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Sample records for recurrent herpes infections

  1. Clinical and biological differences between recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straus, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    The major features that distinguish recurrent herpes simplex virus infections from zoster are illustrated in this article by two case histories. The clinical and epidemiologic features that characterize recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections are reviewed. It is noted that herpesvirus infections are more common and severe in patients with cellular immune deficiency. Each virus evokes both humoral and cellular immune response in the course of primary infection. DNA hybridization studies with RNA probes labelled with sulfur-35 indicate that herpes simplex viruses persist within neurons, and that varicella-zoster virus is found in the satellite cells that encircle the neurons

  2. Genital herpes simplex virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, M S

    1979-09-01

    In recent years, a great increase in interest in genital herpes has been stimulated partly by the rising prevalence of this disease and partly by observations suggesting that genital herpes is a cause of cervical cancer. The clinical pictures produced by genital herpes simplex virus infections are similar in men and women. In contrast to recurrent attacks, initial episodes of infection are generally more extensive, last longer, and are more often associated with regional lymphadenopathy and systemic symptoms. Genital herpes in pregnancy may pose a serious threat to the newborn infant. Although the data suggesting genital herpes simplex virus infection is a cause of cervical cancer are quite extensive, the evidence is largely circumstantial. In spite of these more serious aspects of genital herpes simplex virus infection, episodes of genital herpes are almost always self-limited and benign. Frequent recurrences pose the major therapeutic and management problem. At present, there is no satisfactory treatment for recurrent genital herpes simplex virus in fection. Many of the suggested therapies, although some sound very promising, are potentially dangerous and should be used only under carefully controlled conditions.

  3. Recurrences after oral and genital herpes simplex virus infection. Influence of site of infection and viral type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, W E; Coombs, R W; Benedetti, J; Critchlow, C; Corey, L

    1987-06-04

    We prospectively followed 39 adults with concurrent primary herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection (12 with HSV type 1 and 27 with HSV type 2) of the oropharynx and genitalia, caused by the same virus in each person, to evaluate the influence of viral type (HSV-1 vs. HSV-2) and site of infection (oropharyngeal vs. genital) on the frequency of recurrence. The subsequent recurrence patterns of HSV infection differed markedly according to viral type and anatomical site. Oral-labial recurrences developed in 5 of 12 patients with HSV-1 and 1 of 27 patients with HSV-2 (P less than 0.001). Conversely, genital recurrences developed in 24 of 27 patients with HSV-2 and 3 of 12 patients with HSV-1 (P less than 0.01). The mean rate of subsequent genital recurrences (due to HSV-1 and HSV-2) was 0.23 per month, whereas the mean rate of oral-labial recurrences was only 0.04 per month (P less than 0.001). The mean monthly frequencies of recurrence were, in order, genital HSV-2 infections, 0.33 per month; oral-labial HSV-1 infections, 0.12 per month; genital HSV-1 infections, 0.020 per month; and oral HSV-2 infections, 0.001 per month (P less than 0.01 for each comparison). We conclude that the likelihood of reactivation of HSV infection differs between HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections and between the sacral and trigeminal anatomical sites. The sixfold more frequent clinical recurrence rate of genital HSV infections as compared with oral-labial HSV infections may account for the relatively rapid increase in the prevalence of clinically recognized genital herpes in recent years.

  4. Surgical excision for recurrent herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) anogenital infection in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinze, Folasade; Shaver, Aaron; Raffanti, Stephen

    2017-10-01

    Recurrent anogenital herpes simplex virus infections are common in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), of whom approximately 5% develop resistance to acyclovir. We present a case of a 49-year-old man with HIV who had an 8-year history of recurrent left inguinal herpes simplex virus type 2 ulcerations. He initially responded to oral acyclovir, but developed resistance to acyclovir and eventually foscarnet. The lesion progressed to a large hypertrophic mass that required surgical excision, which led to resolution without recurrences. Our case highlights the importance of surgical excision as a treatment option in refractory herpes simplex virus anogenital infections.

  5. Expression of IFN-Inducible Genes with Antiviral Function OAS1 and MX1 in Health and under Conditions of Recurrent Herpes Simplex Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaulov, A V; Shulzhenko, A E; Karsonova, A V

    2017-07-01

    We studied the expression of IFN-inducible genes OAS1 and Mx1 in lysates of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients suffering from recurrent Herpes simplex infections in comparison with healthy people. To induce the expression of the studied genes, blood mononuclears were incubated with recombinant IFN-α2b in concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 U/ml for 3 h and then the content of the studied transcripts was evaluated. Relative expression of OAS1 and Mx1 in patients with recurrent forms of Herpes simplex both during the acute stage and clinical remission did not differ significantly from that in healthy people after stimulation with IFN-α2b in a concentration of 1 U/ml and in higher concentrations (10 and 100 U/ml). It was concluded that intracellular signal transduction in IFN-α-activated cells in vitro was not disturbed in patients with recurrent forms of Herpes simplex infection. Thus, the reported phenomenon of IFN-signalling distortion by Herpes simplex virus proteins observed in experiments on model cell lines infected with Herpes simplex virus was not confirmed in our experiments on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Herpes simplex infection.

  6. Genital herpes simplex virus infections in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, G; Corey, L

    1984-02-01

    With the decline in prevalence of childhood-acquired oral-labial herpes simplex type 1 infections in some populations and the increasing incidence of genital herpes infections in adults, clinicians are more likely to see patients with severe primary, first-episode genital herpes infections. Complications of these primary infections may include aseptic meningitis and urine retention secondary to sacral radiculopathy or autonomic dysfunction. Presented are the clinical course of first-episode and recurrent infections, complications, diagnostic laboratory methods, and results of controlled clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of topical, intravenous, and oral preparations of acyclovir.

  7. Recurrent genital herpes treatments and their impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentjens, Mathijs H; Yeung-Yue, Kimberly A; Lee, Patricia C; Tyring, Stephen K

    2003-01-01

    Herpes genitalis is one of the most common viral sexually transmitted diseases in the world, with an estimated seroprevalence in the US of greater than 20%. Two viruses of the same family cause herpes genitalis: herpes simplex virus 1 and 2. After the resolution of primary infection, the virus persists in the nerve roots of the sacral plexus, often causing recurrent (though generally less severe) outbreaks. These outbreaks, as well as the infectious potential to the patient's sexual partners, results in significant psychological stress on the patient, and has a tremendous negative impact on QOL. Current treatment modalities may result in a reduction in the number of outbreaks and viral shedding, but no cure exists. Although studies have clearly demonstrated the negative impact of recurrent genital herpes on QOL, an assessment scale specific to herpes was not developed until recently. Earlier studies indicated that patients did not perceive a significant benefit from episodic treatment with antivirals, but studies using the Recurrent Genital Herpes Quality of Life Questionnaire (RGHQoL) have now demonstrated that suppressive antiviral therapy improves quality of life in patients with frequent recurrences of genital herpes. However, not all patients with recurrent genital herpes need suppressive therapy, and proposed factors to consider include frequency of recurrence, physical and psychological distress caused by recurrences, and the potential for transmission to the patient's sexual partner. Newer therapeutic modalities, including the topical immune response modifier resiquimod and herpes vaccines, may eventually be shown to further decrease the psychological morbidity of recurrent genital herpes.

  8. Genital herpes simplex virus infections: clinical manifestations, course, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, L; Adams, H G; Brown, Z A; Holmes, K K

    1983-06-01

    The clinical course and complications of 268 patients with first episodes and 362 with recurrent episodes of genital herpes infection were reviewed. Symptoms of genital herpes were more severe in women than in men. Primary first-episode genital herpes was accompanied by systemic symptoms (67%), local pain and itching (98%), dysuria (63%), and tender adenopathy (80%). Patients presented with several bilaterally distributed postular ulcerative lesions that lasted a mean of 19.0 days. Herpes simplex virus was isolated from the urethra, cervix, and pharynx of 82%, 88%, and 13% of women with first-episode primary genital herpes, and the urethra and pharynx of 28% and 7% of men. Complications included aseptic meningitis (8%), sacral autonomic nervous system dysfunction (2%), development of extragenital lesions (20%), and secondary yeast infections (11%). Recurrent episodes were characterized by small vesicular or ulcerative unilaterally distributed lesions that lasted a mean of 10.1 days. Systemic symptoms were uncommon and 25% of recurrent episodes were asymptomatic. The major concerns of patients were the frequency of recurrences and fear of transmitting infection to partners or infants.

  9. The negative association between a history of recurrent herpes labialis and cervical neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, M. P.; Wilterdink, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    We considered the possibility that herpetic recurrences and herpes virus associated neoplasia are mutually exclusive disorders because they are expressions of different herpes virus-host relationships. We assumed that the human body copes with orofacial and genital herpes infections in the same

  10. [TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC RECURRENT HERPES VIRUS INFECTION OF GENITAL LOCALIZATION: A CLINICAL STUDY OF FORTEPREN PREPARATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narovlyansky, A N; Sedov, A M; Pronin, A V; Shulzhenko, A E; Sanin, A V; Zuikova, I N; Schubelko, R V; Savchenko, A Yu; Parfenova, T M; Izmestieva, A V; Izmestieva, An V; Grigorieva, E A; Suprun, O V; Zubashev, I K; Kozlov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Selection of optimal dosage regimen, length of treatment course (frequency of administration), safety, tolerance and clinical effectiveness evaluation of the medical preparation fortepren in patients with chronical recurrent herpes virus infection of genital localization. The medical product of antiviral and immune modulating effect--fortepren (sodium polyprenyl phosphate) as a 4 mg/ml solution for injections combined with the base course of acyclic nucleoside acyclovir, 400 mg tablets, held studies. 40 male and female patients participated in the study. After a 10-day acyclovir course (400 mg x 3 times a day) for removing the acute phase, 4 groups of 10 individuals were formed: 1--5 ml (20 mg) of fortepren i/m once at day 13 ± 2 after the start of the study after the completion of the treatment of the acute phase of the disease; 2--5 ml (20 mg) fortepren i/m 3 times at an interval of 21 days; 3--2 ml (8 mg) fortepren i/m 3 times at an interval of 21 days; 4 (control)--5 ml of placebo i/m at remission stage 3 times at an interval of 21 days. Increase of the duration of inter-recurrence period, decrease of the severity of the recurrences, state of skin and mucous damage elements, improvements of immunologic parameters were considered during effectiveness evaluation. Significant differences in the frequency of recurrences of genital herpes were shown for 3 months of observation in experimental and control groups. A significant reduction of genital herpes recurrence frequency from 3.52 ± 0.09 (before treatment) to 2.89 ± 0.08 (after treatment) was noted in patients of group 3 (p genital herpes in the form of vesicle elements after treatment in groups 2 (p = 0.02) and 3 (p = 0.005) was found. Evaluation of local symptoms has established that burning have caused minimal discomfort for patients of groups 3 and 4 and itch and soreness--of groups 1 and 3. The least pronounced exacerbations were noted in patients of group 3. Intramuscular administration of fortepren

  11. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed. PMID:23320014

  12. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Alami Chentoufi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2 are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed.

  13. Isolation of herpes simplex virus from the genital tract during symptomatic recurrence on the buttocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkering, Katrina; Gardella, Carolyn; Selke, Stacy; Krantz, Elizabeth; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna

    2006-10-01

    To estimate the frequency of isolation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from the genital tract when recurrent herpes lesions were present on the buttocks. Data were extracted from a prospectively observed cohort attending a research clinic for genital herpes infections between 1975 and 2001. All patients with a documented herpes lesion on the buttocks, upper thigh or gluteal cleft ("buttock recurrence") and concomitant viral cultures from genital sites including the perianal region were eligible. We reviewed records of 237 subjects, 151 women and 86 men, with a total of 572 buttock recurrences. Of the 1,592 days with genital culture information during a buttock recurrence, participants had concurrent genital lesions on 311 (20%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 14-27%) of these days. Overall, HSV was isolated from the genital region on 12% (95% CI 8-17%) of days during a buttock recurrence. In the absence of genital lesions, HSV was isolated from the genital area on 7% (95% CI 4%-11%) of days during a buttock recurrence and, among women, from the vulvar or cervical sites on 1% of days. Viral shedding of herpes simplex virus from the genital area is a relatively common occurrence during a buttock recurrence of genital herpes, even without concurrent genital lesions, reflecting perhaps reactivation from concomitant regions of the sacral neural ganglia. Patients with buttock herpes recurrences should be instructed about the risk of genital shedding during such recurrences. II-2.

  14. Frequency of Herpes Zoster Recurrence in Central District of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jae Won; Lee, Jin Yong; Her, Young; Kim, Chul Woo; Kim, Sang Seok

    2017-10-01

    Herpes zoster is characterized by unilateral grouped vesicles along the distribution of a dermatome. A global recurrence rate as low as 0.5%∼6.2% has been reported for herpes zoster. The recurrence of herpes zoster is higher in immunocompromised patients and older patients. The purpose of this study is to assess the frequency of herpes zoster recurrence and factors that can influence its recurrence. From January 2005 to December 2015, 14,343 patients with herpes zoster were enrolled in this study. The patients were diagnosed at Hallym University Medical Centers and Kangwon National University Hospital in Seoul, Gyeonggi, and Gangwon. Herpes zoster recurrence and patient characteristics were surveyed by medical record review and a telephonic survey. The overall frequency of herpes zoster recurrence was 1.18%. The frequency of recurrence was higher in women than in men. It was also higher in patients aged 50∼70 years than in patients who were younger or older than this. Additionally, we assessed that the frequency of recurrence was statistically higher in patients with a compromised immune system and in patients who experienced longer lasting pain during their first episode. The frequency of herpes zoster recurrence is more common in women, older age, patient with longer pain duration and immunocompromised patients.

  15. DNA immunization against experimental genital herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, N; Stanberry, L R; Bernstein, D I; Lew, D

    1996-04-01

    A nucleic acid vaccine, expressing the gene encoding herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 glycoprotein D (gD2) under control of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early gene promoter, was used to immunize guinea pigs against genital HSV-2 infection. The vaccine elicited humoral immune responses comparable to those seen after HSV-2 infection. Immunized animals exhibited protection from primary genital HSV-2 disease with little or no development of vesicular skin lesions and significantly reduced HSV-2 replication in the genital tract. After recovery from primary infection, immunized guinea pigs experienced significantly fewer recurrences and had significantly less HSV-2 genomic DNA detected in the sacral dorsal root ganglia compared with control animals. Thus, immunization reduced the burden of latent infection resulting from intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, and a nucleic acid vaccine expressing the HSV-2 gD2 antigen protected guinea pigs against genital herpes, limiting primary infection and reducing the magnitude of latent infection and the frequency of recurrent disease.

  16. Comparison of indirect hemagglutination and 51Chromium release tests for detection of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 antibodies in patients with recurrent herpes infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavalu, L.; Seth, P.

    1980-01-01

    Indirect hemagglutination and 51 Cr release tests (IHAT and 51-CRT respectively) were compared in patients with recurrent herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections from whom HSV-1 or HSV-2 was isolated. Both tests were equally sensitive and specific in detecting HSV antibodies. However, IHAT was more specific in detecting homologous HSV antibody response in patients with recurrent HSV-2 infections. Past infections with HSV-1 in the patients with dual infections were detected by determining HSV-type specific antibodies by inhibition of IHAT. Cross absorption studies showed that the antibody reactivity measured by the two tests was qualitatively and quantitatively different. Nevertheless, IHAT has been found to be more appropriate test for seroepidemiologic studies of HSV-2 infections because of its specificity, rapidity and less cost, whereas, 51-CRT appears to measure antibodies against recent and more predominant type of infecting HSV. (Author)

  17. Psychosocial Treatment for Recurrent Genital Herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, David J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assigned 21 individuals with recurrent genital herpes to psychosocial intervention, social support, or waiting-list control conditions. Those receiving psychosocial intervention (herpes simplex virus information, relaxation training, stress management instructions, and an imagery technique) reported significantly greater reductions in herpes…

  18. CXCL10/CXCR3-Dependent Mobilization of Herpes Simplex Virus-Specific CD8+ TEM and CD8+ TRM Cells within Infected Tissues Allows Efficient Protection against Recurrent Herpesvirus Infection and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Chilukuri, Sravya; Syed, Sabrina A; Tran, Tien T; Furness, Julie; Bahraoui, Elmostafa; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2017-07-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes latency within the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG). HSV-specific memory CD8 + T cells play a critical role in preventing HSV-1 reactivation from TG and subsequent virus shedding in tears that trigger recurrent corneal herpetic disease. The CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10)/CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) chemokine pathway promotes T cell immunity to many viral pathogens, but its importance in CD8 + T cell immunity to recurrent herpes has been poorly elucidated. In this study, we determined how the CXCL10/CXCR3 pathway affects TG- and cornea-resident CD8 + T cell responses to recurrent ocular herpesvirus infection and disease using a well-established murine model in which HSV-1 reactivation was induced from latently infected TG by UV-B light. Following UV-B-induced HSV-1 reactivation, a significant increase in both the number and function of HSV-specific CXCR3 + CD8 + T cells was detected in TG and corneas of protected C57BL/6 (B6) mice, but not in TG and corneas of nonprotected CXCL10 -/- or CXCR3 -/- deficient mice. This increase was associated with a significant reduction in both virus shedding and recurrent corneal herpetic disease. Furthermore, delivery of exogenous CXCL10 chemokine in TG of CXCL10 -/- mice, using the neurotropic adeno-associated virus type 8 (AAV8) vector, boosted the number and function of effector memory CD8 + T cells (T EM ) and tissue-resident memory CD8 + T cells (T RM ), but not of central memory CD8 + T cells (T CM ), locally within TG, and improved protection against recurrent herpesvirus infection and disease in CXCL10 -/- deficient mice. These findings demonstrate that the CXCL10/CXCR3 chemokine pathway is critical in shaping CD8 + T cell immunity, locally within latently infected tissues, which protects against recurrent herpesvirus infection and disease. IMPORTANCE We determined how the CXCL10/CXCR3 pathway affects CD8 + T cell responses to recurrent ocular herpesvirus

  19. Genital herpes simplex virus infection: clinical course and attempted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L G; Keeney, R E

    1981-06-01

    The epidemiology, clinical course, diagnosis, and attempted treatments of herpes genitalis are reviewed. Herpes genitalis is an increasingly common sexually transmitted disease for which there is no effective treatment. It can occur in either sex and is mot commonly first found in patients 14 to 29 years old. Initial exposure to the virus may result in prolonged local symptoms (pain, itching, discharge) and signs (ulcerative lesions) as well as fever, malaise, myalgias, and fatigue. After the initial exposure, the virus may be found in a latent stage in the dorsal nerve root ganglia in the sacral area, and recurrences of disease may ensue. The frequency and clinical course of recurrent genital herpes can be of varying duration and severity. Although antiviral substances, immune potentiators, topical surfactants, and photodynamic inactivation have been used to treat genital herpes infections, there is no proven effective therapy.

  20. Cell-mediated immunity to herpes simplex in humans: lymphocyte cytotoxicity measured by 51Cr release from infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, A.S.; Percy, J.S.; Kovithavongs, T.

    1975-01-01

    We assessed cell-mediated immunity to herpes simplex virus type 1 antigen in patients suffering from recurrent cold sores and in a series of healthy controls. Paradoxically, all those subject to recurrent herpetic infections had, without exception, evidence of cell-mediated immunity to herpes antigens. This was demonstrated by lymphocyte transformation and specific 51 Cr release from infected human amnion cells after incubation with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Where performed, skin tests with herpes antigen were also positive. In addition, serum from these patients specifically sensitized herpes virus-infected cells to killing by nonimmune, control mononuclear cells. These tests were negative in the control patients except in a few cases, and it is suggested that these latter may be the asymptomatic herpes virus carriers previously recognized or that they may have experienced a genital infection. (U.S.)

  1. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infection by ultraviolet light: a human model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, J.J.; Mannix, M.L.; Rooney, J.F.; Notkins, A.L.; Straus, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus often results in a latent infection of local sensory ganglia and a disease characterized by periodic viral reactivation and mucocutaneous lesions. The factors that trigger reactivation in humans are still poorly defined. In our study, five patients with documented histories of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection on the buttocks or sacrum were exposed to three times their minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet light. Site-specific cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection occurred at 4.4 +/- 0.4 days after exposure to ultraviolet light in 8 of 13 attempts at reactivation. We conclude that ultraviolet light can reactivate herpes simplex virus under experimentally defined conditions. This model in humans should prove useful in evaluating the pathophysiology and prevention of viral reactivation

  2. Herpes simplex virus specific T cell response in a cohort with primary genital infection correlates inversely with frequency of subsequent recurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen-Röhl, Elisabeth; Schepis, Danika; Atterfelt, Fredrik; Franck, Kristina; Wikström, Arne; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke; Bergström, Tomas; Aurelius, Elisabeth; Kärre, Klas; Berg, Louise; Gaines, Hans

    2017-05-01

    During the last decades, a changing epidemiological pattern of genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection has emerged. Primary infection is now caused as often by HSV-1 as by HSV-2. Once established, HSV can be reactivated leading to recurrent mucocutaneous lesions as well as meningitis. Why some otherwise immune-competent individuals experience severe and frequent recurrences is not known, and the immunological mechanism underlying recurrent symptomatic HSV infection is not fully understood. In this study, we investigate and characterise the immune response of patients with first episode of HSV genital infection and its relation to the frequency of symptomatic recurrences. In this cohort study, clinical and immunological data were collected from 29 patients who were followed 1 year after presenting with a first episode of genital or meningeal HSV infection. They were classified by PCR and serology as those with primary HSV-1, primary HSV-2 and non-primary HSV-2 infection. HSV-specific interleukin(Il)-4 and Il-10 responses at first visit were higher in primary infected HSV-2 infected patients experiencing lower numbers of recurrences during subsequent year. The median number of recurrences following primary HSV-2 genital infection may partly be predicted by the strength of an early HSV-specific IL-4 and IL-10 response. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. [Recurrent herpes zoster with neuralgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwickert, Myriam; Saha, Joyonto

    2006-06-01

    We present the case of a 40-year-old female patient suffering from recurrent herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia. Herpes zoster has recurred several times per year for more than 15 years. At admission, rash localised on the right sacral region and accompanied by neuralgia had lasted for 3 months. Standard out-patient treatment remained unsuccessful. A multimodal integrative therapy regimen including fasting, hydrotherapy, leech application and treatment with autologous blood led to rapid healing of herpetic lesions and persistent pain relief. The case is discussed.

  4. Neonatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnest, G; de la Fuente Fonnest, I; Weber, Tom

    1997-01-01

    : All newborns with perinatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991 were identified from hospital-records. RESULTS: Of 862,298 deliveries 136 possible cases were found but only 30 (22%) fulfilled the criteria for neonatal herpes. The incidence increased from 2.36 to 4.56 per 100,000 live births during 1977...... herpes recurrence. Four infants had a serious infection in spite of Cesarean section. This study does not support a policy of Cesarean section in case of maternal recurrent herpes simplex infection at delivery.......BACKGROUND: To prevent neonatal herpes, women in labor with genital herpes infection are still delivered by Cesarean section. This policy is currently being debated. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal herpes in Denmark and to evaluate the prevention practice. METHODS...

  5. Neonatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnest, G; de la Fuente Fonnest, I; Weber, Tom

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent neonatal herpes, women in labor with genital herpes infection are still delivered by Cesarean section. This policy is currently being debated. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal herpes in Denmark and to evaluate the prevention practice. METHODS...... herpes recurrence. Four infants had a serious infection in spite of Cesarean section. This study does not support a policy of Cesarean section in case of maternal recurrent herpes simplex infection at delivery.......BACKGROUND: To prevent neonatal herpes, women in labor with genital herpes infection are still delivered by Cesarean section. This policy is currently being debated. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal herpes in Denmark and to evaluate the prevention practice. METHODS......: All newborns with perinatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991 were identified from hospital-records. RESULTS: Of 862,298 deliveries 136 possible cases were found but only 30 (22%) fulfilled the criteria for neonatal herpes. The incidence increased from 2.36 to 4.56 per 100,000 live births during 1977...

  6. Valaciclovir versus aciclovir in patient initiated treatment of recurrent genital herpes: A randomised, double blind clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Bodsworth; R.J. Crooks; S. Borelli; G. Vejlsgaard; J. Paavonen; A.M. Worm; N. Uexkull; J. Esmann; A. Strand; A.J. Ingamells; A. Gibb (A.); S.E. Barton (Simon); C. Beylot (C.); J. Bingham (J.); G. Bojs (G.); D. Cheetham (D.); E. Curless (E.); B. Czarnetzki (B.); S. Davies (S.); A. Eichmann (A.); B. Goh; D. Goldmeir (D.); G. Gross; U.F. Haustein; G. Kinghorn (G.); J. Lauharanta; C. Law; G. Luzzi (G.); A. McMillan (A.); J. Meaden (J.); U. Montemagno (U.); P. Morel; M. Negosanti; J.E. Nielsen (Jorgen); A. Nilsen; E-K. Ong; J.P. Ortonne; R. Patel; J. Patten; D. Petzold; T. Rufli; S. Saari; M. Shahmanesh; A. Simpanen (A.); J. Soltz-Szots; J.P. Stahl; E. Stolz (Ernst); I. Thelin; N. von Uexkull; A. Wikstrom; P. Woolley

    1997-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the efficacy and safety of twice daily valaciclovir with five times daily aciclovir in the treatment of an episode of recurrent genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in immunocompetent individuals. Methods: 739 patients with a history of recurrent genital HSV

  7. Genital herpes simplex.

    OpenAIRE

    Tummon, I. S.; Dudley, D. K.; Walters, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the herpes simplex virus. Following the initial infection the virus becomes latent in the sacral ganglia. Approximately 80% of patients are then subject to milder but unpredictable recurrences and may shed the virus even when they are asymptomatic. The disorder causes concern because genital herpes in the mother can result in rare but catastrophic neonatal infection and because of a possible association between genital herpes and canc...

  8. Effects of a traditional Chinese medicine, Longdanxiegan formula granule, on Toll-like receptor pathway in female guinea pigs with recurrent genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Lin; Deng, Yihui; Liu, Xiaodan; Zou, Zhixiang; Mi, Lan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Longdanxiegan formula granule (LDXGFG), a Chinese traditional medicine on Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway in recurrent genital herpes. An experimental recurrent genital herpes model was constructed using herpes guinea pig model. The effect of LDXGFG on expression levels of TLR pathway genes were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the dendritic cells and Langerhans cells were isolated and the TLR pathway genes of these cells were assayed after LDXGFG treatment. The result suggested two different expression patterns of TLR pathway genes in genital herpes and recurrent genital herpes, including upregulated genes and downregulated genes. TLR1, TLR4, TLR6, TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, and TLR10 showed a significant decrease while, TLR2, TLR3, and TLR5 increased in genital herpes and recurrent genital herpes guinea pigs. Meanwhile, the downregulated genes in genital herpes and recurrent genital herpes were stimulated by LDXGFG. By contrast, the upregulated genes decreased significantly after LDXGFG treatment. In both dendritic cells and Langerhans cells, the TLR pathway genes exhibited same pattern: the LDXGFG corrected the abnormal expression of TLR pathway genes. The present results suggest that LDXGFG is an alternative, inexpensive, and lasting-effect medicine for herpes simplex virus 2 infection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Laboratory diagnosis and epidemiology of herpes simplex 1 and 2 genital infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinšek Biškup, Urška; Uršič, Tina; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 are the main cause of genital ulcers worldwide. Although herpes simplex virus type 2 is the major cause of genital lesions, herpes simplex virus type 1 accounts for half of new cases in developed countries. Herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence rises with sexual activity from adolescence through adulthood. Slovenian data in a high-risk population shows 16% seroprevalence of HSV-2. HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA in genital swabs was detected in 19% and 20.7%, respectively. In most cases, genital herpes is asymptomatic. Primary genital infection with herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 can be manifested by a severe clinical picture, involving the vesicular skin and mucosal changes and ulcerative lesions of the vulva, vagina, and cervix in women and in the genital region in men. Direct methods of viral genome detection are recommended in the acute stage of primary and recurrent infections when manifest ulcers or lesions are evident. Serological testing is recommended as an aid in diagnosing genital herpes in patients with reinfection in atypical or already healed lesions. When herpes lesions are present, all sexual activities should be avoided to prevent transmission of infection. Antiviral drugs can reduce viral shedding and thus reduce the risk of sexual transmission of the virus.

  10. Recidiverende erythema multiforme udløst af herpes simplex-virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård Grejsen, Dorthe; Henningsen, Emil

    2012-01-01

    We describe two cases of recurrent erythema multiforme, both associated to infection with herpes simplex virus. The importance of subclinical herpes is illustrated. Antiviral and additional treatment is described.......We describe two cases of recurrent erythema multiforme, both associated to infection with herpes simplex virus. The importance of subclinical herpes is illustrated. Antiviral and additional treatment is described....

  11. Lack of evidence for intertypic recombinants in the pathogenesis of recurrent genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, K H; Boggs, D

    1986-01-01

    Clinical observations indicate that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is significantly less likely than herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) to establish latency in (or reactivate from) sacral ganglionic tissue. In an effort to identify viral functions associated with latency, we analyzed HSV-1 isolates from three patients with established recurrent genital herpes and sought evidence of DNA sequences and proteins similar to those found in HSV-2. By restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns and by DNA hybridization analysis using either whole HSV-2 DNA or several cloned segments of HSV-2 DNA as probes, we found that the three HSV-1 isolates from patients with recurrent genital herpes showed no unusual homology to HSV-2 as compared with other HSV-1 isolates. Similarly, the proteins of these isolates could not be distinguished from those of other HSV-1 isolates and were distinct from those of HSV-2. At this level of resolution, there was no evidence to suggest that these recurrent genital HSV-1 isolates were intertypic recombinants, nor did they show any other unusual similarity to HSV-2.

  12. Recurrent herpes labialis and HSV-1 herpes genitalis: which is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonte, Sergio; Sidoti, Francesca; Ribero, Simone; Dal Conte, Ivano; Curtoni, Antonio; Ciccarese, Giulia; Stroppiana, Elena; Stella, Maria L; Costa, Cristina; Cavallo, Rossana; Rebora, Alfredo; Drago, Francesco

    2017-02-08

    Recently, Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 seroprevalence declined among adolescents, rendering young people lacking HSV-1 antibodies more susceptible to genital HSV-1 acquisition, if sexually exposed. The aim of the present study was to identify the possible risk factors for the development of HSV-1 related herpes genitalis (HG). From January 2012 to December 2015, patients with HG attending three Sexually Transmitted Infections Units in Northern Italy were recruited. A genital swab on the lesions for the search of HSV-1/2 DNA through Real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a serum sample for HSV-1/2 specific serology were performed. Moreover, patients were asked whether they had personal history of herpes labialis (HL). Patients with PCR proved HSV-1 HG were included as cases; asymptomatic subjects attending STI Units for a blood check were recruited as controls and were checked for HSV-1/2 serology. 141 cases and 70 controls were enrolled. Specific HSV-1 antibodies were found in 34.7% of the cases and 67% of the controls. History of recurrent herpes labialis (RHL) was found in 4% of the cases and 31% of the controls. The occurrence of RHL in HSV-1 seropositive patients resulted lower in the case group compared to the control group. We can speculate about a protective role for RHL against the clinical appearance of HSV-1 HG. The clinical usefulness of our study involved especially the counseling in serodiscordant couples. The presence of HSV-1 antibodies in asymptomatic sexual partners does appear protective for HG manifestation only in presence of RHL history.

  13. Emergence of herpes simplex type 1 as the main cause of recurrent genital ulcerative disease in women in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, P V; O'Neill, H J; Wyatt, D E; McCaughey, C; Quah, S; McBride, M O

    2003-05-01

    Genital herpes is a common infection affecting some 20% of sexually active people. Although herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 can both establish genital latency, reactivation from the sacral ganglia favours HSV-2. Over the past decade the incidence of type 1 genital infection in women has greatly increased. To determine whether the increased prevalence of HSV-1 genital infection was benign or influencing the pattern of virus recovery in recurrent infection. A retrospective analysis of laboratory computer records was undertaken. Patients attending six genitourinary medicine (GUM) departments, over an 80 months period, were identified. Recurrent infection was confirmed where virus was recovered from at least two separate episodes of genital ulceration that were separated by an interval of 12 or more weeks. Episodes were further analysed for frequency, age, gender and virus type. Sixty nine patients with recurrent genital herpetic infection were identified. HSV-1 and HSV-2 were predominantly recovered from recurrent genital infections in females (34 HSV-1 vs. ten HSV-2) and males (one HSV-1 vs. 24 HSV-2), respectively (P>0.001). The mean age of females and males, at the initial diagnosis, was 26 and 39 years. There was no difference in the recurrence rate by type. HSV-1 has become the commonest cause of recurrent genital ulceration in Northern Ireland, almost entirely due its recent increased prevalence in women over the last decade. Women are experiencing genital herpetic infections at an earlier age than men.

  14. Refractory lymphedema of the hand: an unusual presentation of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Majdzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV infection of the hand resulting in lymphatic complications such as lymphangitis and lymphedema is exceedingly uncommon. Although these complications typically resolve in 21 days, they can be persistent and may not resolve even with antiviral use, thereby mimicking dyshidrotic eczema or a bacterial event and often being misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated as such. We report a case of frequently recurring HSV infection of the hand over a long period of time resulting in refractory lymphedema which did not resolve with antiviral treatment. We further endeavor to raise awareness about this highly unusual presentation of HSV infection. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted for similar cases using PubMed and Medline. Case Report: This is the first reported case with nearly a decade-long interval between the onset of primary HSV infection and the development of chronic lymphedema. Although valacyclovir significantly reduced the episodic aggravation of the lymphedema, it did not entirely resolve it. Similar cases of persistent lymphedema also included a long history of untreated and recurrent HSV infection of the hand, suggesting that this lymphatic outcome may be circumvented by prompt treatment with antivirals. Conclusion: This case report not only presents a highly uncommon lymphatic manifestation and unusual timeline of exacerbation of the very common HSV infection, but also highlights the importance and benefits of early initiation of antiviral therapy and the prevention of reactivation.

  15. Genital herpes simplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummon, I S; Dudley, D K; Walters, J H

    1981-07-01

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the herpes simplex virus. Following the initial infection the virus becomes latent in the sacral ganglia. Approximately 80% of patients are then subject to milder but unpredictable recurrences and may shed the virus even when they are asymptomatic. The disorder causes concern because genital herpes in the mother can result in rare but catastrophic neonatal infection and because of a possible association between genital herpes and cancer of the cervix. No effective treatment is as yet available. Weekly monitoring for virus by cervical culture from 32 weeks' gestation is recommended for women with a history of genital herpes and for those whose sexual partner has such a history.

  16. Nasal Immunization Confers High Avidity Neutralizing Antibody Response and Immunity to Primary and Recurrent Genital Herpes in Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Josefine; Zhang, Yuan; Olafsdottir, Thorunn A.; Thörn, Karolina; Cairns, Tina M.; Wegmann, Frank; Sattentau, Quentin J.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Harandi, Ali M.

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections in both the developing and developed world. Following infection, individuals experience life-long latency associated with sporadic ulcerative outbreaks. Despite many efforts, no vaccine has yet been licensed for human use. Herein, we demonstrated that nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 gD envelope protein mounts significant protection to primary infection as well as the establishment of latency and recurrent genital herpes in guinea pigs. Nasal immunization was shown to elicit specific T cell proliferative and IFN-γ responses as well as systemic and vaginal gD-specific IgG antibody (Ab) responses. Furthermore, systemic IgG Abs displayed potent HSV-2 neutralizing properties and high avidity. By employing a competitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis combined with a battery of known gD-specific neutralizing monoclonal Abs (MAbs), we showed that nasal immunization generated IgG Abs directed to two major discontinuous neutralizing epitopes of gD. These results highlight the potential of nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 envelope protein for induction of protective immunity to primary and recurrent genital herpes. PMID:28082979

  17. Nasal Immunization Confers High Avidity Neutralizing Antibody Response and Immunity to Primary and Recurrent Genital Herpes in Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Josefine; Zhang, Yuan; Olafsdottir, Thorunn A; Thörn, Karolina; Cairns, Tina M; Wegmann, Frank; Sattentau, Quentin J; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Harandi, Ali M

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections in both the developing and developed world. Following infection, individuals experience life-long latency associated with sporadic ulcerative outbreaks. Despite many efforts, no vaccine has yet been licensed for human use. Herein, we demonstrated that nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 gD envelope protein mounts significant protection to primary infection as well as the establishment of latency and recurrent genital herpes in guinea pigs. Nasal immunization was shown to elicit specific T cell proliferative and IFN-γ responses as well as systemic and vaginal gD-specific IgG antibody (Ab) responses. Furthermore, systemic IgG Abs displayed potent HSV-2 neutralizing properties and high avidity. By employing a competitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis combined with a battery of known gD-specific neutralizing monoclonal Abs (MAbs), we showed that nasal immunization generated IgG Abs directed to two major discontinuous neutralizing epitopes of gD. These results highlight the potential of nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 envelope protein for induction of protective immunity to primary and recurrent genital herpes.

  18. The genital herpes problem in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, B; Puccetti, C; Cervi, F

    2012-10-01

    Genital herpes is a common sexually transmitted infection. In reproductive age it involves the additional risk of vertical transmission to the neonate. Rates of transmission are affected by the viral type and whether the infection around delivery is primary or recurrent. Neonatal herpes is a rare but very severe complication of genital herpes infection and is caused by contact with infected genital secretions at the time of labor. Maternal acquisition of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the third trimester of pregnancy carries the highest risk of neonatal transmission. Prevention of neonatal herpes depends on preventing acquisition of genital HSV infection during late pregnancy and avoiding exposure of the infant to herpetic lesions during delivery. Uninfected woman should be counselled about the need of avoiding sexual contact during the third trimester. Elective caesarean section before the onset of labor is the choice mode of delivery for women with genital lesions or with prodromal symptoms near the term, even if it offers only a partial protection against neonatal infection. Antiviral suppressive therapy is used from 36 weeks of gestation until delivery in pregnant women with recurrences to prevent genital lesions at the time of labor so reducing the need of caesarean sections. Currently, routine maternal serologic screening is not yet recommended. Because most mothers of infants who acquire neonatal herpes lack histories of clinically evident genital herpes, researchers should focus on the recognition of asymptomatic primary genital HSV infections.

  19. Perineal herpes simplex infection in bedridden geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkels, Arjen F; Piérard, Gérald E

    2007-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) lesions are prone to reactivation and recurrence in response to various local or systemic triggering factors. To study the characteristics of five bedridden geriatric patients who presented with herpetic recurrences on the buttocks, gluteal cleft, and perianal region during hospitalization. Data were gathered regarding age, gender, reason for hospitalization, localization of lesions, clinical presentation, previous clinical diagnosis and topical treatments, immune status and immunosuppressant drug intake, as well as prior history of labial or genital herpes. A skin biopsy was taken for histologic examination and immunohistochemical viral identification. Viral culture and viral serology were performed and data regarding antiviral therapy were recorded. The five patients (three women, two men) were aged >80 years and hospitalized for either severe drug-induced renal insufficiency (one case), severe pneumonia (two cases), or stroke causing restricted mobility (two cases). Numerous well demarcated, painful ulcerations developed in the perianal region of these patients, and one patient also presented with some vesicular lesions. The lesions had been confused with mycotic and/or bacterial infections for 10-14 days. No inguinal lymphadenopathies were present and there was no fever. None of the patients had a previous history of recurrent labial or genital HSV infections or HIV infection. Histology was suggestive of HSV infection in two of five patients. Immunohistochemistry identified HSV type I (three patients) and HSV type II (two patients) infections. Viral culture with immunofluorescence viral identification revealed HSV type I in one of the four patients in whom a swab for viral culture was taken. Serology revealed past HSV infection. All lesions cured gradually after 10-14 days of intravenous acyclovir (aciclovir) treatment. Herpetic lesions of the perineal region represent a rare complication in bedridden geriatric patients in the absence

  20. Managing recurrent genital herpes with acyclovir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedi T

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy five patients of recurrent genital herpes (RGH treated with oral or topical acyclovir and placebo were compared and followed for periods ranging 4 to 8 years in a prospective study. Oral acyclovir definitely helps RGH patients; it shortens healing time; postpones recurrences and instills confidence in the patients. There is sufficient evidence that RGH dies a natural death with time as seen after 8 years follow up in placebo group patients. Topical use of acyclovir cream is not as useful as believed.

  1. A trivalent subunit antigen glycoprotein vaccine as immunotherapy for genital herpes in the guinea pig genital infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Sita; Hook, Lauren M; Shaw, Carolyn E; Friedman, Harvey M

    2017-12-02

    An estimated 417 million people worldwide ages 15 to 49 are infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), the most common cause of genital ulcer disease. Some individuals experience frequent recurrences of genital lesions, while others only have subclinical infection, yet all risk transmitting infection to their intimate partners. A vaccine was developed that prevents shingles, which is a recurrent infection caused by varicella-zoster virus (VZV), a closely related member of the Herpesviridae family. The success of the VZV vaccine has stimulated renewed interest in a therapeutic vaccine for genital herpes. We have been evaluating a trivalent subunit antigen vaccine for prevention of genital herpes. Here, we assess the trivalent vaccine as immunotherapy in guinea pigs that were previously infected intravaginally with HSV-2. The trivalent vaccine contains HSV-2 glycoproteins C, D, and E (gC2, gD2, gE2) subunit antigens administered with CpG and alum as adjuvants. We previously demonstrated that antibodies to gD2 neutralize the virus while antibodies to gC2 and gE2 block their immune evasion activities, including evading complement attack and inhibiting activities mediated by the IgG Fc domain, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that the trivalent vaccine significantly boosts ELISA titers and neutralizing antibody titers. The trivalent vaccine reduces the frequency of recurrent genital lesions and vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA by approximately 50% and almost totally eliminates vaginal shedding of replication-competent virus, suggesting that the trivalent vaccine is a worthy candidate for immunotherapy of genital herpes.

  2. Prevention and management of genital herpes simplex infection during pregnancy and delivery: Guidelines from the French College of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sénat, Marie-Victoire; Anselem, Olivia; Picone, Olivier; Renesme, Laurent; Sananès, Nicolas; Vauloup-Fellous, Christelle; Sellier, Yann; Laplace, Jean-Pierre; Sentilhes, Loïc

    2018-05-01

    Identify measures to diagnose, prevent, and treat genital herpes infection during pregnancy and childbirth as well as neonatal herpes infection. Bibliographic search from the Medline and Cochrane Library databases and review of international clinical practice guidelines. Genital herpes lesions are most often due to HSV-2 (LE2). The risk of HSV seroconversion during pregnancy is 1-5% (LE2). Genital herpes lesions during pregnancy in a woman with a history of genital herpes is a recurrence. In this situation, there is no need for virologic confirmation (Grade B). In pregnant women with genital lesions who report they have not previously had genital herpes, virological confirmation by PCR and identifying the specific IgG type is necessary (professional consensus). A first episode of genital herpes during pregnancy should be treated with aciclovir (200 mg 5 times daily) or valaciclovir (1000 mg twice daily) for 5-10 days (Grade C), and recurrent herpes during pregnancy with aciclovir (200 mg 5 times daily) or valaciclovir (500 mg twice daily) (Grade C). The risk of neonatal herpes is estimated at between 25% and 44% if a non primary and primary first genital herpes episode is ongoing at delivery (LE2) and 1% for a recurrence (LE3). Antiviral prophylaxis should be offered to women with either a first or recurrent episode of genital herpes during pregnancy from 36 weeks of gestation until delivery (Grade B). Routine prophylaxis is not recommended for women with a history of genital herpes but no recurrence during pregnancy (professional consensus). A cesarean delivery is recommended if a first episode of genital herpes is suspected (or confirmed) at the onset of labor (Grade B) or if it occured less than 6 weeks before delivery (professional consensus) or in the event of premature rupture of the membranes at term. When a recurrence of genital herpes is underway at the onset of labor, cesarean delivery is most likely to be considered when the membranes are

  3. Superior efficacy of helicase-primase inhibitor BAY 57-1293 for herpes infection and latency in the guinea pig model of human genital herpes disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Judith; Fischer, Ruediger; Eckenberg, Peter; Henninger, Kerstin; Ruebsamen-Waigmann, Helga; Kleymann, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    The efficacy of BAY 57-1293, a novel non-nucleosidic inhibitor of herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), bovine herpesvirus and pseudorabies virus, was studied in the guinea pig model of genital herpes in comparison with the licensed drug valaciclovir (Valtrex). Early therapy with BAY 57-1293 almost completely suppressed the symptoms of acute HSV-2 infection, and reduced virus shedding and viral load in the sacral dorsal root ganglia by up to three orders of magnitude, resulting in decreased latency and a greatly diminished frequency of subsequent recurrent episodes. In contrast, valaciclovir showed only moderate effects in this set of experiments. When treatment was initiated late during the course of disease after symptoms were apparent, that is, a setting closer to most clinical situations, the efficacy of therapy with BAY 57-1293 was even more pronounced. Compared with valaciclovir, BAY 57-1293 halved the time necessary for complete healing. Moreover, the onset of action was fast, so that only very few animals developed new lesions after treatment commenced. Finally, in a study addressing the treatment of recurrent disease in animals whose primary infection had remained untreated BAY 57-1293 was efficient in suppressing the episodes. In summary, superior potency and efficacy of BAY 57-1293 over standard treatment with valaciclovir was demonstrated in relevant animal models of human genital herpes disease in terms of abrogating an HSV infection, reducing latency and the frequency of subsequent recurrences. Furthermore, BAY 57-1293 shortens the time to healing even if initiation of therapy is delayed.

  4. Generating protective immunity against genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Haina; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2013-10-01

    Genital herpes is an incurable, chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Not only does genital herpes cause painful, recurrent symptoms, it is also a significant risk factor for the acquisition of other sexually transmitted infections such as HIV-1. Antiviral drugs are used to treat herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, but they cannot stop viral shedding and transmission. Thus, developing a vaccine that can prevent or clear infection will be crucial in limiting the spread of disease. In this review we outline recent studies that improve our understanding of host responses against HSV infection, discuss past clinical vaccine trials, and highlight new strategies for vaccine design against genital herpes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Update on congenital and neonatal herpes infections: infection due to cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero-Artigao, F

    2017-05-17

    Newborn infants are a population which is especially susceptible to viral infections that frequently affect the central nervous system. Herpes infections can be transmitted to the foetus and to the newborn infant, and give rise to severe clinical conditions with long-term sensory and cognitive deficits. Two thirds of newborn infants with encephalitis due to herpes simplex virus and half of the children with symptomatic congenital infection by cytomegalovirus develop sequelae, which results in high community health costs in the long term. Fortunately, the better knowledge about these infections gained in recent years together with the development of effective antiviral treatments have improved the patients' prognosis. Valganciclovir (32 mg/kg/day in two doses for six months) prevents the development of hypoacusis and improves the neurological prognosis in symptomatic congenital infection due to cytomegalovirus. Acyclovir (60 mg/kg/day in three doses for 2-3 weeks) prevents the development of severe forms in skin-eyes-mouth herpes disease, and lowers the rate of mortality and sequelae when the disease has disseminated and is located in the central nervous system.

  6. [Management of pregnant women with recurrent herpes. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists, Obstetricians (CNGOF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselem, O

    2017-12-01

    To provide guidelines for the management of woman with genital herpes during pregnancy or labor and with known history of genital herpes. MedLine and Cochrane Library databases search and review of the main foreign guidelines. Genital herpes ulceration during pregnancy in a woman with history of genital herpes correspond to a recurrence. In this situation, there is no need for virologic confirmation (Grade B). In case of recurrent herpes during pregnancy, antiviral therapy with acyclovir or valacyclovir can be administered but provide low efficiency on duration and severity of symptoms (Grade C). Antiviral treatment proposed is acyclovir (200mg 5 times daily) or valacyclovir (500mg twice daily) for 5 to 10 days (Grade C). Recurrent herpes is associated with a risk of neonatal herpes around 1% (LE3). Antiviral prophylaxis should be offered for women with recurrent genital herpes during pregnancy from 36 weeks of gestation and until delivery (Grade B). There is no evidence of the benefit of prophylaxis in case or recurrence only before the pregnancy. There is no recommendation for systematic prophylaxis for women with history of recurrent genital herpes and no recurrence during the pregnancy. At the onset of labor, virologic testing is indicated only in case of genital ulceration (Professional consensus). In case of recurrent genital herpes at the onset of labor, cesarean delivery will be all the more considered if the membranes are intact and/or in case of prematurity and/or in case of HIV positive woman and vaginal delivery will be all the more considered in case of prolonged rupture of membranes after 37 weeks of gestation in an HIV negative woman (Professional consensus). In case of recurrent genital herpes at the onset of labor and intact membranes, cesarean delivery should be considered. In case of recurrent genital herpes and prolonged rupture of membranes at term, the benefit of cesarean delivery is more questionable and vaginal delivery should be considered

  7. Unusual presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in a boxer: 'Boxing glove herpes'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Begoña; Galache-Osuna, Cristina; Coto-Segura, Pablo; Suárez-Casado, Héctor; Mallo-García, Susana; Jiménez, Jorge Santos-Juanes

    2013-02-01

    Herein, we describe a patient with lesions of cutaneous herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection over the knuckles of both hands in the context of an outbreak among boxers. Interestingly, the infection had an unusually long duration (4 weeks), and was not acquired directly through skin-to-skin contact, as it usually does among athletes (herpes gladiatorum). In our case, transmission was acquired through the use of shared boxing gloves contaminated by HSV-1. To the best of our knowledge, herpes gladiatorum, or wrestler's herpes, has not been described previously in boxers and infection over the knuckles is not commonly reported. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2011 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  8. Ocular herpes simplex virus: how are latency, reactivation, recurrent disease and therapy interrelated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dujaili, Lena J; Clerkin, Patrick P; Clement, Christian; McFerrin, Harris E; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Varnell, Emily D; Kaufman, Herbert E; Hill, James M

    2011-08-01

    Most humans are infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 in early childhood and remain latently infected throughout life. While most individuals have mild or no symptoms, some will develop destructive HSV keratitis. Ocular infection with HSV-1 and its associated sequelae account for the majority of corneal blindness in industrialized nations. Neuronal latency in the peripheral ganglia is established when transcription of the viral genome is repressed (silenced) except for the latency-associated transcripts and microRNAs. The functions of latency-associated transcripts have been investigated since 1987. Roles have been suggested relating to reactivation, establishment of latency, neuronal protection, antiapoptosis, apoptosis, virulence and asymptomatic shedding. Here, we review HSV-1 latent infections, reactivation, recurrent disease and antiviral therapies for the ocular HSV diseases.

  9. False-negative type-specific glycoprotein G antibody responses in STI clinic patients with recurrent HSV-1 or HSV-2 DNA positive genital herpes, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, Martijn S.; Roest, Wim; Hansen, Gino; Kwa, David; de Vries, Henry J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-discriminating antibody tests (glycoprotein G (gG) directed) are used to identify naïve persons and differentiate acute infections from recurrences. We studied test characteristics of three commercially available antibody tests in patients with recurrent (established

  10. Ocular herpes simplex virus: how are latency, reactivation, recurrent disease and therapy interrelated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dujaili, Lena J; Clerkin, Patrick P; Clement, Christian; McFerrin, Harris E; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Varnell, Emily D; Kaufman, Herbert E; Hill, James M

    2012-01-01

    Most humans are infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 in early childhood and remain latently infected throughout life. While most individuals have mild or no symptoms, some will develop destructive HSV keratitis. Ocular infection with HSV-1 and its associated sequelae account for the majority of corneal blindness in industrialized nations. Neuronal latency in the peripheral ganglia is established when transcription of the viral genome is repressed (silenced) except for the latency-associated transcripts and microRNAs. The functions of latency-associated transcripts have been investigated since 1987. Roles have been suggested relating to reactivation, establishment of latency, neuronal protection, antiapoptosis, apoptosis, virulence and asymptomatic shedding. Here, we review HSV-1 latent infections, reactivation, recurrent disease and antiviral therapies for the ocular HSV diseases. PMID:21861620

  11. Pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus infections of the cornea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Maertzdorf (Jeroen)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe identification of human herpes virus (HHV) infections can be traced back to ancient Greece where Herpes simplex vims (HSV) infections in humans were first documented. Hippocrates used the word "herpes", meaning to creep or crawl, to describe spreading skin lesions. Although the

  12. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection Mimicking Bullous Disease in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L.Y. Lecluse

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficient patients are at risk of developing extended or atypical herpes simplex virus infections, which can be easily misdiagnosed. We present the case of a 79-year-old, treatment-induced (oral corticosteroid, immunocompromised female with an extensive atypical herpes simplex virus infection. This patient presented with multiple erosions and vesicles on the trunk with a subacute onset. The clinical differential diagnosis was herpes simplex infection, herpes zoster infection, pemphigus vulgaris or bullous pemphigoid. Due to the atypical clinical presentation and negative Tzanck test, suspicion of viral infection was low. High-dose steroid treatment was initiated. Subsequent histopathology, however, showed a herpes simplex virus infection. After discontinuing steroid treatment and initiating antiviral treatment, the patient recovered within a week. Emphasis must be placed on the importance of clinical awareness of extended and clinically atypical herpes simplex infections in immunocompromised patients. A negative Tzanck test does not rule out the possibility of a herpes infection.

  13. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Clara; Whitley, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in diagnosis and treatment. Prior to antiviral therapy, 85% of patients with disseminated HSV disease and 50% of patients with central nervous system disease died within 1 year. The advent of antiviral therapy has dramatically improved the prognosis of neonatal HSV with initially vidarabine and subsequently acyclovir increasing the survival rate of infected neonates and improving long-term developmental outcomes. More recently, polymerase chain reaction has allowed earlier identification of HSV infection and provided a quantitative guide to treatment. Current advances in the treatment of neonatal HSV infections are looking toward the role of prolonged oral suppression therapy in reducing the incidence of recurrent disease. Of concern, however, are increasing reports of acyclovir-resistant HSV isolates in patients following prolonged therapy.

  14. Herpes Genitalis: Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbrei, A.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes genitalis is caused by the herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 and can manifest as primary or recurrent infection. It is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and due to associated physical and psychological morbidity it constitutes a considerable, often underestimated medical problem. In addition to providing the reader with basic knowledge of the pathogen and clinical presentation of herpes genitalis, this review article discusses important aspects of the laboratory diagnostics, antiviral therapy and prophylaxis. The article is aimed at all health-care workers managing patients with herpes genitalis and attempts to improve the often suboptimal counselling, targeted use of laboratory diagnostics, treatment and preventive measures provided to patients. PMID:28017972

  15. Herpes simplex virus type 2-associated recurrent aseptic (Mollaret's meningitis in genitourinary medicine clinic: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou-Foul AK

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad K Abou-Foul, Thajunisha M Buhary, Sedki L Gayed Department of Genitourinary Medicine, Royal Blackburn Hospital, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Blackburn, UK Introduction: Cases of idiopathic recurrent benign aseptic meningitis were first described by Mollaret. Today, herpes simplex virus (HSV is considered the cause of most cases of Mollaret's meningitis. Case report: A 40-year-old male was referred to our genitourinary medicine clinic with recurrent genital herpetic lesions. He had HSV-2-positive genital ulcers 8 years earlier. One year after the first infection, he developed severe recurrent attacks of headache associated with meningitis symptoms. The results of all radiological and biochemical tests were normal, but the patient reported a correlation between his attacks and genital herpes flare-ups. We diagnosed the patient with Mollaret's meningitis and started him on continuous suppressive acyclovir therapy, which resulted in marked clinical improvement. Discussion: Mollaret's meningitis is a rare form of idiopathic recurrent aseptic meningitis that has a sudden onset, short duration, and spontaneous remission with unpredictable recurrence. We believe that the presence of concurrent or recurrent mucocutaneous herpetic lesions can aid its diagnosis, prior to which, affected patients usually have many unnecessary investigations and treatments. Therefore, detailed sexual history should be sought in all patients with aseptic meningitis, and clinicians should also ask about history of recurrent headaches in all patients with recurrent herpetic anogenital lesions. Continuous suppressive acyclovir therapy may reduce the frequency and severity of attacks and can dramatically improve lifestyle. Keywords: HSV-2 virus, acyclovir, Mollaret's meningitis, recurrent aseptic meningitis, HSV-2 virus, viral meningitis, acyclovir

  16. Large Amounts of Reactivated Virus in Tears Precedes Recurrent Herpes Stromal Keratitis in Stressed Rabbits Latently Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, Guey-Chuen; Osorio, Nelson; Jiang, Xianzhi; Geertsema, Roger; Hsiang, Chinhui; Brown, Don; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent herpetic stromal keratitis (rHSK), due to an immune response to reactivation of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), can cause corneal blindness. The development of therapeutic interventions such as drugs and vaccines to decrease rHSK have been hampered by the lack of a small and reliable animal model in which rHSK occurs at a high frequency during HSV-1 latency. The aim of this study is to develop a rabbit model of rHSK in which stress from elevated temperatures increases the frequency of HSV-1 reactivations and rHSK. Rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 were subjected to elevated temperatures and the frequency of viral reactivations and rHSK were determined. In an experiment in which rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 were subjected to ill-defined stress as a result of failure of the vivarium air conditioning system, reactivation of HSV-1 occurred at over twice the normal frequency. In addition, 60% of eyes developed severe rHSK compared to tears of that eye and whenever this unusually large amount of reactivated virus was detected in tears, rHSK always appeared 4-5 days later. In subsequent experiments using well defined heat stress the reactivation frequency was similarly increased, but no eyes developed rHSK. The results reported here support the hypothesis that rHSK is associated not simply with elevated reactivation frequency, but rather with rare episodes of very high levels of reactivated virus in tears 4-5 days earlier.

  17. Cutaneous varicella zoster virus infection following zoster vaccination: report of post-vaccination herpes zoster skin infection and literature review of zoster vaccination efficacy and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiff, Katherine M; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-06-15

    BackgroundHerpes zoster vaccine is currently recommended in the United States for immune competent individuals ≥60 years. The efficacy of the herpes zoster vaccine decreases with age and with time following vaccination.PurposeAn elderly man with herpes zoster following vaccination is described. The guidelines for vaccination and issues regarding re-vaccination are reviewed. PubMed was used to search the following terms: efficacy, elderly, herpes zoster, herpes zoster incidence, herpes zoster recurrence, and vaccination. The papers and relevant citations were reviewed. The clinical features of a patient with post-vaccination herpes zoster skin infection are presented; in addition, vaccine efficacy and guidelines are reviewed.ResultsA 91-year-old man, vaccinated for herpes zoster 10 years earlier, presented with crusted erosions on his face corresponding to the area innervated by the ophthalmic division of the left trigeminal nerve. Evaluation using polymerase chain reaction confirmed the diagnosis of herpes zoster.ConclusionsHerpes zoster vaccine decreases in efficacy with both age and number of years following vaccination. Therefore, booster shots or revaccination in the older population may be of benefit.

  18. Herpes zoster infection of the face: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetharamiah Sunder Raj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV is a DNA virus and a member of the alpha herpes viridae family, causing both primary and recurrent infection. Herpes zoster (HZ, commonly called shingles, is a distinctive syndrome caused by reactivation of VZV. This reactivation occurs when immunity to VZV declines because of aging or immune-suppression. HZ can occur at any age but most commonly affects the elderly population. HZ may affect any sensory ganglia and its cutaneous nerve. Most of the infections affect dermatomes of T3 to L2, but approximately 13% of the patients present with infections involving any of the three branches of the trigeminal nerve. Prodromal symptoms include neuropathic pain, headache, malaise, and disrupted sleep. HZ causes pruritic, localized, vesicular rash which usually appears unilaterally in the distribution of one or more adjacent sensory nerves accompanied by neuropathic pain in the affected dermatome. This is a case report of HZ infection in a 55-year-old male patient who was managed with comprehensive medical treatment.

  19. The Changing Epidemiology of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection: The Associated Effects on the Incidence of Ocular Herpes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedi Kiasari, B.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 with a worldwide distribution has been reported in all human populations, resulting in a clinical spectrum of infections. Although HSV type 2 (HSV-2 is known as the most common cause of genital herpes, an increasing number of cases with genital herpes are caused by HSV-1. The present study aimed to discuss the changes in the epidemiology of HSV-1 infection including the decline in the general incidence of HSV-1 infection in childhood and the increased rate of genital herpes, caused by HSV-1. Moreover, changes in the epidemiology of ocular herpes, i.e., the reduced rate of primary ocular herpes in children and increased incidence of ocular HSV infection in adults, were discussed.

  20. Optimal management of genital herpes: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, genital herpes is a global medical problem with significant physical and psychological morbidity. Genital herpes is caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 and can manifest as primary and/or recurrent infection. This manuscript provides an overview about the fundamental knowledge on the virus, its epidemiology, and infection. Furthermore, the current possibilities of antiviral therapeutic interventions and laboratory diagnosis of genital herpes as well as the present situation and perspectives for the treatment by novel antivirals and prevention of disease by vaccination are presented. Since the medical management of patients with genital herpes simplex virus infection is often unsatisfactory, this review aims at all physicians and health professionals who are involved in the care of patients with genital herpes. The information provided would help to improve the counseling of affected patients and to optimize the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of this particular disease.

  1. [Herpes zoster infection with acute urinary retention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, G; Komoly, S; Juhász, E

    1990-03-11

    The history of a young female patient is presented. She developed urine retention of sudden onset as a complication of herpes zoster infection manifested in the sacral dermatomes. Symptomatic and antiviral treatments were introduced with full recovery of bladder function. The correct diagnosis of this rare and benign complication of herpes zoster infection can help to avoid unnecessary and invasive examinations.

  2. Sacral herpes-zoster infection presenting as sciatic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablin, J; Symon, Z; Mevorach, D

    1996-06-01

    Acute herpes-zoster infection is a painful dermatomal lesion that can be manifested by a wide array of neurologic symptoms. We present a 55-year-old female with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, who developed a left sciatic pain involving the S roots. Two weeks later, the patient developed fever and vesicular rash over the left gluteal area. Herpes-zoster infection was diagnosed and confirmed by the presence of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies against varicella-zoster. The pain and rash resolved, after treatment with acyclovir. In the appropriate clinical setting, sacral herpes-zoster infection ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of new-onset sciatic pain.

  3. On the Issue of Herpes Infection as an Actual Problem Nowadays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Borak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Among persistent intracellular agents, a group of herpesviruses occupies the leading place after the prevalence. The World Health Organization (WHO warns the international community of the danger of latent herpes infection pandemic. According to the WHO, 70 to 90 % of the world population is infected with one or more types of herpes virus, and in 50 % of them, due to the absence of stable immunity, disease relapses occur annually. The family of herpes viruses found in humans includes herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2, Zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes type 6, 7, 8. Thus, in the pathogenesis of herpes infection type 1 and 2, there are four main phases: the penetration of the epithelial cells → penetration into the nerve endings and paravertebral ganglia → elimination of the virus from tissues and organs → reactivation of herpes simplex virus and moving it to the port of infection. Herpetic and cytomegalovirus infection that belongs to the group of TORCH infections is the most common cause fetal infection, which can lead to the birth of a child with disabilities. Herpesvirus infections are considered as a group of infections associated with human immunodeficiency syndrome, and is a common cause of damage to the central nervous system and internal organs in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Almost all known now human herpesviruses can cause damage to the nervous system. In this regard, herpes infections have become one of the leading medical and social problems and acquire national importance.

  4. Transient urinary retention and chronic neuropathic pain associated with genital herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haanpää, Maija; Paavonen, Jorma

    2004-10-01

    Genital herpes (GH) causes genital ulcer disease, severe transient pain, and often paresthesias. Whether or not GH can cause urinary retention or chronic neuropathic pain is not well known. We present two immunocompetent patients with GH associated with neuropathic symptoms. We also review the literature on GH and associated neurologic problems. Patient 1 had primary herpes simplex virus (HSV)-2 infection with transient urinary retention and chronic bilateral neuropathic pain in the sacral area. Patient 2 had recurrent HSV-1 associated with unitaleral chronic neuropathic pain in the sacral area. Although transient urinary retention associated with GH is not uncommon, chronic neuropathic pain has not been reported previously. Our cases show that chronic neuropathic pain, that is "pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system," can follow genital HSV infection.

  5. [Ulcerating Herpes simplex infections in intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M; Wohlrab, J; Radke, J; Marsch, W C; Soukup, J

    2002-11-01

    Herpes simplex infections are potentially a life-threatening situation for immunocompromised as well as critically ill patients. The correct diagnosis is made more difficult in comatose patients by the fact that the characteristic symptom of extreme pain cannot be registered. The clinical dermatological findings (polycyclic configuration, easily bleeding ulcers) are thus especially important in patients under intensive care conditions. As examples, the cases of 3 critically ill patients (subarachnoid bleeding or head injury) developing therapy-resistant, flat sacral or perioral skin ulcers with peripheral blisters are presented. Herpes simplex virus was confirmed immunohistologically and in the smear test. All patients subsequently died. These cases emphasize that patients in the intensive care unit are in danger of developing a chronic persistent Herpes simplex infection due to latent immunosuppression. Chronic persistent Herpes infections may be underrated in intensive therapy, and must always be ruled out in case of therapy-resistant erosions or ulcerations.

  6. Activation of Herpes Simplex Infection after Tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begolli Gerqari, Antigona; Ferizi, Mybera; Kotori, Merita; Daka, Aferdita; Hapciu, Syzana; Begolli, Ilir; Begolli, Mirije; Gerqari, Idriz

    2018-04-01

    Tattooing is a procedure where ink is applied to an area of the skin, mostly intraepidermally (1). This procedure is carried out mainly for aesthetic purposes. Lately, it has been used as a corrective medical procedure following amputation of mammilla. The procedure is aggressive (2), and the fact that skin is punctured many times with the same needle which cannot be fully sterilized may cause infection of the treated area with bacterial, fungal, or viral agents that may lead to health consequences manifesting in the form of verrucae vulgaris, molluscum contagiosum, and herpes simplex. On the other hand, complications such as granulomas, allergic reactions, Koebner phenomenon, lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, lichen ruber planus, hepatitis C, and HIV infections should also be considered as potential consequences of tattooing (3-7). Even systemic reactions have been reported. Herein we describe a case of herpes infection activation after tattooing. Herein we present the case of a 46-year-old woman, employed in the medical sector, with a two-day history of herpes simplex in the labial area that manifested following application of a cosmetic tattoo meant to outline the lips (Figure 1). Two days after tattoo application, the vesicular lesions appeared along the area that was filled with ink, followed by sub-febrile temperature and fever and a subjective feeling of itching initially, followed by burning sensation and pain. The skin signs located on erythematous base were mainly grouped vesicles with sharply demarcated borders. Regional lymphatic nodes, mainly retro auricular, were enlarged. Within 48 hours, the patient was treated with acyclovir tablets in a dose of 800 mg three times a day and an antipyretic. Acyclovir ointment was administered during the first two days, as well as tetracycline ointment after the second day of the eruption. On the fifth day, we observed regression of the skin changes (Figure 2), and complete healing was achieved after one week. We

  7. Efficacy of N-methanocarbathymidine against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 shedding and infection in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, David I; Bravo, Fernando J; Pullum, Derek A; Shen, Hui; Wang, Mei; Rahman, Aquilur; Glazer, Robert I; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2015-02-01

    Current approved nucleoside therapies for genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are effective but improved therapies are needed for treatment of both acute and recurrent diseases. The effects of N-methanocarbathymidine were evaluated and compared to acyclovir using guinea pig models of acute and recurrent infection. For acute disease following intravaginal inoculation of 10(6 )pfu HSV-2 (MS strain), animals were treated intraperitoneally beginning 24 h post-infection, and the effects on disease severity, vaginal virus replication, subsequent recurrences, and latent virus loads were evaluated. For evaluation of recurrent infection, animals were treated for 21 days beginning 14 days after infection and disease recurrence and recurrent shedding were evaluated. Treatment of the acute disease with N-methanocarbathymidine significantly reduced the severity of acute disease and decreased acute vaginal virus shedding more effectively than acyclovir. Significantly, none of the animals developed visible disease in the high-dose N-methanocarbathymidine group and this was the only group in which the number of days with recurrent virus shedding was reduced. Treatment of recurrent disease was equivalent to acyclovir when acyclovir was continuously supplied in the drinking water. N-methanocarbathymidine was effective as therapy for acute and recurrent genital HSV-2 disease in the guinea pig models. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Neonatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnest, G; de la Fuente Fonnest, I; Weber, Tom

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent neonatal herpes, women in labor with genital herpes infection are still delivered by Cesarean section. This policy is currently being debated. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal herpes in Denmark and to evaluate the prevention practice. METHODS......: All newborns with perinatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991 were identified from hospital-records. RESULTS: Of 862,298 deliveries 136 possible cases were found but only 30 (22%) fulfilled the criteria for neonatal herpes. The incidence increased from 2.36 to 4.56 per 100,000 live births during 1977......-1984 through 1984-1991. Three mothers (10%) had recurrent herpes at delivery, three (10%) had primary herpes, and five (17%) had oral herpes. Seven infants (23%) were delivered by Cesarean section. Nine (30%) only had cutaneous herpes, four (13%) had CNS herpes, nine (30%) had disseminated disease. Six (20...

  9. A possible role for polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the defence against recrudescent herpes simplex virus infection in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, A.S.; Miller, C.

    1978-01-01

    A 51 Cr release assay has been used to demonstrate that human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) can damage herpes simplex infected target cells sensitized with antiviral antibody. Effective sensitizing antibodies were found in both serum and saliva of all those persons tested who were subject to recurrent cold sores. PMNL were much less effective as killer cells than peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but as they are the predominant inflammatory cell within the HSVl lesion they may be, quantitatively, more important. The cytotoxic effects of both PMNL and mononuclear cells were significantly reduced by prostaglandin El as well as by several drugs that were tested. It is suggested that antibody dependent PMNL-mediated cytotoxicity may play a role in the human host defences against recrudescent herpes simplex infection. (author)

  10. Genital Herpes: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Mary Jo

    2016-06-01

    Genital herpes is a common sexually transmitted disease, affecting more than 400 million persons worldwide. It is caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) and characterized by lifelong infection and periodic reactivation. A visible outbreak consists of single or clustered vesicles on the genitalia, perineum, buttocks, upper thighs, or perianal areas that ulcerate before resolving. Symptoms of primary infection may include malaise, fever, or localized adenopathy. Subsequent outbreaks, caused by reactivation of latent virus, are usually milder. Asymptomatic shedding of transmissible virus is common. Although HSV-1 and HSV-2 are indistinguishable visually, they exhibit differences in behavior that may affect management. Patients with HSV-2 have a higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Polymerase chain reaction assay is the preferred method of confirming HSV infection in patients with active lesions. Treatment of primary and subsequent outbreaks with nucleoside analogues is well tolerated and reduces duration, severity, and frequency of recurrences. In patients with HSV who are HIV-negative, treatment reduces transmission of HSV to uninfected partners. During pregnancy, antiviral prophylaxis with acyclovir is recommended from 36 weeks of gestation until delivery in women with a history of genital herpes. Elective cesarean delivery should be performed in laboring patients with active lesions to reduce the risk of neonatal herpes.

  11. Factors affecting the purpose suppressive antiviral therapy for patients with recurrent genital herpes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Коlova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the factors that influence the destination of suppressive antiviral therapy in patients with recurrent genital herpes doctors of different specialties.Material and Methods: The study was conducted based on an anonymous survey of professionals providing medical care to patients with genital herpes. The survey involved 67 experts – 44 dermatologist, 13 obstetricians and 10 urologists working in Skin and Venereal Diseases, Women’s consuitation post and Saint Petersburg clinics.Results: Most respondents indicated that among patients with genital herpes, seeking an appointment, dominated by patients with relapsing nature of the disease. Suppressive antiviral therapy is recommended 68,7% of specialists, including dermatologists 61,3%, 84,6% of obstetricians and gynecologists, and 80% of urologists. The main indications for its experts consider high frequency of relapses, the patient’s tendency to promiscuity, the desire of the patient with fewer relapses, and the emotional response of the patient for the presence of the disease. Do not prescribe suppressive therapy for recurrent genital herpes 31,4% of the doctors surveyed. Among the reasons for which are not appointed by the type of treatment, the patient is dominated by the rejection of this type of treatment, the lack of experience of the destination suppressive therapy, as well as the uncertainty of specialists in its effectiveness.Conclusion: Suppressive antiviral therapy is recommended 68,7% of specialists. Do not prescribe this type of treatment for recurrent genital herpes 31,4% of the doctors surveyed. The proportion of professionals who refuse the appointment of suppressive antiviral therapy, the highest among dermatologists (38,7% compared with 15,4% among obstetricians and 20% of urologists. The most frequent grounds for refusal from this type of treatment is the lack of confidence in its effectiveness. 

  12. Herpes Simplex Virus Infections of the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    This article summarizes knowledge of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of the central nervous system (CNS). Disease pathogenesis, detection of DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis and prognosis, and approaches to therapy warrant consideration. HSV infection of the CNS is one of few treatable viral diseases. Clinical trials indicate that outcome following neonatal herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections of the CNS is significantly improved when 6 months of suppressive oral acyclovir therapy follows IV antiviral therapy. In contrast, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections of the brain do not benefit from extended oral antiviral therapy. This implies a difference in disease pathogenesis between HSV-2 and HSV-1 infections of the brain. PCR detection of viral DNA in the CSF is the gold standard for diagnosis. Use of PCR is now being adopted as a basis for determining the duration of therapy in the newborn. HSV infections are among the most common encountered by humans; seropositivity occurs in 50% to 90% of adult populations. Herpes simplex encephalitis, however, is an uncommon result of this infection. Since no new antiviral drugs have been introduced in nearly 3 decades, much effort has focused on learning how to better use acyclovir and how to use existing databases to establish earlier diagnosis.

  13. Recurrent herpes simplex virus keratitis in a young Nigerian male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comprehensive case history and slit lamp examination revealed the presence of dendritic ulcer in the left eye of the patient. The patient was diagnosed with recurrent herpes simplex virus keratitis. An aggressive multi-treatment plan involving the use of antiviral, antibiotics, and anti inflammatory drugs was administered to ...

  14. The biology of herpes simplex virus infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baringer, J R

    1976-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is a frequent cause of recurrent ocular, oral, genital or cutaneous eruptions in man. Lesions are highly localized and tend to recur at the same site. Among the most consistent factors provoking recurrence is root section of the trigeminal nerve. Clinical and experimental data suggest that herpes simplex virus is commonly resident within the trigeminal ganglia of man, where it may be responsible for recurrent oral or lip lesions, and is less frequently a resident of the second or third sacral ganglia where it might be responsible for genital eruptions. Generally, the trigeminal virus is type 1 and the sacral virus is type 2; the virus is only rarely recoverable from other sensory ganglia. Factors provoking the reactivation from the virus' latent site and the mechanism for reactivation remain largely unknown. Further study is needed to understand the behavior of HSV and other viruses in nervous system tissue.

  15. 2017 European guidelines for the management of genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajul; Kennedy, Oliver J; Clarke, Emily; Geretti, Anna; Nilsen, Arvid; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Green, John; Donders, Gilbert; van der Meijden, Willem; Gomberg, Mikhail; Moi, Harald; Foley, Elizabeth

    2017-12-01

    Genital herpes is one of the commonest sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Using the best available evidence, this guideline recommends strategies for diagnosis, management, and follow-up of the condition as well as for minimising transmission. Early recognition and initiation of therapy is key and may reduce the duration of illness or avoid hospitalisation with complications, including urinary retention, meningism, or severe systemic illness. The guideline covers a range of common clinical scenarios, such as recurrent genital herpes, infection during pregnancy, and co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

  16. RECURRENT CROUP IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Piskunova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of examination of 1849 children, entering children's infectioushospitalofVladivostokwith the clinical picture of croup of viral etiology. The clinical features of primary and recurrent croup are described. Frequency of recurrent croup inVladivostokis 8%. Children with a recurrent croup had the burdened premorbid background, and also persistent herpetic infections (cytomegalic infection in 42,9% cases, cytomegalic infection in combination with the herpes simplex virus -1. Frequency of croups substantially rose in the period of epidemic of influenza.

  17. Urinary retention associated with herpes zoster infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L M; Fowler, J F; Owen, L G; Callen, J P

    1993-01-01

    Herpes zoster infection particularly involving the sacral dermatomes has been associated with bladder and bowel dysfunction, most commonly urinary retention. We report two patients who developed acute urinary retention, one of whom also had constipation, within days of herpes zoster skin lesions of the S2-S4 dermatomes. Herpes zoster is a reversible cause of neurogenic bladder and bowel dysfunction and should be considered in a patient that presents with acute urinary retention and/or constipation. Sensory abnormalities and flaccid detrusor paralysis are most likely involved in the pathogenesis.

  18. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection: epidemiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) are highly prevalent viruses capable of establishing lifelong infection. Genital herpes in women of childbearing age represents a major risk for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HSV infection, with primary and first-episode genital HSV infections posing the highest risk. The advent of antiviral therapy with parenteral acyclovir has led to significant improvement in neonatal HSV disease mortality. Further studies are needed to improve the clinician's ability to identify infants at increased risk for HSV infection and prevent MTCT, and to develop novel antiviral agents with increased efficacy in infants with HSV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Herpes simplex ulcerative esophagitis in healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman A; Fagih, Mosa A

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is a common cause of ulcerative esophagitis in the immunocompromised or debilitated host. Despite a high prevalence of primary and recurrent Herpes simplex virus infection in the general population, Herpes simplex virus esophagitis (HSVE) appears to be rare in the immunocompetent host. We report three cases of endoscopically-diagnosed HSVE in apparently immunocompetent children; the presentation was characterized by acute onset of fever, odynophagia, and dysphagia. In two cases, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically by identification of herpes viral inclusions and culture of the virus in the presence of inflammation. The third case was considered to have probable HSVE based on the presence of typical cold sore on his lip, typical endoscopic finding, histopathological evidence of inflammation in esophageal biopsies and positive serologic evidence of acute Herpes simplex virus infection. Two cases received an intravenous course of acyclovir and one had self-limited recovery. All three cases had normal immunological workup and excellent health on long-term follow-up.

  20. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of Herpes simplex virus type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    momtaz

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is the main cause of recurrent genital infection (Slomka, 1996). Most infections are asymptomatic. The virus establishes latent infection in the local ganglia and is reactivated and shed frequently. Antibodies to HSV infections become detectable in serum samples (Koelle ...

  1. FEATURES OF CYTOKINE PRODUCTION IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT HERPETIC INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Novikovа

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Cytokines play an important role in resistance to herpesvirus infections. Therefore, studies of cytokine profile are necessary in recurrent herpetic infection. However, functional studies of cytokine network upon remission of the disease yielded controversial results. In this paper, we provide some results concerning comprehensive evaluation of ex vivo cytokine production by whole blood leukocytes drawn from 15 patients observed during clinical remission of recurrent Herpes Simplex virus infection. We have found a decrease of IL-1β, IL-8 and IL-10 production, as well as imbalance of cytokine profile, with predominance of IFNγ and IL-8 synthesis over IL-10 production, along with increased IL-4 and IL-13 levels to IL-1β contents. Differently directed correlations between the content of activated lymphocytes (CD3+HLA-DR+ and CD3+CD4+CD25+, natural killers (СD3-СD16/56+, NKT-cells and cytokine production levels were found in the groups of patients and healthy individuals. These differences may be due to shifts in major cytokineproducing populations in herpesvirus infections.

  2. Sacral myeloradiculitis complicating genital herpes in a HIV-infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, I; Quereda, C; Navas, E; Pérez-Elias, M J; Jover, F; Moreno, S

    2005-02-01

    Myeloradiculitis is a rare neurological complication of herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2) infection, frequently associated with a fatal outcome. Among patients with HIV infection, HSV-2 myeloradiculitis has occasionally been reported, always associated with advanced immunosuppression and AIDS. We report a patient with HIV infection but no history of previous opportunistic infections, who developed sacral myeloradiculitis immediately after an episode of genital herpes. Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium showed necrotizing myelitis in the conus medullaris and enhancement of sacral roots. CD4 lymphocyte count was 530/mm3. Other possible causes of myeloradiculitis in HIV-infected patients were appropriately excluded. Acyclovir therapy resulted in partial clinical improvement. This report shows that myeloradiculitis as a complication of genital herpes may occur in the early stages of HIV infection and may have a favourable outcome with antiviral treatment.

  3. Herpes Simplex Vaccines: Prospects of Live-attenuated HSV Vaccines to Combat Genital and Ocular infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfield, Brent; Kousoulas, Konstantin Gus

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and its closely related type-2 (HSV-2) viruses cause important clinical manifestations in humans including acute ocular disease and genital infections. These viruses establish latency in the trigeminal ganglionic and dorsal root neurons, respectively. Both viruses are widespread among humans and can frequently reactivate from latency causing disease. Currently, there are no vaccines available against herpes simplex viral infections. However, a number of promising vaccine approaches are being explored in pre-clinical investigations with few progressing to early phase clinical trials. Consensus research findings suggest that robust humoral and cellular immune responses may partially control the frequency of reactivation episodes and reduce clinical symptoms. Live-attenuated viral vaccines have long been considered as a viable option for generating robust and protective immune responses against viral pathogens. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the same alphaherpesvirus subfamily with herpes simplex viruses. A live-attenuated VZV vaccine has been extensively used in a prophylactic and therapeutic approach to combat primary and recurrent VZV infection indicating that a similar vaccine approach may be feasible for HSVs. In this review, we summarize pre-clinical approaches to HSV vaccine development and current efforts to test certain vaccine approaches in human clinical trials. Also, we discuss the potential advantages of using a safe, live-attenuated HSV-1 vaccine strain to protect against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections. PMID:27114893

  4. The Laboratory Diagnosis of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameeta Singh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2 cause genital herpes infections and are the most common cause of genital ulcer disease in industrialized nations. Although these infections are very common, the majority of them remain underdiagnosed because they are asymptomatic or unrecognized. A clinical diagnosis of genital herpes should always be confirmed by laboratory testing; this can be accomplished through the use of direct tests for viral isolation, the detection of antigen or, more recently, the detection of HSV DNA using molecular diagnostic techniques. Testing for serotypes is recommended because of the different prognostic and counselling implications. Type-specific HSV serology is becoming more readily available and will enhance the ability to make the diagnosis and guide clinical management in select patients.

  5. Urinary retention due to herpes virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, T; Yasuda, K; Sakakibara, R; Hattori, T; Uchiyama, T; Minamide, M; Ito, H

    1998-01-01

    Urinary retention is uncommon in patients with herpes zoster and anogenital herpes simplex. Seven patients (four men, three women) with a mean age of 68.1 years (range, 35-84) with urinary retention due to herpes zoster (n = 6) or anogenital herpes simplex (n = 1) were studied. Six patients had unilateral skin eruption in the saddle area (S2-4 dermatome) and one patient with herpes zoster had a skin lesion in the L4-5 dermatome. All patients had detrusor areflexia without bladder sensation, and two of them had inactive external sphincter on electromyography at presentation. Clean intermittent catheterization was performed, and voiding function was recovered in 4-6 weeks (average, 5.4) in all patients. Urodynamic study was repeated after recovery of micturition in three patients, and they returned to normal on cystometrography and external sphincter electromyography. Acute urinary retention associated with anogenital herpes infection has been thought to occur when the meninges or sacral spinal ganglia were involved, and, in conclusion, this condition may be considered to be reversible.

  6. Laryngopharyngeal reflux and herpes simplex virus type 2 are possible risk factors for adult-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (prospective case-control study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formánek, M; Jančatová, D; Komínek, P; Matoušek, P; Zeleník, K

    2017-06-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). Although HPV prevalence is high, the incidence of papillomatosis is low. Thus, factors other than HPV infection probably contribute to RRP. This study investigated whether patients with papillomatosis are more often infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 and chlamydia trachomatis (ChT) and whether laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) occurs in this group of patients more often. Prospective case-control study. Department of Otorhinolaryngology of University Hospital. The study included 20 patients with adult-onset RRP and 20 adult patients with vocal cord cyst and no pathology of laryngeal mucosa (control group). Immunohistochemical analysis of pepsin, HPV, herpes simplex virus type 2 and ChT was performed in biopsy specimens of laryngeal papillomas and of healthy laryngeal mucosa (control group) obtained from medial part of removed vocal cord cyst during microlaryngoscopy procedures. Pathologic LPR (pepsin in tissue) was diagnosed in 8/20 (40.0%) patients with papillomatosis and in 0/20 control patients (P = .003). Herpes simplex virus type 2 was present in 9/20 (45.0%) patients with papillomatosis and in 0/20 control patients (P = .001). Five specimens were positive for both pepsin and herpes simplex virus type 2. No samples were positive for ChT. There were no significant differences between groups for age, body mass index, diabetes mellitus and gastrooesophageal reflux disease. Tobacco exposure was not more frequent in RRP group either (P = .01). Results show that LPR and herpes simplex virus type 2 are significantly more often present in patients with RRP. LPR and herpes simplex virus type 2 might activate latent HPV infection and thereby be possible risk factors for RRP. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. False-negative type-specific glycoprotein G antibody responses in STI clinic patients with recurrent HSV-1 or HSV-2 DNA positive genital herpes, The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooijen, Martijn S; Roest, Wim; Hansen, Gino; Kwa, David; de Vries, Henry J C

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-discriminating antibody tests (glycoprotein G (gG) directed) are used to identify naïve persons and differentiate acute infections from recurrences. We studied test characteristics of three commercially available antibody tests in patients with recurrent (established by viral PCR tests) herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital herpes episodes. Serum samples (at minimum 3 months after t=0) were examined for the presence of gG-1-specific or gG-2-specific antibodies using the HerpeSelect 1 and 2 Immunoblot IgG, the HerpeSelect 1 and 2 enzyme linked immunoassays IgG and the LIAISON HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgG indirect chemiluminescence immunoassays. The immunoblot was HSV-1 positive in 70.6% (95% CI 44.0% to 89.7%), the LIAISON in 88.2% (95% CI 63.5% to 98.5%) and the ELISA in 82.4% (95% CI 56.6% to 96.2%) of the 17 patients with a recurrent HSV-1 episode. From 33 patients with a recurrent HSV-2 episode, the immunoblot was HSV-2 positive in 84.8% (95% CI 68.1% to 94.9%), the LIAISON in 69.7% (95% CI 51.3% to 84.4%) and the ELISA in 84.8% (95% CI 68.1% to 94.9%). Among 15/17 (88.2%; 95% CI 63.5% to 98.5%) patients with HSV-1 and 30/33 (90.1%; 95% CI 75.7% to 98.1%) patients with HSV-2, HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibodies, respectively, were detected in at least one of the three antibody tests. Commercial type-specific gG HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibody assays were false negative in 12-30% of patients with recurrent HSV-1 or HSV-2 DNA positive genital lesions. The clinical and epidemiological use of type-specific HSV serology can be hampered by false-negative results, especially if based on a single test. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. [Herpes simplex virus infections, an update for the practitioner].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, Pascal

    2011-04-27

    The herpesviruses HSV-1 and -2 classically infect the oral and genital area respectively. They descend from a common ancestor but have evolved separately since several million years, getting each adapted to these areas. Thus, while both can infect either site, HSV-1 reactivates often orally, while HSV-2 does so in the genital area. The followings facts are stressed, because we think they are new, or worth attention regarding HSV epidemiology (plateauing of the HSV-2 epidemic in the US, growing share of HSV-1 as a genital herpes agent), clinical expression (extra-oral and extra-genital lesions, severity of gingivostomatitis), diagnosis (confusing herpes and zoster in the trigeminal and sacral areas) and treatment (relative worth of suppressive and episodic treatments of genital herpes, as well as shortening of these latter, and treatment of gingivostomatitis and herpes labialis).

  9. [Characteristics and role of the gluteal herpes in a female population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M; Saavedra, T; Briones, H

    1989-01-01

    Based on the fact that the gluteal herpes may constitute the clinical expression of the reactivation of a Herpes simplex virus latent at the sacral lymph node, we investigated a group of women who were carriers of gluteal herpetic infection, the characteristics of the infection, the virus type principally associated to it, and its possible relation with the genital herpes. Forty one women with gluteal herpes verified by virologic laboratory were studied. 75.7% of these women had had in addition to this herpetic infection in other places, mainly genital, with an average of 7.2 of recurrent episodes per year, (range: 1 to 18 episodes yearly). 78% of the isolated virus was typified as HSV-2 by the use of monoclonal antibodies. It is stand out the importance of considering the background of gluteal herpes as causative of classification of herpetic high risk.

  10. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF THE HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS INFECTION

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    Ljiljana Kostadinović

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Over 150 sorts of viruses are capable of causing diseases of the respiratory ways. The virus infections have become the cost to be paid for urbanization and industrialization. The acute virus infections jeopardize mankind by their complications with numerous consequences. They open up the way to super infections, they provoke endogenous infections and lead to insufficiency of the vital organs. The viruses penetrate the organism mainly through the respiratory ways, digestive and urinary-sexual organs and skin. Some viruses immediately at the place of their entrance into the organism find receptive cells in which they can multiply (herpes virus and etc.. Some viruses must get through the blood, through the lymph or the nerve fibers to the target organs that they have affinity for.The changes that primarily occur in the mouth with manifest lymphadenopathy of the surrounding area emerge with respect to the type of the acute infection dis-ease.The human herpes viruses are responsible for a great number of diseases in people; that is why it can be said that the infections they induce are a very frequent cause of people's diseases in the world. Man is natural and the only host for the types I and II of the herpes simplex virus (HSV; that is why the infected person is regarded as the source of infection. The infection transmission can be by direct contact or over the contaminated secretions during the sexual intercourse. The age and the socioeconomic status (living conditions, level of medical culture, habits, etc. affect to agreat extent epidemiology of the HSV infection. The HSV distribution in the region of Niš in the five-year period (from 1987 to 1992 was the highest in the early and late summer (June and September.

  11. Diagnosis and management of recurrent herpetiform stomatitis and Behçet syndrome like recurrent aphthous stomatitis herpetiform type

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    Endah Ayu Tri Wulandari

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS is a common inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa. The aetiology of RAS remains unclear, yet there are several predisposing factors which could be involved in the onset of the lesion. The herpetiform type of RAS appeared to be similar to recurrent oral Herpes Simplex infection and also could be part of Behçet Syndrome. This case report discussed a patient suffering from a herpetiform type of RAS with its clinical appearance resembling recurrent oral Herpes Simplex infection and Behçet syndrome. Initial treatment was undertaken based on the empirical treatment, yet the respond was not satisfactory. Then, laboratory tests were undertaken, including complete blood count, the total population of T lymphocyte, B lymphocyte, T helper, T suppressor, NK cells, T helper/T suppressor ratio, C3, C4, IgG, IgA, and IgM. These tests showed that there were immune and hematinic deficiency condition. Nevertheless, the clinical appearance, laboratory findings and consultation did not support the diagnosis of recurrent oral Herpes Simplex infection and Behçet Syndrome, thus, enhancing the definite diagnosis of the herpetiform type of RAS with immune and hematinic deficiency as the underlying condition. Based on the definite diagnosis, treatment plan was then revised to target the underlying condition.

  12. THE PREVALENCE OF INFECTION WITH HERPES VIRUSES AMONG FREQUENTLY ILL CHILDREN

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    Volyansky AY

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Frequently ill children (FIC - a group of dispensary an inclusion criterion which is the frequency of episodes of colds are over 4-6 throughout the year depending on age. In children population among all diseases marked the absolute predominance (90% of acute respiratory infections (ARI. The maximum incidence of acute respiratory infections among children there is between the ages of 1 to 3 years, and then gradually decreases. Among primary school children the incidence is 2-5 cases a year, among teens - no more than 2-4 diseases throughout the year. Opinions of scholars and practitioners pediatricians as to the legality of frequent classification of cases of children to pathologic conditions of the immune system are different and often diametrically opposed. Objective: To determine the prevalence of infection with herpes viruses of frequently ill children. Materials and methods. The analysis consists the results of clinical and laboratory examination of 170 frequently ill children. The criterion for selection of children for the study is the frequency of episodes of colds according to the classification of A.A.Baranov V.Yu.Albitskiy. Analysis of clinical and anamnesis data revealed that in the observed group of children there is a high rate of recurrent respiratory diseases. Thus, in the observed group of children the average incidence of ARI was 7,42 ± 0,92 episodes a year. The average duration of an episode of disease was 9,12 ± 2,75 days. The complicated course occurred in 32% of cases, the average duration of a complicated episode grew to 12,37 ± 3,91 days. This study led to the following conclusions: 1. To 3 years of age, about 85% frequently ill children are infected with at least one virus of the family Herpesviridae. By 6 years of age the number grows to 95%, to 11 years - to 98%. 2. Infectiousness 3 or more herpes viruses among children up to 3 years is more than 30%, among children 3-6 years is 48%, in the age group 6-11 years more

  13. Neonatal herpes infections in The Netherlands in the period 2006-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelaar, Steffannie J A L; Poeran, Jashvant; Steegers, Eric A P; van der Meijden, Willem I

    2015-05-01

    To monitor the incidence of neonatal herpes in The Netherlands between 2006 and 2011, as well as the adherence to the rather conservative Dutch prevention policy. Questionnaires were sent to all virology laboratories (n = 44), gynaecology and paediatrics departments of all hospitals in The Netherlands (n = 89). Questionnaires for the laboratories pertained to rates of proven cases of neonatal herpes; for the gynaecologists and paediatricians it pertained to rates of genital herpes during pregnancy and neonatal herpes, and their policy. For gynaecologists this concerned the risk of herpes simplex virus transmission in case of primary genital herpes during pregnancy or labour; for paediatricians it concerned the diagnostic policy in a neonate suspected of neonatal herpes. For the period 2006-2011 38 cases of neonatal herpes were reported, yielding an incidence of 4.7 per 100,000 births. The estimated annual number of pregnant women with primary or recurrent genital herpes was 278. Of the responding gynaecologists and paediatricians, only 59% and up to 39%, respectively, reported a policy in accordance with the national guideline. The incidence of neonatal herpes in The Netherlands seems to have increased in the period 2006-2011. Combined with suboptimal guideline adherence this warrants strategies to improve awareness and subsequent adherence.

  14. Herpes zoster could be an early manifestation of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2016-05-01

    No formal epidemiological research based on systematic analysis has focused on the relationship between herpes zoster and immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Taiwan. Our aim was to explore whether herpes zoster is an early manifestation of undiagnosed human HIV infection in Taiwan. This was a retrospective cohort study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. A total of 35,892 individuals aged ≤ 84 years with newly diagnosed herpes zoster from 1998 to 2010 were assigned to the herpes zoster group, whereas 143,568 sex-matched and age-matched, randomly selected individuals without herpes zoster served as the non-herpes zoster group. The incidence of HIV diagnosis at the end of 2011 was estimated in both groups. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) for risk of HIV diagnosis associated with herpes zoster and other comorbidities including drug dependence and venereal diseases. The overall incidence of HIV diagnosis was 4.19-fold greater in the herpes zoster group than that in the non-herpes zoster group (3.33 per 10,000 person-years vs. 0.80 per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI 4.04-4.35). The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed that the adjusted hazard ratio of HIV diagnosis was 4.37 (95% CI 3.10-6.15) for individuals with herpes zoster and without comorbidities, as compared with individuals without herpes zoster and without comorbidities. Herpes zoster is associated with HIV diagnosis. Patients who have risk behaviors of HIV infection should receive regular surveillance for undiagnosed HIV infection when they present with herpes zoster. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. IMMUNE DISORDERS AND THEIR CORRECTION IN PATIENTS WITH HERPES INFECTION OF THE OROPHARYNX

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    Makarevich V.A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent herpes infection of the oropharynx caused by herpes simplex virus type I and II occupies an important place among the infectious diseases of the oral cavity. The mechanisms which lead to the development of recurrence of the disease are studied insufficiently, and this limits the clinical possibilities of prophylactics. The frequency of the manifestations of herpetic infection and their intensity depend on the state of the immune system, in particular, the nature and level of pathogenic disorders of immune response. The immunotherapy requires a personalized approach taking into account the variability of “sensitivity” of immune index of the patient for potential therapeutic effects. The aim of the study was to justify the treatment of immune disorders and timeous prevention of recurrence, and also complications that occur when infection activates during the long-term viral persistence, based on definition of the characteristics of immune disorders in patients with moderate and high recurrence rate of the disease. Materials and methods. The study involved 86 patients aged 18 to 49 years with herpesviral gingivostomatitis and pharyngotonsillitis and herpetic vesicular dermatitis. The control group consisted of 19 healthy people of comparable age. Patients with recurrent HSV infection were divided into two groups. Group I was formed of patients with moderate rates of relapse less than 4 times per year (n = 51, and group II represented patients with high rates of relapse not less than 4 times a year (n=35. Lymphocyte subsets were defined by fluorescent microscopy method using FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies against surface antigens CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD22. Evaluation of functional lymphocyte reactivity was performed by setting 5 mg/ml PHA-stimulated RBTL. Phagocytic activity was defined by latex method. The NBT-test was used to evaluate the metabolic capacity of phagocytes. The CIC in serum were defined by method of selective 3

  16. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The antiviral effectiveness of butylated hydroxytoluene on herpes cutaneous infections in hairless mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, A.D.; Arruda, D.; Snipes, W.; Frost, P.

    1982-01-01

    Hairless mice, cutaneously infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), were treated topically with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The effectiveness of BHT in shortening the duration of infections was assayed under three conditions. In the first experiments, mice undergoing primary infections with no prior immunity to HSV-1 were utilized. These animals tended to develop deep lesions that were not typical of recurrent HSV-1 infections in humans. A second set of experiments utilized mice that had recovered from a primary infection and that were immunosuppressed by γ irradiation. Immunosuppression was essential for the full development of lesions upon reinfection. The lesions in these animals remained more localized with less tendency to spread into deep tissues. A third set of experiments utilized animals that were subcutaneously inoculated with human serum γ-globulin 24 hr prior to infection. Lesions on these animals also remained localized and did not penetrate into deep tissues. Under all three conditions, BHT was found to be effective in reducing the clearance time of HSV-1 cutaneous lesions when applied topically to the infected area

  18. Combined Therapy at Persistent Herpes Virus Infection in Sickly Children

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    F. S. Kharlamova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined 40 sickly children with recurrent croup (RC — 28 and bronchial obstruction (ROB — 8, (RC + ROB — 4 aged from 18 months till 14 years. We found that high frequency of persistent herpes viruses usually occurs as associations with CMV, EBV and human herpes virus 6 type. We substantiated anti viral and immune corrective therapy in two schemes compared in efficacy: the 1st group was administered monotherapy with Viferon, and the 2nd group received combined therapy Viferon + Arbidol in doses according to the age during three months. We received a more expressed clinical immunologic effect from the therapy with decreased antigenic load and frequency of recurrence of RC and ROB with Viferon application in suppositories in combination with Arbidol per orally in the intermittent scheme during three months. 

  19. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2018-04-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) is an uncommon but devastating infection in the newborn, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The use of PCR for identification of infected infants and acyclovir for treatment has significantly improved the prognosis for affected infants. The subsequent use of suppressive therapy with oral acyclovir following completion of parenteral treatment of acute disease has further enhanced the long-term prognosis for these infants. This review article will discuss the epidemiology, risk factors and routes of acquisition, clinical presentation, and evaluation of an infant suspected to have the infection, and treatment of proven neonatal HSV disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The potential of immunostimulatory CpG DNA for inducing immunity against genital herpes: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harandi, Ali M

    2004-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) invades human genital tract mucosa and following local replications can be rapidly transmitted via peripheral nerve axons to the sacral ganglia where it can establish latency. Reactivation of the latent viral reservoir results in recurrent ulcers in the genital region. Innate immunity, the first line of defence during both primary and recurrent genital herpes infections, is crucial during the period of acute infection to limit early virus replication and to facilitate the development of an appropriate specific acquired immunity. Recent developments in immunology reveal that the mammalian innate immune systems use Toll-like receptor (TLR) to specifically sense evolutionary conserved molecules such as bacterial DNA in pathogens. Recently, local-vaginal delivery of CpG containing oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), a synthetic mimic of bacterial DNA, holds substantial promise as a strong inducer of innate immunity against genital herpes infections in the animal models of the disease. These preclinical observations provide a scientific ground work for introduction of this novel intervention strategy to clinic. This review aims to highlight recent developments and future challenges in use of immunostimulatory CpG ODN for inducing immunity against genital herpes infection and disease.

  1. Topical therapy of recurrent herpes - acyclovir versus tromantidine

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    Kumar Bhushan

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty men with recurrent genital herpes were treated with either acyclovir 5% cream or tromantidine 1 % ointment applied topically. Acyclovir cream was applied 5 times and tromantidine cream 4 times daily for 5 days. At least one pre-treatment episode was observed by one of the authors. Self assessment charts were provided to the patients to record prodromal symptoms and healing time. For comparison at least 3 post treatment episodes were observed and com-pared with mean healing time of 3 pre-treatment episodes. Both acyclovir cream and tromantidine ointment significantly reduced the duration of prodrome, hastened healing and so reduced mean healing time.

  2. Infection and Transport of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Neurons: Role of the Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a neuroinvasive human pathogen that has the ability to infect and replicate within epithelial cells and neurons and establish a life-long latent infection in sensory neurons. HSV-1 depends on the host cellular cytoskeleton for entry, replication, and exit. Therefore, HSV-1 has adapted mechanisms to promote its survival by exploiting the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons to direct its active transport, infection, and spread between neurons and epithelial cells during primary and recurrent infections. This review will focus on the currently known mechanisms utilized by HSV-1 to harness the neuronal cytoskeleton, molecular motors, and the secretory and exocytic pathways for efficient virus entry, axonal transport, replication, assembly, and exit from the distinct functional compartments (cell body and axon) of the highly polarized sensory neurons. PMID:29473915

  3. Prophylactic Antiviral Treatment in Recurrent Herpes Zoster: A Case Report

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    Hatice Gamze Bayram

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster (HZ occurs in older ages with activation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV which persists in a dormant phase within the dorsal root ganglia. The incidence of HZ in immunosuppressed patients is 20-100 times higher and the clinical progress is more severe than in immunocompetent individuals. A 48-year-old man who had been diagnosed with acute myelocytic leukemia type M3 and had been treated with immunosuppressive agents was admitted to our clinic. The patient was clinically diagnosed as having HZ. He was treated with acyclovir 800 mg five times daily for 7 days. In the consecutive three months, he attended our clinic again with similar complaints. The left cervical (C5, C6 dermatomes were involved at the fourth attack of HZ. Multinucleated giant cells were determined on the Tzanck smear. VZV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Treatment with valacyclovir 1 g three times daily for 14 days was prescribed and then, prophylactic treatment with valacyclovir 500 mg two times a day was administered. Although immunosuppressive treatment was continued, no new attacks of herpes zoster occurred. We think that prophylactic antiviral therapy should be initiated in immunosuppressive individuals who have recurrent herpes zoster attacks.

  4. Herpes: a dilemma for client and clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, B J; Poteet, G W

    1987-01-01

    In the last 10 years genital herpes simplex has reached epidemic proportions, affecting 5 million Americans, with 500,000 new cases yearly. The incidence is highest among middle and upper socioeconomic groups and among whites. There are 2 antigenically distinct strains of the herpes simplex virus, and type II is the cause of 85% of the genital infections. The virus has an affinity for tissues derived from the embryonic ectoderm -- skin, mucous membranes, eye, and central nervous system. Transmission is by personal contact with an infected area. The clinical course of the disease involves 4 stages. In the primary stage the typical lesions are vesicles, which rupture, leaving painful shallow ulcerations. The primary stage lasts from 2 to 4 weeks with approximately 10 days of viral shedding. In the latent stage the virus lies dormant in the sacral ganglion and is noninfectious. In the shedding stage the virus replicates and sheds in genital secretions. The recurrent stage is characterized by prodromal itching or tingling sensations prior to the eruption of the vesicles and by neuralgia. Recurrence occurs as often as 4 to 7 times a year and lasts from 7 to 10 days, with viral shedding for 4 or 5 days. Definitive diagnosis can be made from viral tissue culture or the Tzanck and Papanicolaou smears. There is no cure for herpes although acyclovir has been found to shorten the duration of the episodes. Except for pregnancy complications, the most serious complications of recurrent genital herpes are psychological. The disease is socially stigmatizing and inhibits sexual activity. The nurse should provide supportive care, information about the transmission and symptoms of the disease, and counseling as to precautions to take, such as condom and spermicide use, avoidance of oral sex, abstention when lesions are present, and limiting sex to one partner.

  5. Evaluation of mixed infection cases with both herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hisatoshi; Kawana, Takashi; Ishioka, Ken; Ohno, Shigeaki; Aoki, Koki; Suzutani, Tatsuo

    2008-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is isolated principally from the upper half of the body innervated by the trigeminal ganglia whereas herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is generally isolated from the lower half of the body innervated by the sacral ganglia. However, recent reports suggest that HSV-1 and HSV-2 can each infect both the upper and lower half of the body causing a variety of symptoms and there is a possibility that HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections can occur simultaneously with both causing symptoms. HSV type in clinical isolates from 87 patients with genital herpes and 57 with ocular herpes was determined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and six cases of mixed infection with both HSV-1 and HSV-2 were identified. Of the six cases, three were patients with genital herpes and three were ocular herpes patients. Analysis of the copy number of the HSV-1 and HSV-2 genome by a quantitative real time PCR demonstrated that HSV-1 was dominant at a ratio of approximately 100:1 in the ocular infections. In contrast, the HSV-2 genome was present at a 4-40 times higher frequency in isolates from genital herpes patients. There was no obvious difference between the clinical course of mixed infection and those of single HSV-1 or HSV-2 infections. This study indicated that the frequency of mixed infection with both HSV-1 and HSV-2 is comparatively higher than those of previous reports. The genome ratio of HSV-1 and HSV-2 reflects the preference of each HSV type for the target organ.

  6. Pediatric herpes simplex virus infections: an evidence-based approach to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jennifer E; Garcia, Sylvia E

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is a common virus that causes a variety of clinical presentations ranging from mild to life-threatening. Orolabial and genital herpes are common disorders that can often be managed in an outpatient setting; however, some patients do present to the emergency department with those conditions, and emergency clinicians should be aware of possible complications in the pediatric population. Neonatal herpes is a rare disorder, but prompt recognition and initiation of antiviral therapy is imperative, as the morbidity and mortality of the disease is high. Herpes encephalitis is an emergency that also requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose. Herpes simplex virus is also responsible for a variety of other clinical presentations, including herpes gladiatorum, herpetic whitlow, eczema herpeticum, and ocular herpes. This issue reviews the common clinical presentations of the herpes simplex virus, the life-threatening infections that require expedient identification and management, and recommended treatment regimens.

  7. Interferon status at the women with recurrent genital herpes in combined liposomal RNA treatment

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    A. Sh. Makhmutkhodzhayev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the estimation of the influence of liposomal ribonucleic acid (RNA medicine «Liprina» on interferon status of women with recurrent genital herpes. In this study 60 women were included, who combined (acyclovir and Liprina, n = 40 or monoterapy with acyclovir (n = 20 were received. The levels of serum interferon alpha and gamma along with cervical virus elimination were estimated. The medicine «Liprina» increased the therapy efficiency of the women with genital herpes, that perhaps related with endogen interferon production amplification.

  8. Serologic Screening for Genital Herpes Infection: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Davidson, Karina W; Epling, John W; García, Francisco A R; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phillips, William R; Phipps, Maureen G; Pignone, Michael P; Silverstein, Michael; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2016-12-20

    Genital herpes is a prevalent sexually transmitted infection in the United States, occurring in almost 1 in 6 persons aged 14 to 49 years. Infection is caused by 2 subtypes of the herpes simplex virus (HSV), HSV-1 and HSV-2. Antiviral medications may provide symptomatic relief from outbreaks but do not cure HSV infection. Neonatal herpes infection, while uncommon, can result in substantial morbidity and mortality. To update the 2005 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for genital herpes. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy, benefits, and harms of serologic screening for HSV-2 infection in asymptomatic persons, including those who are pregnant, as well as the effectiveness and harms of preventive medications and behavioral counseling interventions to reduce future symptomatic episodes and transmission to others. Based on the natural history of HSV infection, its epidemiology, and the available evidence on the accuracy of serologic screening tests, the USPSTF concluded that the harms outweigh the benefits of serologic screening for genital HSV infection in asymptomatic adolescents and adults, including those who are pregnant. The USPSTF recommends against routine serologic screening for genital HSV infection in asymptomatic adolescents and adults, including those who are pregnant. (D recommendation).

  9. Studies on the DNA-excision repair in lymphocytes of patients with recurrent Herpes simplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanta, D.; Topaloglou, A.; Altmann, H.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations of the semiconservatrive DNA replication and the excision repair in lymphocytes of patients with recurrent herpes simplex showed defects that could lead to mutations in the DNA with following lower immuncompetence and possibility for activation of already present oncogenic virus formations within the cellular DNA

  10. Interleukin-33 is expressed in the lesional epidermis in herpes virus infection but not in verruca vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meijuan; Komine, Mayumi; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Oshio, Tomoyuki; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro

    2018-04-25

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is released on cell injury and activates the immune reaction. IL-33 is involved in antiviral reaction in herpes virus infection, but the source that secretes IL-33 has not been identified. We speculate that keratinocytes injured in herpes virus infection secrete IL-33. In order to detect IL-33 in the lesional epidermis of patients with herpes virus infection, we immunostained several cutaneous herpes virus infection samples with an anti-IL-33 antibody, and compared them with cutaneous human papilloma virus (HPV) infection samples. We observed strong nuclear and mild cytoplasmic staining in epidermal keratinocytes of the lesional skin samples with herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections. However, staining was not observed in the epidermis of verruca vulgaris (VV) samples. We assumed that the strong immune reaction to herpes virus infection may depend on strong IL-33 expression in the epidermis, while very weak immune reaction in samples from patients with VV may be due to low or no expression of IL-33 in the lesional epidermis. © 2018 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  11. Future of an “Asymptomatic” T-cell Epitope-Based Therapeutic Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervillez, Xavier; Gottimukkala, Chetan; Kabbara, Khaled W.; Nguyen, Chelsea; Badakhshan, Tina; Kim, Sarah M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Considering the limited success of the recent herpes clinical vaccine trial [1], new vaccine strategies are needed. Infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) in the majority of men and women are usually asymptomatic and results in lifelong viral latency in neurons of sensory ganglia (SG). However, in a minority of men and women HSV spontaneous reactivation can cause recurrent disease (i.e., symptomatic individuals). Our recent findings show that T cells from symptomatic and asymptomatic men and women (i.e. those with and without recurrences, respectively) recognize different herpes epitopes. This finding breaks new ground and opens new doors to assess a new vaccine strategy: mucosal immunization with HSV-1 & HSV-2 epitopes that induce strong in vitro CD4 and CD8 T cell responses from PBMC derived from asymptomatic men and women (designated here as “asymptomatic” protective epitopes”) could boost local and systemic “natural” protective immunity, induced by wild-type infection. Here we highlight the rationale and the future of our emerging “asymptomatic” T cell epitope-based mucosal vaccine strategy to decrease recurrent herpetic disease. PMID:22701511

  12. Herpes zoster infection of maxillary nerve: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isha Thakur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve branches caused by varicella zoster is a clinical entity consisting of erythematous macules, papules, vesicles, bullae, small ulcers and erythematous plaques, with characteristic short acute/pre-eruptive phases and long herpetic periods with pain. It is caused by reactivation of latent varicella infection. Herpes zoster is a less common endemic disease compared to varicella. During the prodromal stage, the only presenting symptom may be odontalgia, which may prove to be a diagnostic challenge for the dentist. Emergency treatment for a misdiagnosis such as trigeminal neuralgia, odontalgia, and acute pulpitis, as well as complications reported in literature such as tooth resorption, periapical lesions, periodontal destructions, and osteomyelitis may cause an irreversible damage to the patient. Hence, the dentist must be familiar with the presenting signs and symptoms in prodrome of herpes zoster infection of trigeminal nerve. The present article focuses on the pathogenesis, clinical picture, difficulties in diagnosis and management of such cases.

  13. Dendritic cells in the cornea during Herpes simplex viral infection and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min S; Carnt, Nicole A; Truong, Naomi R; Pattamatta, Ushasree; White, Andrew J; Samarawickrama, Chameen; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2017-11-10

    Herpes simplex keratitis is commonly caused by Herpes simplex virus type 1, which primarily infects eyelids, corneas, or conjunctiva. Herpes simplex virus type 1-through sophisticated interactions with dendritic cells (DCs), a type of antigen-presenting cell)-initiates proinflammatory responses in the cornea. Corneas were once thought to be an immune-privileged region; however, with the recent discovery of DCs that reside in the cornea, this long-held conjecture has been overturned. Therefore, evaluating the clinical, preclinical, and cell-based studies that investigate the roles of DCs in corneas infected with Herpes simplex virus is critical. With in vivo confocal microscopy, animal models, and cell culture experiments, we may further the understanding of the sophisticated interactions of Herpes simplex virus with DCs in the cornea and the molecular mechanism associated with it. It has been shown that specific differentiation of DCs using immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and polymerase chain reaction analysis in both human and mice tissues and viral tissue infections are integral to increasing understanding. As for in vivo confocal microscopy, it holds promise as it is the least invasive and a real-time investigation. These tools will facilitate the discovery of various targets to develop new treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bullous Variant of Sweet’s Syndrome after Herpes Zoster Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Yuichiro Endo; Miki Tanioka; Hideaki Tanizaki; Minako Mori; Hiroshi Kawabata; Yoshiki Miyachi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Cutaneous manifestations of Sweet’s syndrome (SS) are typically painful plaque-forming erythematous papules, while bullae are quite uncommon. We present a case of bullous variant of SS in acute myeloid leukaemia. In this case, herpes infection of the left mandible had preceded the development of SS. Case Report: A 75-year-old male with myelodysplastic syndrome first presented with herpes zoster virus infection-like bullae and erosive plaques on the left side of the face and neck. Treatme...

  15. Autophagy interaction with herpes simplex virus type-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Douglas; Liang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    abstract More than 50% of the U.S. population is infected with herpes simplex virus type-I (HSV-1) and global infectious estimates are nearly 90%. HSV-1 is normally seen as a harmless virus but debilitating diseases can arise, including encephalitis and ocular diseases. HSV-1 is unique in that it can undermine host defenses and establish lifelong infection in neurons. Viral reactivation from latency may allow HSV-1 to lay siege to the brain (Herpes encephalitis). Recent advances maintain that HSV-1 proteins act to suppress and/or control the lysosome-dependent degradation pathway of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) and consequently, in neurons, may be coupled with the advancement of HSV-1-associated pathogenesis. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that HSV-1 infection may constitute a gradual risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders. The relationship between HSV-1 infection and autophagy manipulation combined with neuropathogenesis may be intimately intertwined demanding further investigation. PMID:26934628

  16. Topical SMIP-7.7, a toll-like receptor 7 agonist, protects against genital herpes simplex virus type-2 disease in the guinea pig model of genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, David I; Cardin, Rhonda D; Bravo, Fernando J; Earwood, Julie; Clark, Jennifer R; Li, Yongkai; Mishra, Pranab; Li, Chun; Nayak, Bishnu P; Miller, Andrew T; Wu, Tom Y-H; Cooke, Michael P; Valiante, Nicholas M

    2014-04-11

    Development of more effective therapies for genital herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) infections remains a priority. The toll-like receptors (TLR) are attractive targets for the immunomodulation of primary and recurrent genital herpes infection. The guinea pig model of genital HSV-2 disease was therefore used to evaluate the efficacy of a new TLR-7 agonist, SMIP-7.7. The effects of SMIP-7.7 at concentrations between 0.90% and 0.09% were compared to the vehicle control or Aldara(®) (3M Health Care Limited, Northridge, CA, USA) as treatment for genital HSV-2 infections. Following intravaginal inoculation of Hartley guinea pigs with 10(6) pfu HSV-2 (MS strain), animals were treated intravaginally beginning at 36 h post-infection. Animals were evaluated for acute disease, acute virus replication, recurrent disease and shedding, as well as infection of the dorsal root ganglia. Treatment with SMIP-7.7 significantly decreased mean total lesion scores during primary infection (all doses, P<0.01 compared with vehicle control, and similar to Aldara(®)). Vaginal virus titres were reduced in treated animals compared with vehicle control (P<0.001 for each treatment versus vehicle control on day 4). Treatment with SMIP-7.7 also significantly decreased the number of recurrent lesion days, the number of days with recurrent virus shedding and the infection of the dorsal root ganglia compared to the vehicle control, and was similar to Aldara(®). As opposed to Aldara(®), SMIP-7.7 did not induce fever or weight loss during treatment. SMIP-7.7 improves the outcome of primary and recurrent HSV-2 disease comparable to Aldara(®) but without some of the side effects associated with Aldara(®).

  17. Studies on the DNA excision repair in lymphocytes of patients with recurrent herpes simplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanta, D.; Topaloglou, A.; Altmann, H.

    1979-01-01

    DNA repair was investigated in lymphocytes from patients with recurrent herpes simplex and from healthy controls. From the results - depressed UV type repair, depressed gamma type repair, reduced RF - it may be concluded that mutations can be expected due to the faults remaining in the DNA. This may not only lower cellular immunocompetence, but also activate already present oncogenic virus informations within the cellular DNA. Thus, irrespective of the possible oncogenic potential of HSV, there seems to be an increased risk of late effects in patients with recurrent herpetic manifestations. (Auth.)

  18. Seronegative Herpes simplex Associated Esophagogastric Ulcer after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Matevossian

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex infection is characterized by acute or subacute infection, often followed by a chronic carrier state. Consecutive recurrences may flare up if immunocompromise occurs. Herpes simplex associated esophagitis or duodenal ulcer have been reported in immunocompromised patients due to neoplasm, HIV/AIDS or therapeutically induced immune deficiency. Here we report the case of an HSV-DNA seronegative patient who developed grade III dysphagia 13 days after allogeneic liver transplantation. Endoscopy revealed an esophageal-gastric ulcer, and biopsy histopathology showed a distinct fibroplastic and capillary ulcer pattern highly suspicious for viral infection. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed a distinct nuclear positive anti-HSV reaction. Antiviral therapy with acyclovir and high-dose PPI led to a complete revision of clinical symptoms within 48 h. Repeat control endoscopy after 7 days showed complete healing of the former ulcer site at the gastroesophageal junction. Although the incidence of post-transplantation Herpes simplex induced gastroesophageal disease is low, the viral HSV ulcer may be included into a differential diagnosis if dysphagia occurs after transplantation even if HSV-DNA PCR is negative.

  19. Genital Herpes: Insights into Sexually Transmitted Infectious Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishankar, Dinesh; Shukla, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Etiology, transmission and protection: Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) is a leading cause of sexually transmitted infections with recurring manifestations throughout the lifetime of infected hosts. Currently no effective vaccines or prophylactics exist that provide complete protection or immunity from the virus, which is endemic throughout the world. Pathology/Symptomatology: Primary and recurrent infections result in lesions and inflammation around the genital area and the latter accounts for majority of genital herpes instances. Immunocompromised patients including neonates are susceptible to additional systemic infections including debilitating consequences of nervous system inflammation. Epidemiology, incidence and prevalence: More than 500 million people are infected worldwide and most reported cases involve the age groups between 16-40 years, which coincides with an increase in sexual activity among this age group. While these numbers are an estimate, the actual numbers may be underestimated as many people are asymptomatic or do not report the symptoms. Treatment and curability: Currently prescribed medications, mostly nucleoside analogs, only reduce the symptoms caused by an active infection, but do not eliminate the virus or reduce latency. Therefore, no cure exists against genital herpes and infected patients suffer from periodic recurrences of disease symptoms for their entire lives. Molecular mechanisms of infection: The last few decades have generated many new advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that drive HSV infection. The viral entry receptors such as nectin-1 and HVEM have been identified, cytoskeletal signaling and membrane structures such as filopodia have been directly implicated in viral entry, host motor proteins and their viral ligands have been shown to facilitate capsid transport and many host and HSV proteins have been identified that help with viral replication and pathogenesis. New understanding has emerged on the role of

  20. Genital Herpes: Insights into Sexually Transmitted Infectious Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishankar, Dinesh; Shukla, Deepak

    2016-06-27

    Etiology, transmission and protection: Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) is a leading cause of sexually transmitted infections with recurring manifestations throughout the lifetime of infected hosts. Currently no effective vaccines or prophylactics exist that provide complete protection or immunity from the virus, which is endemic throughout the world. Pathology/Symptomatology: Primary and recurrent infections result in lesions and inflammation around the genital area and the latter accounts for majority of genital herpes instances. Immunocompromised patients including neonates are susceptible to additional systemic infections including debilitating consequences of nervous system inflammation. Epidemiology, incidence and prevalence: More than 500 million people are infected worldwide and most reported cases involve the age groups between 16-40 years, which coincides with an increase in sexual activity among this age group. While these numbers are an estimate, the actual numbers may be underestimated as many people are asymptomatic or do not report the symptoms. Treatment and curability: Currently prescribed medications, mostly nucleoside analogs, only reduce the symptoms caused by an active infection, but do not eliminate the virus or reduce latency. Therefore, no cure exists against genital herpes and infected patients suffer from periodic recurrences of disease symptoms for their entire lives. Molecular mechanisms of infection: The last few decades have generated many new advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that drive HSV infection. The viral entry receptors such as nectin-1 and HVEM have been identified, cytoskeletal signaling and membrane structures such as filopodia have been directly implicated in viral entry, host motor proteins and their viral ligands have been shown to facilitate capsid transport and many host and HSV proteins have been identified that help with viral replication and pathogenesis. New understanding has emerged on the role of

  1. Peripheral Blood CD4 T-Cell and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell (pDC) Reactivity to Herpes Simplex Virus 2 and pDC Number Do Not Correlate with the Clinical or Virologic Severity of Recurrent Genital Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Nicholas J.; Magaret, Amalia; Laing, Kerry J.; Kask, Angela Shaulov; Wang, Minna; Mark, Karen E.; Schiffer, Joshua T.; Wald, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Leukocytes participate in the immune control of herpes simplex virus (HSV). Data from HIV coinfections, germ line mutations, and case reports suggest involvement of CD4 T cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). We investigated the relationships between these cells and recurrent genital herpes disease severity in the general population. Circulating CD4 T-cell responses to HSV-2 were measured in specimens from 67 immunocompetent individuals with measured genital lesion and HSV shedding rates. Similarly, pDC number and functional responses to HSV-2 were analyzed in 40 persons. CD4 responses and pDC concentrations and responses ranged as much as 100-fold between persons while displaying moderate within-person consistency over time. No correlations were observed between these immune response parameters and genital HSV-2 severity. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) coinfection was not correlated with differences in HSV-2-specific CD4 T-cell responses. The CD4 T-cell response to HSV-2 was much more polyfunctional than was the response to CMV. These data suggest that other immune cell subsets with alternate phenotypes or anatomical locations may be responsible for genital herpes control in chronically infected individuals. PMID:22761381

  2. Acyclovir in the prevention of duodenal ulcer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune, S J; Linde, J; Bonnevie, O

    1990-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that reactivation of a latent herpes simplex virus infection may be a cause of recurrent duodenal ulceration. Patients with recently healed duodenal ulcer were entered into a double blind, randomised study of maintenance treatment with the antiviral drug acyclovir...... (400 mg bid) versus placebo, to determine if suppression of herpes virus infection would influence the natural history of the ulcer disease. One hundred and fifteen patients entered the trial and 76 patients completed it according to the protocol. Endoscopy was performed when ulcer symptoms recurred...

  3. Pregnancy and herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and may pass the virus to their baby. Herpes type 2 (genital herpes) is the most common cause of herpes infection ... prenatal visit if you have a history of genital herpes. If you have frequent herpes outbreaks, you'll ...

  4. Refining criteria for diagnosis of cutaneous infections caused by herpes viruses through correlation of morphology with molecular pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böer Almut

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections of the skin by herpes viruses do not always present themselves in typical fashion. Early diagnosis, however, is crucial for appropriate treatment. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR allows diagnosis and differential diagnosis of herpes virus infections, but the method is not yet available in large parts of the world, where diagnosis is made based on morphology alone. AIM: To refine criteria for the diagnosis of herpes virus infections of the skin by way of correlation of clinical and histopathologic findings with results of PCR studies. METHODS: We studied 75 clinically diagnosed patients of "zoster," "varicella," and "herpes simplex", to correlate clinical and histopathological findings with results of PCR studies on paraffin embedded biopsy specimens. RESULTS: Clinical suspicion of infection by herpes viruses was confirmed by histopathology in 37% of the cases and by PCR studies in 65% of the cases. Zoster was frequently misdiagnosed as infection with herpes simplex viruses (30%. When diagnostic signs of herpes virus infection were encountered histopathologically, PCR confirmed the diagnosis in 94%. By way of correlation with results of PCR studies, initial lesions of herpes virus infections could be identified to have a distinctive histopathological pattern. Herpetic folliculitis appeared to be a rather common finding in zoster, it occurring in 28% of the cases. CONCLUSION: We conclude that correlation of clinical and histopathological features with results of PCR studies on one and the same paraffin embedded specimen permits identification of characteristic morphologic patterns and helps to refine criteria for diagnosis both clinically and histopathologically.

  5. Herpes zoster infection, vaccination and immunocompromised rheumatology patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Mortimer B

    2013-01-01

    Varicella is a self-limiting and relatively mild disease of childhood, although it is frequently more severe and complicated among the immunocompromised rheumatology patients on immunomodulator therapies. In addition, future reactivation of the dormant virus in dorsal root ganglia may cause herpes zoster infection, which can be very debilitating. In this manuscript, we discuss the nature of this infection along with its potential vaccine especially among rheumatology patients.

  6. Genital Herpes in Marital Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jacob

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available During 1983-86, 225 patients were clinically diagnosed to have genital herpes (GH at our clinic. Of these, 90 men and 55 women were currently married. All the spouses were screened clinically and through standardized techniques for isolation and typing of herpes simplex virus, serological testing and Papanicolaou smear. There were 90 couples in whom at least one spouse had GH and in 38 (42% couples both partners had GH. Clinically, 49% of wives and 75% of husbands of GH patients were diagnosed to have the disease. The spouses of recurrent GH patients had a higher frequency of the disease than spouses of primary GH patients. Among spouses who were clinically asymptomatic, 40% had high serological titres suggestive of GH. Wives generally experienced more severe symptoms, especially pain in the lesions. Majority of lesions in both the partners were vesicles and ulcers. Prodromata were more among recurrent GH patients in both the partners. The frequency of recurrences wasalso similar in spouses. Seventy percent of wives and 40% of husbands could not identify any precipitating factor. Intercourse, physical stress and rich food were cited as possible factors in the remaining. All the wives had acquired the diseases through their husbands who were promiscuous. Fifty percent of husbands had been infected before marriage. Given the fact that asymptomatic carriers exist, it is better to consider all marital partners of GH as infected. Repeated and long-term follow, - up examination, particularly of wives of GH patients is therefore essential as an important socio-preventive aspect of this disease.

  7. Evaluation of the activity and safety of CS21 barrier genital gel® compared to topical aciclovir and placebo in symptoms of genital herpes recurrences: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemis, A; Duteil, L; Tillet, Y; Dereure, O; Ortonne, J-P

    2014-09-01

    Topical or systemic antiviral drugs reduce the duration of genital herpes recurrences but may not always alleviate functional symptoms. To assess the efficacy and safety of oxygenated glycerol triesters-based CS21 barrier genital gel(®) vs. topical aciclovir and placebo (vehicle) in resolving functional symptoms and in healing of genital herpes recurrences. A prospective randomized controlled, investigator-blinded trial of CS21 barrier genital gel(®) vs. topical aciclovir (reference treatment) and placebo (vehicle) was designed. The primary endpoint was the cumulative score of four herpes-related functional symptoms (pain, burning, itching and tingling sensations). Secondary endpoints included objective skin changes (erythema, papules, vesicles, oedema, erosion/ulceration, crusts), time to heal, local tolerance and overall acceptability of the treatment as reported by a self-administered questionnaire. Overall, 61 patients were included. CS 21 barrier genital gel(®) was significantly more efficient than topical aciclovir and vehicle for subjective symptoms and pain relief in genital herpes recurrences; additionally, time to heal was significantly shorter with CS 21 than with vehicle, whereas no significantly difference was observed between patients receiving topical aciclovir and vehicle. The treatments under investigation were well tolerated and the adverse events were comparable in the three treatment groups. Overall, these results support the interest of using of CS 21 barrier genital gel(®) in symptomatic genital herpes recurrences. Accordingly, this product offers a valuable alternative in topical management of recurrent genital herpes. © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  8. Herpes zoster in African patients: an early manifestation of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Perre, P; Bakkers, E; Batungwanayo, J; Kestelyn, P; Lepage, P; Nzaramba, D; Bogaerts, J; Serufilira, A; Rouvroy, D; Uwimana, A

    1988-01-01

    During a 3-month period, 131 cases of herpes zoster were diagnosed in Kigali, Rwanda. There were 46 female and 85 male patients. Mean age was 29 years (range 1-66). An unusually high proportion of patients presented with cranial and sacral nerve localisation of their cutaneous lesions. 55/131 patients (42%) had involvement of more than one dermatome. None of the patients had an underlying condition known to favour herpes zoster. 120/131 (92%) had antibodies to HIV detected by an immunoenzymatic assay (EIA) and indirect immunofluorescence. 92/125 adult patients (74%) had no sign or symptom related to HIV infection other than herpes zoster. This study suggests that herpes zoster in Central Africa is an early and readily detectable manifestation of HIV-induced immunosuppression.

  9. Genital Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). It can cause sores on ... also infect their babies during childbirth. Symptoms of herpes are called outbreaks. You usually get sores near ...

  10. The "Knife-Cut Sign" Revisited: A Distinctive Presentation of Linear Erosive Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Immunocompromised Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2015-10-01

    The "knife-cut sign" is a distinctive presentation of linear erosive herpes simplex virus infection in immunocompromised patients. To describe a man whose herpes simplex virus infection-related skin lesions demonstrated the "knife-cut sign" and to review the characteristics of reported immunosuppressed individuals with "knife-cut" cutaneous herpes simplex virus lesions. A man with multiple myeloma and post-stem cell transplant cutaneous graft-versus-host disease managed with systemic prednisone and sirolimus developed disseminated cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection with virus-associated linear ulcers of the inguinal folds and the area between his ear and scalp; the lesions at both sites had a distinctive "knife-cut" appearance. Using the PubMed database, an extensive literature search was performed on herpes simplex virus, immunocompromised patient, and "knife-cut sign". Herpes simplex virus infection-associated skin lesions that demonstrate the "knife-cut sign" present in patients who are immunosuppressed secondary to either an underlying medical condition or a systemic therapy or both. The distinctive virus-related cutaneous lesions appear as linear ulcers and fissures in intertriginous areas, such as the folds in the inguinal area, the vulva, and the abdomen; in addition, other sites include beneath the breast, within the gluteal cleft, and the area between the ear and the scalp. Not only herpes simplex virus-2, but also herpes simplex virus-1 has been observed as the causative viral serotype; indeed, herpes simplex virus-1 has been associated with genital and inframammary lesions in addition to those above the neck. Direct fluorescent antibody testing is a rapid method for confirming the clinically suspected viral infection; however, since false-negative direct fluorescent antibody testing occurred in some of the patients, it may be prudent to also perform viral cultures and possibly lesional skin biopsies to establish the diagnosis. The herpes simplex

  11. [Meningoradiculitis caused by herpes simplex virus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, A E; Venema, A W; Veldkamp, K E

    2007-10-27

    A 24-year-old immune-competent woman was admitted to hospital with a three-day history of fever and headache. On examination bilateral facial nerve palsy, lumbosacral radicular pain, reduced sacral sensibility and urinary retention were found. Open perianal lesions were suspect for genital herpes. The symptoms were compatible with a meningoradiculitis including a sacral polyradiculitis. On testing, cerebrospinal fluid was found to be abnormal with a lymphocytic cell reaction. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of cerebrospinal fluid and of the perianal lesions was positive for herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). An MRI scan showed colouration of part of the cauda equina. The patient was treated by intravenous injections of acyclovir 10 mg/kg t.i.d. for 21 days, after which she completely recovered. HSV-2 infection of the nervous system can cause lymphocytic, and sometimes recurrent meningitis as well as sacral polyradiculitis. It may also occur without any symptomatic genital herpes infection. A positive result from a PCR test of the cerebrospinal fluid confirms this diagnosis. Treatment with acyclovir should be started as soon as possible.

  12. Therapeutic Vaccine for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Infection: Findings From a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, David I; Wald, Anna; Warren, Terri; Fife, Kenneth; Tyring, Stephen; Lee, Patricia; Van Wagoner, Nick; Magaret, Amalia; Flechtner, Jessica B; Tasker, Sybil; Chan, Jason; Morris, Amy; Hetherington, Seth

    2017-03-15

    Genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection causes recurrent lesions and frequent viral shedding. GEN-003 is a candidate therapeutic vaccine containing HSV-2 gD2∆TMR and ICP4.2, and Matrix-M2 adjuvant. Persons with genital herpes were randomized into 3 dose cohorts to receive 3 intramuscular doses 21 days apart of 10 µg, 30 µg, or 100 µg of GEN-003, antigens without adjuvant, or placebo. Participants obtained genital swab specimens twice daily for HSV-2 detection and monitored genital lesions for 28-day periods at baseline and at intervals after the last dose. One hundred and thirty-four persons received all 3 doses. Reactogenicity was associated with adjuvant but not with antigen dose or dose number. No serious adverse events were attributed to GEN-003. Compared with baseline, genital HSV-2 shedding rates immediately after dosing were reduced with GEN-003 (from 13.4% to 6.4% for 30 μg [P genital HSV shedding and lesion rates. NCT01667341 (funded by Genocea). © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Atypical oral presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in a patient after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, E M; Karp, D L; Wu, T C; Corio, R L

    1994-01-01

    An atypical oral presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in a 49-year-old woman after orthotopic liver transplantation is reported. Clinically, the differential diagnosis included chronic hyperplastic candidiasis, nodular leukoplakia of undetermined etiology, and malignant neoplasm. An excisional biopsy revealed herpesvirus infection, and immunoperoxidase staining confirmed herpes simplex virus infection. This report describes the clinical and histologic appearance of these lesions and the course and treatment of the patient.

  14. Application of shRNA-containing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based gene therapy for HSV-2-induced genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihong; Xiang, Yang; Wei, Zhun; Yu, Bo; Shao, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Hong; Li, Manmei; Guan, Ming; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    HSV-1-based vectors have been widely used to achieve targeted delivery of genes into the nervous system. In the current study, we aim to use shRNA-containing HSV-1-based gene delivery system for the therapy of HSV-2 infection. Guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with HSV-2 and scored daily for 100 days for the severity of vaginal disease. HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 was applied intravaginally daily between 8 and 14 days after HSV-2 challenge. Delivery of HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 had no effect on the onset of disease and acute virus shedding in animals, but resulted in a significant reduction in both the cumulative recurrent lesion days and the number of days with recurrent disease. Around half of the animals in the HSV-2 shRNA group did not develop recurrent disease 100 days post HSV-2 infection. In conclusion, HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 particles are effective in reducing the recurrence of genital herpes caused by HSV-2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Characteristics of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Rhesus Macaques and the Associated Pathological Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shengtao; Cai, Hongzhi; Xu, Xingli; Feng, Min; Wang, Lichun; Liao, Yun; Zhang, Ying; He, Zhanlong; Yang, Fengmei; Yu, Wenhai; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Jumin; Li, Qihan

    2017-01-30

    As one of the major pathogens for human herpetic diseases, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) causes herpes labialis, genital herpes and herpetic encephalitis. Our aim here was to investigate the infectious process of HSV1 in rhesus macaques and the pathological features induced during this infection. Clinical symptoms that manifested in the rhesus macaque during HSV1 infection included vesicular lesions and their pathological features. Viral distribution in the nervous tissues and associated pathologic changes indicated the typical systematic pathological processes associated with viral distribution of HSV1.Interestingly, vesicular lesions recurred in oral skin or in mucosa associated with virus shedding in macaques within four to five months post-infection,and viral latency-associated transcript (LAT) mRNA was found in the trigeminal ganglia (TG)on day 365 post-infection. Neutralization testing and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) detection of specific T cell responses confirmed the specific immunity induced by HSV1 infection. Thus, rhesus macaques could serve as an infectious model for HSV1 due to their typical clinical symptoms and the pathological recurrence associated with viral latency in nervous tissues.

  16. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Since the type of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection affects prognosis and subsequent counseling, type-specific testing to distinguish HSV-1 from HSV-2 is always recommended. Although PCR has been the diagnostic standard method for HSV infections of the central nervous system, until now viral culture has been the test of choice for HSV genital infection. However, HSV PCR, with its consistently and substantially higher rate of HSV detection, could replace viral culture as the gold standard for the diagnosis of genital herpes in people with active mucocutaneous lesions, regardless of anatomic location or viral type. Alternatively, antigen detection—an immunofluorescence test or enzyme immunoassay from samples from symptomatic patients--could be employed, but HSV type determination is of importance. Type-specific serology based on glycoprotein G should be used for detecting asymptomatic individuals but widespread screening for HSV antibodies is not recommended. In conclusion, rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis of HSV is now become a necessity, given the difficulty in making the clinical diagnosis of HSV, the growing worldwide prevalence of genital herpes and the availability of effective antiviral therapy. PMID:24885431

  17. Guidance on management of asymptomatic neonates born to women with active genital herpes lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberlin, David W; Baley, Jill

    2013-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection of the neonate is uncommon, but genital herpes infections in adults are very common. Thus, although treating an infant with neonatal herpes is a relatively rare occurrence, managing infants potentially exposed to HSV at the time of delivery occurs more frequently. The risk of transmitting HSV to an infant during delivery is determined in part by the mother's previous immunity to HSV. Women with primary genital HSV infections who are shedding HSV at delivery are 10 to 30 times more likely to transmit the virus to their newborn infants than are women with recurrent HSV infection who are shedding virus at delivery. With the availability of commercial serological tests that reliably can distinguish type-specific HSV antibodies, it is now possible to determine the type of maternal infection and, thus, further refine management of infants delivered to women who have active genital HSV lesions. The management algorithm presented herein uses both serological and virological studies to determine the risk of HSV transmission to the neonate who is delivered to a mother with active herpetic genital lesions and tailors management accordingly. The algorithm does not address the approach to asymptomatic neonates delivered to women with a history of genital herpes but no active lesions at delivery.

  18. Newer trends in the management of genital herpes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nath Amiya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of genital herpes is complex. Apart from using the standard antivirals, an ideal management protocol also needs to address various aspects of the disease, including the psychological morbidity. Oral acyclovir, valacyclovir or famciclovir are recommended for routine use. Long-term suppressive therapy is effective in reducing the number of recurrences and the risk of transmission to others. Severe or disseminated disease may require intravenous therapy. Resistant cases are managed with foscarnet or cidofovir. Genital herpes in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals usually needs a longer duration of antiviral therapy along with continuation of highly active anti retroviral therapy (HAART. Genital herpes in late pregnancy increases the risk of neonatal herpes. Antiviral therapy and/or cesarean delivery are indicated depending on the clinical circumstance. Acyclovir appears to be safe in pregnancy. But, there is limited data regarding the use of valacyclovir and famciclovir in pregnancy. Neonatal herpes requires a higher dose of acyclovir given intravenously for a longer duration. Management of the sex partner, counseling and prevention advice are equally important in appropriate management of genital herpes. Vaccines till date have been marginally effective. Helicase-primase inhibitors, needle-free mucosal vaccine and a new microbicide product named VivaGel may become promising treatment options in the future.

  19. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  20. Bovine herpes virus infections in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, S; Kumar, Manoj; Manohar, M; Chauhan, R S

    2009-06-01

    Bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1) is primarily associated with clinical syndromes such as rhinotracheitis, pustular vulvovaginitis and balanoposthitis, abortion, infertility, conjunctivitis and encephalitis in bovine species. The main sources of infection are the nasal exudates and the respiratory droplets, genital secretions, semen, fetal fluids and tissues. The BHV-1 virus can become latent following a primary infection with a field isolate or vaccination with an attenuated strain. The viral genomic DNA has been demonstrated in the sensory ganglia of the trigeminal nerve in infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) and in sacral spinal ganglia in pustular vulvovaginitis and balanoposthitis cases. BHV-1 infections can be diagnosed by detection of virus or virus components and antibody by serological tests or by detection of genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nucleic acid hybridization and sequencing. Inactivated vaccines and modified live virus vaccines are used for prevention of BHV-1 infections in cattle; subunit vaccines and marker vaccines are under investigation.

  1. [Factual approach to the treatment of genital herpes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkels, A F; Piérard, G E

    2000-05-01

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease. After the primary infection, the virus establishes a life-long latency in the sacral dorsal root ganglia. Recurrences may occur at an unpredictable rate. The clinical signs are not always easy to recognize and viral identification techniques may be helpful such as immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization on Tzanck smears and muco-cutaneous biopsies. The treatment of genital herpes can follow one of three strategies using antiviral drugs, non-specific immunomodulators, and vaccination. The new oral antiviral drugs decrease the severity of clinical manifestations without, however, providing a definitive cure. In this article recent knowledge about the clinical aspects, differential diagnosis, diagnostic methods, treatment options and management is reviewed.

  2. Immunization against Genital Herpes with a Vaccine Virus That has Defects in Productive and Latent Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Xavier J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Knipe, David M.

    1999-06-01

    An effective vaccine for genital herpes has been difficult to achieve because of the limited efficacy of subunit vaccines and the safety concerns about live viruses. As an alternative approach, mutant herpes simplex virus strains that are replication-defective can induce protective immunity. To increase the level of safety and to prove that replication was not needed for immunization, we constructed a mutant herpes simplex virus 2 strain containing two deletion mutations, each of which eliminated viral replication. The double-mutant virus induces protective immunity that can reduce acute viral shedding and latent infection in a mouse genital model, but importantly, the double-mutant virus shows a phenotypic defect in latent infection. This herpes vaccine strain, which is immunogenic but has defects in both productive and latent infection, provides a paradigm for the design of vaccines and vaccine vectors for other sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS.

  3. Effect of acycloguanosine treatment of acute and latent herpes simplex infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, H J; Bell, S E; Elion, G B; Nash, A A; Wildy, P

    1979-04-01

    Systemic treatment of mice with the nucleoside analog 9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)guanine (acycloguanosine [aciclovir]) was found to be highly effective against acute type 1 herpes simplex virus infection of the pinna. The drug ablated clinical signs and reduced virus replication both in tissue local to the inoculation site and within the nervous system. Provided that moderate-sized virus inocula were used, acycloguanosine treatment reduced or prevented the establishment of a latent infection in the dorsal root ganglia relating to the sensory nerve supply of the ear. However, although it aborted artificially produced infections in dorsal root ganglia, acycloguanosine was found not to be effective against the latent infection once established. This finding strongly indicated that latent herpes simplex virus in mice can exist in a nonreplicating form.

  4. Eye and Periocular Skin Involvement in Herpes Zoster Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeropoulos, Chris D; Bassukas, Ioannis D; Moschos, Marilita M; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) is a clinical manifestation of the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection and is more common in people with diminished cell-mediated immunity. Lesions and pain correspond to the affected dermatomes, mostly in first or second trigeminal branch and progress from maculae, papules to vesicles and form pustules, and crusts. Complications are cutaneous, visceral, neurological, ocular, but the most debilitating is post-herpetic neuralgia. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus may affect all the ophthalmic structures, but most severe eye-threatening complications are panuveitis, acute retinal necrosis (ARN) and progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as well. Antiviral medications remain the primary therapy, mainly useful in preventing ocular involvement when begun within 72 hours after the onset of the rash. Timely diagnosis and management of HZO are critical in limiting visual morbidity. Vaccine in adults over 60 was found to be highly effective to boost waning immunity what reduces both the burden of herpes zoster (HZ) disease and the incidence of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN).

  5. Herpes zoster in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Alexander K C; Robson, W Lane M; Leong, Alexander G

    2006-01-01

    Herpes zoster is caused by reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus that resides in a dorsal root ganglion. Herpes zoster can develop any time after a primary infection. Because varicella vaccine is a live attenuated virus, herpes zoster can develop in a vaccine recipient. The incidence of herpes zoster among vaccine recipients is about 14 cases per 100,000 person-years. In young children, herpes zoster has a predilection for areas supplied by the cervical and sacral dermatomes. The most common complications are secondary bacterial infection, depigmentation, and scarring. Although the diagnosis of herpes zoster is based on a distinct clinical appearance, viral DNA analysis of the lesion by polymerase chain reaction or restriction fragment length polymorphism is necessary to differentiate wild from vaccine-type viruses. Acyclovir is the treatment of choice for herpes zoster.

  6. Detection of herpes simplex virus-specific DNA sequences in latently infected mice and in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, S; Minson, A C; Field, H J; Anderson, J R; Wildy, P

    1986-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus-specific DNA sequences have been detected by Southern hybridization analysis in both central and peripheral nervous system tissues of latently infected mice. We have detected virus-specific sequences corresponding to the junction fragment but not the genomic termini, an observation first made by Rock and Fraser (Nature [London] 302:523-525, 1983). This "endless" herpes simplex virus DNA is both qualitatively and quantitatively stable in mouse neural tissue analyzed over a 4-month period. In addition, examination of DNA extracted from human trigeminal ganglia has shown herpes simplex virus DNA to be present in an "endless" form similar to that found in the mouse model system. Further restriction enzyme analysis of latently infected mouse brainstem and human trigeminal DNA has shown that this "endless" herpes simplex virus DNA is present in all four isomeric configurations.

  7. Membrane prteins of herpes simplex infected cells. Immunological and biochemical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling-Wester, Sijtske

    1981-01-01

    As a consequence of infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV), cells exhibit a number of alterations. One of these is expressed as a change in the polypeptide composition of the surface of the infected cells. In this study several methods used for the isolation of these polypeptides expressed on the

  8. Photodynamic treatment of Herpes simplex virus infection in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Hester, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of photodynamic action on in vitro herpes simplex virus infections of CV-1 monkey kidney fibroblasts or human skin fibroblasts were determined using proflavine sulfate and white fluorescent lamps. Photodynamic treatment of confluent cell monolayers prior to virus infection inactivated cell capacity, i.e. the capacity of the treated cells to support subsequent virus growth as measured by plaque formation. The capacity of human cells was more sensitive to inactivation than the capacity of monkey cells when 6 μM proflavine was used. Treated cell monolayers recovered the capacity to support virus plaque formation when virus infection was delayed four days after the treatment. Experiments in which the photodynamically treated monolayers were infected with UV-irradiated virus demonstrated that this treatment induced Weigle reactivation in both types of cells. This reactivation occurred for virus infection just after treatment or 4 days later. A Luria-Latarjet-type experiment was also performed in which cultures infected with unirradiated virus were photodynamically treated at different times after the start of infection. The results showed that for the first several hours of the virus infection the infected cultures were more sensitive to inactivation by photodynamic treatment than cell capacity. By the end of the eclipse period the infected cultures were less sensitive to inactivation than cell capacity. Results from extracellular inactivation of virus growth in monkey cells at 6 μM proflavine indicated that at physiological pH the virus has a sensitivity to photodynamic inactivation similar to that for inactivation of cell capacity. The combined data indicated that photodynamic treatment of the cell before or after virus infection could prevent virus growth. Thus, photodynamic inactivation of infected and uninfected cells may be as important as inactivation of virus particles when considering possible mechanisms in clinical photodynamic therapy for herpes

  9. Obstetric outcomes of human Herpes virus‑2 infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study investigated the obstetric outcomes of herpes simplex virus (HSV‑2) infection among pregnant women. Materials and Methods: In this prospective cohort study, a total of 674 consenting pregnant women attending ante‑natal clinic in the University of Benin Teaching Hospital and Central Hospital Benin ...

  10. Virus specific antigens in mammalian cells infected with herpes simplex virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, D. H.; Shedden, W. I. H.; Elliot, A.; Tetsuka, T.; Wildy, P.; Bourgaux-Ramoisy, D.; Gold, E.

    1966-01-01

    Antisera to specific proteins in herpes simplex infected cells were produced by immunization of rabbits with infected rabbit kidney cells. These antisera were highly virus specific and produced up to twelve lines in immunodiffusion tests against infected cell extracts. Acrylamide electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis revealed up to ten virus specific proteins of varying size. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4288648

  11. Effect of Acycloguanosine Treatment on Acute and Latent Herpes Simplex Infections in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Hugh J.; Bell, Susanne E.; Elion, Gertrude B.; Nash, Anthony A.; Wildy, Peter

    1979-01-01

    Systemic treatment of mice with the nucleoside analog 9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)guanine (acycloguanosine [aciclovir]) was found to be highly effective against acute type 1 herpes simplex virus infection of the pinna. The drug ablated clinical signs and reduced virus replication both in tissue local to the inoculation site and within the nervous system. Provided that moderate-sized virus inocula were used, acycloguanosine treatment reduced or prevented the establishment of a latent infection in the dorsal root ganglia relating to the sensory nerve supply of the ear. However, although it aborted artificially produced infections in dorsal root ganglia, acycloguanosine was found not to be effective against the latent infection once established. This finding strongly indicated that latent herpes simplex virus in mice can exist in a nonreplicating form. PMID:464587

  12. Genital Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be can be considerable embarrassment, shame, and stigma associated with a herpes diagnosis that can substantially ... complications for a pregnant woman and her newborn child. See “ How does herpes infection affect a pregnant ...

  13. [Genital herpes and pregnancy: Serological and molecular diagnostic tools. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauloup-Fellous, C

    2017-12-01

    To describe serological and molecular tools available for genital and neonatal herpes, and their use in different clinical situations. Bibliographic investigations from MedLine database and consultation of international clinical practice guidelines. Virological confirmation of genital herpes during pregnancy or neonatal herpes must rely on PCR (Professional consensus). HSV type-specific serology (IgG) will allow determining the immune status of a patient (in the absence of clinical lesions). However, there is currently no evidence to justify universal HSV serological testing during pregnancy (Professional consensus). In case of genital lesions in a pregnant woman that do not report any genital herpes before, it is recommended to perform a virological confirmation by PCR and HSV type-specific IgG in order to distinguish a true primary infection, a non-primary infection associated with first genital manifestation, from a recurrence (Grade C). HSV IgM is useless for diagnosis of genital herpes (Grade C). If a pregnant woman has personal history of genital herpes but no lesions, whatever the gestational age, it is not recommended to perform genital sampling nor serology (Professional consensus). In case of recurrence, if the lesion is characteristic of herpes, virological confirmation is not necessary (Professional Agreement). However, if the lesion is not characteristic, virological confirmation by PCR should be performed (Professional consensus). At birth, HSV PCR samples should be collected as soon as neonatal herpes is suspected (symptomatic neonate) (best before beginning antiviral treatment but must not delay the treatment), or after 24hours of life in case of asymptomatic neonate born to a mother with herpes lesions at delivery (Professional consensus). Clinical samples for virological confirmation should include at least blood and a peripheral location. In case of clinical manifestations of herpes in the neonate, first samples PCR positive, preterm birth, or

  14. Herpes zoster and HIV infection in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naburi, A E; Leppard, B

    2000-04-01

    Two hundred consecutive patients with herpes zoster attending the skin clinic at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) were examined and checked for HIV infection. They ranged in age from 10 months to 86 years with the majority in their 20s and 30s. The dermatomes involved were thoracic (97), trigeminal (50), cervical (37), lumbar (19) and sacral (3). Six (3%) had more than one dermatome involved and 2 (1%) had disseminated disease. Only 2 (1%) had severe ulceration of the skin and all healed in less than 4 weeks. In children under the age of 10 years and in adults between the ages of 20 and 49 years virtually 100% were HIV positive; even in the age group 50-59 more than three-quarters were HIV positive. We conclude that the presence of herpes zoster at any site is a good indication that the patient is HIV positive except in the teens and the very elderly.

  15. Secondary Hemophagocytic Syndrome Associated with Herpes Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Rodionovskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic syndrome is one of the complications of herpes virus infections. Here, we describe the case of a 8—year-old male with secondary hemophagocytic syndrome. The disease was diagnosed in the early stages. The patient received treatment with dexamethasone, intravenous immunoglobulin, which has led to a weakening of the ignition and the suppression of the disease with rapid treatment.

  16. Eye and Periocular Skin Involvement in Herpes Zoster Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeropoulos, Chris D.; Bassukas, Ioannis D.; Moschos, Marilita M.; Tabbara, Khalid F.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) is a clinical manifestation of the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection and is more common in people with diminished cell-mediated immunity. Lesions and pain correspond to the affected dermatomes, mostly in first or second trigeminal branch and progress from maculae, papules to vesicles and form pustules, and crusts. Complications are cutaneous, visceral, neurological, ocular, but the most debilitating is post-herpetic neuralgia. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus may affect all the ophthalmic structures, but most severe eye-threatening complications are panuveitis, acute retinal necrosis (ARN) and progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as well. Antiviral medications remain the primary therapy, mainly useful in preventing ocular involvement when begun within 72 hours after the onset of the rash. Timely diagnosis and management of HZO are critical in limiting visual morbidity. Vaccine in adults over 60 was found to be highly effective to boost waning immunity what reduces both the burden of herpes zoster (HZ) disease and the incidence of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). PMID:27800502

  17. State infants after perinatal complications prevention by mother with the association of HIV and herpes virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhdanovich O.I.; Anoshyna T.M.; Kolomiichenko T.V.

    2016-01-01

    Relevance. Complicated and little studied issue is the perinatal complications prevention in pregnant women with HIV and herpes virus infections (GI) The goal — to evaluate the effectiveness of the system of perinatal complications prevention during the association of HIV and herpes infection. Materials and methods. Selected 60 HIV-infected pregnant women with the GI, which divided into 2 groups: primary — 30 pregnant women with the use of recommended prophylaxis complex (specific immunogl...

  18. Herpes simplex-virus type 1 påvist hos patient med herpes zoster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Patricia Louise; Schønning, Kristian; Larsen, Helle Kiellberg

    2012-01-01

    In this case report we present an otherwise healthy 63 year-old male patient with herpes zoster corresponding to the 2nd left branch of the trigeminal nerve. Real time-polymerase chain reaction analyses were positive for both herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and varicella zoster virus (VZV......). The most probable explanation is that this reflects asymptomatic, latent expression of HSV-1 in a herpes zoster patient with no clinical relevance. Another hypothesis is that reactivation of a neurotropic herpes virus can reactivate another neurotropic virus if both types are present in the same ganglion....... If co-infection with HSV/VZV is suspected the treatment regimen for herpes zoster will sufficiently treat a possible HSV infection also....

  19. Interferon Lambda 4 Genotype Is Not Associated with Recurrence of Oral or Genital Herpes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystle A Lang Kuhs

    Full Text Available IFNL4-ΔG/TT (rs368234815 genotype is associated with hepatitis C virus clearance and may play a role in other infections. IFN-λ4 protein is generated only in individuals who carry the IFNL4-ΔG allele. The IFNL4 rs12979860-T allele, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with IFNL4-ΔG, was recently reported to be associated with more frequent and severe oral herpes episodes. We investigated the association of IFNL4-ΔG/TT with herpes simplex virus (HSV-related outcomes among 2,192 African American and European American participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS. WIHS is a prospective cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected and at-risk women that began in 1994. This report includes follow-up through 2013. Available data included: HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies at study entry; bi-annually ascertained episodes of (self-reported oral herpes, (self-reported genital sores and (clinician-observed genital ulcers; HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL specimens. IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotyping was determined by TaqMan. We compared women with IFNL4-ΔG/ΔG or IFNL4-TT/ΔG genotypes (i.e., IFNL4-ΔG carriers to those with the IFNL4-TT/TT genotype, adjusting for age, race and HIV status. For outcomes with repeated measurements, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR, 95% confidence interval [CI] and p-value were determined using a generalized estimating equations approach. Median participant age at enrollment was 36 years; 81% were African American, 74% were HIV-infected. Among 1,431 participants tested for antibodies, 72.8% were positive for HSV-1 and 79.0% were positive for HSV-2. We observed no association between IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotype and any outcome: HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibody prevalence (p>0.1, all comparisons; oral herpes (aOR, 1.2; p = 0.35; genital sores (aOR, 1.0; p = 0.71; genital ulcers (aOR, 1.1; p = 0.53; detectable HSV-2 DNA in CVL (N = 322; aOR, 0.71; p = 0.49; HSV-2 DNA level (p = 0.68. In this large prospective study, IFNL4

  20. Interferon Lambda 4 Genotype Is Not Associated with Recurrence of Oral or Genital Herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A; Kuniholm, Mark H; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Chen, Sabrina; Desai, Seema; Edlin, Brian R; Peters, Marion G; Plankey, Michael; Sharp, Gerald B; Strickler, Howard D; Villacres, Maria C; Quinn, Thomas C; Gange, Stephen J; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Greenblatt, Ruth M; O'Brien, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    IFNL4-ΔG/TT (rs368234815) genotype is associated with hepatitis C virus clearance and may play a role in other infections. IFN-λ4 protein is generated only in individuals who carry the IFNL4-ΔG allele. The IFNL4 rs12979860-T allele, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with IFNL4-ΔG, was recently reported to be associated with more frequent and severe oral herpes episodes. We investigated the association of IFNL4-ΔG/TT with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-related outcomes among 2,192 African American and European American participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). WIHS is a prospective cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and at-risk women that began in 1994. This report includes follow-up through 2013. Available data included: HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies at study entry; bi-annually ascertained episodes of (self-reported) oral herpes, (self-reported) genital sores and (clinician-observed) genital ulcers; HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens. IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotyping was determined by TaqMan. We compared women with IFNL4-ΔG/ΔG or IFNL4-TT/ΔG genotypes (i.e., IFNL4-ΔG carriers) to those with the IFNL4-TT/TT genotype, adjusting for age, race and HIV status. For outcomes with repeated measurements, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 95% confidence interval [CI] and p-value were determined using a generalized estimating equations approach. Median participant age at enrollment was 36 years; 81% were African American, 74% were HIV-infected. Among 1,431 participants tested for antibodies, 72.8% were positive for HSV-1 and 79.0% were positive for HSV-2. We observed no association between IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotype and any outcome: HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibody prevalence (p>0.1, all comparisons); oral herpes (aOR, 1.2; p = 0.35); genital sores (aOR, 1.0; p = 0.71); genital ulcers (aOR, 1.1; p = 0.53); detectable HSV-2 DNA in CVL (N = 322; aOR, 0.71; p = 0.49); HSV-2 DNA level (p = 0.68). In this large prospective study, IFNL4-

  1. Efficacy of the anti-VZV (anti-HSV3 vaccine in HSV1 and HSV2 recurrent herpes simplex disease: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Goaster J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Le Goaster,1 Sylvie Gonzalo,2 Patrice Bourée,1 Frederic Tangy,3 Anne-Lise Haenni41Department of Tropical Diseases, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire (CHU, University of Paris XI, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, 2Biomnis Laboratory, Ivry-sur-Seine, 3Retro-Virology, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, Pasteur Institute, Paris; 4Jacques Monod Institute, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, University of Paris VII, Paris, FranceBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using the anti-varicella zoster virus (anti-VZV, also known as anti-HSV3 vaccine against orobuccal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 and genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV2. This was suggested by study of the phylogenetic tree of members of the herpes virus family, which showed a close relationship between VZV (HSV3 and the HSV1 and HSV2 herpes viruses.Methods: The present prospective study was conducted from January 2005 through January 2011. Twenty-four patients afflicted with HSV1 and HSV2 herpes recurrences over a period of years, numbering 6–8 and more recurrences per year, agreed to receive the anti-VZV vaccine. They were compared with 26 nonvaccinated patients presenting with herpes simplex diseases 2–5 times a year. All 50 patients were documented with anti-HSV1, anti-HSV2, and anti-VZV antibody serological testing.Results: From 2005 through 2011, for the 24 anti-VZV vaccinated patients, the average number of herpes relapses decreased to 0, correlated with an increased anti-VZV antibody level and clinical recovery of all patients, whereas no improvement was observed for the 26 nonvaccinated herpes patients.Conclusion: Data for the anti-VZV serological antibody levels tested before and after anti-VZV vaccination showed a significant (P < 0.001 increase among vaccinated patients. This suggests defective anti-VZV immune power in these patients. After 6 years of positive results for anti-VZV vaccine, this is a logical and

  2. Herpes simplex type 2 pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calore Edenilson Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive reviews of pulmonary infections in AIDS have reported few herpetic infections. Generally these infections are due to Herpes simplex type 1. Pneumonia due to herpes type 2 is extremely rare. We describe a 40 year-old HIV positive woman who complained of fever, cough and dyspnea for seven years. She had signs of heart failure and the appearance of her genital vesicles was highly suggestive of genital herpes. Echocardiography showed marked pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy and tricuspid insufficiency. After a few days of hospitalization she was treated with Aciclovir and later with Ganciclovir. An open pulmonary biopsy revealed an interstitial inflammation, localized in the alveolar walls. Some pulmonary arteries had widened walls and focal hyaline degeneration. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the nuclei had herpes simplex virus type 2 in many endothelial cells (including vessels with widened walls, macrophages in the alveolar septa and pneumocytes. There was clinical improvement after treatment for herpes. We concluded that as a consequence of herpes infection, endothelial involvement and interstitial inflammation supervene, with thickening of vascular walls and partial obliteration of the vessel lumen. A direct consequence of these changes in pulmonary vasculature was pulmonary hypertension followed by heart failure.

  3. Herpes simplex type 2 pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenilson Eduardo Calore

    Full Text Available Extensive reviews of pulmonary infections in AIDS have reported few herpetic infections. Generally these infections are due to Herpes simplex type 1. Pneumonia due to herpes type 2 is extremely rare. We describe a 40 year-old HIV positive woman who complained of fever, cough and dyspnea for seven years. She had signs of heart failure and the appearance of her genital vesicles was highly suggestive of genital herpes. Echocardiography showed marked pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy and tricuspid insufficiency. After a few days of hospitalization she was treated with Aciclovir and later with Ganciclovir. An open pulmonary biopsy revealed an interstitial inflammation, localized in the alveolar walls. Some pulmonary arteries had widened walls and focal hyaline degeneration. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the nuclei had herpes simplex virus type 2 in many endothelial cells (including vessels with widened walls, macrophages in the alveolar septa and pneumocytes. There was clinical improvement after treatment for herpes. We concluded that as a consequence of herpes infection, endothelial involvement and interstitial inflammation supervene, with thickening of vascular walls and partial obliteration of the vessel lumen. A direct consequence of these changes in pulmonary vasculature was pulmonary hypertension followed by heart failure.

  4. Herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy and in neonate: status of art of epidemiology, diagnosis, therapy and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barucca Valentina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection is one of the most common viral sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. The first time infection of the mother may lead to severe illness in pregnancy and may be associated with virus transmission from mother to foetus/newborn. Since the incidence of this sexually transmitted infection continues to rise and because the greatest incidence of herpes simplex virus infections occur in women of reproductive age, the risk of maternal transmission of the virus to the foetus or neonate has become a major health concern. On these purposes the Authors of this review looked for the medical literature and pertinent publications to define the status of art regarding the epidemiology, the diagnosis, the therapy and the prevention of HSV in pregnant women and neonate. Special emphasis is placed upon the importance of genital herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy and on the its prevention to avoid neonatal HSV infections.

  5. Occurrence of herpes zoster varicella infections after completion of treatment for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauw, B.E. de; Janssen, J.Th.P.; Vaissier, P.; Haanen, C.

    1983-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of 210 cases of patients with Hodgkin's disease revealed an overall incidence of herpes zoster varicella of 9.5 per cent. Patients with the mixed cellular histological subtype showed a significantly increased (p < 0.05) risk as compared with the total population. More than 90 per cent of the herpes zoster varicella infections occurred after termination of treatment; a combination of radiotherapy with chemotherapy proved to be a predisposing factor. (Auth.)

  6. Using centralized laboratory data to monitor trends in herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 infection in British Columbia and the changing etiology of genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Mark; Li, Xuan; Petric, Martin; Krajden, Mel; Isaac-Renton, Judith L; Ogilvie, Gina; Rekart, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the regional epidemiology of genital Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) infections is important for clinical and public health practice, due to the increasing availability of type-specific serologic testing in Canada and the contribution of genital HSV-2 infection to ongoing HIV transmission. We used centralized laboratory data to describe trends in viral identifications of genital HSV in BC and assess the utility of these data for ongoing population surveillance. Records of viral identifications (1997-2005) were extracted from the Provincial Public Health Microbiology & Reference Laboratory database. Classification as genital or other site was based on documented specimen site. We conducted a descriptive analysis of trends over time, and calculated odds of HSV-1 infection among individuals with genital herpes. Of 48,183 viral identifications, 56.8% were genital, 10.0% were peri-oral and 9.1% cutaneous; site was unknown for 22.9%. Among genital identifications, HSV-1 infection was more likely in females, younger age groups, and later time periods. The proportion of genital herpes due to HSV-1 increased over time from 31.4% to 42.8% in BC. Our analysis of population-level laboratory data demonstrates that the proportion of genital herpes due to HSV-1 is increasing over time in BC, particularly among women and younger age groups; this has implications for clinical practice including the interpretation of type-specific serology. Provincial viral identification data are useful for monitoring the distribution of genital HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections over time. Improving clinical documentation of specimen site would improve the utility of these data.

  7. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carr...

  8. Herpes simplex and varicella zoster CNS infections: clinical presentations, treatments and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai; Salazar, Lucrecia; Aguilera, Elizabeth; Wootton, Susan H; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    To describe the clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics, imaging studies and prognostic factors of adverse clinical outcomes (ACO) among adults with herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV) CNS infections. Retrospective review of adult patients with positive HSV or VZV polymerase chain reaction on CSF from an observational study of meningitis or encephalitis in Houston, TX (2004-2014), and New Orleans, LA (1999-2008). Ninety-eight adults patients were identified; 25 had encephalitis [20 (20.4 %) HSV, 5 (5.1 %) VZV], and 73 had meningitis [60 (61.1 %) HSV and 13 (13.3 %) VZV]. HSV and VZV had similar presentations except for nausea (P 1 and an encephalitis presentation were independently associated with an ACO. The treatment for HSV meningitis was variable, and all patients had a good clinical outcome. Alpha herpes CNS infections due to HSV and VZV infections have similar clinical and laboratory manifestations. ACO was observed more frequently in those patients with comorbidities and an encephalitis presentation.

  9. Primary Genital Herpes Diseases in İnfancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinç Gümüş Pekacar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic primary genital herpes infection is very rare in early childhood. Herpes simplex virus 1 type is the infectious agent in 20-50% percent of primery infections. Sexual abuse should be considered when genital herpes is seen in a person before sexual active age. It is mild and self limiting unless the patient is immune compramised. In this paper we discussed a 17 months old patient with genital herpes and approach to genital herpes in children.

  10. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carriers serve as reservoirs for transmission; therefore, a household approach to decolonization is more effective than measures performed by individuals alone. Other factors, such as environmental surface contamination, may also be considered. Novel strategies for the prevention of recurrent SSTI are needed. PMID:26311356

  11. Clinical Efficacy of Oral Ganciclovir for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Recurrent Herpes Simplex Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1, which has high recurrent rate and incidence of severe vision loss, is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the world. The aim was to explore the clinical efficacy of oral ganciclovir (GCV in the prevention of recurrent HSK. Methods: A multicenter, prospective, randomized, single-blind, and controlled clinical trial was conducted from April 2010 to June 2013. One hundred seventy-three patients (173 eyes involved who were diagnosed as recurrent HSK definitely, including stromal keratitis and corneal endotheliitis, were divided into three groups randomly: negative control (placebo group was topically administered with 0.15% GCV ophthalmic gel, 4 times per day and 0.1% fluorometholone eye drops, 3 times per day until resolution of HSK; positive control acyclovir (ACV group was topically adopted the same ophthalmic gel and eye drops and additionally received oral ACV 400 mg 5 times a day for 10 weeks and followed by 400 mg 2 times per day for 6 months; test GCV group was topically adopted the same treatment as negative control group and additionally received oral GCV 1000 mg 3 times per day for 8 weeks. The symptoms and signs were evaluated before and after the therapy 1 st week, 2 nd week and then followed up every 2 weeks until recovery. Furthermore, we followed up recurrence of HSK for every 3 months after recovery and then assessed the cure time, recurrent rate and adverse reactions. Results: One hundred and seventy-three patients were followed up 7-48 months (mean 32.1 ± 12.3 months, but 34 patients were failed to follow-up. The cure time was 12.1 ± 4.3, 11.9 ± 4.0 weeks in negative control (placebo group and positive control ACV group respectively (P = 0.991, which was longer than that in test GCV group (8.6 ± 2.8 weeks and there was a significant difference between test GCV group and negative control (placebo group or positive control ACV group (P

  12. Association Between Unprotected Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure and Recurrence of Ocular Herpes Simplex Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludema, Christina; Cole, Stephen R.; Poole, Charles; Smith, Jennifer S.; Schoenbach, Victor J.; Wilhelmus, Kirk R.

    2014-01-01

    Studies have suggested that exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light may increase risk of herpes simplex virus (HSV) recurrence. Between 1993 and 1997, the Herpetic Eye Disease Study (HEDS) randomized 703 participants with ocular HSV to receipt of acyclovir or placebo for prevention of ocular HSV recurrence. Of these, 308 HEDS participants (48% female and 85% white; median age, 49 years) were included in a nested study of exposures thought to cause recurrence and were followed for up to 15 months. We matched weekly UV index values from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to each participant's study center and used marginal structural Cox models to account for time-varying psychological stress and contact lens use and selection bias from dropout. There were 44 recurrences of ocular HSV, yielding an incidence of 4.3 events per 1,000 person-weeks. Weighted hazard ratios comparing persons with ≥8 hours of time outdoors to those with less exposure were 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.27, 2.63) and 3.10 (95% CI: 1.14, 8.48) for weeks with a UV index of <4 and ≥4, respectively (ratio of hazard ratios = 3.68, 95% CI: 0.43, 31.4). Though results were imprecise, when the UV index was higher (i.e., ≥4), spending 8 or more hours per week outdoors was associated with increased risk of ocular HSV recurrence. PMID:24142918

  13. Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 Infection among Females in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 has recently been found to have synergistic effect with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and co-infection of the two presents more severe burden to the immunity of the victim. This leads to much morbidity and mortality with negative economic impact. In this study, we set out to determine ...

  14. Pityriasis Lichenoides Chronica Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Javier González Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pityriasis lichenoides is a rare, acquired spectrum of skin conditions of an unknown etiology. Case Report. A 28-year-old man presented with recurrent outbreaks of herpes simplex virus associated with the onset of red-to-brown maculopapules located predominantly in trunk in each recurrence. Positive serologies to herpes simplex virus type 2 were detected. Histopathological examination of one of the lesions was consistent with a diagnosis of pityriasis lichenoides chronica. Discussion. Pityriasis lichenoides is a rare cutaneous entity of an unknown cause which includes different clinical presentations. A number of infectious agents have been implicated based on the clustering of multiple outbreaks and elevated serum titers to specific pathogens (human immunodeficiency virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma gondii, and herpes simplex virus. In our patient, resolution of cutaneous lesions coincided with the administration of antiviral drugs and clinical improvement in each genital herpes recurrence. In conclusion, we report a case in which cutaneous lesions of pityriasis lichenoides chronica and a herpes simplex virus-type 2-mediated disease have evolved concomitantly.

  15. CLINICAL AND VIROLOGIC FOUNDATION FOR PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS TYPE 6 INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Myukke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about an infection caused by human herpes virus type 6, its' epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical variants, is reviewed. Clinical cases, diagnosed at a time of study, are briefly reviewed.Key words: human herpes virus type 6, exanthema subitum (roseola infantum, fever of unknown origin, mononucleosis like syndrome, meningoencephalitis, children.

  16. [The Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of neonatal herpes simplex infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-13

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections are rare, but are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Most newborns acquire herpes simplex virus infection in the peripartum period. For peripartum transmission to occur, women must be shedding the virus in their genital tracts symptomatically or asymptomatically around the time of delivery. There are evidence-based interventions in pregnancy to prevent the transmission to the newborn. Caesarean section should be performed in the presence of herpetic lesions, and antiviral prophylaxis in the last weeks of pregnancy is recommended to suppress genital tract herpes simplex virus at the time of delivery. The diagnosis and early treatment of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections require a high index of suspicion, especially in the absence of skin lesions. It is recommended to rule out herpes simplex virus infections in those newborns with mucocutaneous lesions, central nervous system involvement, or septic appearance. The prognosis of newborns with skin, eye, and/or mouth disease in the high-dose acyclovir era is very good. Antiviral treatment not only improves mortality rates in disseminated and central nervous system disease, but also improves the rates of long-term neurodevelopmental impairment in the cases of disseminated disease. Interestingly, a 6-month suppressive course of oral acyclovir following the acute infection has improved the neurodevelopmental prognosis in patients with CNS involvement. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus co-infection presenting as exuberant genital ulcer in a woman infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, A I; Borges-Costa, J; Soares-Almeida, L; Sacramento-Marques, M; Kutzner, H

    2014-12-01

    In patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), genital herpes can result in severe and atypical clinical presentations, and can become resistant to aciclovir treatment. Rarely, these manifestations may represent concurrent herpes simplex virus (HSV) with other agents. We report a 41-year-old black woman with HIV who presented with extensive and painful ulceration of the genitalia. Histological examination of a biopsy sample was suggestive of herpetic infection, and intravenous aciclovir was started, but produced only partial improvement. PCR was performed on the biopsy sample, and both HSV and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA was detected. Oral valganciclovir was started with therapeutic success. CMV infection is common in patients infected with HIV, but its presence in mucocutaneous lesions is rarely reported. This case exemplifies the difficulties of diagnosis of genital ulcers in patients infected with HIV. The presence of exuberant and persistent HSV genital ulcers in patients with HIV should also raise suspicions of the presence of co-infection with other organisms such as CMV. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Genital herpes.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the prevalence of genital herpes, outlines the typical clinical courses of the disease in its primary and recurrent forms. He discusses the physical, psychological and social effects of this sexually transmitted disease and provides three protocols for the use of oral acyclovir in its treatment.

  19. Synthetic analogues of bovine bactenecin dodecapeptide reduce herpes simplex virus type 2 infectivity in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Shestakov, Andrey; Hancock, Robert E. W

    2013-01-01

    We have evaluated the potential of four synthetic peptides (denoted HH-2, 1002, 1006, 1018) with a distant relationship to the host defense peptide bovine bactenecin dodecapeptide for their ability to prevent genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in mice. All four peptides...... infectious doses of HSV-2. These data show that peptides HH-2 and 1018 have antiviral properties and can be used to prevent genital herpes infection in mice. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....... was introduced in human semen. Two of the peptides proved especially effective in reducing HSV-2 infection also in vivo. When admixed with virus prior to inoculation, both HH-2 and 1018 reduced viral replication and disease development in a genital model of HSV-2 infection in mice, and also when using very high...

  20. Herpes zoster infection: a rare cause of acute urinary retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jonathan E; Kapoor, Anil

    2003-06-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) infection has been reported as a rare cause of acute urinary retention. HZ infection involving sacral, thoracolumbar, and rarely high thoracic dermatomes is believed to occasionally cause motor and sensory neuropathy of the bladder. This is specifically achieved by the interruption of the detrusor reflex causing subsequent bladder atonia. As the course and management of this entity is quite benign, HZ should remain a diagnostic consideration in the management of urinary retention. We report a case of acute urinary retention of approximately 2.5 liters associated with HZ infection and review the proposed pathogenesis and therapeutic considerations in the management of this entity.

  1. [Genital herpes and pregnancy: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, prevention and screening. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists and Obstetrician (CNGOF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, O

    2017-12-01

    To analyze the consequences of genital herpes infections in pregnant women. The PubMed database and the recommendations from the French and foreign obstetrical societies or colleges have been consulted. The symptomatology of herpes genital rash is often atypical (NP2) and not different during pregnancy (Professional consensus). It is most often due to HSV2 (NP2). Seventy percent of pregnant patients have a history of infection with Herpes simplex virus, without reference to genital or labial localization, and this is in most cases type 1 (NP2). The prevalence of clinical herpes lesions at birth in the event of recurrence is about 16% compared with 36% in the case of initial infection (NP4). In HSV+ patients, asymptomatic herpetic excretion is 4 to 10%. The rate of excretion increases in HIV+ patients (20 to 30%) (NP2). The risk of HSV seroconversion during pregnancy is 1 to 5% (NP2), but can reach 20% in case of sero-discordant couple (NP2). Questioning is not always sufficient to determine the history of herpes infection of a patient and her partner (NP2) and the clinical examination is not always reliable (NP2). Herpetic hepatitis and encephalitis are rare and potentially severe (NP4). These diagnoses should be discussed during pregnancy and antiviral therapy should be started as soon as possible (Professional consensus). There is no established link between herpes infection and miscarriages (NP3). There appears to be an association between untreated herpes infection and premature delivery (NP3) but not in the case of treated infections (NP4). Herpetic fetopathies are exceptional (NP4). There is no argument for recommending specific prenatal diagnosis for herpes infection during pregnancy (Professional consensus). Condom use reduces the risk of initial infection in women who are not pregnant (NP3). There is no evidence to justify routine screening during pregnancy (Professional consensus). There is a strong discrepancy between the prevalence of herpetic excretion

  2. Superficial herpes simplex virus wound infection following lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolak, Wojtek; Wojarski, Jacek; Zegleń, Sławomir; Ochman, Marek; Urlik, Maciej; Hudzik, Bartosz; Wozniak-Grygiel, Elzbieta; Maruszewski, Marcin

    2017-08-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are infections of tissues, organs, or spaces exposed by surgeons during performance of an invasive procedure. SSIs are classified into superficial, which are limited to skin and subcutaneous tissues, and deep. The incidence of deep SSIs in lung transplant (LTx) patients is estimated at 5%. No reports have been published as to the incidence of superficial SSIs specifically in LTx patients. Common sense would dictate that the majority of superficial SSIs would be bacterial. Uncommonly, fungal SSIs may occur, and we believe that no reports exist as to the incidence of viral wound infections in LTx patients, or in any solid organ transplant patients. We report a de novo superficial wound infection with herpes simplex virus following lung transplantation, its possible source, treatment, and resolution. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  4. Preparation of herpes simplex virus-infected primary neurons for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Saksena, Monica; Boadle, Ross; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides the resolution necessary to identify both viruses and subcellular components of cells infected with many types of viruses, including herpes simplex virus. Recognized as a powerful tool in both diagnostic and research-based virology laboratories, TEM has made possible the identification of new viruses and has contributed to the elucidation of virus life cycle and virus-host cell interaction. Whilst there are many sample preparation techniques for TEM, conventional processing using chemical fixation and resin embedding remains a useful technique, available in virtually all EM laboratories, for studying virus/cell ultrastructure. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of herpes simplex virus-infected primary neurons, grown on plastic cover slips, to allow sectioning of neurons and axons in their growth plane. This technique allows TEM examination of cell bodies, axons, growth cones, and varicosities, providing powerful insights into virus-cell interaction.

  5. Update On Emerging Antivirals For The Management Of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections: A Patenting Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D.; Vadlapatla, Ramya K.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, some drugs are associated with dose-limiting toxicities which limit their further utility. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antiherpetic compounds with different mechanisms of action which will be safe and effective against emerging drug resistant viral isolates. Significant advances have been made towards the design and development of novel antiviral therapeutics during the last decade. As evident by their excellent antiviral activities, pharmaceutical companies are moving forward with several new compounds into various phases of clinical trials. This review provides an overview of structure and life cycle of HSV, progress in the development of new therapies, update on the advances in emerging therapeutics under clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of Herpes simplex virus infections. PMID:23331181

  6. Intra-vaginal Zinc Oxide Tetrapod Nanoparticles as Novel Immunoprotective Agents against Genital Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Thessicar E.; Hadigal, Satvik R.; Yakoub, Abraam; Mishra, Yogendra K.; Bhattacharya, Palash; Haddad, Christine; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Adelung, Rainer; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Shukla, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all efforts to generate an effective protection against the life-long, recurrent genital infections caused by Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) have failed. Apart from sexual transmission, the virus can also be transmitted from mothers to neonates, and is a key facilitator of HIV co-acquisition. Here, we uncover a nanoimmunotherapy using specially designed Zinc Oxide Tetrapod Nanoparticles (ZOTEN) with engineered oxygen vacancies. We demonstrate that ZOTEN, when used intravaginally as a microbicide, is an effective suppressor of HSV-2 genital infection in female BALB/c mice. The strong HSV-2 trapping ability of ZOTEN significantly reduced the clinical signs of vaginal infection and effectively decreased animal mortality. In parallel, ZOTEN promoted the presentation of bound HSV-2 virions to mucosal antigen presenting cells, enhancing T cell- mediated and antibody-mediated responses to the infection, and thereby, suppressing a re-infection. We also found that ZOTEN exhibits strong adjuvant-like properties, which is highly comparable to alum, a commonly used adjuvant. Overall, our study provides very first evidence for the protective efficacy of an intravaginal microbicide/vaccine or microbivac platform against primary and secondary female genital herpes infections. PMID:27183601

  7. Recurrent intraoral HSV-1 infection: A retrospective study of 58 immunocompetent patients from Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovaru, Serban; Parlatescu, Ioanina; Tovaru, Mihaela; Cionca, Lucia; Arduino, Paolo-Giacomo

    2011-03-01

    To revise the clinical features of the recurrent intraoral herpetic infection (RIOH) with respect to precipitating factors, demographic, clinical features and outcome. Fifty-eight, unrelated Caucasian, immunocompetent patients with positive laboratory test for intraoral Herpes simplex virus infection were studied. The mean age in the women's group (n=42) was 41.23 years (± 21.73) and in the men's group was 32.25 years (±15.68). Possible trigger factors were identified in 9 cases (15.5%). General symptoms were noted in 20 cases (34.48%). Most of patients in this study presented multiple lesions. 14 patients had vermillion lesions associated with intraoral lesions. In most of the cases both fixed and mobile mucosa was concomitantly involved. Treatment was prescribed in order to control the symptoms and to shorten the evolution with minimal side effects. Intraoral secondary herpetic infection could be polymorphous and sometimes associated with general symptoms. The recognition of its atypical features may prevent unnecessary and costly investigations and treatments for unrelated though clinically similar-appearing disorders.

  8. Role of type-specific herpes simplex virus-1 and 2 serology as a diagnostic modality in patients with clinically suspected genital herpes: A comparative study in Indian population from a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Vrushali; Bhalla, Preena

    2016-01-01

    Type-specific serology (TSS) test for herpes simplex virus (HSV) have been used as a research tool in seroepidemiological studies for some years. However, TSS as a diagnostic modality for diagnosis of current episode of genital herpes is not well documented. To measure the seroprevalence of type-specific HSV Type 1 (HSV-1) and Type 2 (HSV-2) IgG antibodies in cases provisionally diagnosed as primary and recurrent genital herpes and to evaluate the role of TSS as a diagnostic modality for diagnosis of genital herpes versus polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A cross-sectional study was performed over a period of 10 months in which 44 adult patients with clinically suspected genital herpes were recruited. An in-house glycoprotein G gene base PCR was performed directly from the genital lesion specimen for simultaneous detection and typing of HSV. TSS was performed to detect IgG antibody against HSV-1 and 2 in all patients using commercially available kits, and the results were compared. Seroprevalence of HSV-1 IgG was 43% among primary and 65% among recurrent genital herpes cases (P = 0.22). Whereas that of HSV-2 IgG was found to be 14% and 83% in respective patient group (P = 0.0001). When compared to PCR results HSV-1 IgG detection in both primary and recurrent genital herpes diagnosis had poor specificity, positive predictive value, and sensitivity. Whereas, HSV-2 serology had a sensitivity of 13.33% and 73.33% in primary and recurrent genital herpes and specificity of 83.33% and 85.71%, respectively. HSV-2 IgG detection helps in strengthening the diagnosis of recurrent HSV-2 disease, whereas the absence of HSV-2 IgG antibody helps in excluding genital herpes as a likely cause of recurrent genital ulceration. However, detection of HSV-1 IgG antibody may not be useful for diagnosis in patients of genital ulcer disease.

  9. Helicase-primase inhibitor amenamevir for herpesvirus infection: Towards practical application for treating herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, K

    2017-11-01

    Valacyclovir and famciclovir enabled successful systemic therapy for treating herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection by their phosphorylation with viral thymidine kinase. Helicase-primase inhibitors (HPIs) inhibit the progression of the replication fork, an initial step in DNA synthesis to separate the double strand into two single strands. The HPIs amenamevir and pritelivir have a novel mechanism of action, once-daily administration with nonrenal excretory characteristics, and clinical efficacy for genital herpes. Amenamevir exhibits anti-VZV and anti-HSV activity while pritelivir only has anti-HSV activity. A clinical trial of amenamevir for herpes zoster has been completed, and amenamevir has been licensed and successfully used in 20,000 patients with herpes zoster so far in Japan. We have characterized the features of the antiviral action of amenamevir and, unlike acyclovir, the drug's antiviral activity is not influenced by the viral replication cycle. Amenamevir is opening a new era of antiherpes therapy. Copyright 2017 Clarivate Analytics.

  10. [Pemphigus and herpes: Multicentre survey and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlant, M; Seta, V; Bernard, P; Fourati, S; Meritet, J-F; Wolkenstein, P; Dupin, N; Joly, P; Chosidow, O; Ingen-Housz-Oro, S

    2018-06-01

    Although herpes superinfection is a well-known complication of pemphigus, it has not been widely investigated. To investigate the frequency and features of herpes infection in patients with ongoing pemphigus. We carried out a multicenter retrospective study between 2008 and 2016 in patients with newly diagnosed pemphigus presenting active herpes infection. Clinical, virological, immunological and therapeutic data were collated. We performed a literature review for pemphigus and herpes. Among the 191 pemphigus patients, screening for herpes (PCR or culture) was carried out in 11 to 71 % of subjects, depending on the center in question. Twenty-four patients (12 women, mean age 58 years) presented at least one episode of herpes infection. The frequency of positivity ranged from 0 to 42 % by center. Twenty-one cases consisted of pemphigus vulgaris and infection occurred at a mucosal site in 19 patients. Herpes infection was identified at the time of diagnosis in 15 patients and 17 patients received no specific treatment for their pemphigus. The virus was identified using PCR in 23 cases. Ten patients subsequently received prophylactic treatment for herpes. The mean duration of follow-up was 36 months (0-89 months). Thirteen of the 24 patients had 23 relapses of pemphigus; PCR testing for herpes was performed 19 times and was positive in 6 cases (31.5 %). Our study showed wide variation in the incidence of herpes superinfection in patients with pemphigus, reflecting the different screening approach at each center (being performed either routinely or only in the event of strong suspicion). The prognostic value of routine screening for herpes in patients with active pemphigus lesions remains to be demonstrated by further prospective investigations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular diagnosis of visceral herpes zoster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M. D.; Weel, J. F.; van Oers, M. H.; Boom, R.; Wertheim-van Dillen, P. M.

    2001-01-01

    Patients with disseminated herpes zoster may present with severe abdominal pain that results from visceral involvement of varicella-zoster-virus infection. In the absence of cutaneous eruptions of herpes zoster, visceral herpes zoster is extremely difficult to diagnose. This diagnostic difficulty

  12. Chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale, genital herpes simplex infection, and molluscum contagiosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta-Juzbašić, Aleksandra; Čeović, Romana

    2014-01-01

    Chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, and granuloma inguinale may be considered as tropical venereal diseases. These diseases were a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in past centuries. Currently, patients with these bacterial infections that are endemic to the tropics occasionally consult with dermatologists in temperate climates. Due to the increasing frequency of travel to the tropics for tourism and work, as well as the increasing number of immigrants from these areas, it is important for dermatologists practicing in temperate climates to be familiar with the dermatologic manifestations of such infections, to be prepared to diagnose these diseases, and to treat these patients. All three "tropical" infections respond well to prompt and appropriate antimicrobial treatment, although herpes progenitalis still cannot be cured, and the number of people infected keeps growing; moreover, genital herpes can be transmitted by viral shedding before and after the visual signs or symptoms. Acyclovir, valacyclovir, and famciclovir can shorten outbreaks and make them less severe or even stop them from happening. There is currently no etiologic treatment for molluscum contagiosum, and the majority of treatment options are mechanical, causing a certain degree of discomfort. The molluscum contagiosum virus, unlike the other infectious agents mentioned, does not invade the skin. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. UV radiation and mouse models of herpes simplex virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norval, Mary; El-Ghorr, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Orolabial human infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are very common; following the primary epidermal infection, the virus is retained in a latent form in the trigeminal ganglia from where it can reactivate and cause a recrudescent lesion. Recrudescences are triggered by various stimuli including exposure to sunlight. In this review three categories of mouse models are used to examine the effects of UV irradiation on HSV infections: these are UV exposure prior to primary infection, UV exposure as a triggering event for recrudescence and UV exposure prior to challenge with virus is mice already immunized to HSV. In each of these models immunosuppression occurs, which is manifest, in some instances, in increased morbidity or an increased rate of recrudescence. Where known, the immunological mechanisms involved in the models are summarized and their relevance to human infections considered. (Author)

  14. Vaccination with the Secreted Glycoprotein G of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Induces Protective Immunity after Genital Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önnheim, Karin; Ekblad, Maria; Görander, Staffan; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2016-04-22

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infects the genital mucosa and establishes a life-long infection in sensory ganglia. After primary infection HSV-2 may reactivate causing recurrent genital ulcerations. HSV-2 infection is prevalent, and globally more than 400 million individuals are infected. As clinical trials have failed to show protection against HSV-2 infection, new vaccine candidates are warranted. The secreted glycoprotein G (sgG-2) of HSV-2 was evaluated as a prophylactic vaccine in mice using two different immunization and adjuvant protocols. The protocol with three intramuscular immunizations combining sgG-2 with cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) motifs and alum induced almost complete protection from genital and systemic disease after intra-vaginal challenge with HSV-2. Robust immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers were detected with no neutralization activity. Purified splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced interferon-γ (IFN-γ) when re-stimulated with the antigen in vitro. sgG-2 + adjuvant intra-muscularly immunized mice showed a significant reduction of infectious HSV-2 and increased IFN-γ levels in vaginal washes. The HSV-2 DNA copy numbers were significantly reduced in dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, and in serum at day six or day 21 post challenge. We show that a sgG-2 based vaccine is highly effective and can be considered as a novel candidate in the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HSV-2 infection.

  15. No evidence of parvovirus B19, Chlamydia pneumoniae or human herpes virus infection in temporal artery biopsies in patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Tarp, B; Obel, N

    2002-01-01

    conditions. DNA was extracted from frozen biopsies and PCR was used to amplify genes from Chlamydia pneumoniae, parvovirus B19 and each of the eight human herpes viruses: herpes simplex viruses HSV-1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus and human herpes viruses HHV-6, -7 and -8......OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have suggested that infective agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of giant cell arteritis (GCA), in particular Chlamydia pneumoniae and parvovirus B19. We investigated temporal arteries from patients with GCA for these infections as well as human herpes viruses....... RESULTS: In all 30 biopsies, PCR was negative for DNAs of parvovirus B19, each of the eight human herpes viruses and C. pneumoniae. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of DNA from parvovirus B19, human herpes virus or C. pneumoniae in any of the temporal arteries. These agents do not seem to play a unique...

  16. Whole Blood Polymerase Chain Reaction in a Neonate with Disseminated Herpes Simplex Virus Infection and Liver Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Scoble

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A late preterm neonate born by cesarean section with intact membranes presented at 9 days of life with shock and liver failure. Surface cultures were negative but whole blood polymerase chain reaction was positive for herpes simplex virus type 2, underscoring the value of this test in early diagnosis of perinatally acquired disseminated herpes simplex virus infection without skin lesions.

  17. Type-specific identification of anogenital herpes simplex virus infections by use of a commercially available nucleic acid amplification test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Pol, Barbara; Warren, Terri; Taylor, Stephanie N; Martens, Mark; Jerome, Keith R; Mena, Leandro; Lebed, Joel; Ginde, Savita; Fine, Paul; Hook, Edward W

    2012-11-01

    Herpes infections are among the most common sexually transmitted infections (STI), but diagnostic methods for genital herpes have not kept pace with the movement toward molecular testing. Here, we describe an FDA-approved molecular assay that identifies and types herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections for use in routine clinical settings. Paired samples from anogenital lesions were tested using the BD ProbeTec HSV Q(x) (HSVQ(x)) system, HSV culture and, a laboratory-developed PCR assay. Family planning, obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN), or sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics in the United States served as recruitment sites. Sensitivity and specificity estimates, head-to-head comparisons, measures of agreement, and latent-class analyses were performed to provide robust estimates of performance. A total of 508 participants (174 men and 334 women) with anogenital lesions were included; 260 HSV-2 and 73 HSV-1 infections were identified. No differences in test performance based on gender, clinic type, location of the lesion, or type of lesion were observed. The sensitivity of HSV-2 detection ranged from 98.4 to 100% depending on the analytical approach, while the specificity ranged from 80.6%, compared to the less sensitive culture method, to 97.0%, compared to PCR. For HSV-1, the sensitivity and specificity ranges were 96.7 to 100% and 95.1 to 99.4%, respectively. This assay may improve our ability to accurately diagnose anogenital lesions due to herpes infection.

  18. State infants after perinatal complications prevention by mother with the association of HIV and herpes virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhdanovich O.I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Relevance. Complicated and little studied issue is the perinatal complications prevention in pregnant women with HIV and herpes virus infections (GI The goal — to evaluate the effectiveness of the system of perinatal complications prevention during the association of HIV and herpes infection. Materials and methods. Selected 60 HIV-infected pregnant women with the GI, which divided into 2 groups: primary — 30 pregnant women with the use of recommended prophylaxis complex (specific immunoglobulins, interferon α-2β, flavonoids, probiotics, arginine glutamat, the comparison group — 30 pregnant women with the knowledge of the pregnancy according to the Ministry of Health reports. Results. After recommended treatment course significantly improving the condition of children at birth: in satisfactory condition (without asphyxia was born 60.0 against 37.9% of children (p<0.05. Relatively better and during the period of early neonatal adaptation: 1.5–2 times lower than the frequency of jaundice, hemorrhagic syndrome, and gastrointestinal. Significantly reduces the incidence of life-threatening syndromes and further development of the child as neurological (up 23.3% vs. 44.8%, p<0.05 and RDS (up 16.7% vs. 37.9%, p<0.05. Conclusions. Security and high efficiency of the proposed complex of perinatal complications prevention for HIV-infected pregnant women with herpes infection can be recommended for implementation in antenatal clinics and maternity homes.

  19. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus in HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boateng Wiafe MD MSc

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster is a common infection caused by the human herpes virus 3, the same virus that causes chickenpox. It is a member of herpes viridae, the same family as the herpes simplex virus, Epstein- Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus occurs when a latent varicella zoster virus in the trigeminal ganglia involving the ophthalmic division of the nerve is reactivated. Of the three divisions of the fifth cranial nerve, the ophthalmic is involved 20 times more frequently than the other divisions.

  20. No. 250-Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Annette; Larochelle, Annick

    2017-10-01

    To provide an update of the definition, epidemiology, clinical presentation, investigation, treatment, and prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, post-coital antibiotic prophylaxis, and acute self-treatment are all efficient alternatives to prevent recurrent urinary tract infection. Vaginal estrogen and cranberry juice can also be effective prophylaxis alternatives. A search of PubMed and The Cochrane Library for articles published in English identified the most relevant literature. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date restrictions. This update is the consensus of the Sub-Committee on Urogynaecology of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Recommendations were made according to the guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Recurrent urinary tract infections need careful investigation and can be efficiently treated and prevented. Different prophylaxis options can be selected according to each patient's characteristics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Association of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Serostatus With Genital Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men: The HPV in Men Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, Catharina Johanna; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Papenfuss, Mary R.; da Silva, Roberto José Carvalho; Villa, Luisa Lina; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Nyitray, Alan G.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies in women indicate that some sexually transmitted infections promote human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence and carcinogenesis. Little is known about this association in men; therefore, we assessed whether Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection and herpes simplex virus type 2

  2. Atypical Presentation of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection Refractory to Treatment With Acyclovir in 2 Hematologic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Rodríguez, D; Sendagorta Cudós, E; Rueda Carnero, J M; Herranz Pinto, P

    2017-12-01

    Herpesvirus infections are not uncommon in hematologic patients. Our first patient, diagnosed with chronic lymphatic leukemia, presented extensive genital herpes infection refractory to treatment with acyclovir and with a partial response to foscarnet, which had to be withdrawn due to systemic adverse effects. The second patient, diagnosed with follicular Hodgkin lymphoma, presented hypertrophic herpes infection refractory to treatment with acyclovir but that responded to intralesional cidofovir and topical imiquimod. As in other immunodepressed patients, herpesvirus infection in hematologic patients can present atypical manifestations, as well as resistance to treatments that act via the viral thymidine kinase. A high level of clinical suspicion is therefore needed to make an early diagnosis, together with extensive knowledge of the different treatments available. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Status of prophylactic and therapeutic genital herpes vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Sita; Friedman, Harvey M

    2014-06-01

    A half billion people have genital herpes infections worldwide. Approximately one-fifth of American women between ages 14 and 49 are HSV-2 seropositive. The development of an effective genital herpes vaccine is a global health necessity based on the mental anguish genital herpes causes for some individuals, the fact that pregnant women with genital herpes risk transmitting infection to their newborn children, and the observation that HSV-2 infection is associated with a 3-fold to 4-fold increased probability of HIV acquisition. We review the strengths and limitations of preclinical animal models used to assess genital herpes vaccine candidates and the goals of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. We also discuss the current pipeline of vaccine candidates and lessons learned from past clinical trials that serve as a stimulus for new strategies, study designs and endpoint determinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions KidsHealth / For Parents / Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions What's in this article? ...

  5. Protection from genital herpes disease, seroconversion and latent infection in a non-lethal murine genital infection model by immunization with an HSV-2 replication-defective mutant virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Fernando M; Knipe, David M

    2016-01-15

    Viral vaccines have traditionally protected against disease, but for viruses that establish latent infection, it is desirable for the vaccine to reduce infection to reduce latent infection and reactivation. While seroconversion has been used in clinical trials of herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccines to measure protection from infection, this has not been modeled in animal infection systems. To measure the ability of a genital herpes vaccine candidate to protect against various aspects of infection, we established a non-lethal murine model of genital HSV-2 infection, an ELISA assay to measure antibodies specific for infected cell protein 8 (ICP8), and a very sensitive qPCR assay. Using these assays, we observed that immunization with HSV-2 dl5-29 virus reduced disease, viral shedding, seroconversion, and latent infection by the HSV-2 challenge virus. Therefore, it may be feasible to obtain protection against genital disease, seroconversion and latent infection by immunization, even if sterilizing immunity is not achieved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosseir, Sandy B; Lind, Lawrence R; Winkler, Harvey A

    2012-03-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections most often present with symptoms of irritative voiding. In most cases, they are caused by reinfection with a previously isolated organism. Patients with one or more symptoms of uncomplicated recurrent urinary tract infection should undergo thorough examination and screening for underlying comorbidities that increase susceptibility. When frequent reinfections, empiric treatment relapse, persistent infections, or risk factors for complicated infections are encountered, patients may benefit from urodynamics, cystoscopy, renal ultrasound, intravenous urogram, or voiding cystourethrogram to evaluate for anatomic, functional, or metabolic abnormalities affecting the urinary tract (e.g., stones, stricture, obstruction, vesicoureteral reflux, lesions, detrusor underactivity). These patients may benefit from culture-guided empiric treatment and further evaluation by urology, nephrology, or infectious disease specialists. In patients with a history of uncomplicated urinary tract infections, empiric treatment guided by local antimicrobial resistance may efficiently treat a suspected recurrence. After successful treatment of the acute infection, postcoital prophylaxis, continuous prophylaxis, or self-start empiric treatment may be selected based on frequency of recurrent infections, temporal relation to intercourse, and patient characteristics. Ancillary measures such as probiotics, cranberry products, or local estrogen replacement may also be considered. This article will review the current definition, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, work-up, treatment, treatment side effects, and prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women. A suggested algorithm for evaluation and treatment based on current literature is provided.

  7. Population-based surveillance of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection in Australia, 1997-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl A; Raynes-Greenow, Camille; Isaacs, David

    2014-08-15

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is uncommon, but mortality after disseminated disease and morbidity after encephalitis are high. For the last decade, increased dose and duration of acyclovir has been advised to prevent disease progression and recurrence. We sought to determine prospectively the epidemiologic, clinical, and secular trends of this condition in Australia. This was prospective national active surveillance for neonatal HSV disease through the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit from 1997 to 2011. Case notification triggered a questionnaire requesting de-identified data from the pediatric clinician. We identified 131 confirmed cases of neonatal HSV disease in 15 years from 261 notifications (95% response). The reported incidence (3.27 cases per 100 000 live births overall; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.73-3.86) was stable. Overall mortality was 18.8% (95% CI, 12.1-25.5); the mortality rate was significantly lower in the latter part of the study period, 2005-2011, compared with 1997-2004 (P = .04). There were significantly more young mothers (<20 years of age) compared with Australian birth record data (18.5% vs 4.8%; P < .001). HSV-1 infection was more common than HSV-2 (62.7% vs 37.3%; P < .001), and the rate of HSV-1 infections increased significantly over the surveillance period (P < .05). From 2002, most infants received high-dose acyclovir. The time from symptom onset to initiation of therapy in survivors did not change over time. Mortality from neonatal HSV infection has fallen but remains high. HSV-1 is the major serotype causing neonatal disease in Australia. Young mothers represent an important target group for prevention. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Immunobiology of herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus infections of the fetus and newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, William J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Koelle, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Immunologic “immaturity” is often blamed for the increased susceptibility of newborn humans to infection, but the precise mechanisms and details of immunologic development remain somewhat obscure. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are two of the more common severe infectious agents of the fetal and newborn periods. HSV infection in the newborn most commonly occurs after exposure to the virus during delivery, and can lead to a spectrum of clinical disease ranging from isolat...

  9. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Epitope-Specific Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells from Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Individuals with Ocular Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Spencer, Doran; Garg, Sumit; Fremgen, Daniel; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Pham, Thanh T.; Hewett, Charlie; Kuang, Jasmine; Ong, Nicolas; Huang, Lei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB)-specific CD8+ T cells protect mice from herpes infection and disease. However, whether and which HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells play a key role in the “natural” protection seen in HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we have dissected the phenotypes and the functions of HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells from HLA-A*02:01 positive, HSV-1 seropositive ASYMP and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpes disease). We found the following. (i) Healthy ASYMP individuals maintained a significantly higher proportion of differentiated HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7low CD44high CD62Llow). In contrast, SYMP patients had frequent less-differentiated central memory CD8+ T cells (TCM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7high CD44low CD62Lhigh). (ii) ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportions of multifunctional effector CD8+ T cells which responded mainly to gB342–350 and gB561–569 “ASYMP” epitopes, and simultaneously produced IFN-γ, CD107a/b, granzyme B, and perforin. In contrast, effector CD8+ T cells from SYMP individuals were mostly monofunctional and were directed mainly against nonoverlapping gB17–25 and gB183–191 “SYMP” epitopes. (iii) Immunization of an HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model of ocular herpes with “ASYMP” CD8+ TEM cell epitopes, but not with “SYMP” CD8+ TCM cell epitopes, induced a strong CD8+ T cell-dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings provide insights into the role of HSV-specific CD8+ TEM cells in protection against herpes and should be considered in the development of an effective vaccine. IMPORTANCE A significantly higher proportion of differentiated and multifunctional HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM

  10. Current thinking on genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Annika M; Rosenthal, Susan L; Stanberry, Lawrence R

    2014-02-01

    Genital herpes has a high global prevalence and burden of disease. This manuscript highlights recent advances in our understanding of genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections. Studies demonstrate a changing epidemiological landscape with an increasing proportion of genital herpes cases associated with HSV type 1. There is also growing evidence that the majority of infected individuals exhibit frequent, brief shedding episodes that are most often asymptomatic, which likely contribute to high HSV transmission rates. Given this finding as well as readily available serological assays, some have proposed that routine HSV screening be performed; however, this remains controversial and is not currently recommended. Host immune responses, particularly local CD4 and CD8 T cell activity, are crucial for HSV control and clearance following initial infection, during latency and after reactivation. Prior HSV immunity may also afford partial protection against HSV reinfection and disease. Although HSV vaccine trials have been disappointing to date and existing antiviral medications are limited, novel prophylactic and therapeutic modalities are currently in development. Although much remains unknown about genital herpes, improved knowledge of HSV epidemiology, pathogenesis and host immunity may help guide new strategies for disease prevention and control.

  11. VIRAL ETIOLOGY OF RECURRENT URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Ibishev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recurrent urinary tract infection is an actual problem of modern urology.Objective. Complex investigation of urinary tract infections including viral etiology for chronic recurrent cystitis in womenMaterials and methods. The study included 31 women with recurrent infection of urinary tract. Inclusion criteria were the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms caused by infection, severe recurrent course, the lack of anatomical and functional disorders of the urinary tract, the absence of bacterial pathogens during the study, taking into account the culture of aerobic and anaerobic culturing techniques.Results. The analysis of the clinical manifestations, the dominant in the study group were pain and urgency to urinate at 100% and 90% of women surveyed, respectively, and less frequent urination were recorded in 16.1% of patients. In general clinical examination of urine in all cases identified leukocyturia and 90% of the hematuria. By using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR in midstream urine of all examined was verified 10 types of human papilloma virus (HPV with the predominance of 16 and 18 types . Considering the presence of recurrent infectious and inflammatory processes of the urinary tract, cystoscopy with bladder biopsy was performed for all patients. When histomorphological biopsies of all patients surveyed noted the presence of the specific characteristics of HPV: papillary hyperplasia with squamous koilocytosis, pale cytoplasm and shrunken kernels. When analyzing the results of PCR biopsy data corresponded with the results of PCR in midstream urine in all biopsies was detected HPV.Conclusions. Human papillomavirus infection may be involved in the development of viral cystitis. In the etiological structure of viral cystitis, both highly oncogenic and low oncogenic HPV types can act.

  12. Preventing herpes simplex virus in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-12-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are very common worldwide. Approximately 22% of pregnant women are infected genitally with HSV, and most of them are unaware of this. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is HSV disease in the newborn. Although neonatal HSV infections remain uncommon, due to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with the infection, HSV infection in the newborn is often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. This review summarizes the epidemiology and management of neonatal HSV infections and discusses strategies to prevent HSV infection in the newborn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Herpes viral culture of lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grow in the laboratory dish and the skin sample used in the test did not contain any herpes virus. Be aware that a normal (negative) culture does not always mean that you do not have a herpes infection or have not had one in the past.

  14. Co-infection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in women with reproductive tract infections (RTI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Ksh Mamta; Devi, Kh Sulochana; Singh, Ng Brajachand; Singh, N Nabakishore; Singh, I Dorendra

    2008-09-01

    In India, HSV seroprevalence and its coinfection with HIV among female patients with reproductive tract infections (RTI) are sparse. We aim to ascertain the seroprevalence of HSV and its coinfection with HIV and common sexually transmitted infections attending Obstetrics and Gynaecology outpatient department, RIMS. The study included 92 female patients with RTI. Diagnostic serology was done for HSV-1 and HSV-2 using group specific IgM indirect immunoassay using ELISA, HIV by 3 ELISA/Rapid/Simple (E/R/S) test of different biological antigen. Diagnosis of RTI was made on clinical grounds with appropriate laboratory investigations--microscopy, Gram stain smear etc. Bacterial vaginosis was diagnosed using Nugent's criteria, Syphilis by rapid plasma reagin (RPR) card test and Chlamydia trachomatis by IgG ELISA. Out of 92 sera tested for HSV, 18 (19.6%) were IgM HSV positive and 9 (9.8%) were HIV positive. Co-infection rate of HSV in HIV positive was 16.7%. None of the patients had clinical herpes genitalis, all were subclinical cases. 55.5% of HSV positives belongs to age group 21 to 30 years. Of the HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgM positives 3 (15%) had HIV, 4 (22.2%) bacterial vaginosis, 2 (11.1%) were RPR positive, 4 (22.2%) Chlamydia trachomatis, 3 (15%) were pregnant. 16 (88.8%) were unemployed, 14 (77.7%) had education level below 10 standard. Our study suggest that every case of RTI, be it an ulcerative or nonulcerative must be thoroughly evaluated by laboratory testing for primary subclinical genital HSV coinfection as this has profound implications on their judicious management and aversion of complications. Early diagnosis and treatment of HSV infection together with prophylaxis for recurrent HSV disease will prevent progression and spread of HIV disease.

  15. Indirect micro-immunofluorescence test for detecting type-specific antibodies to herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsey, T; Darougar, S

    1980-02-01

    A rapid indirect micro-immunofluorescence test capable of detecting and differentiating type-specific antibodies to herpes simplex virus is described. The test proved highly sensitive and, in 80 patients with active herpes ocular infection, antibody was detected in 94%. No anti-herpes antibody was detected in a control group of 20 patients with adenovirus infections. Testing of animal sera prepared against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and of human sera from cases of ocular and genital herpes infections showed that the test can differentiate antibodies to the infecting serotypes. Specimens of whole blood, taken by fingerprick, and eye secretions, both collected on cellulose sponges, could be tested by indirect micro-immunofluorescence. Anti-herpes IgG, IgM, and IgA can also be detected.

  16. Differential stability of host mRNAs in Friend erythroleukemia cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayman, B.A.; Nishioka, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences of herpes simplex virus type 1 infection on cellular macromolecules were investigated in Friend erythroleukemia cells. The patterns of protein synthesis, examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, demonstrated that by 4 h postinfection the synthesis of many host proteins, with the exception of histones, was inhibited. Examination of the steady-state level of histone H3 mRNA by molecular hybridization of total RNA to a cloned mouse histone H3 complementary DNA probe demonstrated that the ratio of histone H3 mRNA to total RNA remained unchanged for the first 4 h postinfection. In contrast, the steady-state levels of globin and actin mRNAs decreased progressively at early intervals postinfection. Studies on RNA synthesis in isolated nuclei demonstrated that the transcription of the histone H3 gene was inhibited to approximately the same extent as that of actin gene. It was concluded that the stabilization of preexisting histone H3 mRNA was responsible for the persistence of H3 mRNA and histone protein synthesis in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected Friend erythroleukemia cells. The possible mechanisms influencing the differential stability of host mRNAs during the course of productive infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 are discussed

  17. Recurrent Herpes Zoster- A Marker of AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazumdar Gautam

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented to us with herpes zoster involving the T 8 to T 10 dermatomes. She had a scar involving the same dermatomes on the other half of the body. Investigations revealed that both the patient and her husband were HIV positive with CD4 cell count less than 200.

  18. Human Asymptomatic Epitope Peptide/CXCL10-Based Prime/Pull Vaccine Induces Herpes Simplex Virus-Specific Gamma Interferon-Positive CD107+ CD8+ T Cells That Infiltrate the Cornea and Trigeminal Ganglia of Humanized HLA Transgenic Rabbits and Protect against Ocular Herpes Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif A; Srivastava, Ruchi; Vahed, Hawa; Roy, Soumyabrata; Walia, Sager S; Kim, Grace J; Fouladi, Mona A; Yamada, Taikun; Ly, Vincent T; Lam, Cynthia; Lou, Anthony; Nguyen, Vivianna; Boldbaatar, Undariya; Geertsema, Roger; Fraser, Nigel W; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2018-06-13

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a prevalent human pathogen that infects the cornea causing potentially blinding herpetic disease. A clinical herpes vaccine is still lacking. In the present study, a novel prime/pull vaccine was tested in Human Leukocyte Antigen- (HLA-) transgenic rabbit model of ocular herpes (HLA Tg rabbit). Three asymptomatic (ASYMP) peptide epitopes were selected from the HSV-1 membrane glycoprotein C (UL44 400-408 ), the DNA replication binding helicase (UL9 196-204 ), and the tegument protein (UL25 572-580 ), all preferentially recognized by CD8 + T cells from "naturally protected" HSV-1-seropositive healthy ASYMP individuals (who never had recurrent corneal herpetic disease). HLA Tg rabbits were immunized with a mixture of these three ASYMP CD8 + T cell peptide epitopes (UL44 400-408 , UL9 196-204 and UL25 572-580 ), delivered subcutaneously with CpG 2007 adjuvant (prime). Fifteen days later, half of the rabbits received a topical ocular treatment with a recombinant neurotropic AAV8 vector, expressing the T cell-attracting CXCL10 chemokine (pull). The frequency, function of HSV-specific CD8 + T cells induced by the prime/pull vaccine were assessed in peripheral blood, cornea, and trigeminal ganglia (TG). Compared to peptides alone, the peptides/CXCL10 prime/pull vaccine generated frequent polyfunctional gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ + ) CD107 + CD8 + T cells that infiltrated both the cornea and TG. CD8 + T cells mobilization into cornea and TG of prime/pull- vaccinated rabbits was associated with a significant reduction in corneal herpes infection and disease following an ocular HSV-1 challenge (McKrae). These findings draw attention to the novel prime/pull vaccine strategy to mobilize anti-viral CD8 + T cells into tissues protecting them against herpes infection and disease. IMPORTANCE There is an urgent need for a vaccine against widespread herpes simplex virus infections. The present study demonstrates that immunization of HLA

  19. Herpes viruses, cytokines, and altered hemostasis in vital exhaustion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Diest, R. van; Hamulyak, K.; Maes, M.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Appels, A.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Infections with herpes viruses have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that vital exhaustion (VE) is associated with multiple herpesvirus infections, such as herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and

  20. Characterization of herpes simplex virus type 2 latency-associated transcription in human sacral ganglia and in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croen, K D; Ostrove, J M; Dragovic, L; Straus, S E

    1991-01-01

    The ability of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) to establish latency in and reactivate from sacral dorsal root sensory ganglia is the basis for recurrent genital herpes. The expression of HSV-2 genes in latently infected human sacral ganglia was investigated by in situ hybridization. Hybridizations with a probe from the long repeat region of HSV-2 revealed strong nuclear signals overlying neurons in sacral ganglia from five of nine individuals. The RNA detected overlaps with the transcript for infected cell protein O but in the opposite, or "anti-sense," orientation. These observations mimic those made previously with HSV-1 in human trigeminal ganglia and confirm the recent findings during latency in HSV-2-infected mice and guinea pigs. Northern hybridization of RNA from infected Vero cells showed that an HSV-2 latency-associated transcript was similar in size to the larger (1.85 kb) latency transcript of HSV-1. Thus, HSV-1 and HSV-2 latency in human sensory ganglia are similar, if not identical, in terms of their cellular localization and pattern of transcription.

  1. The Diagnosis of Genital Herpes – Beyond Culture: An Evidence-Based Guide for the Utilization of Polymerase Chain Reaction and Herpes Simplex Virus Type-Specific Serology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ratnam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of persons with genital herpes is necessary for optimal patient management and prevention of transmission. Because of inherent inaccuracies, clinical diagnosis of genital herpes should be confirmed by laboratory testing for the causative agents herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and HSV type 2 (HSV-2. Further identification of the HSV type is valuable for counselling on the natural history of infection and risk of transmission. Laboratory methods include antigen detection, culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR and conventional and type-specific serology (TSS. PCR has, by far, the greater sensitivity and should be the test of choice for symptomatic cases. HSV-2 TSS is indicated for patients with genital lesions in whom antigen detection, culture or PCR fail to detect HSV, and for patients who are asymptomatic but have a history suggestive of genital herpes. HSV-2 TSS is further indicated for patients infected with HIV. HSV-2 TSS along with HSV-1 TSS may be considered, as appropriate, in evaluating infection and/or immune status in couples discordant for genital herpes, women who develop their first clinical episode of genital herpes during pregnancy, asymptomatic pregnant women whose partners have a history of genital herpes or HIV infection, and women contemplating pregnancy or considering sexual partnership with those with a history of genital herpes. The above should be performed in conjunction with counselling of infected persons and their sex partners.

  2. Herpes simplex virus following stab phlebectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Lum, Ying Wei; Heller, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection following surgery is an unusual postoperative phenomenon. Many mechanisms have been suggested, with the most likely explanation related to latent virus reactivation due to a proinflammatory response in the setting of local trauma. Here, we present a case of herpes simplex virus reactivation in an immunocompetent female following a conventional right lower extremity stab phlebectomy. Salient clinical and physical examination findings are described, and management strategies for herpes simplex virus reactivation are outlined. This is the first known case report of herpes simplex virus reactivation following lower extremity phlebectomy.

  3. [Laboratory diagnosis of genital herpes--direct immunofluorescence method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, Anna; Romejko-Wolniewicz, Ewa; Zareba-Szczudlik, Julia; Kilijańczyk, Marek; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Młynarczyk, Grazyna

    2013-07-01

    Aim of the study was to determine clinical usefulness of direct immunofluorescence method in the laboratory diagnosis of genital herpes in women. Overall 187 anogenital swabs were collected from 120 women. Using a dacron-tipped applicator 83 swabs were collected from women suspected of genital herpes and 104 from patients with no signs of genital infection. All samples were tested using cell culture (Vero cell line) and then direct immunofluorescence method (DIF) for the identification of antigens of herpes simplex viruses: HSV-1 and HSV-2. Characteristic cytopathic effect (CPE), indicative of alphaherpesvirus infection, was observed in 43.4% of cultures with clinical specimens collected from women with suspected genital herpes and in 29.8% of cultures of clinical specimens taken from patients with no clinical symptoms of genital herpes. Herpes simplex viruses were determined in 73 samples by direct immunofluorescence method after amplification of the virus in cell culture. The DIF test confirmed the diagnosis based on the microscopic CPE observation in 85%. In 15% of samples (taken from pregnant women without clinical signs of infection) we reported positive immunofluorescence in the absence of CPE. The frequency of antigen detection was statistically significantly higher in samples that were positive by culture study (chi-square test with Yates's correction, p genital herpes in swabs taken from the vestibule of the vagina and the vulva. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of detection of Herpes Simplex Virus antigens in specimens from different parts of the genital tract in both groups of women (chi-square test, p > 0.05). In our study HHV-1 was the main causative agent of genital herpes. The growing worldwide prevalence of genital herpes, challenges with the clinical diagnosis, and availability of effective antiviral therapy are the main reasons for a growing interest in rapid, proper laboratory diagnosis of infected

  4. Blocking herpes simplex virus 2 glycoprotein E immune evasion as an approach to enhance efficacy of a trivalent subunit antigen vaccine for genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Sita; Huang, Jialing; Shaw, Carolyn; Friedman, Harvey M

    2014-08-01

    genital herpes infection will have major public health benefits. Our vaccine approach includes strategies to prevent the virus from evading immune attack. Mice were immunized with a trivalent vaccine containing an antigen that induces antibodies to block virus entry and two antigens that induce antibodies that block immune evasion from antibody and complement. Immunized mice demonstrated no genital disease, and 32/33 (97%) animals had no evidence of infection of dorsal root ganglia, suggesting that the vaccine may prevent the establishment of latency and recurrent infections. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Approach to the child with recurrent infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan A AlKhater

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with a history of recurrent, severe, or unusual infections present a diagnostic challenge. It is important to maintain a high index of suspicion for the diagnosis of immunodeficiency, for early diagnosis and treatment can improve outcome. Differentiation between infections caused by common risk factors, or immune dysfunction should be based on a detailed history and physical examination and, if indicated, followed by appropriate laboratory studies. This paper aims at providing guidelines for the evaluation of children with recurrent infections. It provides an overview of the diagnostic approach including important details required from the history, physical examination, and an appropriate choice of screening test to be ordered.

  6. Reactivation of Herpes Zoster Keratitis With Corneal Perforation After Zoster Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebski, Andre; Brownstein, Seymour; Ziai, Setareh; Saleh, Solin; Lam, Kay; Jackson, W Bruce

    2017-06-01

    We present a case of reactivated herpes zoster keratouveitis of 6 years duration with corneal perforation requiring penetrating keratoplasty shortly after inoculation with herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax, Merck, Quebec, Canada). Retrospective case report. A 67-year-old woman with a 5-year history of recurrent unilateral herpes zoster keratouveitis in her right eye presented with another recurrence 2 weeks after Zostavax vaccination. Three months later, she developed descemetocele and 2 months afterward, corneal perforation, which was managed by penetrating keratoplasty. Immunohistopathological examination disclosed positive staining for varicella zoster virus in most of the keratocytes adjacent to the descemetocele and perforation, most vividly in the deeper two-thirds of the stroma where the keratocytes were most dense, but not in corneal epithelium or endothelium. Electron microscopic examination showed universally severely degenerated corneal keratocytes in the corneal stroma adjacent to the perforation with variable numbers of herpes virus capsids present in half of these cells. Only a rare normal-appearing keratocyte was identified in the more peripheral corneal stroma. We present a case of reactivation of herpes keratouveitis shortly after vaccination with Zostavax in a patient with previous herpes zoster ophthalmicus. We demonstrate, for the first time, ultrastructural evidence consistent with inactive virus capsids in diffusely degenerated keratocytes in the extracted corneal tissue.

  7. Identification and characterization of 20 immunocompetent patients with simultaneous varicella zoster and herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giehl, K A; Müller-Sander, E; Rottenkolber, M; Degitz, K; Volkenandt, M; Berking, C

    2008-06-01

    It has been shown that varicella zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) can co-localize to the same sensory ganglion. However, only a few case reports on VZV/HSV co-infections exist. Objective To identify and characterize patients with concurrent VZV and HSV infection at the same body site. In 1718 patients, the presence of VZV and HSV in suspicious skin lesions was investigated by polymerase chain reaction analysis. Clinical characteristics of co-infected patients were compared with matched control patients infected with either VZV or HSV. The data are discussed in the context of an extensive review of the literature. Twenty (1.2%) of 1718 patients were infected with both VZV and HSV at the same body site. The mean age was 54 years (range, 2-83). The clinical diagnosis was zoster in 65%, herpes simplex in 20%, varicella in 10% and erythema multiforme in 5% of cases. The trigeminus region was affected in 60% and the trunk in 25%. Involvement of the head was most commonly associated with a severe course of disease and with older age. Simultaneous VZV/HSV infection is rare but can occur in immunocompetent patients, which is often overlooked. The majority of cases is localized to the trigeminus region and affects elderly people.

  8. Recurrent urinary tract infections in females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsin, R.; Siddiqui, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated Urinary tract infections are common in adult women across the entire age spectrum, with mean annual incidence of 15% and 10% in those aged 15-39 and 40-79 years, respectively. Urinary tract infection (UTI), with its diverse clinical syndromes and affected host groups, remains one of the most common but widely misunderstood and challenging infectious diseases encountered in clinical practice. Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) present a significant problem for women and a challenge for the doctors who care for them. The diagnosis of uncomplicated UTI can be achieved best by a thorough assessment of patient symptoms with or without the addition of a urine dipstick test. Treatment should be based on the most recent guidelines, taking into account resistance patterns in the local community. The patient who suffers from recurrent UTIs can be treated safely and effectively with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, post-coital therapy, or self-initiated treatment. This review article covers the latest trends in the management of recurrent UTI among women. Further research is needed regarding rapid diagnosis of UTI, accurate presumptive identification of patients with resistant pathogens, and development of new antimicrobials for drug-resistant UTI. (author)

  9. Characterization and detection of Vero cells infected with Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 using Raman spectroscopy and advanced statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, A; Shufan, E; Zeiri, L; Huleihel, M

    2014-07-01

    Herpes viruses are involved in a variety of human disorders. Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) is the most common among the herpes viruses and is primarily involved in human cutaneous disorders. Although the symptoms of infection by this virus are usually minimal, in some cases HSV-1 might cause serious infections in the eyes and the brain leading to blindness and even death. A drug, acyclovir, is available to counter this virus. The drug is most effective when used during the early stages of the infection, which makes early detection and identification of these viral infections highly important for successful treatment. In the present study we evaluated the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a sensitive, rapid, and reliable method for the detection and identification of HSV-1 viral infections in cell cultures. Using Raman spectroscopy followed by advanced statistical methods enabled us, with sensitivity approaching 100%, to differentiate between a control group of Vero cells and another group of Vero cells that had been infected with HSV-1. Cell sites that were "rich in membrane" gave the best results in the differentiation between the two categories. The major changes were observed in the 1195-1726 cm(-1) range of the Raman spectrum. The features in this range are attributed mainly to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Disseminated herpes zoster ophthalmicus in an immunocompetent 8-year old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladokun, Regina Eziuka; Olomukoro, Chikodili N; Owa, Adewale B

    2013-08-02

    Varicella results from a primary infection with the varicella virus while herpes zoster is caused by a reactivation of a latent infection. Dissemination of herpes zoster is uncommon in immunocompetent individuals. Reports of disseminated herpes zoster in children are even less common than in adults. An unusual case of disseminated herpes zoster ophthalmicus in an 8-year old immunocompetent black boy is presented. He had a previous primary Varicella zoster virus infection at three years of age. In the current report, he presented during an on-going chicken pox outbreak and survived with no significant complications. A breakthrough varicella virus re-infection or a reactivation is possible, both of which could present as zoster. This case emphasizes the need for prevention of varicella virus infection through universal childhood immunization and effective infection control strategies in health care settings.

  11. Disseminated herpes zoster ophthalmicus in an immunocompetent 8-year old boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Eziuka Oladokun

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Varicella results from a primary infection with the varicella virus while herpes zoster is caused by a reactivation of a latent infection. Dissemination of herpes zoster is uncommon in immunocompetent individuals. Reports of disseminated herpes zoster in children are even less common than in adults. An unusual case of disseminated herpes zoster ophthalmicus in an 8-year old immunocompetent black boy is presented. He had a previous primary Varicella zoster virus infection at three years of age. In the current report, he presented during an on-going chicken pox outbreak and survived with no significant complications. A breakthrough varicella virus re-infection or a reactivation is possible, both of which could present as zoster. This case emphasizes the need for prevention of varicella virus infection through universal childhood immunization and effective infection control strategies in health care settings.

  12. Knowledge of genital herpes infection among antenatal clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a major cause of genital ulcer disease worldwide and a significant factor for increased risk of acquisition and transmission of the Human Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV). The determination of the level of knowledge of genital herpes is necessary for the design and implementation of ...

  13. Application of speckle image correlation for real-time assessment of metabolic activity in herpes virus-infected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, A. P.; Malygin, A. S.; Mikhailova, J. A.; Borodin, E. M.; Bakharev, A. A.; Poryvayeva, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    Earlier we reported developing a speckle interferometry technique and a device designed to assess the metabolic activity of a cell monolayer cultivated on a glass substrate. This paper aimed at upgrading the technique and studying its potential for real-time assessment of herpes virus development process. Speckle dynamics was recorded in the image plane of intact and virus-infected cell monolayer. HLE-3, L-41 and Vero cells were chosen as research targets. Herpes simplex virus-1-(HSV-1)- infected cell cultures were studied. For 24 h we recorded the digital value of optical signal I in one pixel and parameter η characterizing change in the distribution of the optical signal on 10 × 10-pixel areas. The coefficient of multiple determination calculated by η time dependences for three intact cell cultures equals 0.94. It was demonstrated that the activity parameters are significantly different for intact and virus-infected cells. The difference of η value for intact and HSV-1-infected cells is detectable 10 minutes from the experiment start.

  14. Application of speckle image correlation for real-time assessment of metabolic activity in herpes virus-infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, A P; Malygin, A S; Mikhailova, J A; Borodin, E M; Bakharev, A A; Poryvayeva, A P

    2014-01-01

    Earlier we reported developing a speckle interferometry technique and a device designed to assess the metabolic activity of a cell monolayer cultivated on a glass substrate. This paper aimed at upgrading the technique and studying its potential for real-time assessment of herpes virus development process. Speckle dynamics was recorded in the image plane of intact and virus-infected cell monolayer. HLE-3, L-41 and Vero cells were chosen as research targets. Herpes simplex virus-1-(HSV-1)- infected cell cultures were studied. For 24 h we recorded the digital value of optical signal I in one pixel and parameter η characterizing change in the distribution of the optical signal on 10 × 10-pixel areas. The coefficient of multiple determination calculated by η time dependences for three intact cell cultures equals 0.94. It was demonstrated that the activity parameters are significantly different for intact and virus-infected cells. The difference of η value for intact and HSV-1-infected cells is detectable 10 minutes from the experiment start.

  15. Herpes zoster - typical and atypical presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Roy Rafael; Peleg, Roni

    2017-08-01

    Varicella- zoster virus infection is an intriguing medical entity that involves many medical specialties including infectious diseases, immunology, dermatology, and neurology. It can affect patients from early childhood to old age. Its treatment requires expertise in pain management and psychological support. While varicella is caused by acute viremia, herpes zoster occurs after the dormant viral infection, involving the cranial nerve or sensory root ganglia, is re-activated and spreads orthodromically from the ganglion, via the sensory nerve root, to the innervated target tissue (skin, cornea, auditory canal, etc.). Typically, a single dermatome is involved, although two or three adjacent dermatomes may be affected. The lesions usually do not cross the midline. Herpes zoster can also present with unique or atypical clinical manifestations, such as glioma, zoster sine herpete and bilateral herpes zoster, which can be a challenging diagnosis even for experienced physicians. We discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of Herpes Zoster, typical and atypical presentations.

  16. Prevalence, incidence and determinants of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection among HIV-seronegative women at high-risk of HIV infection: a prospective study in Beira, Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meque, Ivete; Dubé, Karine; Feldblum, Paul J.; Clements, Archie C. A.; Zango, Arlinda; Cumbe, Fidelina; Chen, Pai Lien; Ferro, Josefo J.; van de Wijgert, Janneke H.

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence, incidence and determinants of herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2) infection, and associations between HSV-2 and incident HIV infection, among women at higher risk for HIV infection in Beira, Mozambique. Between 2009 and 2012, 411 women aged 18-35 years at higher risk of HIV

  17. Associations of HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-C Alleles Frequency with Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections and Diseases Across Global Populations: Implication for the Development of an Universal CD8+ T-Cell Epitope-Based Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samandary, Sarah; Kridane-Miledi, Hédia; Sandoval, Jacqueline S.; Choudhury, Zareen; Langa-Vives, Francina; Spencer, Doran; Chentoufi, Aziz A.; Lemonnier, François A.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of the world’s population is infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 and/or type 2 (HSV-1 and/or HSV-2), that cause a wide range of diseases including genital herpes, oro-facial herpes, and the potentially blinding ocular herpes. While the global prevalence and distribution of HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections cannot be exactly established, the general trends indicate that: (i) HSV-1 infections are much more prevalent globally than HSV-2; (ii) Over half billion people worldwide are infected with HSV-2; (iii) the sub-Saharan African populations account for a disproportionate burden of genital herpes infections and diseases; (iv) the dramatic differences in the prevalence of herpes infections between regions of the world appear to be associated with differences in the frequencies of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. The present report: (i) analyzes the prevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections across various regions of the world; (ii) analyzes potential associations of common HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-C alleles with the prevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in the Caucasoid, Oriental, Hispanic and Black major populations; and (iii) discusses how our recently developed HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C transgenic/H-2 class I null mice will help validate HLA/herpes prevalence associations. Overall, high prevalence of herpes infection and disease appears to be associated with high frequency of HLA-A*24, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*53 and HLA-B*58 alleles. In contrast, low prevalence of herpes infection and disease appears to be associated with high frequency of HLA-B*44 allele. The finding will aid in developing a T-cell epitope-based universal herpes vaccine and immunotherapy. PMID:24798939

  18. Struggling with recurrent Clostridium difficile infections: is donor faeces the solution?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nood, E.; Speelman, P.; Kuijper, E. J.; Keller, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in hospitals and the community constitute an increasing treatment problem. While most patients with a first infection respond to either metronidazole or oral vancomycin, therapy in recurrent C. difficile infections tends to fail

  19. Herpes simplex virus latency-associated transcript sequence downstream of the promoter influences type-specific reactivation and viral neurotropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertke, Andrea S; Patel, Amita; Krause, Philip R

    2007-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) establishes latency in sensory nerve ganglia during acute infection and may later periodically reactivate to cause recurrent disease. HSV type 1 (HSV-1) reactivates more efficiently than HSV-2 from trigeminal ganglia while HSV-2 reactivates more efficiently than HSV-1 from lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to cause recurrent orofacial and genital herpes, respectively. In a previous study, a chimeric HSV-2 that expressed the latency-associated transcript (LAT) from HSV-1 reactivated similarly to wild-type HSV-1, suggesting that the LAT influences the type-specific reactivation phenotype of HSV-2. To further define the LAT region essential for type-specific reactivation, we constructed additional chimeric HSV-2 viruses by replacing the HSV-2 LAT promoter (HSV2-LAT-P1) or 2.5 kb of the HSV-2 LAT sequence (HSV2-LAT-S1) with the corresponding regions from HSV-1. HSV2-LAT-S1 was impaired for reactivation in the guinea pig genital model, while its rescuant and HSV2-LAT-P1 reactivated with a wild-type HSV-2 phenotype. Moreover, recurrences of HSV-2-LAT-S1 were frequently fatal, in contrast to the relatively mild recurrences of the other viruses. During recurrences, HSV2-LAT-S1 DNA increased more in the sacral cord compared to its rescuant or HSV-2. Thus, the LAT sequence region, not the LAT promoter region, provides essential elements for type-specific reactivation of HSV-2 and also plays a role in viral neurotropism. HSV-1 DNA, as quantified by real-time PCR, was more abundant in the lumbar spinal cord, while HSV-2 DNA was more abundant in the sacral spinal cord, which may provide insights into the mechanism for type-specific reactivation and different patterns of central nervous system infection of HSV-1 and HSV-2.

  20. Fatal congenital cytomegalovirus infection following recurrent maternal infection after a 7-year interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergun, U. Guney; Bakaris, S.; Ucmak, H.; Ozbeck, A.

    2007-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the risk for fetal infection is greatest with maternal primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and much less likely with recurrent infection. Here, we report a fatal case of congenital CMV infection following recurrent maternal infectious after a 7-year interval. A 3-months-old female baby presented with fever, jaundice, vomiting and stopping breast-feeding. Physical examination revealed mild respiratory distress, hepatosplenomegaly, microcephaly and growth retardation. Laboratory examination included bilirubin concentrations (total 7.17 mg/dl; conjugated 6.67 mg/dl), aspartate transaminase (141 IU), and alanine transminase (141 IU), and alanine transminase (499 IU). Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay test results revealed (+) CMV IgM and (+) CMV IgG. She died on the 10 th day of admission with the diagnosis of CMV hepatitis, pneumonia and multi-organ failure. Nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions demonstrated in the lung, liver and brain on postmortem biopsy. This case highlights that the outcome of babies born to mothers with recurrent maternal CMV infection may be more severe and fatal than previously thought. (author)

  1. Interventions for men and women with their first episode of genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Rachel; Roberts, Helen; Flower, Deralie; Jordan, Vanessa

    2016-08-30

    Genital herpes is incurable, and is caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). First-episode genital herpes is the first clinical presentation of herpes that a person experiences. Current treatment is based around viral suppression in order to decrease the length and severity of the episode. To determine the effectiveness and safety of the different existing treatments for first-episode genital herpes on the duration of symptoms and time to recurrence. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (from inception to April 2016), MEDLINE (from inception to April 2016), the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Sexually Transmitted Infections Review Group (from inception to April 2016), EMBASE (from inception to April 2016), PsycINFO (from inception to April 2016), CINAHL (from inception to April 2016), LILACS (from inception to April 2016), AMED (from inception to April 2016), and the Alternative Medicines Specialised Register (from inception to April 2016). We handsearched a number of relevant journals, searched reference lists of all included studies, databases of ongoing trials, and other Internet databases. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on participants with first-episode genital herpes. We excluded vaccination trials, and trials in which the primary objective assessed a complication of HSV infection. All studies written in English were independently assessed by at least two review authors for inclusion, risk of bias for each trial, and to extract data. Studies requiring translation were assessed for inclusion, trial quality, and data extraction by external translators. We included 26 trials with 2084 participants analysed. Most of the studies were conducted in the United Kingdom (UK) and United States (US), and involved men and women experiencing their first episode of genital herpes, with the exception of three studies which included only women. We rated the majority of these studies as having an unclear risk of bias

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 2 infections of the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars Haukali; Vestergaard, Bent Faber; Wandall, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are rare with meningitis as the most common clinical presentation. We have investigated the clinical spectrum of CNS infections in 49 adult consecutive patients with HSV-2 genome in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). HSV......-2 in the CSF was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and patients were diagnosed as encephalitis or meningitis according to predefined clinical criteria by retrospective data information from consecutive clinical journals. The annual crude incidence rate of HSV-2 CNS disease was 0.26 per...... 100,000. 43 (88%) had meningitis of whom 8 (19%) had recurring lymphocytic meningitis. Six patients (12%) had encephalitis. 11 of 49 patients (22%) had sequelae recorded during follow-up. None died as a result of HSV-2 CNS disease. Thus, the clinical presentation of HSV-2 infection of the CNS...

  3. Asymptomatic HLA-A*02:01–Restricted Epitopes from Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional CD8+ T Cells from Seropositive Asymptomatic Individuals and Protect HLA Transgenic Mice against Ocular Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervillez, Xavier; Qureshi, Huma; Chentoufi, Aziz A.; Khan, Arif A.; Kritzer, Elizabeth; Yu, David C.; Diaz, Oscar R.; Gottimukkala, Chetan; Kalantari, Mina; Villacres, Maria C.; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; McKinney, Denise M.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from C57BL/6 mice suggests that CD8+ T cells, specific to the immunodominant HSV-1 glycoprotein B (gB) H-2b–restricted epitope (gB498–505), protect against ocular herpes infection and disease. However, the possible role of CD8+ T cells, specific to HLA-restricted gB epitopes, in protective immunity seen in HSV-1–seropositive asymptomatic (ASYMP) healthy individuals (who have never had clinical herpes) remains to be determined. In this study, we used multiple prediction algorithms to identify 10 potential HLA-A*02:01–restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes from the HSV-1 gB amino acid sequence. Six of these epitopes exhibited high-affinity binding to HLA-A*02:01 molecules. In 10 sequentially studied HLA-A*02:01–positive, HSV-1–seropositive ASYMP individuals, the most frequent, robust, and polyfunctional CD8+ T cell responses, as assessed by a combination of tetramer, IFN-γ-ELISPOT, CFSE proliferation, CD107a/b cytotoxic degranulation, and multiplex cytokine assays, were directed mainly against epitopes gB342–350 and gB561–569. In contrast, in 10 HLA-A*02:01–positive, HSV-1–seropositive symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent clinical herpes disease) frequent, but less robust, CD8+ T cell responses were directed mainly against nonoverlapping epitopes (gB183–191 and gB441–449). ASYMP individuals had a significantly higher proportion of HSV-gB–specific CD8+ T cells expressing CD107a/b degranulation marker and producing effector cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α than did SYMP individuals. Moreover, immunization of a novel herpes-susceptible HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model with ASYMP epitopes, but not with SYMP epitopes, induced strong CD8+ T cell–dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. These findings should guide the development of a safe and effective T cell–based herpes vaccine. PMID:24101547

  4. Neurogenic bladder from occult herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, J F; Walicke, P A; Swenson, M R

    1986-11-01

    Active infection with herpes zoster may cause acute urinary retention, especially when it involves sacral dermatomes. Although frank retention usually develops days to weeks after eruption of the typical rash, bladder incompetence infrequently develops first, raising concern over other, more ominous etiologies. In the case presented, rash appearance was delayed until six weeks after the initial onset of urinary retention, a much longer interval than previously reported. Occult herpes zoster infection should be considered in patients presenting with an acute neurogenic bladder of obscure cause.

  5. A Comparative Analysis of Polymerase Chain Reaction and Direct Fluorescent Antibody Test for Diagnosis of Genital Herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Vrushali; Bhalla, Preena; Rawat, Deepti; Garg, Vijay Kumar; Sardana, Kabir; Sethi, Sumit

    2017-01-01

    To compare laboratory tests that can simultaneously detect and type herpes simplex virus (HSV) directly from the genital ulcer specimens in clinically suspected cases of genital herpes. A study was conducted over 10 months and 44 adult male and female patients clinically suspected with genital herpes were recruited. Genital ulcer swab specimens were subjected to glycoprotein-G gene-based conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and commercially available direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test and the results were compared. PCR for HSV was positive in 82% (36/44) cases. DFA was positive in 68.2% (30/44) cases. There was 100% agreement between HSV types detected by DFA and PCR. The strength of agreement between the results was better in primary genital herpes than recurrent cases. PCR was found to be better in the detection of HSV in recurrent genital herpes patients. It is a better modality, especially when genital herpes clinically presents with ulcerative or crusted lesions, and is also a cheaper alternative as compared to DFA.

  6. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection After Recurrent Maternal Infection: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Olukman

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is a double- stranded DNA virus in the Herpesvirus family, and it is a common cause of congenital viral infections. Congenital CMV infection is transmitted from the mother with viremia to the fetus via the placenta. Disease may result from a primary or recurrent maternal infection but the former is a common cause of severe disease. The risk for fetal infection is grater in primary maternal infection. We report a newborn infant with symptomatic congenital CMV infection associated with\trecurrent maternal infection.

  7. Probiotics in the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections in children

    OpenAIRE

    Zwolińska, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections are a serious clinical problem both in adults and children. Febrile episodes of recurrent urinary tract infections may lead to the formation of renal scars and development of chronic kidney disease. Traditionally, management involved antibiotic prophylaxis introduced after a first febrile episode. Recently, however, the indications for antibiotic therapy have been narrowed down to treat cases of recurrent urinary tract infections and disorders which...

  8. Herpes Zoster ophthalmicus and HIV seropositivity in South-south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herpes zoster is a painful vesiculobullous dermatitis which occurs as a result of previously established varicella zoster virus infection. It is a well established fact that Herpes zoster ophthalmicus is a well known marker of human immune deficiency virus infection even in Africans. The aim of this study is to determine if indeed ...

  9. Determining the cause of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection using whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, James Heng Chiak; Truong, Cynthia; Minot, Samuel S; Greenfield, Nick; Budvytiene, Indre; Lohith, Akshar; Anikst, Victoria; Pourmand, Nader; Banaei, Niaz

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the contribution of relapse and reinfection to recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has implications for therapy and infection prevention, respectively. We used whole genome sequencing to determine the relation of C. difficile strains isolated from patients with recurrent CDI at an academic medical center in the United States. Thirty-five toxigenic C. difficile isolates from 16 patients with 19 recurrent CDI episodes with median time of 53.5days (range, 13-362) between episodes were whole genome sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. In 84% (16) of recurrences, the cause of recurrence was relapse with prior strain of C. difficile. In 16% (3) of recurrent episodes, reinfection with a new strain of C. difficile was the cause. In conclusion, the majority of CDI recurrences at our institution were due to infection with the same strain rather than infection with a new strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Distribution of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 genomes in the human spinal ganglia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Y

    1994-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is well known for its propensity to cause recurrent oral or genital mucosal infections in humans. HSV-1 is involved primarily in oral lesions, whereas HSV-2 is more frequently involved in genital lesions. Based on this, it is thought that HSV-1 may produce latent infections in trigeminal ganglia, and HSV-2 in the sacral ganglia. However the distribution pattern of latent HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in spinal ganglia remains unknown. Using the polymerase chain reaction we detected latent herpes HSV-1 and HSV-2 in human spinal ganglia obtained from autopsy material. A pair of primers which were specific for a part of the HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA polymerase domain were employed. HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNAs were detected in 11 of 40 (28%) and 15 of 40 (38%) cervical ganglia, respectively, 52 of 103 (50%) and 47 of 103 (46%) thoracic ganglia, 16 of 53 (30%) and 17 of 53 (32%) lumbar ganglia, and 3 of 20 (15%) and 3 of 20 (15%) sacral ganglia. These findings suggest that latent HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections have a widespread distribution from the cervical ganglia to sacral ganglia. Importantly this study demonstrated latent HSV-1 infection of both the lumbar and sacral ganglia for the first time.

  11. Role of neutralizing antibodies and T-cells in pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus infection in congenitally athymic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, A K; Buckmaster, A; Nash, A A; Field, H J; Wildy, P

    1982-11-01

    Congenitally athymic nude mice were infected with 10(4) p.f.u. herpes simplex type 1 (strain SC16). Following the passive transfer of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (AP7, AP8 and AP12) it was observed that AP7 alone reduced the virus infectivity in the nervous system; AP8 and AP12 failed to protect mice probably due to poor in vivo binding to the neutralization site on the virus. Latent ganglionic infection could be established in nude mice following adoptive transfer of optimum number (2 x 10(7) cells/mouse) of immune lymph node cells from day 7 herpes virus-infected hairy immunocompetent donor mice. Moreover, in some of the immune lymph node cell protected nudes, latency could be maintained even in complete absence of neutralizing antibodies. Results of ear-ablation experiments revealed that removal of primary source of infection after day 5 of infection reduced the amount of virus in the ganglia and spinal cord. Acute neurological infection was not detected following transfer of protective anti-gp-D neutralizing antibody (LP2) in combination with removal of infected pinna. These data suggest that continuous seeding of virus occurs in related ganglia via the axonal route from infected ear pinna. It appears that local T-cell-mediated immune mechanisms are involved in maintenance of latency.

  12. Prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Around 40-50% of women experience at least one urinary tract infection (UTI) during their lifetime and 20-30% of these have a recurrence within 3-4 months of the initial infectionRecurrent UTI (usually defined as three episodes in the last 12 months or two episodes in the last 6 months) can have a considerable impact on a woman's quality of life. Each episode of acute UTI in young women is typically associated with about 6 days of symptoms, 2.4 days of restricted activities and 0.4 days of bed rest.¹ Antibacterial prophylaxis is effective in preventing recurrent episodes, but at the expense of unwanted effects and a risk of promoting bacterial resistance. Here we assess the efficacy of different antibacterial regimens and non-antibacterial alternatives (cranberry, probiotics, oestrogens, immunostimulation, hyaluronic acid and chondroitin, acupuncture and herbs) in the prevention of recurrent uncomplicated UTIs in women.

  13. Recurrent neck infection with branchial arch fistula in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madana, J; Yolmo, Deeke; Kalaiarasi, R; Gopalakrishnan, S; Saxena, S K; Krishnapriya, S

    2011-09-01

    Acute suppurative neck infections associated with third or fourth branchial arch fistulas are frequently recurrent. Third and fourth branchial arch anomalies are much less common than those of second arch and usually present with left thyroid lobe inflammation. The authors present their experience with 15 cases of pyriform sinus fistulae (PSF) of third branchial arch origin and 3 cases of fourth arch origin, all of which presented as recurrent neck infection mainly on the left side. A retrospective review of 18 cases of third and fourth arch fistulae treated at JIPMER from 2005 to 2010. This study includes 18 patients with PSF diagnosed by the existence of fistulous tract radiologically and intraoperatively with pathological correlation. Neck exploration with excision of tract and left hemithyroidectomy was performed in all cases. The patients consisted of 7 males and 11 females, and the ages ranged from 3 to 15 years. All of them presented with recurrent episodes of neck infection. Investigations performed include computed tomography (CT) fistulography, barium swallow and ultrasound which were useful in delineating pyriform sinus fistulous tract preoperatively. All cases were on the left side and the fistula was identified by barium swallow in 14 cases (80%), while intraoperative and pathologic confirmation of the tract was possible in all cases (100%). Neck exploration with an emphasis on complete exposure of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and exposure of the pyriform sinus opening to facilitate complete fistulous tract excision with left hemithyroidectomy was successful in all patients. A follow up period of 1-3 years showed no recurrence. Recurrent neck infection in a child should alert the physician to the possibility of an underlying pyriform sinus fistula of branchial origin and CT fistulography should be performed after the resolution of the neck infection to delineate the tract anatomically. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  14. Herpes zoster, immunological deterioration and disease progression in HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, J.; Krol, A.; van Praag, R. M.; Frissen, P. H.; Schellekens, P. T.; Lange, J. M.; Coutinho, R. A.; van der Meer, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the incidence of herpes zoster, the relationship between herpes zoster and immunological markers, and the prognostic value of herpes zoster for progression of HIV disease. DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 966 homosexual participants in The Amsterdam Cohort Study were studied.

  15. The Challenges and Opportunities for Development of a T-Cell Epitope-Based Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a half billion individuals worldwide. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. HSV-1 infections are more prevalent than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. While genital herpes in mainly caused by HSV-2 infections, in recent years, there is an increase in the proportion of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 infections in young adults, which reach 50% in some western societies. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries their development has been notoriously difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One “common denominator” among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or whole viral proteins, which contain both pathogenic “symptomatic” and protective “asymptomatic” antigens/epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate that using an “asymptomatic” epitope-based vaccine strategy that selectively incorporates protective epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized, in vitro, by effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells from “naturally” protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect, in vivo, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models from ocular and genital herpes infections and diseases, could be the answer to many of the scientific challenges facing HSV vaccine

  16. Concomitant herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis in a man with ulcerative colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Varun K.; Friedman-Moraco, Rachel J.; Quigley, Brian C.; Farris, Alton B.; Norvell, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Herpesvirus infections often complicate the clinical course of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; however, invasive disease due to herpes simplex virus is distinctly uncommon. Methods: We present a case of herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis, review all the previously published cases of herpes simplex virus colitis, and discuss common clinical features and outcomes. We also discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of herpes simplex virus infections, focusing specifically on patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Results: A 43-year-old man with ulcerative colitis, previously controlled with an oral 5-aminosalicylic agent, developed symptoms of a colitis flare that did not respond to treatment with systemic corticosteroid therapy. One week later he developed orolabial ulcers and progressive hepatic dysfunction, with markedly elevated transaminases and coagulopathy. He underwent emergent total colectomy when imaging suggested bowel micro-perforation. Pathology from both the colon and liver was consistent with herpes simplex virus infection, and a viral culture of his orolabial lesions and a serum polymerase chain reaction assay also identified herpes simplex virus. He was treated with systemic antiviral therapy and made a complete recovery. Conclusions: Disseminated herpes simplex virus infection with concomitant involvement of the colon and liver has been reported only 3 times in the published literature, and to our knowledge this is the first such case in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk of invasive herpes simplex virus infections increases with some, but not all immunomodulatory therapies. Optimal management of herpes simplex virus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease includes targeted prophylactic therapy for patients with evidence of latent infection, and timely initiation of antiviral therapy for those patients suspected to have invasive disease. PMID:27759636

  17. Topical treatment of herpes simplex virus infection with enzymatically created siRNA swarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavilainen, Henrik; Lehtinen, Jenni; Romanovskaya, Alesia; Nygårdas, Michaela; Bamford, Dennis H; Poranen, Minna M; Hukkanen, Veijo

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a common human pathogen. Despite current antivirals, it causes a significant medical burden. Drug resistant strains exist and they are especially prevalent in immunocompromised patients and in HSV eye infections. New treatment modalities are needed. BALB/c mice were corneally infected with HSV and subsequently treated with a swarm of enzymatically created, Dicer-substrate small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules that targeted the HSV gene UL29. Two infection models were used, one in which the infection was predominantly peripheral and another in which it spread to the central nervous system. Mouse survival, as well as viral spread, load, latency and peripheral shedding, was studied. The anti-HSV-UL29 siRNA swarm alleviated HSV infection symptoms, inhibited viral shedding and replication and had a favourable effect on mouse survival. Treatment with anti-HSV-UL29 siRNA swarm reduced symptoms and viral spread in HSV infection of mice and also inhibited local viral replication in mouse corneas.

  18. Impact of CCR5 Delta32/+ deletion on herpes zoster among HIV-1-infected homosexual men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, Anneke; Lensen, Ruud; Veenstra, Jan; Prins, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Coutinho, Roel A.

    2006-01-01

    The association between the presence of CCR5 Delta32 heterozygosity and incidence of clinical herpes zoster was studied among 296 homosexual men from the Amsterdam cohort study (ACS) infected with human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) with an estimated date of seroconversion. Of them 63 were

  19. HSV-1/HSV-2 Infection-Related Cancers in Bantu Populations Driving HIV-1 Prevalence in Africa: Tracking the Origin of AIDS at the Onset of the 20th Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goaster, Jacqueline; Bouree, Patrice; El Sissy, Franck N; Phuong Bui, Florence; Pokossy Epee, Johanna; Rollin, Paul; Tangy, Frédéric; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2016-01-01

    At the onset of the 20th century, ancient clinical observations of cancer epidemics in Bantu populations of Sub-Saharan Africa were discovered. They were reported from 1914 to 1960, but remained unexplained. In 1983, in San Francisco, Calif., USA, cancer epidemics were related to infections by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) known as AIDS disease. Yet since 1996, it is known that HIV-1 strains are not the only ones involved. In Sub-Saharan Africa, recurrent orobuccal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and genital recurrent herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) appeared many times prior to infection by HIV-1. Data on these ancient medical observations regarding African cancer epidemics can today be referred to as the relationship between the unfortunate immune deficiency of herpes in Bantu populations and HIV-1 viral strains. For centuries, the Bantu populations dispersed in forests were living in close proximity to chimpanzees infected by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and were exposed to SIV contamination which became HIV-1 in human beings. Presently, these unexplained Bantu cancer epidemics can be linked to the viral partnership of HSV-1/HSV-2 to HIV-1 strains. The key issue is now to prevent HSV-1/HSV-2 diseases related to HIV-1. An anti-herpes treatment administered early during childhood to Bantu populations will offer a mean of preventing herpes diseases related to HIV-1 infection and hence avoid cancer epidemics.

  20. Epidemiology, treatment and prevention of herpes zoster: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, Elsam; Mengting, Lu; Kumar, Hanasha; Jianbo, Wu

    2018-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a major health burden that can affect individuals of any age. It is seen more commonly among individuals aged ≥50 years, those with immunocompromised status, and those on immunosuppressant drugs. It is caused by a reactivation of varicella zoster virus infection. Cell-mediated immunity plays a role in this reactivation. Fever, pain, and itch are common symptoms before the onset of rash. Post-herpetic neuralgia is the most common complication associated with herpes zoster. Risk factors and complications associated with herpes zoster depend on the age, immune status, and the time of initializing treatment. Routine vaccination for individuals over 60 years has shown considerable effect in terms of reducing the incidence of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia. Treatment with antiviral drugs and analgesics within 72 hours of rash onset has been shown to reduce severity and complications associated with herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia. This study mainly focuses on herpes zoster using articles and reviews from PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, and a manual search from Google Scholar. We cover the incidence of herpes zoster, gender distribution, seasonal and regional distribution of herpes zoster, incidence of herpes zoster among immunocompromised individuals, incidence of post-herpetic neuralgia following a zoster infection, complications, management, and prevention of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia.

  1. An unusual cause for recurrent chest infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lobo, Ronstan

    2012-10-01

    We present a case of an elderly non-smoking gentleman who, since 2005, had been admitted multiple times for recurrent episodes of shortness of breath, wheeze, cough and sputum. The patient was treated as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and\\/or lower respiratory tract infections. Bronchoscopy was done which revealed multiple hard nodules in the trachea and bronchi with posterior tracheal wall sparing. Biopsies confirmed this as tracheopathia osteochondroplastica (TO). He had increasing frequency of admission due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and pseudomonas infections, which failed to clear despite intravenous, prolonged oral and nebulised antibiotics. The patient developed increasing respiratory distress and respiratory failure. The patient died peacefully in 2012. This case report highlights the typical pathological and radiological findings of TO and the pitfalls of misdiagnosing patients with recurrent chest infections as COPD.

  2. Herpes Simplex Mastitis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Brown

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common sites of herpes simplex virus (HSV infection are around the oral cavity and the genitalia. However, HSV can infect any skin or mucous membrane surface. One uncommon site of HSV infection is the breast. Reports of herpetic breast infections are predominantly cases of transmission from a systemically HSV-infected neonate to the mother during breast-feeding. A review of the literature identified only six reports suggesting HSV breast lesions acquired by means other than through an infected infant. Of these, only one report suggests HSV transmission to the breast from a male sexual partner. A second case of clinically unsuspected symptomatic herpes mastitis presumably acquired from sexual contact in a 46-year-old woman is presented. Herpes simplex type 1 was isolated by using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymerization techniques. The purpose of this report is to alert physicians to HSV mastitis.

  3. Recurrent Acute Respiratory Infections in Children: Effectiveness and Safety of Phytotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Vavilova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent respiratory infections in children lead to physical development disorders, formation of chronic nidi of infection, failure of adaptive mechanisms and degradation o immunobiological resisting barriers; this causes development of new diseases. Results of the presented non interventional clinical study confirm high safety profile and effectiveness of a therapeutic phytopreparation for recurrent respiratory infections

  4. A Comprehensive Study of Costs Associated With Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Barber, Grant E; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2017-02-01

    BACKGROUND Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common healthcare-associated infection and is associated with considerable morbidity. Recurrent CDI is a key contributing factor to this morbidity. Despite an estimated 83,000 recurrences annually in the United States, there are few accurate estimates of costs associated with recurrent CDI. OBJECTIVE We performed this study (1) to identify the health consequences of recurrent CDI including need for repeat hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and surgery; (2) to determine costs associated with recurrent CDI and identify determinants of such costs; and (3) to compare the outcomes and costs of recurrent CDI to those who develop reinfection. METHODS We identified all patients with confirmed recurrent CDI between January to December 2013 at a single referral center. Healthcare burden associated with recurrence including diagnostic testing, pharmacologic treatment, and inpatient and outpatient healthcare visits were identified in the 12 months following the first recurrence. Total healthcare costs were calculated, and the predictors of high healthcare utilization were identified. RESULTS Our study population included 98 patients with recurrent CDI. The median interval between the initial infection and recurrence was 37 days. The mean age of the cohort was 67 years, two-thirds were women (62%), and the mean Charlson index was 8.6. During the year following the first recurrence of CDI, each patient underwent a mean of 4.4 stool C. difficile toxin tests and received a mean of 2.5 prescriptions for oral vancomycin (range, 0-6). Most patients (84%) with recurrence had a CDI-related hospitalization, and 6% underwent colectomy. The mean total CDI-associated cost was $34,104 per patient, with hospitalization costs accounting for 68%, surgery 20%, and drug treatment 8% of this cost, respectively. Extrapolating to the United States overall, we estimate an annual cost of $2.8 billion related to recurrent CDI

  5. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts. PMID:25278776

  6. Literature Review of Saccharomyces boulardii in the Treatment of Refractory Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Warila

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of S. boulardii for the treatment of recurrent C. difficile infections.Methods: Eligible articles included S. boulardii in patients with recurrent C. difficile infection. The primary endpoint examined was clinical resolution of infection with no further recurrences during follow-up.Results: Six studies met inclusion criteria. A case report showed resolution of recurrences in one patient, and an experimental trial showed a trend towards decreased recurrences in patients receiving S. boulardii (85% no further recurrences. Two randomized controlled trials found a significant decrease in recurrences for S. boulardii versus placebo (34.6% vs 64.7%, P=0.04; 16.7% vs 50%, P=0.05. One meta-analysis determined significant efficacy for S. boulardii in reducing relapses (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.35-0.98, while another concluded there was insufficient evidence to recommend probiotics for C. difficile infection.Conclusions: S. boulardii may be considered for patients with recurrent C. difficile infection, refractory to antibiotic regimens alone.

  7. MYCOPLASMA INFECTION IN CHILDREN: CURRENT DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Harlamova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presents literary and own data (52 patients on the role of mycoplasma infection. Mycoplasma infection is associated with long-term antigenemia in children, causes recurrent disease and autoimmunity. Among the 52 examined patients diagnosed with pneumonia in 17, bronchitis — from 19, rhinosinusitis  — at 11, StevensJohnson syndrome — in 2 children.  In half the cases mycoplasmosis occurs against the backdrop of persistent active herpes virus infection (in 27 children (52%. To optimize the causal and pathogenetic therapy mycoplasma requires correction of immune disorders.

  8. Update on Neonatal Herpes Simplex Epidemiology in the Netherlands: A Health Problem of Increasing Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oeffelen, Louise; Biekram, Manisha; Poeran, Jashvant; Hukkelhoven, Chantal; Galjaard, Sander; van der Meijden, Wim; Op de Coul, Eline

    2018-01-18

    This paper provides an update on the incidence of neonatal herpes, guideline adherence by health care professionals (HCP), and trends in genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection during pregnancy in the Netherlands. Questionnaires were sent to all hospitals inquiring about numbers and characteristics of neonatal and maternal HSV infections, and guideline adherence between 2012 and 2015. Longitudinal trends were investigated from 1999 onwards using survey data and Perinatal Registry of the Netherlands data (Perined). Trends were smoothed with Poisson regression splines. Risk indicators for neonatal and maternal HSV infections were examined with Poisson regression analyses. Neonatal herpes incidence was 4.8/100,000 live births based on survey data (2012-2015) and 3.4/100,000 based on Perined (2012-2014). Mortality rate was 23% (7/30). Neonatal herpes incidence increased slightly over time as did the prevalence of genital HSV infection among pregnant women. Non-Western ethnicity (RR 1.9, 95%CI 1.5-2.5) and age herpes during pregnancy. In Perined, none of the neonatal herpes cases had a mother diagnosed with an active genital herpes infection during pregnancy. Preventive measures to reduce vertical herpes transmission (such as caesarean section) were less commonly reported by HCP in 2012-2015 compared to 2006-2011. Neonatal herpes incidence in the Netherlands slowly increased over the last 15 years. An increased genital HSV prevalence during pregnancy or, to lower extent, the decreased guideline adherence by HCP may be responsible. A rise in asymptomatic maternal HSV shedding is also plausible, emphasizing the challenges in preventing neonatal herpes.

  9. Four Cases of Urinary Dysfunction Associated with Sacral Herpes Zoster

    OpenAIRE

    松尾, 朋博; 大庭, 康司郎; 宮田, 康好; 井川, 掌; 酒井, 英樹

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster is caused by the infection of Varicella-Zoster virus. The anatomical distribution of herpes zoster in the sacral area is only6. 9%1). Moreover, the onset rate of herpes zoster with urinary dysfunction is 0.6%1). The lesion sites of herpes zoster which cause urinary dysfunction are almost lumber and sacral areas. We describe four cases of sacral herpes zoster with urinary dysfunction in this report. All patients were elderly people (66-84 years old), and all patients were adminis...

  10. Herpes zoster: A clinical study in 205 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E N Abdul Latheef

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Even though herpes zoster is a common condition its incidence and pattern of occurrence in the era of HIV disease is significant. Aim: To analyze the incidence, pattern of occurrence and evolution of herpes zoster with special attention to provocative factors if any. Materials and Method s: This was an analytical study conducted for 2 years based on a preformed proforma containing preliminary information, a detailed clinical evaluation regarding the segment of involvement, morphology, pattern of lesions, complications, disseminations etc. and investigations to establish provocative factors if any. Results: Incidence of herpes zoster was mainly in the fourth and third decades of life. A definite history of chicken pox was present in only 63.4% cases. In the majority (70% herpes zoster occurred spontaneously. In 30% cases, immunosuppression due to chemotherapy, malignancy, HIV infection, diabetes mellitus were observed. The commonest segment affected was thoracic (42.4% followed by cranial (28.2% and cervical (12.1%. Majority resolved in 7-14 days except immunosuppressed. 34.6% of the patients had complications such as secondary bacterial infection, post herpetic neuralgia, and motor weakness. Ten patients had HIV infection as a provocative factor. Conclusion: The results of incidence and clinical pattern of herpes zoster is almost parallel to the previous studies. Any factors of immunosuppression should be checked, especially HIV, particularly in disseminated and long-lasting cases.

  11. The nervous system in genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infections in mice. Lethal panmyelitis or nonlethal demyelinative myelitis or meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J R; Stoner, G L

    1984-11-01

    Female mice were inoculated vaginally with the MS strain of herpes simplex virus type 2, and serially positive vaginal cultures were used to confirm infection. The proportion of mice infected and the mortality rate in infected mice decreased with increasing age. In mice 12 weeks old, clinical, neuropathologic, and virologic criteria defined four patterns of disease. Moribund mice had severe genital lesions, hindleg paralysis, and urinary and fecal retention, and most died during the second week of infection. These mice had a panmyelitis with a decreasing gradient of both viral antigen and lesions extending rostrally from the lumbosacral cord into the brain stem. Lesions were about equally distributed in gray and white matter and were characterized by neuronal loss and axonal demyelination, respectively. By contrast, mice with nonfatal infections had mild or no evident genital lesions and a small proportion had mild hindleg weakness. Of these, some mice had demyelinative lesions, particularly in the lower spinal cord but also at higher cord and brain stem levels, whereas others had leptomeningitis. Both of these groups had sacral sensory root abnormalities. A third group of survivors lacked both sensory root and central nervous system abnormalities. This report defines a broader spectrum of disease patterns following infection by a natural route than has been previously appreciated. It provides the first evidence that nonfatal herpes simplex virus type 2 infection by a peripheral route can produce central nervous system demyelination. It indicates that in aseptic meningitis with this agent, the route of virus spread to the central nervous system is neural and not hematogenous. Finally, the antigenic and pathologic observations presented here complement and confirm the virus isolation data and pathologic findings of others that genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection causes ascending infection in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  12. High variability in viral load in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with herpes simplex and varicella-zoster infections of the central nervous system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžek, Daniel; Piskunova, N.; Žampachová, E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 12 (2007), s. 1217-1219 ISSN 1198-743X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : cerebrospinal fluid, herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus * herpes simplex virus * varicella-zoster virus * central nervous system infections * quantitative real-time PCR Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2007

  13. Prodrugs of herpes simplex thymidine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanachkova, Milka; Xu, Wei-Chu; Dvoskin, Sofya; Dix, Edward J; Yanachkov, Ivan B; Focher, Federico; Savi, Lida; Sanchez, M Dulfary; Foster, Timothy P; Wright, George E

    2015-04-01

    Because guanine-based herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase inhibitors are not orally available, we synthesized various 6-deoxy prodrugs of these compounds and evaluated them with regard to solubility in water, oral bioavailability, and efficacy to prevent herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation from latency in a mouse model. Organic synthesis was used to prepare compounds, High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to analyze hydrolytic conversion, Mass Spectrometry (MS) to measure oral bioavailability, and mouse latent infection and induced reactivation to evaluate the efficacy of a specific prodrug. Aqueous solubilities of prodrugs were improved, oxidation of prodrugs by animal cytosols occurred in vitro, and oral absorption of the optimal prodrug sacrovir™ (6-deoxy-mCF3PG) in the presence of the aqueous adjuvant Soluplus® and conversion to active compound N(2)-[3-(trifluoromethyl)pheny])guanine (mCF3PG) were accomplished in mice. Treatment of herpes simplex virus-1 latent mice with sacrovir™ in 1% Soluplus in drinking water significantly suppressed herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation and viral genomic replication. Ad libitum oral delivery of sacrovir™ was effective in suppressing herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation in ocularly infected latent mice as measured by the numbers of mice shedding infectious virus at the ocular surface, numbers of trigeminal ganglia positive for infectious virus, number of corneas that had detectable infectious virus, and herpes simplex virus-1 genome copy numbers in trigeminal ganglia following reactivation. These results demonstrate the statistically significant effect of the prodrug on suppressing herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation in vivo. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. [Recurrent pulmonary infection and oral mucosal ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Fei-Mei; Tang, Lan-Lan; Zhang, Hui; Xie, Min; Yang, Ming-Hua; Yang, Liang-Chun; Yu, Yan; Cao, Li-Zhi

    2017-04-01

    An 8-year-old girl who had experienced intermittent cough and fever over a 3 year period, was admitted after experiencing a recurrence for one month. One year ago the patient experienced a recurrent oral mucosal ulcer. Physical examination showed vitiligo in the skin of the upper right back. Routine blood tests and immune function tests performed in other hospitals had shown normal results. Multiple lung CT scans showed pulmonary infection. The patient had recurrent fever and cough and persistent presence of some lesions after anti-infective therapy. The antitubercular therapy was ineffective. Routine blood tests after admission showed agranulocytosis. Gene detection was performed and she was diagnosed with dyskeratosis congenita caused by homozygous mutation in RTEL1. Patients with dyskeratosis congenita with RTEL1 gene mutation tend to develop pulmonary complications. Since RTEL1 gene sequence is highly variable with many mutation sites and patterns and can be inherited via autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance, this disease often has various clinical manifestations, which may lead to missed diagnosis or misdiagnosis. For children with unexplained recurrent pulmonary infection, examinations of the oral cavity, skin, and nails and toes should be taken and routine blood tests should be performed to exclude dyskeratosis congenita. There are no specific therapies for dyskeratosis congenita at present, and when bone marrow failure and pulmonary failure occur, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and lung transplantation are the only therapies. Androgen and its derivatives are effective in some patients. Drugs targeting the telomere may be promising for patients with dyskeratosis congenita.

  15. The association between herpes virus infections and functional somatic symptoms in a general population of adolescents. The TRAILS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Jonker

    Full Text Available FSS have been suggested to follow activation of the immune system, triggered by herpes virus infections. The aim of this study was to find out whether herpes virus infections were associated with the experience of FSS in adolescents, and whether this association was mediated by hsCRP, as a general marker of immune activation.This study was performed in TRAILS, a large prospective population cohort of 2230 adolescents (mean age: 16.1 years, SD = .66, 53.4% girls. FSS were assessed using the somatic complaints subscale of the Youth Self-Report. FSS were analyzed as total scores and divided in two group clusters based on previous studies in this cohort. Levels of hsCRP and antibody levels to the herpes viruses HSV1, HSV2, CMV, EBV and HHV6 were assessed in blood samples at age 16. Also a value for pathogen burden was created adding the number of viruses the adolescents were seropositive for. Multiple regression analysis with bootstrapping was used to analyze the association between viral antibodies and pathogen burden, hsCRP and FSS scores.Antibody levels and pathogen burden were not associated with FSS total scores or FSS scores in both symptom groups. hsCRP was associated with the total FSS score (B = .02, 95% CI: .004 to .028, p = .01 and FSS score in the symptom group of headache and gastrointestinal complaints (B = .02, 95% CI: .001 to .039, p = .04.Our study showed no association between herpes virus infections and FSS in general or specific FSS symptom clusters. A role for inflammatory processes in FSS development was supported by the significant association we found between hsCRP levels and FSS, especially in the symptom group of headache and gastrointestinal complaints.

  16. The association between herpes virus infections and functional somatic symptoms in a general population of adolescents. The TRAILS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Iris; Schoevers, Robert; Klein, Hans; Rosmalen, Judith

    2017-01-01

    FSS have been suggested to follow activation of the immune system, triggered by herpes virus infections. The aim of this study was to find out whether herpes virus infections were associated with the experience of FSS in adolescents, and whether this association was mediated by hsCRP, as a general marker of immune activation. This study was performed in TRAILS, a large prospective population cohort of 2230 adolescents (mean age: 16.1 years, SD = .66, 53.4% girls). FSS were assessed using the somatic complaints subscale of the Youth Self-Report. FSS were analyzed as total scores and divided in two group clusters based on previous studies in this cohort. Levels of hsCRP and antibody levels to the herpes viruses HSV1, HSV2, CMV, EBV and HHV6 were assessed in blood samples at age 16. Also a value for pathogen burden was created adding the number of viruses the adolescents were seropositive for. Multiple regression analysis with bootstrapping was used to analyze the association between viral antibodies and pathogen burden, hsCRP and FSS scores. Antibody levels and pathogen burden were not associated with FSS total scores or FSS scores in both symptom groups. hsCRP was associated with the total FSS score (B = .02, 95% CI: .004 to .028, p = .01) and FSS score in the symptom group of headache and gastrointestinal complaints (B = .02, 95% CI: .001 to .039, p = .04). Our study showed no association between herpes virus infections and FSS in general or specific FSS symptom clusters. A role for inflammatory processes in FSS development was supported by the significant association we found between hsCRP levels and FSS, especially in the symptom group of headache and gastrointestinal complaints.

  17. [Clinical, epidemiological, and etiological studies of adult aseptic meningitis: a report of 12 cases of herpes simplex meningitis, and a comparison with cases of herpes simplex encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeno, Takahiro; Shiga, Yuji; Takeshima, Shinichi; Tachiyama, Keisuke; Kamimura, Teppei; Kono, Ryuhei; Takemaru, Makoto; Takeshita, Jun; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2018-01-26

    We treated 437 cases of adult aseptic meningitis and 12 cases (including 2 recurrent patients; age, 31.8 ± 8.9 years; 7 females) of herpes simplex meningitis from 2004 to 2016. The incidence rate of adult herpes simplex meningitis in the cases with aseptic meningitis was 2.7%. One patient was admitted during treatment of genital herpes, but no association was observed between genital herpes and herpes simplex meningitis in the other cases. The diagnoses were confirmed in all cases as the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was positive for herpes simplex virus (HSV)-DNA. For diagnosis confirmation, the DNA test was useful after 2-7 days following initial disease onset. Among other types of aseptic meningitis, the patients with herpes simplex meningitis showed relatively high white blood cell counts and relatively high CSF protein and high CSF cell counts. CSF cells showed mononuclear cell dominance from the initial stage of the disease. During same period, we also experienced 12 cases of herpes simplex encephalitis and 21 cases of non-hepatic acute limbic encephalitis. Notably, the patients with herpes simplex meningitis were younger and their CSF protein and cells counts were higher than those of the patients with herpes simplex encephalitis.

  18. Fatal Neonatal Herpes Simplex Infection Likely from Unrecognized Breast Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Scott S

    2016-02-01

    Type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is very prevalent yet in rare circumstances can lead to fatal neonatal disease. Genital acquisition of type 2 HSV is the usual mode for neonatal herpes, but HSV-1 transmission by genital or extragenital means may result in greater mortality rates. A very rare scenario is presented in which the mode of transmission was likely through breast lesions. The lesions were seen by nurses as well as the lactation consultant and obstetrician in the hospital after delivery of the affected baby but not recognized as possibly being caused by herpes. The baby died 9 days after birth with hepatic failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Peripartum health care workers need to be aware of potential nongenital (including from the breast[s]) neonatal herpes acquisition, which can be lethal. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Oral antiviral therapy for prevention of genital herpes outbreaks in immunocompetent and nonpregnant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cleach, Laurence; Trinquart, Ludovic; Do, Giao; Maruani, Annabel; Lebrun-Vignes, Benedicte; Ravaud, Philippe; Chosidow, Olivier

    2014-08-03

    Genital herpes is caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) or 2 (HSV-2). Some infected people experience outbreaks of genital herpes, typically, characterized by vesicular and erosive localized painful genital lesions. To compare the effectiveness and safety of three oral antiviral drugs (acyclovir, famciclovir and valacyclovir) prescribed to suppress genital herpes outbreaks in non-pregnant patients. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the search portal of the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and pharmaceutical company databases up to February 2014. We also searched US Food and Drug Administration databases and proceedings of seven congresses to a maximum of 10 years. We contacted trial authors and pharmaceutical companies. We selected parallel-group and cross-over randomized controlled trials including patients with recurrent genital herpes caused by HSV, whatever the type (HSV-1, HSV-2, or undetermined), with at least four recurrences per year (trials concerning human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients or pregnant women were not eligible) and comparing suppressive oral antiviral treatment with oral acyclovir, famciclovir, and valacyclovir versus placebo or another suppressive oral antiviral treatment. Two review authors independently selected eligible trials and extracted data. The Risk of bias tool was used to assess risk of bias. Treatment effect was measured by the risk ratio (RR) of having at least one genital herpes recurrence. Pooled RRs were derived by conventional pairwise meta-analyses. A network meta-analysis allowed for estimation of all possible two-by-two comparisons between antiviral drugs. A total of 26 trials (among which six had a cross-over design) were included. Among the 6950 randomly assigned participants, 54% (range 0 to 100%) were female, mean age was 35 years (range 26 to 45.1), and the mean number of recurrences per year was 11

  20. A clinico-epidemiological study of herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, S K; Radhakrishnan, S

    2016-04-01

    Herpes zoster is a common viral infection of skin caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus infection from the spinal ganglia. The clinico-epidemiological patterns of this disease in an Indian setting required to be studied. A cross sectional study was conducted on all consecutive cases of herpes zoster reporting to the Dermatology Outpatient Department at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Bangalore during a period of one year from 01 Jun 2013 to 31 May 2014. Detailed history, examination, HIV screening and Tzanck smear were carried out in all cases. 84 cases of herpes zoster were seen with a mean age of 30 years. Majority (39%) of cases were seen in the 21-30 year age group. Thoracic segments were involved in 65.4%, cervical in 11.9%, cranial in 11.5%, lumbar in 8.3% and sacral segments in 3.5%. 63% of cases had zoster associated pain. One case had motor involvement.3.57% of the patients were HIV positive. This study shows a lower age incidence of herpes zoster HIV positivity and zoster associated pain as compared to other studies. The pattern of segmental involvement in herpes zoster seen in this study was similar to other studies.

  1. Burden of recurrent Chlamydia trachomatis infections in young women: further uncovering the "hidden epidemic".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolai, Linda M; Hochberg, Abby L; Ethier, Kathleen A; Lewis, Jessica B; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2007-03-01

    To determine the frequency and patterns of recurrent Chlamydia trachomatis infections, the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection in young women. Cohort study using different data collection methods, including face-to-face interviews, medical record reviews, urine-based screening for C trachomatis infections, and a review of state health department reports of C trachomatis diagnoses. Ten community-based health centers that provided reproductive health care from June 1998 to September 2001. Eligibility criteria included being nulliparous, between the ages of 14 and 19 years, and human immunodeficiency virus-negative, all at the time of recruitment. This convenience sample (N = 411) was recruited by word of mouth, clinician referrals, and advertisements in the clinics. Prospective follow-up data were available for 93.9% (386/411) of the sample. The exposure of interest was prior chlamydia infection. Main Outcome Measure Diagnosis of recurrent C trachomatis infection. During the follow-up period of 23 318 person-months (mean, 4.7 years per person), 216 participants (52.6%) were diagnosed as having C trachomatis infection, and 123 participants (29.9% of the total sample and 56.9% of those with initial infections) were diagnosed as having recurrent C trachomatis infections. Of 456 C trachomatis diagnoses made during the study period, 241 (52.9%) were recurrent infections. The rate of recurrent infections was 42.1 per 1000 person-months. The median time to recurrent infection was 5.2 months. Recurrent C trachomatis infections comprise a substantial health burden among young women, possibly higher than previously recognized in this vulnerable population.

  2. Recurrent nontuberculous mycobacterial endophthalmitis: a diagnostic conundrum

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    Venkateswaran N

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nandini Venkateswaran,1 Gabrielle Yeaney,2 Mina Chung,3,4 Holly B Hindman3,41University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 3Flaum Eye Institute, 4Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USAObjective: To report a case of recurrent nontuberculous mycobacterial endophthalmitis in the context of neurotrophic keratopathy secondary to herpes zoster ophthalmicus that had an atypical presentation and complex course, and highlights the challenges of causative organism identification and therapeutic interventions in this condition.Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted to determine the visual outcomes of the patient.Results: A 68-year-old pseudophakic male with long-standing neurotrophic keratopathy and perforated descemetocele managed with cyanoacrylate glue and a contact bandage lens in the left eye, began experiencing recurrent episodes of endophthalmitis after undergoing a penetrating keratoplasty. Several therapeutic procedures including an anterior chamber washout, two pars plana vitrectomies, explantation of the posterior chamber intraocular lens and capsular bag, and multiple intravitreal antimicrobial injections, were performed to which he has ultimately responded favorably, with no signs of infection to date and stable visual acuity. The causative organism of his recurrent infections was initially identified as Mycobacterium abscessus through biochemical testing and 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene sequencing; however, repeat polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing of the 65 kDa heat shock protein (hsp65 gene for experimental purposes confirmed the accurate identification of the organism to be Mycobacterium chelonae. Given the greater reliability of PCR and sequencing of the hsp65 gene over traditional biochemical tests and culture techniques, M. chelonae was likely the

  3. Quantitative uptake studies of 131I-labeled (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine in herpes simplex virus-infected cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, M.J.; Samuel, J.; Wiebe, L.I.; Knaus, E.E.; Tyrrell, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    We have synthesized a 131 I-radiolabeled antiviral compound (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (IVdU) and shown that this agent was selectively trapped within rabbit kidney cells, infected in vitro by thymidine kinase-positive (TK+) herpes simplex virus (HSV). The uptake of 131 I-labeled IVdU was specific, as it was not concentrated within either HSV (TK-) or mock-infected cells. In certain conditions, over 40% of the radiolabel was selectively trapped within HSV (TK+)-infected cells. This was a 20- to 30-fold increase over the uptake of 131 I-labeled IVdU by HSV (TK-) or mock-infected cells. The uptake of 131 I-labeled IVdU varied directly with (i) the dose of the virus used to infect the rabbit kidney cells; (ii) the concentration of radiolabeled IVdU added to the system; and (iii) the time of exposure of IVdU to infected cells. The ability of this agent to be trapped within HSV (TK+)-infected cells merits further evaluation in animal models as it has potential as a noninvasive, herpes-specific diagnostic test, in particular for HSV encephalitis

  4. [Reactivation of herpes zoster infection by varicella-zoster virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvjetković, D; Jovanović, J; Hrnjaković-Cvjetković, I; Brkić, S; Bogdanović, M

    1999-01-01

    ), secondary bacterial infection of vesicles. Immunocompromised patients often develop more severe disease lasting up to two weeks, skin lesions are more numerous and often with hemorrhagic base and there is a high possibility for cutaneous dissemination and visceral involvement including viral pneumonia, encephalitis and hepatitis. Chronic shingles may also be found in immunocompromised hosts, particularly in those with a diagnosis of HIV infection. In patients with HIV infection, shingles is often characterised by radicular pain and itching several days before appearance of skin lesions. Those patients may have two or more dermatomes involved and recurrences of shingles cannot be quite infrequent in those patients. But visceral involvement is rarer than in other immunocompromised patients. Shingles may occur in the second half of pregnancy and usually have a mild course. However, congenital abnormalities has been described in few cases. The diagnosis of shingles is usually made by history and physical examination. Exceptionally, for example in zoster sine herpete and atypical forms of shingles, virus isolation and serological tests must be used. Some other diseases may cause similar skin lesions and rash (varicella, erysipelas, impetigo, enteroviral infections, herpes simplex infections). These diseases are excluded by using detailed history taking and physical examination, laboratory findings, virus isolation and commercially available serological tests. The vast majority of immunocompetent persons with shingles should be treated only by symptomatic therapy. Predominantly it is directed toward reduction of fever and avoiding secondary bacterial skin infection in immunocompetent hosts. Acute neuritis and post-herpetic neuralgia require administration of various analgesics, even like amitriptyline hydrochloride and fluphenazine hydrochloride. Acyclovir therapy is limited to ophthal

  5. Herpes zoster and the risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Ying Lian

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster infection and stroke are highly prevalent in the general population; however, reports have presented inconsistent findings regarding the relationship between herpes zoster infection and stroke. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to clarify this association.The PubMed and Embase databases were searched for studies published from their inception to January 2016. Two investigators independently extracted the data. The pooled relative risk (RR was calculated using a random effects model.A total of 8 studies met the inclusion criteria. During the first 1 month after herpes zoster infection, the pooled RRs for ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke were 1.55 (95% CI, 1.46-1.65 and 1.70 (95% CI, 0.73-3.96, respectively, and within 3 months after infection, the corresponding RRs were 1.17 (95% CI, 1.12-1.23 and 2.05 (95% CI, 1.17-3.60, respectively. At 1 year and more than 1 year after herpes zoster infection, a significant relationship was not observed between herpes zoster infection and the incidence of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Publication bias was not observed.The accumulated evidence generated from this systematic review indicates that an increased risk for ischemic stroke occurred in the short term after herpes zoster infection, whereas a significant relationship was not observed in the long term after infection. With respect to hemorrhagic stroke, the association was not significant. With respect to hemorrhagic stroke, the association between was not significant except within 3 months after a herpes zoster infection.

  6. HSV-1/HSV-2 Infection-Related Cancers in Bantu Populations Driving HIV-1 Prevalence in Africa: Tracking the Origin of AIDS at the Onset of the 20th Century

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    Jacqueline Le Goaster

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: At the onset of the 20th century, ancient clinical observations of cancer epidemics in Bantu populations of Sub-Saharan Africa were discovered. They were reported from 1914 to 1960, but remained unexplained. In 1983, in San Francisco, Calif., USA, cancer epidemics were related to infections by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 known as AIDS disease. Yet since 1996, it is known that HIV-1 strains are not the only ones involved. In Sub-Saharan Africa, recurrent orobuccal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and genital recurrent herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 appeared many times prior to infection by HIV-1. Case Reports: Data on these ancient medical observations regarding African cancer epidemics can today be referred to as the relationship between the unfortunate immune deficiency of herpes in Bantu populations and HIV-1 viral strains. For centuries, the Bantu populations dispersed in forests were living in close proximity to chimpanzees infected by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV and were exposed to SIV contamination which became HIV-1 in human beings. Presently, these unexplained Bantu cancer epidemics can be linked to the viral partnership of HSV-1/HSV-2 to HIV-1 strains. Conclusion: The key issue is now to prevent HSV-1/HSV-2 diseases related to HIV-1. An anti-herpes treatment administered early during childhood to Bantu populations will offer a mean of preventing herpes diseases related to HIV-1 infection and hence avoid cancer epidemics.

  7. Detection of Vero Cells Infected with Herpes Simplex Types 1 and 2 and Varicella Zoster Viruses Using Raman Spectroscopy and Advanced Statistical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huleihel, Mahmoud; Shufan, Elad; Zeiri, Leila; Salman, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Of the eight members of the herpes family of viruses, HSV1, HSV2, and varicella zoster are the most common and are mainly involved in cutaneous disorders. These viruses usually are not life-threatening, but in some cases they might cause serious infections to the eyes and the brain that can lead to blindness and possibly death. An effective drug (acyclovir and its derivatives) is available against these viruses. Therefore, early detection and identification of these viral infections is highly important for an effective treatment. Raman spectroscopy, which has been widely used in the past years in medicine and biology, was used as a powerful spectroscopic tool for the detection and identification of these viral infections in cell culture, due to its sensitivity, rapidity and reliability. Our results showed that it was possible to differentiate, with a 97% identification success rate, the uninfected Vero cells that served as a control, from the Vero cells that were infected with HSV-1, HSV-2, and VZV. For that, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was performed on the Raman spectra after principal component analysis (PCA) with a leave one out (LOO) approach. Raman spectroscopy in tandem with PCA and LDA enable to differentiate among the different herpes viral infections of Vero cells in time span of few minutes with high accuracy rate. Understanding cell molecular changes due to herpes viral infections using Raman spectroscopy may help in early detection and effective treatment.

  8. Detection of Vero Cells Infected with Herpes Simplex Types 1 and 2 and Varicella Zoster Viruses Using Raman Spectroscopy and Advanced Statistical Methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Huleihel

    Full Text Available Of the eight members of the herpes family of viruses, HSV1, HSV2, and varicella zoster are the most common and are mainly involved in cutaneous disorders. These viruses usually are not life-threatening, but in some cases they might cause serious infections to the eyes and the brain that can lead to blindness and possibly death. An effective drug (acyclovir and its derivatives is available against these viruses. Therefore, early detection and identification of these viral infections is highly important for an effective treatment. Raman spectroscopy, which has been widely used in the past years in medicine and biology, was used as a powerful spectroscopic tool for the detection and identification of these viral infections in cell culture, due to its sensitivity, rapidity and reliability. Our results showed that it was possible to differentiate, with a 97% identification success rate, the uninfected Vero cells that served as a control, from the Vero cells that were infected with HSV-1, HSV-2, and VZV. For that, linear discriminant analysis (LDA was performed on the Raman spectra after principal component analysis (PCA with a leave one out (LOO approach. Raman spectroscopy in tandem with PCA and LDA enable to differentiate among the different herpes viral infections of Vero cells in time span of few minutes with high accuracy rate. Understanding cell molecular changes due to herpes viral infections using Raman spectroscopy may help in early detection and effective treatment.

  9. Herpes Zoster in Two Healthy Children

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    İbrahim Kökçam

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster is an acute dermatomal viral infection caused by the reactivation of varicella zoster virus. The disease is commonly seen among elderly people and immunocompromised individuals, it is also rarely observed in immunocompetent children though. In this report, two herpes zoster cases with trigeminal-involvement in which no factors inducing the reactivation of the virus were detected are presented, as the disease is unusually seen during childhood.

  10. Coinfection and Emergence of Rifamycin Resistance during a Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Emma C; Major, Giles A; Spiller, Robin C; Kuehne, Sarah A; Minton, Nigel P

    2016-11-01

    Clostridium difficile (Peptoclostridium difficile) is a common health care-associated infection with a disproportionately high incidence in elderly patients. Disease symptoms range from mild diarrhea to life-threatening pseudomembranous colitis. Around 20% of patients may suffer recurrent disease, which often requires rehospitalization of patients. C. difficile was isolated from stool samples from a patient with two recurrent C. difficile infections. PCR ribotyping, whole-genome sequencing, and phenotypic assays were used to characterize these isolates. Genotypic and phenotypic screening of C. difficile isolates revealed multiple PCR ribotypes present and the emergence of rifamycin resistance during the infection cycle. Understanding both the clinical and bacterial factors that contribute to the course of recurrent infection could inform strategies to reduce recurrence. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01670149.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Multiple antibody targets on herpes B glycoproteins B and D identified by screening sera of infected rhesus macaques with peptide microarrays.

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    Sven-Kevin Hotop

    Full Text Available Herpes B virus (or Herpesvirus simiae or Macacine herpesvirus 1 is endemic in many populations of macaques, both in the wild and in captivity. The virus elicits only mild clinical symptoms (if any in monkeys, but can be transmitted by various routes, most commonly via bites, to humans where it causes viral encephalitis with a high mortality rate. Hence, herpes B constitutes a considerable occupational hazard for animal caretakers, veterinarians and laboratory personnel. Efforts are therefore being made to reduce the risk of zoonotic infection and to improve prognosis after accidental exposure. Among the measures envisaged are serological surveillance of monkey colonies and specific diagnosis of herpes B zoonosis against a background of antibodies recognizing the closely related human herpes simplex virus (HSV. 422 pentadecapeptides covering, in an overlapping fashion, the entire amino acid sequences of herpes B proteins gB and gD were synthesized and immobilized on glass slides. Antibodies present in monkey sera that bind to subsets of the peptide collection were detected by microserological techniques. With 42 different rhesus macaque sera, 114 individual responses to 18 different antibody target regions (ATRs were recorded, 17 of which had not been described earlier. This finding may pave the way for a peptide-based, herpes B specific serological diagnostic test.

  12. [The features in preventing recurrent lower urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzhieva, Z K; Kazilov, Yu B

    2016-08-01

    This review outlines characteristics of medications most commonly used for preventing recurrent lower urinary tract infection (UTI). It shows that the treatment and prophylaxis of UTI should be comprehensive and include the restoration of the normal urogenital tract anatomy and use in addition to antibacterial and anti-inflammatory drugs, agents, normalizing the function of the lower urinary tract, as well as drugs for local and systemic immunoprophylaxis, protection of the urothelium from recurrent infection, local hormone replacement therapy in menopause, and dietary supplements to acidify the urine.

  13. Herpes zoster: A clinicocytopathological insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Snehal; Singaraju, Sasidhar; Einstein, A; Sharma, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster or shingles is reactivation of the varicella zoster virus that had entered the cutaneous nerve endings during an earlier episode of chicken pox traveled to the dorsal root ganglia and remained in a latent form. This condition is characterized by occurrence of multiple, painful, unilateral vesicles and ulceration which shows a typical single dermatome involvement. In this case report, we present a patient with herpes zoster involving the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve, with unilateral vesicles over the right side of lower third of face along the trigeminal nerve tract, with intraoral involvement of buccal mucosa, labial mucosa and the tongue of the same side. Cytopathology revealed classic features of herpes infection including inclusion bodies, perinuclear halo and multinucleated cells.

  14. Immunological markers of frequently recurrent genital herpes simplex virus and their response to hypnotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, P A; Henderson, D C; Barton, S E; Champion, A J; Rollin, M S; Catalan, J; McCormack, S M; Gruzelier, J

    1999-11-01

    Patients were recruited for hypnotherapy from a clinic for patients with frequently recurrent genital herpes simplex virus (rgHSV). Psychological and immunological parameters were measured 6 weeks prior to hypnotherapy and 6 weeks afterwards, during which time each patient kept a diary of symptoms of rgHSV. Following hypnotherapy there was a significant overall reduction in the number of reported episodes of rgHSV, accompanied by an increase in the numbers of CD3 and CD8 lymphocytes, which may represent a non specific effect of hypnosis. The improvers showed significant rises in natural killer (NK) cell counts, HSV specific lymphokine activated killer (LAK) activity, and reduced levels of anxiety when compared to non-improvers. NK cell numbers and HSV specific LAK activity may therefore be important in the reduction in rgHSV following hypnotherapy.

  15. Apparent rarity of asymptomatic herpes cervicitis in a woman with intra-uterine contraceptive device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeola Fowotade

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Infection with genital herpes simplex virus (HSV remains a common viral sexually transmitted disease, often subclinical and a major worldwide problem of women of reproductive age group. Herpes cervicitis is an unusual presentation of Herpes simplex virus infection in females. The finding of herpes cervicitis on routine pap smear of an asymptomatic woman on Intrauterine contraceptive device still further supports the need for increased awareness on the possibility of Herpes simplex virus infection among women, particularly those on Intrauterine contraceptive device. The index case is a 28 years old Nigerian female who was referred to our Special Treatment Clinic on account of an abnormal pap smear cytology which was in keeping with Herpes cervicitis. There was no history of genital ulcer in this patient; however ELISA for HSV 2 IgM was positive in her. We therefore describe a case of herpes cervicitis in an asymptomatic woman on intrauterine contraceptive device. This case highlights to clinicians the need to be aware of the possibility of this association and to carry out relevant investigations so as to identify and treat these patients appropriately. Therefore, there is a need to put in place adequate public health intervention strategy to prevent genital herpes in women of reproductive age group with a view to preventing the possibility of congenital herpes in subsequent pregnancy.

  16. Recurrent Respiratory Infections in Children

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    F. Yurochko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper covers a problem of recurrent respiratory infections (RRI in children. Their description, risk factors, diagnostic algorithm have been dwelt. A special attention is paid to the treatment. An optimal antibiotic in RRI of bacterial genesis is a high-dose amoxicillin/clavulanate (registered as Augmentin™ ES in Ukraine, the efficacy of which is 94.6–96.3 % according to different data.

  17. A comparative analysis of polymerase chain reaction and direct fluorescent antibody test for diagnosis of genital herpes

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    Vrushali Patwardhan

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: PCR was found to be better in the detection of HSV in recurrent genital herpes patients. It is a better modality, especially when genital herpes clinically presents with ulcerative or crusted lesions, and is also a cheaper alternative as compared to DFA.

  18. Effect of undecylenic acid as a topical microbicide against genital herpes infection in mice and guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, N; Ireland, J; Stanberry, L R; Bernstein, D I

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of topical microbicides to help prevent the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STD). Undecylenic acid (UA), a monosaturated fatty acid, is the active ingredient in a number of over-the-counter (OTC) antifungal spray powders, that also exhibits in vitro antibacterial and antiviral activity, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) activity. We, therefore, evaluated UA as a topical microbicide against genital HSV infection using the murine and guinea pig models of genital herpes. Mice were administered a 20% solution of UA in polyethylene glycol (PEG) vehicle, vehicle alone or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) intravaginally immediately prior to vaginal challenge with HSV-2. Pre-treatment with UA decreased the number of mice that became infected (P < 0.001 vs. PBS or vehicle control), developed symptoms (P <0.001) or died (P <0.001). However, when treatment was extended to either 5 min prior to or after viral inoculation, protection was lost. Similar findings were found using the guinea pig model, where UA treatment completely prevented HSV-2 vaginal infection when given immediately prior to HSV-2 inoculation (P<0.001 vs. PBS or vehicle control). Thus, UA, an approved OTC medication, provided significant protection against HSV disease and infection only when applied immediately before viral inoculation, indicating that better formulations were needed to extend the duration of protection.

  19. Disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection between black and white men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Netochukwu; Rosenberg, Eli S; Luisi, Nicole; Sanchez, Travis; del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kelley, Colleen F

    2015-09-01

    HIV disproportionately affects black men who have sex with men, and herpes simplex virus type 2 is known to increase acquisition of HIV. However, data on racial disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 prevalence and risk factors are limited among men who have sex with men in the United States. InvolveMENt was a cohort study of black and white HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA. Univariate and multivariate cross-sectional associations with herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence were assessed among 455 HIV-negative men who have sex with men for demographic, behavioural and social determinant risk factors using logistic regression. Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 was 23% (48/211) for black and 16% (38/244) for white men who have sex with men (p = 0.05). Education, poverty, drug/alcohol use, incarceration, circumcision, unprotected anal intercourse, and condom use were not associated with herpes simplex virus type 2. In multivariate analyses, black race for those ≤25 years, but not >25 years, and number of sexual partners were significantly associated. Young black men who have sex with men are disproportionately affected by herpes simplex virus type 2, which may contribute to disparities in HIV acquisition. An extensive assessment of risk factors did not explain this disparity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection suggesting differences in susceptibility or partner characteristics. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection Among Renal Transplant Recipients: Risk Factors and Long-Term Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawab, Khaled Abdel; Gheith, Osama; Al Otaibi, Torki; Nampoory, Naryanam; Mansour, Hany; Halim, Medhat A; Nair, Prasad; Said, Tarek; Abdelmonem, Mohamed; El-Sayed, Ayman; Awadain, Waleed

    2017-04-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most common type of bacterial infection in kidney transplant procedures, with adverse effects on graft and patient survival. We aimed to evaluate the risk factors of recurrent urinary tract infection in renal transplant recipients and its impact on patient and graft survival. In a cohort of 1019 patients who were transplanted between 2000 and 2010 at Hamed Al-Essa Organ Transplant Center in Kuwait, 86% developed at least 1 episode of urinary tract infection, with only 6.2% of patients having recurrent infections. We compared patients with recurrent urinary tract infections (group 1) with those who had no recurrence (group 2) regarding their risk factors. Patients in group 1 were significantly younger than those in group 2 (34.9 ± 23 vs 42.8 ± 16 y; P urinary tract infections (P infections were significantly more prevalent among group 1 (10.8% vs 3.8%; P = .008). Long-term graft outcome (functioning and failed) were 78.5% and 21.5% in group 1 versus 85.1% and 13.9% in group 2 (P = .18). Patient outcomes (living and deceased donors) were 98.4% and 1.6% in group 1 versus 95.7% and 4.3% in group 2 (P = .187). Adult females, thymoglobulin induction, pretransplant urologic problems, and hepatitis C infection were the risk factors of recurrent urinary tract infection among our renal transplant patients. However, recurrence did not adversely affect graft or patient survival.

  1. TLR3 deficiency renders astrocytes permissive to herpes simplex virus infection and facilitates establishment of CNS infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Harder, Louis Andreas; Holm, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are highly prevalent neurotropic viruses. While they can replicate lytically in cells of the epithelial lineage, causing lesions on mucocutaneous surfaces, HSVs also establish latent infections in neurons, which act as reservoirs of virus for subsequent reactivation......, it is not known what cell type mediates the role of TLR3 in the immunological control of HSV, and it is not known whether TLR3 sensing occurs prior to or after CNS entry. Here, we show that in mice TLR3 provides early control of HSV-2 infection immediately after entry into the CNS by mediating type I IFN...... responses in astrocytes. Tlr3-/- mice were hypersusceptible to HSV-2 infection in the CNS after vaginal inoculation. HSV-2 exhibited broader neurotropism in Tlr3-/- mice than it did in WT mice, with astrocytes being most abundantly infected. Tlr3-/- mice did not exhibit a global defect in innate immune...

  2. Comparative studies of types 1 and 2 herpes simplex virus infection of cultured normal keratinocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Su, S J; Wu, H H; Lin, Y H; Lin, H Y

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the differences in biological properties, multiplication patterns, and cytopathic effects between type 1 and type 2 herpes simplex virus (HSV) through the replication of HSV in cultured normal human keratinocytes. METHODS--Keratinocytes were obtained from surgical specimens of normal gingiva, cervix, trunk skin, and newborn foreskin. They were cultured in serum free, chemically defined, culture medium and infected with a pool of HSV collected from clinical specimens. RESU...

  3. The Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becknell, Brian; Schober, Megan; Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by pediatricians. Currently, the diagnosis and management of acute urinary tract infection and recurrent urinary tract infection in children remains controversial. Recently published guidelines and large clinical trials have attempted to clarify UTI diagnostic and management strategies. In this manuscript, we review the diagnosis and management of acute and recurrent urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. PMID:25421102

  4. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christine; Gottlieb, Sami L; Wald, Anna

    2016-06-03

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and -2 (HSV-2) are highly prevalent global pathogens which commonly cause recurrent oral and genital ulcerations. Less common but more serious complications include meningitis, encephalitis, neonatal infection, and keratitis. HSV-2 infection is a significant driver of the HIV epidemic, increasing the risk of HIV acquisition 3 fold. As current control strategies for genital HSV-2 infection, including antiviral therapy and condom use, are only partially effective, vaccines will be required to reduce infection. Both preventive and therapeutic vaccines for HSV-2 are being pursued and are in various stages of development. We will provide an overview of efforts to develop HSV-2 vaccines, including a discussion of the clinical need for an HSV vaccine, and status of research and development with an emphasis on recent insights from trials of vaccine candidates in clinical testing. In addition, we will touch upon aspects of HSV vaccine development relevant to low and middle income countries. Copyright © 2016 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Asymptomatic Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Iranian Mothers and Their Newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Ahmad; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Mollaei, Hamidreza; Abedi-Kiasari, Bahman; Fallah, Fatemeh Hoda; Mortazavi, Helya Sadat

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection among pregnant women as well as congenital infection of their newborns in Tehran. One hundred samples of blood sera from pregnant women were analyzed for the presence of HSV specific antibodies. Umbilical cord blood samples from the newborns were analyzed for the presence of HSV DNA using real-time PCR. HSV IgG and IgM antibodies were found in 97% and 2% of pregnant women, respectively. Of all the 100 cord blood samples, 6 were positive for HSV DNA in which 2 cases were from mothers who had detectable IgM. It was notable that all corresponding mothers of six HSV positive infants had detectable IgG antibodies in their sera. It was demonstrated that the presence of HSV DNA in cord blood of newborns could be a risk marker for maternal-fetal transmission of the virus in asymptomatic pregnant women.

  6. An Adjuvanted Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Subunit Vaccine Elicits a T Cell Response in Mice and Is an Effective Therapeutic Vaccine in Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoberne, Mojca; Cardin, Rhonda; Lee, Alexander; Kazimirova, Ana; Zielinski, Veronica; Garvie, Danielle; Lundberg, Amy; Larson, Shane; Bravo, Fernando J.; Bernstein, David I.; Flechtner, Jessica B.

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapeutic herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) vaccine efficacy depends upon the promotion of antigen-specific immune responses that inhibit reactivation or reactivated virus, thus controlling both recurrent lesions and viral shedding. In the present study, a candidate subunit vaccine, GEN-003/MM-2, was evaluated for its ability to induce a broad-spectrum immune response in mice and therapeutic efficacy in HSV-2-infected guinea pigs. GEN-003 is comprised of HSV-2 glycoprotein D2 (gD2ΔTMR340-363) and a truncated form of infected cell polypeptide 4 (ICP4383-766), formulated with Matrix M-2 (MM-2) adjuvant (GEN-003/MM-2). In addition to eliciting humoral immune responses, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells characterized by the secretion of multiple cytokines and cytolytic antigen-specific T cell responses that were able to be recalled at least 44 days after the last immunization were induced in immunized mice. Furthermore, vaccination with either GEN-003 or GEN-003/MM-2 led to significant reductions in both the prevalence and severity of lesions in HSV-2-infected guinea pigs compared to those of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control-vaccinated animals. While vaccination with MM-2 adjuvant alone decreased recurrent disease symptoms compared to the PBS control group, the difference was not statistically significant. Importantly, the frequency of recurrent viral shedding was considerably reduced in GEN-003/MM-2-vaccinated animals but not in GEN-003- or MM-2-vaccinated animals. These findings suggest a possible role for immunotherapeutic GEN-003/MM-2 vaccination as a viable alternative to chronic antiviral drugs in the treatment and control of genital herpes disease. PMID:23365421

  7. [Four cases of urinary dysfunction associated with sacral herpes zoster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Tomohiro; Oba, Kojiro; Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki

    2014-02-01

    Herpes zoster is caused by the infection of Varicella-Zoster virus. The anatomical distribution of herpes zoster in the sacral area is only 6. 9%1). Moreover, the onset rate of herpes zoster with urinary dysfunction is 0.6%1). The lesion sites of herpes zoster which cause urinary dysfunction are almost lumber and sacral areas. We describe four cases of sacral herpes zoster with urinary dysfunction in this report. All patients were elderly people (66-84 years old), and all patients were administered anti-virus drugs and alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockers. Because of urinary retention, three patients have performed clean intermittent self-catheterization (CIC) for several weeks. As the lesions of herpes zoster healed, each patient recovered from urinary dysfunction.

  8. Therapeutic immunization with a mixture of herpes simplex virus 1 glycoprotein D-derived “asymptomatic” human CD8+ T-cell epitopes decreases spontaneous ocular shedding in latently infected HLA transgenic rabbits: association with low frequency of local PD-1+ TIM-3+ CD8+ exhausted T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif A; Srivastava, Ruchi; Chentoufi, Aziz A; Geertsema, Roger; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Dasgupta, Gargi; Osorio, Nelson; Kalantari, Mina; Nesburn, Anthony B; Wechsler, Steven L; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-07-01

    Most blinding ocular herpetic disease is due to reactivation of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) from latency rather than to primary acute infection. No herpes simplex vaccine is currently available for use in humans. In this study, we used the HLA-A*02:01 transgenic (HLA Tg) rabbit model of ocular herpes to assess the efficacy of a therapeutic vaccine based on HSV-1 gD epitopes that are recognized mainly by CD8(+) T cells from "naturally" protected HLA-A*02:01-positive, HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Three ASYMP CD8(+) T-cell epitopes (gD(53-61), gD(70-78), and gD(278-286)) were linked with a promiscuous CD4(+) T-cell epitope (gD(287-317)) to create 3 separate pairs of CD4-CD8 peptides, which were then each covalently coupled to an Nε-palmitoyl-lysine moiety, a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) ligand. This resulted in the construction of 3 CD4-CD8 lipopeptide vaccines. Latently infected HLA Tg rabbits were immunized with a mixture of these 3 ASYMP lipopeptide vaccines, delivered as eye drops in sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The ASYMP therapeutic vaccination (i) induced HSV-specific CD8(+) T cells that prevent HSV-1 reactivation ex vivo from latently infected explanted trigeminal ganglia (TG), (ii) significantly reduced HSV-1 shedding detected in tears, (iii) boosted the number and function of HSV-1 gD epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells in draining lymph nodes (DLN), conjunctiva, and TG, and (iv) was associated with fewer exhausted HSV-1 gD-specific PD-1(+) TIM-3+ CD8(+) T cells. The results underscore the potential of an ASYMP CD8(+) T-cell epitope-based therapeutic vaccine strategy against recurrent ocular herpes. Seventy percent to 90% of adults harbor herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), which establishes lifelong latency in sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. This latent state sporadically switches to spontaneous reactivation, resulting in viral shedding in tears. Most blinding

  9. The psychosocial impact of serological diagnosis of asymptomatic herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, S L; Zimet, G D; Leichliter, J S; Stanberry, L R; Fife, K H; Tu, W; Bernstein, D I

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of a positive herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) serological test on psychosocial functioning among people with no known history of genital herpes. Individuals (age 14-30 years) without a history of genital herpes were recruited from an urban university setting and sexually transmitted diseases (STD), primary care, and adolescent clinics. Participants completed a questionnaire addressing psychological functioning, psychosocial adjustment, and perceived quality of sex and were offered free HSV-2 antibody testing. 33 HSV-2 positive people and 60 HSV-2 negative people demographically matched from the same source of recruitment were re-evaluated at a 3 month follow up visit. HSV-2 positive participants also completed a genital herpes quality of life (GHQOL) measure. Of the 33 who were HSV-2 seropositive, four did not recall their diagnosis. In comparing those who were HSV-2 positive with those who were negative, repeated measures analysis of variance indicated there were no significant differences over time on any of the measures. None the less, many HSV-2 positive individuals indicated that the diagnosis had a notable impact on their quality of life. Also, among the HSV-2 positive people, lower GHQOL at the 3 month follow up was predicted by higher interpersonal sensitivity (r = -0.44, p<0.05), lower social support (r = 0.40, p<0.05), and quality of sex (r = 0.62, p<0.01) at baseline. A diagnosis of asymptomatic HSV-2 infection does not appear to cause significant lasting psychological difficulties. Those for whom the diagnosis had the greatest impact were interpersonally vulnerable before the diagnosis. These results suggest that assessment of interpersonal distress may be important to include as part of pretest and post-test counselling.

  10. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings in a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiner, L.; Demaerel, Ph.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Herpes simplex meningoencephalitis is one of the most common viral central nervous system infection in adults. Early diagnosis is essential for treatment. Case report: We present a case of a 68-year-old female patient with herpes simplex infection. On admission, she was in severe clinical condition. Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging detected brain involvement better than conventional sequences. After acyclovir therapy, the patient fully recovered. Conclusion: DW magnetic resonance imaging is expected to provide a more sensitive imaging in herpes simplex patients than conventional sequences

  11. Herpes Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Herpes Keratitis Sections What is Herpes Keratitis? Herpes Keratitis ... Herpes Keratitis Symptoms Herpes Keratitis Treatment What is Herpes Keratitis? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es la queratitis ...

  12. 2014 UK national guideline for the management of anogenital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Raj; Green, John; Clarke, Emily; Seneviratne, Kanchana; Abbt, Naomi; Evans, Ceri; Bickford, Jane; Nicholson, Marian; O'Farrell, Nigel; Barton, Simon; FitzGerald, Mark; Foley, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    These guidelines concern the management of anogenital herpes simplex virus infections in adults and give advice on diagnosis, management, and counselling of patients. This guideline replaces the 2007 BASHH herpes guidelines and includes new sections on herpes proctitis, key points to cover with patients regarding transmission and removal of advice on the management of HSV in pregnancy which now has a separate joint BASHH/RCOG guideline. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Sexually Transmitted Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infected person’s herpes sore or fluid from a herpes sore. Having genital herpes during pregnancy can cause serious health problems for ... pass herpes to your baby if you have genital herpes sores and blisters (called an outbreak) for the ...

  14. Premenopausal women with recurrent urinary tract infections have lower quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Siobhan S; Guo, Huifang; Raman, Lata; Tambyah, Paul A; Chen, Swaine L; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2018-05-22

    To examine the impact on quality of life of recurrent acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection among premenopausal Singaporean women, and to determine the risk factors for lower quality of life among these patients. A total of 85 patients with recurrent acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection who were referred to the Urology Department at the National University Hospital, Singapore, were prospectively recruited over a 3-year period to complete the validated Short Form 36 Health Survey version 1. In addition, demographic and clinical details including symptomology and medical history were analyzed for factors impacting quality of life. Short Form 36 Health Survey version 1 results were compared with published population norms. After adjusting for age, gender and race, recurrent acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection patients had significantly lower quality of life on seven out of eight Short Form 36 Health Survey version 1 domains when compared with age-, gender- and race-adjusted population norms for Singapore. Among those with recurrent acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection, those who also reported caffeine consumption had significantly lower Short Form 36 Health Survey version 1 scores than those who did not. Those who reported chronic constipation also had consistently lower Short Form 36 Health Survey version 1 scores across all domains. Recurrent acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection has a negative impact on the quality of life of premenopausal, otherwise healthy women. Recurrent acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection patients who also have chronic constipation or consume caffeine have lower quality of life than those who do not. More studies are required to understand the relationships between these common problems and risk factors. © 2018 The Japanese Urological Association.

  15. Signs of chronic stress in women with recurrent candida vulvovaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrström, Sophia M; Kornfeld, Dan; Thuresson, Jessica; Rylander, Eva

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is an association between recurrent vulvovaginal candida and chronic stress. Chronic stress affects the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, which influences the immune function. Recurrent candida vulvovaginitis is increasing. Women with recurrent vulvovaginal candida (n = 35) and age-matched healthy control subjects (n = 35) collected saliva for the analysis of cortisol. Hormone analyses of blood samples and vulvovaginal examinations were performed. A questionnaire was completed. Morning rise cortisol level was significantly blunted among patients compared with control subjects (P vulvovaginal candida, compared with control subjects. More patients than control subjects reported a history of condyloma, bacterial vaginosis, and herpes genitalis. No differences were seen between patients and control subjects regarding sexual hormone binding globulin, dihydroepiandrosterone, testosterone or Hemoglobin A1c. Morning rise salivary cortisol level is blunted in women with recurrent vulvovaginal candida, which indicates signs of chronic stress. The higher incidence of vulvovaginal infections in these women compared with control subjects may reflect impaired immunity, which may be due to chronic stress.

  16. Effect of ultrasound on herpes simplex virus infection in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwai Soichi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound has been shown to increase the efficiency of gene expression from retroviruses, adenoviruses and adeno-associated viruses. The effect of ultrasound to stimulate cell membrane permeabilization on infection with an oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was examined. Results Vero monkey kidney cells were infected with HSV-1 and exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound after an adsorption period. The number of plaques was significantly greater than that of the untreated control. A combination of ultrasound and microbubbles further increased the plaque number. Similar results were obtained using a different type of HSV-1 and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells. The appropriate intensity, duty cycle and time of ultrasound to increase the plaque number were 0.5 W/cm2, 20% duty cycle and 10 sec, respectively. Ultrasound with microbubbles at an intensity of 2.0 W/cm2, at 50% duty cycle, or for 40 sec reduced cell viability. Conclusion These results indicate that ultrasound promotes the entry of oncolytic HSV-1 into cells. It may be useful to enhance the efficiency of HSV-1 infection in oncolytic virotherapy.

  17. Piroxicam inhibits herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astani, A; Albrecht, U; Schnitzler, P

    2015-05-01

    Piroxicam is a potent, nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) which also exhibits antipyretic activity. The antiviral effect of piroxicam against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was examined in vitro on RC-37 monkey kidney cells using a plaque reduction assay. Piroxicam was dissolved in ethanol or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined at 4 μg/ml and 75 μg/ml, respectively. The IC50 for the standard antiherpetic drug acyclovir was determined at 1.6 μM. At non-cytotoxic concentrations of these piroxicam solutions, plaque formation was significantly reduced by 62.4% for ethanolic piroxicam and 72.8% for piroxicam in DMSO. The mode of antiviral action of these drugs was assessed by time-on-addition assays. No antiviral effect was observed when cells were incubated with piroxicam prior to infection with HSV-1 or when HSV-1 infected cells were treated with dissolved piroxicam. Herpesvirus infection was, however, significantly inhibited when HSV-1 was incubated with piroxicam prior to the infection of cells. These results indicate that piroxicam affected the virus before adsorption, but not after penetration into the host cell, suggesting that piroxicam exerts a direct antiviral effect on HSV-1. Free herpesvirus was sensitive to piroxicam in a concentration-dependent manner and the inhibition of HSV-1 appears to occur before entering the cell but not after penetration of the virus into the cell. Considering the lipophilic nature of piroxicam, which enables it to penetrate the skin, it might be suitable for topical treatment of herpetic infections.

  18. Evasion of Early Antiviral Responses by Herpes Simplex Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suazo, Paula A.; Ibañez, Francisco J.; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R.; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V.; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; González, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency. PMID:25918478

  19. Effect of pravastatin and fosinopril on recurrent urinary tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, K.B.; Visser, Sipke; Hak, E.

    OBJECTIVES: Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a problem affecting both women and men. Animal experiments and in vitro studies indicate that statins might prevent recurrent UTIs. We assessed the effects of pravastatin on UTI antibiotic prescribing among adults. METHODS: A post hoc

  20. A case of MOG antibody-positive bilateral optic neuritis and meningoganglionitis following a genital herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masataka; Iwasaki, Yuko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Kaneko, Kimihiko; Nakashima, Ichiro; Kunieda, Takenobu; Kaneko, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2017-10-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody-positive optic neuritis (ON) and myelitis are recognized as important differential diagnosis of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody-positive neuromyelitis optica (NMO)/NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD). Similar to NMO/NMOSD associated with AQP4 antibodies, preceding infections have been reported in patients with MOG antibody-positive ON. This is the first report of bilateral ON following a herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection associated with a positive MOG antibody. A 41-year-old man who initially presented with genital herpes developed allodynia in the Th2-Th5 and Th8-L2 areas, urinary retention, and painful visual loss in the left eye. Ophthalmological evaluation and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral ON. A spinal MRI showed leptomeningeal enhancement from the thoracic to lumbar vertebrae and abnormal enhancement of the L3 to S3 dorsal root ganglia without a change in intramedullary signals. Following treatment with acyclovir and steroid pulse, he fully recovered. Serum anti-AQP4 antibodies were negative, but anti-MOG antibodies were positive. Finally, he was diagnosed with MOG antibody-positive bilateral ON and meningoganglionitis following an HSV infection. Our case supports a relationship between anti-MOG antibodies and ON triggered by an HSV infection. Clinicians should thus consider testing for MOG antibodies in patients with post-infectious neurological symptoms due to an HSV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A suspected dental cellulitis leading to diagnosis of both herpes zoster ophthalmicus and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace E. Parkins, BDS, FDS.RCPS (Glas., FWACS, FGCS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster ophthalmicus and HIV are serious health problems. We report a case of a 37-year-old woman who presented to the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital with dyspnea and facial cellulitis, and a diagnosis 5 days prior of dental cellulitis made at a district hospital. Investigations revealed that the facial cellulitis was secondary to herpes zoster infection involving the ophthalmic division of the left trigeminal nerve. The patient responded well to oral acyclovir but developed postherpetic neuralgia. During the course of treatment, she was also diagnosed to be HIV-1 positive and was referred for further management. This case represents a unique report in which the patient presented to the hospital with symptoms of cellulitis suggestive of underlying dental infection but was later diagnosed with both herpes zoster ophthalmicus and an underlying HIV infection. Atypical presentations of herpes zoster can occur in HIV/AIDS. Signs of herpes zoster infection with cellulitis should alert the clinician that the patient may have a possible underlying immunosuppressive disease. The population must be educated regarding the importance of early presentation and careful compliance with treatment as well as regular follow-ups.

  2. Herpes simplex virus-2 genital tract shedding is not predictable over months or years in infected persons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Dhankani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2 is a chronic reactivating infection that leads to recurrent shedding episodes in the genital tract. A minority of episodes are prolonged, and associated with development of painful ulcers. However, currently, available tools poorly predict viral trajectories and timing of reactivations in infected individuals. We employed principal components analysis (PCA and singular value decomposition (SVD to interpret HSV-2 genital tract shedding time series data, as well as simulation output from a stochastic spatial mathematical model. Empirical and model-derived, time-series data gathered over >30 days consists of multiple complex episodes that could not be reduced to a manageable number of descriptive features with PCA and SVD. However, single HSV-2 shedding episodes, even those with prolonged duration and complex morphologies consisting of multiple erratic peaks, were consistently described using a maximum of four dominant features. Modeled and clinical episodes had equivalent distributions of dominant features, implying similar dynamics in real and simulated episodes. We applied linear discriminant analysis (LDA to simulation output and identified that local immune cell density at the viral reactivation site had a predictive effect on episode duration, though longer term shedding suggested chaotic dynamics and could not be predicted based on spatial patterns of immune cell density. These findings suggest that HSV-2 shedding patterns within an individual are impossible to predict over weeks or months, and that even highly complex single HSV-2 episodes can only be partially predicted based on spatial distribution of immune cell density.

  3. Synthesis and methylation of ribosomal RNA in HeLa cells infected with the herpes virus pseudorabies virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furlong, J.C.; Kyriakidis, S.; Stevely, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of infection with the herpes virus pseudorabies virus on the metabolism of HeLa cell ribosomal RNA were examined. There is a decline both in the synthesis of nucleolar 45S ribosomal precursor RNA and in its processing to mature cytoplasmic RNA. The methylated oligonucleotides in the ribosomal RNA species were studied. The methylation of cytoplasmic ribosomal RNA was essentially unchanged. However there was some undermethylation of the nucleolar precursor. If undermethylated RNA does not mature then this may partly explain the reduced processing in the infected cells. (Author)

  4. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1.

  5. Tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles show antiviral activity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Orlowski

    Full Text Available The interaction between silver nanoparticles and herpesviruses is attracting great interest due to their antiviral activity and possibility to use as microbicides for oral and anogenital herpes. In this work, we demonstrate that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles sized 13 nm, 33 nm and 46 nm are capable of reducing HSV-2 infectivity both in vitro and in vivo. The antiviral activity of tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles was size-related, required direct interaction and blocked virus attachment, penetration and further spread. All tested tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles reduced both infection and inflammatory reaction in the mouse model of HSV-2 infection when used at infection or for a post-infection treatment. Smaller-sized nanoparticles induced production of cytokines and chemokines important for anti-viral response. The corresponding control buffers with tannic acid showed inferior antiviral effects in vitro and were ineffective in blocking in vivo infection. Our results show that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles are good candidates for microbicides used in treatment of herpesvirus infections.

  6. Risk Factors for Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection and Renal Scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Ron; Shaikh, Nader; Pohl, Hans; Gravens-Mueller, Lisa; Ivanova, Anastasia; Zaoutis, Lisa; Patel, Melissa; deBerardinis, Rachel; Parker, Allison; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Haralam, Mary Ann; Pope, Marcia; Kearney, Diana; Sprague, Bruce; Barrera, Raquel; Viteri, Bernarda; Egigueron, Martina; Shah, Neha; Hoberman, Alejandro

    2015-07-01

    To identify risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal scarring in children who have had 1 or 2 febrile or symptomatic UTIs and received no antimicrobial prophylaxis. This 2-year, multisite prospective cohort study included 305 children aged 2 to 71 months with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) receiving placebo in the RIVUR (Randomized Intervention for Vesicoureteral Reflux) study and 195 children with no VUR observed in the CUTIE (Careful Urinary Tract Infection Evaluation) study. Primary exposure was presence of VUR; secondary exposures included bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD), age, and race. Outcomes were recurrent febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection (F/SUTI) and renal scarring. Children with VUR had higher 2-year rates of recurrent F/SUTI (Kaplan-Meier estimate 25.4% compared with 17.3% for VUR and no VUR, respectively). Other factors associated with recurrent F/SUTI included presence of BBD at baseline (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09-3.93]) and presence of renal scarring on the baseline (99m)Tc-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid scan (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.88 [95% CI: 1.22-6.80]). Children with BBD and any degree of VUR had the highest risk of recurrent F/SUTI (56%). At the end of the 2-year follow-up period, 8 (5.6%) children in the no VUR group and 24 (10.2%) in the VUR group had renal scars, but the difference was not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio: 2.05 [95% CI: 0.86-4.87]). VUR and BBD are risk factors for recurrent UTI, especially when they appear in combination. Strategies for preventing recurrent UTI include antimicrobial prophylaxis and treatment of BBD. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Clinical Features of Herpes Zoster Infections in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Çölgeçen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Herpes zoster (HZ is a rare disease in childhood and encountered especially in immunosuppressed patients. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical features of HZ in children. Materials and methods: Records of 24 children, who had a diagnosis of HZ and were referred to the dermatology and pediatric outpatient clinic during February 2009-February 2011, were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Twenty-four patients, - 14 female (58.3%, 10 male (41.7% -, aged between 4 and 16 years were assessed. The mean age of the patients was 10.6±3.7 years. The most frequent complaint was pruritus (54.2%. Sixteen patients had thoracic involvement, whilst the rest had lumbar (n: 4, trigeminal (n: 3 and sacral (n: 1 involvements, respectively. Eleven children were distressed and 2 children had physical trauma. Ten patients were treated with acyclovir orally, 3 were given valacyclovir orally and the rest had only local treatment. No complications were reported. Conclusion: HZ may be seen in healthy children with no immunosuppresion and the infection in these patients has a favorable course.

  8. The synthesis of polyadenylated messenger RNA in herpes simplex type I virus infected BHK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T J; Wildy, P

    1975-09-01

    The pattern of polyadenylated messenger RNA (mRNA) synthesis in BHK cell monolayers, infected under defined conditions with herpes simplex type I virus has been investigated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or pulse-labelled RNA isolated by oligo dT-cellulose chromatography. Two classes of mRNA molecules were synthesized in infected cells; these were not detected in uninfected cells. The rate of synthesis of the larger, 18 to 30S RNA class reached a maximum soon after injection and then declined, whereas the rate of synthesis of the 7 to 11 S RNA class did not reach a maximum until much later and did not decline. In the presence of cytosine arabinoside, the rate of mRNA synthesis in infected cells was reduced but the electrophoretic pattern remained the same.

  9. In vitro stimulation of rabbit T lymphocytes by cells expressing herpes simplex antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, A K; Ling, N R; Nash, A A; Bachan, A; Wildy, P

    1982-04-01

    Lymphocyte stimulation responses to herpes antigens were studied using virus-infected X-irradiated cells. Rabbits were immunized with herpes simplex virus type 1 (strain HFEM) grown in RK 13 cells. For in vitro stimulation assay BHK21 cells were X-irradiated (15 000 rad) and infected with a high m.o.i. of a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant (N102) of HFEM strain at the non-permissive temperature (38.5 degrees C) of virus. Virus antigens were expressed on the infected cells and there was no leakage of infectious virus into the medium at 38.5 degrees C. T lymphocytes from rabbits immunized with herpes simplex virus were specifically activated by herpesvirus-infected X-irradiated cells; lymph node cells from rabbits immunized with RK13 cells and from non-immune rabbits showed no proliferative response.

  10. Patient recognition of recrudescent herpes labialis: a clinical and virological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamey, P J; Biagioni, P A

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain how accurate the general public was at diagnosing the condition of recrudescent herpes labialis. An advertisement was placed in a local newspaper inviting patients to attend the Oral Medicine Clinic as soon as they thought they developed the clinically evident stage of herpes labialis. At the clinic, patients were examined to confirm the clinical presence of herpes labialis and also had a swab of the lesion(s) taken for virus culture. Virus culture was by the HEP-2 culture technique capable of detecting both herpes simplex Type 1 and herpes simplex Type 2. Patients also completed a detailed questionnaire concerning their knowledge of herpes labialis. In total, 41 patients attended for screening. The findings were that all patients had clinical herpes labialis, and herpes simplex virus was isolated in 96% of cases. In contrast, in only about 50% of cases were patients aware that their herpes labialis was caused by a virus. The general public are very good at recognizing herpes labialis lesions but need to be given more information about their infectivity.

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 1 is the leading cause of genital herpes in New Brunswick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garceau, Richard; Leblanc, Danielle; Thibault, Louise; Girouard, Gabriel; Mallet, Manon

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the role of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV1) in the epidemiology of genital herpes in Canada. Data on herpes viral cultures for two consecutive years obtained from L'Hôpital Dr GL Dumont, which performs all the viral culture testing in New Brunswick, were reviewed. It was hypothesized that HSV1 was the main cause of genital herpes in New Brunswick. Samples of genital origin sent to the laboratory for HSV culture testing between July 2006 and June 2008 were analyzed. Samples from an unspecified or a nongenital source were excluded from analysis. Multiple positive samples collected from the same patient were pooled into a single sample. HSV was isolated from 764 different patients. HSV1 was isolated in 62.6% of patients (male, 55%; female, 63.8%). HSV1 was isolated in 73.2% of patients 10 to 39 years of age and in 32% of patients ≥40 years of age. The difference in rates of HSV1 infection between the 10 to 39 years of age group and the ≥40 years of age group was statistically significant (Pgenital site. Significant rate differences were demonstrated between the groups 10 to 39 years of age and ≥40 years of age. Little is known about the role of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV1) in the epidemiology of genital herpes in Canada. Data on herpes viral cultures for two consecutive years obtained from L’Hôpital Dr GL Dumont, which performs all the viral culture testing in New Brunswick, were reviewed. It was hypothesized that HSV1 was the main cause of genital herpes in New Brunswick. Samples of genital origin sent to the laboratory for HSV culture testing between July 2006 and June 2008 were analyzed. Samples from an unspecified or a nongenital source were excluded from analysis. Multiple positive samples collected from the same patient were pooled into a single sample. HSV was isolated from 764 different patients. HSV1 was isolated in 62.6% of patients (male, 55%; female, 63.8%). HSV1 was isolated in 73.2% of patients 10 to

  12. Prospects and perspectives for development of a vaccine against herpes simplex virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Shane C; Schleiss, Mark R

    2014-11-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 are human pathogens that lead to significant morbidity and mortality in certain clinical settings. The development of effective antiviral medications, however, has had little discernible impact on the epidemiology of these pathogens, largely because the majority of infections are clinically silent. Decades of work have gone into various candidate HSV vaccines, but to date none has demonstrated sufficient efficacy to warrant licensure. This review examines developments in HSV immunology and vaccine development published since 2010, and assesses the prospects for improved immunization strategies that may result in an effective, licensed vaccine in the near future.

  13. Hospitalizations realted to herpes zoster infection in the Canary Islands, Spain (2005-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rojas, Amós; Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Núñez-Gallo, Domingo Ángel; Matute-Cruz, Petra; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel

    2017-08-24

    Herpes zoster is an important problem of public health especially among the elderly in Spain. A population-based retrospective epidemiological study to estimate the burden of herpes zoster requiring hospitalization in the Canary Islands, Spain was conducted by using data from the national surveillance system for hospital data, Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos. Records of all patients admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of herpes zoster in any position and cases of primary diagnosis (ICD-9-MC codes 053.0-053.9) during a 10-year period (2005-2014), were selected. A total of 1088 hospitalizations with a primary or secondary diagnosis of herpes zoster were identified during the study period. Annually there were 6.99 hospitalizations by herpes zoster per 100,000 population. It increases with age reaching a maximum in persons ≥85 years of age (43.98 admissions per 100,000). Average length of hospitalization was 16 days and 73 patients died, with a case-fatality rate of 4.03%. In 22% of the cases hospitalized, herpes zoster was the primary diagnosis. The hospitalization burden of herpes zoster in adults in the Canary Islands was still important during the last decade and justify the implementation of preventive measures, like vaccination in the elderly or other high risk groups to reduce the most severe cases of the disease.

  14. Hospital risk management of cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, F; Zhang, J; Feng, J; Yang, H

    2016-10-01

    The epidemiology of cutaneous herpes simplex infection (CHSI) has dramatically changed over the past several decades. Valaciclovir is one of a new generation of antiviral medications that has expanded treatment options for the most common cutaneous manifestations of herpes simplex virus. However, the efficacy and safety of formulations with different doses of valaciclovir remain unclear. To carry out hospital risk management by ascertaining the incidence and risk of CHSI in patients during treatment with varying doses of valaciclovir. The PubMed, MEDLINE and Web of Science electronic databases were systematically searched from database inception to date of searching. Efficacy of drug treatment was measured by average easement score (AES). Safety was characterized as the proportion of patients with drug adverse reactions (DARs) such as fever, dizziness, headache, anxiety, irritability and yellowing of the skin. Outcomes for continuous and dichotomous data were estimated by standard mean difference (SMD) and risk ratio (RR), respectively. Five randomized controlled trials involving 1753 randomized participants for efficacy assessment and 1874 randomized participants for safety assessment were identified. Valaciclovir dose increasing from 1000 mg/day improved AES only moderately, but significantly promoted the incidence of DARs. Twice-daily treatment showed no increase in therapeutic effect but greatly increased DAR incidence. The valaciclovir dose that produced a reduction in AES was 1000 mg/day: SMD = -0.73 (95% CI -0.98 to 0.48; P < 0.01) and RR = 0.95 (95% CI 0.81-1.09; P < 0.002). Increasing the daily dose of valaciclovir does not substantially improve therapeutic efficacy for CHSI but may raise DAR incidence. Drug doses of 1000 and 2000 mg/day show no significant difference in efficacy scores, but the latter exhibits a higher incidence of DARs. The dose-dependent, long-term efficacy and safety of valaciclovir remain to be explored. © 2016 British Association of

  15. Antibiotic resistance in children with recurrent or complicated urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, N; Quol, K; Al-Momani, T; Al-Awaisheh, F; Al-Kayed, D

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is certainly one of the most common childhood infections. Emerging resistance to the antibiotics is not unusual. Current hospitalization for children with urinary tract infection is reserved for severe or complicated cases. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern among children with recurrent or complicated urinary tract infection. A retrospective study carried out at Prince Hashem hospital, Zarqa city, eastern Jordan and involved 336 episodes of culture proved urinary tract infection obtained from 121 patients with recurrent UTI, who used prophylactic antibiotics during the period from April 1, 2004 to December 31, 2006. The isolated microorganisms and there antibiotics susceptibility were studied. Seventy three patients (60.3%) were found to have some forms of urinary tract anomaly, significantly more prevalent among male children Purinary tract infection (64.3% vs. 16.6%, Purinary tract infection. Proteus, Pseudomonas and Candida spp. were more prevalent in patients with complicated (Presistant to most antibiotics tested. Pediatric urine culture isolates are becoming increasingly resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Empirical treatment with Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) or Cephalexin as the initial drug is ineffective. Nitrofurantoin and Nalidixic acid can be considered as the first line antibiotics for prophylaxis and or treatment of patients with recurrent UTI, while Meropenam and Ciprofloxacin can be used empirically in treating patients with complicated UTI.

  16. Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Herpes Testing Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Content View Sources Ask Us Also Known As Herpes Culture Herpes Simplex Viral Culture HSV DNA HSV ...

  17. Genital herpes and its treatment in relation to preterm delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De-Kun; Raebel, Marsha A; Cheetham, T Craig; Hansen, Craig; Avalos, Lyndsay; Chen, Hong; Davis, Robert

    2014-12-01

    To examine the risks of genital herpes and antiherpes treatment during pregnancy in relation to preterm delivery (PTD), we conducted a multicenter, member-based cohort study within 4 Kaiser Permanente regions: northern and southern California, Colorado, and Georgia. The study included 662,913 mother-newborn pairs from 1997 to 2010. Pregnant women were classified into 3 groups based on genital herpes diagnosis and treatment: genital herpes without treatment, genital herpes with antiherpes treatment, and no herpes diagnosis or treatment (unexposed controls). After controlling for potential confounders, we found that compared with being unexposed, having untreated genital herpes during first or second trimester was associated with more than double the risk of PTD (odds ratio (OR) = 2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80, 2.76). The association was stronger for PTD due to premature rupture of membrane (OR = 3.57, 95% CI: 2.53, 5.06) and for early PTD (≤35 weeks gestation) (OR = 2.87, 95% CI: 2.22, 3.71). In contrast, undergoing antiherpes treatment during pregnancy was associated with a lower risk of PTD compared with not being treated, and the PTD risk was similar to that observed in the unexposed controls (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.38). The present study revealed increased risk of PTD associated with genital herpes infection if left untreated and a potential benefit of antiherpes medications in mitigating the effect of genital herpes infection on the risk of PTD. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Protein sequences clustering of herpes virus by using Tribe Markov clustering (Tribe-MCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamam, A.; Siswantining, T.; Febriyani, N. L.; Novitasari, I. D.; Cahyaningrum, R. D.

    2017-07-01

    The herpes virus can be found anywhere and one of the important characteristics is its ability to cause acute and chronic infection at certain times so as a result of the infection allows severe complications occurred. The herpes virus is composed of DNA containing protein and wrapped by glycoproteins. In this work, the Herpes viruses family is classified and analyzed by clustering their protein-sequence using Tribe Markov Clustering (Tribe-MCL) algorithm. Tribe-MCL is an efficient clustering method based on the theory of Markov chains, to classify protein families from protein sequences using pre-computed sequence similarity information. We implement the Tribe-MCL algorithm using an open source program of R. We select 24 protein sequences of Herpes virus obtained from NCBI database. The dataset consists of three types of glycoprotein B, F, and H. Each type has eight herpes virus that infected humans. Based on our simulation using different inflation factor r=1.5, 2, 3 we find a various number of the clusters results. The greater the inflation factor the greater the number of their clusters. Each protein will grouped together in the same type of protein.

  19. Metabolism of the carbocyclic analogue of (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine in herpes simplex virus-infected cells. Incorporation of C-IVDU into DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Clercq, E.; Bernaerts, R.; Balzarini, J.; Herdewijn, P.; Verbruggen, A.

    1985-01-01

    The carbocyclic analogues of (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (BVDU) and (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (IVDU), in which the sugar moiety is replaced by a cyclopentane ring and which have been designated as C-BVDU and C-IVDU, respectively, are, like their parent compounds BVDU and IVDU, potent and selective inhibitors of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and, to a lesser extent, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) replication. The authors have now synthesized the radiolabeled C-IVDU analogue, C-[ 125 I]IVDU, and determined its metabolism by HSV-infected and mock-infected Vero cells. C-[ 125 I]IVDU was effectively phosphorylated by HSV-1-infected cells and, to a lesser extent, HSV-2-infected cells. C-[ 125 I]IVDU was not phosphorylated to an appreciable extent by either mock-infected cells or cells that had been infected with a thymidine kinase-deficient mutant of HSV-1. Furthermore, C-[ 125 I]IVDU was incorporated into both viral and cellular DNA of HSV-1-infected Vero cells. This finding represents the first demonstration of the incorporation of a cyclopentylpyrimidine into DNA

  20. Recurrent urinary tract infections in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Abdullatif; Ahmed, Kamran; Zaman, Iftikhar; Khan, Muhammad Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2015-06-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are more common in women and are frequently defined as ≥2 episodes in the last 6 months or ≥3 episodes in the last 12 months. In a primary care setting, 53 % of women above the age of 55 years and 36 % of younger women report a recurrence within 1 year. Thus, management and prevention of recurrent UTI is of utmost significance. This review aims to highlight the latest research in prevention strategies and suggest a management pathway. A search was conducted on MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews databases for the latest systematic reviews and high-quality randomized controlled trials. Special emphasis was placed on the remit "recurrent" and strongly adhered to. Furthermore, a Google search was conducted for current guidelines on the management of UTIs. Current prevention strategies include eliminating risk factors that increase the risk of acquiring recurrent UTI and continuous, post-coital and self-initiated antimicrobial prophylaxis. Other prospective preventative strategies, currently under trial, include use of vaccinations, D-mannose and lactobacillus (probiotics). Although risk factors should be identified and addressed accordingly, individualized antibiotic prophylaxis remains the most effective method of management. Non-antibiotic prevention strategies such as cranberry, vitamin C and methenamine salts lack strong evidence to be introduced as routine management options and as alternatives to antibiotics. Based on current evidence and guidelines, a management pathway is recommended. Emerging therapies require further evaluation before they can be recommended.

  1. Extended Release of an Anti–Heparan Sulfate Peptide From a Contact Lens Suppresses Corneal Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishankar, Dinesh; Buhrman, Jason S.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Gemeinhart, Richard A.; Shukla, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To prolong the release of a heparan sulfate binding peptide, G2-C, using a commercially available contact lens as a delivery vehicle and to demonstrate the ability of the released peptide to block herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of corneal HSV-1 infection. Methods Commercially available contact lenses were immersed in peptide solution for 5 days prior to determining the release of the peptide at various time points. Cytotoxicity of the released samples was determined by MTT and cell cycle analysis, and the functional activity of the released samples were assessed by viral entry, and viral spread assay using human corneal epithelial cells (HCE). The ability to suppress infection in human and pig cornea ex vivo and mouse in vivo models were also assessed. Results Peptide G2-C was released through the contact lens. Following release for 3 days, the peptide showed significant activity by inhibiting HSV-1 viral entry and spread in HCE cells. Significant suppression of infection was also observed in the ex vivo and in vivo experiments involving corneas. Conclusions Extended release of an anti–HS peptide through a commercially available contact lens can generate significant anti–HSV-1 activity and provides a new and effective way to control corneal herpes. PMID:26780322

  2. The occurrence of herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 in skin and mucosal lesions in patients with suspicion of genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Emilia; Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, Beata; Machura, Paulina; Majewska, Anna; Dzieciqtkowski, Tomasz; Mlynarzyk, Grazyna; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Majewski, Slawomir

    Infection with herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 (HSV 1 and 2 or Human herpesvirus HHV) are one of the most common infections in human. Real time PCR is a sensitive and specific method for diagnostics of HHV infections. The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence of HHV 1 and HHV 2 DNA in patient with clinical symptoms suggesting HHV infection. We used real time PCR to investigate swabs from genital and perianal lesions from 74 patients of the Department of Dermatology and Venereology Medical University Warsaw and of gynecological outpatient clinics in Warsaw 40 women and 34 men. The results were positive for HHV 2 in 25 cases (34%), for HHV 1 in 19 cases (26%) and for both viruses in 20 cases (27%). 10 samples were negative for both viruses. The results confirm that the main cause of symptomatic genital herpes is HHV 2, however the percentage of HHV 1 and specially of mixed HHV 1/HHV 2 infections was unexpectedly high.

  3. Dipylidium caninum mimicking recurrent enterobius vermicularis (pinworm) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkari, Ayman; Kiska, Deanna L; Riddell, Scott W; Wilson, Kathy; Weiner, Leonard B; Domachowske, Joseph B

    2008-05-01

    Pinworm infection is a very common diagnosis in young children that is not always confirmed through laboratory evaluation before empiric therapy is prescribed. This article describes a toddler who was treated several times for pinworms because small white worms were seen in her perianal area. Laboratory analysis of parasite material found in her diaper later confirmed a diagnosis of dipylidiasis. Because the signs of dipylidiasis and pinworm infection overlap and the treatments for these parasitic infections are different, the laboratory should clinically confirm suspected persistent or recurrent pinworms.

  4. Concomitant herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis in a man with ulcerative colitis: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Varun K; Friedman-Moraco, Rachel J; Quigley, Brian C; Farris, Alton B; Norvell, J P

    2016-10-01

    Herpesvirus infections often complicate the clinical course of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; however, invasive disease due to herpes simplex virus is distinctly uncommon. We present a case of herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis, review all the previously published cases of herpes simplex virus colitis, and discuss common clinical features and outcomes. We also discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of herpes simplex virus infections, focusing specifically on patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A 43-year-old man with ulcerative colitis, previously controlled with an oral 5-aminosalicylic agent, developed symptoms of a colitis flare that did not respond to treatment with systemic corticosteroid therapy. One week later he developed orolabial ulcers and progressive hepatic dysfunction, with markedly elevated transaminases and coagulopathy. He underwent emergent total colectomy when imaging suggested bowel micro-perforation. Pathology from both the colon and liver was consistent with herpes simplex virus infection, and a viral culture of his orolabial lesions and a serum polymerase chain reaction assay also identified herpes simplex virus. He was treated with systemic antiviral therapy and made a complete recovery. Disseminated herpes simplex virus infection with concomitant involvement of the colon and liver has been reported only 3 times in the published literature, and to our knowledge this is the first such case in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk of invasive herpes simplex virus infections increases with some, but not all immunomodulatory therapies. Optimal management of herpes simplex virus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease includes targeted prophylactic therapy for patients with evidence of latent infection, and timely initiation of antiviral therapy for those patients suspected to have invasive disease.

  5. Recent advances in recurrent urinary tract infection from pathogenesis and biomarkers to prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Fong Jhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI might be one of the most common problems in urological clinics. Recent research has revealed novel evidence about recurrent UTI and it should be considered a different disease from the first infection. The pathogenesis of recurrent UTI might include two mechanisms, bacterial factors and deficiencies in host defense. Bacterial survival in the urinary bladder after antibiotic treatment and progression to form intracellular bacterial communities might be the most important bacterial factors. In host defense deficiency, a defect in pathogen recognition and urothelial barrier function impairment play the most important roles. Immunodeficiency and urogenital tract anatomical abnormalities have been considered the essential risk factors for recurrent UTI. In healthy women, voiding dysfunction and behavioral factors also increase the risk of recurrent UTI. Sexual intercourse and estrogen deficiency in postmenopausal women might have the strongest association with recurrent UTI. Traditional lifestyle factors such as fluid intake and diet are not considered independent risk factors now. Serum and urine biomarkers to predict recurrent UTI from the first infection have also attracted a wide attention recently. Current clinical evidence suggests that serum macrophage colony-stimulating factor and urinary nerve growth factor have potential predictive value for recurrent UTI. Clinical trials have proven the efficacy of the oral immunoactive agent OM-89 for the prevention of UTI. Vaccines for recurrent UTI are recommended by the latest guidelines and are available on the market.

  6. Herpes Simplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin diseases Athlete's foot Chickenpox Cold sores Genital herpes Genital warts Head lice Herpes simplex Impetigo Molluscum contagiosum ... swollen lymph nodes (glands) in the neck (oral herpes) or groin (genital herpes) are possible. Problems urinating . People (most often ...

  7. Reduction of /sup 51/Cr-permeability of tissue culture cells by infection with herpes simplex virus type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Habermehl, K.O.; Diefenthal, W.; Hampl, H.

    1979-01-01

    Infection of different strains of tissue culture cells with herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1) resulted in a reduced /sup 51/Cr-permeability. A stability of the cellular membrane to Triton X-100, toxic sera and HSV-specific complement-mediated immune-cytolysis could be observed simultaneously. The results differed with respect to the cell strain used in the experiments.

  8. Experimental Oral Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1 Co-infection in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meropi Aravantinou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2 similarly initiate infection in mucosal epithelia and establish lifelong neuronal latency. Anogenital HSV-2 infection augments the risk for sexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission and is associated with higher HIV viral loads. However, whether oral HSV-1 infection contributes to oral HIV susceptibility, viremia, or oral complications of HIV infection is unknown. Appropriate non-human primate (NHP models would facilitate this investigation, yet there are no published studies of HSV-1/SIV co-infection in NHPs. Thus, we performed a pilot study for an oral HSV-1 infection model in SIV-infected rhesus macaques to describe the feasibility of the modeling and resultant immunological changes. Three SIV-infected, clinically healthy macaques became HSV-1-infected by inoculation with 4 × 108 pfu HSV-1 McKrae on buccal, tongue, gingiva, and tonsils after gentle abrasion. HSV-1 DNA was shed in oral swabs for up to 21 days, and shedding recurred in association with intra-oral lesions after periods of no shedding during 56 days of follow up. HSV-1 DNA was detected in explant cultures of trigeminal ganglia collected at euthanasia on day 56. In the macaque with lowest baseline SIV viremia, SIV plasma RNA increased following HSV-1 infection. One macaque exhibited an acute pro-inflammatory response, and all three animals experienced T cell activation and mobilization in blood. However, T cell and antibody responses to HSV-1 were low and atypical. Through rigorous assessesments, this study finds that the virulent HSV-1 strain McKrae resulted in a low level HSV-1 infection that elicited modest immune responses and transiently modulated SIV infection.

  9. Presage of oncolytic virotherapy for oral cancer with herpes simplex virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Yura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A virus is a pathogenic organism that causes a number of infectious diseases in humans. The oral cavity is the site at which viruses enter and are excreted from the human body. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 produces the primary infectious disease, gingivostomatitis, and recurrent disease, labial herpes. HSV-1 is one of the most extensively investigated viruses used for cancer therapy. In principle, HSV-1 infects epithelial cells and neuronal cells and exhibits cytotoxicity due to its cytopathic effects on these cells. If the replication of the virus occurs in tumor cells, but not normal cells, the virus may be used as an antitumor agent. Therefore, HSV-1 genes have been modified by genetic engineering, and in vitro and in vivo studies with the oncolytic virus have demonstrated its efficiency against head and neck cancer including oral cancer. The oncolytic abilities of other viruses such as adenovirus and reovirus have also been demonstrated. In clinical trials, HSV-1 is the top runner and is now available for the treatment of patients with advanced melanoma. Thus, melanoma in the oral cavity is the target of oncolytic HSV-1. Oncolytic virotherapy is a hopeful and realistic modality for the treatment of oral cancer.

  10. LONG-TERM RESULTS OF IMMUNOPROPHYLAXIS RECURRENT INFECTION OF THE UROGENITAL TRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Kulchavenya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study included 48 patients who received a first course of Uro-Vaxom in 2007-2008, 19 men with chronic prostatitis/urethroprostatitis, and 29 women with recurrent cystitis. In just five years, it was noted 125 recurrences of urogenital infections, of which 88 cases (70,4% is required in addition to Uro-Vaxom antibiotics in combination with herbal medicine, and in the remaining 37 cases, and (29,6%, Uro-Vaxom alone was enough to relieve inflammation. In five years there were 254 monthly rate of Uro-Vaxom, of whom 125 (49,2% with curative intent for recurrent urogenital infections, and 129 (50,8% – from preventive, without exacerbation of underlying disease. Key for Punishment - intercurrent infection, mainly respiratory (86 cases – 66,7%, stress (14 cases – 10,8% in the 29 and the cases (22,5% patients received Uro-Vaxom alone, without a doctor's prescription , focusing on the sensations.

  11. Evaluation of Clinical and Laboratory Data in Patients with Recurrent Infections and Suspected Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ahanchian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frequent infections is among the most frequent clinical dilemmas for primary care physicians. Immunodeficiency disorders are a heterogeneous group of illnesses that predispose patients to the recurrent infections, autoimmunity and malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory data collected for the final diagnosis of patients referred with recurrent infections and suspected immunodeficiency to a local immunodeficiency clinic.   Methods: This epidemiological study was carried out between April 2010 and September 2012 at the Immunodeficiency Clinic of Mashhad. All patients with clinical manifestations of immunodeficiency who were referred to our clinic during this period of time were included in this study. 41 patients aged from 10 months to 51 years, were evaluated. Results: Forty one patients, aged between 10 months and 51 years were evaluated. Eleven patients had a primary immunodeficiency, four cases had a secondary immunodeficiency, in three patients an underlying structural disease were found, eight patients were predisposed to recurrent infections as a result of allergies and finally, fifteen cases were found to be normal individuals.   Discussion: Most patients with recurrent infection have a normal immune system. Allergic disorders are the most common predisposing factor to recurrent infection. However, as immunodeficiency disorders are potentially serious, early diagnosis can improve the quality of life and outcome and prevent severe sequels in future.

  12. HIV-positive patient with herpes zoster: a manifestation of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

    2012-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a common illness that can lead to serious morbidity. There is now evidence that HIV-infected patients who have been treated with antiretroviral therapy are at greater risk of developing herpes zoster not when they are severely immunocompromised but, paradoxically, when their immune system is recovering. This is a manifestation of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. The objectives of this report are to (1) inform health care providers that HIV-infected patients may develop multiple infectious, autoimmune, and oncological manifestations after treatment with antiretroviral medication, as they have immune system reconstitution, and (2) discuss herpes zoster, one of the possible manifestations. The patient is a 68-year-old HIV-positive man who presented with herpes zoster after being treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) when his immune system was recovering, not when he was most immunosuppressed. Emergency department physicians should be aware that HIV-infected patients treated with HAART may have clinical deterioration despite immune system strengthening. This immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome can present with infectious, autoimmune, or oncological manifestations. Our case patient, an HIV-positive man with immune system recovery after treatment with HAART, presented with an infectious manifestation, herpes zoster.

  13. Suppression of human papillomavirus gene expression in vitro and in vivo by herpes simplex virus type 2 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, L.; Ward, M.G.; Welsh, P.A.; Budgeon, L.R.; Neely, E.B.; Howett, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have found that women infected with both herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 or HPV-18 are at greater risk of developing cervical carcinoma compared to women infected with only one virus. However, it remains unclear if HSV-2 is a cofactor for cervical cancer or if HPV and HSV-2 interact in any way. We have studied the effect of HSV-2 infection on HPV-11 gene expression in an in vitro double-infection assay. HPV transcripts were down-regulated in response to HSV-2 infection. Two HSV-2 vhs mutants failed to reduce HPV-16 E1-circumflexE4 transcripts. We also studied the effect of HSV-2 infection on preexisting experimental papillomas in a vaginal epithelial xenograft model. Doubly infected grafts demonstrated papillomatous transformation and the classical cytopathic effect from HSV-2 infection. HPV and HSV DNA signals were mutually exclusive. These studies may have therapeutic applications for HPV infections and related neoplasms

  14. Polyploidization on SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalyan, Zaven; Izmailyan, Roza; Karalova, Elena; Abroyan, Liana; Hakobyan, Lina; Avetisyan, Aida; Semerjyan, Zara

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidization is one of the most dramatic changes occurring within cell genome owing to various reasons including under many viral infections. We examined the impact of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) on SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma cell line. The infected cells were followed from 6 hours up to 96 hours post infection (hpi). A large number of polyploid cells with giant nuclei was observed under the influence of HSV-1 at 24 hpi with the DNA content of 32c to 64c or more, in comparison with control SK-N-MC cells that were characterized by relatively moderate values of ploidy, i.e. 8с to 16с (where 1c is the haploid amount of nuclear DNA found in normal diploid populations in G0/G1). After 48-96 hpi, the population of polyploid cells with giant nuclei decreased to the benchmark level. The SK-NMC cells infected with HSV-1 for 24 hours were stained with gallocyanine and monitored for cytological features. The infected cells underwent virus induced cellcell and nuclei fusion with the formation of dense nuclei syncytium. The metabolic activity of HSV-1 infected cells was higher in both nuclei and nucleoli when compared to control cells.

  15. Lactoferricin but not lactoferrin inhibit herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakov, Andrey; Jenssen, Håvard; Nordström, Inger; Eriksson, Kristina

    2012-03-01

    We have evaluated the potential of bovine lactoferrin and lactoferricin for their ability to prevent and/or treat genital HSV-2 infection in mice. We confirm previous data showing that both lactoferrin and lactoferricin have antiviral properties in vitro and can inhibit HSV-2 infection of GMK cells in a dose-dependent manner. When tested in vivo, lactoferricin but not lactoferrin was also a potent inhibitor of HSV-2 infection. When admixed with virus prior to inoculation, lactoferricin inhibited disease development and significantly reduced the viral load in a genital model of HSV-2 infection in mice. Lactoferrin and lactoferricin were also tested for their ability to stimulate the production of chemokines. Neither of the compounds induced the production of CCL3, CCL5, CXCL1 or CXCL2 by mouse splenocytes in vitro. However, when tested in vivo, both lactoferrin and lactoferricin were able to induce local vaginal production of CCL5. Lactoferrin also induced CXCL2 production. The prophylactic and/or therapeutic effects of lactoferrin or lactoferricin were also tested. But none of the compounds were efficient in blocking HSV-2 infection when given 24h prior to HSV-2 infection. Lactoferricin however showed promising results as a therapeutic agent and delayed both disease onset by 3days as well as reducing the viral load almost 15-fold when given as a single dose 24h post-infection. These data show that lactoferricin can block genital herpes infection in mice, and perhaps also be used for post-infection treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A pilot study on Trichomonas vaginalis in women with recurrent urinary tract infections

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    Po-Chih Chang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trichomoniasis and recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs shared similar risk factors, age distribution and overlapping symptoms. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV in women with recurrent UTIs, attending a urology clinic in a medical center, in order to inform screening and treatment policies. Methods: Women with recurrent UTIs, defined as the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms (dysuria, frequency and urgency and three positive urine cultures on voided urine specimens in the previous year, were enrolled prospectively from January 2013 to April 2014. Urine samples were collected for culture and tested for TV using immunochromatographic strip. Outpatient follow-up was arranged to diagnose any symptomatic UTI recurrence. Results: Sixty-five women were recruited. Mean age was 57.4 ± 14.3 year-old and follow-up duration was 9.5 ± 4.0 months. The prevalence of TV was 16.9% (11/65. Eight women had UTI recurrence in the follow-up period. Recurrence rate did not differ in patients with and without concomitant TV infection. Conclusions: Given the high prevalence of TV, we suggest that testing for TV should be considered in women with recurrent UTIs. Further larger studies are needed to evaluate the potential benefit of treating TV in this group of patients. Keywords: Prevalence, Trichomonas vaginalis, Urinary tract infection, Women

  17. Recurrent urinary tract infection by burkholderia cepacia in a live related renal transplant recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeshan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is high virulent organism usually causing lower respiratory tract infections especially in Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and post lung transplant. Urinary tract infections with Burkholderia cepacia have been associated after bladder irrigation or use of contaminated hospital objects. Post renal transplant urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complications. Recurrent urinary tract infection with Burkholderia cepacia is a rare finding. Complete anatomical evaluation is essential in case recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) after renal transplant. Vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR) and neurogenic urinary bladder was found to be important risk factors. (author)

  18. Epstein-Barr virus and herpes simplex infection assessment in schizophrenia and bipolar patients compared to healthy subjects

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    Amir Asoode

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Some viruses (including herpes viruses due to  neurotropic properties and latency  are considered as a possible factor in many central nervous system disorders, including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The aim of the current study was to assess the level of IgG antibodies against Herpes Simplex virus (HSV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV in these diseases. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, a total of 92 serum samples including those of 46  patients admitted to Iran Psychiatric Hospital and 46 samples of the healthy personnel of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, as a control group, were assessed. The level of IgG antibodies against HSV 1 & 2 and EBV were tested using ELISA kits and  the presence or absence of EBV genome (active infection was examined by Real-time PCR.  Finally, the obtained. Data were analyzed by means of IBM SPSS( V:22 software using Chi square test and T- test. Results: Prevalence of HSV 1 & 2 antibodies in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (case group. and healthy individuals (control group. were 80/4% and 82/6% ,respectively. The results showed no significant difference in HSV 1 & 2 antibody regarding P value (P= 0.79. Prevalence of EBV antibodies in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and healthy controls were 100% and 89/1%, respectively. The results showed significant differences between the two groups in terms of anti-EBV antibody titers with P value of  0.02. Besides,  in order to detect the genome of EBV virus, Real-time PCR was u sedon 87 samples with positive EBV antibodies in which no EBV genome was detected. Conclusion: The findings showed a significant association between EBV infection with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but there was no significant association between herpes simplex viruses with the mentioned diseases.

  19. Incidence of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in 5 sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics and the effect of HIV/STD risk-reduction counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Sami L; Douglas, John M; Foster, Mark; Schmid, D Scott; Newman, Daniel R; Baron, Anna E; Bolan, Gail; Iatesta, Michael; Malotte, C Kevin; Zenilman, Jonathan; Fishbein, Martin; Peterman, Thomas A; Kamb, Mary L

    2004-09-15

    The seroincidence of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection was determined among 1766 patients attending sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics and enrolled in a randomized, controlled trial of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/STD risk-reduction counseling (RRC). Arm 1 received enhanced RRC (4 sessions); arm 2, brief RRC (2 sessions); and arm 3, the control arm, brief informational messages. The overall incidence rate was 11.7 cases/100 person-years (py). Independent predictors of incidence of HSV-2 infection included female sex; black race; residence in Newark, New Jersey; new HSV-2 infections were diagnosed clinically. Incidence rates were 12.9 cases/100 py in the control arm, 11.8 cases/100 py in arm 2, and 10.3 cases/100 py in arm 1 (hazard ratio, 0.8 [95% confidence interval, 0.6-1.1], vs. controls). The possible benefit of RRC in preventing acquisition of HSV-2 infection offers encouragement that interventions more specifically tailored to genital herpes may be useful and should be an important focus of future studies.

  20. Pediatric recurrent respiratory tract infections: when and how to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pediatric recurrent respiratory tract infections: when and how to explore the immune system? (About 53 cases). Mohammed El-Azami-El-Idrissi, Mounia Lakhdar-Idrissi, Sanae Chaouki, Samir Atmani, Abdelhak Bouharrou, Moustapha Hida ...

  1. Targeting Herpes Simplex Virus-1 gD by a DNA Aptamer Can Be an Effective New Strategy to Curb Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejabhiram Yadavalli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 is an important factor for vision loss in developed countries. A challenging aspect of the ocular infection by HSV-1 is that common treatments, such as acyclovir, fail to provide effective topical remedies. Furthermore, it is not very clear whether the viral glycoproteins, required for HSV-1 entry into the host, can be targeted for an effective therapy against ocular herpes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that HSV-1 envelope glycoprotein gD, which is essential for viral entry and spread, can be specifically targeted by topical applications of a small DNA aptamer to effectively control ocular infection by the virus. Our 45-nt-long DNA aptamer showed high affinity for HSV-1 gD (binding affinity constant [Kd] = 50 nM, which is strong enough to disrupt the binding of gD to its cognate host receptors. Our studies showed significant restriction of viral entry and replication in both in vitro and ex vivo studies. In vivo experiments in mice also resulted in loss of ocular infection under prophylactic treatment and statistically significant lower infection under therapeutic modality compared to random DNA controls. Thus, our studies validate the possibility that targeting HSV-1 entry glycoproteins, such as gD, can locally reduce the spread of infection and define a novel DNA aptamer-based approach to control HSV-1 infection of the eye.

  2. Potential risk of developing herpes simplex encephalitis in patients treated with sildenafil following primary exposure to genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, A; Mccoy, J; Kovacevic, M; Situm, M; Lonky, N

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. As a consequence of HSE, up to 75% of infected individuals die or experience irreversible neurological damage. While the pathogenesis of the disease is unknown, it is traditionally hypothesized that the viral infection occurs by neuronal transmission directly from peripheral sites. Non-neuronal modes of infection have generally been overlooked as the brain is protected by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). The BBB poses an effective barrier to pathogens as well as to drugs such as chemotherapies. In the pursuit to deliver chemotherapeutic agents to the brain, several studies demonstrated that phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, such as sildenafil, may increase the permeability of the BBB enabling successful delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the brain. In this communication, we report a case of HSE infection in a 62-year-old man, which we suspect was facilitated by the use of sildenafil during a primary genital herpes simple virus (HSV) infection. Due to large number of patients treated with PDE5 inhibitors for erectile dysfunction and the high incidence of genital HSV infection in the general population, a larger study should examine the potential risk of developing HSE in patients treated with PDE5 inhibitors.

  3. Identification of a herpes simplex labialis susceptibility region on human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Maurine R; Jones, Brandt B; Otterud, Brith E; Leppert, Mark; Kriesel, John D

    2008-02-01

    Most of the United States population is infected with either herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex virus type 2, or both. Reactivations of HSV-1 infection cause herpes simplex labialis (HSL; cold sores or fever blisters), which is the most common recurring viral infection in humans. To investigate the possibility of a human genetic component conferring resistance or susceptibility to cold sores (i.e., a HSL susceptibility gene), we conducted a genetic linkage analysis that included serotyping and phenotyping 421 individuals from 39 families enrolled in the Utah Genetic Reference Project. Linkage analysis identified a 2.5-Mb nonrecombinant region of interest on the long arm of human chromosome 21, with a multipoint logarithm of odds score of 3.9 noted near marker abmc65 (D21S409). Nonparametric linkage analysis of the data also provided strong evidence for linkage (P = .0005). This region of human chromosome 21 contains 6 candidate genes for herpes susceptibility. The development of frequent cold sores is associated with a region on the long arm of human chromosome 21. This region contains several candidate genes that could influence the frequency of outbreaks of HSL.

  4. Herpes - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genital herpes - resources; Resources - genital herpes ... following organizations are good resources for information on genital herpes : March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/complications/sexually- ...

  5. Herpes zoster of gingiva in an older woman: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Aditi; Sivaraman, Karthik; Thomas, Betsy S

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the article is to highlight the distinguishing features of secondary varicella gingival infection in an older women. Herpes zoster is an acute sporadic, painful viral infection in older people caused by the reactivation of the latent varicella zoster virus. Herpes zoster affecting the gingiva without any dermal lesions is a rare pathological condition that mimics many intraoral vesiculobullous lesions. The ambiguous nature of this condition creates a diagnostic dilemma. A 58-year-old woman presented with an acute, unilateral and persistent burning sensation and pain in the gingiva with desqaumating vesicullobulous lesion. The women was diagnosed with secondary varicella zoster infection. Herpes zoster of the gingiva could manifest as painful desquamative vesicular lesions, pulpal or other painful neuralgic condition in older individuals which need careful diagnosis before formulating appropiate treatment plan. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Unusual Clinical Presentation and Role of Decompressive Craniectomy in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Kumar, Nuthan; Vyas, Sameer; Vasishta, Rakesh Kumar; Aggarwal, Ashish

    2015-08-01

    Decompressive craniectomy in pediatric central nervous infections with refractory intracranial hypertension is less commonly practiced. We describe improved outcome of decompressive craniectomy in a 7-year-old boy with severe herpes simplex encephalitis and medically refractory intracranial hypertension, along with a brief review of the literature. Timely recognition of refractory intracranial hypertension and surgical decompression in children with herpes simplex encephalitis can be life-saving. Additionally, strokelike atypical presentations are being increasingly recognized in children with herpes simplex encephalitis and should not take one away from the underlying herpes simplex encephalitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. [The differential diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and subacute herpes virus myelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky, G N; Zavalishin, E E; Chub, R V; Morozova, E A; Serkov, S V

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of incurable and potentially curable neurological diseases is an urgent problem of modern neurology. The authors present a case report of subacute herpes virus myelitis, a rare complication of herpes infection by Varicella-Zoster virus. The differential diagnosis with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is described.

  8. Functional decline and herpes zoster in older people: an interplay of multiple factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Herpes zoster is a frequent painful infectious disease whose incidence and severity increase with age. In older people, there is a strong bidirectional link between herpes zoster and functional decline, which refers to a decrement in ability to perform activities of daily living due to ageing and disabilities. However, the exact nature of such link remains poorly established. Based on the opinion from a multidisciplinary group of experts, we here propose a new model to account for the interplay between infection, somatic/psychiatric comorbidity, coping skills, polypharmacy, and age, which may account for the functional decline related to herpes zoster in older patients. This model integrates the risk of decompensation of underlying disease; the risk of pain becoming chronic (e.g. postherpetic neuralgia); the risk of herpes zoster non-pain complications; the detrimental impact of herpes zoster on quality of life, functioning, and mood; the therapeutic difficulties due to multimorbidity, polypharmacy, and ageing; and the role of stressful life events in the infection itself and comorbid depression. This model underlines the importance of early treatment, strengthening coping, and vaccine prevention.

  9. Forebyggelse af herpes zoster med vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Rønholt, Finn; Gerstoft, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) are frequently occurring diseases in elderly and in immuno-compromised persons. The live attenuated HZ vaccine boosts an existing immune response, so that the already established varicella-zoster virus infection is kept latent. Vaccination has...

  10. Progressive Hypertrophic Genital Herpes in an HIV-Infected Woman despite Immune Recovery on Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H. Yudin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most HIV-infected individuals are coinfected by Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2. HSV-2 reactivates more frequently in HIV-coinfected individuals with advanced immunosuppression, and may have very unusual clinical presentations, including hypertrophic genital lesions. We report the case of a progressive, hypertrophic HSV-2 lesion in an HIV-coinfected woman, despite near-complete immune restoration on antiretroviral therapy for up to three years. In this case, there was prompt response to topical imiquimod. The immunopathogenesis and clinical presentation of HSV-2 disease in HIV-coinfected individuals are reviewed, with a focus on potential mechanisms for persistent disease despite apparent immune reconstitution. HIV-infected individuals and their care providers should be aware that HSV-2 may cause atypical disease even in the context of near-comlpete immune reconstitution on HAART.

  11. Disseminated cutaneous Herpes Simplex Virus-1 in a woman with rheumatoid arthritis receiving Infliximab: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justice Elizabeth

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with a seronegative rheumatoid arthritis who developed pustular psoriasis whilst on etanercept and subsequently developed disseminated herpes simplex on infliximab. Case presentation Our patient presented with an inflammatory arthritis which failed to respond to both methotrexate and leflunomide, and sulphasalazine treatment led to side effects. She was started on etanercept but after 8 months of treatment developed scaly pustular lesions on her palms and soles typical of pustular psoriasis. Following the discontinuation of etanercept, our patient required high doses of oral prednisolone to control her inflammatory arthritis. A second biologic agent, infliximab, was introduced in addition to low-dose methotrexate and 15 mg of oral prednisolone. However, after just 3 infusions of infliximab, she was admitted to hospital with a fever, widespread itchy vesicular rash and worsening inflammatory arthritis. Fluid from skin vesicles examined by polymerase chain reaction showed Herpes Simplex Virus type 1. Blood cultures were negative and her chest X-ray was normal. Her infliximab was discontinued and she was started on acyclovir, 800 mg five times daily for 2 weeks. She made a good recovery with improvement in her skin within 48 hours. She continued for 2 months on a prophylactic dose of 400 mg bd. Her rheumatoid arthritis became increasingly active and a decision was made to introduce adalimumab alongside acyclovir. Acyclovir prophylaxis has been continued but the dose tapered so that she is taking only 200 mg of acyclovir on alternate days. There has been no recurrence of Herpes Simplex Virus lesions despite increasing adalimumab to 40 mg weekly 3 months after starting treatment. Conclusion We believe this to be the first reported case of widespread cutaneous Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 infection following treatment with infliximab. We discuss the clinical manifestations of Herpes

  12. Update on Neonatal Herpes Simplex Epidemiology in the Netherlands: A Health Problem of Increasing Concern?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oeffelen, Louise; Biekram, Manisha; Poeran, Jashvant; Hukkelhoven, Chantal; Galjaard, Sander; van der Meijden, Wim; Op de Coul, Eline

    2018-01-01

    This paper provides an update on the incidence of neonatal herpes, guideline adherence by health care professionals (HCP), and trends in genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection during pregnancy in the Netherlands.

  13. Immunological and biochemical changes in young children with recurrent course of respiratory infections and cytomegaloviral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Boyarskaya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection in practically healthy children of different ages ranges from 50% to 64%. Both acute course of infection and prolonged persistance of pathogen is accompanied by immune deficiency formation that may become one of factors in charge of high level of infection morbidity in future as recurrent respiratory infections (RRI. At the same time significant spread of deficiency states in infants - deficiency of iron ion or vitamin D - is also accompanied by changes in immunological reactivity, especially when combined with intracellular infections. Purpose of the work was to study some immune and biochemical changes in young children (n=37 with recurrent respiratory diseases and cytomegaloviral infection. Materials and methods. In 51 children the CMV infection was verificated by simultaneous detection of specific anti-CMV IgG and anti-CMV IgM in blood serum and viral DNA finding by polymerase chain reaction. The observation group consisted of 37 (72.5% children infected with CMV as well as suffering from recurrent respiratory infections. Comparison group was represented by the remaining 14 (27.5% patients with episodic respiratory infections (ERI. In RRI group the patients with the frequent respiratory diseases with bacterial implications four and more times during the second year of life were included. The levels of serum iron and 25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol (vitamine 25(ОНD were detected in blood serum of all children by ELECSYS-test. In the early convalescence period after respiratory infections comparative immunograms assessment was conducted by three main components: phagocytic activity of neutrophils, the system of cellular immunity and quality of humoral immunity. In the vast majority (72.5% of the children age up to 1yo with verified CMV infection respiratory infections of viral and bacterial etiology gained a recurrent course (p <0.05. In the early convalescence period after respiratory infection process in children

  14. Development and validation of a nomogram predicting recurrence risk in women with symptomatic urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tommaso; Mazzoli, Sandra; Migno, Serena; Malossini, Gianni; Lanzafame, Paolo; Mereu, Liliana; Tateo, Saverio; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Pickard, Robert S; Bartoletti, Riccardo

    2014-09-01

    To develop and externally validate a novel nomogram predicting recurrence risk probability at 12 months in women after an episode of urinary tract infection. The study included 768 women from Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Florence, Italy, affected by urinary tract infections from January 2005 to December 2009. Another 373 women with the same criteria enrolled at Santa Chiara Hospital, Trento, Italy, from January 2010 to June 2012 were used to externally validate and calibrate the nomogram. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models tested the relationship between urinary tract infection recurrence risk, and patient clinical and laboratory characteristics. The nomogram was evaluated by calculating concordance probabilities, as well as testing calibration of predicted urinary tract infection recurrence with observed urinary tract infections. Nomogram variables included: number of partners, bowel function, type of pathogens isolated (Gram-positive/negative), hormonal status, number of previous urinary tract infection recurrences and previous treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. Of the original development data, 261 out of 768 women presented at least one episode of recurrence of urinary tract infection (33.9%). The nomogram had a concordance index of 0.85. The nomogram predictions were well calibrated. This model showed high discrimination accuracy and favorable calibration characteristics. In the validation group (373 women), the overall c-index was 0.83 (P = 0.003, 95% confidence interval 0.51-0.99), whereas the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.79-0.91). The present nomogram accurately predicts the recurrence risk of urinary tract infection at 12 months, and can assist in identifying women at high risk of symptomatic recurrence that can be suitable candidates for a prophylactic strategy. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  15. Molecular diagnostics and newborns at risk for genital herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Caroline; Arnolds, Marin; Niklas, Victoria

    2015-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in the newborn carries a high mortality rate and can result in lifelong neurologic impairment. The severity of HSV infection in the newborn has always dictated conservative management when prodromal symptoms or active genital lesions (or those suggestive of genital herpes) are present during labor and delivery. The risk of intrapartum infection, however, is related to the presence or absence of maternal immunity (neutralizing antibody) to HSV. The most significant risk of transmission is in first-episode primary infections with active lesions at delivery. Recent recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics Committees on Infectious Diseases and the Fetus and Newborn use rapid serologic and virologic screening in the management of asymptomatic infants born to mothers with active genital herpes. The revised guidelines highlight infants at greatest risk for HSV disease but do not apply to asymptomatic infants born to mothers with a history of HSV but no genital lesions at delivery. The current guidelines also stipulate that maternal serologic screening and molecular assays for HSV in newborn blood and cerebrospinal fluid must be available and reported in a timely fashion. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. A Cell Culture Model of Latent and Lytic Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Spiral Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuehong; Li, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) is supposed to be one of the causes of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. This study aims to establish a cell culture model of latent and lytic HSV-1 infection in spiral ganglia. In the presence of acyclovir, primary cultures of SGNs were latently infected with HSV-1 expressing green fluorescent protein. Four days later, these cells were treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a known chemical reactivator of HSV-1. TCID50 was used to measure the titers of virus in cultures on Vero cells. RNA from cultures was detected for the presence of transcripts of ICP27 and latency-associated transcript (LAT) using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. There is no detectable infectious HSV-1 in latently infected cultures, whereas they could be observed in both lytically infected and latently infected/TSA-treated cultures. LAT was the only detectable transcript during latent infection, whereas lytic ICP27 transcript was detected in lytically infected and latently infected/TSA-treated cultures. Cultured SGNs can be both latently and lytically infected with HSV-1. Furthermore, latently infected SGNs can be reactivated using TSA, yielding infectious virus.

  17. Reflection on care in recurrent sexually transmitted co-infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparello, Joel Zamora; Beyers, Carl; Por, Jitna

    Reflection is a skill that nurses are expected to practise to help them continually re-evaluate their personal effectiveness in problem solving. This skill is necessary when caring for patients who are experiencing the complex challenges linked to psychosexual and psychosociological behavioural changes associated with HIV infection and recurrent sexually transmitted co-infections (STC-I). The Johns model of structured reflection was used in the reflection described here to aid the critical thinking process in helping a nurse to manage and deliver up-to-date, effective care and to develop a strong nurse-patient therapeutic relationship. A holistic approach is key to delivering care to patients with recurrent STC-I. This involves taking a sexual health history and establishing the correct diagnosis, followed by the administration of pharmaceutical and psychotherapeutic treatments to facilitate psychosexual, psychosocial, and psychological changes. This article uses a reflective learning experience in caring for a patient with recurrent STC-I to give insights on psychosexual and psychosociological behavioural strategies. Used with a diagnosis and pharmacological intervention, these strategies can be put into nursing practice and enhance the quality of nursing care.

  18. What Makes Oral Candidiasis Recurrent Infection? A Clinical View

    OpenAIRE

    Azmi M. G. Darwazeh; Tamer A. Darwazeh

    2014-01-01

    Clinical oral Candida infection (candidiasis) is one of the common oral mucosal infections, and its management is usually frustrating due to either treatment failure or recurrence. Historically, oral candidiasis has been branded as disease of diseased. The unsuccessful management of oral candidiasis can due to either incorrect diagnosis, failure to identify (or correct) the underlying predisposing factor(s), or inaccurate prescription of antifungal agents. Failure to properly treat oral ca...

  19. Retention of urine and sacral paraesthesia in anogenital herpes simplex infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edis, R H

    1981-01-01

    Two definite and 2 probable cases of anogenital herpes simplex and sacral radiculitis are described. Symptoms were typical and consisted of paraesthesia and neuralgic pain in the perineum and legs, urinary retention and constipation occurring within several days to a week after an anogenital herpetic eruption. However, at presentation only 1 case had an obvious history of anogenital herpes simplex. Neurological signs were not striking and consisted of a reduced appreciation of light touch and pin prick over the sacral dermatomes and in 2 cases reduced anal sphincter tone. CSF examination in 3 patients showed a lymphocytosis. Bladder catheterisation was required for up to 2 weeks in 2 patients. The paraesthesia persisted for weeks to months. It should be more widely recognised that anogenital herpes simplex, with sacral radiculitis, is probably the commonest cause of acute retention of urine in young sexually active people.

  20. A Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Human Asymptomatic CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes-Based Vaccine Protects Against Ocular Herpes in a “Humanized” HLA Transgenic Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Huang, Jiawei; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. A clinical vaccine that protects from ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and disease still is lacking. In the present study, preclinical vaccine trials of nine asymptomatic (ASYMP) peptides, selected from HSV-1 glycoproteins B (gB), and tegument proteins VP11/12 and VP13/14, were performed in the “humanized” HLA–transgenic rabbit (HLA-Tg rabbit) model of ocular herpes. We recently reported that these peptides are highly recognized by CD8+ T cells from “naturally” protected HSV-1–seropositive healthy ASYMP individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Methods. Mixtures of three ASYMP CD8+ T-cell peptides derived from either HSV-1 gB, VP11/12, or VP13/14 were delivered subcutaneously to different groups of HLA-Tg rabbits (n = 10) in incomplete Freund's adjuvant, twice at 15-day intervals. The frequency and function of HSV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cells induced by these peptides and their protective efficacy, in terms of survival, virus replication in the eye, and ocular herpetic disease were assessed after an ocular challenge with HSV-1 (strain McKrae). Results. All mixtures elicited strong and polyfunctional IFN-γ– and TNF-α–producing CD107+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, associated with a significant reduction in death, ocular herpes infection, and disease (P herpes, and provide a prototype vaccine formulation that may be highly efficacious for preventing ocular herpes in humans. PMID:26098469

  1. Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Recurrent or Complicated Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nidal S Younish; K Qual; T Al-Awaisheh; F Al-Awaisheh; D Al-Kayed

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Urinary tract infection is certainly one of the most common childhood infections. Emerging resistance to the antibiotics is not unusual. Current hospitalization for children with urinary tract infection is reserved for severe or complicated cases. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern among children with recurrent or complicated urinary tract infection. METHODS: A retrospective study carried out at Prince Hashem hospital, Zarqa ...

  2. Bezlotoxumab: A Review in Preventing Clostridium difficile Infection Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Emma D

    2017-10-01

    Bezlotoxumab (Zinplava™) is a fully human monoclonal antibody against Clostridium difficile toxin B indicated for the prevention of C. difficile infection (CDI) recurrence in patients with a high recurrence risk. It is the first agent approved for recurrence prevention and is administered as a single intravenous infusion in conjunction with standard-of-care (SoC) antibacterial treatment for CDI. In well-designed, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials (MODIFY 1 and 2), a single infusion of bezlotoxumab, given in combination with SoC antibacterial therapy for CDI in adults, was effective in reducing CDI recurrence in the 12 weeks post-treatment, with this benefit being seen mainly in the patients at high recurrence risk. Bezlotoxumab did not impact the efficacy of the antibacterials being used to treat the CDI and, consistent with its benefits on CDI recurrence, appeared to reduce the need for subsequent antibacterials, thus minimizing further gut microbiota disruption. Longer term, there were no further CDI recurrences over 12 months' follow-up among patients who had received bezlotoxumab in MODIFY 2 and entered an extension substudy. Bezlotoxumab has low immunogenicity and is generally well tolerated, although the potential for heart failure in some patients requires consideration; cost-effectiveness data for bezlotoxumab are awaited with interest. Thus, a single intravenous infusion of bezlotoxumab during SoC antibacterial treatment for CDI is an emerging option for reducing CDI recurrence in adults at high risk of recurrence.

  3. Radioimmunoassay of Herpes simplex virus antibody: correlation with ganglionic infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forghani, B.; Klassen, T.; Baringer, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Results of herpes simplex virus (HSV) isolation from a series of human post-mortem trigeminal thoracic and sacral ganglia were correlated with HSV antibody type(s) detected in the sera by radioimmunoassay (RIA). HSV type I was isolated from trigeminal ganglia of 44 out of 90 individuals, from thoracic ganglia of 1 out of 25, and from sacral ganglia of 1 out of 68 cases. HSV type was recovered from sacral ganglia of 8 out of 68 individuals. In all cases in which an HSV was isolated from ganglia and was available for testing, homologous, type-specific antibody was demonstrable, and in a few instances antibody to the heterologous HSV was also detected. In those individuals in which HSV type I was isolated from trigeminal ganglia and HSV type 2 from sacral ganglia, antibody to both virus types was present in the sera, indicating that simultaneous latent infections with each of the two viruses can occur, and that antibody is produced to each virus independently. Antibody to HSV type 1, 2 or both types was demonstrated in 8 out of 10 cases in which virus isolation attempts were negative, suggesting either a higher sensitivity of RIA for detecting HSV infection, or the presence of latent HSV at some other site in the body which was not sampled. (author)

  4. Herpes simplex virus-1 infection or Simian virus 40-mediated immortalization of corneal cells causes permanent translocation of NLRP3 to the nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Long Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate into the potential involvement of pyrin containing 3 gene (NLRP3, a member of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors with cytosolic pattern recognition, in the host defense of corneas against viruses. METHODS: The herpes viral keratitis model was utilized in BALB/c mice with inoculation of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1. Corneal tissues removed during therapy of patients with viral keratitis as well as a Simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40-immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line were also examined. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect NLRP3 in these subjects, focusing on their distribution in tissue or cells. Western blot was used to measure the level of NLRP3 and another two related molecules in NLPR3 inflammasome, namely caspase-1 and IL-1β. RESULTS: The NLRP3 activation induced by HSV-1 infection in corneas was accompanied with redistribution of NLRP3 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in both murine and human corneal epithelial cells. Furthermore, in the SV40-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells, NLRP3 was exclusively located in the nucleus, and treatment of the cells with high concentration of extracellular potassium (known as an inhibitor of NLRP3 activation effectively drove NLRP3 back to the cytoplasm as reflected by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot. CONCLUSION: It is proposed that herpes virus infection activates and causes redistribution of NLRP3 to nuclei. Whether this NLRP3 translocation occurs with other viral infections and in other cell types merit further study.

  5. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Bell's Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The association between herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 infection and Bell palsy was determined in 47 children studied at Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY. Swabs of saliva and conjunctiva were taken for PCR testing.

  6. Risk Factors Associated with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection among Postmenopausal Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameel, S.; Mahmud, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary Tract Infection is one of the most common infections encountered by women. These infections have the tendency to recur. In order to identify women at risk of recurrence there is a need to identify risk factors associated with it. Among women, factors predisposing to recurrent infections are not much explored. The study was done with an objective to determine different risk factors associated with recurrent UTI among postmenopausal women. Methods: This was a cross sectional study conducted at the Out Patient Department of Nephrology in Shifa International Hospital Islamabad over a period of six months, June 6th to December 5th 2012. Information regarding demographics and risk factors were recorded on a predesigned proforma. A descriptive analysis was done for quantitative variables like age and qualitative variables like marital status and frequency of different risk factors. Stratification of risk factors according to age was also done. Results: Hundred females were enrolled into the study after informed consent. The mean age of the study population was 64.4±9.48. 97 percent of the population was married. Out of 100 patients, 42 had high post-void volume, 35 had urinary incontinence and 17 patients were having cystocele. According to age stratification, most frequently affected age group was between 51-60 years (38 percent), followed by 61-70 years (36 percent), then 25 percent in more than 70 years, whereas only 1 percent was between 41-50 years. Conclusion: Recurrent UTI in postmenopausal females is most frequently associated with high post void volume and most frequently affected age group is between 51-60 years. (author)

  7. Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia: An Examination of Psychological Antecedents

    OpenAIRE

    Sansone, Randy A.; Sansone, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster and an associated complication, postherpetic neuralgia, are both attributable to the varicella zoster virus. This virus, which lies dormant within the affected sensory ganglia after an initial infection, appears to be triggered in part by a decrease in immunity. According to available research, stress, stressful life events, and depressive symptoms are identified antecedents to outbreaks of herpes zoster. Likewise, the development of postherpetic neuralgia has been associated wi...

  8. Prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Vahlensieck, W; Bauer, H W; Weidner, W; Piechota, H J; Naber, K G

    2013-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequent bacterial infections in the community and health care setting. Mostly young and, to some extent, postmenopausal women are affected by recurrent UTI (rUTI) defined as ≥3 UTI/year or ≥2 UTI/half year. In contrast, rUTI is rare in healthy men. On the other hand, rUTI are frequently found in female and male patients with complicating urological factors, e.g. urinary catheters, infection stones. Remediable predisposing factors in uncomplicated rUTI in women are rare. In complicated rUTI the success depends mainly on the possibility to eliminate or at leastimprove the complicating risk factors. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis or postcoital prophylaxis, if there is close correlation with sexual intercourse, are most effective to prevent rUTI. Nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim (or cotrimoxazole), and fosfomycin trometamol are available as first-line drugs. Oral cephalosporins and quinolones should be restricted to specific indications. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the number of uropathogens in the gut and/or vaginal flora and reduces bacterial "fitness". Given the correct indication, the recurrence rate of rUTI can be reduced by about 90%. Due to possible adverse events and the concern of selecting resistant pathogens, according to the guidelines of the European Association of Urology antimicrobial prophylaxis should be considered only after counselling, behavioural modification and non-antimicrobial measures have been attempted. In postmenopausal patients vaginal substitution of oestriol should be started first. Oral or parenteral immunoprophylaxis is another option in patients with rUTI. Other possibilities with varying scientific evidence are prophylaxis with cranberry products, specific plant combinations or probiotics. The prophylaxis of catheter-associated UTI should employ strategies which result in a reduction of frequency and duration of catheter drainage of the urinary tract. The currently available

  9. Topical undecylenic acid for herpes simplex labialis: a multicenter, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafran, S D; Sacks, S L; Aoki, F Y; Tyrrell, D L; Schlech, W F; Mendelson, J; Rosenthal, D; Gill, M J; Bader, R L; Chang, I

    1997-07-01

    A multicenter, patient-initiated, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 15% undecylenic acid cream was conducted with 573 patients with recurrent herpes labialis. Treatment was applied 5 or 6 times daily until crusting and then thrice daily until healing. Patients were assessed daily until 48 h after crusting and then every other day until healing. Undecylenic acid significantly reduced the incidence and duration of viral shedding and the duration and severity of itching but did not increase abortive episodes or reduce times to healing, crusting, or progression of lesion size. When treatment was initiated during the prodrome, the time to crusting was reduced (P = .02) and the area under the symptom-time curve for pain and tenderness was reduced, approaching statistical significance (P = .06). Active treatment was well tolerated but caused dysgeusia and local irritation. Undecylenic acid 15% cream reduces viral shedding in recurrent herpes labialis, but clinical benefits are minimal and largely restricted to patients initiating therapy during the prodrome.

  10. Herpes simplex encephalitis : from virus to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, Flore; Deback, Claire; Agut, Henri

    2011-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the cause of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), a devastating human disease which occurs in 2-4 cases per million/year. HSE results either from a primary infection or virus reactivation, in accordance with the common pattern of HSV infection which is a chronic lifelong process. However its pathophysiology remains largely unknown and its poor prognosis is in contrast with the usually good tolerance of most clinical herpetic manifestations. HSE is due to HSV type 1 (HSV-1) in most cases but HSV type 2 (HSV-2) may be also implicated, especially in infants in the context of neonatal herpes. Polymerase chain reaction detection of HSV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid is the diagnosis of choice for HSE. Acyclovir, a nucleoside analogue which inhibits viral DNA polymerase activity, is the reference treatment of HSE while foscarnet constitutes an alternative therapy and the efficacy of cidofovir is currently uncertain in that context. The emergence of HSV resistance to acyclovir, a phenomenon which is mainly observed among immunocompromised patients, is a current concern although no case of HSE due to an acyclovir-resistant HSV strain has been reported to date. Nevertheless the identification and development of novel therapeutic strategies against HSV appears to be a non dispensable objective for future research in virology.

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 2: Cluster of unrelated cases in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troché, Gilles; Marque Juillet, Stephanie; Burrel, Sonia; Boutolleau, David; Bédos, Jean-Pierre; Legriel, Stephane

    2016-10-01

    Herpes simplex viruses, which are associated with various clinical manifestations, can be transmitted to critically ill patients from other patients or health care staff. We report an apparent outbreak of mucocutaneous herpes simplex virus 2 infections (5 cases in 10 weeks). An epidemiologic investigation and genotype analysis showed no connections among the 5 cases. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Esophagitis in a Young Immunocompetent Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K. Kadayakkara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE is commonly identified in immunosuppressed patients. It is rare among immunocompetent patients and almost all of the reported cases are due to HSV-1 infection. HSV-2 esophagitis is extremely rare. We report the case of a young immunocompetent male who presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and epigastric pain. Endoscopy showed multitudes of white nummular lesions in the distal esophagus initially suspected to be candida esophagitis. However, classic histopathological findings of multinucleated giant cells with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions and positive HSV-2 IgM confirmed the diagnosis of HSV-2 esophagitis. The patient rapidly responded to acyclovir treatment. Although HSV-2 is predominantly associated with genital herpes, it can cause infections in other parts of the body previously attributed to only HSV-1 infection.

  13. T cell-macrophage interaction in arginase-mediated resistance to herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonina, L; Nash, A A; Arena, A; Leung, K N; Wildy, P

    1984-09-01

    Peritoneal macrophages activated by-products derived from a herpes simplex virus-specific helper T cell clone were used to investigate intrinsic and extrinsic resistance mechanisms to herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro. T cell-activated macrophages produced fewer infective centres, indicating enhanced intrinsic resistance, and markedly reduced the growth of virus in a permissive cell line. The reduction in virus growth correlated with the depletion of arginine in the support medium, presumably resulting from increased arginase production by activated macrophages. The significance of these findings for antiviral immunity in vivo is discussed.

  14. Genital herpes in children under 11 years and investigations for sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, Richard; Hughes, Gwenda; Hill, Julia; Debelle, Geoff

    2011-08-01

    The implications for sexual abuse investigation of genital herpes in a child are uncertain because of a lack of good quality research evidence. The incidence, presenting features, history of exposure, indicators of child maltreatment and outcomes of child protection investigations in children with genital herpes are described. Ascertainment of all cases of genital herpes in children herpes simplex type 1, eight were tested for other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and only one had a full STI screen. Three cases had other clinical features suggestive of sexual abuse. Six cases were referred for child protection investigation, but no sexual abuse was substantiated. Genital herpes in children under 11 years is rare. Almost a third of children diagnosed with genital herpes did not have appropriate virological investigation and few were screened for other STIs. Around a quarter of cases were referred to child protection agencies for further investigation, which limits any inferences in this study about mode of transmission in children. Sexual abuse guidance should emphasise the need for thorough assessment and investigation in cases of genital herpes in children.

  15. Psychiatric aspects of herpes simplex encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis and herpes zoster encephalitis among immunocompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Więdłocha, Magdalena; Marcinowicz, Piotr; Stańczykiewicz, Bartłomiej

    2015-01-01

    The psychopathological symptoms occurring in the course of diseases associated with infections are often initially isolated and non-characteristic, and may cause diagnostic difficulties. Moreover, such disorders tend to be less responsive to psychiatric management. Among possible causes such as trauma, neoplasm and vascular changes, inflammatory changes of the brain as a result of a viral infection should also be considered. There were 452 registered cases of viral encephalitis in Poland in 2010, and although not very prevalent they remain a severe and life-threatening condition. What is more, the frequently occurring neurological and psychiatric complications of viral encephalitis often result in permanent disabilities, causing a significant decrease in the quality of life. This article presents the three types of encephalitis that are most prevalent among immunocompetent patients in Poland, i.e. herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and herpes zoster encephalitis (HZE). The psychopathology of the acute phase of the infection, the residual symptoms, features apparent in imaging studies and some neuropathological aspects are also presented. The paper also focuses on psychiatric aspects of the diagnostics and treatment of the described conditions. The clinical pictures of these infections are quite specific, although they cover a wide range of symptoms, and these characteristic features are described. The aim of this review is also to show the significance of thorough diagnostics and a multidisciplinary approach to patients with viral CNS infections.

  16. Differential in situ hybridization for herpes simplex virus typing in routine skin biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, H. J.; Dekker, H.; van Amstel, P.; Cairo, I.; van den Berg, F. M.

    1995-01-01

    A herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 specific recombinant plasmid probe designated pH2S3 was constructed from non-HSV-1 crossreactive regions of the HSV-2 genome. DNA in situ hybridization on in vitro reconstructed tissue samples of sheep collagen matrix impregnated with herpes virus-infected human

  17. The calcitonin receptor gene is a candidate for regulation of susceptibility to herpes simplex type 1 neuronal infection leading to encephalitis in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a fatal infection of the central nervous system (CNS predominantly caused by Herpes simplex virus type 1. Factors regulating the susceptibility to HSE are still largely unknown. To identify host gene(s regulating HSE susceptibility we performed a genome-wide linkage scan in an intercross between the susceptible DA and the resistant PVG rat. We found one major quantitative trait locus (QTL, Hse1, on rat chromosome 4 (confidence interval 24.3-31 Mb; LOD score 29.5 governing disease susceptibility. Fine mapping of Hse1 using recombinants, haplotype mapping and sequencing, as well as expression analysis of all genes in the interval identified the calcitonin receptor gene (Calcr as the main candidate, which also is supported by functional studies. Thus, using unbiased genetic approach variability in Calcr was identified as potentially critical for infection and viral spread to the CNS and subsequent HSE development.

  18. Effect of genital herpes on cervicovaginal HIV shedding in women co-infected with HIV AND HSV-2 in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Jim; Riedner, Gabriele; Maboko, Leonard; Hoelscher, Michael; Weiss, Helen A; Lyamuya, Eligius; Mabey, David; Rusizoka, Mary; Belec, Laurent; Hayes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To compare the presence and quantity of cervicovaginal HIV among HIV seropositive women with clinical herpes, subclinical HSV-2 infection and without HSV-2 infection respectively; to evaluate the association between cervicovaginal HIV and HSV shedding; and identify factors associated with quantity of cervicovaginal HIV. Four groups of HIV seropositive adult female barworkers were identified and examined at three-monthly intervals between October 2000 and March 2003 in Mbeya, Tanzania: (1) 57 women at 70 clinic visits with clinical genital herpes; (2) 39 of the same women at 46 clinic visits when asymptomatic; (3) 55 HSV-2 seropositive women at 60 clinic visits who were never observed with herpetic lesions; (4) 18 HSV-2 seronegative women at 45 clinic visits. Associations of genital HIV shedding with HIV plasma viral load (PVL), herpetic lesions, HSV shedding and other factors were examined. Prevalence of detectable genital HIV RNA varied from 73% in HSV-2 seronegative women to 94% in women with herpetic lesions (geometric means 1634 vs 3339 copies/ml, p = 0.03). In paired specimens from HSV-2 positive women, genital HIV viral shedding was similar during symptomatic and asymptomatic visits. On multivariate regression, genital HIV RNA (log10 copies/mL) was closely associated with HIV PVL (β = 0.51 per log10 copies/ml increase, 95%CI:0.41-0.60, pgenital HIV than the presence of herpetic lesions. These data support a role of HSV-2 infection in enhancing HIV transmissibility.

  19. Urinary NGAL deficiency in recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Catherine S; Johnson, Kathryn; Patel, Viral; Wax, Rebecca; Rodig, Nancy; Barasch, Jonathan; Bachur, Richard; Lee, Richard S

    2017-06-01

    Children with recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTI) often show no identifiable cause of their infections. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is known to be upregulated within the uroepithelium and kidney of patients with UTI and exhibits a localized bacteriostatic effect through iron chelation. We hypothesize that some patients with rUTI without an identifiable cause of their recurrent infections have locally deficient NGAL production. We therefore explored whether a lack of NGAL production may be a factor in the pathogenesis of rUTI. Patients seen in the urology clinic for rUTI who were tract, or other reasons that predispose to UTI, such as neurogenic bladder, the need for intermittent catheterization, or unrepaired posterior urethral valves. Control patients were healthy children enrolled from the emergency department with no history of UTI or renal dysfunction, normal urinalysis at the time of enrollment, and presenting no diagnosis associated with increased NGAL levels, such as acute kidney injury or infection. NGAL was measured by immunoblot. Fifteen cases and controls were enrolled. Median urinary NGAL levels were significantly decreased in rUTI patients compared with controls [15 (14-29) ng/ml vs 30 (27-61) ng/ml; p = 0.002)] Although comparatively diminished, measurable NGAL levels were present in all patients with rUTI. Urinary NGAL is significantly decreased in patients with compared with patients without rUTI. These data suggest that some patients with rUTI may be predisposed to UTI because of a relative local deficiency in urinary NGAL production.

  20. Loss of urinary voiding sensation due to herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Akiyuki; Nagumo, Kiyomi; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Fujinawa, Naoto; Hashimoto, Tasuku

    2003-01-01

    A case of sacral herpes zoster infection in a 56-year-old man with the complication of loss of urinary voiding sensation is presented. He had typical herpes zoster eruption on the left S2 dermatome, hypalgesia of the S1-S4 dermatomes, and absence of urinary voiding sensation. There was no other urinary symptom at the first medical examination. Urinary complications associated with herpes zoster are uncommon, but two types, acute cystitis and acute retention, have been recognized. No cases of loss of urinary voiding sensation due to herpes zoster have been reported. In this case, hypalgesia of the sacral dermatomes was mild compared to the marked loss of urethral sensation. This inconsistency is explained by the hypothesis that the number of urethral fibers is very small as compared to that of cutaneous fibers, therefore, urethral sensation would be more severely disturbed than cutaneous sensation. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Frequency of recurrent urinary tract infection in patients with pelvic organ prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Töz E

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Emrah Töz,1 Sefa Kurt,2 Çagdas Sahin,1 Mehmet Tunç Canda3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tepecik Training and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Izmir Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kent Hospital, Izmir, Turkey Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate the existence of a relationship between pelvic organ prolapse (POP and recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI. Materials and methods: The hospital database was searched for women diagnosed with pelvic floor disorders and all medical records were reviewed for recurrent UTI, diagnosed by two or more positive urine cultures taken within 12 months of each other. The control group was created using one-to-one matching for age and menopausal status. The prevalence of recurrent UTI in these patients were compared. Results: The mean age of the 210 participants was 54.64±5.15 years. We found no association between POP and recurrent UTI. In the prolapse group, 22 women (21% had recurrent UTI compared with 19 women (18% in the control group (P=0.316. Post-void residual (PVR volumes >50 mL were associated with increased prevalence of recurrent UTI. Conclusion: POP is not a risk factor for recurrent UTI, but women with POP are more likely to have high PVR volumes. High PVR volumes increase the risk of recurrent UTI. Clinical examination and ultrasound assessment of PVR should be performed in all women presenting with prolapse and UTI. Elevated PVR is the most significant risk factor, linking POP with recurrent UTI. Keywords: recurrent urinary tract infection, pelvic organ prolapse, post-void residual

  2. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be pharmacological

  3. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be

  4. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be

  5. Current Concepts for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection: Diagnostics and Pathogenesis of Genital Tract Shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is a DNA virus that is efficiently transmitted through intimate genital tract contact and causes persistent infection that cannot be eliminated. HSV-2 may cause frequent, symptomatic self-limited genital ulcers, but in most persons infection is subclinical. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the virus is frequently shed from genital surfaces even in the absence of signs or symptoms of clinical disease and that the virus can be transmitted during these periods of shedding. Furthermore, HSV-2 shedding is detected throughout the genital tract and may be associated with genital tract inflammation, which likely contributes to increased risk of HIV acquisition. This review focuses on HSV diagnostics, as well as what we have learned about the importance of frequent genital HSV shedding for (i) HSV transmission and (ii) genital tract inflammation, as well as (iii) the impact of HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition and transmission. We conclude with discussion of future areas of research to push the field forward. PMID:26561565

  6. Current Concepts for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection: Diagnostics and Pathogenesis of Genital Tract Shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christine; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is a DNA virus that is efficiently transmitted through intimate genital tract contact and causes persistent infection that cannot be eliminated. HSV-2 may cause frequent, symptomatic self-limited genital ulcers, but in most persons infection is subclinical. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the virus is frequently shed from genital surfaces even in the absence of signs or symptoms of clinical disease and that the virus can be transmitted during these periods of shedding. Furthermore, HSV-2 shedding is detected throughout the genital tract and may be associated with genital tract inflammation, which likely contributes to increased risk of HIV acquisition. This review focuses on HSV diagnostics, as well as what we have learned about the importance of frequent genital HSV shedding for (i) HSV transmission and (ii) genital tract inflammation, as well as (iii) the impact of HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition and transmission. We conclude with discussion of future areas of research to push the field forward. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. CYTOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF THE NUCLEOPROTEINS OF HELA CELLS INFECTED WITH HERPES VIRUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, R; Wildy, P

    1963-05-01

    The morphological and cytochemical changes in HeLa cells infected with herpes virus have been studied at frequent intervals during infection and related to the growth of virus and the multiplicity of the virus inoculum. Infection with a high multiplicity inoculum produced enlargement and extrusion of small ribonucleoprotein (RNP) bodies in the nucleoli (nucleolini) to form RNP bodies in the nucleoplasm (B bodies) beginning (1/2) hour after infection. 3 hours after infection, RNP of the pars amorpha appeared to diffuse into the adjacent nucleoplasm, where, (1/2) hour later, the classical type A inclusion or A body first appeared. The A bodies displaced the B bodies and the nucleoli and eventually filled the nucleus. 6 hours after infection, minute granules containing RNA, DNA, and non-histone protein appeared inside the A bodies (A granules) and increased in number until the late stages of infection, when they disappeared. 18 hours after infection, at the time when the A bodies came to fill the nucleus completely, extrusion of RNP from the nucleus produced cytoplasmic masses which have been termed C bodies. B bodies were formed in the majority of cells before the maturation of infectious virus, but the number of B bodies could not be correlated with the amount of virus in the cell or with the multiplicity of the inoculum. It is suggested that the formation of B bodies may be the result of inhibition of the onset of mitotic division by a mechanism which does not inhibit the formation of RNA in the nucleolini. The nature of the A bodies, the A granules, and the C bodies is discussed and it is concluded that the A granules may represent aggregations of maturing virus in the nucleus. The progression of some C mitotic metaphases to the formation of post-C mitotic multinucleated giant cells is described. These are distinct from syncytia formed by cell fusion.

  8. Molecular characteristics of Clostridium difficile strains from patients with a first recurrence more than 8 weeks after the primary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yijian; Rashid, Mamun Ur; Huang, Haihui; Fang, Hong; Nord, Carl Erik; Wang, Minggui; Weintraub, Andrej

    2017-08-01

    Nearly all published studies of recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) report recurrent CDI within 8 weeks after the primary infection. This study explored the molecular characteristics of C. difficile isolates from the first recurrent CDI more than 8 weeks after the primary infection. Consecutive hospitalized patients with a recurrent CDI more than 8 weeks after a primary infection were enrolled prospectively from January 2008 to February 2011. All C. difficile isolates of the primary and recurrent infections were collected and subjected to polymerase chain reaction ribotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. There were 62 cases of CDI in this study, which included 32 cases (51.6%) of recurrence due to the same ribotype of C. difficile, 26 (41.9%) cases due to a different ribotype, and four (6.5%) cases with 2-4 recurrences due to the same or different strains. One hundred and forty C. difficile isolates were obtained, which included 62 primary CDI isolates and 78 recurrent isolates. Ribotype 020 was the most common C. difficile strain in primary and recurrent infections. Ribotype 001 accounted for 15.4% (10/78) of recurrent infections and 3.2% (2/62) of primary infections (p = 0.0447). The minimum inhibitory concentration at 90% (MIC 90 ) values of linezolid, moxifloxacin, and clindamycin against type 001 strains were much higher, compared to the three other common ribotypes. Recurrent CDI more than 8 weeks after a primary infection can be caused by the same or different C. difficile ribotype at similar percentages. Ribotype 001 C. difficile strains, which have a lower susceptibility to antimicrobials, were isolated more frequently in patients with a recurrent CDI. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viral Therapy: A Stride toward Selective Targeting of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchala, Dhaval S; Bhatt, Lokesh K; Prabhavalkar, Kedar S

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic viral therapy, which makes use of replication-competent lytic viruses, has emerged as a promising modality to treat malignancies. It has shown meaningful outcomes in both solid tumor and hematologic malignancies. Advancements during the last decade, mainly genetic engineering of oncolytic viruses have resulted in improved specificity and efficacy of oncolytic viruses in cancer therapeutics. Oncolytic viral therapy for treating cancer with herpes simplex virus-1 has been of particular interest owing to its range of benefits like: (a) large genome and power to infiltrate in the tumor, (b) easy access to manipulation with the flexibility to insert multiple transgenes, (c) infecting majority of the malignant cell types with quick replication in the infected cells and (d) as Anti-HSV agent to terminate HSV replication. This review provides an exhaustive list of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 along with their genetic alterations. It also encompasses the major developments in oncolytic herpes simplex-1 viral therapy and outlines the limitations and drawbacks of oncolytic herpes simplex viral therapy.

  10. Genital herpes stigma: Toward the Measurement and Validation of a highly prevalent yet hidden public health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Katie; Merin, Abigail; Rendina, H Jonathon; Pachankis, John E

    2018-02-01

    Despite its highly prevalent and stigmatizing nature, genital herpes has received little attention from stigma researchers relative to other sexually transmitted infections. This limitation is of great relevance to researchers and practitioners in both clinical and healthcare settings, given that stigma can cause psychological distress and hinder disclosure to sexual partners, hence contributing to the spread of genital herpes. The present research developed and examined the psychometric properties of a quantitative measure of genital herpes stigma. Two hundred individuals diagnosed with genital herpes recruited through online genital herpes support groups completed a survey containing 37 items adapted from the HIV Stigma Scale, questions about demographic and herpes-related characteristics, and measures of relevant psychosocial variables. A confirmatory factor analysis yielded an 18-item scale with four factors: personalized stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concern with public attitudes. All subscales demonstrated good internal consistency, with Cronbach alphas ranging from 0.74 to 0.87. Construct validity was supported by correlations with relevant psychosocial variables, including negative affect, rumination, and perceived social support. As a psychometrically sound assessment tool, the Genital Herpes Stigma Scale can be used in both clinical and research settings to facilitate future efforts to alleviate the negative psychological consequences of this incurable viral infection.

  11. Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Recurrent or Complicated Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidal S Younish

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric urine culture isolates are becoming increasingly resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Empirical treatment with Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX or Cephalexin as the initial drug is ineffective. Nitrofurantoin and Nalidixic acid can be considered as the first line antibiotics for prophylaxis and or treatment of patients with recurrent UTI, while Meropenam and Ciprofloxacin can be used empirically in treating patients with complicated UTI. Key words: Antibiotic resistance, Complicated, Recurrent, Urinary tract infection

  12. Herpes simplex virus bronchiolitis in a cannabis user

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Libraty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV lower respiratory tract infections in adults are uncommon. We present a case of HSV bronchiolitis and pneumonitis in an immunocompetent individual, likely linked to chronic habitual marijuana use and a herpetic orolabial ulcer. The case serves as a reminder to consider HSV as a potential unusual cause of lower respiratory tract infection/inflammation in individuals with chronic habitual marijuana use.

  13. Use of Lactobacillus spp. to prevent recurrent urinary tract infections in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Qin Xiang; Peters, Christina; Venkatanarayanan, Nandini; Goh, Yan Yih; Ho, Collin Yih Xian; Yeo, Wee-Song

    2018-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infections seen in the community, especially amongst females. The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the increased occurrence of E. coli resistant isolates worldwide. A promising non-antibiotic approach is the use of probiotic lactobacilli strains. This paper hypothesizes that Lactobacillus spp. containing products are able to prevent recurrent urinary tract infections in females. Using the keywords [lactobacillus OR lactobacilli OR probiotic] and [urinary tract infection OR UTI OR cystitis], a preliminary search on the PubMed, Ovid, Google Scholar and ClinicalTrials.gov database yielded 1,647 papers published in English between 1-Jan-1960 and 1-May-2017. 9 clinical trials with a total of 726 patients were reviewed. Different lactobacilli strains (in either oral or suppository formulation) were utilized and they demonstrated varying efficacy in the prevention of recurrent UTIs. Using a random-effects model, pooled risk ratio of at least one recurrent UTI episode during the entire study duration was 0.684 (95% CI 0.438 to 0.929, p probiotics for UTIs is plausible and supported by current data. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC14 were the most commonly studied lactobacilli strains. Further and more robust randomized controlled trials with standardized lactobacilli strains and formulation are required for confirmation of effects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of soluble glycoprotein D-mediated herpes simplex virus type 1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvitov, Marianna; Frampton, Arthur R.; Shah, Waris A.; Wendell, Steven K.; Ozuer, Ali; Kapacee, Zoher; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) entry into permissive cells involves attachment to cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and fusion of the virus envelope with the cell membrane triggered by the binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to cognate receptors. In this study, we characterized the observation that soluble forms of the gD ectodomain (sgD) can mediate entry of gD-deficient HSV-1. We examined the efficiency and receptor specificity of this activity and used sequential incubation protocols to determine the order and stability of the initial interactions required for entry. Surprisingly, virus binding to GAGs did not increase the efficiency of sgD-mediated entry and gD-deficient virus was capable of attaching to GAG-deficient cells in the absence of sgD. These observations suggested a novel binding interaction that may play a role in normal HSV infection

  15. Labial fusion causing urinary incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infection in a postmenopausal female: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirim, Ayhan; Hasirci, Eray

    2011-01-01

    A 73-year-old postmenopausal woman was admitted with recurrent urinary tract infection and a history of incontinence. General physical examination was normal. Complete labial fusion was noticed on genital examination. Surgical intervention was performed. This therapy alleviated incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infection.

  16. Diagnostic Value of Histological and Microbiological Screening in Etiopathogenesis of Recurrent and Hypertrophic Tonsillitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uldis Viesturs

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the mechanisms and causes of recurrent tonsillitis is considerable. CD4+CD25+ T-lymphocytes have an important role in the maintenance of immunological tolerance. The aim of our research was to compare the diagnostic value of palatine tonsils histological and microbiological screening in patients with hypertrophic and recurrent tonsillitis. 14 patients with hypertrophic and 10 patients with chronic tonsillitis undergoing tonsillectomy were enrolled in the study. Rapid diagnosis of adenovirus, parainfluenza, influenza A and B, and respiratory syncytial virus infection was made before tonsillectomy by viral antigen detection using the immunofluorescence procedure from tonsils. Herpes simplex and cytomegaloviruses DNA were detected by the polymerase chain reaction. Samples for bacteriological studies were collected using a cotton swab. Immunohistochemical methods were used to evaluate S-100 and TGF-beta1 expression. The obtained results showed that patients with recurrent tonsillitis had less S-100 and TGF-beta1 positive cells in parafollicular regions compared to patients with hypertrophic tonsillitis. In both groups, tonsils were colonized predominantly by gram-positive microorganisms and adenovirus (36% of cases. However, in patients with recurrent tonsillitis, associations of gram-positive, gram-negative bacteria and viruses (40% of cases were observed. To conclude, recurrent tonsillitis is characterized by the breakdown of the immunological tolerance to oral microflora.

  17. Decreasing seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 in Germany leaves many people susceptible to genital infection: time to raise awareness and enhance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korr, Gerit; Thamm, Michael; Czogiel, Irina; Poethko-Mueller, Christina; Bremer, Viviane; Jansen, Klaus

    2017-07-06

    Herpes simplex infections (HSV1/2) are characterized by recurrent symptoms, a risk of neonatal herpes, and the facilitation of HIV transmission. In Germany, HSV1/2 infections are not notifiable and data are scarce. A previous study found higher HSV1/2 seroprevalences in women in East Germany than in women in West Germany. We assessed changes in the HSV1/2 seroprevalences over time and investigated determinants associated with HSV1/2 seropositivity to guide prevention and control. The study was based on the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS; 2008-2011) and the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey (GNHIES; 1997-1999). We tested serum samples from DEGS participants for HSV1 and HSV2 immunoglobulin G. We used Pearson's χ 2 test to compare the HSV1/HSV2 seroprevalences in terms of sex, age, and region of residence (East/West Germany) and investigated potential determinants by calculating prevalence ratios (PR) with log-binomial regression. All statistical analyses included survey weights. In total, 6627 DEGS participants were tested for HSV1, and 5013 were also tested for HSV2. Overall, HSV1 seroprevalence decreased significantly from 1997-1999 (82.1%; 95%CI 80.6-83.6) to 2008-2011 (78.4%; 95%CI 77.8-79.7). In the same period, overall HSV2 seroprevalence decreased significantly from 13.3% (95%CI 11.9-14.9) to 9.6% (95%CI 8.6-10.8), notably in 18-24-year-old men (10.4 to 0%) in East Germany. Women were more likely than men to be seropositive for HSV1 (PR 1.1) or HSV2 (PR 1.6). A lower level of education, smoking, and not speaking German were associated with HSV1 in both sexes. Women of older age, who smoked, or had a history of abortion and men of older age or who had not attended a nursery school during childhood were more often seropositive for HSV2. The reduced seroprevalences of HSV1 and HSV2 leave more people susceptible to genital HSV1/2 infections. Practitioners should be aware of HSV infection as a differential

  18. When is bacterial vaginosis not bacterial vaginosis?--a case of cervical carcinoma presenting as recurrent vaginal anaerobic infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, M M; Tidy, J A; McCulloch, T A; Rogstad, K E

    1997-01-01

    Vaginal anaerobic infection is the most common cause of vaginal discharge in women. We present a case of recurrent vaginal anaerobic infection and cervical carcinoma and discuss the association of the two conditions. More frequent cytology/colposcopy may be indicated in women who give a history of recurrent or persistent vaginal anaerobic infection.

  19. Lactoferrin Glu561Asp polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to herpes simplex keratitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keijser, S; Jager, M J; Dogterom-Ballering, H C M

    2008-01-01

    Lactoferrin plays an important role in the defense against infections, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis. We studied the impact of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human lactoferrin gene on the susceptibility to HSV infections of the eye and the severity of such infections...

  20. Treatment of recurrent complicated urinary tract infections in children with vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Hua; Huang, Fang-Liang; Fu, Lin-Shien; Chou, Chia-Man; Chien, Ya-Li; Huang, Chung-Ming; Lin, Chin-Fu; Chen, Po-Yen

    2016-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) are often caused by uropathogens with a high rate of drug resistance and are associated with a high rate of recurrence with a single pathogen. In this study, we evaluated the incidence of recurrent UTI and the drug resistance pattern of Escherichia coli in children with VUR. We also evaluated whether combination therapy comprising fosomycin plus one other antimicrobial agent is effective for treatment of recurrent UTIs. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all children with VUR who developed at least one episode of UTI during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2013 at a single medical center. The effectiveness of fosfomycin plus amikicin for Enterobacteriaceae or ceftazidime for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was prospectively studied in six children with recurrent relapsing UTIs. The study population comprised 129 children (age range, from 1month to 15 years; mean ± standard deviation, 2.37 ± 2.91 years) with VUR who developed at least one UTI during the 10-year study period; 68 (52.7%) had recurrent UTIs. The presence of an underlying urinary tract anomaly was predictive of recurrence (p = 0.028). The rates of susceptibility of E. coli to cefazolin (p UTIs. Combination therapy with fosfomycin plus amikacin or ceftazidime was shown to be an effective therapeutic option for recurrent UTIs due to a single uropathogen. The rates of susceptibility of E. coli to commonly used antimicrobials were significantly lower in children who developed more than one episode of UTI. The empiric choice of cefazolin or cefotaxime was usually ineffective. Administration of fosfomycin plus amikacin or ceftazidime was an effective therapeutic and preventive strategy in children with VUR and recurrent relapsing UTI. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Herpes zoster induced neuropathic bladder--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Nan; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Shu-Pin; Su, Chin-Ming; Chen, Chung-Chin; Wang, Chii-Jye; Chou, Yii-Her; Huang, Chun-Hsiung

    2002-01-01

    Herpes zoster infection involving the sacral dermatomes has been associated with bladder dysfunction and, although rarely, with acute urinary retention. Less than 150 cases have been reported in the literature. After reviewing our institute's chart records covering a period of time dating from 1991 to 2001, we found that three of our patients had developed acute urinary retention following herpes zoster skin lesions of the S2-4 dermatomes. Herein we report our findings. These three patients had previously been found to have normal voiding status. However, at the time of complaint urodynamic studies revealed detrusor areflexia or detrusor hyporeflexia with decreased sensation of bladder filling. After micturation recovery, repeat urodynamic studies revealed detrusor pressure and bladder sensation recovery. After one to six weeks of treatment, all three patients could void spontaneously without catheterization. We found that, when treated with antiviral medication, supportive analgesics, and temporary urinary drainage, which included urethral catheterization and suprapubic cystostomy, acute urinary retention associated with herpes zoster has a generally favorable prognosis. In other words, we found that in spite of its rarity, herpes zoster induced neuropathic bladder dysfunction is reversible when treated appropriately.

  2. Rapid host immune response and viral dynamics in herpes simplex virus-2 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Corey, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2) is episodically shed throughout the human genital tract. While high viral load correlates with development of genital ulcers, shedding also commonly occurs even when ulcers are not present, allowing for silent transmission during coitus and contributing to high seroprevalence of HSV-2 worldwide. Frequent viral reactivation occurs despite diverse and complementary host and viral mechanisms within ganglionic tissue that predispose towards latency, suggesting that viral replication may be constantly occurring in a small minority of neurons within the ganglia. Within genital mucosa, the in vivo expansion and clearance rates of HSV-2 are extremely rapid. Resident dendritic cells and memory HSV-specific T cells persist at prior sites of genital tract reactivation, and in conjunction with prompt innate recognition of infected cells, lead to rapid containment of infected cells. Shedding episodes vary greatly in duration and severity within a single person over time: this heterogeneity appears best explained by variation in the densities of host immunity across the genital tract. The fact that immune responses usually control viral replication in genital skin prior to development of lesions provides optimism that enhancing such responses could lead to effective vaccines and immunotherapies. PMID:23467247

  3. Herpes Zoster Oticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Herpes Zoster Oticus Information Page Herpes Zoster Oticus Information Page What research is being ... neurotropic viruses and development of neurological diseases including herpes simplex and varicella-zoster viruses. × What research is ...

  4. Trichomonas vaginalis infection: How significant is it in men presenting with recurrent or persistent symptoms of urethritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Andrea; Ross, Jonathan D C

    2016-01-01

    Persistent or recurrent non-gonococcal urethritis has been reported to affect up to 10-20% of men attending sexual health clinics. An audit was undertaken to review the management of persistent or recurrent non-gonococcal urethritis in men presenting at Whittall Street Clinic, Birmingham, UK. Detection of Trichomonas vaginalis infection was with the newly-introduced nucleic acid amplification test. A total of 43 (8%) of 533 men treated for urethritis re-attended within three months with persistent or recurrent symptoms. Chlamydia trachomatis infection was identified in 13/40 (33%), T. vaginalis in 1/27 (4%) and Mycoplasma genitalium in 6/12 (50%). These findings suggest that the prevalence of T. vaginalis infection remains low in our clinic population and may not contribute significantly to persistent or recurrent non-gonococcal urethritis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Herpes viruses and HIV-1 drug resistance mutations influence the virologic and immunologic milieu of the male genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianella, Sara; Morris, Sheldon R; Anderson, Christy; Spina, Celsa A; Vargas, Milenka V; Young, Jason A; Richman, Douglas D; Little, Susan J; Smith, Davey M

    2013-01-02

    To further understand the role that chronic viral infections of the male genital tract play on HIV-1 dynamics and replication. Retrospective, observational study including 236 paired semen and blood samples collected from 115 recently HIV-1 infected antiretroviral naive men who have sex with men. In this study, we evaluated the association of seminal HIV-1 shedding to coinfections with seven herpes viruses, blood plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, CD4 T-cell counts, presence of transmitted drug resistance mutations (DRMs) in HIV-1 pol, participants' age and stage of HIV-infection using multivariate generalized estimating equation methods. Associations between herpes virus shedding, seminal HIV-1 levels, number and immune activation of seminal T-cells was also investigated (Mann-Whitney). Seminal herpes virus shedding was observed in 75.7% of individuals. Blood HIV-1 RNA levels (P herpes virus (HHV)-8 levels (P herpes viruses seminal shedding in our cohort. Shedding of CMV, EBV and HHV-8 and absence of DRM were associated with increased frequency of HIV-1 shedding and/or higher levels of HIV-1 RNA in semen, which are likely important cofactors for HIV-1 transmission.

  6. Risk factors for recurrent hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection in a Japanese university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikone M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mayu Hikone,1 Yusuke Ainoda,1,2 Sayaka Tago,2 Takahiro Fujita,2 Yuji Hirai,2 Kaori Takeuchi,2 Kyoichi Totsuka31Department of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh General Hospital, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Kitatama Hospital, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a highly prevalent hospital-associated infection. Although most patients respond well to discontinuation of antibiotics, 20%–30% of patients relapse. To initiate early therapeutic measures, the risk factors for recurrent CDI must be identified, although very few Japanese studies have used standard surveillance definitions to identify these risk factors.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with health care facility-onset CDI between August 2011 and September 2013. Patients with diarrhea who were positive for Clostridium difficile (via an enzyme immunoassay were defined as having CDI. Clinical data (eg, demographics, comorbidities, medication, laboratory results, and clinical outcomes were evaluated, and multivariate analysis was used to identify risk factors that were associated with recurrent CDI.Results: Seventy-six health care facility-onset CDI cases were identified, with an incidence rate of 0.8 cases per 10,000 patient-days. Fourteen cases (18.4% were recurrent, with 13 patients having experienced a single recurrent episode and one patient having experienced three recurrent episodes. The 30-day and 90-day mortality rates were 7.9% and 14.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that recurrent patients were more likely to have underlying malignant disease (odds ratio: 7.98; 95% confidence interval: 1.22–52.2; P=0.03 and a history of intensive care unit hospitalization (odds ratio: 49.9; 95% confidence interval: 1.01–2,470; P=0.049.Conclusion: Intensive care unit hospitalization and malignancy are risk factors for recurrent

  7. Global and Regional Estimates of Prevalent and Incident Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infections in 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine J Looker

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 commonly causes orolabial ulcers, while HSV-2 commonly causes genital ulcers. However, HSV-1 is an increasing cause of genital infection. Previously, the World Health Organization estimated the global burden of HSV-2 for 2003 and for 2012. The global burden of HSV-1 has not been estimated.We fitted a constant-incidence model to pooled HSV-1 prevalence data from literature searches for 6 World Health Organization regions and used 2012 population data to derive global numbers of 0-49-year-olds with prevalent and incident HSV-1 infection. To estimate genital HSV-1, we applied values for the proportion of incident infections that are genital.We estimated that 3709 million people (range: 3440-3878 million aged 0-49 years had prevalent HSV-1 infection in 2012 (67%, with highest prevalence in Africa, South-East Asia and Western Pacific. Assuming 50% of incident infections among 15-49-year-olds are genital, an estimated 140 million (range: 67-212 million people had prevalent genital HSV-1 infection, most of which occurred in the Americas, Europe and Western Pacific.The global burden of HSV-1 infection is huge. Genital HSV-1 burden can be substantial but varies widely by region. Future control efforts, including development of HSV vaccines, should consider the epidemiology of HSV-1 in addition to HSV-2, and especially the relative contribution of HSV-1 to genital infection.

  8. Sampling strategies to measure the prevalence of common recurrent infections in longitudinal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luby Stephen P

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring recurrent infections such as diarrhoea or respiratory infections in epidemiological studies is a methodological challenge. Problems in measuring the incidence of recurrent infections include the episode definition, recall error, and the logistics of close follow up. Longitudinal prevalence (LP, the proportion-of-time-ill estimated by repeated prevalence measurements, is an alternative measure to incidence of recurrent infections. In contrast to incidence which usually requires continuous sampling, LP can be measured at intervals. This study explored how many more participants are needed for infrequent sampling to achieve the same study power as frequent sampling. Methods We developed a set of four empirical simulation models representing low and high risk settings with short or long episode durations. The model was used to evaluate different sampling strategies with different assumptions on recall period and recall error. Results The model identified three major factors that influence sampling strategies: (1 the clustering of episodes in individuals; (2 the duration of episodes; (3 the positive correlation between an individual's disease incidence and episode duration. Intermittent sampling (e.g. 12 times per year often requires only a slightly larger sample size compared to continuous sampling, especially in cluster-randomized trials. The collection of period prevalence data can lead to highly biased effect estimates if the exposure variable is associated with episode duration. To maximize study power, recall periods of 3 to 7 days may be preferable over shorter periods, even if this leads to inaccuracy in the prevalence estimates. Conclusion Choosing the optimal approach to measure recurrent infections in epidemiological studies depends on the setting, the study objectives, study design and budget constraints. Sampling at intervals can contribute to making epidemiological studies and trials more efficient, valid

  9. Distribution of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 genomes in human spinal ganglia studied by PCR and in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Y; Furuta, Y; Takasu, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, H; Matsukawa, S; Fujioka, Y; Takahashi, H; Kurata, T; Nagashima, K

    1997-06-01

    Clinical data indicate that the recurring herpes simplex virus (HSV) from oro-labial lesions is HSV subtype 1 and that the virus from genital lesions is HSV-2. This suggests that HSV-1 and HSV-2 reside in latent forms in the trigeminal ganglia and sacral ganglia, respectively. However, the distribution of latent HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in human spinal ganglia has not been fully examined. This report concerns the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH) to such a study. By using PCR and employing the respective primers, HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNAs were detected in 207 of 524 samples from 262 spinal ganglia (from the cervical to the sacral ganglia) examined on both sides. The percentages of HSV-1 and HSV-2 detected in a given set of ganglia were similar, indicating an absence of site preference. By ISH, few but positive hybridization signals were detected evenly in sacral ganglia sections. The data suggest that regional specificity of recurrent HSV infections is not due to regional distribution of latent virus, but that local host factors may be important for recurrences.

  10. [Recurrent urinary tract infections should not be treated cavalierly. First verify the diagnosis!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Naber, K G

    2003-10-23

    Acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) and acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis (AUP) are two common urinary tract infections (UTI) in otherwise healthy young women. Both weaknesses of the mucosal barrier and specific factors of uropathogenic bacteria must be present before the bacteria can adhere to the urothelium and give rise to an infection. These circumstances are also of relevance in recurrent UTI. Antibiotic treatment of AUC and AUP is based on the guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). For the prevention of recurrent UTI, antibiotics, functional foods, injections, probiotic agents and other measures are recommended with varying potential for success.

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 in the Netherlands : seroprevalence, risk factors and changes during a 12-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenberg, Petra J; Tjhie, Jeroen H T; de Melker, Hester E; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Bergen, Jan E A M; van der Sande, Marianne A B; van Benthem, Birgit H B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genital herpes results in considerable morbidity, including risk of neonatal herpes, and is increasingly being caused by Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1. Possibly children are less often HSV-1 infected, leaving them susceptible until sexual debut. We assessed changes in the Dutch HSV-1

  12. Non-healing genital herpes mimicking donovanosis in an immunocompetent man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Khute, Prakash; Patel, Anjali; Gupta, Somesh

    2016-01-01

    Although atypical presentations of herpetic infection in immunocompetent individuals are common, they very rarely have the extensive, chronic and verrucous appearances seen in the immunocompromised host. We report a case of genital herpes manifesting as painless chronic non-healing genital ulcers with exuberant granulation tissue in an immunocompetent man. Owing to this morphology, the ulcers were initially mistaken for donovanosis. To the best of our knowledge, such a presentation of genital herpes in an immunocompetent individual has not been described previously. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Bovine lactoferrin and lactoferricin interfere with intracellular trafficking of Herpes simplex virus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, A K; Jenssen, H; Moniri, M Roshan; Hancock, R E W; Panté, N

    2009-01-01

    Although both lactoferrin (Lf), a component of the innate immune system of living organisms, and its N-terminal pepsin cleavage product lactoferricin (Lfcin) have anti-herpes activity, the precise mechanisms by which Lf and Lfcin bring about inhibition of herpes infections are not fully understood. In the present study, experiments were carried out to characterize the activity of bovine Lf and Lfcin (BLf and BLfcin) against the Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1). HSV-1 cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking were studied by immunofluorescence microscopy. In comparison to the untreated infected control cells, both the BLf- and BLfcin-treated cells showed a significant reduction in HSV-1 cellular uptake. The few virus particles that were internalized appeared to have a delayed intracellular trafficking. Thus, in addition to their interference with the uptake of the virus into host cells, Lf and Lfcin also exert their antiviral effect intracellularly.

  14. [Neonatal herpes: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations and management. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renesme, L

    2017-12-01

    To describe the epidemiology of neonatal herpes and its risk factors, clinical and paraclinic manifestations, propose guidelines for a newborn at risk of neonatal herpes, describe treatment modalities, describe post-natal transmission and its prevention. Bibliographic search from Medline, Cochrane Library databases and research of international clinical practice guidelines. Neonatal herpes is rare (about 20 cases per year in France) and mainly due to HSV 1 (level of evidence LE3). The main risk factors for mother-to-child transmission are maternal primary episode of genital herpes close to delivery and serotype HSV 1 (LE3). There are three clinical forms of neonatal herpes : SEM infection for skin, eyes and mucosa, central nervous system (CNS) associated infection, and the disseminated infection. Neurological mortality and morbidity depend on the clinical form and the HSV serotype (LE3). In most of the case of neonatal herpes, the mothers have no history of genital herpes (LE3). Fever and vesicular rash may be absent at the time of diagnosis (LE3). In case of suspicion of neonatal herpes, different samples (blood and cerebrospinal fluid) for HSV PCR must be carried out to confirm the diagnosis (Professional consensus). Any newborn suspected of neonatal herpes should be treated with intravenous aciclovir (Grade A) prior to the results of HSV PCR (Professional consensus). In case of maternal genital herpes at delivery, the management of an asymptomatic newborn depends on the evaluation of the risk of transmission. In case of maternal reactivation (low risk of transmission), HSV PCR samples are taken at 24hours of life and the newborn must be follow closely until results. In the case of maternal primary episode or non-primary infection first episode (high risk of transmission), the samples are taken at 24hours of life and intravenous treatment with aciclovir is started (Professional consensus). The treatment of neonatal herpes is based on intravenous aciclovir (60mg

  15. Recurrent Respiratory Infections and Psychological Problems in Junior School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent respiratory infections (RRI) are among most common diseases in school-aged children. Little is known about possible associations between RRI and children psychological well-being. Aim: To study possible associations between RRI in junior school pupils and their emotional/behavioural characteristics. Methods: The RRI group…

  16. HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes identified from herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Zhang, Xiuli; Lamberth, Kasper

    2008-01-01

    Evidence obtained from both animal models and humans suggests that T cells specific for HSV-1 and HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) contribute to protective immunity against herpes infection. However, knowledge of gD-specific human T cell responses is limited to CD4+ T cell epitopes, with no CD8+ T cell ...... following ocular or genital infection with either HSV-1 or HSV-2. The functional gD CD8+ T cell epitopes described herein are potentially important components of clinical immunotherapeutic and immunoprophylactic herpes vaccines.......Evidence obtained from both animal models and humans suggests that T cells specific for HSV-1 and HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) contribute to protective immunity against herpes infection. However, knowledge of gD-specific human T cell responses is limited to CD4+ T cell epitopes, with no CD8+ T cell...

  17. [Recurrent and catheter-associated urinary tract infections : Prophylaxis and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechota, H

    2017-06-01

    Urinay tract infection (UTI) as one of the most frequent bacterial infections in humans is of utmost relevance. Because of the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, urinalysis should always include urine culture and a resistogram in order to avoid an unspecific selection and overuse of antibiotics. Prevention of recurrent UTI must first of all rule out predisposing uropathogenic conditions. Nowadays, a great variety of drugs, behavioral, and supportive treatment options can effectively minimize UTI recurrence. The growing importance of vaccines (immunotherapy), probiotics (lactobacilli), and standardized herbal preparations meets the need of reducing antibiotic use and the development of antimicrobial resistance. Around 80% of all nosocomial UTIs (nUTIs) are associated with indwelling urinary catheters. It is estimated that up to 70% of all nUTIs occurring in Germany may be avoided by using appropriate preventative measures. Therefore, profound knowledge about the basics of catheter-associated nUTIs and the correct management of urinary catheters are of utmost individual and socioeconomic importance.

  18. CURRENT STATUS OF PROBLEM: CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Bulgakova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with children suffered from recurrent respiraatory infections. The authors attempted to summarize the literature data on the research findings of inosine pranobex application (Isoa prinosine, Teva, Israel in complex therapy against virulent and inflammatory diseases. Within recent years, many experts emphaasize the persistence of viruses and other pathogenic microorganaisms in the human body, which leads to changes in reactivity and emergence of the chronic diseases. These disorders are especially urgent for sickly children, suffering from respiratory infections, what well justifies the application of bacteriogenic immunomodulaa tors, interferon synthesis inductors, expediency for incorporating immunomodulators with antiviral action into complex therapy along with special vaccination against flu, pneumococcus and etc.Key words: sickly children, acute respiratory infections, immunomodulators, inosine pranobex.

  19. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 in the Netherlands: seroprevalence, risk factors and changes during a 12-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenberg, Petra J.; Tjhie, Jeroen H. T.; de Melker, Hester E.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; van Bergen, Jan E. A. M.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; van Benthem, Birgit H. B.

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes results in considerable morbidity, including risk of neonatal herpes, and is increasingly being caused by Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1. Possibly children are less often HSV-1 infected, leaving them susceptible until sexual debut. We assessed changes in the Dutch HSV-1 and HSV-2

  20. Recurrence of hepatitis C virus genotype- 4 infection following orthotopic liver transplantation: natural history and predictors of outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudawi, Hatim; Helmy, Ahmed; Kamel, Yasser; AlSaghier, Mohammed; AlSofayan, Mohammed; AlSebayel, Mohammed; Khalaf, Hatem; AlBahili, Hamad; Alhiek, Yasser; Alawi, Khalil; Mohamed, Hazem; AlJedai, Ahmed; AlHamoudi, Waleed; Abdo, Ayman

    2007-01-01

    There are few reports on hepatitis C virus genotype 4 (HCV-4) recurrences after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Therefore, we undertook a study to determine the epidemiological, clinical and virological characteristics of patients with biopsy-proven recurrent HCV infection and analyzed the factors that influence recurrent disease severity. We also compared disease recurrence and outcomes between HCV-4 and other genotypes. All patients who underwent OLT (locally or abroad) for HCV related hepatic cirrhosis from 1991 to 2006 and had recurrent HCV infection were identified. Clinical, laboratory and pathological data before and after OLT were collected and analyzed. Of 116 patients who underwent OLT for hepatitis C, 46 (39.7%) patients satisfied the criteria of recurrent hepatitis C. Twenty-nine (63%) patients were infected with HCV genotype 4. Mean (SD) for age was 54.9 (10.9) years. Nineteen of the HCV genotype 4 patients (65.5%) were males, 21 (72.4%) received deceased donor grafts, and 7 (24.1%) developed > - 1 acute rejection episodes. Pathologically, 7 (24.1%) and 4 (13.8%) patients had inflammation grade 3-4 and fibrosis stage 3-4, respectively. Follow-up biopsy in 9 (31%) HCV genotype 4 patients showed stable, worse and improved fibrosis stage in 5, 2 and 2 patients, respectively. Of the 7 patients in the recurrent HCV group who died, 6 were infected with genotype 4 and 4 of them died of HCV-related disease. This analysis suggests that HCV recurrence following OLT in HCV-4 patients is not significantly different from its recurrence for other genotypes. (author)

  1. Recurrent wheezing is associated with intestinal protozoan infections in Warao Amerindian children in Venezuela: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, Marcella M A; Verhagen, Lilly M; Hermans, Peter W M; del Nogal, Berenice; Sánchez, Adriana Márquez; Acevedo, Natacha Martinez; Murga, Rosalicia Ramirez; Roelfsema, Jeroen; Pinelli, Elena; de Waard, Jacobus H

    2014-05-29

    While in developed countries the prevalence of allergic diseases is rising, inflammatory diseases are relatively uncommon in rural developing areas. High prevalence rates of helminth and protozoan infections are commonly found in children living in rural settings and several studies suggest an inverse association between helminth infections and allergies. No studies investigating the relationship between parasitic infections and atopic diseases in rural children of developing countries under the age of 2 years have been published so far. We performed a cross-sectional survey to investigate the association of helminth and protozoan infections and malnutrition with recurrent wheezing and atopic eczema in Warao Amerindian children in Venezuela. From August to November 2012, 229 children aged 0 to 2 years residing in the Orinoco Delta in Venezuela were enrolled. Data were collected through standardized questionnaires and physical examination, including inspection of the skin and anthropometric measurements. A stool sample was requested from all participants and detection of different parasites was performed using microscopy and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We observed high prevalence rates of atopic eczema and recurrent wheezing, respectively 19% and 23%. The prevalence of helminth infections was 26% and the prevalence of protozoan infections was 59%. Atopic eczema and recurrent wheezing were more frequently observed in stunted compared with non-stunted children in multivariable analysis (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.3 - 13.6, p = 0.015 and OR 4.5, 95% CI 0.97 - 21.2, p = 0.055). Furthermore, recurrent wheezing was significantly more often observed in children with protozoan infections than in children without protozoan infections (OR 6.7, 95% CI 1.5 - 30.5). High prevalence rates of atopic eczema and recurrent wheezing in Warao Amerindian children under 2 years of age were related to stunting and intestinal protozoan infections respectively. Helminth

  2. Human Asymptomatic Epitopes Identified from the Herpes Simplex Virus Tegument Protein VP13/14 (UL47) Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional Effector Memory CD44high CD62Llow CD8+ TEM Cells and Protect Humanized HLA-A*02:01 Transgenic Mice against Ocular Herpesvirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Garg, Sumit; Syed, Sabrina A; Furness, Julie N; Vahed, Hawa; Pham, Tiffany; Yu, Howard T; Nesburn, Anthony B; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2017-01-15

    and functional features of protective HSV-specific CD8 + T cells that should guide the development of a safe and effective T-cell-based herpes simplex vaccine. Although most herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1)-infected individuals shed the virus in their body fluids following reactivation from latently infected sensory ganglia, the majority never develop a recurrent herpetic disease and remain asymptomatic (ASYMP). In contrast, small proportions of individuals are symptomatic (SYMP) and develop frequent bouts of recurrent disease. The present study demonstrates that naturally protected ASYMP individuals have a higher frequency of effector memory CD8 + T cells (CD8 + T EM cells) specific to three epitopes derived from the HSV-1 tegument protein VP13/14 (VP13/14 286-294 ,VP13/14 504-512 , and VP13/14 544-552 ) than SYMP patients. Moreover, immunization of humanized HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three CD8 + T EM -cell epitopes from ASYMP individuals induced robust and polyfunctional HSV-specific CD8 + T cells associated with strong protective immunity against ocular herpesvirus infection and disease. The findings support the emerging concept of the development of a safe and effective asymptomatic herpes simplex vaccine that is selectively based on CD8 + T-cell epitopes from ASYMP individuals. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Coexistência de pênfigo vulgar e infecção pelo vírus herpes simples na mucosa oral Coexistence of pemphigus vulgaris and herpes simplex virus infection in oral mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna Milagres

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O pênfigo vulgar é uma doença mucocutânea, imunomediada, caracterizada por lesões vesiculobolhosas, enquanto a infecção pelo vírus herpes simples (HSV é comum na cavidade oral. A coexistência das duas doenças tem sido relatada por alguns autores. Este artigo relata o caso de um paciente com múltiplas lesões em várias áreas da mucosa oral, cujo procedimento foi raspagem e biópsia incisional, que resultou no diagnóstico de pênfigo vulgar associado à infecção pelo HSV. Destaca-se a inusitada associação das doenças e a identificação citopatológica de duas populações celulares com aspectos morfológicos distintos e característicos, capazes de determinar o correto diagnóstico, sendo fundamental para a conduta e terapêutica adequada.Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune mucocutaneous disease, characterized by vesiculobullous lesions. Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection is common in the oral cavity and the coexistence of pemphigus vulgaris and HSV infection has been reported by some authors. In this work, we report a case of a patient with multiple lesions involving several areas of the oral mucous membrane. Based on scraping cytology and incisional biopsy findings, the diagnosis was pemphigus vulgaris associated with HSV infection. We call attention to the uncommon association of both diseases and the cytological identification of two cell populations with different and characteristic morphological aspects, able enough to establish the correct diagnosis and define an appropriate therapeutic approach.

  4. Herpes Zoster Lesions on Reconstructed Breast Skin: Rare Objective Proof of Reinervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurenz Weitgasser

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Blazed up Herpes zoster lesions have been described in very few patients after free and pedicled flap transfer for reconstructive purpose. Although sensory recovery after flap reconstructions has been studied extensively most studies addressed subjective perceptions of sensation. Objective investigations of spontaneous reinervation of free and pedicled flaps are rare. We would like to present a witnessed herpes zoster infection of a latissimus dorsi skin flap 2 years after breast reconstruction.

  5. Time-resolved Global and Chromatin Proteomics during Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulej, Katarzyna; Avgousti, Daphne C; Sidoli, Simone; Herrmann, Christin; Della Fera, Ashley N; Kim, Eui Tae; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2017-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) lytic infection results in global changes to the host cell proteome and the proteins associated with host chromatin. We present a system level characterization of proteome dynamics during infection by performing a multi-dimensional analysis during HSV-1 lytic infection of human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Our study includes identification and quantification of the host and viral proteomes, phosphoproteomes, chromatin bound proteomes and post-translational modifications (PTMs) on cellular histones during infection. We analyzed proteomes across six time points of virus infection (0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 h post-infection) and clustered trends in abundance using fuzzy c-means. Globally, we accurately quantified more than 4000 proteins, 200 differently modified histone peptides and 9000 phosphorylation sites on cellular proteins. In addition, we identified 67 viral proteins and quantified 571 phosphorylation events (465 with high confidence site localization) on viral proteins, which is currently the most comprehensive map of HSV-1 phosphoproteome. We investigated chromatin bound proteins by proteomic analysis of the high-salt chromatin fraction and identified 510 proteins that were significantly different in abundance during infection. We found 53 histone marks significantly regulated during virus infection, including a steady increase of histone H3 acetylation (H3K9ac and H3K14ac). Our data provide a resource of unprecedented depth for human and viral proteome dynamics during infection. Collectively, our results indicate that the proteome composition of the chromatin of HFF cells is highly affected during HSV-1 infection, and that phosphorylation events are abundant on viral proteins. We propose that our epi-proteomics approach will prove to be important in the characterization of other model infectious systems that involve changes to chromatin composition. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of focal herpes simplex virus encephalitis using a radiolabeled antiviral drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of mapping herpes simplex viral infection comprising administering a radiolabeled antiviral active 5-substituted 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-substituted-D-arabinofuranosyl) pyrimidine nucleoside to the infected subject, and scanning the area in which the infection is to be mapped for the radiolabel

  7. Recurrent paratyphoid fever A co-infected with hepatitis A reactivated chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanling; Xiong, Yujiao; Huang, Wenxiang; Jia, Bei

    2014-05-12

    We report here a case of recurrent paratyphoid fever A with hepatitis A co-infection in a patient with chronic hepatitis B. A 26-year-old male patient, who was a hepatitis B virus carrier, was co-infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A and hepatitis A virus. The recurrence of the paratyphoid fever may be ascribed to the coexistence of hepatitis B, a course of ceftriaxone plus levofloxacin that was too short and the insensitivity of paratyphoid fever A to levofloxacin. We find that an adequate course and dose of ceftriaxone is a better strategy for treating paratyphoid fever. Furthermore, the co-infection of paratyphoid fever with hepatitis A may stimulate cellular immunity and break immunotolerance. Thus, the administration of the anti-viral agent entecavir may greatly improve the prognosis of this patient with chronic hepatitis B, and the episodes of paratyphoid fever and hepatitis A infection prompt the use of timely antiviral therapy.

  8. Probiotics in the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Zwolińska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent urinary tract infections are a serious clinical problem both in adults and children. Febrile episodes of recurrent urinary tract infections may lead to the formation of renal scars and development of chronic kidney disease. Traditionally, management involved antibiotic prophylaxis introduced after a first febrile episode. Recently, however, the indications for antibiotic therapy have been narrowed down to treat cases of recurrent urinary tract infections and disorders which pose a significant risk for their development. In the current era of the ubiquitous use of antibiotics, bacterial resistance is an increasingly alarming problem, hence the recent search for alternative methods of prophylactic treatment. For many reasons, probiotics appear to be an excellent alternative. The microbiome of the human gastrointestinal tract and urogenital tract consists of a multitude of helpful probiotic bacteria, including the especially beneficial Lactobacillus strain. A significant relationship has been confirmed to exist between infections of the urinary tract and a decreased number of lactobacilli. Their antibacterial properties include their ability to  secrete numerous substances inhibiting the growth of  pathogenic microorganisms and to form a biofilm preventing the adhesion of uropathogens to the epithelium of the urinary tract as well as, indirectly, their immunomodulatory potential. This study is aimed at discussing the existing evidence supporting the effectiveness of probiotics in the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections, with special emphasis on the paediatric population. Probiotics make an excellent and safe alternative for the traditional prophylactic antibiotic therapy.

  9. Effectiveness of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections: open randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardweg, M.T. van den; Boonacker, C.W.; Rovers, M.M.; Hoes, A.W.; Schilder, A.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections. DESIGN: Open randomised controlled trial. SETTING: 11 general hospitals and two academic centres. PARTICIPANTS: 111 children aged 1-6 with recurrent upper respiratory tract

  10. Exploiting Herpes Simplex Virus Entry for Novel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Shukla

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Herpes Simplex virus (HSV is associated with a variety of diseases such as genital herpes and numerous ocular diseases. At the global level, high prevalence of individuals who are seropositive for HSV, combined with its inconspicuous infection, remains a cause for major concern. At the molecular level, HSV entry into a host cell involves multiple steps, primarily the interaction of viral glycoproteins with various cell surface receptors, many of which have alternate substitutes. The molecular complexity of the virus to enter a cell is also enhanced by the existence of different modes of viral entry. The availability of many entry receptors, along with a variety of entry mechanisms, has resulted in a virus that is capable of infecting virtually all cell types. While HSV uses a wide repertoire of viral and host factors in establishing infection, current therapeutics aimed against the virus are not as diversified. In this particular review, we will focus on the initial entry of the virus into the cell, while highlighting potential novel therapeutics that can control this process. Virus entry is a decisive step and effective therapeutics can translate to less virus replication, reduced cell death, and detrimental symptoms.

  11. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of herpes simplex virus encephalitis with a radiolabeled antiviral drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Y.; Price, R.W.; Rottenberg, D.A.; Fox, J.J.; Su, T.L.; Watanabe, K.A.; Philips, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    2'-Fluoro-5-methyl-1-ν-D-arabinosyluracil (FMAU) labeled with carbon-14 was used to image herpes simplex virus type 1-infected regions of rat brain by quantitative autoradiography. FMAU is a potent antiviral pyrimidine nucleoside which is selectively phosphorylated by virus-coded thymidine kinase. When the labeled FMAU was administered 6 hours before the rats were killed, the selective uptake and concentration of the drug and its metabolites by infected cells (defined by immunoperoxidase staining of viral antigens) allowed quantitative definition and mapping of HSV-1-infected structures in autoradiograms of brain sections. These results shown that quantitative autoradiography can be used to characterize the local metabolism of antiviral drugs by infected cells in vivo. They also suggest that the selective uptake of drugs that exploit viral thymidine kinase for their antiviral effect can, by appropriate labeling, be used in conjunction with clinical neuroimaging techniques to define infected regions of human brain, thereby providing a new approach to the diagnosis of herpes encephalitis in man

  12. Follow-up after infants younger than 2 months of age with urinary tract infection in Southern Israel: epidemiologic, microbiologic and disease recurrence characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Evgenia; Tchernin, Dov; Schreyber, Ruth; Muller, Robert; Leibovitz, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The timing of most recurrences after neonatal urinary tract infection is during the first year of life, with peak incidence 2-6 months after the initial infection. Information on the microbiologic characteristics of recurrent urinary tract infection episodes in relation to the microbiology of the initial episodes is limited. To analyze the epidemiologic/microbiological characteristics of 1st and recurrent urinary tract infection in infants urinary tract infection admitted during 2005-2009 and followed till the age of 1 year. 151 neonates were enrolled (2.7% of all 5617 febrile infants urinary tract infection occurring during the first 2 months of life was 151/73,480 (0.2%) live births during 2005-2009 in southern Israel (2.1 cases/1000 live births). One pathogen was isolated in 133 (88.1%); Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Enterococcus spp., Morganella morganii, Proteus spp., and Enterobacter spp. represented the most common pathogens (57.9%, 12.2%, 7.9%, 6.7%, 6.1%, and 5%, respectively). Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, and cefuroxime-axetil were the most commonly recommended prophylactic antibiotics (45%, 13.2%, and 8%, respectively). Twenty-three recurrent urinary tract infection episodes were recorded in 20 (13.2%) patients; 6/23 (26%) were diagnosed within one month following 1st episode. E. coli was the most frequent recurrent urinary tract infection pathogen (12/23, 52.2%). No differences were recorded in E. coli distribution between first urinary tract infection vs. recurrent urinary tract infection. Seventeen (74%) recurrent urinary tract infection episodes were caused by pathogens different (phenotypically) from those isolated in 1st episode. Recurrent urinary tract infection occurred in 25.0%, 8.3%, and 0 patients recommended trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cefuroxime-axetil, or amoxicillin prophylaxis, respectively. (1) The study determined the incidence of urinary tract infection in febrile infants urinary tract infection; (3) recurrent

  13. Genital Shedding of Herpes Simplex Virus Among Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Persons with HSV-2 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronstein, Elizabeth; Johnston, Christine; Huang, Meei-Li; Selke, Stacy; Magaret, Amalia; Warren, Terri; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Context Since HSV-2 antibody tests have become commercially available, an increasing number of persons learn that they have genital herpes through serologic testing. The course of natural history of HSV-2 in asymptomatic, seropositive persons is uncertain. Objective To evaluate the virologic and clinical course of HSV genital shedding among participants with symptomatic and asymptomatic HSV-2 infection. Design, Setting and Participants Cohort of 498 immunocompetent HSV-2 seropositive persons enrolled in prospective studies of genital HSV shedding at the University of Washington Virology Research Clinic, Seattle, Washington, and Westover Heights Clinic in Portland, Oregon, between 1992 and 2008. Each participant obtained daily self-collected swabs of genital secretions for ≥ 30 days. Main Outcome Measurement The rate of viral shedding measured by quantitative real-time fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HSV DNA from genital swabs. Results HSV was detected on 4,753 of 23,683 days (20.1%; 95% CI, 18.3 to 22.0) in persons with symptomatic genital HSV-2 infection compared with 519 of 5,070 days (10.2%; 95% CI, 7.7 to 13.6) in persons with asymptomatic infection, pgenital viral shedding among persons with symptomatic genital HSV-2 infection compared with 85 of 519 days (16.4%; 95% CI, 11.2 to 23.9) among persons with asymptomatic infection, pgenital tract less frequently than persons with symptomatic infection, but much of the difference is attributable to less frequent genital lesions, as lesions are accompanied by frequent viral shedding. PMID:21486977

  14. Innate-like behavior of human invariant natural killer T cells during herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Lucie; Nevoralova, Zuzana; Novak, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, CD1d restricted T cells, are involved in the immune responses against various infection agents. Here we describe their behavior during reactivation of human herpes simplex virus (HSV). iNKT cells exhibit only discrete changes, which however, reached statistically significant level due to the relatively large patient group. Higher percentage of iNKT cells express NKG2D. iNKT cells down-regulate NKG2A in a subset of patients. Finally, iNKT cells enhance their capacity to produce TNF-α. Our data suggests that iNKT cells are involved in the immune response against HSV and contribute mainly to its early, innate phase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection systems for antibody responses against herpes B virus

    OpenAIRE

    Pöhlmann, Stefan; Krüger, Astrid; Hafezi, Wali; Schneider, Stefan; Gruber, Jens; Winkler, Michael; Kaul, Artur

    2017-01-01

    Herpes B virus (BV) infection is highly prevalent among adult Asian macaques and rarely causes severe disease in infected animals. In contrast, BV infection of humans can induce fatal encephalitis in the absence of treatment. Therefore, the development of diagnostic tests for specific and sensitive detection of antibodies against BV is an important task. The cross-reactivity of antibodies against BV with related simplex viruses of other primates may afford an opportunity to ...

  16. Recurrent fevers and failure to thrive in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David R; Chan, Sarah; Chang, Johanna; Broderick, Lori; Hoffman, Hal M

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 2-year old boy with consanguineous parents who recently emigrated from India and presented with oral ulcers and lymphadenopathy. He also had a history of recurrent fevers, polyarticular arthritis, chronic diarrhea, failure to thrive, and developmental delay. Infectious workup revealed herpes simplex virus 1 viremia and radiological evaluation revealed osteopenia and erosions involving multiple joints. We describe the immunologic and genetic evaluation of this patient and discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to an infant with recurrent fevers.

  17. The Role of LAT in Increased CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion in Trigeminal Ganglia of Mice Latently Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus 1▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sariah J.; Hamrah, Pedram; Gate, David; Mott, Kevin R.; Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Zheng, Lixin; Town, Terrence; Jones, Clinton; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Ahmed, Rafi; Wechsler, Steven L.; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is a classic example of latent viral infection in humans and experimental animal models. The HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) plays a major role in the HSV-1 latency reactivation cycle and thus in recurrent disease. Whether the presence of LAT leads to generation of dysfunctional T cell responses in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of latently infected mice is not known. To address this issue, we used LAT-positive [LAT(+)] and LAT-deficient [LAT(−)] viruses to evaluate the effect of LAT on CD8 T cell exhaustion in TG of latently infected mice. The amount of latency as determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) of viral DNA in total TG extracts was 3-fold higher with LAT(+) than with LAT(−) virus. LAT expression and increased latency correlated with increased mRNA levels of CD8, PD-1, and Tim-3. PD-1 is both a marker for exhaustion and a primary factor leading to exhaustion, and Tim-3 can also contribute to exhaustion. These results suggested that LAT(+) TG contain both more CD8+ T cells and more CD8+ T cells expressing the exhaustion markers PD-1 and Tim-3. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analyses of expression of CD3/CD8/PD-1/Tim-3, HSV-1, CD8+ T cell pentamer (specific for a peptide derived from residues 498 to 505 of glycoprotein B [gB498–505]), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The functional significance of PD-1 and its ligands in HSV-1 latency was demonstrated by the significantly reduced amount of HSV-1 latency in PD-1- and PD-L1-deficient mice. Together, these results may suggest that both PD-1 and Tim-3 are mediators of CD8+ T cell exhaustion and latency in HSV-1 infection. PMID:21307196

  18. Attitudes and Willingness to Assume Risk of Experimental Therapy to Eradicate Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseso, Linda; Magaret, Amalia S; Jerome, Keith R; Fox, Julie; Wald, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Current treatment of genital herpes is focused on ameliorating signs and symptoms but is not curative. However, as potential herpes simplex virus (HSV) cure approaches are tested in the laboratory, we aimed to assess the interest in such studies by persons with genital herpes and the willingness to assume risks associated with experimental therapy. We constructed an anonymous online questionnaire that was posted on websites that provide information regarding genital herpes. The questions collected demographic and clinical information on adults who self-reported as having genital herpes, and assessed attitudes toward and willingness to participate in HSV cure clinical research. Seven hundred eleven participants provided sufficient responses to be included in the analysis. Sixty-six percent were women; the median age was 37 years, and the median time since genital HSV diagnosis was 4.7 years. The willingness to participate in trials increased from 59.0% in phase 1 to 68.5% in phase 2, and 81.2% in phase 3 trials, and 40% reported willingness to participate even in the absence of immediate, personal benefits. The most desirable outcome was the elimination of risk for transmission to sex partner or neonate. The mean perceived severity of receiving a diagnosis of genital HSV-2 was 4.2 on a scale of 1 to 5. Despite suppressive therapy available, persons with genital herpes are interested in participating in clinical research aimed at curing HSV, especially in more advanced stages of development.

  19. Herpes simplex virus downregulation of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor enhances human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeate, Joseph G; Porras, Tania B; Woodham, Andrew W; Jang, Julie K; Taylor, Julia R; Brand, Heike E; Kelly, Thomas J; Jung, Jae U; Da Silva, Diane M; Yuan, Weiming; Kast, W Martin

    2016-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) was originally implicated in the aetiology of cervical cancer, and although high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is now the accepted causative agent, the epidemiological link between HSV and HPV-associated cancers persists. The annexin A2 heterotetramer (A2t) has been shown to mediate infectious HPV type 16 (HPV16) uptake by human keratinocytes, and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), an endogenous A2t ligand, inhibits HPV16 uptake and infection. Interestingly, HSV infection induces a sustained downregulation of SLPI in epithelial cells, which we hypothesized promotes HPV16 infection through A2t. Here, we show that in vitro infection of human keratinocytes with HSV-1 or HSV-2, but not with an HSV-1 ICP4 deletion mutant that does not downregulate SLPI, leads to a >70% reduction of SLPI mRNA and a >60% decrease in secreted SLPI protein. Consequently, we observed a significant increase in the uptake of HPV16 virus-like particles and gene transduction by HPV16 pseudovirions (two- and 2.5-fold, respectively) in HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected human keratinocyte cell cultures compared with uninfected cells, whereas exogenously added SLPI reversed this effect. Using a SiMPull (single-molecule pulldown) assay, we demonstrated that endogenously secreted SLPI interacts with A2t on epithelial cells in an autocrine/paracrine manner. These results suggested that ongoing HSV infection and resultant downregulation of local levels of SLPI may impart a greater susceptibility for keratinocytes to HPV16 infection through the host cell receptor A2t, providing a mechanism that may, in part, provide an explanation for the aetiological link between HSV and HPV-associated cancers.

  20. Genital herpes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpes - genital - self-care; Herpes simplex - genital - self-care; Herpesvirus 2 - self-care; HSV-2 - self-care ... Genital herpes cannot be cured. Antiviral medicine (acyclovir and related drugs) may relieve pain and discomfort and help ...

  1. Frequency Of Different Risk Factors Associated With Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection Among Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameel, Sadia; Mahmud, Syed Nayer

    2016-01-01

    Urinary Tract Infection is one of the most common infections encountered by women. These infections have the tendency to recur. In order to identify women at risk of recurrence there is a need to identify risk factors associated with it. Among women, factors predisposing to recurrent infections are not much explored. The study was done with an objective to determine different risk factors associated with recurrent UTI among postmenopausal women. This was a cross sectional study conducted at the Out Patient Department of Nephrology in Shifa International Hospital Islamabad over a period of six months, June 6th to December 5th 2012. Information regarding demographics and risk factors were recorded on a predesigned pro forma. A descriptive analysis was done for quantitative variables like age and qualitative variables like marital status and frequency of different risk factors. Stratification of risk factors according to age was also done. Hundred females were enrolled into the study after informed consent. The mean age of the study population was 64.4±9.48. 97% of the population was married. Out of 100 patients, 42 had high post-void volume, 35 had urinary incontinence and 17 patients were having cystocele. According to age stratification, most frequently affected age group was between 51-60 years (38%), followed by 61-70 years (36%), then 25% in more than 70 years, whereas only 1% was between 41-50 years. Recurrent UTI in postmenopausal females is most frequently associated with high post void volume and most frequently affected age group is between 51-60 years.

  2. High rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence in HIV-infected individuals with spontaneous HCV RNA clearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, L; Mocroft, A; Soriano, V

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Following resolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, recurrence has been shown to occur in some persons with repeated exposure to HCV. We aimed to investigate the rate and factors associated with HCV RNA recurrence among HIV-1-infected patients with prior spontaneous HCV RNA cle......-up. Our findings underline the importance of maintaining focus on preventive measures to reduce IDU and sharing of contaminated needles. Clinicians should maintain a high degree of vigilance to identify patients with new HCV infection early....

  3. Adherence of Lactobacillus crispatus to vaginal epithelial cells from women with or without a history of recurrent urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Louisa; Stapleton, Ann E; Stamm, Walter E; Hillier, Sharon L; Wobbe, Cheryl L; Gupta, Kalpana

    2006-11-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus strain CTV-05 is a vaginal probiotic proposed for use in women with recurrent urinary tract infection to reduce vaginal colonization with Escherichia coli and the risk of urinary tract infection. However, the ability of this probiotic strain to adhere to the target mucosa, vaginal epithelial cells, has not been assessed in women with recurrent urinary tract infection. We measured the adherence of L. crispatus strain CTV-05 to vaginal epithelial cells collected from more than 100 premenopausal women with (cases) and without (controls) a history of recurrent urinary tract infection. We also examined the effects of relevant host factors on bacterial adherence. Bacterial adherence assays were performed by combining L. crispatus CTV-05 with exfoliated vaginal epithelial cells collected from 51 case women and 51 controls. L. crispatus CTV-05 adhered in high numbers to vaginal epithelial cells from women with recurrent urinary tract infection (mean adherence of 50.5 lactobacilli per vaginal epithelial cell) and controls (mean adherence of 39.4 lactobacilli per vaginal epithelial cell). Adherence was significantly higher using vaginal epithelial cells from women with a maternal history of urinary tract infection (p = 0.036) and a nonsecretor phenotype (p urinary tract infection. These data strongly support further evaluation of this probiotic in clinical trials of women with recurrent urinary tract infection.

  4. Post-transplantation Infections in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arze, S; Arze, L; Abecia, C

    2016-03-01

    Over 26 years, we found 46 infectious episodes in 350 kidney transplant recipients. Fifteen were urinary tract infections, recurrent in 4 patients. There were 8 cytomegalovirus infections, three of them fatal when intravenous (IV) ganciclovir was not available. Seven patients had a reactivation of tuberculosis (TB) in the pleura, cervical spine, lumbar spine, knee, ankle, skin and peritoneum, respectively, and were all resolved satisfactorily with conventional anti-TB therapy. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of acyclovir developed an extensive herpes zoster infection in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was resolved with the use of oral acyclovir, and 1 had a disseminated herpes simplex infection resolved with the use of IV acyclovir. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with trimethoprim sulfa developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was fatal in one of them. In 2 patients, we found a Nocardia infection, confined to the lung, which was cured in one of the cases and systemic and fatal in the other. Two patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of nystatin developed esophageal candidiasis in the 1st 6 months after transplantation. One patient developed infective endocarditis in a stenotic bicuspid aortic valve and died 10 years later after another incident of infective endocarditis at the prosthetic aortic valve. Two patients developed an extensive condyloma at the penis, perianal region, and perineum owing to human papillomavirus, requiring extensive surgical resection and podophyllin applications. Another patient developed fatal post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease due to Epstein-Barr virus infection 15 years after transplantation. One patient developed a severe and fatal mucocutaneous leishmaniasis with no response to conventional antimonial therapy. It is interesting to note that despite Chagas disease being endemic

  5. Mutations Inactivating Herpes Simplex Virus 1 MicroRNA miR-H2 Do Not Detectably Increase ICP0 Gene Expression in Infected Cultured Cells or Mouse Trigeminal Ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dongli; Pesola, Jean M; Li, Gang; McCarron, Seamus; Coen, Donald M

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) latency entails the repression of productive ("lytic") gene expression. An attractive hypothesis to explain some of this repression involves inhibition of the expression of ICP0, a lytic gene activator, by a viral microRNA, miR-H2, which is completely complementary to ICP0 mRNA. To test this hypothesis, we engineered mutations that disrupt miR-H2 without affecting ICP0 in HSV-1. The mutant virus exhibited drastically reduced expression of miR-H2 but showed wild-type levels of infectious virus production and no increase in ICP0 expression in lytically infected cells, which is consistent with the weak expression of miR-H2 relative to the level of ICP0 mRNA in that setting. Following corneal inoculation of mice, the mutant was not significantly different from wild-type virus in terms of infectious virus production in the trigeminal ganglia during acute infection, mouse mortality, or the rate of reactivation from explanted latently infected ganglia. Critically, the mutant was indistinguishable from wild-type virus for the expression of ICP0 and other lytic genes in acutely and latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. The latter result may be related to miR-H2 being less effective in inhibiting ICP0 expression in transfection assays than a host microRNA, miR-138, which has previously been shown to inhibit lytic gene expression in infected ganglia by targeting ICP0 mRNA. Additionally, transfected miR-138 reduced lytic gene expression in infected cells more effectively than miR-H2. While this study provides little support for the hypothesis that miR-H2 promotes latency by inhibiting ICP0 expression, the possibility remains that miR-H2 might target other genes during latency. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), which causes a variety of diseases, can establish lifelong latent infections from which virus can reactivate to cause recurrent disease. Latency is the most biologically interesting and clinically vexing feature of the virus. Ever since

  6. Understanding perceptions of genital herpes disclosure through analysis of an online video contest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catallozzi, Marina; Ebel, Sophia C; Chávez, Noé R; Shearer, Lee S; Mindel, Adrian; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2013-12-01

    The aims of this study were to examine pre-existing videos in order to explore the motivation for, possible approaches to, and timing and context of disclosure of genital herpes infection as described by the lay public. A thematic content analysis was performed on 63 videos submitted to an Australian online contest sponsored by the Australian Herpes Management Forum and Novartis Pharmaceuticals designed to promote disclosure of genital herpes. Videos either provided a motivation for disclosure of genital herpes or directed disclosure without an explicit rationale. Motivations included manageability of the disease or consistency with important values. Evaluation of strategies and logistics of disclosure revealed a variety of communication styles including direct and indirect. Disclosure settings included those that were private, semiprivate and public. Disclosure was portrayed in a variety of relationship types, and at different times within those relationships, with many videos demonstrating disclosure in connection with a romantic setting. Individuals with genital herpes are expected to disclose to susceptible partners. This analysis suggests that understanding lay perspectives on herpes disclosure to a partner may help healthcare providers develop counselling messages that decrease anxiety and foster disclosure to prevent transmission.

  7. Efficacy of the Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Glycoprotein D/AS04 Vaccine against Genital HSV-2 and HSV-1 Infection and Disease in the Cotton Rat Sigmodon hispidus Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalova, Marina; McKay, Jamall; Mbaye, Aissatou; Sanford-Crane, Hannah; Blanco, Jorge C G; Huber, Ashley; Herold, Betsy C

    2015-10-01

    Subunit vaccines based on the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD-2) have been the major focus of HSV-2 vaccine development for the past 2 decades. Based on the promising data generated in the guinea pig model, a formulation containing truncated gD-2, aluminum salt, and MPL (gD/AS04) advanced to clinical trials. The results of these trials, however, were unexpected, as the vaccine protected against HSV-1 infection but not against HSV-2. To address this discrepancy, we developed a Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA)-treated cotton rat Sigmodon hispidus model of HSV-2 and HSV-1 genital infection. The severity of HSV-1 genital herpes was less than that of HSV-2 genital herpes in cotton rats, and yet the model allowed for comparative evaluation of gD/AS04 immunogenicity and efficacy. Cotton rats were intramuscularly vaccinated using a prime boost strategy with gD/AS04 (Simplirix vaccine) or control vaccine formulation (hepatitis B vaccine FENDrix) and subsequently challenged intravaginally with HSV-2 or HSV-1. The gD/AS04 vaccine was immunogenic in cotton rats and induced serum IgG directed against gD-2 and serum HSV-2 neutralizing antibodies but failed to efficiently protect against HSV-2 disease or to decrease the HSV-2 viral load. However, gD/AS04 significantly reduced vaginal titers of HSV-1 and better protected animals against HSV-1 compared to HSV-2 genital disease. The latter finding is generally consistent with the clinical outcome of the Herpevac trial of Simplirix. Passive transfer of serum from gD/AS04-immunized cotton rats conferred stronger protection against HSV-1 genital disease. These findings suggest the need for alternative vaccine strategies and the identification of new correlates of protection. In spite of the high health burden of genital herpes, there is still no effective intervention against the disease. The significant gap in knowledge on genital herpes pathogenesis has been further highlighted by the recent failure of GSK

  8. Recurrent skin and soft tissue infections in HIV-infected patients during a 5-year period: incidence and risk factors in a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmige, Vagish; McNulty, Moira; Silverman, Ethan; David, Michael Z

    2015-10-26

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are common in the era of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus among HIV-infected patients. Recurrent infections are frequent. Risk factors for recurrence after an initial SSTI have not been well-studied. Retrospective cohort study, single center, 2005-2009. Paper and electronic medical records were reviewed by one of several physicians. Subjects with initial SSTI were followed until the time of SSTI recurrence. Standard descriptive statistics were calculated to describe the characteristics of subjects who did and did not develop a recurrent SSTI. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate the risk of recurrent SSTI. A Cox regression model was developed to identify predictors of SSTI recurrence. 133 SSTIs occurred in 87 individuals. 85 subjects were followed after their initial SSTI, of whom 30 (35.3 %) had a recurrent SSTI in 118.3 person-years of follow-up, for an incidence of second SSTI of 253.6 SSTIs/1000 person-years (95 % CI 166.8-385.7). The 1-year Kaplan-Meier estimated risk of a second SSTI was 29.2 % (95 % CI 20.3-41.0 %), while the 3-year risk was 47.0 % (95 % CI 34.4-61.6 %). Risk factors for recurrent SSTI in a multivariable Cox regression model were non-hepatitis liver disease (HR 3.44; 95 % CI 1.02-11.5; p = 0.05), the presence of an intravenous catheter (HR 6.50; 95 % CI 1.47-28.7; p = 0.01), and a history of intravenous drug use (IVDU) (HR 2.80; 95 % CI 1.02-7.65; p = 0.05); African-American race was associated with decreased risk of recurrent SSTI (HR 0.12; 95 % CI 0.04-0.41; p < 0.01). Some evidence was present for HIV viral load ≥ 1000 copies/mL as an independent risk factor for recurrent SSTI (HR 2.21; 95 % CI 0.99-4.94; p = 0.05). Hemodialysis, currently taking HAART, CD4+ count, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or azithromycin use, initial SSTI type, diabetes mellitus, incision and drainage of the original SSTI, or self-report of being a man who has sex with men were not

  9. Association of Environmental Contamination in the Home With the Risk for Recurrent Community-Associated, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Justin; Sullivan, Sean B; Urena, Julia; Miller, Maureen; Vavagiakis, Peter; Shi, Qiuhu; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Lowy, Franklin D

    2016-06-01

    The role of environmental contamination in recurrent Staphylococcus aureus infections within households and its potential effect on intervention strategies has been debated recently. To assess whether household environmental contamination increases the risk for recurrent infection among individuals with a community-associated methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) infection. This cohort study was conducted from November 1, 2011, to June 30, 2014, in the Columbia University Medical Center catchment area. All patients within 72 hours of presentation with skin or soft-tissue infections and blood, urine, or sputum cultures positive for MRSA were identified. Two hundred sixty-two patients met study inclusion criteria; 83 of these (31.7%) agreed to participate (index patients) with 214 household members. Participants were followed up for 6 months, and 62 of the 83 households (74.7%) completed follow-up. Participants and researchers were blinded to exposure status throughout the study. Follow-up was completed on June 30, 2014, and data were assessed from July 1, 2014, to February 19, 2016. Concordant environmental contamination, defined as having an isolate with the identical staphylococcal protein A and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec type or antibiogram type as the index patient's clinical isolate, present on 1 or more environmental surfaces at the time of a home visit to the index patient after infection. Index recurrent infection, defined as any self-reported infection among the index patients during follow-up. One patient did not complete any follow-up. Of the remaining 82 index patients, 53 (64.6%) were female and 59 (72.0%) were Hispanic. The mean age was 30 (SD, 20; range, 1-79) years. Forty-nine of 61 MRSA infections where the clinical isolate could be obtained (80.3%) were due to the epidemic strain USA300. Among the 82 households in which a patient had an index MRSA infection, the clinical isolate was present in the environment in 20 (24.4%) and not

  10. Enhanced resistance to herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in transgenic mice expressing a soluble form of herpesvirus entry mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Etsuro; Yoshino, Saori; Amagai, Keiko; Taharaguchi, Satoshi; Kimura, Chiemi; Morimoto, Junko; Inobe, Manabu; Uenishi, Tomoko; Uede, Toshimitsu

    2004-01-01

    Herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family used as a cellular receptor by virion glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus (HSV). Both human and mouse forms of HVEM can mediate entry of HSV-1 but have no entry activity for pseudorabies virus (PRV). To assess the antiviral potential of HVEM in vivo, three transgenic mouse lines expressing a soluble form of HVEM (HVEMIg) consisting of an extracellular domain of murine HVEM and the Fc portion of human IgG1 were generated. All of the transgenic mouse lines showed marked resistance to HSV-1 infection when the mice were challenged intraperitoneally with HSV-1, but not to PRV infection. The present results demonstrate that HVEMIg is able to exert a significant antiviral effect against HSV-1 infection in vivo

  11. Effects of Toll-like receptor 3 on herpes simplex virus type-1-infected mouse neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiuning; Shi, Lihong; Zhang, Haoyun; Li, Ruifang; Liang, Ruiwen; Liu, Zhijun

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection on the phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and the expression of interferon-β (IFN-β), as well as to clarify the functions of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in mouse neural stem cells (NSCs) infected with HSV-1. In HSV-1-infected cultured NSCs, immunofluorescence, reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and ELISA were performed to reveal the expression patterns of TLR3, IRF3, and IFN-β. Then, lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was used to block the expression of TLR3, and its effect on host resistance to HSV-1 infection was investigated. Under uninfected conditions, NSCs expressed TLR3 and phosphorylated IRF3, but after infection, the expression level of TLR3 was upregulated and the phosphorylation level of IRF3 in the nucleus was significantly enhanced, while IFN-β was also expressed. After TLR3 expression was blocked by lentivirus-mediated RNAi, IRF3 phosphorylation and IFN-β expression were downregulated. Therefore, HSV-1 upregulated the expression of TLR3 in NSCs and promoted nuclear translocation after IRF3 was phosphorylated to induce IFN-β expression. TLR3 exhibited an anti-HSV-1 infection capacity via innate immune functions.

  12. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knipe, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression

  13. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knipe, David M., E-mail: david_knipe@hms.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression.

  14. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) as a coronary atherosclerosis risk factor in HIV-infected men: multicenter AIDS cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Rulin C; Budoff, Matthew; Hodis, Howard N; Rinaldo, Charles R; Jenkins, Frank J; Jacobson, Lisa P; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Taiwo, Babafemi; Post, Wendy S; Margolick, Joseph B; Detels, Roger

    2012-08-01

    We assessed associations of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and -2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) infection with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in 291 HIV-infected men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by non-contrast coronary CT imaging. Markers for herpesviruses infection were measured in frozen specimens collected 10-12 years prior to case identification. Multivariable logistic regression models and ordinal logistic regression models were performed. HSV-2 seropositivity was associated with coronary atherosclerosis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=4.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.58-10.85) after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, cardiovascular risk factors, and HIV infection related factors. Infection with a greater number of herpesviruses was associated with elevated CAC levels (AOR=1.58, 95% CI=1.06-2.36). Our findings suggest HSV-2 may be a risk factor for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in HIV-infected men. Infection with multiple herpesviruses may contribute to the increased burden of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detrusor instability in children with recurrent urinary tract infection and/or enuresis. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Kristensen, E S; Nielsen, K K

    1986-01-01

    Forty-one children, aged 5-15 years, were referred because of recurrent urinary infections and/or enuresis. They were examined prospectively by means of cystometry. CO2 cystometry revealed detrusor instability in 18 children (44%), but if complete reproducibility were to be requested in repeated ...... tests, only 7 children (17%) would have presented instability. Detrusor instability was not significantly related to definite pathological changes in the urinary tract or to irritative bladder symptoms.......Forty-one children, aged 5-15 years, were referred because of recurrent urinary infections and/or enuresis. They were examined prospectively by means of cystometry. CO2 cystometry revealed detrusor instability in 18 children (44%), but if complete reproducibility were to be requested in repeated...

  16. A Population Genomics Approach to Assessing the Genetic Basis of Within-Host Microevolution Underlying Recurrent Cryptococcal Meningitis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Rhodes

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Recurrence of meningitis due to Cryptococcus neoformans after treatment causes substantial mortality in HIV/AIDS patients across sub-Saharan Africa. In order to determine whether recurrence occurred due to relapse of the original infecting isolate or reinfection with a different isolate weeks or months after initial treatment, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS to assess the genetic basis of infection in 17 HIV-infected individuals with recurrent cryptococcal meningitis (CM. Comparisons revealed a clonal relationship for 15 pairs of isolates recovered before and after recurrence showing relapse of the original infection. The two remaining pairs showed high levels of genetic heterogeneity; in one pair we found this to be a result of infection by mixed genotypes, while the second was a result of nonsense mutations in the gene encoding the DNA mismatch repair proteins MSH2, MSH5, and RAD5. These nonsense mutations led to a hypermutator state, leading to dramatically elevated rates of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions. Hypermutator phenotypes owing to nonsense mutations in these genes have not previously been reported in C. neoformans, and represent a novel pathway for rapid within-host adaptation and evolution of resistance to first-line antifungal drugs.

  17. SEROPREVALENCE OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS 8 (HHV8 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Praise

    SEROPREVALENCE OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS 8 (HHV8) INFECTION. AMONG COMMERCIAL SEX WORKERS IN JOS. Zakari1, H., Nimzing2, L., Agabi1, Y. A., Amagam3, P. and Dashen,1 M. M.. 1Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University o f Jos, Nigeria. 2Department of Medical Microbiology, ...

  18. Recurrent urinary tract infections in women: How promising is the use of probiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varsha; Nag, Deepika; Garg, Pratibha

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) currently rank amongst the most prevalent bacterial infections, representing a major health hazard. UTIs in females usually start as vaginal infections and ascend to the urethra and bladder. Recurrent UTIs (rUTIs) can be defined as at least three episodes of UTI in 1 year or two episodes in 6 months. Various antibiotics have been the mainstay of therapy in ameliorating the incidence of UTIs, but recurrent infections continue to afflict many women. It necessitates the exploitation of alternative antimicrobial therapy. Probiotics have been shown to be effective in varied clinical trials for long-term preventions of rUTI. Because Escherichia coli is the primary pathogen involved in UTIs which spreads from the rectum to vagina and then ascends up the sterile urinary tract, improving the gut or vaginal flora will thus impact the urinary tract. Since a healthy vaginal microbiota is mainly dominated by Lactobacillus species, in this context, exogenously administered probiotics containing Lactobacilli play a pivotal role in reducing the risk of rUTI. The concept of artificially boosting the Lactobacilli numbers through probiotic administration has long been conceived but has been recently shown to be possible. Lactobacilli may especially be useful for women with a history of recurrent, complicated UTIs or on prolonged antibiotic use. Probiotics do not cause antibiotic resistance and may offer other health benefits due to vaginal re-colonisation with Lactobacilli. However, more comprehensive research is still needed, to recommend for probiotics as an alternative to antibiotics.

  19. Genital Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... No single step can protect you from every single type of STI. Can women who have sex with women get genital herpes? ... No single step can protect you from every single type of STI. Can women who have sex with women get genital herpes? ...

  20. Effect of genital herpes on cervicovaginal HIV shedding in women co-infected with HIV AND HSV-2 in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Todd

    Full Text Available To compare the presence and quantity of cervicovaginal HIV among HIV seropositive women with clinical herpes, subclinical HSV-2 infection and without HSV-2 infection respectively; to evaluate the association between cervicovaginal HIV and HSV shedding; and identify factors associated with quantity of cervicovaginal HIV.Four groups of HIV seropositive adult female barworkers were identified and examined at three-monthly intervals between October 2000 and March 2003 in Mbeya, Tanzania: (1 57 women at 70 clinic visits with clinical genital herpes; (2 39 of the same women at 46 clinic visits when asymptomatic; (3 55 HSV-2 seropositive women at 60 clinic visits who were never observed with herpetic lesions; (4 18 HSV-2 seronegative women at 45 clinic visits. Associations of genital HIV shedding with HIV plasma viral load (PVL, herpetic lesions, HSV shedding and other factors were examined.Prevalence of detectable genital HIV RNA varied from 73% in HSV-2 seronegative women to 94% in women with herpetic lesions (geometric means 1634 vs 3339 copies/ml, p = 0.03. In paired specimens from HSV-2 positive women, genital HIV viral shedding was similar during symptomatic and asymptomatic visits. On multivariate regression, genital HIV RNA (log10 copies/mL was closely associated with HIV PVL (β = 0.51 per log10 copies/ml increase, 95%CI:0.41-0.60, p<0.001 and HSV shedding (β = 0.24 per log10 copies/ml increase, 95% CI:0.16-0.32, p<0.001 but not the presence of herpetic lesions (β = -0.10, 95%CI:-0.28-0.08, p = 0.27.HIV PVL and HSV shedding were more important determinants of genital HIV than the presence of herpetic lesions. These data support a role of HSV-2 infection in enhancing HIV transmissibility.

  1. First and recurrent pediatric urinary tract infections: do they have different antibiotic susceptibilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narchi, H; Al-Hamdani, M

    2008-08-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility studies in children rarely differentiate between first and recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI), although the latter, frequently associated with underlying urinary tract anomalies and antibiotic prophylaxis, are more likely to be associated with higher antibiotic resistance of uropathogens as a result. We investigated whether antibiotic resistance was different between first and recurrent UTIs in 250 episodes (145 first and 105 recurrent) in 154 children (2 months to 12 years of age) with culture proven UTI. According to univariate analysis, resistance to cefuroxime and gentamicin was significantly lower in recurrences. This association remained statistically significant in the multivariable analysis, with adjusted odds ratio OR of 0.8 for cefuroxime (p=0.04) and for gentamicin (p=0.003) after adjusting for the role of confounding factors. The risk of resistance to other antibiotics was otherwise similar for first and recurrent UTIs.

  2. Unidentified angular recurrent ulceration responsive to antiviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Amtha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent ulcer on angular area is usually called stomatitis angularis. It is caused by many factors such as vertical dimension reduce, vitamin B12, and immune system deficiency, C. albicans and staphylococcus involvement. Clinically is characterized by painful fissure with erythematous base without fever. Purpose: to describe an unidentified angular ulcer proceeded by recurrent ulcers with no response of topical therapy. Case: An 18-years old male came to Oral Medicine clinic in RSCM who complained of angular recurrent ulcers since 3 years ago which developed on skin and bleed easily on mouth opening. Patient had fever before the onset of ulcers. Large, painful, irregular ulcers covered by red crustae on angular area bilaterally. Patient has been treated with various drugs without improvement and lead to mouth opening limitation. Intra oral shows herpetiformtype of ulcer and swollen of gingival. Case management: Provisional diagnosis was established as viral infection thus acyclovir 200 mg five times daily for two weeks and topical anti inflammation gel were administered. Blood test for IgG/IgM of HSV1 and HSV2 were non reactive, however ulceration showed a remarkable improvement. The ulcers healed completely after next 2 weeks with acyclovir. Conclusion: The angular ulceration on above patient failed to fulfill the criteria of stomatitis angularis or herpes labialis lesion. However it showed a good response to antiviral. Therefore, unidentified angular ulceration was appointed, as the lesion might be triggered by other type of human herpes virus or types of virus that response to acyclovir.Latar belakang: ulser rekuren pada sudut mulut biasanya disebut stomatitis angularis. Kelainan ini disebabkan oleh banyak faktor seperti berkurangnya dimensi vertikal, defisiensi vitamin B12 dan sistem kekebalan tubuh, infeksi C. albicans serta staphylococcus. Secara klinis kelainan ini ditandai dengan fisur sakit pada sudut mulut dengan dasar

  3. A Case of Fetal Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Diagnosed Prenatally by Ultrasonography in the Third Trimester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mi Bum; Kim, Yu Ri; Hwang, Han Sung; Park, Yong Won; Kim, Young Han

    2007-01-01

    Almost all reported incidences of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in newborns result as a complication of rupture of the amniotic membranes or the delivery of the baby, but infection via the placenta and amniotic membranes is rare. Ventriculomegaly was detected at 36 weeks of gestation by prenatal ultrasonography, and an emergency cesarean section was then performed at 36 weeks of gestation. We report a case of herpes simplex encephalitis detected at 36 weeks of gestation by prenatal ultrasonography, which was confirmed by a postnatal serologic test and CSF test with a brief review of literature

  4. A Case of Fetal Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Diagnosed Prenatally by Ultrasonography in the Third Trimester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mi Bum; Kim, Yu Ri; Hwang, Han Sung; Park, Yong Won; Kim, Young Han [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Almost all reported incidences of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in newborns result as a complication of rupture of the amniotic membranes or the delivery of the baby, but infection via the placenta and amniotic membranes is rare. Ventriculomegaly was detected at 36 weeks of gestation by prenatal ultrasonography, and an emergency cesarean section was then performed at 36 weeks of gestation. We report a case of herpes simplex encephalitis detected at 36 weeks of gestation by prenatal ultrasonography, which was confirmed by a postnatal serologic test and CSF test with a brief review of literature

  5. Smoking, not human papilloma virus infection, is a risk factor for recurrence of sinonasal inverted papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hwan-Jung; Mun, Sue Jean; Cho, Kyu-Sup; Hong, Sung-Lyong

    2016-01-01

    The recurrence rate of sinonasal inverted papillomas (SNIP) is 15-20%. However, few studies have investigated patient-dependent factors related to recurrence of SNIPs. To analyze risk factors, including human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and smoking, as well as other factors, for recurrence of SNIPs. Fifty-four patients who were diagnosed with SNIP and underwent surgery were enrolled: 39 men and 15 women, with the mean age of 54.0 years. Their mean follow-up was 40.6 months. Demographics and information about the history of smoking, previous surgery, tumor extent, follow-up, and recurrence were reviewed retrospectively. Those patients whose tumors were associated with malignant transformation were excluded in this study. HPV detection and genotyping in the tumor specimens were performed with the HPV DNA chip, a polymerase chain reaction-based DNA microarray system. Seven patients (13.0%) had recurrence, with a mean time to recurrence of 39.8 months. Recurrence rates in T1, T2, T3, and T4 of the Krouse staging system were 0% (0/4), 8.3% (2/24), 17.4% (4/23), and 33.3% (1/3), respectively (p > 0.5). Eight patients (14.8%) were positive for HPV DNA. All of these patients belonged to the group without recurrence (p > 0.5). However, recurrence rates according to HPV DNA positivity were not statistically different (0% versus 15.2%). Three (42.9%) in the group with recurrence and four (8.5%) in the group without recurrence were smokers (p < 0.5). Smoking was associated with recurrence of SNIP. However, HPV infection is not a recurrence of SNIP risk factor.

  6. Early, patient-initiated treatment of herpes labialis with topical 10% acyclovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruance, S L; Crumpacker, C S; Schnipper, L E; Kern, E R; Marlowe, S; Arndt, K A; Overall, J C

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether topical acyclovir in polyethylene glycol could reduce the severity of herpes simplex labialis if applied immediately after onset of a recurrence, 10% acyclovir in polyethylene glycol ointment or polyethylene glycol alone was prospectively dispensed to 352 patients in a double-blind, randomized trial. Sixty-nine subjects initiated treatment in the prodrome (57%) or erythema (43%) stage and were followed by clinical and virological criteria. The healing time (6.0 days), maximum lesion area (42 mm2), vesicle or ulcer formation (91%), and maximum lesion virus titer (4.8 log10 PFU) in the drug recipients were not reduced in comparison with those who received the vehicle (5.2 days, 30 mm2, 75%, and 4.5 log10 PFU, respectively). Topical acyclovir in polyethylene glycol was ineffective for the treatment of herpes labialis despite an optimum therapeutic opportunity. PMID:6732224

  7. Recurrent urinary tract infections in young children: role of DMSA scintigraphy in detecting vesicoureteric reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awais, Muhammad; Rehman, Abdul; Nadeem, Naila; Zaman, Maseeh Uz

    2015-01-01

    Performing micturiting cystourethrography (MCUG) in young children with recurrent urinary tract infections is controversial with discrepancy among the major guidelines. Previous studies have shown that a normal dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy may avoid the need of performing MCUG for detecting vesicoureteric reflux in children with first febrile urinary tract infection. However, the role of DMSA for ruling out vesicoureteric reflux in children with recurrent urinary tract infections has not been studied. Approval from institutional ethical review committee was sought and the requirement of informed consent was waived. A total of 50 children under the age of 10 years with recurrent urinary tract infections underwent MCUG scan within 3 months of DMSA scan from January 2011 to September 2012 at our institution. Diagnosis of recurrent urinary tract infections and grading of vesicoureteric reflux was according to previously established standards. Abnormalities on DMSA scan - scarring, hydronephrosis and reduced differential renal function - were compared with presence of vesicoureteric reflux on MCUG. High-grade vesicoureteric reflux was noted on MCUG in 22 (44%) cases. The findings on DMSA included hydronephrosis and scarring in 25 (50%) and 25 (50%) cases, respectively. Abnormalities on DMSA scan for detecting the presence of high-grade vesicoureteric reflux on MCUG examination had sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 95.45%, 35.71%, 53.85% and 90.91%, respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 1.48 and 0.13 respectively. DMSA scan had high overall sensitivity and negative predictive value with a low negative likelihood ratio for ruling out high-grade vesicoureteric reflux on MCUG, which may obviate the need of invasive MCUG along with its associated drawbacks. (orig.)

  8. Recurrent urinary tract infections in young children: role of DMSA scintigraphy in detecting vesicoureteric reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awais, Muhammad; Rehman, Abdul; Nadeem, Naila [Aga Khan University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan); Zaman, Maseeh Uz [Aga Khan University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2014-07-04

    Performing micturiting cystourethrography (MCUG) in young children with recurrent urinary tract infections is controversial with discrepancy among the major guidelines. Previous studies have shown that a normal dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy may avoid the need of performing MCUG for detecting vesicoureteric reflux in children with first febrile urinary tract infection. However, the role of DMSA for ruling out vesicoureteric reflux in children with recurrent urinary tract infections has not been studied. Approval from institutional ethical review committee was sought and the requirement of informed consent was waived. A total of 50 children under the age of 10 years with recurrent urinary tract infections underwent MCUG scan within 3 months of DMSA scan from January 2011 to September 2012 at our institution. Diagnosis of recurrent urinary tract infections and grading of vesicoureteric reflux was according to previously established standards. Abnormalities on DMSA scan - scarring, hydronephrosis and reduced differential renal function - were compared with presence of vesicoureteric reflux on MCUG. High-grade vesicoureteric reflux was noted on MCUG in 22 (44%) cases. The findings on DMSA included hydronephrosis and scarring in 25 (50%) and 25 (50%) cases, respectively. Abnormalities on DMSA scan for detecting the presence of high-grade vesicoureteric reflux on MCUG examination had sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 95.45%, 35.71%, 53.85% and 90.91%, respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 1.48 and 0.13 respectively. DMSA scan had high overall sensitivity and negative predictive value with a low negative likelihood ratio for ruling out high-grade vesicoureteric reflux on MCUG, which may obviate the need of invasive MCUG along with its associated drawbacks. (orig.)

  9. High Rates of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection in Homeless Women: Informing Public Health Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J Daniel; Cohen, Jennifer; Grimes, Barbara; Philip, Susan S; Weiser, Sheri D; Riley, Elise D

    2016-08-01

    Homeless and unstably housed women living in an urban setting are at risk for sexually transmitted diseases, yet the seroprevalence and correlates of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) specific to impoverished women are poorly understood. Between April and October 2010, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of sociodemographic, structural, and behavioral factors associated with prevalent HSV-2 infection (recent and historical infections) within a community-recruited cohort of homeless and unstably housed women. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify independent sociobehavioral correlates of HSV-2 infection. Among 213 women (114 HIV positive and 99 HIV negative), the median age was 49, 48% were African American, and 63% had completed high school. HSV-2 seroprevalence was 88%, and only 17% of infected women were aware of their infection. In adjusted analysis, odds of HSV-2 infection were significantly higher for those reporting at-risk drinking (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 7.04; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.59, 67.91), heterosexual orientation (AOR = 4.56; 95% CI = 1.81, 11.69), and for those who were HIV positive (AOR = 3.64; 95% CI = 1.43, 10.30). Odds of HSV-2 infection decreased as current income increased (AOR for each $500 monthly increase = 0.90; 95% CI = 0.78, 0.997). There is an extremely high seroprevalence of HSV-2 infection among homeless and unstably housed women, and most are unaware of their HSV-2 status. Screening all unstably housed women for HSV-2 infection, with additional counseling for sexual risk and alcohol use, may lead to the identification of more infections and be a first step in reducing additional disease transmission.

  10. Acute urinary retention attributable to sacral herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheson, J; Mudd, D

    2004-11-01

    Acute urinary retention in women is uncommon. A 63 year old woman presented with suprapubic pain, a palpable bladder, and multiple grouped vesicles on the right buttock. Catheterisation showed a residual of 2000 ml. A case is reported of acute urinary retention secondary to herpes zoster infection of the sacral nerves (S2-4).

  11. Recurrent pneumococcal meningitis in a splenectomised HIV-infected patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quesne Gilles

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of human disease, especially in pre-school children and elderly people, as well as in special risk groups such as asplenic, antibody deficient patients, or presenting disruption of natural barriers. The occurrence of pneumococcal disease has increased with the onset of the HIV epidemic and the emergence of drug-resistance. Case presentation We report the case of an HIV-1-infected patient who experienced three episodes of recurrent pneumococcal meningitis over a 4-year period, desp