrasound and CT more accurate diagnosis can be made. Our study was carried out to analyse the radiological and clinical findings of 32 cases of pancreatic pseudocysts confirmed at Wonju College of Medicine Yonsei University from Jan. 1979 to Aug. 1986. The results are as follows: 1. Male to female ratio was 4.3:1 Incidence was the most common in 4th decades. 2. The most frequent symptom was epigastric pain (100%). 3. In a total of 32 cases, 15 cases had a underlying cause of pancreatitis, 9 cases abdominal trauma. 4. In laboratory findings, serum amylase level was elevated in 23 cases, leucocytosis in 10 cases. 5. On chest films, the lungs were mostly normal. Soft tissue mass density in 12 cases was the most common finding on abdomen films. 6. UGI series were helpful in directing attention by pancreatic pseudocysts' location and size. 7. Ultrasonogram using primary procedure for the detection of pseudocyst (23 cases) disclosed anechoic lesion in 8 cases, mixed echo lesion in 15 cases. Mixed echo patterns, in terms of internal echo patters, were echogenic spots (8 cases), septation and echogenic spots (3 cases), fluid-fluid level (3 cases), etc. 8. CT scanning is the best imaging procedure, providing detailed morphologic information about the pancreatic pseudocyst and surrounding tissue.

  8. Laboratory diagnosis of pancreatitis and cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtyareva, I.I.; Gajsenko, A.V.; Putseva, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    The content of fibrin fibrinogen splitting products (FSP), radioimmune trypsine, C-peptide and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 in the blood of 82 patients with acute pancreatitis (edematous and hemorrhagic), and chronic recurrent pancreatitis at the stage of exacerbation, 42 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 34 patients with cancer of the pancreas (stages 3-4) and 22 healthy persons were studied. Results indicate a high diagnostic value of determination FSP, trypsin and C-peptide in patients with acute pancreatitis and chronic recurring pancreatitis at the stage of exacerbation, trypsin and C-peptide in patients with chronic pancreatitis associated with severe exocrinous insufficiency of the pancreas, KA 19-9 in patients with cancer of the pancreas

  9. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  10. Locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Chemoradiotherapy, reevaluation and secondary resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpero, J.R.; Turrini, O.

    2006-01-01

    Induction chemoradiotherapy (CRT) may down-stage locally advanced pancreatic tumors but secondary resections are unfrequent. However some responders' patients may benefit of a RO resection. Patients and methods. We report 18 resections among 29 locally advanced pancreatic cancers; 15 patients were treated with neo-adjuvant 5-FU-cisplatin based (13) or taxotere based (2 patients) chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy), and 3 patients without histologically proven adenocarcinoma were resected without any preoperative treatment. Results. The morbidity rate was 28% and the mortality rate was 7%; one patient died after resection (5.5%) and one died after exploration (9%). The RO resection rate was 50%. The median survival for the resected patients was not reached and the actuarial survival at 3 years was 59%. Two specimens showed no residual tumor and the two patients were alive at 15 and 46 months without recurrence; one specimen showed less than 10% viable tumoral cells and the patient was alive at 36 months without recurrence. A mesenteric infarction was the cause of a late death at 3 years in a disease free patient (radiation induced injury of the superior mesenteric artery). The median survival of the 11 non-resected patients was 21 months and the actuarial survival at 2 years was 0%. When the number of the resected patients (18) was reported to the entire cohort of the patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated during the same period in our institution, the secondary resectability rate was 9%. Conclusion. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy identifies poor surgical candidates through observation and may enhance the margin status of patients undergoing secondary resection for locally advanced tumors. However it remains difficult to evaluate the results in the literature because of the variations in the definitions of resectability. The best therapeutic strategy remains to be defined, because the majority of patients ultimately succumb with distant metastatic disease

  11. PANCREATIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pancreatic cancer is quite common malignant tumor of gastointestinal tract and its incidence is increasing in well developed part of the world. Despite of all advanced diagnostic methods the disease is in most cases recognised too late when the tumor is not resectable.Conclusions. Only in 20–30% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is possible, and even in this group 5year survival is very low. In the patients where the tumor is not resectable, sometimes only palliative procedures are indicated and sometimes only simptomatic therapy is possible. The average survival period in this group of patients is 12–20 months. Adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy has not shown much of benefit and the prognosis is still very bad.

  12. Acute Pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K.C.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of acute viral hepatitis and acute pancreatitis is well described. This study was conducted to find out the frequency of pancreatic involvement in acute viral hepatitis in the Nepalese population. Methods: Consecutive patients of acute viral hepatitis presenting with severe abdominal pain between January 2005 and April 2010 were studied. Patients with history of significant alcohol consumption and gall stones were excluded. Acute viral hepatitis was diagnosed by clinical examination, liver function test, ultrasound examination and confirmed by viral serology. Pancreatitis was diagnosed by clinical presentation, biochemistry, ultrasound examination and CT scan. Results: Severe abdominal pain was present in 38 of 382 serologically-confirmed acute viral hepatitis patients. Twenty five patients were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. The pancreatitis was mild in 14 and severe in 11 patients. The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 18 and hepatitis A virus in 7 patients. Two patients died of complications secondary to shock. The remaining patients recovered from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis occurred in 6.5 % of patients with acute viral hepatitis. Cholelithiasis and gastric ulcers are the other causes of severe abdominal pain. The majority of the patients recover with conservative management. Keywords: acute viral hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, pain abdomen, hepatitis E, hepatitis A, endemic zone

  13. Considerations for the grade IIIb pancreatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Katsuhiko; Ishii, Takayuki; Ootawa, Satoru; Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Eisuke; Nishiya, Kei; Yokoyama, Kouya; Shimizu, Kimio; Ogawa, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic duct disruption accompanied by pancreatic trauma is very severe. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) is considered the main diagnostic modality. However, it is invasive and can be associated with significant complications. We diagnosed pancreatic trauma based on only Computed tomography (CT) scan data. We operated based on specific signs of pancreatic injuries on CT scans, such as edema or hematoma of the pancreatic parenchyma, fractures or lacerations of the pancreas, active hemorrhage and, in all cases, there were main pancreatic duct injuries. Certain drainage of the pancreatic juice is necessary for pancreatic duct disruption. The operation method was selected according to the location of the damage. If it is at all possible pancreas preserving surgery should be performed. It is necessary to select the operation according to the patient's age and general condition, the cause of the injury, the range of the injury, and the experience of the surgeon. When the main duct injury was not certain, ERP during the operation was very useful. We report on a method of endoscopically treating a pseudocyst, which has adhered to the stomach, secondary to pancreatic main duct disruption. Transgastric placement of a stent into the pseudocyst is possible in restricted cases. (author)

  14. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J-Matthias

    2017-02-23

    Abstract : Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor's metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  15. Non-neoplastic cystic and cystic-like lesions of the pancreas: may mimic pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Brian K P; Tan, Yu-Meng; Chung, Yaw-Fui A; Chow, Pierce K H; Ong, Hock-Soo; Lim, Dennis T H; Wong, Wai-Keong; Ooi, London L P J

    2006-05-01

    epithelial (congenital) cyst (n = 3), retention cyst (n = 1) and mucinous non-neoplastic cyst (n = 1). At a median follow up of 20 months (range, 3-34 months), none of the patients had any evidence of recurrent disease. Non-neoplastic cystic and cystic-like lesions of the pancreas are rare causes of pancreatic cystic lesions that are generally benign and do not require surgery when asymptomatic. However, despite advances in diagnostic investigations such as endoscopic ultrasound with fluid aspirate and magnetic resonance imaging, the preoperative diagnosis remains unreliable. Hence, the challenge for all clinicians is to recognize these lesions preoperatively and to avoid 'unnecessary' surgery.

  16. Acute pancreatitis with gliptins: Is it a clinical reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukrishnan Jayaraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are reports of acute pancreatitis with the use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (gliptins. This class of drugs is widely being prescribed for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM in our country. We evaluated the incidence of acute pancreatitis with the use of gliptins during the period January 2012-June 2013. Patients of type 2 DM on treatment with any of the gliptins (Sitagliptin, vildagliptin, or saxagliptin for at least 1 month duration were included. A total of 185 patients were included (205.3 patient years of follow-up. Five of them had history of acute pancreatitis (all mild >6 months prior to inclusion with complete resolution and no chronic pancreatitis. One patient (0.48 per 100 patient years presented with mild acute pancreatitis which resolved in 8 days. Asymptomatic elevation of serum amylase > 3× upper limit of normal was noted in five patients (2.4 per 100 patient years, without any sonological evidence of pancreatitis, which resolved on withdrawal of gliptins. None of the patients with previous history of pancreatitis had a recurrence of pancreatitis. In a group at low risk of acute pancreatitis, incidence of acute pancreatitis is low with the use of gliptins.

  17. Persistent and recurrent hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Carole; Paladino, Nunzia Cinzia; Lowery, Aoife; Castinetti, Fréderic; Taieb, David; Sebag, Fréderic

    2017-06-01

    Despite remarkable progress in imaging modalities and surgical management, persistence or recurrence of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) still occurs in 2.5-5% of cases of PHPT. The aim of this review is to expose the management of persistent and recurrent hyperparathyroidism. A literature search was performed on MEDLINE using the search terms "recurrent" or "persistent" and "hyperparathyroidism" within the past 10 years. We also searched the reference lists of articles identified by this search strategy and selected those we judged relevant. Before considering reoperation, the surgeon must confirm the diagnosis of PHPT. Then, the patient must be evaluated with new imaging modalities. A single adenoma is found in 68% of cases, multiglandular disease in 28%, and parathyroid carcinoma in 3%. Others causes (<1%) include parathyromatosis and graft recurrence. The surgeon must balance the benefits against the risks of a reoperation (permanent hypocalcemia and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy). If surgery is necessary, a focused approach can be considered in cases of significant imaging foci, but in the case of multiglandular disease, a bilateral neck exploration could be necessary. Patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes are at high risk of recurrence and should be managed regarding their hereditary pathology. The cure rate of persistent-PHPT or recurrent-PHPT in expert centers is estimated from 93 to 97%. After confirming the diagnosis of PHPT, patients with persistent-PHPT and recurrent-PHPT should be managed in an expert center with all dedicated competencies.

  18. Features of Pancreatic Pathology in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sorokman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The prevalence of pancreatitis in children with digestive disorders is 5–25 %. Aim of research: to determine the prevalence of pancreatic pathology in children. Material and methods. The research was conducted on the basis of department of gastroenterology of Chernivtsi Regional Clinical Children’s Hospital during 2013–2015. Results. The overall prevalence of chronic pancreatitis in children of Chernivtsi region is 1.8 %. It should also be noted that 66 % of children with chronic gastroduodenitis and 100 % of children with duodenal bulb ulcer had ultrasound changes of pancreas. Signs of chronic pancreatitis were detected in 1 child with celiac disease and 4 children with lactose intolerance; 17 children had identified ultrasound signs of pancreatic fibrosis, and reduced elastase‑1 in stool, which can be considered as signs of chronic pancreatitis; 9 children had identified ultrasound signs of structural changes of pancreas, but the level of elastase‑1 was normal (patients with recurrent pancreatitis; 18 children had no ultrasound changes of pancreas and no deviation in the structure and the level of elastase‑1. Conclusion. The chronic pancreatitis in children is often associated with pain (epigastric paroxysmal pain with frequent changes of pain location, dyspeptic (often manifested by nausea and vo­miting and astheno-vegetative syndromes which are associated with disharmonious physical development. All patients with chronic pancreatitis were revealed to have focal or linear fibrotic changes in the parenchyma of the pancreas, nonspecific changes in coprogram and a significant reduction of elastase‑1 level in blood.

  19. Pancreaticopleural Fistula Causing Massive Right Hydrothorax and Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Ern-Hwei Chan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothorax secondary to a pancreaticopleural fistula (PPF is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. In patients with a history of pancreatitis, diagnosis is made by detection of amylase in the pleural exudate. Imaging, particularly magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, aids in the detection of pancreatic ductal disruption. Management includes thoracocentesis and pancreatic duct drainage or pancreatic resection procedures. We present a case of massive right hydrothorax secondary to a PPF due to recurrent acute pancreatitis. Due to respiratory failure, urgent thoracocentesis was done. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and cholecystectomy was performed. The patient remains well at one-year follow-up.

  20. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, P; Keller, J; Lankisch, P G

    2001-04-01

    Malabsorption due to severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is one of the most important late features of chronic pancreatitis. Generally, steatorrhea is more severe and occurs several years prior to malabsorption of other nutrients because synthesis and secretion of lipase are impaired more rapidly, its intraluminal survival is shorter, and the lack of pancreatic lipase activity is not compensated for by nonpancreatic mechanisms. Patients suffer not only from nutritional deficiencies but also from increased nutrient delivery to distal intestinal sites, causing symptoms by profound alteration of upper gastrointestinal secretory and motor functions. Adequate nutrient absorption requires delivery of sufficient enzymatic activity into the duodenal lumen simultaneously with meal nutrients. The following recommendations are based on modern therapeutic concepts: 25,000 to 40,000 units of lipase per meal using pH-sensitive pancreatin microspheres, with dosage increases, compliance checks, and differential diagnosis in case of treatment failure. Still, in most patients, lipid digestion cannot be completely normalized by current standard therapy, and future developments are needed to optimize treatment.

  1. Type 3c (pancreatogenic) diabetes mellitus secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Phil A; Bellin, Melena D; Andersen, Dana K; Bradley, David; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Forsmark, Christopher E; Goodarzi, Mark O; Habtezion, Aida; Korc, Murray; Kudva, Yogish C; Pandol, Stephen J; Yadav, Dhiraj; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases defined by persistent hyperglycaemia. Type 2 diabetes, the most prevalent form, is characterised initially by impaired insulin sensitivity and subsequently by an inadequate compensatory insulin response. Diabetes can also develop as a direct consequence of other diseases, including diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Historically, diabetes due to diseases of the exocrine pancreas was described as pancreatogenic or pancreatogenous diabetes mellitus, but recent literature refers to it as type 3c diabetes. It is important to note that type 3c diabetes is not a single entity; it occurs because of a variety of exocrine pancreatic diseases with varying mechanisms of hyperglycaemia. The most commonly identified causes of type 3c diabetes are chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, haemochromatosis, cystic fibrosis, and previous pancreatic surgery. In this Review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical relevance of type 3c diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and highlight several important knowledge gaps. PMID:28404095

  2. Remnant pancreatic parenchymal volume predicts postoperative pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Keisuke; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Naoya; Uemura, Kenichiro; Sudo, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Yasushi; Kondo, Naru; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatectomy, including pancreatoduodenectomy and distal pancreatectomy, often causes postoperative pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI). Our aim was to clarify a relationship between remnant pancreatic volume and postoperative PEI. A total of 227 patients who underwent pancreatoduodenectomy or distal pancreatectomy were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent a (13)C-labeled mixed triglyceride breath test to assess pancreatic exocrine function and abdominal dynamic computed tomography for assessing remnant pancreatic volume after pancreatectomy at a median of 7 months postoperatively. The percent (13)CO2 cumulative dose at 7 hours (% dose (13)C cum 7 h) pancreatectomy were performed in 174 (76.7%) and 53 (23.3%) patients, respectively. Of the 227 patients, 128 (56.3%) developed postoperative PEI. Postoperative % dose (13)C cum 7 h was strongly correlated with remnant pancreatic volume (r = .509, P pancreatectomy (P pancreatectomy. Remnant pancreatic volume may predict postoperative PEI in patients who undergo pancreatectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of chymotrypsin C in development and progression of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Zejie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chymotrypsin C (CTRC is a trypsinogen synthesized by pancreatic acinar cells and secreted by pancreatic duct cells and belongs to the family of serine chymotrypsin. The main function of CTRC is to regulate the balance between activation and degradation of trypsin and maintain the structural and functional integrity of the pancreas. CTRC gene mutations can cause abnormal activation of trypsinogen and abnormal degradation of trypsin and then lead to the development of pancreatitis. The downregulation or absence of CTRC expression may be associated with the development and metastasis of pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the structure and biological function of CTRC and its mechanism of action in the development and progression of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  4. Elevation of serum pancreatic amylase and distortion of pancreatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes mellitus has been shown to cause severe impairment in exocrine pancreatic function and cyto-architecture. Ocimum grattissimum has been reported to lower blood glucose levels in experimental diabetic animals. This study, therefore, aims to investigate if treatment with O. grattissimum can alleviate ...

  5. The expression of dominant negative TCF7L2 in pancreatic beta cells during the embryonic stage causes impaired glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Weijuan; Xiong, Xiaoquan; Ip, Wilfred; Xu, Fenghao; Song, Zhuolun; Zeng, Kejing; Hernandez, Marcela; Liang, Tao; Weng, Jianping; Gaisano, Herbert; Nostro, M Cristina; Jin, Tianru

    2015-04-01

    Disruption of TCF7L2 in mouse pancreatic β-cells has generated different outcomes in several investigations. Here we aim to clarify role of β-cell TCF7L2 and Wnt signaling using a functional-knockdown approach. Adenovirus-mediated dominant negative TCF7L2 (TCF7L2DN) expression was conducted in Ins-1 cells. The fusion gene in which TCF7L2DN expression is driven by P TRE3G was utilized to generate the transgenic mouse line TCF7L2DN Tet . The double transgenic line was created by mating TCF7L2DN Tet with Ins2-rtTA, designated as βTCFDN. β-cell specific TCF7L2DN expression was induced in βTCFDN by doxycycline feeding. TCF7L2DN expression in Ins-1 cells reduced GSIS, cell proliferation and expression of a battery of genes including incretin receptors and β-cell transcription factors. Inducing TCF7L2DN expression in βTCFDN during adulthood or immediately after weaning generated no or very modest metabolic defect, while its expression during embryonic development by doxycycline feeding in pregnant mothers resulted in significant glucose intolerance associated with altered β-cell gene expression and reduced β-cell mass. Our observations support a cell autonomous role for TCF7L2 in pancreatic β-cells suggested by most, though not all, investigations. βTCFDN is a novel model for further exploring the role of TCF7L2 in β-cell genesis and metabolic homeostasis.

  6. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. ► Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. ► Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. ► Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. ► This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called “cancer stem cells”, within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the “stemness” of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  7. Percutaneous catheter drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnel, F.; Gebauer, A.; Jantsch, H.; Prayer, L.; Schurawitzki, H.; Feil, W.

    1991-01-01

    The results of CT/US-guided percutaneous drainage in 35 patients with pancreatic pseudocysts are reported. 27 patients recovered without surgery and no further treatment was required. 8 patients required a subsequent surgery due to recurrence. The role of CT/US-guided percutaneous drainage in pancreatic pseudocysts as well as an analysis of the technical aspects associated with a successful procedure are discussed. Although US may be used, we believe CT is safer and allows more precise localisation and guidance in the treatment of pseudocysts. (orig.) [de

  8. [Delayed recurrence of a phaechromocytoma with metastasis as a cause of severe hypertension in a woman with a surgically intervened retroperitoneal tumour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Varas, C; García, P A de la Torre; Heras Benito, M; Urzola Rodríguez, G; Castro Ramos, J C

    We present the case of a woman with a previous history of hypertension and retroperitoneal tumour. The histology was reported as a paraganglioma. There was no clinical follow-up. Years later, there was a recurrence of the phaeochromocytoma after presenting with a difficult to control hypertension, along with elevation of urinary catecholamines. The case aims to highlight the importance of performing a clinical follow-up in these patients, due to the risk of recurrence. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Pathologic Cellular Events in Smoking-Related Pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrower, Edwin [Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare, West Haven, CT 06516 (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Pancreatitis, a debilitating inflammatory disorder, results from pancreatic injury. Alcohol abuse is the foremost cause, although cigarette smoking has recently surfaced as a distinct risk factor. The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke and its toxins initiate pathological cellular events leading to pancreatitis, have not been clearly defined. Although cigarette smoke is composed of more than 4000 compounds, it is mainly nicotine and the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), which have been extensively studied with respect to pancreatic diseases. This review summarizes these research findings and highlights cellular pathways which may be of relevance in initiation and progression of smoking-related pancreatitis.

  10. Haemosuccus pancreaticus due to true splenic artery aneurysm: a rare cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MK Roy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available “Haemosuccus pancreaticus” is an unusual cause of severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding and results from rupture of splenic artery aneurysm into the pancreatic duct. More commonly, it is a pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery which develops as sequelae of pancreatitis. However, true aneurysm of the splenic artery without pancreatitis has rarely been incriminated as the etiologic factor of this condition. Owing to the paucity of cases and limited knowledge about the disease, diagnosis as well as treatment become challenging. Here we describe a 60-year-old male presenting with severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding and abdominal pain, which, after considerable delay, was diagnosed to be due to splenic artery aneurysm. Following an unsuccessful endovascular embolisation, the patient was cured by distal pancreatectomy and ligation of aneurysm.

  11. Surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Dejan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The principal indication for surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis is intractable pain. Depending upon the presence of dilated pancreatic ductal system, pancreatic duct drainage procedures and different kinds of pancreatic resections are applied. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to show the most appropriate procedure to gain the most possible benefits in dependence of type of pathohistological process in chronic pancreatitis. METHOD: Our study included 58 patients with intractable pain caused by chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic genesis. The first group consisted of 30 patients with dilated pancreatic ductal system more than 10 mm. The second group involved 28 patients without dilated pancreatic ductal system. Pain relief, weight gain and glucose tolerance were monitored. RESULTS: All patients of Group I (30 underwent latero-lateral pancreaticojejunal - Puestow operation. 80% of patients had no pain after 6 month, 13.6% had rare pain and 2 patients, i.e. 6.4%, who continued to consume alcohol, had strong pain. Group II consisting of 28 patients was without dilated pancreatic ductal system. This group was subjected to various types of pancreatic resections. Whipple procedure (W was done in 6 patients, pylorus preserving Whipple (PPW in 7 cases, and duodenum preserving cephalic pancreatectomy (DPCP was performed in 15 patients. Generally, 89.2% of patients had no pain 6 month after the operation. An average weight gain was 1.9 kg in W group, 2.8 kg in PPW group and 4.1 kg in DPCP group. Insulin-dependent diabetes was recorded in 66.6% in W group, 57.1% in PPW group and 0% in DPCP group. CONCLUSION: According to our opinion, DPCP may be considered the procedure of choice for surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis in patients without dilatation of pancreas ductal system because of no serious postoperative metabolic consequences.

  12. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T; Hauptman, Paul J; Stolker, Joshua M

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  13. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-01-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT

  14. Estrogen-associated severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljenedil, Sumayah; Hegele, Robert A; Genest, Jacques; Awan, Zuhier

    Estrogen, whether therapeutic or physiologic, can cause hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis is a rare complication. We report 2 women who developed estrogen-associated severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis. The first patient developed pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia associated with in vitro fertilization cycles. Marked reduction in her triglyceride was achieved with dietary restrictions and fibrate. The second patient developed pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia during her pregnancies. She was noncompliant with the treatment; therefore, her triglyceride remained high after delivery. In both patients, no hypertriglyceridemia-associated genes mutations were identified, although the second patient had strong polygenic susceptibility to hypertriglyceridemia. Estrogen-induced severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition. Screening in high-risk patients is crucial to prevent subsequent complications. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Failure of oral antibiotic therapy, including azithromycin, in the treatment of a recurrent breast abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Shelanah; Molland, Janice Gail; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    We report a case of recurrent, multifocal Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A breast abscesses, resistant to ciprofloxacin, which relapsed despite surgery, aspiration and multiple courses of antibiotics, including co-trimoxazole and azithromycin. The patient was cured after a prolonged course of intravenous ceftriaxone.

  16. Rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome caused by SMARCB1 constitutional deletion: prenatal detection of new case of recurrence in siblings due to gonadal mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Laura; Paganini, Irene; Frontali, Marina; Ciabattoni, Serena; Sangiuolo, Federica Carla; Papi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumors are aggressive malignancies that show loss-of-function mutations of SMARCB1 gene, a member of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex controlling gene transcription. One-third of patients affected by rhabdoid tumor harbor a germ-line mutation of SMARCB1 defining a rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome. The occurrence of a second somatic mutation determines the development of neoplasia in a two-hit model. Most germ-line mutations occur de novo, and few cases of recurrence in a sibship have been described. Here we report on a new Italian family with recurrence of SMARCB1 germ-line deletion in two siblings due to gonadal mosaicism. The deletion was identified in the 9-month-old proband with malignant rhabdoid tumor of the right kidney and disseminated metastases. Testing of both parents confirmed the de novo origin of the mutation, but recurrence was then detected prenatally in a new pregnancy. This is the sixth family with malignant rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome with the recurrence of the same germ-line SMARCB1 mutation in the sibship but not in healthy parents, suggesting that gonadal mosaicism is a less rare event than supposed. The clinical outcome in our patient confirms previous data of poorer outcome in patients with rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome.

  17. Recurrent bacterial meningitis occurring five years after closed head injury and caused by an intranasal post-traumatic meningo-encephalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, G.; Piazza, I.

    1991-01-01

    A case of atypical presentation of a post-traumatic intranasal meningo-encephalocele is described in a patient with a history of recurrent bacterial meningitis occurring 5 years after closed head injury. The usefulness of the CT and MRI findings in diagnostic evaluation of this lesion is emphasized. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2068033

  18. Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Antiβ2glicoprotein-1 Antibodies as the Cause of Recurrent Tibial Vein Thrombosis in SAPHO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przepiera-Będzak, Hanna; Brzosko, Marek

    2016-12-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is defined by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with recurrent venous or arterial thromboembolism (1). SAPHO syndrome is a rare disease, characterized by specific clinical manifestations of synovitis, acne pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis. It is a disease that manifests with a combination of osseous and articular manifestations associated with skin lesions (2). Venous thrombosis complicating SAPHO syndrome seems to be uncommon with an unclear pathogenesis (3-9). Coexistence of antiphospholipid syndrome and SAPHO syndrome was not previously mentioned in literature. A 33-year-old white woman was diagnosed with SAPHO syndrome at the age of 31. The patient was previously diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome and depressive syndrome. She was treated with sulfasalazin (2 g daily) and methotrexate (20 mg weekly). Seven months before admission to our department she experienced an episode of deep vein thrombosis of the left leg, successfully treated with subcutaneous enoxaparin sodium (40 mg daily) that was continued for the following 6 months as secondary prophylaxis. Pustular skin changes on palmar surface of the hands and plantar surface of the feet (characteristic for palmo-plantar pustulosis), tenderness of sterno-clavicular joints, swelling and restricted motion of both wrists, and pain on motion in both elbows, shoulders, knees, and ankles were found on physical examination. There was also a moderate amount of effusion in her left knee. There was a 3-centimeter difference between the circumferences of the shins. The level of C reactive protein was increased (6.21 mg/L). The patient was positive for antiβ2glicoprotein-1 (anti-β2G-1) antibodies. Tests for anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), antiannexin V antibodies, antiphosphatidylserine antibodies (aPS), and antiprothrombin antibodies (aPT) were negative. Prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and D-dimer level were normal, and

  19. Arginase-II Promotes Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Release From Pancreatic Acinar Cells Causing β-Cell Apoptosis in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yuyan; Yepuri, Gautham; Necetin, Sevil; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Ming, Xiu-Fen; Yang, Zhihong

    2017-06-01

    Aging is associated with glucose intolerance. Arginase-II (Arg-II), the type-II L -arginine-ureahydrolase, is highly expressed in pancreas. However, its role in regulation of pancreatic β-cell function is not known. Here we show that female (not male) mice deficient in Arg-II (Arg-II -/- ) are protected from age-associated glucose intolerance and reveal greater glucose induced-insulin release, larger islet size and β-cell mass, and more proliferative and less apoptotic β-cells compared with the age-matched wild-type (WT) controls. Moreover, Arg-II is mainly expressed in acinar cells and is upregulated with aging, which enhances p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) activation and release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Accordingly, conditioned medium of isolated acinar cells from old WT (not Arg-II -/- ) mice contains higher TNF-α levels than the young mice and stimulates β-cell apoptosis and dysfunction, which are prevented by a neutralizing anti-TNF-α antibody. In acinar cells, our study demonstrates an age-associated Arg-II upregulation, which promotes TNF-α release through p38 MAPK leading to β-cell apoptosis, insufficient insulin secretion, and glucose intolerance in female rather than male mice. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  20. Acute pancreatitis: current perspectives on diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adarsh P; Mourad, Moustafa M; Bramhall, Simon R

    2018-01-01

    The last two decades have seen the emergence of significant evidence that has altered certain aspects of the management of acute pancreatitis. While most cases of acute pancreatitis are mild, the challenge remains in managing the severe cases and the complications associated with acute pancreatitis. Gallstones are still the most common cause with epidemiological trends indicating a rising incidence. The surgical management of acute gallstone pancreatitis has evolved. In this article, we revisit and review the methods in diagnosing acute pancreatitis. We present the evidence for the supportive management of the condition, and then discuss the management of acute gallstone pancreatitis. Based on the evidence, our local institutional pathways, and clinical experience, we have produced an outline to guide clinicians in the management of acute gallstone pancreatitis. PMID:29563826

  1. Infection-triggered familial or recurrent cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy caused by mutations in a component of the nuclear pore, RANBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilson, Derek E; Adams, Mark D; Orr, Caitlin M D

    2009-01-01

    a susceptibility locus (ANE1) in a family segregating recurrent ANE as an incompletely penetrant, autosomal-dominant trait. We now report that all affected individuals and obligate carriers in this family are heterozygous for a missense mutation (c.1880C-->T, p.Thr585Met) in the gene encoding the nuclear pore...... protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2). To determine whether this mutation is the susceptibility allele, we screened controls and other patients with ANE who are unrelated to the index family. Patients from 9 of 15 additional kindreds with familial or recurrent ANE had the identical mutation. It arose de...... novo in two families and independently in several other families. Two other patients with familial ANE had different RANBP2 missense mutations that altered conserved residues. None of the three RANBP2 missense mutations were found in 19 patients with isolated ANE or in unaffected controls. We conclude...

  2. A Recurrent De Novo PACS2 Heterozygous Missense Variant Causes Neonatal-Onset Developmental Epileptic Encephalopathy, Facial Dysmorphism, and Cerebellar Dysgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Heather E; Jean-Marçais, Nolwenn; Yang, Edward; Heron, Delphine; Tatton-Brown, Katrina; van der Zwaag, Paul A; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Krock, Bryan L; Backer, E; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Sinnema, Margje; Reijnders, Margot R F; Bearden, David; Begtrup, Amber; Telegrafi, Aida; Lunsing, Roelineke J; Burglen, Lydie; Lesca, Gaetan; Cho, Megan T; Smith, Lacey A; Sheidley, Beth R; Moufawad El Achkar, Christelle; Pearl, Phillip L; Poduri, Annapurna; Skraban, Cara M; Tarpinian, Jennifer; Nesbitt, Addie I; Fransen van de Putte, Dietje E; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Rump, Patrick; Chatron, Nicolas; Sabatier, Isabelle; De Bellescize, Julitta; Guibaud, Laurent; Sweetser, David A; Waxler, Jessica L; Wierenga, Klaas J; Donadieu, Jean; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ramsey, Keri M; Nava, Caroline; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Vitobello, Antonio; Tran Mau-Them, Frédéric; Philippe, Christophe; Bruel, Ange-Line; Duffourd, Yannis; Thomas, Laurel; Lelieveld, Stefan H; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke; Brunner, Han G; Keren, Boris; Thevenon, Julien; Faivre, Laurence; Thomas, Gary; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel

    2018-05-03

    Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEEs) represent a large clinical and genetic heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental diseases. The identification of pathogenic genetic variants in DEEs remains crucial for deciphering this complex group and for accurately caring for affected individuals (clinical diagnosis, genetic counseling, impacting medical, precision therapy, clinical trials, etc.). Whole-exome sequencing and intensive data sharing identified a recurrent de novo PACS2 heterozygous missense variant in 14 unrelated individuals. Their phenotype was characterized by epilepsy, global developmental delay with or without autism, common cerebellar dysgenesis, and facial dysmorphism. Mixed focal and generalized epilepsy occurred in the neonatal period, controlled with difficulty in the first year, but many improved in early childhood. PACS2 is an important PACS1 paralog and encodes a multifunctional sorting protein involved in nuclear gene expression and pathway traffic regulation. Both proteins harbor cargo(furin)-binding regions (FBRs) that bind cargo proteins, sorting adaptors, and cellular kinase. Compared to the defined PACS1 recurrent variant series, individuals with PACS2 variant have more consistently neonatal/early-infantile-onset epilepsy that can be challenging to control. Cerebellar abnormalities may be similar but PACS2 individuals exhibit a pattern of clear dysgenesis ranging from mild to severe. Functional studies demonstrated that the PACS2 recurrent variant reduces the ability of the predicted autoregulatory domain to modulate the interaction between the PACS2 FBR and client proteins, which may disturb cellular function. These findings support the causality of this recurrent de novo PACS2 heterozygous missense in DEEs with facial dysmorphim and cerebellar dysgenesis. Copyright © 2018 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  3. Same-admission versus interval cholecystectomy for mild gallstone pancreatitis (PONCHO): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, D.W. da; Bouwense, S.A.; Schepers, N.J.; Besselink, M.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Brunschot, S. van; Bakker, O.J.; Bollen, T.L.; Dejong, C.H.; Goor, H. van; Boermeester, M.A.; Bruno, M.J.; Eijck, C.H. van; Timmer, R.; Weusten, B.L.; Consten, E.C.; Brink, M.A.; Spanier, B.W.; Bilgen, E.J.; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Hofker, H.S.; Rosman, C.; Voorburg, A.M.; Bosscha, K.; Duijvendijk, P. van; Gerritsen, J.J.; Heisterkamp, J.; Hingh, I.H. de; Witteman, B.J.; Kruyt, P.M.; Scheepers, J.J.; Molenaar, I.Q.; Schaapherder, A.F.; Manusama, E.R.; Waaij, L.A. van der; Unen, J. van; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Ramshorst, B. van; Gooszen, H.G.; Boerma, D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis, cholecystectomy during the same hospital admission might reduce the risk of recurrent gallstone-related complications, compared with the more commonly used strategy of interval cholecystectomy. However, evidence to support same-admission

  4. Same-admission versus interval cholecystectomy for mild gallstone pancreatitis (PONCHO): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Costa, David W.; Bouwense, Stefan A.; Schepers, Nicolien J.; Besselink, Marc G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; van Brunschot, Sandra; Bakker, Olaf J.; Bollen, Thomas L.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; van Goor, Harry; Boermeester, Marja A.; Bruno, Marco J.; van Eijck, Casper H.; Timmer, Robin; Weusten, Bas L.; Consten, Esther C.; Brink, Menno A.; Spanier, B. W. Marcel; Bilgen, Ernst Jan Spillenaar; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; Rosman, Camiel; Voorburg, Annet M.; Bosscha, Koop; van Duijvendijk, Peter; Gerritsen, Jos J.; Heisterkamp, Joos; de Hingh, Ignace H.; Witteman, Ben J.; Kruyt, Philip M.; Scheepers, Joris J.; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Manusama, Eric R.; van der Waaij, Laurens A.; van Unen, Jacco; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Gooszen, Hein G.; Boerma, Djamila

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis, cholecystectomy during the same hospital admission might reduce the risk of recurrent gallstone-related complications, compared with the more commonly used strategy of interval cholecystectomy. However, evidence to support same-admission

  5. Same-admission versus interval cholecystectomy for mild gallstone pancreatitis (PONCHO) : A multicentre randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Costa, David W.; Bouwense, Stefan A.; Schepers, Nicolien J.; Besselink, Marc G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Van Brunschot, Sandra; Bakker, Olaf J.; Bollen, Thomas L.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Van Goor, Harry; Boermeester, Marja A.; Bruno, Marco J.; Van Eijck, Casper H.; Timmer, Robin; Weusten, Bas L.; Consten, Esther C.; Brink, Menno A.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Bilgen, Ernst Jan Spillenaar; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; Rosman, Camiel; Voorburg, Annet M.; Bosscha, Koop; Van Duijvendijk, Peter; Gerritsen, Jos J.; Heisterkamp, Joos; De Hingh, Ignace H.; Witteman, Ben J.; Kruyt, Philip M.; Scheepers, Joris J.; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Manusama, Eric R.; Van Der Waaij, Laurens A.; Van Unen, Jacco; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.; Van Ramshorst, Bert; Gooszen, Hein G.; Boerma, Djamila

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis, cholecystectomy during the same hospital admission might reduce the risk of recurrent gallstone-related complications, compared with the more commonly used strategy of interval cholecystectomy. However, evidence to support same-admission

  6. Causes of death and prognostic factors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: a prospective study: comparison of 106 MEN1/Zollinger-Ellison syndrome patients with 1613 literature MEN1 patients with or without pancreatic endocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Uehara, Hirotsugu; Berna, Marc J; Jensen, Robert T

    2013-05-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is classically characterized by the development of functional or nonfunctional hyperplasia or tumors in endocrine tissues (parathyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal). Because effective treatments have been developed for the hormone excess state, which was a major cause of death in these patients in the past, coupled with the recognition that nonendocrine tumors increasingly develop late in the disease course, the natural history of the disease has changed. An understanding of the current causes of death is important to tailor treatment for these patients and to help identify prognostic factors; however, it is generally lacking.To add to our understanding, we conducted a detailed analysis of the causes of death and prognostic factors from a prospective long-term National Institutes of Health (NIH) study of 106 MEN1 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1/ZES patients) and compared our results to those from the pooled literature data of 227 patients with MEN1 with pancreatic endocrine tumors (MEN1/PET patients) reported in case reports or small series, and to 1386 patients reported in large MEN1 literature series. In the NIH series over a mean follow-up of 24.5 years, 24 (23%) patients died (14 MEN1-related and 10 non-MEN1-related deaths). Comparing the causes of death with the results from the 227 patients in the pooled literature series, we found that no patients died of acute complications due to acid hypersecretion, and 8%-14% died of other hormone excess causes, which is similar to the results in 10 large MEN1 literature series published since 1995. In the 2 series (the NIH and pooled literature series), two-thirds of patients died from an MEN1-related cause and one-third from a non-MEN1-related cause, which agrees with the mean values reported in 10 large MEN1 series in the literature, although in the literature the causes of death varied widely. In the NIH and pooled literature

  7. Hereditary pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, R E; Lynch, H T

    2000-05-01

    Although the total number of patients in these various high-risk groups is relatively small, they nevertheless provide excellent models for studying the cause, natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment of pancreatic cancer. These patients would also benefit greatly from procedures capable of detecting cancer at an early stage. This knowledge would be useful for the much commoner sporadic form of pancreatic cancer, in which diagnosis is almost always late and prognosis fatal. With early diagnosis, surgical resection before the cancer's extension beyond the organ's anatomic confines could be curative. The establishment of a National Familial Pancreatic Cancer Registry is essential and would increase the availability of these invaluable families for medical research.

  8. A case of pancreatic AV malformation in an elderly man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipin; Kedia, Saurabh; Sonika, Ujjwal; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Pal, Sujoy; Garg, Pramod

    2018-06-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain and weight loss for 6 months. Abdominal imaging showed a large vascular lesion in the head and neck of pancreas suggestive of arteriovenous malformation (AV malformation). Endoscopic ultrasound was done which showed features of AV malformation with no evidence of pancreatic malignancy. Surgery was planned for definitive treatment of malformation. Digital subtraction angiography with angioembolization was done prior to surgery to reduce vascularity of the lesion. He recovered after a pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histopathology of the resected specimen confirmed the pancreatic AV malformation. There has been no recurrence at 2 years of follow-up.

  9. Predictive factors for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy with pancreaticogastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Hayashidani, Yasuo; Sudo, Takeshi; Ohge, Hiroki; Sueda, Taijiro

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) with pancreaticogastrostomy (PG). A (13)C-labeled mixed triglyceride breath test was performed in 61 patients after PD to assess exocrine pancreatic function. Percent (13)CO(2) cumulative dose at 7 h pancreatic insufficiency. Abdominal computed tomography scans were utilized to assess the dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (MPD dilatation) in the remnant. Thirty-eight of 61 patients (62.3%) were diagnosed with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Univariate analysis identified significant associations between two preoperative factors (preoperative impaired endocrine function and a hard pancreatic texture induced by preexisting obstructive pancreatitis), plus one postoperative factor (MPD dilatation caused by PG stricture) and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (P pancreatic insufficiency after PD may be partly explainable by preexisting obstructive pancreatitis prior to surgery, surgeons desiring to obtain better postoperative exocrine pancreatic function after PD would be well-advised to devote considerable attention to preventing PG stricture.

  10. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term and was successfully treated with postpartum therapeutic plasma exchange. Patient also developed several other complications related to her substantial hypertriglyceridemia including preeclampsia, chylous ascites, retinal detachment, pleural effusion, and chronic pericarditis. This patient had no previous family or personal history of lipid abnormality and had four successful prior pregnancies without developing gestational hypertriglyceridemia. Such a severe hypertriglyceridemia is usually seen in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndromes where hypertriglyceridemia is exacerbated by the pregnancy, leading to fatal complications such as acute pancreatitis.

  11. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  12. Recurrent infantile digital fibromatosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case of an 8-year-old-boy with recurrent infantile digital fibromatosis (IDF) who presented with new ... Keywords: fibrous tumors, inclusion body fibromatosis, infantile digital fibromatosis, spindle cells, Reye tumor .... watch-and-wait strategy for patients with histologically confirmed IDF nodules that do not cause ...

  13. Chemotherapy for advanced non-pancreatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, a systematic review and meta-analysis: A lost cause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarca, Angela; Elliott, Emma; Barriuso, Jorge; Backen, Alison; McNamara, Mairéad G; Hubner, Richard; Valle, Juan W

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy is well-established in the treatment of patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) arising from the pancreas (pNETs); however, its role in patients with gastrointestinal non-pancreatic NETs (non-pNETs) is uncertain. This systematic review assesses the evidence for the role of chemotherapy in well-differentiated non-pNET patients. Eligible studies (identified using MEDLINE) were those reporting response and/or survival data for patients with well-differentiated non-pNETs receiving systemic chemotherapy. The primary end-point was overall-response (OR) rate; secondary end-points were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), disease-stabilization (DS) and disease-control (DC) rates. Of 6434 studies screened, 20 were eligible: one randomised phase III trial, 2 randomised phase II studies, 10 single-arm phase II trials and 7 retrospective analyses including a total of 264 patients (median of 11 patients per study, range 6-49); and employing multiple chemotherapy schedules. The mean "median PFS" and "median OS" were 16.9 months (95%-confidence interval (CI) 3.8-30.04) and 32.2 months (95%-CI 10.4-54.2), respectively. The non-weighted mean OR, DS and DC rates were 11.5% (95%-CI 5.8-17.2), 56.5% (95%-CI 38.1-74.9) and 70.7% (95%-CI 54.9-86.5), respectively. In studies including both pNETs and non-pNET patients, meta-analysis showed a lower OR-rate in the non-pNET patients when compared to pNETs [odds ratio (OR) 0.35 (95% CI 0.18-0.66)]; however significance was lost when high-risk bias studies were excluded in a sensitivity analysis [OR 0.45 (95% CI 0.19-1.07); p-value 0.07]. Studies were of evidence level-C with heterogeneous populations and treatments; and small patient numbers. Well-designed, prospective studies are needed to adequately evaluate the role of chemotherapy in this setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis: An illustrated guide to diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, R.D.; Rofe, C.J.; Bryant, T.J.C.; Hacking, C.N.; Stedman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) remains one of the rarer forms of pancreatitis but has become increasingly well recognized and widely diagnosed as it is an important differential, particularly due to the dramatic response to appropriate therapy. It is now best considered as part of a multisystem disease and the notion of “IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease” has become widely recognized as the number of extra-pancreatic associations of AIP grows. More recently AIP has been classified into two subtypes: lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with distinct geographical, age and sex distributions for the two subtypes, in addition to different pathological characteristics. The role of imaging is crucial in AIP and should be considered in conjunction with clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to make the diagnosis. Radiologists are uniquely placed to raise the possibility of AIP and aid the exclusion of significant differentials to allow the initiation of appropriate management and avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Radiological investigation may reveal a number of characteristic imaging findings in AIP but appearances can vary considerably and the focal form of AIP may appear as a pancreatic mass, imitating pancreatic carcinoma. This review will illustrate typical and atypical appearances of AIP on all imaging modes. Emphasis will be placed on the imaging features that are likely to prove useful in discriminating AIP from other causes prior to histopathological confirmation. In addition, examples of relevant differential diagnoses are discussed and illustrated

  15. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Vujasinovic

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor’s metabolism (Warburg effect and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  16. Recurrent vulvovaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anna M; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Vulvovaginitis (VV) is one of the most commonly encountered problems by a gynecologist. Many women frequently self-treat with over-the-counter medications, and may present to their health-care provider after a treatment failure. Vulvovaginal candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis may occur as discreet or recurrent episodes, and have been associated with significant treatment cost and morbidity. We present an update on diagnostic capabilities and treatment modalities that address recurrent and refractory episodes of VV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Alcoholic pancreatitis: A tale of spirits and bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Vonlaufen, Alain; Spahr, Laurent; Apte, Minoti V; Frossard, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a major cause of chronic pancreatitis. About 5% of alcoholics will ever suffer from pancreatitis, suggesting that additional co-factors are required to trigger an overt disease. Experimental work has implicated lipopolysaccharide, from gut-derived bacteria, as a potential co-factor of alcoholic pancreatitis. This review discusses the effects of alcohol on the gut flora, the gut barrier, the liver-and the pancreas and proposes potential interventional strategies. A better understand...

  18. Recurrent parotitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattarai M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent parotitis is an uncommon condition in children. Its etiological factors have not been proved till date although causes due to genetic inheritance, local autoimmune manifestation, allergy, viral infection and immunodeficiency have been suggested. The exact management of this disorder is not yet standardized, but a conservative approach is preferred and all affected children should be screened for Sjogren′s syndrome and immune deficiency including human immunodeficiency virus. We report a 12 years female child who presented with 12 episodes of non-painful recurrent swellings of the bilateral parotid gland in the past 3 years.

  19. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and other current concepts in the radiological assessment of acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Elen Freitas de Cerqueira; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Pereira, Fabio Payao; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition caused by intracellular activation and extravasation of inappropriate proteolytic enzymes determining destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissues. This is a fairly common clinical condition with two main presentations, namely, endematous pancreatitis - a less severe presentation - and necrotizing pancreatitis - the most severe presentation that affects a significant part of patients. The radiological evaluation, particularly by computed tomography, plays a fundamental role in the definition of the management of severe cases, especially regarding the characterization of local complications with implications in the prognosis and in the definition of the therapeutic approach. New concepts include the subdivision of necrotizing pancreatitis into the following presentations: pancreatic parenchymal necrosis with concomitant peripancreatic tissue necrosis, and necrosis restricted to peripancreatic tissues. Moreover, there was a systematization of the terms acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, post-necrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections and walled-off pancreatic necrosis. The knowledge about such terms is extremely relevant to standardize the terminology utilized by specialists involved in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. (author)

  20. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and other current concepts in the radiological assessment of acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Elen Freitas de Cerqueira [Image Memorial/DASA and Diagnoson Medicina Diagnostica, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Pereira, Fabio Payao; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USPU), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2014-05-15

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition caused by intracellular activation and extravasation of inappropriate proteolytic enzymes determining destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissues. This is a fairly common clinical condition with two main presentations, namely, endematous pancreatitis - a less severe presentation - and necrotizing pancreatitis - the most severe presentation that affects a significant part of patients. The radiological evaluation, particularly by computed tomography, plays a fundamental role in the definition of the management of severe cases, especially regarding the characterization of local complications with implications in the prognosis and in the definition of the therapeutic approach. New concepts include the subdivision of necrotizing pancreatitis into the following presentations: pancreatic parenchymal necrosis with concomitant peripancreatic tissue necrosis, and necrosis restricted to peripancreatic tissues. Moreover, there was a systematization of the terms acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, post-necrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections and walled-off pancreatic necrosis. The knowledge about such terms is extremely relevant to standardize the terminology utilized by specialists involved in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. (author)

  1. Pancreatic fibrosis correlates with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Tran; G. van 't Hof; G. Kazemier (Geert); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); C.J. Pek (Chulja); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); H. van Dekken (Herman); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Obstruction of the pancreatic duct can lead to pancreatic fibrosis. We investigated the correlation between the extent of pancreatic fibrosis and the postoperative exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. Methods: Fifty-five patients who were treated for pancreatic and

  2. Recurrences of Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpaciu, D; Goanta, C M; Cirpaciu, M D

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy in known as the most common cause of facial paralysis, determined by the acute onset of lower motor neuron weakness of the facial nerve with no detectable cause. With a lifetime risk of 1 in 60 and an annual incidence of 11-40/100,000 population, the condition resolves completely in around 71% of the untreated cases. Clinical trials performed for Bell's palsy have reported some recurrences, ipsilateral or contralateral to the side affected in the primary episode of facial palsy. Only few data are found in the literature. Melkersson-Rosenthal is a rare neuromucocutaneous syndrome characterized by recurrent facial paralysis, fissured tongue (lingua plicata), orofacial edema. We attempted to analyze some clinical and epidemiologic aspects of recurrent idiopathic palsy, and to develop relevant correlations between the existing data in literature and those obtained in this study. This is a retrospective study carried out on a 10-years period for adults and a five-year period for children. A number of 185 patients aged between 4 and 70 years old were analyzed. 136 of them were adults and 49 were children. 22 of 185 patients with Bell's palsy (12%) had a recurrent partial or complete facial paralysis with one to six episodes of palsy. From this group of 22 cases, 5 patients were diagnosed with Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome. The patients' age was between 4 and 70 years old, with a medium age of 27,6 years. In the group studied, fifteen patients, meaning 68%, were women and seven were men. The majority of patients in our group with more than two facial palsy episodes had at least one episode on the contralateral side. Our study found a significant incidence of recurrences of idiopathic facial palsy. Recurrent idiopathic facial palsy and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome is diagnosed more often in young females. Recurrence is more likely to occur in the first two years from the onset, which leads to the conclusion that we should have a follow up of patients

  3. Imaging of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akisada, Masayoshi; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Nobuyoshi; Tatezawa, Akira; Matsumoto, Kunihiko

    1982-01-01

    There has been no definite examining technique for the early diagnosis of pancreatic diseases, especially small cancers of the pancreas less than 3 cm. Plain abdominal X-rays do not produce reliable roentgenological signs of acute pancreatitis, but the advent of CT has elucidated the condition to some extent. Upper gastrointestinal series are alleged to demonstrate abnormal findings in 80% of cases of pancreatic cancer or cyst. Pancreatic RI scintigraphy expresses the function and anatomy, and the sensitivity with 75 Se is 88%, similar to 87% by US and 80% by CT. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography visualizes extrapancreatic secretory function, as well as the morphology of pancreas, differentiation is not easy in many cases. The greatest indication for US was cysts. The detection rate of pancreatic cancers is similar between plain and contrast CTs, and pancreatic angiography is not specific for pancreatic cancers. (Chiba, N.)

  4. Mild acute pancreatitis with vildagliptin use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikant Saraogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vildagliptin has not been associated with the development of acute pancreatitis in postmarketing reports except one case report from Sydney, Australia. We present the case report of 42 year old male, diabetic, with no historyof alcohol use, on vildagliptin 50 mg and metformin 500 mg daily since 6 months, who presented with severe abdominal pain radiating to back, nausea and fever. On evaluation, serum pancreatic enzymes were elevated, triglycerides were not raised and ultrasound showed swollen and echogenic pancreas, loss of peripancreatic fat plane and pancreatic duct was not dilated. Vildagliptin was stopped and the pancreatits resolved. On Follow up, no secondary cause was not identified. This appears to be the first reported case of acute pancreatitis from India probably attributable to use of vildagliptin, thus raising the possibility that this rare reaction may be a class effect of the DPP-4 inhibitors.

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira-Cunha, Melissa; Newman, William G.; Siriwardena, Ajith K.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related death. The difficulty in detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage, aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapy all contribute to the high mortality. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is expressed in normal human tissues. It is a member of the tyrosine kinase family of growth factors receptors and is encoded by proto-oncogenes. Several studies have demonstrated that EGFR is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer. Over-expression correlates with more advanced disease, poor survival and the presence of metastases. Therefore, inhibition of the EGFR signaling pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. Although several combinations of EGFR inhibitors with chemotherapy demonstrate inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor cell apoptosis and regression in xenograft models, these benefits remain to be confirmed. Multimodality treatment incorporating EGFR-inhibition is emerging as a novel strategy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

  6. Progression from acute to chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Becker, Ulrik; Matzen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Knowledge of the natural course of acute pancreatitis (AP) and risk of progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP) is limited. The aims were to describe: (1) the incidence of progression from AP to CP, (2) prognostic factors for progression, and (3) the natural course and mortality.......1%) during follow-up; 48.2% developed from alcoholic AP, 47.0% from idiopathic AP, and 4.8% from other causes. The mortality rate for patients with progressive AP was 2.7 times higher than in patients with nonprogressive acute pancreatitis, and 5.3 to 6.5 times higher than in the background population....... In Cox regression analyses corrected for age, only smoking was of significance for the progression from AP to CP. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis can progress to CP, not only from alcoholic but also from nonalcoholic AP. Smoking was the strongest risk factor associated with progression. The mortality...

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Iglesias García

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. The 5-year survival rate is approximately 4%, without significant changes over the last 50 years. This poor survival rate and bad prognosis are associated with the diagnosis of advanced-stage disease, which precludes the only potential curative treatment - surgical resection. In this setting, the main objective in the management of pancreatic cancer is to perform an early diagnosis and a correct staging of the disease. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS appears to be an essential tool for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. EUS diagnostic accuracy for detecting pancreatic tumors ranges from 85 to 100%, clearly superior to other imaging techniques. EUS accuracy for the local staging of pancreatic cancer ranges from 70 to 90%, superior or equivalent to other imaging modalities. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration allows a cyto-histological diagnosis in nearly 90% of cases, with a very low complication rate. At present, the formal indications for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration are the necessity of palliative treatment or whenever the possibility of neoadjuvant treatment is present. It could be also indicated to differentiate pancreatic adenocarcinoma from other pancreatic conditions, like lymphoma, metastasis, autoimmune pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis. We can conclude that EUS is an essential tool in the management of patients with pancreatic tumors.

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Iglesias García

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. The 5-year survival rate is approximately 4%, without significant changes over the last 50 years. This poor survival rate and bad prognosis are associated with the diagnosis of advanced-stage disease, which precludes the only potential curative treatment - surgical resection. In this setting, the main objective in the management of pancreatic cancer is to perform an early diagnosis and a correct staging of the disease. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS appears to be an essential tool for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. EUS diagnostic accuracy for detecting pancreatic tumors ranges from 85 to 100%, clearly superior to other imaging techniques. EUS accuracy for the local staging of pancreatic cancer ranges from 70 to 90%, superior or equivalent to other imaging modalities. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration allows a cyto-histological diagnosis in nearly 90% of cases, with a very low complication rate. At present, the formal indications for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration are the necessity of palliative treatment or whenever the possibility of neoadjuvant treatment is present. It could be also indicated to differentiate pancreatic adenocarcinoma from other pancreatic conditions, like lymphoma, metastasis, autoimmune pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis. We can conclude that EUS is an essential tool in the management of patients with pancreatic tumors.

  9. Mitochondrial function and malfunction in the pathophysiology of pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimenko, Oleg V; Gerasimenko, Julia V

    2012-07-01

    As a primary energy producer, mitochondria play a fundamental role in pancreatic exocrine physiology and pathology. The most frequent aetiology of acute pancreatitis is either gallstones or heavy alcohol consumption. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can result in the development of chronic pancreatitis and increase the lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer 100-fold. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality with only about 3-4 % of patients surviving beyond 5 years. It has been shown that acute pancreatitis involves Ca²⁺ overload and overproduction of reactive oxygen species in pancreatic acinar cells. Both factors significantly affect mitochondria and lead to cell death. The pathogenesis of inflammation in acute and chronic pancreatitis is tightly linked to the induction of necrosis and apoptosis. There is currently no specific therapy for pancreatitis, but recent findings of an endogenous protective mechanism against Ca²⁺ overload--and particularly the potential to boost this protection--bring hope of new therapeutic approaches.

  10. Severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis: thirteen years' treatment with lomitapide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Frank M; Stanesa, Maxine; Hegele, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Recurrent pancreatitis is a potentially fatal complication of severe hypertriglyceridemia. Genetic defects and lifestyle risk factors may render this condition unresponsive to current treatments. We report this first case of long-term management of intractable near-fatal recurrent pancreatitis secondary to severe hypertriglyceridemia by a novel use of lomitapide, an inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, recently approved for treatment of familial homozygous hypercholesterolemia. The patient had been hospitalized many times for pancreatitis since age 15 years. Her serum triglyceride level averaged 3900 mg/dL while she received therapy with approved lipid drugs. She is homozygous for a coding mutation (P234L) in lipoprotein lipase, leaving her unable to metabolize triglycerides in chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). Lomitapide reduces the secretion of chylomicrons and VLDL. Lomitapide, which was started when she was 44 years old after near-fatal pancreatitis, lowered her fasting triglyceride level from greater than 3000 mg/dL to a mean (SD) of 903 (870) mg/dL while she received 30 mg/d and to 524 (265) mg/dL while she received 40 mg/d; eliminated chronic abdominal pain; and prevented pancreatitis. However, fatty liver, present before treatment, progressed to steatohepatitis and fibrosis after 12 to 13 years. Lomitapide prevented pancreatitis in severe intractable hypertriglyceridemia but at a potential long-term cost of hepatotoxicity.

  11. Percutaneous transhepatic stent placement in the management of portal venous stenosis after curative surgery for pancreatic and biliary neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Rae; Ko, Gi-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Yoon, Hyun-Ki

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stent placement in the management of portal venous stenosis after curative surgery for pancreatic and biliary neoplasms. From September 1995 to April 2007, percutaneous transhepatic portal venous stent placement was attempted in 19 patients with postoperative portal venous stenosis. Portal venous stenosis was a complication of surgery in 11 patients and caused by tumor recurrence in eight patients. The clinical manifestations were ascites, hematochezia, melena, esophageal varices, and abnormal liver function. Stents were placed in the stenotic or occluded lesions after percutaneous transhepatic portography. Technical and clinical success, stent patency, and complications were evaluated. Stent placement was successful in 18 patients (technical success rate, 95%). Clinical manifestations improved in 16 patients (clinical success rate, 84%). The mean patency period among the 18 patients with technical success was 21.3 ± 23.2 months. The mean patency period of the benign stenosis group (30.1 ± 25.6 months) was longer than that of the tumor recurrence group (7.3 ± 7.7 months), and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.038). There were two cases of a minor complication (transient fever) and three cases of major complications (septicemia, liver abscess, and acute portal venous thrombosis). Percutaneous transhepatic stent placement can be safe and effective in relieving portal venous stenosis after curative surgery for pancreatic and biliary neoplasms. Patients with benign stenosis had more favorable results than did those with tumor recurrence.

  12. Targeted transgastric drainage of isolated pancreatic duct segments to cure persistent pancreaticocutaneous fistulas from pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, F Edward; Kadivar, Fatemeh; Kelly, Peter D; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Vollmer, Charles M; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D

    2015-02-01

    Chronic pancreaticocutaneous fistulas can be difficult to treat. This article presents a snare-target technique for draining a nondilated pancreatic duct into the stomach, diverting pancreatic fluid away from the pancreaticocutaneous fistula to allow it to heal. Internal or internal/external transgastric pancreatic duct or fistula drains were placed in six patients. After an average of 4 months of drainage, all six patients experienced resolution of the cutaneous fistula. Two patients developed a pseudocyst but no recurrent fistula after drain removal, and the other four patients had no pseudocyst or fistula after an average 27-month follow-up (range, 6-74 mo). Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Endocrine pancreatic function changes after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Deqing; Xu, Yaping; Zeng, Yue; Wang, Xingpeng

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impairment of pancreatic endocrine function and the associated risk factors after acute pancreatitis (AP). Fifty-nine patients were subjected to tests of pancreatic function after an attack of pancreatitis. The mean time after the event was 3.5 years. Pancreatic endocrine function was evaluated by fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood insulin, and C-peptide. Homeostasis model assessment was used to evaluate insulin resistance and islet β-cell function. Pancreatic exocrine function was evaluated by fecal elastase 1. Factors that could influence endocrine function were also investigated. Nineteen patients (32%) were found to have elevated FBG, whereas 5 (8%) had abnormal glycosylated hemoglobin levels. The levels of FBG, fasting blood insulin, and C-peptide were higher in patients than in controls (P endocrine insufficiency. Pancreatic exocrine functional impairment was found at the same time. Endocrine functional impairment with insulin resistance was found in patients after AP. Obesity, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes-related symptoms increased the likelihood of developing functional impairment after AP.

  14. The aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis over time in a hospital in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Bendtsen, Flemming; Matzen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    : Gallstone disease significantly (p = 0.04) increased as the cause of acute pancreatitis over the 22-year period, while alcohol remained the major cause of chronic pancreatitis. The validity of the diagnoses for patients with acute pancreatitis varied between 51% and 73%, and for chronic pancreatitis between......INTRODUCTION: The change in aetiology over time of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been sparsely described, as has also the validity of the diagnostic codes. The aim of the study was 1) to clarify whether the aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis changed during the period 1983-2005, and 2......) to validate the diagnostic codes over time for acute and chronic pancreatitis registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) in the same period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All admissions at Hvidovre Hospital coded in the NPR in 1983, 1994 and 2005 with a diagnosis of either acute or chronic pancreatitis...

  15. An overview of the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carolyn C

    2016-11-23

    Chronic pancreatitis is a complex inflammatory condition characterised by irreversible damage to the pancreas. This article explores the pathophysiology of this condition and its effects on pancreatic function. It outlines the causes and presenting features of chronic pancreatitis, as well as its effect on patients' quality of life and the changes to their lifestyle that are likely to be required. Chronic pancreatitis cannot be cured; therefore, treatment aims to control pain, manage problems associated with malabsorption, and assess and manage long-term complications that may develop, such as insulin dependence.

  16. Imaging evaluation of post pancreatic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scialpi, Michele; Scaglione, Mariano; Volterrani, Luca; Lupattelli, Luciano; Ragozzino, Alfonso; Romano, Stefania; Rotondo, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The role of several imaging techniques in patients submitted to pancreatic surgery with special emphasis to single-slice helical computed tomography (CT) and multidetector-row CT (MDCT) was reviewed. Several surgical options may be performed such as Whipple procedure, distal pancreatectomy, central pancreatectomy, and total pancreatectomy. Ultrasound examination may be used to detect peritoneal fluid in the early post-operative period as well as lesion recurrence in long-term follow-up. Radiological gastrointestinal studies has a major role in evaluation of intestinal functionality. In spite of the advent of other imaging modalities, CT is the most effective after pancreatic surgery. On post-operative CT, the most common findings were small fluid peritoneal or pancreatic collections, stranding of the mesenteric fat with perivascular cuffing, reactive adenopathy and pneumobilia. In addition, CT may demonstrate early (leakage of anastomosis, pancreatico-jejunal fistula, haemorrage, acute pancreatitis of the remnant pancreas, peritonitis), and late (chronic fistula, abscess, aneurysms, anastomotic bilio-digestive stenosis, perianastomotic ulcers, biloma, and intra-abdominal bleeding) surgical complications. In the follow-up evaluation, CT may show tumor recurrence, liver and lymph nodes metastasis. Magnetic resonance may be used as alternative imaging modality to CT, when renal insufficiency or contrast sensitivity prevents the use of iodinated i.v. contrast material or when the biliary tree study is primarily requested. The knowledge of the type of surgical procedures, the proper identification of the anastomoses as well as the normal post-operative imaging appearances are essential for an accurate detection of the complications and recurrent disease

  17. Imaging evaluation of post pancreatic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scialpi, Michele [Department of Radiology, ' Santissima Annunziata' Hospital, Via Bruno 1, I-74100 Taranto (Italy)]. E-mail: michelescialpi@libero.it; Scaglione, Mariano [Department of Radiology, ' A. Cardarelli' Hospital, I-80131 Naples (Italy); Volterrani, Luca [Institute of Radiology, University of Siena, I-53100 Siena (Italy); Lupattelli, Luciano [Institute of Radiology, University of Perugia, I-06122 Perugia (Italy); Ragozzino, Alfonso [Department of Radiology, ' A. Cardarelli' Hospital, I-80131 Naples (Italy); Romano, Stefania [Department of Radiology, ' A. Cardarelli' Hospital, I-80131 Naples (Italy); Rotondo, Antonio [Section of Radiology, Department ' Magrassi-Lanzara' , Second University, I-80138 Naples (Italy)

    2005-03-01

    The role of several imaging techniques in patients submitted to pancreatic surgery with special emphasis to single-slice helical computed tomography (CT) and multidetector-row CT (MDCT) was reviewed. Several surgical options may be performed such as Whipple procedure, distal pancreatectomy, central pancreatectomy, and total pancreatectomy. Ultrasound examination may be used to detect peritoneal fluid in the early post-operative period as well as lesion recurrence in long-term follow-up. Radiological gastrointestinal studies has a major role in evaluation of intestinal functionality. In spite of the advent of other imaging modalities, CT is the most effective after pancreatic surgery. On post-operative CT, the most common findings were small fluid peritoneal or pancreatic collections, stranding of the mesenteric fat with perivascular cuffing, reactive adenopathy and pneumobilia. In addition, CT may demonstrate early (leakage of anastomosis, pancreatico-jejunal fistula, haemorrage, acute pancreatitis of the remnant pancreas, peritonitis), and late (chronic fistula, abscess, aneurysms, anastomotic bilio-digestive stenosis, perianastomotic ulcers, biloma, and intra-abdominal bleeding) surgical complications. In the follow-up evaluation, CT may show tumor recurrence, liver and lymph nodes metastasis. Magnetic resonance may be used as alternative imaging modality to CT, when renal insufficiency or contrast sensitivity prevents the use of iodinated i.v. contrast material or when the biliary tree study is primarily requested. The knowledge of the type of surgical procedures, the proper identification of the anastomoses as well as the normal post-operative imaging appearances are essential for an accurate detection of the complications and recurrent disease.

  18. Pancreatic rupture in four cats with high-rise syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehmann, Lea M; Dörner, Judith; Hittmair, Katharina M; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Reifinger, Martin; Dupré, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic trauma and rupture are rare after feline high-rise syndrome; however, should it happen, pancreatic enzymes will leak into the abdominal cavity and may cause pancreatic autodigestion and fatty tissue saponification. If not diagnosed and treated, it can ultimately lead to multiorgan failure and death. In this case series, 700 records of high-rise syndrome cats that presented between April 2001 and May 2006 were analysed, and four cats with pancreatic rupture were identified. Clinical signs, diagnosis using ultrasonography and lipase activity in blood and abdominal effusion, and treatment modalities are reported. Three cats underwent surgical abdominal exploration, one cat was euthanased. Rupture of the left pancreatic limb was confirmed in all cases. Two of the operated cats survived to date. High-rise syndrome can lead to abdominal trauma, including pancreatic rupture. A prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment should be considered.

  19. Risk of pancreatitis after pancreatic duct guidewire placement during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ishikawa-Kakiya

    Full Text Available Advanced techniques have been developed to overcome difficult cannulation cases in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP. Pancreatic duct guidewire placement method (PGW is performed in difficult cannulation cases; it is possible that it places patients at risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP. The mechanism of PEP is still unclear, but pancreatic duct pressure and injury of pancreatic duct are known causes of PEP. Therefore, we hypothesized a relationship between pancreatic duct diameter and PEP and predicted that PGW would increase the risk of PEP in patients with non-dilated pancreatic ducts. This study aimed to investigate whether PGW increased the risk of PEP in patients with pancreatic duct diameter ≤ 3 mm.We analyzed 332 patients with pancreatic duct ≤ 3 mm who performed first time ERCP session. The primary endpoint was the rate of adverse event of PEP. We evaluated the risk of PEP in patients who had undergone PGW compared to those who had not, using the inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW analysis.PGW was found to be an independent risk factor for PEP by univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR], 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-5.38; p = 0.03 after IPTW in patients with pancreatic duct diameter ≤ 3 mm. Adjusted for all covariates, PGW remained an independent risk factor for PEP (OR, 3.12; 95% CI, 1.33-7.33; p = 0.01.Our results indicate that PGW in patients with pancreatic duct diameter ≤ 3 mm increases the risk of PEP.

  20. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Toru; Nakamori, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  1. Computed tomography after modified Whipple procedure with pancreatic duct occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abildgaard, A.; Kolmannskog, F.; Mathisen, O.; Bergan, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Eighty-two CT examinations performed on 28 patients who had undergone a modified Whipple procedure including pancreatic duct occlusion were reviewed. Reduction of the antero-posterior diameter of the body and tail of the pancreatic remnant was observed on consecutive scans in 8 patients (29%). Decreasing liver attenuation was seen in 4 patients (14%) postoperatively, and pseudocysts in the pancreatic remnant in 6 (21%). In 10 examinations performed because of suspected intraabdominal abscess postoperatively, abscess was diagnosed in 2 patients. In 62 routine follow-up CT examinations, significant positive findings were diagnosed in 5 patients: tumor recurrence or metastases in 4, and a large pseuodocyst in one. CT is of value in the early postoperative phase to reveal postoperative complications and in the follow-up of patients with specific symptoms indicating tumor recurrence or metastases. (orig.)

  2. Chronic pancreatitis : Novel concepts in diagnostics and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The most prominent symptom is abdominal pain, which often leads to recurrent hospitalizations, absence of work, multiple interventions, and opioid addiction. Ten years after onset of the disease, more than half of the patients are

  3. The management of complex pancreatic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krige, J E J; Beningfield, S J; Nicol, A J; Navsaria, P

    2005-08-01

    Major injuries of the pancreas are uncommon, but may result in considerable morbidity and mortality because of the magnitude of associated vascular and duodenal injuries or underestimation of the extent of the pancreatic injury. Prognosis is influenced by the cause and complexity of the pancreatic injury, the amount of blood lost, duration of shock, speed of resuscitation and quality and nature of surgical intervention. Early mortality usually results from uncontrolled or massive bleeding due to associated vascular and adjacent organ injuries. Late mortality is a consequence of infection or multiple organ failure. Neglect of major pancreatic duct injury may lead to life-threatening complications including pseudocysts, fistulas, pancreatitis, sepsis and secondary haemorrhage. Careful operative assessment to determine the extent of gland damage and the likelihood of duct injury is usually sufficient to allow planning of further management. This strategy provides a simple approach to the management of pancreatic injuries regardless of the cause. Four situations are defined by the extent and site of injury: (i) minor lacerations, stabs or gunshot wounds of the superior or inferior border of the body or tail of the pancreas (i.e. remote from the main pancreatic duct), without visible duct involvement, are best managed by external drainage; (ii) major lacerations or gunshot or stab wounds in the body or tail with visible duct involvement or transection of more than half the width of the pancreas are treated by distal pancreatectomy; (iii) stab wounds, gunshot wounds and contusions of the head of the pancreas without devitalisation of pancreatic tissue are managed by external drainage, provided that any associated duodenal injury is amenable to simple repair; and (iv) non-reconstructable injuries with disruption of the ampullary-biliary-pancreatic union or major devitalising injuries of the pancreatic head and duodenum in stable patients are best treated by

  4. Pancreatic candidiasis that mimics a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor on magnetic resonance imaging: A case report in an immunocompetent patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Min Jung; Kang, Tae Wook; Ha, Sang Yun

    2015-01-01

    Candida is a commensal organism that is frequently found in the human gastrointestinal tract. It is the most common organism that causes pancreatic fungal infections. However, magnetic resonance imaging findings of Candida infection in the pancreas have not been described. We report imaging findings of pancreatic candidiasis in a patient in immunocompetent condition. It presented as a multi-septated cystic mass with a peripheral solid component in the background of pancreatitis and restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted image that mimicked a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor

  5. Pancreatic candidiasis that mimics a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor on magnetic resonance imaging: A case report in an immunocompetent patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Min Jung; Kang, Tae Wook; Ha, Sang Yun [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Candida is a commensal organism that is frequently found in the human gastrointestinal tract. It is the most common organism that causes pancreatic fungal infections. However, magnetic resonance imaging findings of Candida infection in the pancreas have not been described. We report imaging findings of pancreatic candidiasis in a patient in immunocompetent condition. It presented as a multi-septated cystic mass with a peripheral solid component in the background of pancreatitis and restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted image that mimicked a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor.

  6. Pancreatic cancer clinical trials and accrual in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoos, William A; James, Porsha M; Rahib, Lola; Talley, Anitra W; Fleshman, Julie M; Matrisian, Lynn M

    2013-09-20

    Pancreatic cancer clinical trials open in the United States and their accrual were examined to identify opportunities to accelerate progress in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer-specific clinical trials open in the United States in the years 2011 and 2012 were obtained from the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network database. Accrual information was obtained from trial sponsors. The portfolio of pancreatic cancer clinical trials identified by type (adenocarcinoma or neuroendocrine), phase, disease stage, and treatment approach is reported. More than half of trials for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma applied biologic insights to new therapeutic approaches, and 38% focused on optimization of radiation or chemotherapy delivery or regimens. In 2011, pancreatic cancer trials required total enrollment of 11,786 patients. Actual accrual to 93.2% of trials was 1,804 patients, an estimated 4.57% of the patients with pancreatic cancer alive in that year. The greatest need was for patients with resectable cancer. Trials open in 2011 enrolled an average of 15% of their total target accrual. Physician recommendations greatly influenced patients' decision to enroll or not enroll onto a clinical trial. Matching to a clinical trial within a 50-mile radius and identifying trials for recurrent/refractory disease were documented as challenges for patient accrual. Overall trial enrollment indicates that pancreatic cancer trials open in 2011 would require 6.7 years on average to complete accrual. These results suggest that harmonizing patient supply and demand for clinical trials is required to accelerate progress toward improving survival in pancreatic cancer.

  7. Clinical application of duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Songqiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the indications and therapeutic effect of duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 17 patients who underwent DPPHR in Fujian Provincial Hospital from January 2013 to February 2017. Among these patients, 6 had chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic duct stones, 2 had chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst, 3 had solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreatic head, 3 had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, 2 had serous cystadenoma of the pancreatic head, and 1 had mucinous cystadenoma of the pancreatic head. Results The time of operation was 200-360 minutes (mean 304.0±45.3 minutes, and the intraoperative blood loss was 50-500 ml (mean 267.5±116.1 ml. No patient died in the perioperative period. After surgery, 5 experienced biochemical leak, 2 experienced grade B pancreatic fistula, no patient experienced grade C pancreatic fistula, and 1 experienced gastroplegia; all these patients were cured and discharged after conservative treatment. The length of postoperative hospital stay was 17-78 days (mean 30.8±14.3 days. The 17 patients were followed up for 2 months to 4 years after surgery, and no patient experienced tumor recurrence, new-onset diabetes, dyspepsia, or common bile duct stenosis after surgery. Conclusion Besides ensuring the complete resection of tumor, DPPHR can reduce the incidence rate of surgical trauma and complications and shorten the time of operation and the length of hospital stay. Compared with pancreaticoduodenectomy, DPPHR can better preserve the endocrine and exocrine functions of the pancreas and improve patients′ postoperative quality of life.

  8. Statins and the risk of acute pancreatitis: A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisted, Henriette; Jacobsen, Jacob; Munk, Estrid Muff

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case reports have suggested that statins may cause acute pancreatitis. AIM: To examine if statins are associated with risk of acute pancreatitis. METHODS: We identified 2576 first-time admitted cases of acute pancreatitis from hospital discharge registers in three Danish counties, and......: Our findings speak against a strong causative effect of statins on the risk of acute pancreatitis, and may even indicate a mild protective effect....

  9. Mutations in serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 are strongly associated with chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Drenth, J P H; te Morsche, R; Jansen, J B M J

    2002-01-01

    Background: Although chronic pancreatitis is associated with risk factors such as alcoholism, hyperparathyroidism, and hypertriglyceridaemia, little is known of the actual aetiology of the disease. It is thought that inappropriate activation of trypsinogen causes pancreatitis, and indeed in cases of hereditary pancreatitis mutations of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) have been described. As serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) is a potent natural inhibitor of pancreatic trypsin activi...

  10. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most challenging human malignancies, pancreatic cancer is characterized by its insidious symptoms, low rate of surgical resection, high risk of local invasion, metastasis and recurrence, and overall dismal prognosis. Lymphatic metastasis, above all, is recognized as an early adverse event in progression of pancreatic cancer and has been described to be an independent poor prognostic factor. It should be noted that the occurrence of lymphatic metastasis is not a casual or stochastic but an ineluctable and designed event. Increasing evidences suggest that metastasis-initiating cells (MICs and the microenvironments may act as a double-reed style in this crime. However, the exact mechanisms on how they function synergistically for this dismal clinical course remain largely elusive. Therefore, a better understanding of its molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic lymphatic metastasis is urgently required. In this review, we will summarize the latest advances on lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

  11. Chronic asymptomatic hyperamylasemia unrelated to pancreatic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generoso Uomo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Almost all patients presenting with chronic hyperamylasemia undergo an expensive, long, difficult and often repeated diagnostic workup even if this occurrence is not associated with symptoms or with known pancreatotoxic factors. This is in relationship with the poor knowledge that, beside hyperenzymemia secondary to pancreatic diseases and systemic illnesses, various non-pathological forms of chronic hyperamylasemia can occur in clinical practice. AIM OF THE STUDY This study was addressed to assess the clinical characteristics of patients presenting with chronic hyperamylasemia unrelated to pancreatic diseases (CHUPD. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data of all patients with CHUPD were retrospectively reviewed (June 1997-March 2007. Forty patients were included in the study; median follow- up was 33 months (range 3-84 months. CHUPD was secondary to: a chronic benign pancreatic hyperamylasemia, 16 patients (40%; b macroamylasemia, 15 patients (37.5%; c salivary hyperamylasemia, 9 patients (22.5%. Gilbert’s syndrome was present in 13 patients (32.5%; 8 with macroamylasemia and hyperdyslipidemia in 8 patients (20%; 5 with chronic benign pancreatic hyperamylasemia. Diagnostic exams (all in the normal range performed before our observation were: Ca19-9 serum level in 37/40 (92.5%, ultrasonography and computed tomography-scan in all patients, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 21/40 (52.5%, abdominal magnetic resonance in 14/40 (35%. Previous diagnosis in these asymptomatic subjects were: chronic pancreatitis in 26 cases (65%; recurrent pancreatitis in 10 cases (25%; the remaining 4 patients (10% were addressed without a specific diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS In clinical practice, the occurrence of an unexplained chronic hyperamylasemia very often allows to an unappropriate diagnostic workup due to the poor familiarity with CHUPD conditions.

  12. Alternative treatment of symptomatic pancreatic fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltberger, Georg; Schmelzle, Moritz; Tautenhahn, Hans-Michael; Krenzien, Felix; Atanasov, Georgi; Hau, Hans-Michael; Moche, Michael; Jonas, Sven

    2015-06-01

    The management of symptomatic pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy is complex and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We here report continuous irrigation and drainage of the pancreatic remnant to be a feasible and safe alternative to total pancreatectomy. Between 2005 and 2011, patients were analyzed, in which pancreaticojejunal anastomosis was disconnected because of grade C fistula, and catheters for continuous irrigation and drainage were placed close to the pancreatic remnant. Clinical data were monitored and quality of life was evaluated. A total of 13 of 202 patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy required reoperation due to symptomatic pancreatic fistula. Ninety-day mortality of these patients was 15.3%. Median length of stay on the intensive care unit and total length of stay was 18 d (range 3-45) and 46 d (range 33-96), respectively. Patients with early reoperation (<10 d) had significantly decreased length of stay on the intensive care unit and operation time (P < 0.05). Global health status after a median time of 22 mo (range 6-66) was nearly identical, when compared with that of a healthy control group. Mean follow-up was 44.4 mo (±27.2). Four patients (36.6 %) died during the follow-up period; two patients from tumor recurrence, one patient from pneumonia, and one patient for unknown reasons. Treatment of pancreatic fistula by continuous irrigation and drainage of the preserved pancreatic remnant is a simple and feasible alternative to total pancreatectomy. This technique maintains a sufficient endocrine function and is associated with low mortality and reasonable quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. ENDOCRINE PANCREATIC FUNCTION IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    OpenAIRE

    P. V. Novokhatny

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Among the organs of internal secretion pancreas has a special place thanks to active exocrine function and a wide range of physiological actions of produced hormones. Violations of endocrine pancreas arises in 6.5-38 % of patients with acute pancreatitis. However, there is still no clear understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of hormonal dysfunction of the pancreas in acute pancreatitis, there is no uniform algorithms for its correction. Aim of the research was to study...

  14. Incidence, risk factors, and treatment of pancreatic leakage after pancreaticoduodenectomy: drainage versus resection of the pancreatic remnant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berge Henegouwen, M. I.; de Wit, L. T.; van Gulik, T. M.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic leakage is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy, with incidences varying between 6-24% and a mortality rate up to 40%. Treatment is an issue of controversy. In this study we analyzed risk factors for pancreatic leakage and the results of early

  15. Annually recurrent macroalgal blooms (Ulva prolifera) resulting in the world's largest green-tides caused by expansion of coastal aquaculture in the Yellow Sea off China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesing, John; Liu, Dongyan

    2013-04-01

    The largest macroalgal blooms ever recorded occurred in the Yellow Sea of China in 2008 and 2009 and resulted in extensive green tides along the Shandong Province coastline, including at Qingdao. At their peak these Ulva prolifera blooms covered more than 4,000 km2 and affected 40,000 km2. A smaller bloom was recorded in 2007, but not earlier. Since then massive blooms have occurred annually in summer from 2008 to 2012. Using remote sensing methods, we tracked the source of the 2008 and 2009 blooms to an area along the Jiangsu Province coastline near Yancheng, over 200 km south of Qingdao, where there had been rapid expansion of Porphyra aquaculture to as much as 13 km offshore, prior to the appearance of the first bloom in 2007. Porphyra is grown on rafts which can become heavily fouled with U. prolifera which is disposed of into the sea when the Porphyra is harvested. The timing of the blooms occurred post the April harvest period when daily tidal ranges in this region can be in excess of 7 m. This provides the mechanism for transportation of the floating algae offshore and into the warm nutrient rich waters of the Yellow Sea where it grows rapidly forming large patches. As the patches of algae grow and join, they gradually move north, as a result of wind driven surface currents that prevail in the Yellow Sea in summer, ultimately washing ashore on the Shandong Peninsula. We present a range of oceanographic, biological, ecological and genetic data to support the hypothesis that Porphyra aquaculture provides the source biomass for the Yellow Sea green-tides. Improved aquaculture waste disposal methods in the southern area of Jiangsu Province are likely to reduce or prevent the Yellow Sea green tides and present a feasible solution to a recurrent problem.

  16. Pancreatic Exocrine Function Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Berk, J. Edward

    1982-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and par...

  17. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: Evidence-Based Report on Diagnostic Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L.; Lee, Linda S.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Miller, Frank H.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Levy, Michael J.; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G.; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Philip P.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Vege, Santhi S.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed and evidence based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; S-survey, T-tomography, E-endoscopy and P-pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a non-invasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Futhermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (T-toxic, I-idiopathic, G-genetic, A- autoimmune, R-recurrent and O-obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria) and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multi-center research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves. PMID:25333398

  18. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: evidence-based report on diagnostic guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L; Lee, Linda S; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S; Miller, Frank H; Mortele, Koenraad J; Levy, Michael J; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Phillip P; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U; Forsmark, Christopher E; Vege, Santhi S

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed, and evidence-based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable, or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; survey, tomography, endoscopy, and pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a noninvasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false-positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Furthermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (toxic, idiopathic, genetic, autoimmune, recurrent, and obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria), and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multicenter research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves.

  19. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells and Their Niche: Current Therapeutic Implications and Challenges in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangang Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs have been identified as a subpopulation of stem-like cancer cells with the ability of self-renewal and differentiation in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. CSCs are thought to be responsible for cancer initiation, progression, metastasis, chemoresistance, and recurrence in pancreatic cancer. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs and discuss the mechanisms involved in resistance to chemotherapy, the interactions with the niche, and the potential role in cancer immunoediting. We propose that immunotherapy targeting pancreatic CSCs, in combination with targeting the niche components, may provide a novel treatment strategy to eradicate pancreatic CSCs and hence improve outcomes in pancreatic cancer.

  20. Factors That Affect Disease Progression After First Attack of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Swärd, Per; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about recurrence of pancreatitis after an initial episode, and little is known about how the disease progresses or what factors affect progression. We performed a population-based study of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) to determine their outcomes and associated factors. We performed a retrospective study of patients with first-time AP from 2003 through 2012 in a well-defined area of Sweden. Data were collected from medical records on disease etiology, severity (according to the Atlanta classification), recurrence of AP, subsequent chronic pancreatitis, and mortality. Patients were followed up for a median time of 4.6 years, until death or the end of 2013. We identified 1457 patients with first-time AP (48% biliary disease, 17% alcohol-associated, 9.9% severe); 23% of patients had 1 or more recurrences. Risk for recurrence was significantly higher among smokers (hazard ratio [HR], 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.95; P = .03), patients with alcohol-associated AP (HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.25-2.23; P chronic pancreatitis, although alcohol-associated AP progressed most frequently (2.8/100 patient-years). Patients with recurrent AP were at the highest risk for chronic pancreatitis (HR, 6.74; 95% CI, 4.02-11.3; P associated AP (HR, 3.10; 95% CI, 2.05-5.87; P associated only with organ failure (odds ratio, 71.17; 95% CI, 21.14-239.60; P chronic pancreatitis. Recurrence increases the risk for progression to chronic pancreatitis. Most patients who die upon disease recurrence have biliary AP. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Ultrasound-enhanced nanotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, N.; Nam, K.-H.; Christensen, D. A.; Kennedy, A. M.; Shea, J. E.; Scaife, C. L.

    2010-03-01

    The paper reports in vivo results of ultrasonic nanotherapy of orthotopically grown pancreatic cancer. Phase-shift paclitaxel (PTX) loaded perfluoropentane (PFP) nanoemusions combined with tumor-directed ultrasound have been used with a considerable success for tumor-targeted chemotherapy of gemcitabin (GEM)-refractory pancreatic cancer (PC). The GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer proved sensitive to treatment by a micellar PTX formulation Genexol PM (GEN) andor nanodroplet PTX formulation ndGEN. Due to increased permeability of tumor blood vessels, drug-loaded nanodroplets accumulated in the tumor via passive targeting, which was confirmed by ultrasound imaging. Nanodroplets converted into microbubbles in situ under the action of tumor-directed 1-MHz therapeutic ultrasound. The strongest therapeutic effect was observed for the combination therapy by PTX-loaded nanodroplets, GEM and ultrasound (ndGEN+GEM+ultrasound). This combination therapy resulted in a spectacular tumor regression and in some cases complete tumor resolution. Moreover, formation of metastases was dramatically decreased and ascitis generation was completely suppressed. However for all animal groups, local tumor recurrence was observed after the completion of the treatment indicating that some cancer cells survived the treatment. The recurrent tumors proved more resistant to the repeated therapy than initial tumors.

  2. Apoptosis: Targets in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalthoff Holger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by poor prognosis, because of late diagnosis and lack of response to chemo- and/or radiation therapies. Resistance to apoptosis mainly causes this insensitivity to conventional therapies. Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a central regulator of tissue homeostasis. Certain genetic disturbances of apoptotic signaling pathways have been found in carcinomas leading to tumor development and progression. In the past few years, the knowledge about the complex pathways of apoptosis has strongly increased and new therapeutic approaches based on this knowledge are being developed. This review will focus on the role of apoptotic proteins contributing to pancreatic cancer development and progression and will demonstrate possible targets to influence this deadly disease.

  3. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Affecting Residue Arg1 38 of Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase Cause a Progeroid Form of Autosomal-Dominant Cutis Laxa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Ganesh, Jaya; Tan, Yu Xuan; Al Bughaili, Mohammed; Lin, Angela E.; Sahai, Inderneel; Bahena, Paulina; Reichert, Sara L.; Loh, Abigail; Wright, Graham D.; Liu, Jaron; Rahikkala, Elisa; Pivnick, Eniko K.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Krüger, Ulrike; Zemojtel, Tomasz; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Mostafavi, Roya; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Symoens, Sofie; Pajunen, Leila; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Meierhofer, David; Robinson, Peter N.; Mundlos, Stefan; Villarroel, Camilo E.; Byers, Peter; Masri, Amira; Robertson, Stephen P.; Schwarze, Ulrike; Callewaert, Bert; Reversade, Bruno; Kornak, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Progeroid disorders overlapping with De Barsy syndrome (DBS) are collectively denoted as autosomal-recessive cutis laxa type 3 (ARCL3). They are caused by biallelic mutations in PYCR1 or ALDH18A1, encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), respectively,

  4. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-26

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  5. Surgical Success in Chronic Pancreatitis: Sequential Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography and Surgical Longitudinal Pancreatojejunostomy (Puestow Procedure).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kathryn; Paul, Anu; Harrison, Phillip; Davenport, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Chronic pancreatitis (CP) can be a cause of recurrent, severe, disabling abdominal pain in children. Surgery has been suggested as a useful therapy, although experience is limited and the results unpredictable. We reviewed our experience of a two-stage protocol-preliminary endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and duct stenting, and if symptoms resolved, definitive surgical decompression by longitudinal pancreatojejunostomy (LPJ) (Puestow operation). Patients and Methods This is a single-center, retrospective review of children with established CP who underwent an LPJ between February 2002 and September 2012. A questionnaire was completed (incorporating visual analog scale pain and lifestyle scores) to assess functional outcome. Data are expressed as median (range). Results In this study, eight (M:F ratio of 4:4) children underwent an LPJ and one female child had a more limited pancreatojejunostomy anastomosis following preliminary ERCP and stent placement where possible. Diagnoses included hereditary pancreatitis (n = 3), idiopathic or structural pancreatitis (n = 5), and duct stricture following radiotherapy (n = 1). Median duct diameter presurgery was 5 (4-11) mm. Endoscopic placement of a Zimmon pancreatic stent was possible in six with relief of symptoms in all. Median age at definitive surgery was 11 (range, 7-17) years with a median postoperative stay of 9 (range, 7-12) days and a follow-up of 6 (range, 0.5-12) years. All children reported markedly reduced episodes of pain postprocedure. One developed diabetes mellitus, while three had exocrine deficiency (fecal elastase Puestow operation was safe and complication-free with good medium-term relief of symptoms. We were not able to identify a consistent etiology-associated outcome. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Absceso recidivante por Nocardia asteroides en una paciente portadora de poliglobulia primaria Recurrent brain abscess caused by Nocardia asteroides in a patient with primary polycythaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Aboal

    2006-06-01

    aspiration and the beginning of an antimicrobial therapy are essential to the patient’s good evolution. This paper presents a patient with a primary polycythaemia and a recurrent brain abscess by Nocardia asteroides, probably of dental origin.

  7. Lysosome-Associated Membrane Proteins (LAMP Maintain Pancreatic Acinar Cell Homeostasis: LAMP-2–Deficient Mice Develop PancreatitisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Mareninova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated membrane proteins (LAMPs in pancreatitis. Methods: We analyzed changes in LAMPs in experimental models and human pancreatitis, and the underlying mechanisms: LAMP deglycosylation and degradation. LAMP cleavage by cathepsin B (CatB was analyzed by mass spectrometry. We used mice deficient in LAMP-2 to assess its role in pancreatitis. Results: Pancreatic levels of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 greatly decrease across various pancreatitis models and in human disease. Pancreatitis does not trigger the LAMPs’ bulk deglycosylation but induces their degradation via CatB-mediated cleavage of the LAMP molecule close to the boundary between luminal and transmembrane domains. LAMP-2 null mice spontaneously develop pancreatitis that begins with acinar cell vacuolization due to impaired autophagic flux, and progresses to severe pancreas damage characterized by trypsinogen activation, macrophage-driven inflammation, and acinar cell death. LAMP-2 deficiency causes a decrease in pancreatic digestive enzymes content, and stimulates the basal and inhibits cholecystokinin-induced amylase secretion by acinar cells. The effects of LAMP-2 knockout and acute cerulein pancreatitis overlap, which corroborates the pathogenic role of LAMP decrease in experimental pancreatitis models. Conclusions: The results indicate a critical role for LAMPs, particularly LAMP-2, in maintaining pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis and provide evidence that defective lysosomal function, resulting in impaired autophagy, leads to pancreatitis. Mice with LAMP-2 deficiency present a novel genetic model of human pancreatitis caused by lysosomal/autophagic dysfunction. Keywords: Amylase Secretion, Autophagy

  8. Impact of Clostridium difficile infection caused by the NAP1/RT027 strain on severity and recurrence during an outbreak and transition to endemicity in a Mexican tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla María Tamez-Torres

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and factors associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI due to ribotype 027 (RT027 and recurrence, including an outbreak period, with transition to endemicity. Methods: A case–control study was performed. Clinical and demographic data were collected for patients with CDI during the period January 2008 to December 2015. Ribotyping of the isolates and PCR for toxin A, B, and binary were performed. Results: Among 324 episodes of CDI, 27.7% were caused by RT027. Previous fluoroquinolone use (odds ratio (OR 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.01–3.17, previous gastrointestinal endoscopy (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.29–3.65, chemotherapy (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.19–0.95, and total enteral nutrition (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.18–0.97 were associated with RT027. Age >65 years (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.02–4.10, severe initial episode (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.60–6.15, previous proton pump inhibitor use (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.15–4.74, and continued fluoroquinolones (OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.11–8.51 were associated with recurrence. Among the non-RT027, 59.8% were not assigned by the ribotyping database and 50.7% presented binary toxin. Conclusions: In this population, CDI due to the RT027 strain was not associated with poorer outcomes. This study reinforces the importance of avoiding fluoroquinolones and PPIs to prevent recurrences. The presence of virulence factors among non-RT027 C. difficile strains underscores the importance of performing molecular epidemiology surveillance. Keywords: Clostridium difficile, Recurrence, Molecular epidemiology, Ribotyping

  9. Pancreatic fibrosis correlates with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T C K; van 't Hof, G; Kazemier, G; Hop, W C; Pek, C; van Toorenenbergen, A W; van Dekken, H; van Eijck, C H J

    2008-01-01

    Obstruction of the pancreatic duct can lead to pancreatic fibrosis. We investigated the correlation between the extent of pancreatic fibrosis and the postoperative exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. Fifty-five patients who were treated for pancreatic and periampullary carcinoma and 19 patients with chronic pancreatitis were evaluated. Exocrine pancreatic function was evaluated by fecal elastase-1 test, while endocrine pancreatic function was assessed by plasma glucose level. The extent of fibrosis, duct dilation and endocrine tissue loss was examined histopathologically. A strong correlation