WorldWideScience

Sample records for rectangle-based molecular materials

  1. Molecular Engineering of dosimetric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, P.; Castano, V.M.; Mendoza, D.; Gonzalez, P.

    1999-01-01

    It was studied the thermoluminescent response to the gamma radiation of a new family of solid materials of zircon-silica. In this study some materials have been prepared by the sol-gel method with different stoichiometric relations, finding that it is possible to control, at least, partially, the thermoluminescent behavior starting from the Molecular Engineering of those materials, since the mixture of both ceramics allows to produce materials with different spatial structures. (Author)

  2. Luminescence studies of molecular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.F.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular materials have been widely studied for their potential uses in novel semiconductor devices. They occupy the intellectually interesting area between molecular and bulk descriptions of matter, and as such often have unique and useful characteristics. The design and engineering of these structures is inter-disciplinary in its nature, embracing the fields of physics, electrical engineering and both synthetic and physical chemistry. In this thesis luminescence studies of molecular materials will be presented that probe the nature of the excited states in two promising semiconductor systems. Luminescence techniques provide a powerful and sensitive tool in the investigation of kinetic pathways of radiative and non-radiative emission from these samples. This is particularly appropriate here, as the materials being studied are of potential use in electroluminescent devices. The suitability of photoluminescence techniques comes from both the electroluminescence and photoluminescence sharing the same emitting state. The first class of material studied here is an organic semiconducting polymer, cyano-substituted polyphenylenevinylene (CN-PPV). Conjugated polymers combine semiconducting electronic properties with favourable processing properties and offer the possibility of tuning their optical and electronic properties chemically. The cyanosubstitution increases the electron affinity of the polymer backbone, facilitating electron injection in light-emitting diodes. The polymers are soluble in solvents such as toluene and chloroform due the presence of alkoxy sidegroups. CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals are the other class of material characterised in this work. Semiconductor nanocrystals exhibit interesting size-tunable optical properties due to the confinement of the electronic wave functions. Characterisation of samples produced by different synthetic routes has been carried out to demonstrate the advantages of a novel synthetic method in terms of physical and

  3. Hybrid Materials for Molecular Sieves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Elshof, Johan E.; Klein, Lisa; Aparicio, Mario; Jitianu, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid microporous organosilica membranes for molecular separations made by acid-catalyzed solgel synthesis from bridged silsesquioxane precursors have demonstrated good performance in terms of flux and selectivity and remarkable hydrothermal stability in various pervaporation and gas separation

  4. Molecular Engineering of dosimetric materials; Ingenieria Molecular de materiales dosimetricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, P.; Castano, V.M. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, A.P. 1-1010, Queretaro (Mexico); Mendoza, D.; Gonzalez, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    It was studied the thermoluminescent response to the gamma radiation of a new family of solid materials of zircon-silica. In this study some materials have been prepared by the sol-gel method with different stoichiometric relations, finding that it is possible to control, at least, partially, the thermoluminescent behavior starting from the Molecular Engineering of those materials, since the mixture of both ceramics allows to produce materials with different spatial structures. (Author)

  5. Progress in molecular precursors for electronic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhro, W.E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Molecular-precursor chemistry provides an essential underpinning to all electronic-materials technologies, including photovoltaics and related areas of direct interest to the DOE. Materials synthesis and processing is a rapidly developing field in which advances in molecular precursors are playing a major role. This article surveys selected recent research examples that define the exciting current directions in molecular-precursor science. These directions include growth of increasingly complex structures and stoichiometries, surface-selective growth, kinetic growth of metastable materials, growth of size-controlled quantum dots and quantum-dot arrays, and growth at progressively lower temperatures. Continued progress in molecular-precursor chemistry will afford precise control over the crystal structures, nanostructures, and microstructures of electronic materials.

  6. New architectures for molecular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arico, Fabio

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis is concerned mainly with the synthesis of novel macrocyclic and macropolycyclic oligomers by nucleophilic aromatic substitution under pseudo-high dilution conditions. The cyclic nature of the compounds obtained has been investigated by a range of different analytical techniques, including in some cases single crystal X-ray diffraction. Ring-opening polymerisation of selected macrocycles, in the melt or in solution, was studied as a route to high molecular weight aromatic polymers. In one case the reverse reaction, ring-closing depolymerisation has also been explored for application in the recovery and recycling of a high-value condensation polymer. A potential application of cyclic systems in sub-micron polymer fabrication has been demonstrated using microporous alumina membranes as template for the production of nanoscale polymeric fibrils and tubules. In the present work it is also shown that the previously studied relationship between macrocycles and polymer chains can be extended to a third dimension. Thus, polycondensations involving trifunctional monomers, which would normally afford highly branched or even fully crosslinked polymers, are here shown also to give, under pseudo-high dilution conditions, a series of very large aromatic cage-type molecules. Chemical modification of these macropolycycles was investigated by reducing the carbonyl groups within the cage structures to methylene linkages. The reduced cages so obtained were more tractable and soluble due to the less polar and less rigid methylene groups and the crystals obtained for the latter compounds proved suitable for X-ray crystallographic analysis in order to confirm their macropolycyclic structures. Exploratory studies have shown that a cage-type ether-ketone may be used as a crosslinking agent macrocyclic ring-opening polymerisation. Finally a project, carried out at the University of Strasbourg, under the EU 'Socrates' exchange programme, resulted in the

  7. Molecular materials for photovoltaic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gegout, A.

    2006-10-01

    This work deals with the elaboration of new C60 derivatives functionalized with p-conjugated oligomers in order to prepare organic materials for photovoltaic applications. In a first approach, the donating ability of different OPV-C60 systems has been enhanced to optimize the electron transfer. First, the length of the conjugated system has been increased and two heptamers bearing one and two C60 moieties respectively, have been synthesized. Electronic properties of these compounds have revealed an electron transfer dependant of the solvent's polarity. Then, three other systems combining the C60 with OPV subunits bearing one or two diethyl-amino groups have been prepared. In such systems, the electron transfer process is optimized as the photophysical studies have revealed an electron transfer from the OPV to the C60 subunit with formation of a charge-separated state even in apolar solvents. A dendritic approach has also been developed. Original isomeric branched conjugated systems based on the oligophenylene-ethynylene framework have been prepared. The excited-state properties have been investigated to understand the influence of the conjugation pathways within theses isomeric systems. The functionalization of the dendritic OPE branches with the C60 has allowed the preparation of the first and second generations of fullero-dendrimers. The peripheral OPE dendrons are able to transfer the absorbed energy to the central core. The preparation of photovoltaic cells which incorporate these systems shows that under light irradiation, the material is able to generate electrons and holes, and also transport them in the device, thus leading to a photocurrent. (author)

  8. Design of Molecular Materials: Supramolecular Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jacques; Bassoul, Pierre

    2001-02-01

    This timely and fascinating book is destined to be recognised as THE book on supramolecular engineering protocols. It covers this sometimes difficult subject in an approachable form, gathering together information from many sources. Supramolecular chemistry, which links organic chemistry to materials science, is one of the fastest growth areas of chemistry research. This book creates a correlation between the structure of single molecules and the physical and chemical properties of the resulting materials. By making systematic changes to the component molecules, the resulting solid can be engineered for optimum performance. There is a clearly written development from synthesis of designer molecules to properties of solids and further on to devices and complex materials systems, providing guidelines for mastering the organisation of these systems. Topics covered include: Systemic chemistry Molecular assemblies Notions of symmetry Supramolecular engineering Principe de Curie Organisation in molecular media Molecular semiconductors Industrial applications of molecular materials This superb book will be invaluable to researchers in the field of supramolecular materials and also to students and teachers of the subject.

  9. Computational Nanotechnology Molecular Electronics, Materials and Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation covers research being performed on computational nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes at the NASA Ames Research Center. Topics cover include: nanomechanics of nanomaterials, nanotubes and composite materials, molecular electronics with nanotube junctions, kinky chemistry, and nanotechnology for solid-state quantum computers using fullerenes.

  10. Molecular models and simulations of layered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Heinz, Hendrik; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-01-01

    The micro- to nano-sized nature of layered materials, particularly characteristic of naturally occurring clay minerals, limits our ability to fully interrogate their atomic dispositions and crystal structures. The low symmetry, multicomponent compositions, defects, and disorder phenomena of clays and related phases necessitate the use of molecular models and modern simulation methods. Computational chemistry tools based on classical force fields and quantum-chemical methods of electronic structure calculations provide a practical approach to evaluate structure and dynamics of the materials on an atomic scale. Combined with classical energy minimization, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo techniques, quantum methods provide accurate models of layered materials such as clay minerals, layered double hydroxides, and clay-polymer nanocomposites

  11. Molecular designing of nanoparticles and functional materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Nenad L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interdisciplinary research team implemented the program titled “Molecular designing of nanoparticles with controlled morphological and physicochemical characteristics and functional materials based on them” (MODENAFUNA, between 2011 and 2016, gaining new knowledge significant to the further improvement of nanomaterials and nanotechnologies. It gathered under its umbrella six main interrelated topics pertaining to the design and control of morphological and physicochemical properties of nanoparticles and functional material based on them using new methods of synthesis and processing: 1 inorganic nanoparticles, 2 cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries, 3 functional ceramics with improved electrical and optical properties, 4 full density nanostructured calcium phosphate and functionally-graded materials, 5 nano-calcium phosphate in bone tissue engineering and 6 biodegradable micro- and nano-particles for the controlled delivery of medicaments. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III45004: Molecular designing of nanoparticles with controlled morphological and physicochemical characteristics and functional materials based on them

  12. Molecular beam epitaxy applications to key materials

    CERN Document Server

    Farrow, Robin F C

    1995-01-01

    In this volume, the editor and contributors describe the use of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for a range of key materials systems that are of interest for both technological and fundamental reasons. Prior books on MBE have provided an introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of MBE and emphasize growth and characterization of GaAs-based structures. The aim in this book is somewhat different; it is to demonstrate the versatility of the technique by showing how it can be utilized to prepare and explore a range of distinct and diverse materials. For each of these materials systems MBE has played a key role both in their development and application to devices.

  13. Metal-molecular assembly for functional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuo, Yutaka; Negishi, Yuichi; Yoshizawa, Michito; Uemura, Takashi; Takaya, Hikaru; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Yoshimoto, Soichiro

    2013-01-01

    This book focuses on modern coordination chemistry, covering porous coordination polymers, metalloproteins, metallopeptides, nanoclusters, nanocapsules, aligned polymers, and fullerenes. As well, it deals with applications to electronic devices and surface characterization. These wide-ranging topics are integrally described from the perspectives of dimensionality (one-, two-, and three-dimension), new materials design, synthesis, molecular assembly, function and application. The nine chapters making up this book have been authored by scientists who are at the cutting edge of research in this p

  14. Molecular forensic science of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO 2 (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO 2+x . Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxides materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, process history, or transport of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science required to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensics science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  15. Molecular modeling and multiscaling issues for electronic material applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamoto, Nancy; Yuen, Matthew; Fan, Haibo

    Volume 1 : Molecular Modeling and Multiscaling Issues for Electronic Material Applications provides a snapshot on the progression of molecular modeling in the electronics industry and how molecular modeling is currently being used to understand material performance to solve relevant issues in this field. This book is intended to introduce the reader to the evolving role of molecular modeling, especially seen through the eyes of the IEEE community involved in material modeling for electronic applications.  Part I presents  the role that quantum mechanics can play in performance prediction, such as properties dependent upon electronic structure, but also shows examples how molecular models may be used in performance diagnostics, especially when chemistry is part of the performance issue.  Part II gives examples of large-scale atomistic methods in material failure and shows several examples of transitioning between grain boundary simulations (on the atomistic level)and large-scale models including an example ...

  16. Molecular and nanoscale materials and devices in electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lei; Cao, Lingchao; Liu, Yunqi; Zhu, Daoben

    2004-12-13

    Over the past several years, there have been many significant advances toward the realization of electronic computers integrated on the molecular scale and a much greater understanding of the types of materials that will be useful in molecular devices and their properties. It was demonstrated that individual molecules could serve as incomprehensibly tiny switch and wire one million times smaller than those on conventional silicon microchip. This has resulted very recently in the assembly and demonstration of tiny computer logic circuits built from such molecular scale devices. The purpose of this review is to provide a general introduction to molecular and nanoscale materials and devices in electronics.

  17. Molecular Simulation of Adsorption in Microporous Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Yiannourakou M.; Ungerer P.; Leblanc B.; Rozanska X.; Saxe P.; Vidal-Gilbert S.; Gouth F.; Montel F.

    2013-01-01

    The development of industrial software, the decreasing cost of computing time, and the availability of well-tested forcefields make molecular simulation increasingly attractive for chemical engineers. We present here several applications of Monte-Carlo simulation techniques, applied to the adsorption of fluids in microporous solids such as zeolites and model carbons (pores < 2 nm). Adsorption was computed in the Grand Canonical ensemble ...

  18. Molecular simulation for novel carbon buckyball materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan R. Obayes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of buckyballs was unexpected because the researchers were delivering carbon plasmas to reproduce and describe unidentified interstellar matter. Density functional theory was done to study and design the structure of [8]circulene and three new buckyballs with molecular dimensions of less than a nanometer. Cyclic polymerization reactions can be utilized to prepare new buckyballs, and this process also produces molecules of hydrogen. All reactions are spontaneous and exothermic as per the estimations to the values of entropy, Gibbs energy, and enthalpy changes. The results demonstrate that the most symmetric buckyball is the most stable, and the molecular dimensions are less than a nanometer. The new buckyballs are characterized by the high efficiency of their energy gaps, making it potentially useful for solar cell applications.

  19. Applications of Molecular and Materials Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Chimica Industriale Molecular modeling of solvation Prof. Jacopo Tomasi http://www.dcci.unipi.it/attivita /attivita.html; http://www.dcci.unipi.it...solutions/ cases/notes/scale.html BNFL Sorption of gases in zeolites Dr. Scott L. Owens http://www.bnfl.co.uk/ BAE (British Aerospace Engineering) Rare...permeation of gases ; adhesion and interfacial interactions of siloxane networks; chemical reactivity and catalysis; environmental and cosmetics

  20. Investigation of hybrid molecular material prepared by ionic liquid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Near IR spectral region (1000–2500 nm) shows the elimination of water in the compound which ... 1-Butyl 3-methyl imidazolium bromide; molecular material; phosphotungstic acid; near IR. ..... attributable to the first overtone of hydroxyl groups,.

  1. Molecular Simulation of Adsorption in Microporous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannourakou M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of industrial software, the decreasing cost of computing time, and the availability of well-tested forcefields make molecular simulation increasingly attractive for chemical engineers. We present here several applications of Monte-Carlo simulation techniques, applied to the adsorption of fluids in microporous solids such as zeolites and model carbons (pores < 2 nm. Adsorption was computed in the Grand Canonical ensemble with the MedeA®-GIBBS software, using energy grids to decrease computing time. MedeA®-GIBBS has been used for simulations in the NVT or NPT ensembles to obtain the density and fugacities of fluid phases. Simulation results are compared with experimental pure component isotherms in zeolites (hydrocarbon gases, water, alkanes, aromatics, ethanethiol, etc., and mixtures (methane-ethane, n-hexane-benzene, over a large range of temperatures. Hexane/benzene selectivity inversions between silicalite and Na-faujasites are well predicted with published forcefields, providing an insight on the underlying mechanisms. Also, the adsorption isotherms in Na-faujasites for light gases or ethane-thiol are well described. Regarding organic adsorbents, models of mature kerogen or coal were built in agreement with known chemistry of these systems. Obtaining realistic kerogen densities with the simple relaxation approach considered here is encouraging for the investigation of other organic systems. Computing excess sorption curves in qualitative agreement with those recently measured on dry samples of gas shale is also favorable. Although still preliminary, such applications illustrate the strength of molecular modeling in understanding complex systems in conditions where experiments are difficult.

  2. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Molecular Engineering for Advanced Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumburg, Kjeld

    1995-01-01

    An important aspect of molecular engineering is the `property directed' synthesis of large molecules and molecular assemblies. Synthetic expertise has advanced to a state which allows the assembly of supramolecules containing thousands of atoms using a `construction kit' of molecular building blocks. Expansion in the field is driven by the appearance of new building blocks and by an improved understanding of the rules for joining them in the design of nanometer-sized devices. Another aspect is the transition from supramolecules to materials. At present no single molecule (however large) has been demonstrated to function as a device, but this appears to be only a matter of time. In all of this research, which has a strongly multidisciplinary character, both existing and yet to be developed analytical techniques are and will remain indispensable. All this and more is discussed in Molecular Engineering for Advanced Materials, which provides a masterly and up to date summary of one of the most challenging researc...

  3. Molecular Gels Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Richard G

    2006-01-01

    Molecular gels and fibrillar networks – a comprehensive guide to experiment and theory Molecular Gels: Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks provides a comprehensive treatise on gelators, especially low molecular-mass gelators (LMOGs), and the properties of their gels. The structures and modes of formation of the self-assembled fibrillar networks (SAFINs) that immobilize the liquid components of the gels are discussed experimentally and theoretically. The spectroscopic, rheological, and structural features of the different classes of LMOGs are also presented. Many examples of the application of the principal analytical techniques for investigation of molecular gels (including SANS, SAXS, WAXS, UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and CD spectroscopies, scanning electron, transmission electron and optical microscopies, and molecular modeling) are presented didactically and in-depth, as are several of the theories of the stages of aggregation of individual LMOG molecules leading to SAFINs. Several actua...

  4. Micro-/nanostructured multicomponent molecular materials: design, assembly, and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongpeng

    2015-03-23

    Molecule-based micro-/nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention because their properties can vary greatly from the corresponding macro-sized bulk systems. Recently, the construction of multicomponent molecular solids based on crystal engineering principles has emerged as a promising alternative way to develop micro-/nanomaterials. Unlike single-component materials, the resulting multicomponent systems offer the advantages of tunable composition, and adjustable molecular arrangement, and intermolecular interactions within their solid states. The study of these materials also supplies insight into how the crystal structure, molecular components, and micro-/nanoscale effects can influence the performance of molecular materials. In this review, we describe recent advances and current directions in the assembly and applications of crystalline multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Firstly, the design strategies for multicomponent systems based on molecular recognition and crystal engineering principles are introduced. Attention is then focused on the methods of fabrication of low-dimensional multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Their new applications are also outlined. Finally, we briefly discuss perspectives for the further development of these molecular crystalline micro-/nanomaterials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Development of radiation-resisting high molecular-weight materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tsutomu

    1976-01-01

    The excellent radiation-resisting polyvinyl chloride developed at the opportunity of the research on the relationships between the protection of living body and the polymer-technological protection from radiation is reviewed. The report is divided into four main parts, namely 1) the change in the molecular arrangement of market-available, high molecular-weight materials by gamma-ray irradiation, 2) the protection of high molecular-weight materials from radiation, 3) the relationships between the biological radiation-protective substances and the change to radiation-resisting property of synthesized high molecular-weight substances, and 4) the development of the radiation-resisting high molecular-weight materials as metal-collecting agents. Attention is paid to the polyvinyl chloride having N-methyl-dithio-carbamate radical (PMD), synthesized by the author et. al., that has excellent radiation-resisting property. PMD has some possibility to form thiol- and amino-radicals necessary to protect living things from radiation. It is believed that the protection effects of N-methyl-dithio-carbamate radical are caused by the relatively stable S radical produced by the energy transfer. PMD film is suitable for the irradiation of foods, because it hardly changes the permeability of oxygen and carbon dioxide. PMD produces mercaptide or chelate. A new metal-collecting agent (PSDC) having reactivity with the metallic ions with radiation-resisting property was developed, which is derived from polyvinyl chloride and sodium N-methyl-N-carboxy-methyl-dithio-carbamate. (Iwakiri, K.)

  6. Molecular tools for the construction of peptide-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakers, B E I; van Hest, J C M; Löwik, D W P M

    2014-04-21

    Proteins and peptides are fundamental components of living systems where they play crucial roles at both functional and structural level. The versatile biological properties of these molecules make them interesting building blocks for the construction of bio-active and biocompatible materials. A variety of molecular tools can be used to fashion the peptides necessary for the assembly of these materials. In this tutorial review we shall describe five of the main techniques, namely solid phase peptide synthesis, native chemical ligation, Staudinger ligation, NCA polymerisation, and genetic engineering, that have been used to great effect for the construction of a host of peptide-based materials.

  7. Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials, an Energy Frontier Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Dept.

    2016-09-28

    Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials (MEEM) was established as an interdisciplinary cutting-edge UCLA-based research center uniquely equipped to attack the challenge of rationally designing, synthesizing and testing revolutionary new energy materials. Our mission was to achieve transformational improvements in the performance of materials via controlling the nano-and mesoscale structure using selectively designed, earth-abundant, inexpensive molecular building blocks. MEEM has focused on materials that are inherently abundant, can be easily assembled from intelligently designed building blocks (molecules, nanoparticles), and have the potential to deliver transformative economic benefits in comparison with the current crystalline-and polycrystalline-based energy technologies. MEEM addressed basic science issues related to the fundamental mechanisms of carrier generation, energy conversion, as well as transport and storage of charge and mass in tunable, architectonically complex materials. Fundamental understanding of these processes will enable rational design, efficient synthesis and effective deployment of novel three-dimensional material architectures for energy applications. Three interrelated research directions were initially identified where these novel architectures hold great promise for high-reward research: solar energy generation, electrochemical energy storage, and materials for CO2 capture. Of these, the first two remained throughout the project performance period, while carbon capture was been phased out in consultation and with approval from BES program manager.

  8. Near-term nanotechnology: the molecular fabrication of nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Stephen L.

    1996-09-01

    The remarkably short timescales commonly predicted for achieving full molecular nanotechnology (MNT) are not realistic, as an enormous investment must be made up-front for a distant and ill-defined payoff. The reason is that technology, per se, is not an economic driver; economics instead drives technology. Hence, markets that could motivate the ongoing, incremental development of MNT must be sought. Such markets exist: they fundamentally consist of the molecular assembly of nano structured materials such as semipermeable membranes, catalysts, perfect crystalline fibres, and others. Although in theory atomically precise, such materials have no molecular moving parts and thus will be both easier to build and more robust. Some of these applications (e.g. catalysis), moreover, have huge, mature markets. Once a demand is established, further incremental development of primitive molecular assemblers, or `molecular looms', might then justify the analogies with the explosive development of computer hardware over the last few decades. Finally, the fact that many such applications are likely to be rendered obsolete by full MNT is irrelevant to their interim value as technology drivers.

  9. Non-Adiabatic Molecular Dynamics Methods for Materials Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furche, Filipp [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Parker, Shane M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Muuronen, Mikko J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Roy, Saswata [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-04-04

    The flow of radiative energy in light-driven materials such as photosensitizer dyes or photocatalysts is governed by non-adiabatic transitions between electronic states and cannot be described within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation commonly used in electronic structure theory. The non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) methods based on Tully surface hopping and time-dependent density functional theory developed in this project have greatly extended the range of molecular materials that can be tackled by NAMD simulations. New algorithms to compute molecular excited state and response properties efficiently were developed. Fundamental limitations of common non-linear response methods were discovered and characterized. Methods for accurate computations of vibronic spectra of materials such as black absorbers were developed and applied. It was shown that open-shell TDDFT methods capture bond breaking in NAMD simulations, a longstanding challenge for single-reference molecular dynamics simulations. The methods developed in this project were applied to study the photodissociation of acetaldehyde and revealed that non-adiabatic effects are experimentally observable in fragment kinetic energy distributions. Finally, the project enabled the first detailed NAMD simulations of photocatalytic water oxidation by titania nanoclusters, uncovering the mechanism of this fundamentally important reaction for fuel generation and storage.

  10. Molecular modeling of protein materials: case study of elastin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarakanova, Anna; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-01-01

    Molecular modeling of protein materials is a quickly growing area of research that has produced numerous contributions in fields ranging from structural engineering to medicine and biology. We review here the history and methods commonly employed in molecular modeling of protein materials, emphasizing the advantages for using modeling as a complement to experimental work. We then consider a case study of the protein elastin, a critically important ‘mechanical protein’ to exemplify the approach in an area where molecular modeling has made a significant impact. We outline the progression of computational modeling studies that have considerably enhanced our understanding of this important protein which endows elasticity and recoil to the tissues it is found in, including the skin, lungs, arteries and the heart. A vast collection of literature has been directed at studying the structure and function of this protein for over half a century, the first molecular dynamics study of elastin being reported in the 1980s. We review the pivotal computational works that have considerably enhanced our fundamental understanding of elastin's atomistic structure and its extraordinary qualities—focusing on two in particular: elastin's superb elasticity and the inverse temperature transition—the remarkable ability of elastin to take on a more structured conformation at higher temperatures, suggesting its effectiveness as a biomolecular switch. Our hope is to showcase these methods as both complementary and enriching to experimental approaches that have thus far dominated the study of most protein-based materials. (topical review)

  11. Molecular materials for organic field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T

    2008-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors are important applications of thin films of molecular materials. A variety of materials have been explored for improving the performance of organic transistors. The materials are conventionally classified as p-channel and n-channel, but not only the performance but also even the carrier polarity is greatly dependent on the combinations of organic semiconductors and electrode materials. In this review, particular emphasis is laid on multi-sulfur compounds such as tetrathiafulvalenes and metal dithiolates. These compounds are components of highly conducting materials such as organic superconductors, but are also used in organic transistors. The charge-transfer complexes are used in organic transistors as active layers as well as electrodes. (topical review)

  12. Lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics simulation of complex materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplot, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    In this article we briefly review the lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics simulation techniques, as used for complex ionic and molecular solids, and demonstrate a number of applications through examples of our work. These computational studies, along with experiments, have provided microscopic insight into the structure and dynamics, phase transitions and thermodynamical properties of a variety of materials including fullerene, high temperature superconducting oxides and geological minerals as a function of pressure and temperature. The computational techniques also allow the study of the structures and dynamics associated with disorder, defects, surfaces, interfaces etc. (author)

  13. The emergence of complex behaviours in molecular magnetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Karin; Gatteschi, Dante; Bogani, Lapo

    2014-09-14

    Molecular magnetism is considered an area where magnetic phenomena that are usually difficult to demonstrate can emerge with particular clarity. Over the years, however, less understandable systems have appeared in the literature of molecular magnetic materials, in some cases showing features that hint at the spontaneous emergence of global structures out of local interactions. This ingredient is typical of a wider class of problems, called complex behaviours, where the theory of complexity is currently being developed. In this perspective we wish to focus our attention on these systems and the underlying problematic that they highlight. We particularly highlight the emergence of the signatures of complexity in several molecular magnetic systems, which may provide unexplored opportunities for physical and chemical investigations.

  14. Molecular modeling of polycarbonate materials: Glass transition and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palczynski, Karol; Wilke, Andreas; Paeschke, Manfred; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2017-09-01

    Linking the experimentally accessible macroscopic properties of thermoplastic polymers to their microscopic static and dynamic properties is a key requirement for targeted material design. Classical molecular dynamics simulations enable us to study the structural and dynamic behavior of molecules on microscopic scales, and statistical physics provides a framework for relating these properties to the macroscopic properties. We take a first step toward creating an automated workflow for the theoretical prediction of thermoplastic material properties by developing an expeditious method for parameterizing a simple yet surprisingly powerful coarse-grained bisphenol-A polycarbonate model which goes beyond previous coarse-grained models and successfully reproduces the thermal expansion behavior, the glass transition temperature as a function of the molecular weight, and several elastic properties.

  15. Primordial Molecular Cloud Material in Metal-Rich Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2016-03-01

    The menagerie of objects that make up our Solar System reflects the composition of the huge molecular cloud in which the Sun formed, a late addition of short-lived isotopes from an exploding supernova or stellar winds from a neighboring massive star, heating and/or alteration by water in growing planetesimals that modified and segregated the primordial components, and mixing throughout the Solar System. Outer Solar System objects, such as comets, have always been cold, hence minimizing the changes experienced by more processed objects. They are thought to preserve information about the molecular cloud. Elishevah Van Kooten (Natural History Museum of Denmark and the University of Copenhagen) and co-authors in Denmark and at the University of Hawai'i, measured the isotopic compositions of magnesium and chromium in metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites. They found that the meteorites preserve an isotopic signature of primordial molecular cloud materials, providing a potentially detailed record of the molecular cloud's composition and of materials that formed in the outer Solar System.

  16. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  17. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  18. Molecular Clusters: Nanoscale Building Blocks for Solid-State Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkard, Andrew; Champsaur, Anouck M; Roy, Xavier

    2018-04-17

    The programmed assembly of nanoscale building blocks into multicomponent hierarchical structures is a powerful strategy for the bottom-up construction of functional materials. To develop this concept, our team has explored the use of molecular clusters as superatomic building blocks to fabricate new classes of materials. The library of molecular clusters is rich with exciting properties, including diverse functionalization, redox activity, and magnetic ordering, so the resulting cluster-assembled solids, which we term superatomic crystals (SACs), hold the promise of high tunability, atomic precision, and robust architectures among a diverse range of other material properties. Molecular clusters have only seldom been used as precursors for functional materials. Our team has been at the forefront of new developments in this exciting research area, and this Account focuses on our progress toward designing materials from cluster-based precursors. In particular, this Account discusses (1) the design and synthesis of molecular cluster superatomic building blocks, (2) their self-assembly into SACs, and (3) their resulting collective properties. The set of molecular clusters discussed herein is diverse, with different cluster cores and ligand arrangements to create an impressive array of solids. The cluster cores include octahedral M 6 E 8 and cubane M 4 E 4 (M = metal; E = chalcogen), which are typically passivated by a shell of supporting ligands, a feature upon which we have expanded upon by designing and synthesizing more exotic ligands that can be used to direct solid-state assembly. Building from this library, we have designed whole families of binary SACs where the building blocks are held together through electrostatic, covalent, or van der Waals interactions. Using single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) to determine the atomic structure, a remarkable range of compositional variability is accessible. We can also use this technique, in tandem with vibrational

  19. Molecular simulation of adsorption and transport in hierarchical porous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coasne, Benoit; Galarneau, Anne; Gerardin, Corine; Fajula, François; Villemot, François

    2013-06-25

    Adsorption and transport in hierarchical porous solids with micro- (~1 nm) and mesoporosities (>2 nm) are investigated by molecular simulation. Two models of hierarchical solids are considered: microporous materials in which mesopores are carved out (model A) and mesoporous materials in which microporous nanoparticles are inserted (model B). Adsorption isotherms for model A can be described as a linear combination of the adsorption isotherms for pure mesoporous and microporous solids. In contrast, adsorption in model B departs from adsorption in pure microporous and mesoporous solids; the inserted microporous particles act as defects, which help nucleate the liquid phase within the mesopore and shift capillary condensation toward lower pressures. As far as transport under a pressure gradient is concerned, the flux in hierarchical materials consisting of microporous solids in which mesopores are carved out obeys the Navier-Stokes equation so that Darcy's law is verified within the mesopore. Moreover, the flow in such materials is larger than in a single mesopore, due to the transfer between micropores and mesopores. This nonzero velocity at the mesopore surface implies that transport in such hierarchical materials involves slippage at the mesopore surface, although the adsorbate has a strong affinity for the surface. In contrast to model A, flux in model B is smaller than in a single mesopore, as the nanoparticles act as constrictions that hinder transport. By a subtle effect arising from fast transport in the mesopores, the presence of mesopores increases the number of molecules in the microporosity in hierarchical materials and, hence, decreases the flow in the micropores (due to mass conservation). As a result, we do not observe faster diffusion in the micropores of hierarchical materials upon flow but slower diffusion, which increases the contact time between the adsorbate and the surface of the microporosity.

  20. Molecular evaluation of genetic variability of wheat elite breeding material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brbaklić Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of genetic variability of breeding material is essential for yield improvement in wheat cultivars. Modern techniques based on molecular markers application are more efficient and precise in genetic variability evaluation then conventional methods. Variability of 96 wheat cultivars and lines was analyzed using four microsatellite markers (Gwm11, Gwm428, Psp3200, Psp3071. The markers were chosen according to their potential association with important agronomical traits indicated in the literature. Total of 31 alleles were detected with maximum number of alleles (11 in Xgwm11 locus. The highest polymorphism information content (PIC value (0,831 was found in the locus Xpsp3071. The genotypes were grouped into three subpopulations based on their similarity in the analyzed loci. The results have indicated wide genetic variability of the studied material and possibility of its application in further breeding process after validation of marker-trait association. .

  1. Molecular simulation of polar molecules interaction with MOFs family materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Toni, M.

    2012-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the adsorption of simple molecular fluids in nano-porous materials. Many industrial processes are based on this phenomenon, including ionic exchange, selective separation and heterogeneous catalysis. I used molecular simulation to study the adsorption properties of polar molecules of industrial interest (CO 2 and H 2 O) in a new class of crystalline microporous hybrid organic-inorganic materials called Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs). They have exceptional adsorption properties due to their topological variety and their versatility, allowed by the large range of possibilities offered by organic and coordination chemistry and functionalizations. I first studied the adsorption of CO 2 in a family of materials called IRMOFs, which share the same topology but have different porous volume, in order to characterize the effect of confinement on their adsorption performance. In particular, a general behavior has been highlighted: the critical temperature decreases when the confinement increases. Then, I looked at a recently synthesized cationic MOF called Zn2(CBTACN). After having localized the extra-framework halogen anions in the unit cell of the material, something which was not possible experimentally, I characterized CO 2 adsorption in this system first as a pure gas and then as a component of different mixtures. Finally, I was interested in the hydrothermal stability of MOFs, a crucial issue for their use in industrial applications. I observed the hydration mechanism of system that is analogous to the MOF-5 (IRMOF-0h) and shed light on some collaborative effects of the attack of water that were unknown to in the literature. (author)

  2. Reference materials for molecular diagnostics: Current achievements and future strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Rongrong; Wang, Huimin; Ju, Shaoqing; Cui, Ming

    2018-06-01

    Molecular diagnoses have become more widespread in many areas of laboratory medicine where qualitative or quantitative approaches are used to detect nucleic acids. The increasing number of assay methods and the targets for molecular diagnostics contribute to variability in the test results among clinical laboratories. Thus, reference materials (RMs) are required to enhance the comparability of results. This review focuses on the definition of RMs as well as the production and characteristics of higher order RMs from different organizations and their future strategies. We describe the recent progress in RMs, including the definition of RMs by the Joint Committee for Guides in Metrology, as well as the production and characteristics of higher order RMs by international official bodies. There is an urgent need for RMs in nucleic acid testing, especially higher order RMs. To advance the harmonization and standardization of clinical nucleic acid detection, cooperation between the above organizations is proposed and different approaches to higher order RMs development are also needed. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nano-Doped Monolithic Materials for Molecular Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Acquah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoliths are continuous adsorbents that can easily be synthesised to possess tuneable meso-/macropores, convective fluid transport, and a plethora of chemistries for ligand immobilisation. They are grouped into three main classes: organic, inorganic, and hybrid, based on their chemical composition. These classes may also be differentiated by their unique morphological and physicochemical properties which are significantly relevant to their specific separation applications. The potential applications of monoliths for molecular separation have created the need to enhance their characteristic properties including mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and chemical and thermal stability. An effective approach towards monolith enhancement has been the doping and/or hybridization with miniaturized molecular species of desirable functionalities and characteristics. Nanoparticles are usually preferred as dopants due to their high solid phase dispersion features which are associated with improved intermolecular adsorptive interactions. Examples of such nanomaterials include, but are not limited to, carbon-based, silica-based, gold-based, and alumina nanoparticles. The incorporation of these nanoparticles into monoliths via in situ polymerisation and/or post-modification enhances surface adsorption for activation and ligand immobilisation. Herein, insights into the performance enhancement of monoliths as chromatographic supports by nanoparticles doping are presented. In addition, the potential and characteristics of less common nanoparticle materials such as hydroxyapatite, ceria, hafnia, and germania are discussed. The advantages and challenges of nanoparticle doping of monoliths are also discussed.

  4. Preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers simazine as material potentiometric sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bow Yohandri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imprinting technology is a promising technique for creating recognition elements for selected compounds and has been successfully applied for synthesis of environmental pollutants such as simazine. Simazine is a pesticide ingredient that is commonly used in agriculture, which has devastating effects on the environment if used excessively. Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP provides cavities to form a particular space generated by removing the template when the polymer has formed. In this study, MIP using simazine as template had been made by the cooling-heating method and used as a material potentiometric sensor for detecting simazine. A template (simazine was incorporated into a pre-polymerization solution that contains a methacrylic acid as functional monomer, an ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as cross linker, and benzoyl peroxide as initiator. Characterization was performed by scanning electron microscope (SEM and fourier transforms infra-red (FTIR. The FTIR spectra of the MIP showed that the peaks of amine group decrease significantly, indicating that the simazine concentration decreases drastically. Characterization by SEM images showing the broadest pore size distribution with the highest number of pores in the MIP prepared under the heating time of 150 min. The MIPs therefore could be applied as a simazine sensor.

  5. Langmuir-Blodgett films of molecular organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talham, Daniel R; Yamamoto, Takashi; Meisel, Mark W

    2008-01-01

    Langmuir-Blodgett methods are perhaps the original approach for achieving controlled deposition of organic thin films. Molecules are first organized into a monolayer array on the surface of water before transfer as a monolayer onto solid supports. Molecular monolayers, multilayers, and multilayered heterostructures can be achieved. The capability of exercising such control over thin film assemblies has attracted materials chemists and physicists to develop Langmuir-Blodgett films for studies on organic conductors, magnets, non-linear optics, rectifiers, and intermolecular electron transfer. This article reviews objectives in each of these areas and selects some specific examples from the literature to highlight the state of the art, mostly from the point of view of the chemical systems that are studied. Mixed organic/inorganic hybrid films represent a new direction for Langmuir-Blodgett films in materials science, combining conventional inorganic solid-state phenomena with the properties of the organic networks, and recent examples, taken principally from the authors' work, are highlighted

  6. Si Functionalization With Dye Molecular as Light-Harvesting Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Aqidah Mohd Sinin; Mohd Adib Ibrahim; Mohd Asri Mat Teridi; Norasikin Ahmad Ludin; Suhaila Sepeai; Kamaruzzaman Sopian

    2015-01-01

    The surface plays an important role in thin silicon solar cells, especially with regard to the surface state and interface electronic properties that influence the electron and hole to recombine. In order to keep the recombination loss at a tolerable minimum and avoid an unacceptably large efficiency loss when moving towards thinner silicon materials, the surface must be electronically well passivated. Passivation is the most significant step for the functionalization of silicon. In this study, Si functionalization with a dye molecule might increase the absorption of light that acts as light-harvesting material on the silicon surface. Two types of dye molecular were used; DiL (λ_p_e_a_k = 549 nm) and DiO (λ_p_e_a_k = 484 nm). Both dyes were deposited using a spin-coating technique. These dye layers on the silicon surface were characterized using a Kelvin probe (KP) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. A different mechanism of slow charge trapping and detrapping was observed using KP measurement. A lifetime decay was observed that indicated a slow process of charge detrapping, owing to light trapping inside the dye/ SiNW interface, with a slow process for an equilibrium to establish between the surface states and the space charge region. An average lifetime of the entire fluorescence decay process was recorded at about 1.24 ns (DiO) and 0.22 ns (DiL), using PL spectroscopy. We show conclusively that these two types of dye can be used as light absorbers, in order to improve the surface properties of the silicon. (author)

  7. Molecularly imprinted hydrogels as functional active packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Peña, Elena; González-Vallejo, Victoria; Rico-Yuste, Alberto; Barbosa-Pereira, Letricia; Cruz, José Manuel; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of novel molecularly imprinted hydrogels (MIHs) for the natural antioxidant ferulic acid (FA), and their application as packaging materials to prevent lipid oxidation of butter. A library of MIHs was synthesized using a synthetic surrogate of FA, 3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)propionic acid (HFA), as template molecule, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as cross-linker, and 1-allylpiperazine (1-ALPP) or 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), in combination with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) as functional monomers, at different molar concentrations. The DMAEMA/HEMA-based MIHs showed the greatest FA loading capacity, while the 1-ALLP/HEMA-based polymers exhibited the highest imprinting effect. During cold storage, FA-loaded MIHs protected butter from oxidation and led to TBARs values that were approximately half those of butter stored without protection and 25% less than those recorded for butter covered with hydrogels without FA, potentially extending the shelf life of butter. Active packaging is a new field of application for MIHs with great potential in the food industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis of one-dimensional metal-containing insulated molecular wire with versatile properties directed toward molecular electronics materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masai, Hiroshi; Terao, Jun; Seki, Shu; Nakashima, Shigeto; Kiguchi, Manabu; Okoshi, Kento; Fujihara, Tetsuaki; Tsuji, Yasushi

    2014-02-05

    We report, herein, the design, synthesis, and properties of new materials directed toward molecular electronics. A transition metal-containing insulated molecular wire was synthesized through the coordination polymerization of a Ru(II) porphyrin with an insulated bridging ligand of well-defined structure. The wire displayed not only high linearity and rigidity, but also high intramolecular charge mobility. Owing to the unique properties of the coordination bond, the interconversion between the monomer and polymer states was realized under a carbon monoxide atmosphere or UV irradiation. The results demonstrated a high potential of the metal-containing insulated molecular wire for applications in molecular electronics.

  9. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Progress in research in structure of materials, mechanical, and physical properties, solid state physics, and materials chemistry, including chemical structure, high temperature and surface chemistry, is reported. (FS)

  10. Isotopic evidence for primordial molecular cloud material in metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kooten, Elishevah M. M. E.; Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    product of (26)Al. This correlation is interpreted as reflecting progressive thermal processing of in-falling (26)Al-rich molecular cloud material in the inner Solar System. The thermally unprocessed molecular cloud matter reflecting the nucleosynthetic makeup of the molecular cloud before the last......)Mg*-depleted and (54)Cr-enriched component. This composition is consistent with that expected for thermally unprocessed primordial molecular cloud material before its pollution by stellar-derived (26)Al. The (26)Mg* and (54)Cr compositions of bulk metal-rich chondrites require significant amounts (25......-50%) of primordial molecular cloud matter in their precursor material. Given that such high fractions of primordial molecular cloud material are expected to survive only in the outer Solar System, we infer that, similarly to cometary bodies, metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites are samples of planetesimals...

  11. Molecular simulation strategy for mechanical modeling of amorphous/porous low-dielectric constant materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, C.A.; Sluis, van der O.; Zhang, G.Q.; Ernst, L.J.; Driel, van W.D.; Flower, A.E.; Silfhout, van R.B.R.

    2008-01-01

    We propose an amorphous/porous molecular connection network generation algorithm for simulating the material stiffness of a low-k material (SiOC:H). Based on a given concentration of the basic building blocks, this algorithm will generate an approximate and large amorphous network. The molecular

  12. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    Research is presented concerning materials science including metallurgy and ceramics; solid state physics; and materials chemistry; chemical sciences covering radiation science, chemical physics, and chemical energy; nuclear science; coal research; solar energy; magnetic fusion, conservation; and environmental research. (FS)

  13. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Searcy, A.W.; Muller, R.H.; Peterson, C.V.

    1984-07-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid-state physics, materials chemistry), chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques), actinide chemistry, fossil energy, electrochemical energy storage systems, superconducting magnets, semiconductor materials and devices, and work for others. (DLC)

  14. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searcy, A.W.; Muller, R.H.; Peterson, C.V.

    1984-07-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid-state physics, materials chemistry), chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques), actinide chemistry, fossil energy, electrochemical energy storage systems, superconducting magnets, semiconductor materials and devices, and work for others

  15. Molecular materials and devices: developing new functional systems based on the coordination chemistry approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Henrique E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available At the onset of the nanotechnology age, molecular designing of materials and single molecule studies are opening wide possibilities of using molecular systems in electronic and photonic devices, as well as in technological applications based on molecular switching or molecular recognition. In this sense, inorganic chemists are privileged by the possibility of using the basic strategies of coordination chemistry to build up functional supramolecular materials, conveying the remarkable chemical properties of the metal centers and the characteristics of the ancillary ligands. Coordination chemistry also provides effective self-assembly strategies based on specific metal-ligand affinity and stereochemistry. Several molecular based materials, derived from inorganic and metal-organic compounds are focused on this article, with emphasis on new supramolecular porphyrins and porphyrazines, metal-clusters and metal-polyimine complexes. Such systems are also discussed in terms of their applications in catalysis, sensors and molecular devices.

  16. Multifunctional Materials Based on Self Assembly of Molecular Nanostructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stupp, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    .... The objective was to integrate self assembly, encoded in the triblock structure, luminescent properties, and the properties characteristic of materials that have macroscopically polar structure...

  17. Optical materials based on molecular nano/microcrystals and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    generation capability of these ultrathin films are dimini- shed due to aggregation. The efficient solution to this problem based on polyelectrolyte templating is described. Current efforts in our laboratory are focused on the ex- ploitation of these molecular nanostructures for potential applications in sensors and photonics.

  18. Computational Nanotechnology of Molecular Materials, Electronics and Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers carbon nanotubes, their characteristics, and their potential future applications. The presentation include predictions on the development of nanostructures and their applications, the thermal characteristics of carbon nanotubes, mechano-chemical effects upon carbon nanotubes, molecular electronics, and models for possible future nanostructure devices. The presentation also proposes a neural model for signal processing.

  19. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    Progress made in the following research areas is reported: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid state physics, materials chemistry); chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques); nuclear sciences; fossil energy; advanced isotope separation technology; energy storage; magnetic fusion energy; and nuclear waste management

  20. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    Progress made in the following research areas is reported: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid state physics, materials chemistry); chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques); nuclear sciences; fossil energy; advanced isotope separation technology; energy storage; magnetic fusion energy; and nuclear waste management.

  1. Proceedings of the international conference on molecular spectroscopy of advanced materials and biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajan, D.

    2012-01-01

    This conference was an effort towards exploring advanced applications, with emphasis on recent trends in the Infrared and Raman spectra of advanced materials and biomolecules. The conference topics focused on a wide range of molecular spectroscopy, yet connected with molecular biological systems and materials. As molecular spectroscopy is finding tremendous significance in various fields of materials science, biomedical, pharmaceutical, planetary, mineral and forensic sciences, IMSAB 2012, provided a very dynamic and interactive platform for the international scientific community specializing in the field. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  2. Towards 'selection rules' in the radiation chemistry of molecular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, V.I.; Inst. of Synthetic Polymetric Materials, Moscow; Moscow State Univ.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. There are a lot of experimental evidences suggesting that the primary radiation-induced events in organic solids and polymers are highly selective and sensitive to conformation, molecular packing, matrix environment, etc. Nevertheless, specific 'selection rules' in the radiation chemistry of molecules in solids are still not established. This contribution presents a review of our recent studies of the radiation damage in organic molecules in low-temperature matrices and polymers aimed at elucidation of basic physical factors controlling selectivity of the primary chemical events. The following aspects will be analyzed: 1. 'Fine tuning' effects in positive hole trapping in rigid systems containing molecular 'traps' with close ionization energy. 2. Selective chemical bond weakening in ionized molecules: experimental and theoretical results. 3. Matrix-assisted and matrix-controlled chemical reactions of ionized molecules in solid media (including the effect of 'matrix-catalysis'). 4. Effect of excess energy on the fate of ionized molecules in solid matrices: the role of intramolecular and intermolecular relaxation. Finally, the problem of experimental and theoretical simulation of the distribution of the radiation-induced events in complex molecular systems and polymers will be addressed

  3. Computational modeling of the behavior of nuclear materials (2). Molecular simulations for nuclear materials. Current situation and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, Taira; Itakura, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Molecular simulations for nuclear materials aim to reproduce atomistic-scale phenomena induced by irradiation and infer the change in material properties. In the present work, recent progress in this field is presented. In particular, the following three topics are explained: (1) Quantification of lattice defects formation process induced by fast neutron collision. (2) Identification of dislocation-channeling mechanism induced by interactions between defect clusters and dislocations. (3) Modeling of the three dimensional movement of defect clusters using molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. (author)

  4. Molecular-beam epitaxial growth and ion-beam analysis systems for functional materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, H.; Aoki, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Naramoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental systems for molecular beam epitaxial growth and ion beam analysis have been designed and constructed for the research of inorganic functional materials such as thin films and superlattices. (author)

  5. Computational Nanotechnology of Molecular Materials, Electronics, and Actuators with Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madhu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The role of computational nanotechnology in developing next generation of multifunctional materials, molecular scale electronic and computing devices, sensors, actuators, and machines is described through a brief review of enabling computational techniques and few recent examples derived from computer simulations of carbon nanotube based molecular nanotechnology.

  6. Molecular modeling for the design of novel performance chemicals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, Beena

    2012-01-01

    Molecular modeling (MM) tools offer significant benefits in the design of industrial chemical plants and material processing operations. While the role of MM in biological fields is well established, in most cases MM works as an accessory in novel products/materials development rather than a tool for direct innovation. As a result, MM engineers and practitioners are often seized with the question: ""How do I leverage these tools to develop novel materials or chemicals in my industry?"" Molecular Modeling for the Design of Novel Performance Chemicals and Materials answers this important questio

  7. Far-infrared spectroscopy of lanthanide-based molecular magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Sabrina

    2015-05-13

    This thesis demonstrates the applicability of far-infrared spectroscopy for the study of the crystal-field splitting of lanthanides in single-molecular magnetic materials. The far-infrared studies of three different kinds of single-molecular-magnetic materials, a single-ion magnet, a single-chain magnet and an exchange-coupled cluster, yielded a deeper understanding of the crystal-field splitting of the lanthanides in these materials. In addition, our results offered the opportunity to gain a deeper insight into the relaxation processes of these materials.

  8. Extensively Reversible Thermal Transformations of a Bistable, Fluorescence-Switchable Molecular Solid: Entry into Functional Molecular Phase-Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srujana, P; Radhakrishnan, T P

    2015-06-15

    Functional phase-change materials (PCMs) are conspicuously absent among molecular materials in which the various attributes of inorganic solids have been realized. While organic PCMs are primarily limited to thermal storage systems, the amorphous-crystalline transformation of materials like Ge-Sb-Te find use in advanced applications such as information storage. Reversible amorphous-crystalline transformations in molecular solids require a subtle balance between robust supramolecular assembly and flexible structural elements. We report novel diaminodicyanoquinodimethanes that achieve this transformation by interlinked helical assemblies coupled with conformationally flexible alkoxyalkyl chains. They exhibit highly reversible thermal transformations between bistable (crystalline/amorphous) forms, along with a prominent switching of the fluorescence emission energy and intensity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Materials and Molecular Research Division. Annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, fossil energy, advanced (laser) isotope separation technology, energy storage, superconducting magnets, and nuclear waste management. Work for others included phase equilibria for coal gasification products and β-alumina electrolytes for storage batteries

  10. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This report is divided into: materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, fossil energy, advanced isotope separation technology (AISI), energy storage, magnetic fusion energy (MFE), nuclear waste management, and work for others (WFO). Separate abstracts have been prepared for all except AIST, MFE, and WFO

  11. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-05-01

    This report is divided into: materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, fossil energy, advanced isotope separation technology (AISI), energy storage, magnetic fusion energy (MFE), nuclear waste management, and work for others (WFO). Separate abstracts have been prepared for all except AIST, MFE, and WFO. (DLC)

  12. Materials and Molecular Research Division. Annual report 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, fossil energy, advanced (laser) isotope separation technology, energy storage, superconducting magnets, and nuclear waste management. Work for others included phase equilibria for coal gasification products and ..beta..-alumina electrolytes for storage batteries. (DLC)

  13. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Nanostructured Ceramic Materials on Parallel Computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashishta, Priya; Kalia, Rajiv

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to gain insight into: (1) sintering, structure, and mechanical behavior of nanophase SiC and SiO2; (2) effects of dynamic charge transfers on the sintering of nanophase TiO2; (3) high-pressure structural transformation in bulk SiC and GaAs nanocrystals; (4) nanoindentation in Si3N4; and (5) lattice mismatched InAs/GaAs nanomesas. In addition, we have designed a multiscale simulation approach that seamlessly embeds MD and quantum-mechanical (QM) simulations in a continuum simulation. The above research activities have involved strong interactions with researchers at various universities, government laboratories, and industries. 33 papers have been published and 22 talks have been given based on the work described in this report

  14. Quantum tunneling of magnetization and related phenomena in molecular materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatteschi, Dante; Sessoli, Roberta

    2003-01-20

    Molecules comprising a large number of coupled paramagnetic centers are attracting much interest because they may show properties which are intermediate between those of simple paramagnets and classical bulk magnets and provide unambiguous evidence of quantum size effects in magnets. To date, two cluster families, usually referred to as Mn12 and Fe8, have been used to test theories. However, it is reasonable to predict that other classes of molecules will be discovered which have similar or superior properties. To do this it is necessary that synthetic chemists have a good understanding of the correlation between the structure and properties of the molecules, for this it is necessary that concepts such as quantum tunneling, quantum coherence, quantum oscillations are understood. The goal of this article is to review the fundamental concepts needed to understand quantum size effects in molecular magnets and to critically report what has been done in the field to date.

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystal colossal magnetoresistive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, J.N.; Bozovic, I.; Rzchowski, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Hinaus, B.; Onellion, M.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have grown films of (LaSr)MnO 3 (LSMO) and (LaCa)MnO 3 (LCMO) using atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE). Depending on growth conditions, substrate lattice constant and the exact cation stoichiometry, the films are either pseudomorphic or strain relaxed. The pseudomorphic films show atomically flat surfaces, with a unit cell terrace structure that is a replica of that observed on the slightly vicinal substrates, while the strain relaxed films show bumpy surfaces correlated with a dislocation network. All films show tetragonal structure and exhibit anisotropic magnetoresistance, with a low field response, (1/R)(dR/dH) as large as 5 T -1

  16. Molecular simulation of capillary phase transitions in flexible porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Vincent K.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Mahynski, Nathan A.

    2018-03-01

    We used flat-histogram sampling Monte Carlo to study capillary phase transitions in deformable adsorbent materials. Specifically, we considered a pure adsorbate fluid below its bulk critical temperature within a slit pore of variable pore width. The instantaneous pore width is dictated by a number of factors, such as adsorbate loading, reservoir pressure, fluid-wall interaction, and bare adsorbent properties. In the slit pores studied here, the bare adsorbent free energy was assumed to be biparabolic, consisting of two preferential pore configurations, namely, the narrow pore and the large pore configurations. Four distinct phases could be found in the adsorption isotherms. We found a low-pressure phase transition, driven primarily by capillary condensation/evaporation and accompanied by adsorbent deformation in response. The deformation can be a relatively small contraction/expansion as seen in elastic materials, or a large-scale structural transformation of the adsorbent. We also found a high-pressure transition driven by excluded volume effects, which tends to expand the material and thus results in a large-scale structural transformation of the adsorbent. The adsorption isotherms and osmotic free energies can be rationalized by considering the relative free energy differences between the basins of the bare adsorbent free energy.

  17. Integrating Molecular Computation and Material Production in an Artificial Subcellular Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold; Hadorn, Maik; Bönzli, Eva

    Living systems are unique in that they integrate molecular recognition and information processing with material production on the molecular scale. Pre- dominant locus of this integration is the cellular matrix, where a multitude of biochemical reactions proceed simultaneously in highly compartmen......Living systems are unique in that they integrate molecular recognition and information processing with material production on the molecular scale. Pre- dominant locus of this integration is the cellular matrix, where a multitude of biochemical reactions proceed simultaneously in highly...... compartmentalized re- action compartments that interact and get delivered through vesicle trafficking. The European Commission funded project MatchIT (Matrix for Chemical IT) aims at creating an artificial cellular matrix that seamlessly integrates infor- mation processing and material production in much the same...

  18. Multiresolution molecular mechanics: Surface effects in nanoscale materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qingcheng, E-mail: qiy9@pitt.edu; To, Albert C., E-mail: albertto@pitt.edu

    2017-05-01

    Surface effects have been observed to contribute significantly to the mechanical response of nanoscale structures. The newly proposed energy-based coarse-grained atomistic method Multiresolution Molecular Mechanics (MMM) (Yang, To (2015), ) is applied to capture surface effect for nanosized structures by designing a surface summation rule SR{sup S} within the framework of MMM. Combined with previously proposed bulk summation rule SR{sup B}, the MMM summation rule SR{sup MMM} is completed. SR{sup S} and SR{sup B} are consistently formed within SR{sup MMM} for general finite element shape functions. Analogous to quadrature rules in finite element method (FEM), the key idea to the good performance of SR{sup MMM} lies in that the order or distribution of energy for coarse-grained atomistic model is mathematically derived such that the number, position and weight of quadrature-type (sampling) atoms can be determined. Mathematically, the derived energy distribution of surface area is different from that of bulk region. Physically, the difference is due to the fact that surface atoms lack neighboring bonding. As such, SR{sup S} and SR{sup B} are employed for surface and bulk domains, respectively. Two- and three-dimensional numerical examples using the respective 4-node bilinear quadrilateral, 8-node quadratic quadrilateral and 8-node hexahedral meshes are employed to verify and validate the proposed approach. It is shown that MMM with SR{sup MMM} accurately captures corner, edge and surface effects with less 0.3% degrees of freedom of the original atomistic system, compared against full atomistic simulation. The effectiveness of SR{sup MMM} with respect to high order element is also demonstrated by employing the 8-node quadratic quadrilateral to solve a beam bending problem considering surface effect. In addition, the introduced sampling error with SR{sup MMM} that is analogous to numerical integration error with quadrature rule in FEM is very small. - Highlights:

  19. Molecular depth profiling of organic and biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, John S. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: John.Fletcher@manchester.ac.uk; Conlan, Xavier A. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Lockyer, Nicholas P. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Vickerman, John C. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-30

    Atomic depth profiling using secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, is common in the field micro-electronics; however, the generation of molecular information as a function of sample depth is difficult due to the accumulation of damage both on and beneath the sample surface. The introduction of polyatomic ion beams such as SF{sub 5} and C{sub 60} have raised the possibility of overcoming this problem as they deposit the majority of their energy in the upper surface of the sample resulting in increased sputter yields but with a complimentary reduction in sub-surface damage accumulation. In this paper we report the depth profile analysis of the bio-polymer polycaprolactone, PCL, using the polyatomic ions Au{sub 3}{sup +} and C{sub 60}{sup +} and the monoatomic Au{sup +}. Results are compared to recent analysis of a similar sample using SF{sub 5}{sup +}. C{sub 60}{sup +} depth profiling of cellulose is also demonstrated, an experiment that has been reported as unsuccessful when attempted with SF{sub 5}{sup +} implications for biological analysis are discussed.

  20. ISIS muons for materials and molecular science studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Philip J C; Cottrell, Stephen P; Hillier, Adrian D; Cox, Stephen F J; De Renzi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper marks the first 25 years of muon production at ISIS and the creation in that time of a facility dedicated to the use of these elementary particles as unique microscopic probes in condensed matter and molecular science. It introduces the basic techniques of muon spin rotation, relaxation and resonance, collectively known as μSR, that were already in use by specialist groups at other accelerator labs by the mid-1980s. It describes how these techniques have been implemented and made available at ISIS, beginning in 1987, and how they have evolved and improved since then. Ever widening applications embrace magnetism, superconductivity, interstitial diffusion and charge transport, semiconductors and dielectrics, chemical physics and radical chemistry. Over these first 25 years, a fully supported user facility has been established, open to all academic and industrial users. It presently comprises four scheduled instruments, optimized for different types of measurement, together with auxiliary equipment for radiofrequency or microwave spin manipulation and future plans for pump–probe laser excitation. (comment)

  1. Molecular Beam Epitaxy of lithium niobium oxide multifunctional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellekamp, M. Brooks; Shank, Joshua C.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2017-04-01

    The role of stoichiometry and growth temperature in the preferential nucleation of material phases in the Li-Nb-O family are explored yielding an empirical growth phase diagram. It is shown that while single parameter variation often produces multi-phase films, combining substrate temperature control with the previously published lithium flux limited growth allows the repeatable growth of high quality single crystalline films of many different oxide phases. Higher temperatures (800-1050 °C) than normally used in MBE were necessary to achieve high quality materials. At these temperatures the desorption of surface species is shown to play an important role in film composition. Using this method single phase films of NbO, NbO2, LiNbO2, Li3NbO4, LiNbO3, and LiNb3O8 have been achieved in the same growth system, all on c-plane sapphire. Finally, the future of these films in functional oxide heterostructures is briefly discussed.

  2. Preparation and Gas Adsorption of Porous Materials from Molecular Precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xinming

    with bimodal porosity are produced via cyclotrimerization of two aromatic tetranitriles and in situ carbonization in molten ZnCl2. The carbonization occurs by decomposition of triazine rings, which results in complete loss of nitrogen and formation of substantial mesopores. The resulting materials possess...... surface areas above 1200 m2 g−1 and exhibit exceptionally high H2 uptake (up to 2.34 wt% at 77 K and 1 bar) but low CO2 uptake capacity. In Chapter 4, a nitrogen-rich porous carbon is prepared via cyclotrimerization of a perfluorinated aromatic nitrile and in situ carbonization in molten ZnCl2......), and H2 (2.0 wt%, 77 K and 1.0 bar). Chapters 5, 6, and 7 deal with the construction of triazatriangulenium (TATA)-based ionic porous frameworks. A variety of polycondensation reactions have been applied, but only FeCl3-promoted oxidative polymerization of thiophene-/carbazolefunctionalized TATAs...

  3. Multiscale Modeling using Molecular Dynamics and Dual Domain Material Point Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Tilak Raj [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division. Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics Group, T-3; Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-07-07

    For problems involving large material deformation rate, the material deformation time scale can be shorter than the material takes to reach a thermodynamical equilibrium. For such problems, it is difficult to obtain a constitutive relation. History dependency become important because of thermodynamic non-equilibrium. Our goal is to build a multi-scale numerical method which can bypass the need for a constitutive relation. In conclusion, multi-scale simulation method is developed based on the dual domain material point (DDMP). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed to calculate stress. Since the communication among material points is not necessary, the computation can be done embarrassingly parallel in CPU-GPU platform.

  4. Materials learning from life: concepts for active, adaptive and autonomous molecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merindol, Rémi; Walther, Andreas

    2017-09-18

    Bioinspired out-of-equilibrium systems will set the scene for the next generation of molecular materials with active, adaptive, autonomous, emergent and intelligent behavior. Indeed life provides the best demonstrations of complex and functional out-of-equilibrium systems: cells keep track of time, communicate, move, adapt, evolve and replicate continuously. Stirred by the understanding of biological principles, artificial out-of-equilibrium systems are emerging in many fields of soft matter science. Here we put in perspective the molecular mechanisms driving biological functions with the ones driving synthetic molecular systems. Focusing on principles that enable new levels of functionalities (temporal control, autonomous structures, motion and work generation, information processing) rather than on specific material classes, we outline key cross-disciplinary concepts that emerge in this challenging field. Ultimately, the goal is to inspire and support new generations of autonomous and adaptive molecular devices fueled by self-regulating chemistry.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of melting behavior of alkane as phase change materials slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Zhonghao; Wang Shuangfeng; Wu Maochun; Zhang Yanlai; Li Fuhuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The melting behavior of phase change materials slurry was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation method. ► Four different PCM slurry systems including pure water and water/n-nonadecane composite were constructed. ► Amorphous structure and periodic boundary conditions were used in the molecular dynamics simulations. ► The simulated melting temperatures are very close to the published experimental values. - Abstract: The alkane based phase change materials slurry, with high latent heat storage capacity, is effective to enhance the heat transfer rate of traditional fluid. In this paper, the melting behavior of composite phase change materials slurry which consists of n-nonadecane and water was investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation. Four different systems including pure water and water/n-nonadecane composite were constructed with amorphous structure and periodic boundary conditions. The results showed that the simulated density and melting temperature were very close to the published experimental values. Mixing the n-nonadecane into water decreased the mobility but increased the energy storage capacity of composite systems. To describe the melting behavior of alkane based phase change materials slurry on molecular or atomic scale, molecular dynamics simulation is an effective method.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of disordered materials from network glasses to phase-change memory alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Massobrio, Carlo; Bernasconi, Marco; Salmon, Philip S

    2015-01-01

    This book is a unique reference work in the area of atomic-scale simulation of glasses. For the first time, a highly selected panel of about 20 researchers provides, in a single book, their views, methodologies and applications on the use of molecular dynamics as a tool to describe glassy materials. The book covers a wide range of systems covering ""traditional"" network glasses, such as chalcogenides and oxides, as well as glasses for applications in the area of phase change materials. The novelty of this work is the interplay between molecular dynamics methods (both at the classical and firs

  7. "Intelligent" design of molecular materials: Understanding the concepts of design in supramolecular synthesis of network solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Brian D.

    This work endeavors to delineate modern paradigms for crystal engineering, i.e. the design and supramolecular synthesis of functional molecular materials. Paradigms predicated on an understanding of the geometry of polygons and polyhedra are developed. The primary focus is on structural determination by single crystal X-ray crystallography, structural interpretation using a suite of graphical visualization and molecular modeling software, and on the importance of proper graphical representation in the presentation and explanation of crystal structures. A detailed analysis of a selected series of crystal structures is presented. The reduction of these molecular networks to schematic representations that illustrate their fundamental connectivity facilitates the understanding of otherwise complex supramolecular solids. Circuit symbols and Schlafli notation are used to describe the network topologies, which enables networks of different composition and metrics to be easily compared. This reveals that molecular orientations in the crystals and networks are commensurate with networks that can be derived from spherical close packed lattices. The development of a logical design strategy for a new class of materials based on our understanding of the chemical composition and topology of these networks is described. The synthesis and crystal structure of a series of new materials generated by exploitation of this design strategy is presented, in addition to a detailed analysis of the topology of these materials and their relationship to a 'parent' structure. In summary, this dissertation demonstrates that molecular polygons can self-assemble at their vertexes to produce molecular architectures and crystal structures that are consistent with long established geometric dogma. The design strategy represents a potentially broad ranging approach to the design of nanoporous structures from a wide range of chemical components that are based on molecular shape rather than chemical

  8. Nanometer and molecular materials: the greatness of the very tiny; Materiales manometricos y moleculares: la grandeza de lo infimo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rincon, Marina [Centro de Investigacion en Energia (CIE) de la UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Some of the materials have been present in our lives for many years, and now appear with unique or improved properties by the fact that they can be manufactured in the nanometer scale; that is, a million times smaller than a millimeter and with geometries that include the nanodots, the nanotubes, the nanowires, to mention a few of them. The most popular is the titanium dioxide (Titania), known by many as the white pigment in paints, sunscreens, cosmetics and others for their null toxicity, low cost and high stability. Strictly speaking, these features are really applicable to the micrometric material (which is a thousand times larger than the nanometer) and it is still to be proven toxicity and stability of the nanometer materials; but it is a fact that the nanometer titania is very popular in a multitude of applications that have to do with catalysis, sensors, and energy conversion and storing. We will also deal with conductive polymers, which are molecular conjugated materials. [Spanish] Algunos de los materiales han estado presentes en nuestras vidas por muchos anos y ahora aparecen con propiedades unicas o mejoradas por el hecho de que se pueden fabricar en la escala de los nanometros; esto es, un millon de veces mas pequenos que un milimetro y con geometrias que comprenden los nanopuntos, los nanotubos, los nanoalambres, por mencionar algunas. El mas popular es el dioxido de titanio (titania), conocido por muchos como el pigmento blanco de las pinturas, filtros solares, cosmeticos y demas, por su nula toxicidad, bajo costo y gran estabilidad. Estrictamente hablando, estas caracteristicas son realmente aplicables al material micrometrico (que es mil veces mas grande que el nanometrico) y todavia esta por probarse la toxicidad y estabilidad de los nanomateriales; pero es un hecho que la titania nanometrica es muy popular en un sinfin de aplicaciones que tienen que ver con catalisis, sensores, y conversion y almacenamiento de energia. Hablaremos tambien de

  9. Application of computational methods to the design and characterisation of porous molecular materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jack D; Jelfs, Kim E; Day, Graeme M; Doonan, Christian J

    2017-06-06

    Composed from discrete units, porous molecular materials (PMMs) possess unique properties not observed for conventional, extended, solids, such as solution processibility and permanent porosity in the liquid phase. However, identifying the origin of porosity is not a trivial process, especially for amorphous or liquid phases. Furthermore, the assembly of molecular components is typically governed by a subtle balance of weak intermolecular forces that makes structure prediction challenging. Accordingly, in this review we canvass the crucial role of molecular simulations in the characterisation and design of PMMs. We will outline strategies for modelling porosity in crystalline, amorphous and liquid phases and also describe the state-of-the-art methods used for high-throughput screening of large datasets to identify materials that exhibit novel performance characteristics.

  10. RASPA: molecular simulation software for adsorption and diffusion in flexible nanoporous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbeldam, D.; Calero, S.; Ellis, D.E.; Snurr, R.Q.

    2016-01-01

    A new software package, RASPA, for simulating adsorption and diffusion of molecules in flexible nanoporous materials is presented. The code implements the latest state-of-the-art algorithms for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo (MC) in various ensembles including symplectic/measure-preserving

  11. (TMTSF)2X materials and structural implications for low-dimensional polymeric and disordered molecular semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Krebs, Frederik C

    2000-01-01

    The structural characteristics and the relation to the electronic properties of three types of molecular materials are discussed. In TMTSF2X salts a triclinic unit cell it suggested to be important in avoiding a 2k(F) Peierls distortion. In polythiophenes appropriate ordering of microcrystallites...

  12. The mechanical properties modeling of nano-scale materials by molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, C.; Driel, W.D. van; Poelma, R.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a molecular modeling strategy which is capable of mod-eling the mechanical properties on nano-scale low-dielectric (low-k) materials. Such modeling strategy has been also validated by the bulking force of carbon nano tube (CNT). This modeling framework consists of model generation method,

  13. Stepwise transformation of the molecular building blocks in a porphyrin-encapsulating metal-organic material

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, ZhenJie; Wojtas, Łukasz; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Zaworotko, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    When immersed in solutions containing Cu(II) cations, the microporous metal-organic material P11 ([Cd4(BPT)4]·[Cd(C 44H36N8)(S)]·[S], BPT = biphenyl-3,4′,5-tricarboxylate) undergoes a transformation of its [Cd 2(COO)6]2- molecular building blocks

  14. Phase behaviour of macromolecular liquid crystalline materials. Computational studies at the molecular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimson, Lorna M.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular simulations provide an increasingly useful insight into the static and dynamic characteristics of materials. In this thesis molecular simulations of macro-molecular liquid crystalline materials are reported. The first liquid crystalline material that has been investigated is a side chain liquid crystal polymer (SCLCP). In this study semi-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted at a range of temperatures and an aligning potential has been applied to mimic the effect of a magnetic field. In cooling the SCLCP from an isotropic melt, microphase separation was observed yielding a domain structure. The application of a magnetic field to this structure aligns the domains producing a stable smectic mesophase. This is the first study in which mesophases have been observed using an off-lattice model of a SCLCP. The second material that has been investigated is a dendrimer with terminal mesogenic functionalization. Here, a multi-scale approach has been taken with Monte Carlo studies of a single dendrimer molecule in the gas phase at the atomistic level, semi-atomistic molecular dynamics of a single molecule in liquid crystalline solvents and a coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of the dendrimer in the bulk. The coarse-grained model has been developed and parameterized using the results of the atomistic and semi-atomistic work. The single molecule studies showed that the liquid crystalline dendrimer was able to change its structure by conformational changes in the flexible chains that link the mesogenic groups to the core. Structural change was seen under the application of a mean field ordering potential in the gas phase, and in the presence of liquid crystalline solvents. No liquid crystalline phases were observed for the bulk phase studies of the coarse-grained model. However, when the length of the mesogenic units was increased there was some evidence for microphase separation in these systems. (author)

  15. MOlecular MAterials Property Prediction Package (MOMAP) 1.0: a software package for predicting the luminescent properties and mobility of organic functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yingli; Li, Wenqiang; Peng, Qian; Geng, Hua; Yi, Yuanping; Wang, Linjun; Nan, Guangjun; Wang, Dong; Shuai, Zhigang

    2018-04-01

    MOlecular MAterials Property Prediction Package (MOMAP) is a software toolkit for molecular materials property prediction. It focuses on luminescent properties and charge mobility properties. This article contains a brief descriptive introduction of key features, theoretical models and algorithms of the software, together with examples that illustrate the performance. First, we present the theoretical models and algorithms for molecular luminescent properties calculation, which includes the excited-state radiative/non-radiative decay rate constant and the optical spectra. Then, a multi-scale simulation approach and its algorithm for the molecular charge mobility are described. This approach is based on hopping model and combines with Kinetic Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations, and it is especially applicable for describing a large category of organic semiconductors, whose inter-molecular electronic coupling is much smaller than intra-molecular charge reorganisation energy.

  16. Thin films of molecular materials synthesized from fisher's carbene ferrocenyl: Film formation and electrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Vergara, M.E.; Ortiz, A.; Alvarez-Toledano, C.; Moreno, A.; Alvarez, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of materials from Fisher's carbene ferrocenyl of the elements chromium, molybdenum and tungsten was carried out. The Fisher's compounds that were synthesized included the following combinations of two different metallic atoms: iron with chromium, iron with molybdenum and iron with tungsten. The molecular solids' preparation was done in electro-synthesis cells with platinum electrodes. Thin films were prepared by vacuum thermal evaporation on quartz substrates and crystalline silicon wafers. Pellets and thin films from these compounds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry. The powder and thin films synthesized from these materials show the same intra-molecular bonds shown by infrared spectroscopy results, suggesting that thermal evaporation does not alter these bonds in spite of the thin films being amorphous, in contrast with other bimetallic complexes where material decomposition occurs. The differences in the conductivity values of the prepared films are very small, so they may be attributed to the different metallic ions employed in each case. The tungsten complex exhibits a higher conductivity than the molybdenum and chromium complexes at room temperature. Electrical conductivity values found for thin films are higher than for pellets made of the same molecular materials

  17. Acetic and Acrylic Acid Molecular Imprinted Model Silicone Hydrogel Materials for Ciprofloxacin-HCl Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndon Jones

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact lenses, as an alternative drug delivery vehicle for the eye compared to eye drops, are desirable due to potential advantages in dosing regimen, bioavailability and patient tolerance/compliance. The challenge has been to engineer and develop these materials to sustain drug delivery to the eye for a long period of time. In this study, model silicone hydrogel materials were created using a molecular imprinting strategy to deliver the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Acetic and acrylic acid were used as the functional monomers, to interact with the ciprofloxacin template to efficiently create recognition cavities within the final polymerized material. Synthesized materials were loaded with 9.06 mM, 0.10 mM and 0.025 mM solutions of ciprofloxacin, and the release of ciprofloxacin into an artificial tear solution was monitored over time. The materials were shown to release for periods varying from 3 to 14 days, dependent on the loading solution, functional monomer concentration and functional monomer:template ratio, with materials with greater monomer:template ratio (8:1 and 16:1 imprinted tending to release for longer periods of time. Materials with a lower monomer:template ratio (4:1 imprinted tended to release comparatively greater amounts of ciprofloxacin into solution, but the release was somewhat shorter. The total amount of drug released from the imprinted materials was sufficient to reach levels relevant to inhibit the growth of common ocular isolates of bacteria. This work is one of the first to demonstrate the feasibility of molecular imprinting in model silicone hydrogel-type materials.

  18. In-situ preparation of functionalized molecular sieve material and a methodology to remove template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rekha; Ahmed, Maqsood; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Sakthivel, Ayyamperumal

    2016-03-01

    A series of diaminosilane-functionalized silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieve (SAPO-37) was prepared by in-situ synthesis, and a novel method was developed for the selective removal of structure directing agent (SDA)/template from the functionalized SAPO-37.The complete removal of the SDA was evident according to FT-IR, TGA, 13C MAS-NMR and elemental analysis. The developed method was found to be efficient for removal of template from microporous molecular sieve viz., SAPO-37 and can be applied for other microporous molecular sieves such as SAPO-5, SAPO-40, etc. The powder XRD pattern of the template-removed samples showed a highly crystalline SAPO-37 phase. Argentometric titration revealed that more than 90% of diamine functionality exposed on the surface was accessible for catalytic applications. The resultant materials showed promising activity for ring opening of epoxide with aniline to yield β-amino-alcohol.

  19. In-situ preparation of functionalized molecular sieve material and a methodology to remove template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rekha; Ahmed, Maqsood; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Sakthivel, Ayyamperumal

    2016-03-10

    A series of diaminosilane-functionalized silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieve (SAPO-37) was prepared by in-situ synthesis, and a novel method was developed for the selective removal of structure directing agent (SDA)/template from the functionalized SAPO-37.The complete removal of the SDA was evident according to FT-IR, TGA, (13)C MAS-NMR and elemental analysis. The developed method was found to be efficient for removal of template from microporous molecular sieve viz., SAPO-37 and can be applied for other microporous molecular sieves such as SAPO-5, SAPO-40, etc. The powder XRD pattern of the template-removed samples showed a highly crystalline SAPO-37 phase. Argentometric titration revealed that more than 90% of diamine functionality exposed on the surface was accessible for catalytic applications. The resultant materials showed promising activity for ring opening of epoxide with aniline to yield β-amino-alcohol.

  20. Update on N2O4 Molecular Sieving with 3A Material at NASA/KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Chuck; Dorn, Claudia

    2000-01-01

    During its operational life, the Shuttle Program has experienced numerous failures in the Nitrogen Tetroxide (N2O4) portion of Reaction Control System (RCS), many of which were attributed to iron-nitrate contamination. Since the mid-1980's, N2O4 has been processed through a molecular sieve at the N2O4 manufacturer's facility which results in an iron content typically less than 0.5 parts-per-million-by-weight (ppmw). In February 1995, a Tiger Team was formed to attempt to resolve the iron nitrate problem. Eighteen specific actions were recommended as possibly reducing system failures. Those recommended actions include additional N2O4 molecular sieving at the Shuttle launch site. Testing at NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) determined an alternative molecular sieve material could also reduce the water-equivalent content (free water and HNO3) and thereby further reduce the natural production of iron nitrate in N2O4 while stored in iron-alloy storage tanks. Since April '96, NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been processing N2O4 through the alternative molecular sieve material prior to delivery to Shuttle launch pad N2O4 storage tanks. A new, much larger capacity molecular sieve unit has also been used. This paper will evaluate the effectiveness of N2O4 molecular sieving on a large-scale basis and attempt to determine if the resultant lower-iron and lower-water content N2O4 maintains this new purity level in pad storage tanks and shuttle flight systems.

  1. Characterization of organic materials by LIBS for exploration of correlation between molecular and elemental LIBS signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Rai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study is performed for the preparation of a database by accumulating LIBS spectra of 4-nitroaniline and 4-nitrotoluene in air and argon. Changes in the behavior of the molecular bands of the C2 Swan system and CN violet system as well as of atomic lines of C, H and N in the LIBS signal are appreciable in argon. In order to explore the correlation between observed LIBS signal and molecular composition of these materials, normalized intensities of the emission lines have been estimated for each compound. It has been found that the relative rates of increase/decrease in the normalized intensities for all sets are higher for 4-nitrotoluene in argon. The cause of the higher rate for 4-nitrotoluene might be due to the possession of a distinctive functional group. The ultimate goal behind the whole study is to use this data-base as input for the discrimination of energetic materials.

  2. When biomolecules meet graphene: from molecular level interactions to material design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Wensi; Yu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Zhenping; Su, Zhiqiang; Wei, Gang

    2016-12-01

    Graphene-based materials have attracted increasing attention due to their atomically-thick two-dimensional structures, high conductivity, excellent mechanical properties, and large specific surface areas. The combination of biomolecules with graphene-based materials offers a promising method to fabricate novel graphene-biomolecule hybrid nanomaterials with unique functions in biology, medicine, nanotechnology, and materials science. In this review, we focus on a summarization of the recent studies in functionalizing graphene-based materials using different biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, and viruses. The different interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level are demonstrated and discussed in detail. In addition, the potential applications of the created graphene-biomolecule nanohybrids in drug delivery, cancer treatment, tissue engineering, biosensors, bioimaging, energy materials, and other nanotechnological applications are presented. This review will be helpful to know the modification of graphene with biomolecules, understand the interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level, and design functional graphene-based nanomaterials with unique properties for various applications.

  3. Pathways to Structure-Property Relationships of Peptide-Materials Interfaces: Challenges in Predicting Molecular Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Tiffany R

    2017-07-18

    An in-depth appreciation of how to manipulate the molecular-level recognition between peptides and aqueous materials interfaces, including nanoparticles, will advance technologies based on self-organized metamaterials for photonics and plasmonics, biosensing, catalysis, energy generation and harvesting, and nanomedicine. Exploitation of the materials-selective binding of biomolecules is pivotal to success in these areas and may be particularly key to producing new hierarchically structured biobased materials. These applications could be accomplished by realizing preferential adsorption of a given biomolecule onto one materials composition over another, one surface facet over another, or one crystalline polymorph over another. Deeper knowledge of the aqueous abiotic-biotic interface, to establish clear structure-property relationships in these systems, is needed to meet this goal. In particular, a thorough structural characterization of the surface-adsorbed peptides is essential for establishing these relationships but can often be challenging to accomplish via experimental approaches alone. In addition to myriad existing challenges associated with determining the detailed molecular structure of any molecule adsorbed at an aqueous interface, experimental characterization of materials-binding peptides brings new, complex challenges because many materials-binding peptides are thought to be intrinsically disordered. This means that these peptides are not amenable to experimental techniques that rely on the presence of well-defined secondary structure in the peptide when in the adsorbed state. To address this challenge, and in partnership with experiment, molecular simulations at the atomistic level can bring complementary and critical insights into the origins of this abiotic/biotic recognition and suggest routes for manipulating this phenomenon to realize new types of hybrid materials. For the reasons outlined above, molecular simulation approaches also face

  4. Molecular plasmonics: The role of rovibrational molecular states in exciton-plasmon materials under strong-coupling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukharev, Maxim; Charron, Eric

    2017-03-01

    We extend the model of exciton-plasmon materials to include a rovibrational structure of molecules using wave-packet propagations on electronic potential energy surfaces. Our model replaces conventional two-level emitters with more complex molecules, allowing us to examine the influence of alignment and vibrational dynamics on strong coupling with surface plasmon-polaritons. We apply the model to a hybrid system comprising a thin layer of molecules placed on top of a periodic array of slits. Rigorous simulations are performed for two types of molecular systems described by vibrational bound-bound and bound-continuum electronic transitions. Calculations reveal new features in transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra, including the observation of significantly higher values of the Rabi splitting and vibrational patterns clearly seen in the corresponding spectra. We also examine the influence of anisotropic initial conditions on optical properties of hybrid materials, demonstrating that the optical response of the system is significantly affected by an initial prealignment of the molecules. Our work demonstrates that prealigned molecules could serve as an efficient probe for the subdiffraction characterization of the near-field near metal interfaces.

  5. Research on harmonized molecular materials; Bunshi kyocho zairyo ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Harmonized molecular materials (HMM) were researched to create functional materials adaptable to needs such as environmental harmony and high-efficient conversion in post-industrial society and aging society. Superior mechanisms function efficiently in organisms for perception, transmission and processing of information, and transport and conversion of substances. These functions are caused by harmonization between organic molecules, or organic molecule and metal or inorganic substance. HMM is a key substance to realize these functions similar to those of organisms artificially. It is the purpose of this research to develop HMMs, reform production process by innovating separation and conversion technologies, and finally realize molecular chemical plants. This research also develops high-efficient devices to contribute to the information society, and progresses the industry of bio-functional materials such as high-sensitive bio-sensor. The functions, applications and creation technologies of three kinds of HMM such as assembly, mesophase and microporous materials were researched in fiscal 1995. 956 refs., 128 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. Analysing and Rationalising Molecular and Materials Databases Using Machine-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Sandip; Ceriotti, Michele

    Computational materials design promises to greatly accelerate the process of discovering new or more performant materials. Several collaborative efforts are contributing to this goal by building databases of structures, containing between thousands and millions of distinct hypothetical compounds, whose properties are computed by high-throughput electronic-structure calculations. The complexity and sheer amount of information has made manual exploration, interpretation and maintenance of these databases a formidable challenge, making it necessary to resort to automatic analysis tools. Here we will demonstrate how, starting from a measure of (dis)similarity between database items built from a combination of local environment descriptors, it is possible to apply hierarchical clustering algorithms, as well as dimensionality reduction methods such as sketchmap, to analyse, classify and interpret trends in molecular and materials databases, as well as to detect inconsistencies and errors. Thanks to the agnostic and flexible nature of the underlying metric, we will show how our framework can be applied transparently to different kinds of systems ranging from organic molecules and oligopeptides to inorganic crystal structures as well as molecular crystals. Funded by National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL) and Swiss National Science Foundation.

  7. Thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua

    2012-06-01

    Conventional multi-component gas analysis is based either on laser spectroscopy, laser and photoacoustic absorption at specific wavelengths, or on gas chromatography by separating the components of a gas mixture primarily due to boiling point (or vapor pressure) differences. This paper will present a new gas molecular mass detection method based on thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection by fiber Bragg grating-based gas sensors. Such a nanomaterial and fiber Bragg grating integrated sensing device has been designed to be operated either at high-energy level (highly thermal strained status) or at low-energy level (low thermal strained status). Thermal energy absorption of gas molecular trigs the sensing device transition from high-thermal-energy status to low-thermal- energy status. Experiment has shown that thermal energy variation due to gas molecular thermal energy absorption is dependent upon the gas molecular mass, and can be detected by fiber Bragg resonant wavelength shift with a linear function from 17 kg/kmol to 32 kg/kmol and a sensitivity of 0.025 kg/kmol for a 5 micron-thick nano-trampoline structure and fiber Bragg grating integrated gas sensing device. The laboratory and field validation data have further demonstrated its fast response characteristics and reliability to be online gas analysis instrument for measuring effective gas molecular mass from single-component gas, binary-component gas mixture, and multi-gas mixture. The potential industrial applications include fouling and surge control for gas charge centrifugal compressor ethylene production, gas purity for hydrogen-cooled generator, gasification for syngas production, gasoline/diesel and natural gas fuel quality monitoring for consumer market.

  8. Spatial Distribution and Kinematics of the Molecular Material Associated with eta Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loinard, Laurent; Kamiński, Tomasz; Serra, Paolo; Menten, Karl M.; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2016-12-01

    Single-dish submillimeter observations have recently revealed the existence of a substantial, chemically peculiar molecular gas component located in the innermost circumstellar environment of the very massive luminous blue variable star, η Carinae. Here, we present 5″-resolution interferometric observations of the 1\\to 0 rotational transition of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) toward this star obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The emission is concentrated in the central few arcseconds around η Carinae and shows a clear 150 km s-1 velocity gradient running from west-north-west (blue) to east-south-east (red). Given the extent, location, and kinematics of this molecular material, we associate it with the complex of dusty arcs and knots seen in mid-infrared emission near the center of the Homunculus nebula. Indeed, the shielding provided by this dust could help explain how molecules survive in the presence of the intense UV radiation field produced by η Carinae. The dust located in the central few arcseconds around η Carinae and the molecular component described here most likely formed in situ and out of material expelled by the massive interacting binary system. Thus, η Carinae offers us a rare glimpse of the processes that lead to the formation of dust and molecules around massive stars, which are relevant to the interpretation of dust and molecule detections at high redshifts.

  9. Ordered molecular arrays as templates: A new approach to synthesis of mesoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, P.; Stucky, G.

    There has been a growing interest in the extension of the microporous molecular sieve synthesis and applications to mesoscopic dimensions. Typical areas for the application of mesoscopic zeolite-type structures are in separation (e.g., protein separation and selective adsorption of large organic molecules from waste waters) and catalysis (e.g., processing of tar sand and of the high distillates of crude oils to valuable low-boiling products). Another is in the supramolecular assembly of molecular array and polymers for electronic and optical applications. In a new concept in the synthesis of porous material the templating agent is no longer a single, solvated, organic molecule or metal ion, but rather a self-assembled molecular array. This template leads to mesoporous materials with adjustable pore sizes between 16 and greater than 100 Angstrom, covering well the mesophorous range of greatest interest. The periodic arrangement of pores is very regular, and the pore size distribution measured by absorption is nearly as sharp as that of conventional zeolites.

  10. Electronic structure and molecular orbital study of hole-transport material triphenylamine derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.-C.; Liao, H.-R.; Chang, J.-C.; Chen Likey; Yeh, J.-T.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, triphenylamine (TPA), 4,4'-bis(phenyl-m-tolylamino)biphenyl (TPD), 4,4'-bis(1-naphthylphenylamino)biphenyl (NPB) and their derivatives are widely used in the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices as a hole-transporting material (HTM) layer. We have optimized twenty different structures of HTM materials by using density functional theory (DFT), B3LYP/6-31G method. All these different structures contain mono-amine and diamine TPA derivatives. The energies of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) along with molecular orbitals for these HTMs are also determined. We have found that the central amine nitrogen atom and the phenyl ring, which is next to the central amine nitrogen atom, show significant contribution to the HOMO and LUMO, respectively. The sum of the calculated bond angles (α+β+γ) of the central amine nitrogen atom has been applied to describe the bonding and the energy difference for HOMO and LUMO in these TPA derivatives. Electronic structure calculations have been performed for these TPA derivatives. Again, the LCAO-MO patterns of HOMO and LUMO levels of these derivatives are used to investigate their electron density. A series of electron-transporting steps are predicted for these compounds employing these calculated results

  11. Molecular imprinting-chemiluminescence determination of trimethoprim using trimethoprim-imprinted polymer as recognition material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunhua; Lu, Jiuru; Liu, Mei; Du, Jianxiu

    2005-07-01

    A new molecular imprinting-chemiluminescence method for the determination of trimethoprim was developed, in which trimethoprim-imprinted polymer was used as the molecular recognition material and the CL reaction of trimethoprim with potassium permanganate in acidic medium was used as the detection system. The CL intensity responds linearly to the concentration of trimethoprim within the 5.0 x 10(-8)-5.0 x 10(-6) g mL(-1) range (r= 0.9983) with a detection limit of 2 x 10(-8) g mL(-1). The relative standard deviation for the determination of 1.0 x 10(-7) g mL(-1) trimethoprim solutions is 4.8% (n= 9). The method has been applied to the determination of trimethoprim in pharmaceutical preparations and body fluids, and satisfactory results were obtained.

  12. Hybrid Materials Based on Magnetic Layered Double Hydroxides: A Molecular Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán, Gonzalo; Martí-Gastaldo, Carlos; Ribera, Antonio; Coronado, Eugenio

    2015-06-16

    Design of functional hybrids lies at the very core of synthetic chemistry as it has enabled the development of an unlimited number of solids displaying unprecedented or even improved properties built upon the association at the molecular level of quite disparate components by chemical design. Multifunctional hybrids are a particularly appealing case among hybrid organic/inorganic materials. Here, chemical knowledge is used to deploy molecular components bearing different functionalities within a single solid so that these properties can coexist or event interact leading to unprecedented phenomena. From a molecular perspective, this can be done either by controlled assembly of organic/inorganic molecular tectons into an extended architecture of hybrid nature or by intercalation of organic moieties within the empty channels or interlamellar space offered by inorganic solids with three-dimensional (MOFs, zeolites, and mesoporous hosts) or layered structures (phosphates, silicates, metal dichalcogenides, or anionic clays). This Account specifically illustrates the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) in the preparation of magnetic hybrids, in line with the development of soft inorganic chemistry processes (also called "Chimie Douce"), which has significantly contributed to boost the preparation hybrid materials based on solid-state hosts and subsequent development of applications. Several features sustain the importance of LDHs in this context. Their magnetism can be manipulated at a molecular level by adequate choice of constituting metals and interlayer separation for tuning the nature and extent of magnetic interactions across and between planes. They display unparalleled versatility in accommodating a broad range of anionic species in their interlamellar space that encompasses not only simple anions but chemical systems of increasing dimensionality and functionalities. Their swelling characteristics allow for their exfoliation in organic solvents with high

  13. Young's moduli of carbon materials investigated by various classical molecular dynamics schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayk, Florian; Ehrens, Julian; Heitmann, Tjark; Vorndamme, Patrick; Mrugalla, Andreas; Schnack, Jürgen

    2018-05-01

    For many applications classical carbon potentials together with classical molecular dynamics are employed to calculate structures and physical properties of such carbon-based materials where quantum mechanical methods fail either due to the excessive size, irregular structure or long-time dynamics. Although such potentials, as for instance implemented in LAMMPS, yield reasonably accurate bond lengths and angles for several carbon materials such as graphene, it is not clear how accurate they are in terms of mechanical properties such as for instance Young's moduli. We performed large-scale classical molecular dynamics investigations of three carbon-based materials using the various potentials implemented in LAMMPS as well as the EDIP potential of Marks. We show how the Young's moduli vary with classical potentials and compare to experimental results. Since classical descriptions of carbon are bound to be approximations it is not astonishing that different realizations yield differing results. One should therefore carefully check for which observables a certain potential is suited. Our aim is to contribute to such a clarification.

  14. Final Report: Photo-Directed Molecular Assembly of Multifunctional Inorganic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.G. Potter, Jr.

    2010-10-15

    This final report details results, conclusions, and opportunities for future effort derived from the study. The work involved combining the molecular engineering of photoactive Ti-alkoxide systems and the optical excitation of hydrolysis and condensation reactions to influence the development of the metal-oxygen-metal network at the onset of material formation. Selective excitation of the heteroleptic alkoxides, coupled with control of alkoxide local chemical environment, enabled network connectivity to be influenced and formed the basis for direct deposition and patterning of Ti-oxide-based materials. The research provided new insights into the intrinsic photoresponse and assembly of these complex, alkoxide molecules. Using a suite of electronic, vibrational, and nuclear spectroscopic probes, coupled with quantum chemical computation, the excitation wavelength and fluence dependence of molecular photoresponse and the nature of subsequent hydrolysis and condensation processes were probed in pyridine-carbinol-based Ti-alkoxides with varied counter ligand groups. Several methods for the patterning of oxide material formation were demonstrated, including the integration of this photoprocessing approach with conventional, dip-coating methodologies.

  15. Synthesis and properties of large crystal of aluminum-deficient ultrasil molecular sieve materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, J.; Akhtar, J.; Chughtai, N.A.; Arif, M.; Saeed, K.; Ahmed, M.; Siddique, M.

    2003-01-01

    Large crystals of aluminum-deficient and silica rich molecular sieve materials such as Silicalite-I, Silicalite-II ZSM11-B and ZSM11-Fe have been synthesized hydro thermally from the aqueous silicate gel of (R/sub 2/O -SiO/sub 2/- B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ -Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ -H/sub 2/O) using PTFE-lined stainless digestion bomb. The term R is a alkyl group. The synthesized materials were identified for crystallinity, thermal stability, phase, crystal structure, morphology and unit cell dimensions using thermogravimetry (TG/DTA), differential scanning calorimetric(DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and other analytical techniques. All product materials were found to be white crystalline and crysto-graphically pure. Surface area and particle size distribution of materials were also ascertained. /sup 57/Fe Mossbauer spectroscopic studies on as-synthesized and calcined samples have confirmed the uniform dispersion of Fe/sup 3+/ ions in the tetrahedral framework of ZSM11-Fe material. (author)

  16. Hybrid Light-Matter States in a Molecular and Material Science Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-11-15

    The notion that light and matter states can be hybridized the way s and p orbitals are mixed is a concept that is not familiar to most chemists and material scientists. Yet it has much potential for molecular and material sciences that is just beginning to be explored. For instance, it has already been demonstrated that the rate and yield of chemical reactions can be modified and that the conductivity of organic semiconductors and nonradiative energy transfer can be enhanced through the hybridization of electronic transitions. The hybridization is not limited to electronic transitions; it can be applied for instance to vibrational transitions to selectively perturb a given bond, opening new possibilities to change the chemical reactivity landscape and to use it as a tool in (bio)molecular science and spectroscopy. Such results are not only the consequence of the new eigenstates and energies generated by the hybridization. The hybrid light-matter states also have unusual properties: they can be delocalized over a very large number of molecules (up to ca. 10 5 ), and they become dispersive or momentum-sensitive. Importantly, the hybridization occurs even in the absence of light because it is the zero-point energies of the molecular and optical transitions that generate the new light-matter states. The present work is not a review but rather an Account from the author's point of view that first introduces the reader to the underlying concepts and details of the features of hybrid light-matter states. It is shown that light-matter hybridization is quite easy to achieve: all that is needed is to place molecules or a material in a resonant optical cavity (e.g., between two parallel mirrors) under the right conditions. For vibrational strong coupling, microfluidic IR cells can be used to study the consequences for chemistry in the liquid phase. Examples of modified properties are given to demonstrate the full potential for the molecular and material sciences. Finally an

  17. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π

  18. Electrode Materials, Thermal Annealing Sequences, and Lateral/Vertical Phase Separation of Polymer Solar Cells from Multiscale Molecular Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Wodo, Olga; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Pao, Chun-Wei

    2014-01-01

    . Simulations are performed for various configurations of electrode materials as well as processing temperature. The complex CG molecular data are characterized using a novel extension of our graph-based framework to quantify morphology and establish a link

  19. Molecular design and ordering effects in π-functional materials for transistor and solar cell applications

    KAUST Repository

    Beaujuge, Pierre

    2011-12-21

    Organic electronics are broadly anticipated to impact the development of flexible thin-film device technologies. Among these, solution-processable π-conjugated polymers and small molecules are proving particularly promising in field-effect transistors and bulk heterojunction solar cells. This Perspective analyzes some of the most exciting strategies recently suggested in the design and structural organization of π-functional materials for transistor and solar cell applications. Emphasis is placed on the interplay between molecular structure, self-assembling properties, nanoscale and mesoscale ordering, and device efficiency parameters. A critical look at the various approaches used to optimize both materials and device performance is provided to assist in the identification of new directions and further advances. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Gas-Transport-Property Performance of Hybrid Carbon Molecular Sieve−Polymer Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Mita

    2010-10-06

    High-performance hybrid materials using carbon molecular sieve materials and 6FDA-6FpDA were produced. A detailed analysis of the effects of casting processes and the annealing temperature is reported. Two existing major obstacles, sieve agglomeration and residual stress, were addressed in this work, and subsequently a new membrane formation technique was developed to produce high-performing membranes. The successfully improved interfacial region of the hybrid membranes allows the sieves to increase the selectivity of the membranes above the neat polymer properties. Furthermore, an additional performance enhancement was seen with increased sieve loading in the hybrid membranes, leading to an actual performance above the upper bound for pure polymer membranes. The membranes were also tested under a mixed-gas environment, which further demonstrated promising results. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Molecular Engineering with Organic Carbonyl Electrode Materials for Advanced Stationary and Redox Flow Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Organic carbonyl electrode materials that have the advantages of high capacity, low cost and being environmentally friendly, are regarded as powerful candidates for next-generation stationary and redox flow rechargeable batteries (RFBs). However, low carbonyl utilization, poor electronic conductivity and undesired dissolution in electrolyte are urgent issues to be solved. Here, we summarize a molecular engineering approach for tuning the capacity, working potential, concentration of active species, kinetics, and stability of stationary and redox flow batteries, which well resolves the problems of organic carbonyl electrode materials. As an example, in stationary batteries, 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) with two carbonyls delivers a capacity of 257 mAh g -1 (2.27 V vs Li + /Li), while increasing the number of carbonyls to four with the formation of 5,7,12,14-pentacenetetrone results in a higher capacity of 317 mAh g -1 (2.60 V vs Li + /Li). In RFBs, AQ, which is less soluble in aqueous electrolyte, reaches 1 M by grafting -SO 3 H with the formation of 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonic acid, resulting in a power density exceeding 0.6 W cm -2 with long cycling life. Therefore, through regulating substituent groups, conjugated structures, Coulomb interactions, and the molecular weight, the electrochemical performance of carbonyl electrode materials can be rationally optimized. This review offers fundamental principles and insight into designing advanced carbonyl materials for the electrodes of next-generation rechargeable batteries. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of molecular materials from N-trifluoromethanesulfonyl-1-azahexa-1,3,5-trieno derivates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Gomez, A; Ortiz Rebollo, A; Sanchez Vergara, M.E

    2008-01-01

    Molecular materials have been developed recently for their diverse electrical properties, such as insulation, semiconductors, conductors and superconductors and they can also be used in diodes, transistors, solar cells and electronic switches among other things. The molecular materials are formed by condensation and organization of molecular units that can be organic, organometallic, or metal-organic and whose properties are individually characterized later. Because of their true nature, the properties of molecular materials can be derived from the characteristics of the molecular units that form them. For this study molecular materials were synthesized from electronic donors and acceptors: Cu (TAAB) +2 , Ni (TAAB) +2 and the NTrifluoromethanesulfonyl-1-azahexa-1,3,5-trieno derivatives that are especially attractive from the structural point of view, since in their neutral from they have an extensive electronic dislocation which gives them a very specific chemical behavior. The synthesized materials were chemically and structurally characterized by IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and mass spectrometry. Thin films of the different materials were deposited and the optical activation energy was evaluated, using techniques like profilometry and UV-vis spectroscopy

  3. Animal Hairs as Water-stimulated Shape Memory Materials: Mechanism and Structural Networks in Molecular Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xueliang; Hu, Jinlian

    2016-05-01

    Animal hairs consisting of α-keratin biopolymers existing broadly in nature may be responsive to water for recovery to the innate shape from their fixed deformation, thus possess smart behavior, namely shape memory effect (SME). In this article, three typical animal hair fibers were first time investigated for their water-stimulated SME, and therefrom to identify the corresponding net-points and switches in their molecular and morphological structures. Experimentally, the SME manifested a good stability of high shape fixation ratio and reasonable recovery rate after many cycles of deformation programming under water stimulation. The effects of hydration on hair lateral size, recovery kinetics, dynamic mechanical behaviors and structural components (crystal, disulfide and hydrogen bonds) were then systematically studied. SME mechanisms were explored based on the variations of structural components in molecular assemblies of such smart fibers. A hybrid structural network model with single-switch and twin-net-points was thereafter proposed to interpret the water-stimulated shape memory mechanism of animal hairs. This original work is expected to provide inspiration for exploring other natural materials to reveal their smart functions and natural laws in animals including human as well as making more remarkable synthetic smart materials.

  4. Molecular Understanding and Structural-Based Design of Polyacrylamides and Polyacrylates as Antifouling Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Mingzhen; Chen, Qiang; Ma, Jie; Zheng, Jie

    2016-04-12

    Design and synthesis of highly bioinert and biocompatible antifouling materials are crucial for a broad range of biomedical and engineering applications. Among antifouling materials, polyacrylamides and polyacrylates have proved so promising because of cheap raw materials, ease of synthesis and applicability, and abundant functional groups. The strong surface hydration and the high surface packing density of polyacrylamides and polyacrylates are considered to be the key contributors to their antifouling property. In this article, we review our studies on the design and synthesis of a series of polyacrylamides and polyacrylates with different molecular structures. These polymers can be fabricated into different architectural forms (brushes, nanoparticles, nanogels, and hydrogels), all of which are highly resistant to the attachment of proteins, cells, and bacteria. We find that small structural changes in the polymers can lead to large enhancement in surface hydration and antifouling performance, both showing a positive correlation. This reveals a general design rule for effective antifouling materials. Furthermore, polyacrylamides and polyacrylates are readily functionalized with other bioactive compounds to achieve different new multifunctionalities.

  5. Deformation of nanocrystalline materials by molecular-dynamics simulation: relationship to experiments?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, D.; Yamakov, V.; Phillpot, S.R.; Mukherjee, A.; Gleiter, H.

    2005-01-01

    We review the results of recent molecular-dynamics simulations of the structure and deformation behavior of nanocrystalline materials, i.e., polycrystalline materials with a grain size of typically less than about 100 nm. These simulations have now become large enough and sophisticated enough that they are beginning to cover the entire range of grain sizes over which the experimentally suggested transition from a dislocation-based deformation mechanism to one involving GB processes takes place. Their atomic-level resolution provides novel insights into the intricate interplay between the dislocation and GB processes responsible for this crossover. These simulations also reveal how and why this crossover in the dominant mechanism leads to a transition in the mechanical behavior. However, in spite of these early successes, these simulations are inherently limited to rather idealized model microstructures and extremely high deformation rates. We therefore address the critical question as to the degree to which they begin to capture the experimentally observed, albeit controversial, deformation behavior of real nanocrystalline materials. (Supplementary material to this article, in the form of color graphs of some of the figures and several deformation-simulation movies, can be viewed at http://phillpot.mse.ufl.edu/review.html.)

  6. Design and synthesis of single-source molecular precursors to homogeneous multi-component oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujdala, Kyle Lee

    This dissertation describes the syntheses of single-source molecular precursors to multi-component oxide materials. These molecules possess a core metal or element with various combinations of -OSi(O tBu)3, -O2P(OtBu) 2, and -OB[OSi(OtBu)3] 2 ligands. Such molecules decompose under mild thermolytic conditions (models for oxide-supported metal species and multi-component oxides. Significantly, the first complexes to contain three or more heteroelements suitable for use in the TMP method have been synthesized. Compounds for use as single-source molecular precursors have been synthesized containing Al, B, Cr, Hf, Mo, V, W, and Zr, and their thermal transformations have been examined. Heterogeneous catalytic reactions have been examined for selected materials. Also, cothermolyses of molecular precursors and additional molecules (i.e., metal alkoxides) have been utilized to provide materials with several components for potential use as catalysts or catalyst supports. Reactions of one and two equivs of HOSi(OtBu) 3 with Cr(OtBu)4 afforded the first Cr(IV) alkoxysiloxy complexes (tBuO) 3CrOSi(OtBu)3 and ( tBuO)2Cr[OSi(OtBu) 3]2, respectively. The high-yielding, convenient synthesis of (tBuO)3CrOSi(O tBu)3 make this complex a useful single-source molecular precursor, via the TMP method, to Cr/Si/O materials. The thermal transformations of (tBuO)3CrOSi(O tBu)3 and (tBuO) 2Cr[OSi(OtBu)3]2 to chromia-silica materials occurr at low temperatures (≤180°C), to give isobutene as the major carbon-containing product. The material generated from the solid-state conversion of (tBuO) 3CrOSi(OtBu)3 (CrOS ss) has an unexpectedly high surface area of 315 m2 g-1 that is slightly reduced to 275 m2 g-1 after calcination at 500°C in O2. The xerogel obtained by the thermolysis of an n-octane solution of (tBuO)3CrOSi(O tBu)3 (CrOSixg) has a surface area of 315 m2 g-1 that is reduced to 205 m2 g-1 upon calcination at 500°C. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis revealed that Cr2O 3 is

  7. Microbes on building materials - Evaluation of DNA extraction protocols as common basis for molecular analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettenauer, Joerg D., E-mail: joerg.ettenauer@boku.ac.at [VIBT-BOKU, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Department of Biotechnology, Muthgasse 11, A-1190 Vienna (Austria); Pinar, Guadalupe, E-mail: Guadalupe.Pinar@boku.ac.at [VIBT-BOKU, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Department of Biotechnology, Muthgasse 11, A-1190 Vienna (Austria); Lopandic, Ksenija, E-mail: Ksenija.Lopandic@boku.ac.at [VIBT-BOKU, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Department of Biotechnology, Muthgasse 11, A-1190 Vienna (Austria); Spangl, Bernhard, E-mail: Bernhard.Spangl@boku.ac.at [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Department of Landscape, Spatial and Infrastructure Science, Institute of Applied Statistics and Computing (IASC), Gregor Mendel-Str. 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Ellersdorfer, Guenther, E-mail: Guenther.Ellersdorfer@boku.ac.at [VIBT-BOKU, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Department of Biotechnology, Muthgasse 11, A-1190 Vienna (Austria); Voitl, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Voitl@boku.ac.at [VIBT-BOKU, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Department of Biotechnology, Muthgasse 11, A-1190 Vienna (Austria); Sterflinger, Katja, E-mail: Katja.Sterflinger@boku.ac.at [VIBT-BOKU, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Department of Biotechnology, Muthgasse 11, A-1190 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-11-15

    The study of microbial life in building materials is an emerging topic concerning biodeterioration of materials as well as health risks in houses and at working places. Biodegradation and potential health implications associated with microbial growth in our residues claim for more precise methods for quantification and identification. To date, cultivation experiments are commonly used to gain insight into the microbial diversity. Nowadays, molecular techniques for the identification of microorganisms provide efficient methods that can be applied in this field. The efficiency of DNA extraction is decisive in order to perform a reliable and reproducible quantification of the microorganisms by qPCR or to characterize the structure of the microbial community. In this study we tested thirteen DNA extraction methods and evaluated their efficiency for identifying (1) the quantity of DNA, (2) the quality and purity of DNA and (3) the ability of the DNA to be amplified in a PCR reaction using three universal primer sets for the ITS region of fungi as well as one primer pair targeting the 16S rRNA of bacteria with three typical building materials - common plaster, red brick and gypsum cardboard. DNA concentration measurements showed strong variations among the tested methods and materials. Measurement of the DNA yield showed up to three orders of magnitude variation from the same samples, whereas A260/A280 ratios often prognosticated biases in the PCR amplifications. Visualization of the crude DNA extracts and the comparison of DGGE fingerprints showed additional drawbacks of some methods. The FastDNA Spin kit for soil showed to be the best DNA extraction method and could provide positive results for all tests with the three building materials. Therefore, we suggest this method as a gold standard for quantification of indoor fungi and bacteria in building materials. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up to thirteen extraction methods were evaluated with three

  8. Microbes on building materials — Evaluation of DNA extraction protocols as common basis for molecular analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettenauer, Jörg D.; Piñar, Guadalupe; Lopandic, Ksenija; Spangl, Bernhard; Ellersdorfer, Günther; Voitl, Christian; Sterflinger, Katja

    2012-01-01

    The study of microbial life in building materials is an emerging topic concerning biodeterioration of materials as well as health risks in houses and at working places. Biodegradation and potential health implications associated with microbial growth in our residues claim for more precise methods for quantification and identification. To date, cultivation experiments are commonly used to gain insight into the microbial diversity. Nowadays, molecular techniques for the identification of microorganisms provide efficient methods that can be applied in this field. The efficiency of DNA extraction is decisive in order to perform a reliable and reproducible quantification of the microorganisms by qPCR or to characterize the structure of the microbial community. In this study we tested thirteen DNA extraction methods and evaluated their efficiency for identifying (1) the quantity of DNA, (2) the quality and purity of DNA and (3) the ability of the DNA to be amplified in a PCR reaction using three universal primer sets for the ITS region of fungi as well as one primer pair targeting the 16S rRNA of bacteria with three typical building materials — common plaster, red brick and gypsum cardboard. DNA concentration measurements showed strong variations among the tested methods and materials. Measurement of the DNA yield showed up to three orders of magnitude variation from the same samples, whereas A260/A280 ratios often prognosticated biases in the PCR amplifications. Visualization of the crude DNA extracts and the comparison of DGGE fingerprints showed additional drawbacks of some methods. The FastDNA Spin kit for soil showed to be the best DNA extraction method and could provide positive results for all tests with the three building materials. Therefore, we suggest this method as a gold standard for quantification of indoor fungi and bacteria in building materials. -- Highlights: ► Up to thirteen extraction methods were evaluated with three building materials.

  9. The molecular characteristics of pyrogenic organic materials and their aqueous leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, A. S.; Hatcher, P.; Mitra, S.; Bostick, K. W.; Zimmerman, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter (Py-OM), or black carbon, is known to impact soil chemistry, pollutant transport, regional and global carbon cycling, and climate. Py-OM is incorporated into soils via atmospheric deposition (e.g., from biomass, fossil fuel combustion) or direct applications by humans (e.g., biochars applied for agricultural production). Due to its presumed refractory and immobile nature, soil Py-OM is thought to be efficiently buried, sequestering atmospheric CO2. However, tracers of dissolved Py-OM (Py-DOM) have been detected in appreciable quantities in riverine, estuarine, and oceanic waters suggesting that Py-OM is more mobile in the environment than expected. The molecular characteristics of Py-OM are likely to be a controlling factor in the quantities and impacts of Py-DOM released to aqueous systems. Yet, little is known about the detailed molecular composition of these materials, let alone how those molecular characteristics vary with combustion conditions or are altered by environmental processes. Here, we examine oak and grass Py-OM (combusted over a range of temperatures), natural Py-OM (chars aged in the environment for variable lengths of time), and their Py-DOM leachates via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Multi-CP 13C NMR analyses of Py-OM materials and 1H NMR analyses of corresponding Py-DOM leachates reveal that Py-OM combustion temperature, environmental exposure, and molecular characteristics are reflected in Py-DOM quantities and characteristics. The relative amounts of aromatic C in Py-OM 1) decreases with environmental exposure, the relative oxygen-content in both Py-OM and Py-DOM, and the amount of Py-DOC released per g of Py-OC but 2) is positively correlated with combustion temperature and the relative contributions of acetate and aliphatic hydrogens (CH2) in Py-DOM. Preliminary FTICR-MS analyses show Py-DOM produced from oak at 400 °C to

  10. Controlled molecular self-assembly of complex three-dimensional structures in soft materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changjin; Quinn, David; Suresh, Subra; Hsia, K Jimmy

    2018-01-02

    Many applications in tissue engineering, flexible electronics, and soft robotics call for approaches that are capable of producing complex 3D architectures in soft materials. Here we present a method using molecular self-assembly to generate hydrogel-based 3D architectures that resembles the appealing features of the bottom-up process in morphogenesis of living tissues. Our strategy effectively utilizes the three essential components dictating living tissue morphogenesis to produce complex 3D architectures: modulation of local chemistry, material transport, and mechanics, which can be engineered by controlling the local distribution of polymerization inhibitor (i.e., oxygen), diffusion of monomers/cross-linkers through the porous structures of cross-linked polymer network, and mechanical constraints, respectively. We show that oxygen plays a role in hydrogel polymerization which is mechanistically similar to the role of growth factors in tissue growth, and the continued growth of hydrogel enabled by diffusion of monomers/cross-linkers into the porous hydrogel similar to the mechanisms of tissue growth enabled by material transport. The capability and versatility of our strategy are demonstrated through biomimetics of tissue morphogenesis for both plants and animals, and its application to generate other complex 3D architectures. Our technique opens avenues to studying many growth phenomena found in nature and generating complex 3D structures to benefit diverse applications. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  11. Aspect of use of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (uhmwpe) as biomaterial and as armour material (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuzail, M.

    2011-01-01

    Among the known polymeric materials, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has unique properties as a biomaterial as well as armour material. Its high strength and very high modulus makes it an alternate candidate as body armour for example bullet proof vest. The drawn fibers from this material are best known for their break strength and compete with the steel and carbon fibers. On the other hand, its extremely high molar mass imparts outstanding wear resistance and impact toughness better than any other polymer which makes it a better choice as biomaterial used in hip and knee transplants. As a biomaterial, when body transplants are gamma sterilized, their shelf life depends upon the number and nature of free radicals produced during sterilization. These long-lived radicals ultimately affect the wear properties of hip and knee transplants. The Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) technique used to determine the concentration and nature of free radicals in about 16 years old powder, fibers and ram-extruded bar samples shows that at low microwave power (0.01 mW), polyenyl radicals become prominent while at high microwave power (160 mW), oxygen-centered radicals show their identity. The ESR study also exhibits that the concentration of free radicals depends upon the crystallinities of different morphologies known i.e powder, extruded bars and drawn fibers. Differential scanning calorimetry shows the order of crystallinity as: fiber > extruded bars > powder. (author)

  12. Multi-scale calculation based on dual domain material point method combined with molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Tilak Raj [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-27

    This dissertation combines the dual domain material point method (DDMP) with molecular dynamics (MD) in an attempt to create a multi-scale numerical method to simulate materials undergoing large deformations with high strain rates. In these types of problems, the material is often in a thermodynamically non-equilibrium state, and conventional constitutive relations are often not available. In this method, the closure quantities, such as stress, at each material point are calculated from a MD simulation of a group of atoms surrounding the material point. Rather than restricting the multi-scale simulation in a small spatial region, such as phase interfaces, or crack tips, this multi-scale method can be used to consider non-equilibrium thermodynamic e ects in a macroscopic domain. This method takes advantage that the material points only communicate with mesh nodes, not among themselves; therefore MD simulations for material points can be performed independently in parallel. First, using a one-dimensional shock problem as an example, the numerical properties of the original material point method (MPM), the generalized interpolation material point (GIMP) method, the convected particle domain interpolation (CPDI) method, and the DDMP method are investigated. Among these methods, only the DDMP method converges as the number of particles increases, but the large number of particles needed for convergence makes the method very expensive especially in our multi-scale method where we calculate stress in each material point using MD simulation. To improve DDMP, the sub-point method is introduced in this dissertation, which provides high quality numerical solutions with a very small number of particles. The multi-scale method based on DDMP with sub-points is successfully implemented for a one dimensional problem of shock wave propagation in a cerium crystal. The MD simulation to calculate stress in each material point is performed in GPU using CUDA to accelerate the

  13. The use of FTA cards for preserving unfixed cytological material for high-throughput molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saieg, Mauro Ajaj; Geddie, William R; Boerner, Scott L; Liu, Ni; Tsao, Ming; Zhang, Tong; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; da Cunha Santos, Gilda

    2012-06-25

    Novel high-throughput molecular technologies have made the collection and storage of cells and small tissue specimens a critical issue. The FTA card provides an alternative to cryopreservation for biobanking fresh unfixed cells. The current study compared the quality and integrity of the DNA obtained from 2 types of FTA cards (Classic and Elute) using 2 different extraction protocols ("Classic" and "Elute") and assessed the feasibility of performing multiplex mutational screening using fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy samples. Residual material from 42 FNA biopsies was collected in the cards (21 Classic and 21 Elute cards). DNA was extracted using the Classic protocol for Classic cards and both protocols for Elute cards. Polymerase chain reaction for p53 (1.5 kilobase) and CARD11 (500 base pair) was performed to assess DNA integrity. Successful p53 amplification was achieved in 95.2% of the samples from the Classic cards and in 80.9% of the samples from the Elute cards using the Classic protocol and 28.5% using the Elute protocol (P = .001). All samples (both cards) could be amplified for CARD11. There was no significant difference in the DNA concentration or 260/280 purity ratio when the 2 types of cards were compared. Five samples were also successfully analyzed by multiplex MassARRAY spectrometry, with a mutation in KRAS found in 1 case. High molecular weight DNA was extracted from the cards in sufficient amounts and quality to perform high-throughput multiplex mutation assays. The results of the current study also suggest that FTA Classic cards preserve better DNA integrity for molecular applications compared with the FTA Elute cards. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  14. Wall-collision line broadening of molecular oxygen within nanoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Can T.; Lewander, Maerta; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svensson, Tomas; Svanberg, Sune [Department of Physics, Lund University, P. O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Adolfsson, Erik [Ceramic Materials, SWEREA IVF, Box 104, SE-431 22 Moelndal (Sweden)

    2011-10-15

    Wall-collision broadening of near-infrared absorption lines of molecular oxygen confined in nanoporous zirconia is studied by employing high-resolution diode-laser spectroscopy. The broadening is studied for pores of different sizes under a range of pressures, providing new insights on how wall collisions and intermolecular collisions influence the total spectroscopic line profile. The pressure series show that wall-collision broadening is relatively more prominent under reduced pressures, enabling sensitive means to probe pore sizes of porous materials. In addition, we show that the total wall-collision-broadened profile strongly deviates from a Voigt profile and that wall-collision broadening exhibits an additive-like behavior to the pressure and Doppler broadening.

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy of three-dimensional Dirac material Sr3PbO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, D.; Nakamura, H.; Takagi, H.

    2016-07-01

    A series of anti-perovskites including Sr3PbO are recently predicted to be a three-dimensional Dirac material with a small mass gap, which may be a topological crystalline insulator. Here, we report the epitaxial growth of Sr3PbO thin films on LaAlO3 using molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction indicates (001) growth of Sr3PbO, where [110] of Sr3PbO matches [100] of LaAlO3. Measurements of the Sr3PbO films with parylene/Al capping layers reveal a metallic conduction with p-type carrier density of ˜1020 cm-3. The successful growth of high quality Sr3PbO film is an important step for the exploration of its unique topological properties.

  16. Ab Initio Molecular-Dynamics Simulation of Neuromorphic Computing in Phase-Change Memory Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Jonathan M; Loke, Desmond; Lee, Taehoon; Elliott, Stephen R

    2015-07-08

    We present an in silico study of the neuromorphic-computing behavior of the prototypical phase-change material, Ge2Sb2Te5, using ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. Stepwise changes in structural order in response to temperature pulses of varying length and duration are observed, and a good reproduction of the spike-timing-dependent plasticity observed in nanoelectronic synapses is demonstrated. Short above-melting pulses lead to instantaneous loss of structural and chemical order, followed by delayed partial recovery upon structural relaxation. We also investigate the link between structural order and electrical and optical properties. These results pave the way toward a first-principles understanding of phase-change physics beyond binary switching.

  17. Super-Resolution Molecular and Functional Imaging of Nanoscale Architectures in Life and Materials Science

    KAUST Repository

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2014-06-12

    Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

  18. Molecular studies of Cs adsorption sites in inorganic layered materials: the influence of solution concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiminori; Hunger, Michael

    2017-07-19

    Radioactive Cs released into a soil environment migrates along with groundwater in a manner dependent on Cs concentration. Data on the variation of Cs adsorption as a function of solution concentration are an essential prerequisite to successful decontamination work in Fukushima. To aid the ongoing decontamination work, the adsorption of Cs in aqueous solution across a wide Cs + molarity range is studied for the case of saponite clay as adsorbent, an inorganic layered material that is an abundant mineral in the soil environment. The local molecular structures, i.e. nanosheet surfaces, nanosheet edges, and oncoming hexagonal cavities, participating in Cs adsorption are qualitatively highlighted by means of a recently developed analytical method using data from a conventional elution test, 133 Cs magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR), and the radiocesium interception potential (RIP) [K. Sato, et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2016, 120, 1270]. The concentrations of nanosheet edges amount to between 100 and 400 mmol kg -1 , which are not substantially different from those of the nanosheet surfaces, generally regarded as the main decontamination sites. This unambiguously implies that the nanosheet edges should be targeted as the molecular sites for decontaminating radioactive Cs, in addition to the nanosheet surfaces.

  19. IAEA activities on atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction data for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2013-09-01

    The IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit (http://www-amdis.iaea.org/) aims to provide internationally evaluated and recommended data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M+PMI) processes in fusion research. The Unit organizes technical meetings and coordinates an A+M Data Centre Network (DCN) and a Code Centre Network (CCN). In addition the Unit organizes Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs), for which the objectives are mixed between development of new data and evaluation and recommendation of existing data. In the area of A+M data we are placing new emphasis in our meeting schedule on data evaluation and especially on uncertainties in calculated cross section data and the propagation of uncertainties through structure data and fundamental cross sections to effective rate coefficients. Following a recent meeting of the CCN it is intended to use electron scattering on Be, Ne and N2 as exemplars for study of uncertainties and uncertainty propagation in calculated data; this will be discussed further at the presentation. Please see http://www-amdis.iaea.org/CRP/ for more on our active and planned CRPs, which are concerned with atomic processes in core and edge plasma and with plasma interaction with beryllium-based surfaces and with irradiated tungsten.

  20. Synthesis and Surface-Specific Analysis of Molecular Constituents Relevant to Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be, A. G.; Upshur, M. A.; Chase, H. M.; Geiger, F.; Thomson, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles formed from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) remain a principal, yet elusive, class of airborne particulate matter that impacts the Earth's radiation budget. Given the characteristic molecular complexity comprising biogenic SOA particles, chemical information selective to the gas-aerosol interface may be valuable in the investigation of such systems, as surface considerations likely dictate the phenomena driving particle evolution mechanisms and climate effects. In particular, cloud activation processes may be parameterized using the surface tension depression that coincides with partitioning of surface-active organic species to the gas-droplet interface. However, the extent to which surface chemical processes, such as cloud droplet condensation, are influenced by the chemical structure and reactivity of individual surface-active molecules in SOA particles is largely unknown. We seek to study terpene-derived organic species relevant to the surfaces of biogenic SOA particles via synthesis of putative oxidation products followed by analysis using surface-selective physicochemical measurements. Using dynamic surface tension measurements, considerable differences are observed in the surface tension depression of aqueous pendant droplets that contain synthetically prepared ozonolysis products derived from abundant terpene precursors. Furthermore, sum frequency generation spectroscopy is utilized for comparison of the surface vibrational spectral responses of synthesized reference compounds with those observed for laboratory aerosol toward probing the surface composition of SOA material. Such ongoing findings highlight the underlying importance of molecular structure and reactivity when considering the surface chemistry of biogenic terpene-derived atmospheric aerosols.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between hydrogen and fusion-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooij, Dagmar de

    2010-01-01

    In a thermonuclear reactor fusion between hydrogen isotopes takes place, producing helium and energy. The so-called divertor is the part of the fusion reactor vessel where the plasma is neutralized in order to exhaust the helium. The surface plates of the divertor are subjected to high heat loads and high fluxes of energetic hydrogen and helium. In the next generation fusion device - the tokamak ITER - the expected conditions at the plates are particle fluxes exceeding 10 24 per second and square metre, particle energies ranging from 1 to 100 eV and an average heat load of 10 MW per square metre. Two materials have been identified as candidates for the ITER divertor plates: carbon and tungsten. Since there are currently no fusion devices that can create these harsh conditions, it is unknown how the materials will behave in terms of erosion and hydrogen retention. To gain more insight in the physical processes under these conditions molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted. Since diamond has been proposed as possible plasma facing material, we have studied erosion and hydrogen retention in diamond and amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H). As in experiments, diamond shows a lower erosion yield than a-C:H, however the hydrogen retention in diamond is much larger than in a-C:H and also hardly depending on the substrate temperature. This implies that simple heating of the surface is not sufficient to retrieve the hydrogen from diamond material, whereas a-C:H readily releases the retained hydrogen. So, in spite of the higher erosion yield carbon material other than diamond seems more suitable. Experiments suggest that the erosion yield of carbon material decreases with increasing flux. This was studied in our simulations. The results show no flux dependency, suggesting that the observed reduction is not a material property but is caused by external factors as, for example, redeposition of the erosion products. Our study of the redeposition showed that the

  2. Photocatalytic water splitting: Materials design and high-throughput screening of molecular compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khnayzer, Rony S.

    Due to the expected increases on energy demand in the near future, the development of new catalytic molecular compositions and materials capable of directly converting water, with the aid of solar photons, into hydrogen becomes obviated. Hydrogen is a combustible fuel and precious high-energy feedstock chemical. However, for the water-splitting reaction to proceed efficiently and economically enough for large-scale application, efficient light-absorbing sensitizers and water splitting catalysts are required. To study the kinetics of the water reduction reaction, we have used titania (TiO2) nanoparticles as a robust scaffold to photochemically grow platinum (Pt) nanoparticles from a unique surface-anchored molecular precursor Pt(dcbpy)Cl2 [dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxylic acid-2,2'-bipyridine]. The hybrid Pt/TiO 2 nanomaterials obtained were shown to be a superior water reduction catalyst (WRC) in aqueous suspensions when compared with the benchmark platinized TiO2. In addition, cobalt phosphate (CoPi) water oxidation catalyst (WOC) was photochemically assembled on the surface of TiO2, and its structure and mechanism of activity showed resemblance to the established electrochemically grown CoPi material. Both WRC and WOC described above possessed near unity Faradaic efficiency for hydrogen and oxygen production respectively, and were fully characterized by electron microscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electrochemistry and photochemistry. While there are established materials and molecules that are able to drive water splitting catalysis, some of these efficient semiconductors, including titanium dioxide (TiO2) and tungsten trioxide (WO3), are only able to absorb high-energy (ultraviolet or blue) photons. This high-energy light represents merely a fraction of the solar spectrum that strikes the earth and the energy content of those remaining photons is simply wasted. A strategy to mitigate this problem has been developed over the years in our laboratory. Briefly

  3. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Chiral Cylindrical Molecular Complexes: Functional Heterogeneous Liquid-Solid Materials Formed by Helicene Oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozomi Saito

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiral cylindrical molecular complexes of homo- and hetero-double-helices derived from helicene oligomers self-assemble in solution, providing functional heterogeneous liquid-solid materials. Gels and liotropic liquid crystals are formed by fibril self-assembly in solution; molecular monolayers and fibril films are formed by self-assembly on solid surfaces; gels containing gold nanoparticles emit light; silica nanoparticles aggregate and adsorb double-helices. Notable dynamics appears during self-assembly, including multistep self-assembly, solid surface catalyzed double-helix formation, sigmoidal and stairwise kinetics, molecular recognition of nanoparticles, discontinuous self-assembly, materials clocking, chiral symmetry breaking and homogeneous-heterogeneous transitions. These phenomena are derived from strong intercomplex interactions of chiral cylindrical molecular complexes.

  4. Evaluation of electronic states of implanted materials by molecular orbital calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Jun-ichi; Kano, Shigeki

    1997-07-01

    In order to understand the effect of implanted atom in ceramics and metals on the sodium corrosion, the electronic structures of un-implanted and implanted materials were calculated using DV-Xα cluster method which was one of molecular orbital calculations. The calculated materials were β-Si 3 N 4 , α-SiC and β-SiC as ceramics, and f.c.c. Fe, b.c.c. Fe and b.c.c. Nb as metals. An Fe, Mo and Hf atom for ceramics, and N atom for metals were selected as implanted atoms. Consequently, it is expected that the corrosion resistance of β-Si 3 N 4 is improved, because the ionic bonding reduced by the implantation. When the implanted atom is occupied at interstitial site in α-SiC and β-SiC, the ionic bonding reduced. Hence, there is a possibility to improve the corrosion resistance of α-SiC and β-SiC. It is clear that Hf is most effective element among implanted atoms in this study. As the covalent bond between N atom and surrounding Fe atoms increased largely in f.c.c. Fe by N implantation, it was expected that the corrosion resistance of f.c.c. Fe improved in liquid sodium. (J.P.N.)

  5. Molecular dynamics study of water molecule diffusion in oil-paper insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Ruijin; Zhu Mengzhao; Yang Lijun; Zhou Xin; Gong Chunyan

    2011-01-01

    Moisture is an important factor that influences the safe operation of transformers. In this study, molecular dynamics was employed to investigate the diffusion behavior of water molecules in the oil-paper insulation materials of transformers. Two oil-cellulose models were built. In the first model, water molecules were initially distributed in oil, and in the second model, water molecules were distributed in cellulose. The non-bonding energies of interaction between water molecules and oil, and between water molecules and cellulose, were calculated by the Dreiding force field. The interaction energy was found to play a dominant role in influencing the equilibrium distribution of water molecules. The radial direction functions of water molecules toward oil and cellulose indicate that the hydrogen bonds between water molecules and cellulose are sufficiently strong to withstand the operating temperature of the transformer. Mean-square displacement analysis of water molecules diffusion suggests that water molecules initially distributed in oil showed anisotropic diffusion; they tended to diffuse toward cellulose. Water molecules initially distributed in cellulose diffused isotropically. This study provides a theoretical contribution for improvements in online monitoring of water in transformers, and for subsequent research on new insulation materials.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of water molecule diffusion in oil-paper insulation materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao Ruijin [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhu Mengzhao, E-mail: xiaozhupost@163.co [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang Lijun; Zhou Xin; Gong Chunyan [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2011-03-01

    Moisture is an important factor that influences the safe operation of transformers. In this study, molecular dynamics was employed to investigate the diffusion behavior of water molecules in the oil-paper insulation materials of transformers. Two oil-cellulose models were built. In the first model, water molecules were initially distributed in oil, and in the second model, water molecules were distributed in cellulose. The non-bonding energies of interaction between water molecules and oil, and between water molecules and cellulose, were calculated by the Dreiding force field. The interaction energy was found to play a dominant role in influencing the equilibrium distribution of water molecules. The radial direction functions of water molecules toward oil and cellulose indicate that the hydrogen bonds between water molecules and cellulose are sufficiently strong to withstand the operating temperature of the transformer. Mean-square displacement analysis of water molecules diffusion suggests that water molecules initially distributed in oil showed anisotropic diffusion; they tended to diffuse toward cellulose. Water molecules initially distributed in cellulose diffused isotropically. This study provides a theoretical contribution for improvements in online monitoring of water in transformers, and for subsequent research on new insulation materials.

  7. Molecular beam epitaxy growth and characterization of two-six materials for visible semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Linfei

    This thesis proposes the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth and characterization of a new Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se based semiconductor materials system on InP substrates for visible light emitting diodes (LED) and lasers. The growth conditions for lattice-matched Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se layers with the desired bandgap have been established and optimized. A chemical etching technique to measure the defect density of Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se materials has been established. The accuracy of this method for revealing stacking faults and dislocations was verified by plan-view TEM. Using the techniques such as III-V buffer layer, Zn-irradiation, low-temperature growth, ZnCdSe interfacial layer and growth interruption to improve the quality of the interface of III-V and II-VI, the material quality of Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se has been improved dramatically. Defect density has been reduced from 10sp{10}\\ cmsp{-2} to {˜}5×10sp4\\ cmsp{-2}. The properties of this material system such as the quality and strain state in the epilayer, the dependence of bandgap on temperature, and the band offset have been studied by using double crystal x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence and capacitance voltage measurements. The ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe based quantum well (QW) structures have been grown and studied. Optically pumped lasing with emission range from red to blue has been obtained from ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe based separate-confinement single QW laser structures. The results demonstrate the potential for these materials as integrated full color display devices. Preliminary studies of the degradation behavior of ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe QW were performed. No dark line defects (DLDs) were observed during the degradation. A very strong room temperature differential negative resistance behavior was observed from Al/Znsb{0.61}Cdsb{0.39}Se/nsp+-InP devices, which is useful in millimeter-wave applications. We also found that these devices can be set to either in highly conductive or

  8. Stepwise transformation of the molecular building blocks in a porphyrin-encapsulating metal-organic material

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, ZhenJie

    2013-04-24

    When immersed in solutions containing Cu(II) cations, the microporous metal-organic material P11 ([Cd4(BPT)4]·[Cd(C 44H36N8)(S)]·[S], BPT = biphenyl-3,4′,5-tricarboxylate) undergoes a transformation of its [Cd 2(COO)6]2- molecular building blocks (MBBs) into novel tetranuclear [Cu4X2(COO)6(S) 2] MBBs to form P11-Cu. The transformation occurs in single-crystal to single-crystal fashion, and its stepwise mechanism was studied by varying the Cd2+/Cu2+ ratio of the solution in which crystals of P11 were immersed. P11-16/1 (Cd in framework retained, Cd in encapsulated porphyrins exchanged) and other intermediate phases were thereby isolated and structurally characterized. P11-16/1 and P11-Cu retain the microporosity of P11, and the relatively larger MBBs in P11-Cu permit a 20% unit cell expansion and afford a higher surface area and a larger pore size. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. MyLabStocks: a web-application to manage molecular biology materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuffart, Florent; Yvert, Gaël

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory stocks are the hardware of research. They must be stored and managed with mimimum loss of material and information. Plasmids, oligonucleotides and strains are regularly exchanged between collaborators within and between laboratories. Managing and sharing information about every item is crucial for retrieval of reagents, for planning experiments and for reproducing past experimental results. We have developed a web-based application to manage stocks commonly used in a molecular biology laboratory. Its functionalities include user-defined privileges, visualization of plasmid maps directly from their sequence and the capacity to search items from fields of annotation or directly from a query sequence using BLAST. It is designed to handle records of plasmids, oligonucleotides, yeast strains, antibodies, pipettes and notebooks. Based on PHP/MySQL, it can easily be extended to handle other types of stocks and it can be installed on any server architecture. MyLabStocks is freely available from: https://forge.cbp.ens-lyon.fr/redmine/projects/mylabstocks under an open source licence. © 2014 Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire de la Cellule CNRS. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Synthesis of Fe–Li–Cr Multinuclear Complexes as Molecular Magnet Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iis Siti Jahro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Multinuclear complexes have received considerable interest as molecular magnet materials. Up to now, several complex compounds based on bidentate ligand 2,2’ bipyridine have been synthesized. In this research, the Fe-Li-Cr multinuclear complexes with derivative 2’2- bipyridine ligands: 2-(2’-pyridylquinoline(pq, 2,2’-Pyridil(pdl have been synthesized. The oxalate (ox ligand has also been used as a bridging ligand in these multinuclear complexes. The chemical formula of Li[FeCr(ox2(pq(BF42(H2O2] and [Fe(pdln][LiCr(ox3] complexes have been verified using metal and C, H, N elemental analysis data. The IR spectra in 350 – 4000 cm-1 range exhibit characteristic absorptions, which support the proposed structure of complex. The plausible structure of the compounds has been drawn based on complex formation mechanism. The magnetic susceptibility at room temperature of the pq-complex is about 5.7 BM and of the pdl- complexes are 4.8 and 5.5 BM. These indicated that both spin states of iron(II exist in the multinuclear complexes.

  11. Elongational viscometry and bubble inflation experiments of two HDPE materials with different molecular structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Eggen, Svein; Malmberg, Anneli

    2002-01-01

    The most common materials used for manufacturing of bottles and containers for household and industrial packaging has been single reactor Chromium-catalyst HDPE materials. These materials etc.......The most common materials used for manufacturing of bottles and containers for household and industrial packaging has been single reactor Chromium-catalyst HDPE materials. These materials etc....

  12. A Splash to Nano-Sized Inorganic Energy-Materials by the Low-Temperature Molecular Precursor Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driess, Matthias; Panda, Chakadola; Menezes, Prashanth Wilfried

    2018-05-07

    The low-temperature synthesis of inorganic materials and their interfaces at the atomic and molecular level provides numerous opportunities for the design and improvement of inorganic materials in heterogeneous catalysis for sustainable chemical energy conversion or other energy-saving areas. Using suitable molecular precursors for functional inorganic nanomaterial synthesis allows for facile control over uniform particle size distribution, stoichiometry, and leads to desired chemical and physical properties. This minireview outlines some advantages of the molecular precursor approach in light of selected recent developments of molecule-to-nanomaterials synthesis for renewable energy applications, relevant for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and overall water-splitting. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. An eco-friendly molecularly imprinted fluorescence composite material based on carbon dots for fluorescent detection of 4-nitrophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Tongfan; Wei, Xiao; Nie, Yijing; Zhou, Zhiping; Xu, Yeqing; Yan, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    We on report an eco-friendly molecularly imprinted material based on carbon dots (C-dots) via a facile and efficient sol–gel polymerization for selective fluorescence detection of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). The amino-modified C-dots were firstly synthesized by a hydrothermal process using citric acid as the carbon source and poly(ethyleneimine) as the surface modifier, and then after a sol–gel molecular imprinting process, the molecularly imprinted fluorescence material was obtained. The material (MIP-C-dots) showed strong fluorescence from C-dots and high selectivity due to the presence of a molecular imprint. After the detection conditions were optimized, the relative fluorescence intensity (F_0/F) of MIP-C-dots presented a good linearity with 4-NP concentrations in the linear range of 0.2 − 50 μmol L"-"1 with a detection limit (3σ/k) of 0.06 μmol L"-"1. In addition, the correlation coefficient was 0.9978 and the imprinting factor was 2.76. The method was applicable to the determination of trace 4-NP in Yangtze River water samples and good recoveries from 92.6–107.3 % were obtained. The present study provides a general strategy to fabricate materials based on C-dots with good fluorescence property for selective fluorescence detection of organic pollutants. (author)

  14. Investigating the relative influences of molecular dimensions and binding energies on diffusivities of guest species inside nanoporous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this article is to investigate the relative influences of molecular dimensions and adsorption binding energies on unary diffusivities of guest species inside nanoporous crystalline materials such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The investigations are based

  15. Digital learning material for experimental design and model building in molecular biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Designing experimental approaches is a major cognitive skill in molecular biology research, and building models, including quantitative ones, is a cognitive skill which is rapidly gaining importance. Since molecular biology education at university level is aimed at educating future researchers, we

  16. Neutron cross sections of cryogenic materials: a synthetic kernel for molecular solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granada, J.R.; Gillette, V.H.; Petriw, S.; Cantargi, F.; Pepe, M.E.; Sbaffoni, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    A new synthetic scattering function aimed at the description of the interaction of thermal neutrons with molecular solids has been developed. At low incident neutron energies, both lattice modes and molecular rotations are specifically accounted for, through an expansion of the scattering law in few phonon terms. Simple representations of the molecular dynamical modes are used, in order to produce a fairly accurate description of neutron scattering kernels and cross sections with a minimum set of input data. As the neutron energies become much larger than that corresponding to the characteristic Debye temperature and to the rotational energies of the molecular solid, the 'phonon formulation' transforms into the traditional description for molecular gases. (orig.)

  17. Thin films of molecular materials synthesized from fisher's carbene ferrocenyl: Film formation and electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Vergara, M.E. [Coordinacion de Ingenieria Mecatronica. Escuela de Ingenieria, Universidad Anahuac del Norte. Avenida Lomas de la Anahuac s/n, Col. Lomas Anahuac, 52786, Huixquilucan (Mexico)], E-mail: elena.sanchez@anahuac.mx; Ortiz, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. A. P. 70-360, 04510, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Alvarez-Toledano, C.; Moreno, A. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Alvarez, J.R. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de Mexico. Calle del Puente 222, Col. Ejidos de Huipulco, 14380, Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2008-07-31

    The synthesis of materials from Fisher's carbene ferrocenyl of the elements chromium, molybdenum and tungsten was carried out. The Fisher's compounds that were synthesized included the following combinations of two different metallic atoms: iron with chromium, iron with molybdenum and iron with tungsten. The molecular solids' preparation was done in electro-synthesis cells with platinum electrodes. Thin films were prepared by vacuum thermal evaporation on quartz substrates and crystalline silicon wafers. Pellets and thin films from these compounds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry. The powder and thin films synthesized from these materials show the same intra-molecular bonds shown by infrared spectroscopy results, suggesting that thermal evaporation does not alter these bonds in spite of the thin films being amorphous, in contrast with other bimetallic complexes where material decomposition occurs. The differences in the conductivity values of the prepared films are very small, so they may be attributed to the different metallic ions employed in each case. The tungsten complex exhibits a higher conductivity than the molybdenum and chromium complexes at room temperature. Electrical conductivity values found for thin films are higher than for pellets made of the same molecular materials.

  18. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  19. Miscanthus plants used as an alternative biofuel material. The basic studies on ecology and molecular evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chang-Hung [Graduate Institute of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, College of Life Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung 404 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Miscanthus Anderss, widely distributed in Asia and Pacific Islands, possesses 20 species. Of which 8 species and 1 variety were recorded in Chinese Mainland; 6 species and 1 variety found in Japan; 5 species and 3 varieties distributed in Taiwan; 3 species documented in the Philippines; and rest of species have been recorded in Jawa, eastern Himalaya, and Sikkim. The plant is a C{sub 4} perennial grass with high productivity of biomass. In the 19th and early 20th centuries in Taiwan, Miscanthus was a very important crop used for forage grass, clothing, and shelter, etc. The relatively high germination, and high yield of biomass made the plant available for people of Taiwan including aboriginal. The taxonomic study of Miscanthus plants was much done by several scientists, and its ecological study has been only taken by the present author since 1972. Chou and his associates paid a great attention to elucidate the mechanism of dominance of Miscanthus vegetation and found that allelopathy plays an important role. In addition, the population biology of Miscanthus taxa by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoreses technique to examine the patterns of peroxidase and esterase among populations (over 100) of Miscanthus in Taiwan were conducted. They also elucidated the phylogenetic relationship among species and varieties in Taiwan. Chou and Ueng proposed an evolutionary trend of Miscanthus species, indicating that the Miscanthus sinensis was assumed to be the origin of Miscanthus Anderss, which evolved to M. sinensis var. formosana, and M. sinensis var. flavidus, and M. sinensis var. transmorrisonensis, and Miscanthus floridulus was thought to be an out group of M. sinensis complex. Moreover, molecular phylogeny was attempted to clarify the population heterogeneity of M. sinensis complex, resulting in a substantial information. It would be available for making hybridization between Miscanthus species and its related species, such as Saccharum (sugar cane) spp. which is a

  20. High-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar thermal storage materials using AZO/graphene hybrids by optimizing hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen; Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Chengqun; Li, Man; Li, Shipei; Cao, Chen; Long, Peng; Liu, Enzuo; Hu, Wenping; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2015-10-21

    An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high storage capacity of 138 Wh kg(-1) by optimizing intermolecular H-bonds with a good cycling stability for 50 cycles induced by visible light at 520 nm. Our work opens up a new method for making advanced molecular solar thermal storage materials by tuning molecular interactions on a nano-template.

  1. New organic-inorganic hybrid molecular systems and highly organized materials in catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustov, L. M.

    2015-11-01

    Definitions of hybrid materials are suggested, and applications of these materials are considered. Particular attention is focused on the application of hybrid materials in hydrogenation, partial oxidation, plant biomass conversion, and natural gas reforming, primarily on the use of core-shell nanoparticles and decorated metal nanoparticles in these reactions. Application prospects of various hybrid materials, particularly those of metal-organic frameworks, are discussed.

  2. Electrode Materials, Thermal Annealing Sequences, and Lateral/Vertical Phase Separation of Polymer Solar Cells from Multiscale Molecular Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang

    2014-12-10

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The nanomorphologies of the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer of polymer solar cells are extremely sensitive to the electrode materials and thermal annealing conditions. In this work, the correlations of electrode materials, thermal annealing sequences, and resultant BHJ nanomorphological details of P3HT:PCBM BHJ polymer solar cell are studied by a series of large-scale, coarse-grained (CG) molecular simulations of system comprised of PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/Al layers. Simulations are performed for various configurations of electrode materials as well as processing temperature. The complex CG molecular data are characterized using a novel extension of our graph-based framework to quantify morphology and establish a link between morphology and processing conditions. Our analysis indicates that vertical phase segregation of P3HT:PCBM blend strongly depends on the electrode material and thermal annealing schedule. A thin P3HT-rich film is formed on the top, regardless of bottom electrode material, when the BHJ layer is exposed to the free surface during thermal annealing. In addition, preferential segregation of P3HT chains and PCBM molecules toward PEDOT:PSS and Al electrodes, respectively, is observed. Detailed morphology analysis indicated that, surprisingly, vertical phase segregation does not affect the connectivity of donor/acceptor domains with respective electrodes. However, the formation of P3HT/PCBM depletion zones next to the P3HT/PCBM-rich zones can be a potential bottleneck for electron/hole transport due to increase in transport pathway length. Analysis in terms of fraction of intra- and interchain charge transports revealed that processing schedule affects the average vertical orientation of polymer chains, which may be crucial for enhanced charge transport, nongeminate recombination, and charge collection. The present study establishes a more detailed link between processing and morphology by combining multiscale molecular

  3. Research study on harmonized molecular materials (HMM); Bunshi kyocho zairyo ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    As functional material to satisfy various needs for environmental harmonization and efficient conversion for information-oriented and aging societies, HMM were surveyed. Living bodies effectively carry out transmission/processing of information, and transport/conversion of substances, and these functions are based on harmonization between organic molecules, and between those and metal or inorganic ones. HMM is a key substance to artificially realize these bio-related functions. Its R & D aims at (1) Making a breakthrough in production process based on innovation of material separation/conversion technology, (2) Contribution to an information-oriented society by high-efficiency devices, and (3) Growth of a functional bio-material industry. HMM is classified into three categories: (1) Assembly materials such as organic ultra-thin films (LB film, self-organizing film), and organic/inorganic hybrid materials for optoelectronics, sensors and devices, (2) Mesophase materials such as functional separation membrane and photo-conductive material, and (3) Microporous materials such as synthetic catalyst using guest/host materials. 571 refs., 88 figs., 21 tabs.

  4. Molecular Theory of Detonation Initiation: Insight from First Principles Modeling of the Decomposition Mechanisms of Organic Nitro Energetic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyshevsky, Roman V; Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija M

    2016-02-19

    This review presents a concept, which assumes that thermal decomposition processes play a major role in defining the sensitivity of organic energetic materials to detonation initiation. As a science and engineering community we are still far away from having a comprehensive molecular detonation initiation theory in a widely agreed upon form. However, recent advances in experimental and theoretical methods allow for a constructive and rigorous approach to design and test the theory or at least some of its fundamental building blocks. In this review, we analyzed a set of select experimental and theoretical articles, which were augmented by our own first principles modeling and simulations, to reveal new trends in energetic materials and to refine known existing correlations between their structures, properties, and functions. Our consideration is intentionally limited to the processes of thermally stimulated chemical reactions at the earliest stage of decomposition of molecules and materials containing defects.

  5. Molecular Theory of Detonation Initiation: Insight from First Principles Modeling of the Decomposition Mechanisms of Organic Nitro Energetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Tsyshevsky

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a concept, which assumes that thermal decomposition processes play a major role in defining the sensitivity of organic energetic materials to detonation initiation. As a science and engineering community we are still far away from having a comprehensive molecular detonation initiation theory in a widely agreed upon form. However, recent advances in experimental and theoretical methods allow for a constructive and rigorous approach to design and test the theory or at least some of its fundamental building blocks. In this review, we analyzed a set of select experimental and theoretical articles, which were augmented by our own first principles modeling and simulations, to reveal new trends in energetic materials and to refine known existing correlations between their structures, properties, and functions. Our consideration is intentionally limited to the processes of thermally stimulated chemical reactions at the earliest stage of decomposition of molecules and materials containing defects.

  6. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Energetic Materials: Toward a Molecular Understanding of Impact Sensitivity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dlott, Dana D

    2005-01-01

    ... with 1.5 Angstrom resolution. With 3D spectroscopy we have studied vibrational energy transfer in water and for the first time we have been able to watch vibrational energy flow across the interface between a molecular nanostructure and its surroundings.

  7. Using molecular mechanics to predict bulk material properties of fibronectin fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Bradshaw

    Full Text Available The structural proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM form fibers with finely tuned mechanical properties matched to the time scales of cell traction forces. Several proteins such as fibronectin (Fn and fibrin undergo molecular conformational changes that extend the proteins and are believed to be a major contributor to the extensibility of bulk fibers. The dynamics of these conformational changes have been thoroughly explored since the advent of single molecule force spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations but remarkably, these data have not been rigorously applied to the understanding of the time dependent mechanics of bulk ECM fibers. Using measurements of protein density within fibers, we have examined the influence of dynamic molecular conformational changes and the intermolecular arrangement of Fn within fibers on the bulk mechanical properties of Fn fibers. Fibers were simulated as molecular strands with architectures that promote either equal or disparate molecular loading under conditions of constant extension rate. Measurements of protein concentration within micron scale fibers using deep ultraviolet transmission microscopy allowed the simulations to be scaled appropriately for comparison to in vitro measurements of fiber mechanics as well as providing estimates of fiber porosity and water content, suggesting Fn fibers are approximately 75% solute. Comparing the properties predicted by single molecule measurements to in vitro measurements of Fn fibers showed that domain unfolding is sufficient to predict the high extensibility and nonlinear stiffness of Fn fibers with surprising accuracy, with disparately loaded fibers providing the best fit to experiment. This work shows the promise of this microstructural modeling approach for understanding Fn fiber properties, which is generally applicable to other ECM fibers, and could be further expanded to tissue scale by incorporating these simulated fibers into three dimensional

  8. Effect of gas adsorption on acoustic wave propagation in MFI zeolite membrane materials: experiment and molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Etoungh D; Blasco, Hugues; Da-Costa, Philippe; Drobek, Martin; Ayral, André; Le Clezio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles; Coasne, Benoit; Julbe, Anne

    2014-09-02

    The present study reports on the development of a characterization method of porous membrane materials which consists of considering their acoustic properties upon gas adsorption. Using acoustic microscopy experiments and atomistic molecular simulations for helium adsorbed in a silicalite-1 zeolite membrane layer, we showed that acoustic wave propagation could be used, in principle, for controlling the membranes operando. Molecular simulations, which were found to fit experimental data, showed that the compressional modulus of the composite system consisting of silicalite-1 with adsorbed He increases linearly with the He adsorbed amount while its shear modulus remains constant in a large range of applied pressures. These results suggest that the longitudinal and Rayleigh wave velocities (VL and VR) depend on the He adsorbed amount whereas the transverse wave velocity VT remains constant.

  9. Molecular Packing and Arrangement Govern the Photo-Oxidative Stability of Organic Photovoltaic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Mateker, William R.

    2015-08-19

    For long-term performance chemically robust materials are desired for organic solar cells (OSCs). Illuminating neat films of OSC materials in air and tracking the rate of absorption loss, or photobleaching, can quickly screen a material’s photo-chemical stability. In this report, we photobleach neat films of OSC materials including polymers, solution-processed oligomers, solution-processed small molecules, and vacuum-deposited small molecules. Across the materials we test, we observe photobleaching rates that span seven orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we find that the film morphology of any particular material impacts the observed photobleaching rate, and that amorphous films photobleach faster than crystalline ones. In an extreme case, films of amorphous rubrene photobleach at a rate 2500 times faster than polycrystalline films. When we compare density to photobleaching rate, we find that stability increases with density. We also investigate the relationship between backbone planarity and chemical reactivity. The polymer PBDTTPD is more photostable than it’s more twisted and less ordered furan derivitative, PBDFTPD. Finally, we relate our work to what is known about the chemical stability of structural polymers, organic pigments, and organic light emitting diode materials. For the highest chemical stability, planar materials that form dense, crystalline film morphologies should be designed for OSCs.

  10. Molecular Packing and Arrangement Govern the Photo-Oxidative Stability of Organic Photovoltaic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Mateker, William R.; Heumueller, Thomas; Cheacharoen, Rongrong; Sachs-Quintana, I. T.; Warnan, Julien; Liu, Xiaofeng; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Beaujuge, Pierre; McGehee, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    For long-term performance chemically robust materials are desired for organic solar cells (OSCs). Illuminating neat films of OSC materials in air and tracking the rate of absorption loss, or photobleaching, can quickly screen a material’s photo-chemical stability. In this report, we photobleach neat films of OSC materials including polymers, solution-processed oligomers, solution-processed small molecules, and vacuum-deposited small molecules. Across the materials we test, we observe photobleaching rates that span seven orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we find that the film morphology of any particular material impacts the observed photobleaching rate, and that amorphous films photobleach faster than crystalline ones. In an extreme case, films of amorphous rubrene photobleach at a rate 2500 times faster than polycrystalline films. When we compare density to photobleaching rate, we find that stability increases with density. We also investigate the relationship between backbone planarity and chemical reactivity. The polymer PBDTTPD is more photostable than it’s more twisted and less ordered furan derivitative, PBDFTPD. Finally, we relate our work to what is known about the chemical stability of structural polymers, organic pigments, and organic light emitting diode materials. For the highest chemical stability, planar materials that form dense, crystalline film morphologies should be designed for OSCs.

  11. Solid triphenylmethanol: A molecular material that undergoes multiple internal reorientational processes on different timescales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchin, Simon J.; Xu Mingcan; Serrano-Gonzalez, Heliodoro; Coates, Laura J.; Zaka Ahmed, S.; Glidewell, Christopher; Harris, Kenneth D.M.

    2006-01-01

    In solid triphenylmethanol, the molecules are arranged in hydrogen-bonded tetramers, and it is already well established that the hydrogen bonding in this material undergoes a dynamic switching process between different hydrogen bonding arrangements. In addition to this motion, we show here, from solid-state 2 H NMR studies of the deuterated material (C 6 D 5 ) 3 COH, that each phenyl ring in this material undergoes a 180 deg.-jump reorientation about the C 6 D 5 -C(OH) bond, with an activation energy of ca. 50 kJ mol -1 . The timescale for the phenyl ring dynamics is several orders of magnitude longer than the timescale for the hydrogen bond dynamics in this material, and is uncorrelated with the dynamics of the hydrogen bonding arrangement

  12. Super-Resolution Molecular and Functional Imaging of Nanoscale Architectures in Life and Materials Science

    KAUST Repository

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative

  13. Ring-Opening Polymerization of N-Carboxyanhydrides for Preparation of Polypeptides and Polypeptide-Based Hybrid Materials with Various Molecular Architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Pahovnik, David; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Different synthetic approaches utilizing ring-opening polymerization of N-carboxyanhydrides for preparation of polypeptide and polypeptide-based hybrid materials with various molecular architectures are described. An overview of polymerization

  14. Magnetic materials at finite temperatures: thermodynamics and combined spin and molecular dynamics derived from first principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenbach, Markus; Perera, Meewanage Dilina N.; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M.; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified approach to describe the combined behavior of the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom in magnetic materials. Using Monte Carlo simulations directly combined with first principles the Curie temperature can be obtained ab initio in good agreement with experimental values. The large scale constrained first principles calculations have been used to construct effective potentials for both the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom that allow the unified study of influence of phonon-magnon coupling on the thermodynamics and dynamics of magnetic systems. The MC calculations predict the specific heat of iron in near perfect agreement with experimental results from 300K to above Tc and allow the identification of the importance of the magnon-phonon interaction at the phase-transition. Further Molecular Dynamics and Spin Dynamics calculations elucidate the dynamics of this coupling and open the potential for quantitative and predictive descriptions of dynamic structure factors in magnetic materials using first principles-derived simulations.

  15. Recent advances in small molecular, non-polymeric organic hole transporting materials for solid-state DSSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui Thanh-Tuan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Issue from thin-film technologies, dye-sensitized solar cells have become one of the most promising technologies in the field of renewable energies. Their success is not only due to their low weight, the possibility of making large flexible surfaces, but also to their photovoltaic efficiency which are found to be more and more significant (>12% with a liquid electrolyte, >7% with a solid organic hole conductor. This short review highlights recent advances in the characteristics and use of low-molecular-weight glass-forming organic materials as hole transporters in all solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. These materials must feature specific physical and chemical properties that will ensure both the operation of a photovoltaic cell and the easy implementation. This review is an english extended version based on our recent article published in Matériaux & Techniques 101, 102 (2013.

  16. Molecularly Imprinted Porous Monolithic Materials from Melamine-Formaldehyde for Selective Trapping of Phosphopeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Mingquan; Tran, Tri Minh; Abbas Elhaj, Ahmed Awad

    2017-01-01

    monoliths, chosen based on the combination of meso- and macropores providing optimal percolative flow and accessible surface area, was synthesized in the presence of N-Fmoc and O-Et protected phosphoserine and phosphotyrosine to prepare molecularly imprinted monoliths with surface layers selective...... for phosphopeptides. These imprinted monoliths were characterized alongside nonimprinted monoliths by a variety of techniques and finally evaluated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in the capillary format to assess their abilities to trap and release phosphorylated amino acids and peptides from partly...

  17. Molecular Building Blocks for Nanotechnology From Diamondoids to Nanoscale Materials and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mansoori, G. Ali; Assoufid, Lahsen; Zhang, Guoping

    2007-01-01

    This book is a result of the research and educational activities of a group of outstanding scientists worldwide who have authored the chapters of this book dealing with the behavior of nanoscale building blocks. It contains a variety of subjects covering computational, dry and wet nanotechnology. The state-of-the-art subject matters presented here provide the reader with the latest developments on ongoing nanoscience and nanotechnology research from the bottom-up approach, which starts with with atoms and molecules as molecular building blocks.

  18. Molecular Self-Assembly for the preparation of novel nanostructured materials

    OpenAIRE

    Magaña Rodríguez, José Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    En las últimas décadas, el auto-ensamblaje molecular ha ganado importancia debido a su potencial tecnológico. El estudio de nuevas moléculas con capacidad de formar agregados funcionales es un área de investigación relevante en la ciencia de materiales. Los tensioactivos son los ejemplos más representativos de moléculas auto-ensambladas. Los tensioactivos están formados por una cadena hidrocarbonada (hidrófoba) y un grupo polar (hidrófilo). Los tensioactivos se auto- agregan en solución debid...

  19. III-nitride integration on ferroelectric materials of lithium niobate by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namkoong, Gon; Lee, Kyoung-Keun; Madison, Shannon M.; Henderson, Walter; Ralph, Stephen E.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2005-01-01

    Integration of III-nitride electrical devices on the ferroelectric material lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) has been demonstrated. As a ferroelectric material, lithium niobate has a polarization which may provide excellent control of the polarity of III-nitrides. However, while high temperature, 1000 deg. C, thermal treatments produce atomically smooth surfaces, improving adhesion of GaN epitaxial layers on lithium niobate, repolarization of the substrate in local domains occurs. These effects result in multi domains of mixed polarization in LiNbO 3 , producing inversion domains in subsequent GaN epilayers. However, it is found that AlN buffer layers suppress inversion domains of III-nitrides. Therefore, two-dimensional electron gases in AlGaN/GaN heterojunction structures are obtained. Herein, the demonstration of the monolithic integration of high power devices with ferroelectric materials presents possibilities to control LiNbO 3 modulators on compact optoelectronic/electronic chips

  20. Chitosan Derivatives: Introducing New Functionalities with a Controlled Molecular Architecture for Innovative Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldo M. Argüelles-Monal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The functionalization of polymeric substances is of great interest for the development of innovative materials for advanced applications. For many decades, the functionalization of chitosan has been a convenient way to improve its properties with the aim of preparing new materials with specialized characteristics. In the present review, we summarize the latest methods for the modification and derivatization of chitin and chitosan under experimental conditions, which allow a control over the macromolecular architecture. This is because an understanding of the interdependence between chemical structure and properties is an important condition for proposing innovative materials. New advances in methods and strategies of functionalization such as the click chemistry approach, grafting onto copolymerization, coupling with cyclodextrins, and reactions in ionic liquids are discussed.

  1. Molecular Environmental Science Using Synchrotron Radiation: Chemistry and Physics of Waste Form Materials. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindle, Dennis W.

    2011-01-01

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization. Specially formulated glass compositions and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites are the main candidates for these wastes. An important consideration linked to the durability of waste-form materials is the local structure around the waste components. Equally important is the local structure of constituents of the glass and ceramic host matrix. Knowledge of the structure in the waste-form host matrices is essential, prior to and subsequent to waste incorporation, to evaluate and develop improved waste-form compositions based on scientific considerations. This project used the soft-x-ray synchrotron-radiation-based technique of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) as a unique method for investigating oxidation states and structures of low-Z elemental constituents forming the backbones of glass and ceramic host matrices for waste-form materials. In addition, light metal ions in ceramic hosts, such as titanium, are also ideal for investigation by NEXAFS in the soft-x-ray region. Thus, one of the main objectives was to understand outstanding issues in waste-form science via NEXAFS investigations and to translate this understanding into better waste-form materials, followed by eventual capability to investigate 'real' waste-form materials by the same methodology. We conducted several detailed structural investigations of both pyrochlore ceramic and borosilicate-glass materials during the project and developed improved capabilities at Beamline 6.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to perform the studies.

  2. Molecular Environmental Science Using Synchrotron Radiation: Chemistry and Physics of Waste Form Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindle, Dennis W.

    2011-04-21

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization. Specially formulated glass compositions and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites are the main candidates for these wastes. An important consideration linked to the durability of waste-form materials is the local structure around the waste components. Equally important is the local structure of constituents of the glass and ceramic host matrix. Knowledge of the structure in the waste-form host matrices is essential, prior to and subsequent to waste incorporation, to evaluate and develop improved waste-form compositions based on scientific considerations. This project used the soft-x-ray synchrotron-radiation-based technique of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) as a unique method for investigating oxidation states and structures of low-Z elemental constituents forming the backbones of glass and ceramic host matrices for waste-form materials. In addition, light metal ions in ceramic hosts, such as titanium, are also ideal for investigation by NEXAFS in the soft-x-ray region. Thus, one of the main objectives was to understand outstanding issues in waste-form science via NEXAFS investigations and to translate this understanding into better waste-form materials, followed by eventual capability to investigate “real” waste-form materials by the same methodology. We conducted several detailed structural investigations of both pyrochlore ceramic and borosilicate-glass materials during the project and developed improved capabilities at Beamline 6.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to perform the studies.

  3. Design considerations for multi component molecular-polymeric nonlinear optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, K.D. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kuzyk, M.G. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Fang, T.; Holland, W.R. (AT and T Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (USA)); Cahill, P.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We review our work on multi component polymeric nonlinear optical materials. These materials consist of nonlinear optical molecules incorporated in a polymeric host. A cross-linked triazine polymer incorporating a dicyanovinyl terminated azo dye was found to be relatively stable at 85{degree} and posses an electro-optic coefficient of 11pm/V. We have also observed the zero dispersion condition in a new anomalous dispersion dye for phase matched second harmonic generation, and expect efficient conversion to the blue. A squarylium dye, ISQ, has been found to posses a large third order nonlinearity, and may display two-level behavior. 24 refs., 11 figs.

  4. Selected materials of the international workshop on radiation risk and its origin at molecular and cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2003-11-01

    The workshop ''International Workshop on Radiation Risk and its Origin at Molecular and Cellular Level'' was held at The Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, on the 6th and 7th of February 2003. The Laboratory of Radiation Risk Analysis of JAERI organized it. This international workshop attracted scientists from several different scientific areas, including radiation physics, radiation biology, molecular biology, crystallography of biomolecules, modeling and bio-informatics. Several foreign and domestic keynote speakers addresses the very fundamental areas of radiation risk and tried to establish a link between the fundamental studies at the molecular and cellular level and radiation damages at the organism. The symposium consisted of 13 oral lectures, 10 poster presentations and panel discussion. The 108 participants attended the workshop. This publication comprises of proceedings of oral and poster presentations where available. For the rest of contributions the abstracts or/and selections of presentation materials are shown instead. The 5 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. Molecular engineering with artificial atoms: designing a material platform for scalable quantum spintronics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Matthew F.; Ma, Xiangyu; Zide, Joshua M. O.; Bryant, Garnett W.

    2017-09-01

    Self-assembled InAs Quantum Dots (QDs) are often called "artificial atoms" and have long been of interest as components of quantum photonic and spintronic devices. Although there has been substantial progress in demonstrating optical control of both single spins confined to a single QD and entanglement between two separated QDs, the path toward scalable quantum photonic devices based on spins remains challenging. Quantum Dot Molecules, which consist of two closely-spaced InAs QDs, have unique properties that can be engineered with the solid state analog of molecular engineering in which the composition, size, and location of both the QDs and the intervening barrier are controlled during growth. Moreover, applied electric, magnetic, and optical fields can be used to modulate, in situ, both the spin and optical properties of the molecular states. We describe how the unique photonic properties of engineered Quantum Dot Molecules can be leveraged to overcome long-standing challenges to the creation of scalable quantum devices that manipulate single spins via photonics.

  6. Effects of substrate material on carbon films grown by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, M.; Xu, X.Y.; Man, B.Y.; Kong, D.M.; Xu, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We prepared tri-layers by laser molecular beam epitaxy (LMBE) on sapphire substrate. ► We found that the formation of the graphene film has a strong relation to the structure and properties of the substrate. ► The different carbon film formation mechanism of the buffer layers can affect the morphology of the film. - Abstract: The carbon thin films were grown on different substrates with different buffer layers by laser molecular beam epitaxy (LMBE) with a high purity graphite carbon target. A UV pulsed KrF excimer laser with a wavelength of 248 nm was used as laser source. The structure, surface morphology and other properties of the carbon thin films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the properties of the carbon thin films and the formation of the graphene film have a strong relation to the structure and properties of the substrate. The substrate with a hexagonal wurtzite structure which is similar to the hexagonal honeycomb structure of the carbon atoms arranged in the graphene is more beneficial for the formation of the graphene thin film. In our experiment conditions, the carbon films grown on sapphire substrates with different buffer layers have an ordered structure and a smooth surface, and form high quality tri-layer graphene films.

  7. An equal force theory for network models of soft materials with arbitrary molecular weight distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verron, E.; Gros, A.

    2017-09-01

    Most network models for soft materials, e.g. elastomers and gels, are dedicated to idealized materials: all chains admit the same number of Kuhn segments. Nevertheless, such standard models are not appropriate for materials involving multiple networks, and some specific constitutive equations devoted to these materials have been derived in the last few years. In nearly all cases, idealized networks of different chain lengths are assembled following an equal strain assumption; only few papers adopt an equal stress assumption, although some authors argue that such hypothesis would reflect the equilibrium of the different networks in contact. In this work, a full-network model with an arbitrary chain length distribution is derived by considering that chains of different lengths satisfy the equal force assumption in each direction of the unit sphere. The derivation is restricted to non-Gaussian freely jointed chains and to affine deformation of the sphere. Firstly, after a proper definition of the undeformed configuration of the network, we demonstrate that the equal force assumption leads to the equality of a normalized stretch in chains of different lengths. Secondly, we establish that the network with chain length distribution behaves as an idealized full-network of which both chain length and density of are provided by the chain length distribution. This approach is finally illustrated with two examples: the derivation of a new expression for the Young modulus of bimodal interpenetrated polymer networks, and the prediction of the change in fluorescence during deformation of mechanochemically responsive elastomers.

  8. Solid state photochemistry. Subpanel A-2(a): Design of molecular precursors for electronic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, R.L. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Recent achievements of synthetic chemistry in the field of electronic materials are presented in three categories; viz, precursor design for improved processing, new chemistry for selective growth, and new growth techniques. This is followed by a discussion of challenges and opportunities in two general areas designated as composition and structure, and growth and processing.

  9. [Preparation of molecularly imprinted polypyrrole/Fe3O4 composite material and its application in recognition of tryptophan enantiomers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhidong; Shan, Xueling; Kong, Yong

    2012-04-01

    Ferrosoferric oxide (Fe(3)O(4)) magnetic material was first synthesized, and then the in-situ chemical polymerization of pyrrole was carried out on the surface of Fe(3)O(4) by using pyrole and L-tryptophan (L-Trp) as the functional monomer and templates, respectively. As a result, molecularly imprinted polypyrrole/Fe(3)O(4) composite material was obtained. This composite material was separated from the solution because of its magnetic property. Polypyrrole in the composite was overoxidized in 1 mol/L NaOH solution by applying a potential of 1.0 V, and thus L-Trp templates were de-deoped from the composite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electrochemical methods were employed to characterize the composite. The solution containing L- or D-Trp was pumped through a porous ceramic tube packed with the composite, separately. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was adopted for the detection of L- or D-Trp in the eluate, and the results indicated that the enrichment ability of the composite for L-Trp was almost 2 times that of D-Trp. Therefore, the electro-magnetic composite material has potential applications as chromatographic stationary phase for chiral recognition.

  10. Substitutional HCN- molecular ions in KCN crystal: a paramagnetic probe in a ferroelastic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weid, J.P. von der; Carmo, L.C.S. do; Ribeiro, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    The HCN - molecular ion was produced in single crystals of KCN: 10 -2 OH - irradiated by UV light at 77 K. The spin Hamiltonian parameters were measured at 60 K and the temperature dependence of the spectrum was investigated between 60 K and 170 K. This temperature dependence is explained by the rapid motion of the molecule with the increasing temperature and the elastic interaction of the molecule with the surrounding ions. Using the similarity between the paramagnetic HCN - molecule and the CN - ions of the host lattice a qualitative picture of the local phenomena occuring in the ferroelastic phase of KCN could be made and the energy of the elastic interaction between CN - was estimated of the order of 7 meV [pt

  11. Methodology for studying molecular and supramolecular structures of coals and carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.B. Skripchenko [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Russia Institute for Fossil Fuels - Science and Technology Center for Complex Processing of Solid Fossil Fuels

    2009-07-01

    Those studying coals have to account for petrographic nonuniformity (the optical structural level), different types of chemical bonding between structural fragments, the existence of aromatic clusters in the organic matter, the appearance of a supramolecular order between aromatic clusters, and further orientation ordering of crystallites under the action of the geological pressure. Combinations of conventional chemical strategies with advanced physicochemical methods, such as IR, NMR, EPR, and X-ray spectroscopy; X-ray diffraction; electronic and scanning microscopy; and some others, are pertinent for structure determination. The appearance of supramolecular structures is a manifestation of molecular-level structural rearrangements, which are characteristic of coals, cokes, pitches, and various pyrolytic carbons. This necessitates the use of optical, electronic, and scanning microscopy along with other chemical methods. The occurrence of mineral components in coals can appreciably limit the resolution of IR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography.

  12. Molecular design and theoretical characterization of benzodithiophene based organic photovoltaic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Labanya; Sahu, Sridhar

    2018-05-01

    Two different oligomers, containing methyl substituted Benzodithiophene (BDT) as donor unit, fluorinated thiophene as the π-bridge unit and two different kinds of acceptors based on fluorinated benzothiadiazole, fluorinated benzoselenadiazole units are designed for bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cell (OSC). The ground and excited state properties of those donor-π-acceptor-π-donor (D-π-A-π-D) oligomeric configurations are characterized via density functional (DFT) and time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The parameters such as dipole moment (ρ), chemical potential (µ), electronegativity (χ), frontier molecular orbital (FMO) analysis, HOMO-LUMO gap, open circuit voltage (Voc) and driving force (ΔE) are calculated to analyze geometrical, electronic structural, quantum chemical and photovoltaic properties of the compounds. In addition, optical absorption spectra are also presented for the optical characterization of the compounds.

  13. Integration of molecular machines into supramolecular materials: actuation between equilibrium polymers and crystal-like gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Giacomo; Goujon, Antoine; Moulin, Emilie; Rawiso, Michel; Giuseppone, Nicolas; Buhler, Eric

    2017-11-30

    In this article, the dynamic structure of complex supramolecular polymers composed of bistable [c2]daisy chain rotaxanes as molecular machines that are linked by ureidopyrimidinones (Upy) as recognition moieties was studied. pH actuation of the integrated mechanically active rotaxanes controls the contraction/extension of the polymer chains as well as their physical reticulation. Small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering were used to study in-depth the nanostructure of the contracted and extended polymer aggregates in toluene solution. The supramolecular polymers comprising contracted nanomachines were found to be equilibrium polymers with a mass that is concentration dependent in dilute and semidilute regimes. Surprisingly, the extended polymers form a gel network with a crystal-like internal structure that is independent of concentration and reminiscent of a pearl-necklace network.

  14. Molecular dynamics modeling of bonding two materials by atomic scale friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko S., Iv.; Konovalenko, Ig. S.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Molecular dynamics model of atomic scale friction stir welding has been developed. Formation of a butt joint between two crystallites was modeled by means of rotating rigid conical tool traveling along the butt joint line. The formed joint had an intermixed atomic structure composed of atoms initially belonged to the opposite mated piece of metal. Heat removal was modeled by adding the extra viscous force to peripheral atomic layers. This technique provides the temperature control in the tool-affected zone during welding. Auxiliary vibration action was added to the rotating tool. The model provides the variation of the tool's angular velocity, amplitude, frequency and direction of the auxiliary vibration action to provide modeling different welding modes.

  15. Materials for Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms: Molecular Pharmaceutics and Controlled Release Drug Delivery Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. DeLuca

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled release delivery is available for many routes of administration and offers many advantages (as microparticles and nanoparticles over immediate release delivery. These advantages include reduced dosing frequency, better therapeutic control, fewer side effects, and, consequently, these dosage forms are well accepted by patients. Advances in polymer material science, particle engineering design, manufacture, and nanotechnology have led the way to the introduction of several marketed controlled release products and several more are in pre-clinical and clinical development.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between energetic dust and plasma-facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Guo-jian; Li, Xiao-chun; Xu, Qian; Yang, Zhong-shi; Luo, Guang-nan

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between dust and plasma-facing material (PFM) relate to the lifetime of PFM and impurity production. Series results have been obtained theoretically and experimentally but more detailed studies are needed. In present research, we investigate the evolution of kinetic, potential and total energy of plasma-facing material (PFM) in order to understand the dust/PFM interaction process. Three typical impacting energy are selected, i.e., 1, 10 and 100 keV/dust for low-, high- and hyper-energy impacting cases. For low impacting energy, dust particles stick on PFM surface without damaging it. Two typical time points exist and the temperature of PFM grows all the time but PFM structure experience a modifying process. Under high energy case, three typical points appear. The temperature curve fluctuates in the whole interaction process which indicates there are dust/PFM and kinetic/potential energy exchanges. In the hyper-energy case in present simulation, the violence dust/PFM interactions cause sputtering and crater investigating on energy evolution curves. We further propose the statistics of energy distribution. Results show that about half of impacting energy consumes on heating plasma-facing material meanwhile the other half on PFM structure deformation. Only a small proportion becomes kinetic energy of interstitial or sputtering atoms.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between energetic dust and plasma-facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Guo-jian, E-mail: niugj@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Li, Xiao-chun; Xu, Qian; Yang, Zhong-shi [Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-nan [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of CAS, Hefei (China)

    2015-11-15

    The interactions between dust and plasma-facing material (PFM) relate to the lifetime of PFM and impurity production. Series results have been obtained theoretically and experimentally but more detailed studies are needed. In present research, we investigate the evolution of kinetic, potential and total energy of plasma-facing material (PFM) in order to understand the dust/PFM interaction process. Three typical impacting energy are selected, i.e., 1, 10 and 100 keV/dust for low-, high- and hyper-energy impacting cases. For low impacting energy, dust particles stick on PFM surface without damaging it. Two typical time points exist and the temperature of PFM grows all the time but PFM structure experience a modifying process. Under high energy case, three typical points appear. The temperature curve fluctuates in the whole interaction process which indicates there are dust/PFM and kinetic/potential energy exchanges. In the hyper-energy case in present simulation, the violence dust/PFM interactions cause sputtering and crater investigating on energy evolution curves. We further propose the statistics of energy distribution. Results show that about half of impacting energy consumes on heating plasma-facing material meanwhile the other half on PFM structure deformation. Only a small proportion becomes kinetic energy of interstitial or sputtering atoms.

  18. Dynamic High Pressure Study of Chemistry and Physics of Molecular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezowski, Sebastian Ryszard

    Both temperature and pressure control and influence the packing of molecules in crystalline phases. Our molecular simulations indicate that at ambient pressure, the cubic polymorph of tetracyanoethylene, TCNE, is the energetically stable form up to ˜ 160 K. The observed transition from the cubic to the monoclinic polymorph occurs however only at temperatures above ˜ 318 K due to the large transition barrier. The temperature-induced phase transition in TCNE studied with high-resolution IR spectroscopy is explained in terms of the increased vibrational entropy in the crystals of the monoclinic polymorph. Based upon the inverted design of the Merril-Bassett Diamond Anvil Cell, an improved, second generation dynamic Diamond Anvil Cell was developed. Based on the fluorescence of ruby crystals, we were able to demonstrate that the pressure variation range can be further increased at least up to 7 kbar and that the dynamic pressure compression of up to 1400 GPa/s can be achieved. A new class of mechanophoric system, bis-anthracene, BA, and its photoisomer, PI, is shown to respond reversibly to a mild, static pressure induced by a Diamond Anvil Cell as well as to shear deformation based on absorption spectroscopic measurements. The forward reaction occurs upon illumination with light while the back-reaction may be accelerated upon heating or mechanical stress, coupled to a rehybridization on four equivalent carbon atoms. It is an intriguing result as high pressure stabilizes the photodimerized species in related systems. Our molecular volume simulations ruled out significant differences in the volumes between bis-anthracene and its photoisomer. Kinetic absorption measurements at several different pressures reveal a negative volume of activation in the exothermic back-reaction at room temperature. Through a series of temperature-dependent kinetic measurements it is shown that the barrier of activation for the back-reaction is reduced by more than an order of magnitude at

  19. Light-induced second-order nonlinear optical properties of molecular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, Celine

    1995-01-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of all-optical orientation. The work focusses more particularly on the realization of poled polymers for quadratic nonlinear optics. It is shown that the coherent superposition of two beams at fundamental and second harmonic frequencies results in the breaking of the former centro-symmetry of the material. The source is a Neodymium-YAG laser delivering 25 ps pulses at 1064 nm. The incident second-harmonic beam is obtained by frequency doubling in a KDP crystal. Using a phase conjugation configuration based on six-wave mixing interactions, we have Investigated in detail the mechanism of photo-induced second-harmonic generation in initially centrosymmetric materials. It is shown that the light-induced non-centro-symmetry is due to an orientational hole burning of the molecules. The process involves interference effects between one and two photon absorptions. Experiments are performed in various solutions of an azo-dye molecule (Disperse Red One). The possibility of inducing quasi-permanent second-order susceptibility in a PMMA polymer matrix doped with the azo-dye molecule of Disperse Red One is also demonstrated. The method of all-optical poling consists in a seeding type process with alternate writing and probing phases. Permanent orientation of the molecules can be described in terms of photo-isomerization processes. It leads to a poling of the molecules with a spatial modulation which is phase-matched for frequency doubling. Relevant parameters leading to an efficient polarisation of the sample are identified. A theoretical modelling of the different phenomena observed is proposed. Last part of the study is devoted to an enlarged study of the potentialities offered by this dual-frequency holography technique: orientation of octupolar molecules, polarisation of highly transparent materials. We also show that the new techniques developed during this work can also reveal to be complementary methods for nonlinear

  20. Non-equilibrium dynamics in disordered materials: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Yao, Makoto; Shimojo, Fuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic properties of liquid B 2 O 3 under pressure and highly-charged bromophenol molecule are studied by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on density functional theory (DFT). Diffusion properties of covalent liquids under high pressure are very interesting in the sense that they show unexpected pressure dependence. It is found from our simulation that the magnitude relation of diffusion coefficients for boron and oxygen in liquid B 2 O 3 shows the anomalous pressure dependence. The simulation clarified the microscopic origin of the anomalous diffusion properties. Our simulation also reveals the dissociation mechanism in the coulomb explosion of the highly-charged bromophenol molecule. When the charge state n is 6, hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl group dissociates at times shorter than 20 fs while all hydrogen atoms dissociate when n is 8. After the hydrogen dissociation, the carbon ring breaks at about 100 fs. There is also a difference on the mechanism of the ring breaking depending on charge states, in which the ring breaks with expanding (n = 6) or shrink (n = 8)

  1. Antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state in the single-component molecular material Pd(tmdt)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Rina; Sari, Dita Puspita; Mohd-Tajudin, Saidah Sakinah; Ashi, Retno; Watanabe, Isao; Ishibashi, Shoji; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Ogura, Satomi; Zhou, Biao; Kobayashi, Akiko; Kanoda, Kazushi

    2017-12-01

    A family of compounds built by a single molecular species, M (tmdt) 2, with a metal ion, M , and organic ligands, tmdt, affords diverse electronic phases due to M -dependent interplays between d electrons in M , and π electrons in tmdt. We investigated the spin state in Pd (tmdt) 2 , a π -electron system without a d -electron contribution, through 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and muon-spin resonance experiments. The temperature profiles of the NMR linewidth, relaxation rate, and asymmetry parameter in muon decay show an inhomogeneous antiferromagnetic order with moments distributed around ˜0.1 μB that onsets at above 100 K. This result provides an example of the antiferromagnetic order in a pure π -electron system in M (tmdt) 2, and it demonstrates that correlation among the π electrons is so strong as to give the Néel temperature over 100 K. The small and inhomogeneous moments are understandable as the crucial disorder effect in correlated electrons situated near the Mott transition.

  2. Correlating TEM images of damage in irradiated materials to molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeublin, R.; Caturla, M.-J.; Wall, M.; Felter, T.; Fluss, M.; Wirth, B.D.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Victoria, M.

    2002-01-01

    TEM image simulations are used to couple the results from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to experimental TEM images. In particular we apply this methodology to the study of defects produced during irradiation. MD simulations have shown that irradiation of FCC metals results in a population of vacancies and interstitials forming clusters. The limitation of these simulations is the short time scales available, on the order of 100 s of picoseconds. Extrapolation of the results from these short times to the time scales of the laboratory has been difficult. We address this problem by two methods: we perform TEM image simulations of MD simulations of cascades with an improved technique, to relate defects produced at short time scales with those observed experimentally at much longer time scales. On the other hand we perform in situ TEM experiments of Au irradiated at liquid-nitrogen temperatures, and study the evolution of the produced damage as the temperature is increased to room temperature. We find that some of the defects observed in the MD simulations at short time scales using the TEM image simulation technique have features that resemble those observed in laboratory TEM images of irradiated samples. In situ TEM shows that stacking fault tetrahedra are present at the lowest temperatures and are stable during annealing up to room temperature, while other defect clusters migrate one dimensionally above -100 deg. C. Results are presented here

  3. A versatile single molecular precursor for the synthesis of layered oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maofan; Liu, Jiajie; Liu, Tongchao; Zhang, Mingjian; Pan, Feng

    2018-02-01

    A carbonyl-bridged single molecular precursor LiTM(acac) 3 [transition metal (TM) = cobalt/manganese/nickel (Co/Mn/Ni), acac = acetylacetone], featuring a one-dimensional chain structure, was designed and applied to achieve the layered oxide cathode materials: LiTMO 2 (TM = Ni/Mn/Co, NMC). As examples, layered oxides, primary LiCoO 2 , binary LiNi 0.8 Co 0.2 O 2 and ternary LiNi 0.5 Mn 0.3 Co 0.2 O 2 were successfully prepared to be used as cathode materials. When they are applied to lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), all exhibit good electrochemical performance because of their unique morphology and great uniformity of element distribution. This versatile precursor is predicted to accommodate many other metal cations, such as aluminum (Al 3+ ), iron (Fe 2+ ), and sodium (Na + ), because of the flexibility of organic ligand, which not only facilitates the doping-modification of the NMC system, but also enables synthesis of Na-ion layered oxides. This opens a new direction of research for the synthesis of high-performance layered oxide cathode materials for LIBs.

  4. Molecular and Material Approaches to Overcome Kinetic and Energetic Constraints in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, Thomas [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-08-14

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have attracted a lot of interest as they proffer the possibility of extremely inexpensive and efficient solar energy conversion. The excellent performance of the most efficient DSSCs relies on two main features: 1) a high surface area nanoparticle semiconductor photoanode to allow for excellent light absorption with moderate extinction molecular dyes and 2) slow recombination rates from the photoanode to I3- allowing good charge collection. The I3-/I- couple, however, has some disadvantages, notably the redox potential limits the maximum open-circuit voltage, and the dye regeneration requires a large driving force which constrains the light harvesting ability. Thus, the design features that allow DSSCs to perform as well as they do also prevent further significant improvements in performance. As a consequence, the most efficient device configuration, and the maximum efficiency, has remained essentially unchanged over the last 16 years. Significant gains in performance are possible; however it will likely require a substantial paradigm shift. The general goal of this project is to understand the fundamental role of dye-sensitized solar cell, DSSC, components (sensitizer, redox shuttle, and photoanode) involved in key processes in order to overcome the kinetic and energetic constraints of current generation DSSCs. For example, the key to achieving high energy conversion efficiency DSSCs is the realization of a redox shuttle which fulfills the dual requirements of 1) efficient dye regeneration with a minimal driving force and 2) efficient charge collection. In current generation DSSCs, however, only one or the other of these requirements is met. We are currently primarily interested in understanding the physical underpinnings of the regeneration and recombination reactions. Our approach is to systematically vary the components involved in reactions and interrogate them with a

  5. Molecular design of photovoltaic materials for polymer solar cells: toward suitable electronic energy levels and broad absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongfang

    2012-05-15

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs) sandwich a blend layer of conjugated polymer donor and fullerene derivative acceptor between a transparent ITO positive electrode and a low work function metal negative electrode. In comparison with traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, PSCs offer a simpler device structure, easier fabrication, lower cost, and lighter weight, and these structures can be fabricated into flexible devices. But currently the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSCs is not sufficient for future commercialization. The polymer donors and fullerene derivative acceptors are the key photovoltaic materials that will need to be optimized for high-performance PSCs. In this Account, I discuss the basic requirements and scientific issues in the molecular design of high efficiency photovoltaic molecules. I also summarize recent progress in electronic energy level engineering and absorption spectral broadening of the donor and acceptor photovoltaic materials by my research group and others. For high-efficiency conjugated polymer donors, key requirements are a narrower energy bandgap (E(g)) and broad absorption, relatively lower-lying HOMO (the highest occupied molecular orbital) level, and higher hole mobility. There are three strategies to meet these requirements: D-A copolymerization for narrower E(g) and lower-lying HOMO, substitution with electron-withdrawing groups for lower-lying HOMO, and two-dimensional conjugation for broad absorption and higher hole mobility. Moreover, better main chain planarity and less side chain steric hindrance could strengthen π-π stacking and increase hole mobility. Furthermore, the molecular weight of the polymers also influences their photovoltaic performance. To produce high efficiency photovoltaic polymers, researchers should attempt to increase molecular weight while maintaining solubility. High-efficiency D-A copolymers have been obtained by using benzodithiophene (BDT), dithienosilole

  6. FY 1991 Report on the results of the research and development of silicon-based high-molecular-weight materials; 1991 nendo keisokei kobunshi zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-03-01

    The research and development project has been started to establish the basic technologies for molecular designs, synthesis, material production and evaluation of silicon-based high-molecular-weight materials expected to exhibit excellent characteristics, e.g., electro-optical functions, resistance to heat, flame retardance and mechanical properties. The efforts in FY 1991, the first year for the 10-year project, are mainly directed to the surveys on the R and D trends, both domestic and foreign, to clarify the relationship between the structures and functions/properties. The R and D projects followed include the technologies for synthesizing (1) electroconductive silicon-based high-molecular-weight materials, (2) novel silicon-based high-molecular-weight materials capable of drawing circuits, (3) novel, light-emitting silicon-based high-molecular-weight materials and (4) silicon-based opto-electric conversion materials for the electro-optical functional high-molecular-weight materials; and (1) synthesis of high-molecular-weight structural materials of sea island structure, (2) technologies for forming inter-penetrating type structures (IPN), (3) development of composite structural materials of organometallic complex and silicon-based high-molecular-weight material, and (4) development of silicon-based high-molecular-weight materials of ring structure for the high-molecular-weight structural materials. (NEDO)

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of self-diffusion processes in titanium in bulk material, on grain junctions and on surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushko, Gennady B; Verkhovtsev, Alexey V; Yakubovich, Alexander V; Schramm, Stefan; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2014-08-21

    The process of self-diffusion of titanium atoms in a bulk material, on grain junctions and on surface is explored numerically in a broad temperature range by means of classical molecular dynamics simulation. The analysis is carried out for a nanoscale cylindrical sample consisting of three adjacent sectors and various junctions between nanocrystals. The calculated diffusion coefficient varies by several orders of magnitude for different regions of the sample. The calculated values of the bulk diffusion coefficient correspond reasonably well to the experimental data obtained for solid and molten states of titanium. Investigation of diffusion in the nanocrystalline titanium is of a significant importance because of its numerous technological applications. This paper aims to reduce the lack of data on diffusion in titanium and describe the processes occurring in bulk, at different interfaces and on surface of the crystalline titanium.

  8. The Importance of Interactions at the Molecular Level: A Spectroscopic Study of a New Composite Sorber Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocellà, Valentina; Groppo, Elena; Dani, Alessandro; Castellero, Alberto; Bordiga, Silvia; Zilio, Stefano; De Simone, Agnello; Vacca, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    The functional properties of a new composite material having water vapor getter properties have been investigated by a large arsenal of characterization techniques. The composite system is originated by combining two constituents having very different chemical natures, a magnesium perchlorate (Mg(ClO 4 ) 2 ) salt and a polymeric acrylic matrix. In particular, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy have been fundamental to understand the type of interactions between the salt and the matrix in different hydration conditions. It was found that in the anhydrous composite system the dispersed Mg(ClO 4 ) 2 salt retains its molecular structure, because Mg 2+ cations are still surrounded by their [ClO 4 ] - counter-anions; at the same time, the salt and the polymeric matrix chemically interact each other at the molecular level. These interactions gradually vanish in the presence of water, and disappear in the fully hydrated composite system, where the Mg 2+ cations are completely solvated by the water molecules.

  9. [The molecular composition and spectral properties of polysaccharide isolated from pu-erh tea and its material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jia-shun; Hu, Xiao-jing; Peng, Chun-xiu; Zhou, Hong-jie

    2010-07-01

    Pu-erh tea, a kind of well-known tea from the ancient time, is originally produced in the Yunnan Lanchan River basin through a special solid state fermentation by fungi. It uses sun-dried green tea as its starting materials. To investigate the variation of composition and spectral properties of polysaccharide during solid state fermentation of pu-erh tea by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as preponderant starter and using sun-dried green tea as materials in the present study. The results showed that the content of water soluble polysaccharide was increased, and the activity of hydrolase such as cellulase, pectinase and glucomylase were also enhanced. The content of neutral sugar increased with the ferment time increasing and the M(w) of raw polysaccharide showed significant difference during fermentation. The main polysaccharide TPS2 and TPS1 were isolated and purified from pu-erh tea and its materials by DEAE-52 and Sephadex G-150 column chromatography. TPS2 contains the higher content of uronic acid, but TPS1 contains the higher contents of neutral sugar and protein. Monosaccharide analysis by GC-MS revealed that TPS1 and TPS2 were composed of arabinose, galactose, glucose, rhamnose, xylose and mannose with molar ratios of 24.2 : 23.6 : 5.9 : 3.2 : 1.8 : 1.1 and 19.3 : 26.9 : 3.2 : 2.7 : 1.3 : 5.5, respectively. The average molecular weight of TPS1 and TPS2 was 1.68 x 10(4) and 1.21 x 10(4) Daltons, respectively. UV scanning spectrum showed that TPS1 and TPS2 had no characteristic absorption between 200 and 400 nm wavelength, it suggested that they contain trace protein. IR spectrum of TPS1 and TPS2 demonstrated that pyranoid rings were contained in them. As shown in the image of atomic force microscope, the molecular appearance of TPS1 and TPS2 resembled islands and apparently consisted of conglomerations. The height of conglomerations of TPS2 was about 40 nm and the length or width was 0.5-0.8 microm, while the height of conglomerations of TPS1 was about 4nm and

  10. Molecular plating of thin lanthanide layers with improved material properties for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascon, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    This work describes experiments to gain an improved understanding of the processes associated with the electrochemical production of thin lanthanide layers for nuclear science investigations, i.e., nuclear targets. Nd, Sm, and Gd layers were prepared by means of the so-called molecular plating (MP) technique, where electrodeposition from an organic medium is usually performed in the constant current mode using two-electrode cells. The obtained results allowed the identification of optimized production conditions, which led to a significantly improved layer quality. Constant current density MP is a mass-transport controlled process. The applied current is maintained constant by constant fluxes of electroactive species towards the cathode - where the layer is grown - and the anode. The investigations showed the cell potentials of the electrodeposition systems to be always dominated by the ohmic drop produced by the resistance of the solutions used for the studies. This allowed to derive an expression relating cell potential with concentration of the electroactive species. This expression is able to explain the trends recorded with different electrolyte concentrations and it serves as a basis to get towards a full understanding of the reasons leading to the characteristic minima observed in the evolution of the cell potential curves with time. The minima were found to correspond to an almost complete depletion of the Nd ions obtained by dissolution of the model salt used for the investigations. Nd was confirmed to be deposited at the cathode as derivatives of Nd 3+ - possibly as carboxylate, oxide or hydroxide. This fact was interpreted on the basis of the highly negative values of the standard redox potentials typical for lanthanide cations. Among the different electroactive species present in the complex MP solutions, the Nd 3+ ions were found to contribute to less than 20% to the total current. Because of electrolysis, also the mixed solvent contributed to the

  11. X-ray Birefringence: A New Strategy for Determining Molecular Orientation in Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Benjamin A; Edwards-Gau, Gregory R; Morte-Ródenas, Anabel; Kariuki, Benson M; Lim, Gin Keat; Harris, Kenneth D M; Dolbnya, Igor P; Collins, Stephen P

    2012-11-01

    While the phenomenon of birefringence is well-established in the case of visible radiation and is exploited in many fields (e.g., through the use of the polarizing optical microscope), the analogous phenomenon for X-rays has been a virtually neglected topic. Here, we demonstrate the scope and potential for exploiting X-ray birefringence to determine the orientational properties of specific types of bonds in solids. Specifically, orientational characteristics of C-Br bonds in the bromocyclohexane/thiourea inclusion compound are elucidated from X-ray birefringence measurements at energies close to the bromine K-edge, revealing inter alia the changes in the orientational distribution of the C-Br bonds associated with a low-temperature order-disorder phase transition. From fitting a theoretical model to the experimental data, reliable quantitative information on the orientational properties of the C-Br bonds is determined. The experimental strategy reported here represents the basis of a new approach for gaining insights into the orientational properties of molecules in anisotropic materials.

  12. Molecular-Level Processing of Si-(B)-C Materials with Tailored Nano/Microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marion; Durif, Charlotte; Acosta, Emanoelle Diz; Salameh, Chrystelle; Plaisantin, Hervé; Miele, Philippe; Backov, Rénal; Machado, Ricardo; Gervais, Christel; Alauzun, Johan G; Chollon, Georges; Bernard, Samuel

    2017-12-01

    The design of Si-(B)-C materials is investigated, with detailed insight into the precursor chemistry and processing, the precursor-to-ceramic transformation, and the ceramic microstructural evolution at high temperatures. In the early stage of the process, the reaction between allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS) and borane dimethyl sulfide is achieved. This is investigated in detail through solid-state NMR and FTIR spectroscopy and elemental analyses for Si/B ratios ranging from 200 to 30. Boron-based bridges linking AHPCS monomeric fragments act as crosslinking units, extending the processability range of AHPCS and suppressing the distillation of oligomeric fragments during the low-temperature pyrolysis regime. Polymers with low boron contents display appropriate requirements for facile processing in solution, leading to the design of monoliths with hierarchical porosity, significant pore volume, and high specific surface area after pyrolysis. Polymers with high boron contents are more appropriate for the preparation of dense ceramics through direct solid shaping and pyrolysis. We provide a comprehensive study of the thermal decomposition mechanisms, and a subsequent detailed study of the high-temperature behavior of the ceramics produced at 1000 °C. The nanostructure and microstructure of the final SiC-based ceramics are intimately linked to the boron content of the polymers. B 4 C/C/SiC nanocomposites can be obtained from the polymer with the highest boron content. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Towards molecular doping effect on the electronic properties of two-dimensional layered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arramel; Wang, Q.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, W.; Wee, A. T. S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent advancements of an atomically-thick, flat, and flexible two-dimensional (2D) material has attracted tremendous interest. Graphene and 2D layered semiconductors such as transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) pave the way on the exploration of their unique layer-number dependent electronic and optical properties. The latter have a promising future on the microelectronics due to their sizeable bandgaps, i.e., the crossover from indirect-direct bandgap transition occurs as the thickness of TMDs is decreased to a monolayer. In this work, we systematically investigated the optimum growth parameter of chemical vapor deposition of MoS2 and WSe2, respectively. It turns out that the temperature and the duration growth plays role to produce a large area of TMDs monolayers. Our studies suggest that a well-controlled high quality of TMDs could serves as template and interlayer in the TMD-organic heterointerfaces. Thus it is potentially an attractive approach towards a wide-ranging application in optoelectronics, nanoelectronics and energy-harvesting applications. (paper)

  14. Part 1: characterization of beam synthesized catalytic materials. Part 2: further development of molecular SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheifers, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Part I of this thesis concerns characterization of catalyst materials prepared by an ion beam implanter and by a multiple expansion cluster source. Ion beam synthesis was carried out on a 250-kev ion implanter. After assembling a special reaction chamber, zeolites were implanted with phosphorous and iron. This work contributed to development of a sputter reactor for ion beam synthesis. Silver catalysts were examined in a reactor designed, built and evaluated for catalysts produced by the sputter reactor and by a multiple expansion cluster source. Small surface area silver foil catalysts and silver cluster catalysts showed kinetic activity for epoxidation of ethylene. Positive results for the small surface area silver cluster catalyst demonstrate the feasibility of studying these catalysts with the special reactor. Part 2 concerns fundamentals and applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry. A data system was implemented for a secondary ion mass spectrometer that involved design and construction of a computer interface. Software routines for the interface were written in assembly language for increased operation efficiency

  15. Molecular Materials for Nonaqueous Flow Batteries with a High Coulombic Efficiency and Stable Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Margarita; Cheng, Qian; Yang, Yuan; Nuckolls, Colin; Hernández Sánchez, Raúl; Sisto, Thomas J

    2017-12-13

    This manuscript presents a working redox battery in organic media that possesses remarkable cycling stability. The redox molecules have a solubility over 1 mol electrons/liter, and a cell with 0.4 M electron concentration is demonstrated with steady performance >450 cycles (>74 days). Such a concentration is among the highest values reported in redox flow batteries with organic electrolytes. The average Coulombic efficiency of this cell during cycling is 99.868%. The stability of the cell approaches the level necessary for a long lifetime nonaqueous redox flow battery. For the membrane, we employ a low cost size exclusion cellulose membrane. With this membrane, we couple the preparation of nanoscale macromolecular electrolytes to successfully avoid active material crossover. We show that this cellulose-based membrane can support high voltages in excess of 3 V and extreme temperatures (-20 to 110 °C). These extremes in temperature and voltage are not possible with aqueous systems. Most importantly, the nanoscale macromolecular platforms we present here for our electrolytes can be readily tuned through derivatization to realize the promise of organic redox flow batteries.

  16. Materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Quantification of encapsulated bioburden in spacecraft polymer materials by cultivation-dependent and molecular methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Bauermeister

    Full Text Available Bioburden encapsulated in spacecraft polymers (such as adhesives and coatings poses a potential risk to jeopardize scientific exploration of other celestial bodies. This is particularly critical for spacecraft components intended for hard landing. So far, it remained unclear if polymers are indeed a source of microbial contamination. In addition, data with respect to survival of microbes during the embedding/polymerization process are sparse. In this study we developed testing strategies to quantitatively examine encapsulated bioburden in five different polymers used frequently and in large quantities on spaceflight hardware. As quantitative extraction of the bioburden from polymerized (solid materials did not prove feasible, contaminants were extracted from uncured precursors. Cultivation-based analyses revealed <0.1-2.5 colony forming units (cfu per cm3 polymer, whereas quantitative PCR-based detection of contaminants indicated considerably higher values, despite low DNA extraction efficiency. Results obtained from this approach reflect the most conservative proxy for encapsulated bioburden, as they give the maximum bioburden of the polymers irrespective of any additional physical and chemical stress occurring during polymerization. To address the latter issue, we deployed an embedding model to elucidate and monitor the physiological status of embedded Bacillus safensis spores in a cured polymer. Staining approaches using AlexaFluor succinimidyl ester 488 (AF488, propidium monoazide (PMA, CTC (5-cyano-2,3-diotolyl tetrazolium chloride demonstrated that embedded spores retained integrity, germination and cultivation ability even after polymerization of the adhesive Scotch-Weld 2216 B/A. Using the methods presented here, we were able to estimate the worst case contribution of encapsulated bioburden in different polymers to the bioburden of spacecraft. We demonstrated that spores were not affected by polymerization processes. Besides Planetary

  18. Molecular environmental science using synchrotron radiation: Chemistry and physics of waste form materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindle, Dennis W.; Shuh, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization [1]. Specially formulated glass compositions, many of which have been derived from glass developed for commercial purposes, and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites, will be the main recipients for these wastes. The performance characteristics of waste-form glasses and ceramics are largely determined by the loading capacity for the waste constituents (radioactive and non-radioactive) and the resultant chemical and radiation resistance of the waste-form package to leaching (durability). There are unique opportunities for the use of near-edge soft-x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate speciation of low-Z elements forming the backbone of waste-form glasses and ceramics. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary technique employed to obtain speciation information from low-Z elements in waste forms, NMR is incompatible with the metallic impurities contained in real waste and is thus limited to studies of idealized model systems. In contrast, NEXAFS can yield element-specific speciation information from glass constituents without sensitivity to paramagnetic species. Development and use of NEXAFS for eventual studies of real waste glasses has significant implications, especially for the low-Z elements comprising glass matrices [5-7]. The NEXAFS measurements were performed at Beamline 6.3.1, an entrance-slitless bend-magnet beamline operating from 200 eV to 2000 eV with a Hettrick-Underwood varied-line-space (VLS) grating monochromator, of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. Complete characterization and optimization of this beamline was conducted to enable high-performance measurements

  19. Probing the influence of N-donor capping ligands on supramolecular assembly in molecular uranyl materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Korey P.; Kalaj, Mark; Cahill, Christopher L. [Department of Chemistry, The George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The syntheses and crystal structures of six new compounds containing the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} cation, 3,5-dichlorobenzoic acid, and a chelating N-donor [2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dimethylphen), 2,2{sup '}:6{sup '},2''-terpyridine (terpy), 4{sup '}-chloro-2,2{sup '}:6{sup '},2''-terpyridine (Cl-terpy), or 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-s-triazine (TPTZ)] are reported. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of these materials enabled the exploration of the structural relationship between the benzoic acids and the chelating N-donor as well as providing a platform to evaluate the effects of ligand choice on uranyl hydrolysis and subsequent oligomerization. At an unadjusted pH (ca. 3), a mix of uranyl monomers and dimers are observed, dimer formation resulting from both bridging carboxylate linkers and hydroxo bridges. Assembly by halogen- and hydrogen-bonding interactions as well as π-π interactions was observed depending on the experimental conditions utilized. Further, spectroscopic characterization (both vibrational and luminescence) of complexes 1, 4, and 5 to explore the effects of the electron-donating ability of the capping ligand on the corresponding uranyl luminescence and vibrational spectra suggests that there is a relationship between the observed bathochromic shifts and the electron-donating ability of the capping ligands. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Probing the influence of N-donor capping ligands on supramolecular assembly in molecular uranyl materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Korey P.; Kalaj, Mark; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    The syntheses and crystal structures of six new compounds containing the UO 2 2+ cation, 3,5-dichlorobenzoic acid, and a chelating N-donor [2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dimethylphen), 2,2 ' :6 ' ,2''-terpyridine (terpy), 4 ' -chloro-2,2 ' :6 ' ,2''-terpyridine (Cl-terpy), or 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-s-triazine (TPTZ)] are reported. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of these materials enabled the exploration of the structural relationship between the benzoic acids and the chelating N-donor as well as providing a platform to evaluate the effects of ligand choice on uranyl hydrolysis and subsequent oligomerization. At an unadjusted pH (ca. 3), a mix of uranyl monomers and dimers are observed, dimer formation resulting from both bridging carboxylate linkers and hydroxo bridges. Assembly by halogen- and hydrogen-bonding interactions as well as π-π interactions was observed depending on the experimental conditions utilized. Further, spectroscopic characterization (both vibrational and luminescence) of complexes 1, 4, and 5 to explore the effects of the electron-donating ability of the capping ligand on the corresponding uranyl luminescence and vibrational spectra suggests that there is a relationship between the observed bathochromic shifts and the electron-donating ability of the capping ligands. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Molecular environmental science using synchrotron radiation:Chemistry and physics of waste form materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindle, Dennis W.; Shuh, David K.

    2005-02-28

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization [1]. Specially formulated glass compositions, many of which have been derived from glass developed for commercial purposes, and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites, will be the main recipients for these wastes. The performance characteristics of waste-form glasses and ceramics are largely determined by the loading capacity for the waste constituents (radioactive and non-radioactive) and the resultant chemical and radiation resistance of the waste-form package to leaching (durability). There are unique opportunities for the use of near-edge soft-x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate speciation of low-Z elements forming the backbone of waste-form glasses and ceramics. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary technique employed to obtain speciation information from low-Z elements in waste forms, NMR is incompatible with the metallic impurities contained in real waste and is thus limited to studies of idealized model systems. In contrast, NEXAFS can yield element-specific speciation information from glass constituents without sensitivity to paramagnetic species. Development and use of NEXAFS for eventual studies of real waste glasses has significant implications, especially for the low-Z elements comprising glass matrices [5-7]. The NEXAFS measurements were performed at Beamline 6.3.1, an entrance-slitless bend-magnet beamline operating from 200 eV to 2000 eV with a Hettrick-Underwood varied-line-space (VLS) grating monochromator, of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. Complete characterization and optimization of this beamline was conducted to enable high-performance measurements.

  2. Dependence of mechanical characteristics from composition and structure and optimization of mechanical fracture energy of polymer composite material based on high-molecular rubbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nurullaev

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available By means of numerical experiment the authors investigate dependence of conventional rupturing stress and mechanical fracture energy at uniaxial tension from fractional composition of dispersed filler, plasticizer volume fraction in polymer binder, effective density of transverse bonds, applied to development of covering for different purposes and with advanced service life in temperature range from 223 to 323 K. They compare mechanical characteristics of polymer composite materials (PCMs based on high- and low-molecular rubbers. It was shown that rupturing stress of high-molecular rubber-based PCM is of a higher magnitude than the stress of low-molecular rubber-based one at almost invariable rupturing deformation. Numerical simulation by variation of composition parameters and molecular structure enables evaluation of its maximum fracture energy which is 1000 times higher than mechanical fracture energy of similar composites based on low-molecular rubbers.

  3. Effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts and preliminary exploration of possible molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts and the possible molecular mechanisms. Methods: Fibroblast cell lines L929 were cultured, extracting solution of diatomite ceramic, casting ceramic, heat-pressed ceramic, infiltrated ceramic and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain was prepared and used to process L929 cells, and then cell apoptosis, percentages of cell cycle as well as expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 were detected. Results: Cell apoptosis indexes, number of early apoptosis, number of aponecrosis, percentages of G1 phase, S phase and G2 phase cells as well as expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 of diatomite ceramic group, casting ceramic group, heat-pressed ceramic group and infiltrated ceramic group had no differences from those of control group; cell apoptosis indexes, number of early apoptosis, number of aponecrosis, percentages of G2 phase cells as well as expression levels of Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 of diatomite ceramic group, casting ceramic group, heat-pressed ceramic group and infiltrated ceramic group were lower than those of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain group, and percentages of G1 phase and S phase cells as well as expression levels of Bcl-2 were significantly higher than those of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain group. Conclusion: The effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts has no differences and is weaker than that of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain crown, and biocompatibility of diatomite ceramic is equivalent to that of casting ceramic, heat-pressed ceramic, infiltrated ceramic and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain; mechanisms of different materials of all-ceramic crowns to regulate cell viability include Bcl-2/Bax pathway and Caspase pathway.

  4. Report of the joint seminar on solid state physics, atomic and molecular physics, and materials science in the energy region of tandem accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazumata, Yukio

    1993-01-01

    The joint seminar on Solid State Physics, Atomic and Molecular Physics and Materials Science in the Energy Region of Tandem Acceleration was held at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI, for two days from January 22 to 23, 1991. About 60 physicists and material scientists participated and 18 papers were presented in this seminar. The topics presented in this seminar included lattice defects in semiconductors, ion-solid collisions, atomic collisions by high energy particles, radiation effects on high T c superconducting materials and FCC metals, radiation effects on materials of space and fusion reactors, uranium compounds and superlattice. (J.P.N.)

  5. Selective Adsorption of Nano-bio materials and nanostructure fabrication on Molecular Resists Modified by proton beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. W.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. M.

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this research is the fabrication of nanostructures on silicon substrate using proton beam and selectively adsorption of bio-nano materials on the patterned substrate. Recently, the miniaturization of the integrated devices with fine functional structures was intensively investigated, based on combination of nanotechnology (NT), biotechnology (BT) and information technology (IT). Because of the inherent limitation in optical lithography, large variety of novel patterning technologies were evolved to construct nano-structures onto a substrate. Atomic force microscope-based nanolithography has readily formed sub-50 nm patterns by the local modification of a substrate using a probe with a curvature of 10 nm. The surface property was regarded as one of the most important factors for AFM-based nanolithography as well as for other novel nanolithographies. The molecular thin films such as a self-assembled monolayer or a polymer resist layer have been used as an alternative to modifying the surface property. Although proton or ion beam irradiation has been used as an efficient tool to modify the physical, chemical and electrical properties of a surface, the nano-patterning on the substrate or the molecular film modified with the beam irradiation has hardly been studied at both home and abroad. The selective adsorption of nano-bio materials such as carbon nanotubes and proteins on the patterns would contribute to developing the integrated devices. The polystyrene nanoparticles (400 nm) were arrayed on al silicon surface using nanosphere lithography and the various nanopatterns were fabricated by proton beam irradiation on the polystyrene nanoparticles arrayed silicon surface. We obtained the two different nanopatterns such as polymer nanoring patterns and silicon oxide patterns on the same silicon substrate. The polymer nanoring patterns formed by the crosslinkage of polystyrene when proton beam was irradiated at the triangular void spaces that are enclosed by

  6. Poly(mono/diethylene glycol n-tetradecyl ether vinyl ethers with Various Molecular Weights as Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfang Pei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available At present, research on the relationship of comb-like polymer phase change material structures and their heat storage performance is scarce. Therefore, this relationship from both micro and macro perspectives will be studied in this paper. In order to achieve a high phase change enthalpy, ethylene glycol segments were introduced between the vinyl and the alkyl side chains. A series of poly(mono/diethylene glycol n-tetradecyl ether vinyl ethers (PC14EnVEs (n = 1, 2 with various molecular weights were polymerized by living cationic polymerization. The results of PC14E1VE and PC14E2VE showed that the minimum number of carbon atoms required for side-chain crystallization were 7.7 and 7.2, which were lower than that reported in the literature. The phase change enthalpy 89 J/g (for poly(mono ethylene glycol n-tetradecyl ether vinyl ethers and 86 J/g (for poly(hexadecyl acrylate were approximately equal. With the increase of molecular weight, the melting temperature, the melting enthalpy, and the initial thermal decomposition temperature of PC14E1VE changed from 27.0 to 28.0 °C, from 95 to 89 J/g, and from 264 to 287 °C, respectively. When the number average molar mass of PC14EnVEs exceeded 20,000, the enthalpy values remained basically unchanged. The introduction of the ethylene glycol chain was conducive to the crystallization of alkyl side chains.

  7. Materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available . It is generally included as part of a structurally insulated panel (SIP) where the foam is sandwiched between external skins of steel, wood or cement. Cement composites Cement bonded composites are an important class of building materials. These products... for their stone buildings, including the Egyptians, Aztecs and Inca’s. As stone is a very dense material it requires intensive heating to become warm. Rocks were generally stacked dry but mud, and later cement, can be used as a mortar to hold the rocks...

  8. Octahedral magnesium manganese oxide molecular sieves as the cathode material of aqueous rechargeable magnesium-ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Ye, Ke; Shao, Shuangxi; Wang, Xin; Cheng, Kui; Xiao, Xue; Wang, Guiling; Cao, Dianxue

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The mico-sheet Mg-OMS-1 is synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. • The mechanism of Mg 2+ insertion/deinsertion from Mg-OMS-1 is explored. • The electrode exhibits a good electrochemical performance in MgCl 2 electrolyte. - Abstract: Aqueous magnesium-ion batteries have shown the desired properties of high safety characteristics, similar electrochemical properties to lithium and low cost for energy storage applications. The micro-sheet morphology of todorokite-type magnesium manganese oxide molecular sieve (Mg-OMS-1) material, which applies as a novel cathode material for magnesium-ion battery, is obtained by the simple hydrothermal method. The structure and morphology of the particles are confirmed by X-ray power diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The electrochemical performance of Mg-OMS-1 is researched by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and constant current charge-discharge measurement. Mg-OMS-1 shows a good battery behavior for Mg 2+ insertion and deinsertion in the aqueous electrolyte. When discharging at 10 mA g −1 in 0.2 mol dm −3 MgCl 2 aqueous electrolyte, the initial discharge capacity reaches 300 mAh g −1 . The specific capacity retention rate is 83.7% after cycling 300 times at 100 mA g −1 in 0.5 mol dm −3 MgCl 2 electrolyte with a columbic efficiency of nearly 100%.

  9. Understanding the influence of buckwheat bran on wheat dough baking performance: Mechanistic insights from molecular and material science approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoletti, Miriam; Marti, Alessandra; Marengo, Mauro; Iametti, Stefania; Pagani, M Ambrogina; Renzetti, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    A molecular and material science approach is used to describe the influence of coarse and fine buckwheat bran on wheat dough properties and bread textural quality. Focus is given on (i) gluten solvation and structural arrangements in presence of bran as studied by front-face fluorescence; (ii) thermo-mechanical behavior of dough during heating studied by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis and (iii) texture of bread crumb analyzed in terms of a cellular solid. The thermo-mechanical behavior of dough was found to be largely related to starch phase transitions during heating. The use of thermodynamic approaches to biopolymer melting revealed that key transitions such as the onset of starch gelatinization were function of the interplay of water and bran volume fractions in the dough. Front-face fluorescence studies in wheat dough revealed that gluten solvation and structural arrangements were delayed by increasing bran addition level and reduction in particle size, as indicated by the drastic decrease in the protein surface hydrophobicity index. Variations in gluten structure could be strongly related to dough baking performance, i.e. specific volume. With regards to texture, the approach revealed that crumb texture was controlled by variations in density, moisture and bran volume fractions. Overall, this study elucidates a number of physical mechanisms describing the influence of buckwheat bran addition to dough and bread quality. These mechanisms strongly pointed at the influence of bran on water partitioning among the main polymeric components. In the future, these mechanisms should be investigated with bran material of varying source, composition and structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Correlation between native bonds in a polymeric material and molecular emissions from the laser-induced plasma observed with space and time resolved imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoire, S. [CRITT Materiaux Alsace, 19 rue de St Junien, 67300 Schiltigheim (France); Laboratoire de Recherche des Monuments Historiques, 29 rue de Paris, 77420 Champs-sur-Marne (France); Institut Charles Sadron, CNRS and University of Strasbourg, 23 rue de Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Motto-Ros, V.; Ma, Q.L.; Lei, W.Q.; Wang, X.C. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Pelascini, F.; Surma, F. [CRITT Materiaux Alsace, 19 rue de St Junien, 67300 Schiltigheim (France); Detalle, V., E-mail: vincent.detalle@culture.gouv.fr [Laboratoire de Recherche des Monuments Historiques, 29 rue de Paris, 77420 Champs-sur-Marne (France); Yu, J. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France)

    2012-08-15

    Emissions from C{sub 2} molecules and CN radicals in laser-induced plasmas on polymeric materials were observed with time-resolved spectroscopic imaging. More precisely, differential imaging with a pair of narrowband filters (one centered on the emission line and another out of the line) was used to extract emission images of interested molecules or radicals. The correlation between the molecular emission image of the plasma and the molecular structure of the polymer to be analyzed was studied for four different types of materials: polyamide (PA) with native CN bonds, polyethylene (PE) with simple CC bonds, polystyrene (PS) with delocalized double CC bonds, and polyoxymethylene (POM) which neither contains CC nor CN bonds. A clear correlation is demonstrated between emission and molecular structure of the material, allowing the identification of several organic compounds by differential spectroscopic imaging. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plasma imaging method to discriminate different type of polymers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular emissions (CN and C{sub 2}) are spatially and temporally correlated to native bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several formation processes of molecular fragments are observed.

  11. Rational Design of Molecular Hole-Transporting Materials for Perovskite Solar Cells: Direct versus Inverted Device Configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisorio, Roberto; Iacobellis, Rosabianca; Listorti, Andrea; De Marco, Luisa; Cipolla, Maria Pia; Manca, Michele; Rizzo, Aurora; Abate, Antonio; Gigli, Giuseppe; Suranna, Gian Paolo

    2017-07-26

    Due to a still limited understanding of the reasons making 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9'-spirobifluorene (Spiro-OMeTAD) the state-of-the-art hole-transporting material (HTM) for emerging photovoltaic applications, the molecular tailoring of organic components for perovskite solar cells (PSCs) lacks in solid design criteria. Charge delocalization in radical cationic states can undoubtedly be considered as one of the essential prerequisites for an HTM, but this aspect has been investigated to a relatively minor extent. In marked contrast with the 3-D structure of Spiro-OMeTAD, truxene-based HTMs Trux1 and Trux2 have been employed for the first time in PSCs fabricated with a direct (n-i-p) or inverted (p-i-n) architecture, exhibiting a peculiar behavior with respect to the referential HTM. Notwithstanding the efficient hole extraction from the perovskite layer exhibited by Trux1 and Trux2 in direct configuration devices, their photovoltaic performances were detrimentally affected by their poor hole transport. Conversely, an outstanding improvement of the photovoltaic performances in dopant-free inverted configuration devices compared to Spiro-OMeTAD was recorded, ascribable to the use of thinner HTM layers. The rationalization of the photovoltaic performances exhibited by different configuration devices discussed in this paper can provide new and unexpected prospects for engineering the interface between the active layer of perovskite-based solar cells and the hole transporters.

  12. Rational molecular dynamics scheme for predicting optimum concentration loading of nano-additive in phase change materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monisha Rastogi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the diffusion and phase transition behaviour of paraffin reinforced with carbon nano-additives namely graphene oxide (GO and surface functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT. Bulk disordered systems of paraffin hydrocarbons impregnated with carbon nano-additives have been generated in realistic equilibrium conformations for potential application as latent heat storage systems. Ab initio molecular dynamics(MD in conjugation with COMPASS forcefield has been implemented using periodic boundary conditions. The proposed scheme allows determination of optimum nano-additive loading for improving thermo-physical properties through analysis of mass, thermal and transport properties; and assists in determination of composite behaviour and related performance from microscopic point of view. It was observed that nanocomposites containing 7.8 % surface functionalised SWCNT and 55% GO loading corresponds to best latent heat storage system. The propounded methodology could serve as a by-pass route for economically taxing and iterative experimental procedures required to attain the optimum composition for best performance. The results also hint at the large unexplored potential of ab-initio classical MD techniques for predicting performance of new nanocomposites for potential phase change material applications.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of the lattice thermal conductivity of thermoelectric material CuInTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Liu, H.J., E-mail: phlhj@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Cheng, L.; Zhang, J.; Jiang, P.H.; Liang, J.H.; Fan, D.D.; Shi, J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2017-05-10

    Highlights: • A simple but effective Morse potential is constructed to accurately describe the interatomic interactions of CuInTe{sub 2}. • The lattice thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} predicted by MD agrees well with those measured experimentally, as well as those calculated from phonon BTE. • Introducing Cd impurity or Cu vacancy can effectively reduce the lattice thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} and thus further enhance its thermoelectric performance. - Abstract: The lattice thermal conductivity of thermoelectric material CuInTe{sub 2} is predicted using classical molecular dynamics simulations, where a simple but effective Morse-type interatomic potential is constructed by fitting first-principles total energy calculations. In a broad temperature range from 300 to 900 K, our simulated results agree well with those measured experimentally, as well as those obtained from phonon Boltzmann transport equation. By introducing the Cd impurity or Cu vacancy, the thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} can be effectively reduced to further enhance the thermoelectric performance of this chalcopyrite compound.

  14. Rational molecular dynamics scheme for predicting optimum concentration loading of nano-additive in phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul; Madhar, Niyaz Ahamad; Shaikh, Hamid; Al-Zahrani, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    The present study deals with the diffusion and phase transition behaviour of paraffin reinforced with carbon nano-additives namely graphene oxide (GO) and surface functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). Bulk disordered systems of paraffin hydrocarbons impregnated with carbon nano-additives have been generated in realistic equilibrium conformations for potential application as latent heat storage systems. Ab initio molecular dynamics(MD) in conjugation with COMPASS forcefield has been implemented using periodic boundary conditions. The proposed scheme allows determination of optimum nano-additive loading for improving thermo-physical properties through analysis of mass, thermal and transport properties; and assists in determination of composite behaviour and related performance from microscopic point of view. It was observed that nanocomposites containing 7.8 % surface functionalised SWCNT and 55% GO loading corresponds to best latent heat storage system. The propounded methodology could serve as a by-pass route for economically taxing and iterative experimental procedures required to attain the optimum composition for best performance. The results also hint at the large unexplored potential of ab-initio classical MD techniques for predicting performance of new nanocomposites for potential phase change material applications.

  15. Solution Processed Organic Photovoltaic Cells Using D-A-D-A-D Type Small Molecular Donor Materials with Benzodithiophene and Diketopyrrolopyrrole Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangman; Nam, So Yeon; Suh, Dong Hack; Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Changjin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2016-03-01

    Organic photovoltaic Cells (OPVs) have been considered to be a next-generation energy source to overcome exhaustion of resources. Currently, OPVs are developed based on two types of donor material with polymer and small molecule. Polymeric donor materials have shown better power conversion efficiency (PCE) than small molecular donor materials, since it's easy to control the morphology of photoactive film. However, the difficulty in synthetic reproducibility and purification of polymeric donor were main drawback to overcome. And then, recently small molecule donor materials have been overcome bad morphology of OPVs film by using appropriate alkyl substituents and relatively long conjugation system. In this study, we designed and synthesized D-A-D-A-D type small molecular donor materials containing alternatively linked benzodithiophene (BDT) and diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) units. Also, we studied on the effect of photovoltaic performance of prepared small molecular D-A-D-A-D type donor with variation of thiophene links and with/without hexyl substituent. Our small molecular donors showed HOMO energy levels from -5.26 to -5.34 eV and optical bandgaps from 1.70 to 1.87 eV by CV (cyclic voltammetry) and UV/Vis spectroscopy, respectively. Finally, 3.4% of PCE can be obtained using a mixture of BDT(DPP)2-T2 and PCBM as an active layer with a Voc of 0.78 V, a Jsc of 9.72 mA/cm2, and a fill factor of 0.44 under 100 mW/cm2 AM 1.5G simulated light. We will discuss the performance of D-A-D-A-D type small molecular donor based OPVs with variation of both terminal substituents.

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy of GeTe-Sb2Te3 phase change materials studied by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shayduk, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The integration of phase change materials into semiconductor heterostructures may lead to the development of a new generation of high density non-volatile phase change memories. Epitaxial phase change materials allow to study the detailed structural changes during the phase transition and to determine the scaling limits of the memory. This work is dedicated to the epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te phase change alloys on GaSb(001). We deposit Ge-Sb-Te (GST) films on GaSb(001) substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The film orientation and lattice constant evolution is determined in real time during growth using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID). The nucleation stage of the growth is studied in situ using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Four growth regimes of GST on GaSb(001) were observed: amorphous, polycrystalline, incubated epitaxial and direct epitaxial. Amorphous film grows for substrate temperatures below 100 C. For substrate temperatures in the range 100-160 C, the film grows in polycrystalline form. Incubated epitaxial growth is observed at temperatures from 180 to 210 C. This growth regime is characterized by an initial 0.6nm thick amorphous layer formation, which crystallizes epitaxially as the film thickness increases. The determined lattice constant of the films is 6.01 A, very close to that of the metastable GST phase. The films predominantly possess an epitaxial cube-on-cube relationship. At higher temperatures the films grow epitaxially, however the growth rate is rapidly decreasing with temperature. At temperatures above 270 C the growth rate is zero. The composition of the grown films is close to 2:2:5 for Ge, Sb and Te, respectively. The determined crystal structure of the films is face centered cubic (FCC) with a rhombohedral distortion. The analysis of X-ray peak widths gives a value for the rhombohedral angle of 89.56 . We observe two types of reflections in reciprocal space indicating two FCC sublattices in

  17. Dendritic azo compounds as a new type amorphous molecular material with quick photoinduced surface-relief-grating formation ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yaning; Gu, Xinyu; Guo, Miaocai; Wang, Xiaogong

    2008-09-01

    A series of dendritic azobenzene-containing compounds have been synthesized as a new type amorphous molecular material, which can show quick surface-relief-grating (SRG) formation ability upon light irradiation. For the synthesis, the dendritic precursor tris(2-(ethyl(phenyl)amino)ethyl)benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate and tris(3,5-bis(2-(ethyl(phenyl)amino)ethoxy)benzyl)benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate were prepared by esterification reactions between 1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl chloride and N-ethyl- N-hydroxyethyl-aniline and 3,5-bis[2-( N-ethylanilino)ethoxy] benzylalcohol. The precursors were, respectively reacted with the diazonium salts of 4-nitroaniline, 4-aminobenzoic acid, and 4-aminobenzonitrile to introduce different types of donor-acceptor azo chromophores at the peripheral positions. The structure and properties of the dendritic azo compounds were characterized by the spectroscopic methods and thermal analysis. The surface-relief-grating (SRG) formation behavior of the dendritic azo compounds was studied by exposing the spin-coated thin films to an interference pattern of laser beams (532 nm) at modest intensity (100 mW/cm 2). The results show that the azo compounds can form stable amorphous glasses in a broad temperature range. The glass transition temperatures ( Tgs) depend on the backbone structures and the type of the peripheral azo chromophors. The type of the electron withdrawing groups in the p-positions of the terminal azobenzene units shows a significant influence on the SRG inscription rate. For the compounds containing the same type azo chromophores, the SRG inscription rate is also affected by the backbone structure.

  18. Electrosíntesis y caracterización de materiales moleculares a partir de derivados n-trifluorometansulfonil-1-azahexa-1,3,5-trienos. // Electrosintesis and characterization of molecular materials starting from having derived.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Sánchez Vergara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente existe un interés creciente en los Materiales Moleculares, ya que estos pueden presentar diferentescomportamientos eléctricos que van desde aislantes, semiconductores o bien conductores. En el presente estudio fueronsintetizados materiales de este tipo, a partir de derivados N-Trifluorometansulfonil-1-azahexa-1,3,5-trienos yK3[Cr(C2O43]•3H2O debido a que estos compuestos representan un gran interés por sus variadas aplicaciones en camposcomo la química analítica, además los derivados N-Trifluorometansulfonil-1-azahexa-1,3,5-trienos resultan especialmenteatractivos desde el punto de vista estructural ya que en su forma neutra presentan una extensa deslocalización electrónica locual les confiere un comportamiento químico muy particular. En esta comunicación, se forman mediante electrosíntesisconvencional y mediante electrosíntesis en el módulo de electrocristalización del microscopio de fuerza atómica (AFM,algunos materiales moleculares. Una vez obtenidos dichos materiales, se caracterizan por análisis elemental sobresuperficies (SEM-EDS.Palabras claves: Materiales moleculares, anisotropía, electrocristalización._____________________________________________________________________________Abstract.Recently, molecular materials have been developed because of their electrical properties which give conductor,semiconductor, or superconductor behavior. In this work, the synthesis of new materials formed from Ntrifluoromethanesulfonyl-1-azahexa-1, 3, 5-triene species and K3[Cr(C2O43]•3H2O is reported. NTrifluoromethanesulfonyl-1-azahexa-1,3,5-trienes compounds, which are highly functionalised pentametines, have alsobeen studied due to its interesting physical and chemical properties. These compounds are especially interesting from astructural point of view for some reasons; in a neutral form, they show an extensive electronic delocalisation, which confersthem a very particular chemical behaviour. This study is focused on

  19. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  20. Predictive Mechanical Characterization of Macro-Molecular Material Chemistry Structures of Cement Paste at Nano Scale - Two-phase Macro-Molecular Structures of Calcium Silicate Hydrate, Tri-Calcium Silicate, Di-Calcium Silicate and Calcium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla Espinosa, Ingrid Marcela

    Concrete is a hierarchical composite material with a random structure over a wide range of length scales. At submicron length scale the main component of concrete is cement paste, formed by the reaction of Portland cement clinkers and water. Cement paste acts as a binding matrix for the other components and is responsible for the strength of concrete. Cement paste microstructure contains voids, hydrated and unhydrated cement phases. The main crystalline phases of unhydrated cement are tri-calcium silicate (C3S) and di-calcium silicate (C2S), and of hydrated cement are calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide (CH). Although efforts have been made to comprehend the chemical and physical nature of cement paste, studies at molecular level have primarily been focused on individual components. Present research focuses on the development of a method to model, at molecular level, and analysis of the two-phase combination of hydrated and unhydrated phases of cement paste as macromolecular systems. Computational molecular modeling could help in understanding the influence of the phase interactions on the material properties, and mechanical performance of cement paste. Present work also strives to create a framework for molecular level models suitable for potential better comparisons with low length scale experimental methods, in which the sizes of the samples involve the mixture of different hydrated and unhydrated crystalline phases of cement paste. Two approaches based on two-phase cement paste macromolecular structures, one involving admixed molecular phases, and the second involving cluster of two molecular phases are investigated. The mechanical properties of two-phase macromolecular systems of cement paste consisting of key hydrated phase CSH and unhydrated phases C3S or C2S, as well as CSH with the second hydrated phase CH were calculated. It was found that these cement paste two-phase macromolecular systems predicted an isotropic material behavior. Also

  1. Ni-O4 species anchored on N-doped graphene-based materials as molecular entities and electrocatalytic performances for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dawoon; Lee, Seungjun; Shin, Yunseok; Ohn, Saerom; Park, Sunghee; Lim, Donggyu; Park, Gilsoo; Park, Sungjin

    2017-12-01

    The generation of molecular active species on the surface of nano-materials has become promising routes to produce efficient electrocatalysts. Development of cost-effective catalysts with high performances for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is an important challenge for fuel cell and metal-air battery applications. In this work, we report a novel hybrid produced by room-temperature solution processes using Ni-based organometallic molecules and N-doped graphene-based materials. Chemical and structural characterizations reveal that Ni-containing species are well-dispersed on the surface of graphene network as molecular entity. The hybrid shows excellent electrocatalytic performances for ORR in basic medium with an onset potential of 0.87 V (vs. RHE), superior durability and good methanol tolerance.

  2. Data Evaluation and the Establishment of a Standard Library of Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion. Summary Report of an IAEA Consultants' Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.

    2012-08-01

    Seven experts in the field of atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M+PMI) data and data evaluation for fusion plasma physics met with IAEA A+M Data Unit staff at IAEA Headquarters to provide advice towards the establishment of an evaluated and recommended library of A+M+PMI data for fusion. The proceedings and conclusions of the meeting are summarized here. (author)

  3. Procedures for Evaluation of Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion. Summary Report of an IAEA Consultants' Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on 'Procedures for Evaluation of Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion' on 7-9 February 2012. Fourteen participants from 8 Institutes of 3 Member States attended the three-day meeting held at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki in Japan. The report includes discussions on data evaluation activities, meeting conclusions and recommendations and the abstracts of presentations presented in the meeting. (author)

  4. The fate of injectant coal in blast furnaces: The origin of extractable materials of high molecular mass in blast furnace carryover dusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, S.N.; Wu, L.; Paterson, N.; Herod, A.A.; Dugwell, D.R.; Kandiyoti, R. [University of London Imperial College of Science & Technology, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    The aim of the work was to investigate the fate of injectant coal in blast furnaces and the origin of extractable materials in blast furnace carryover dusts. Two sets of samples including injectant coal and the corresponding carryover dusts from a full sized blast furnace and a pilot scale rig have been examined. The samples were extracted using 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) solvent and the extracts studied by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The blast furnace carryover dust extracts contained high molecular weight carbonaceous material, of apparent mass corresponding to 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} u, by polystyrene calibration. In contrast, the feed coke and char prepared in a wire mesh reactor under high temperature conditions did not give any extractable material. Meanwhile, controlled combustion experiments in a high-pressure wire mesh reactor suggest that the extent of combustion of injectant coal in the blast furnace tuyeres and raceways is limited by time of exposure and very low oxygen concentration. It is thus likely that the extractable, soot-like material in the blast furnace dust originated in tars is released by the injectant coal. Our results suggest that the unburned tars were thermally altered during the upward path within the furnace, giving rise to the formation of heavy molecular weight (soot-like) materials.

  5. Thin films of molecular materials synthesized from C32H20N10M (M Co, Pb, Fe): Film formation, electrical and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Sanchez Vergara, M.E.; Garcia Montalvo, V.; Ortiz, A.; Alvarez, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the synthesis of molecular materials formed from metallic phthalocyanines and 1,4-phenylenediamine is reported. The powder and thin film (∼80-115 nm thickness) samples of the synthesized materials, deposited by vacuum thermal evaporation, show the same intra-molecular bonds in the IR spectroscopy studies, which suggests that the thermal evaporation process does not alter these bonds. The morphology of the deposited films was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and their optical and electrical properties were studied as well. The optical parameters have been investigated using spectrophotometric measurements of transmittance in the wavelength range 200-1200 nm. The absorption spectra recorded in the UV-vis region for the deposited samples showed two bands, namely the Q and Soret bands. The optical activation energy was calculated and found to be 3.41 eV for the material with cobalt, 3.34 eV for the material including lead and 3.5 eV for the material with iron. The effect of temperature on conductivity was measured for the thin films and the corresponding conduction processes are discussed in this work.

  6. An ab initio molecular

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mechanisms of two molecular crystals: An ab initio molecular dynamics ... for Computation in Molecular and Materials Science and Department of Chemistry, School of ..... NSAF Foundation of National Natural Science Foun- ... Matter 14 2717.

  7. The laboratory technology of discrete molecular separation: the historical development of gel electrophoresis and the material epistemology of biomolecular science, 1945-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Howard Hsueh-hao

    2009-01-01

    Preparative and analytical methods developed by separation scientists have played an important role in the history of molecular biology. One such early method is gel electrophoresis, a technique that uses various types of gel as its supporting medium to separate charged molecules based on size and other properties. Historians of science, however, have only recently begun to pay closer attention to this material epistemological dimension of biomolecular science. This paper substantiates the historiographical thread that explores the relationship between modern laboratory practice and the production of scientific knowledge. It traces the historical development of gel electrophoresis from the mid-1940s to the mid-1960s, with careful attention to the interplay between technical developments and disciplinary shifts, especially the rise of molecular biology in this time-frame. Claiming that the early 1950s marked a decisive shift in the evolution of electrophoretic methods from moving boundary to zone electrophoresis, I reconstruct various trajectories in which scientists such as Oliver Smithies sought out the most desirable solid supporting medium for electrophoretic instrumentation. Biomolecular knowledge, I argue, emerged in part from this process of seeking the most appropriate supporting medium that allowed for discrete molecular separation and visualization. The early 1950s, therefore, marked not only an important turning point in the history of separation science, but also a transformative moment in the history of the life sciences as the growth of molecular biology depended in part on the epistemological access to the molecular realm available through these evolving technologies.

  8. Ring-Opening Polymerization of N-Carboxyanhydrides for Preparation of Polypeptides and Polypeptide-Based Hybrid Materials with Various Molecular Architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Pahovnik, David

    2015-09-01

    Different synthetic approaches utilizing ring-opening polymerization of N-carboxyanhydrides for preparation of polypeptide and polypeptide-based hybrid materials with various molecular architectures are described. An overview of polymerization mechanisms using conventional (various amines) as well as some recently developed initiators (hexamethyldisilazane, N-heterocyclic persistent carbenes, etc.) is presented, and their benefits and drawbacks for preparation of polypeptides with well-defined chain lengths and chain-end functionality are discussed. Recent examples from literature are used to illustrate different possibilities for synthesis of pure polypeptide materials with different molecular architectures bearing various functional groups, which are introduced either by modification of amino acids, before they are transformed into corresponding Ncarboxyanhydrides, or by post-polymerization modifications using protective groups and/or orthogonal functional groups. Different approaches for preparation of polypeptide-based hybrid materials are discussed as well using examples from recent literature. Syntheses of simple block copolymers or copolymers with more complex molecular architectures (graft and star copolymers) as well as modifications of nanoparticles and other surfaces with polypeptides are described.

  9. Designing topological defects in 2D materials using scanning probe microscopy and a self-healing mechanism: a density functional-based molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Igor; Đurišić, Ivana; Belić, Milivoj R.

    2017-12-01

    Engineering of materials at the atomic level is one of the most important aims of nanotechnology. The unprecedented ability of scanning probe microscopy to address individual atoms opened up the possibilities for nanomanipulation and nanolitography of surfaces and later on of two-dimensional materials. While the state-of-the-art scanning probe lithographic methods include, primarily, adsorption, desorption and repositioning of adatoms and molecules on substrates or tailoring nanoribbons by etching of trenches, the precise modification of the intrinsic atomic structure of materials is yet to be advanced. Here we introduce a new concept, scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip, for engineering of the atomic structure of membranes based on two-dimensional materials. In order to indicate the viability of the concept, we present our theoretical research, which includes atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, Fourier analysis and electronic transport calculations. While stretching can be employed for fabrication of atomic chains only, our comprehensive molecular dynamics simulations indicate that nanomanipulation by scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip is capable of assembling a wide range of topological defects in two-dimensional materials in a rather controllable and reproducible manner. We analyze two possibilities. In the first case the probe tip is retracted from the membrane while in the second case the tip is released beneath the membrane allowing graphene to freely relax and self-heal the pore made by the tip. The former approach with the tip rotation can be achieved experimentally by rotation of the sample, which is equivalent to rotation of the tip, whereas irradiation of the membrane by nanoclusters can be utilized for the latter approach. The latter one has the potential to yield a yet richer diversity of topological defects on account of a lesser determinacy. If successfully realized experimentally the concept proposed here could

  10. Spectroscopic mapping and selective electronic tuning of molecular orbitals in phosphorescent organometallic complexes – a new strategy for OLED materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal R. Ewen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of molecular electronic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes requires fundamental knowledge about the structural and electronic properties of the employed molecules as well as their interactions with neighboring molecules or interfaces. We show that highly resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and spectroscopy (STS are powerful tools to correlate the electronic properties of phosphorescent complexes (i.e., triplet emitters with their molecular structure as well as the local environment around a single molecule. We used spectroscopic mapping to visualize several occupied and unoccupied molecular frontier orbitals of Pt(II complexes adsorbed on Au(111. The analysis showed that the molecules exhibit a peculiar localized strong hybridization that leads to partial depopulation of a dz² orbital, while the ligand orbitals are almost unchanged. We further found that substitution of functional groups at well-defined positions can alter specific molecular orbitals without influencing the others. The results open a path toward the tailored design of electronic and optical properties of triplet emitters by smart ligand substitution, which may improve the performance of future OLED devices.

  11. New inorganic-organic hybrid materials based on SBA-15 molecular sieves involved in the quinolines synthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    López-Sanz, J.; Pérez-Mayoral, E.; Soriano, E.; Sturm, M.; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; López-Peinado, A. J.; Čejka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 187, č. 1 (2012), s. 97-103 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100400701 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : mesoporous molecular sieves * heterogeneous catalysis * quinolines Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2012

  12. Molecular-level removal of proteinaceous contamination from model surfaces and biomedical device materials by air plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, K K; Kumar, S; Bremmell, K E; Griesser, H J

    2010-11-01

    Established methods for cleaning and sterilising biomedical devices may achieve removal of bioburden only at the macroscopic level while leaving behind molecular levels of contamination (mainly proteinaceous). This is of particular concern if the residue might contain prions. We investigated at the molecular level the removal of model and real-life proteinaceous contamination from model and practical surfaces by air plasma (ionised air) treatment. The surface-sensitive technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to assess the removal of proteinaceous contamination, with the nitrogen (N1s) photoelectron signal as its marker. Model proteinaceous contamination (bovine serum albumin) adsorbed on to a model surface (silicon wafer) and the residual proteinaceous contamination resulting from incubating surgical stainless steel (a practical biomaterial) in whole human blood exhibited strong N1s signals [16.8 and 18.5 atomic percent (at.%), respectively] after thorough washing. After 5min air plasma treatment, XPS detected no nitrogen on the sample surfaces, indicating complete removal of proteinaceous contamination, down to the estimated XPS detection limit 10ng/cm(2). Applying the same plasma treatment, the 7.7at.% nitrogen observed on a clinically cleaned dental bur was reduced to a level reflective of new, as-received burs. Contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy also indicated complete molecular-level removal of the proteinaceous contamination upon air plasma treatment. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of air plasma treatment for removing proteinaceous contamination from both model and practical surfaces and offers a method for ensuring that no molecular residual contamination such as prions is transferred upon re-use of surgical and dental instruments. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Modeling of Energetic Materials: The Parameterization and Validation of Nitrate Esters in the COMPASS Force Field

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bunte, Steven

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the mechanical and other condensed phase properties of energetic materials using atomistic simulation techniques, the COMPASS force field has been expanded to include high-energy nitro functional groups...

  14. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R., E-mail: smitha2@ohio.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  15. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R

    2014-04-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  16. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  17. Low-temperature, ultrahigh-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy combined with molecular beam epitaxy for in situ two-dimensional materials' studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Shaoxiang; Li, Wenbin; Gou, Jian; Cheng, Peng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2018-05-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), which combines scanning probe microscopy with the Raman spectroscopy, is capable to access the local structure and chemical information simultaneously. However, the application of ambient TERS is limited by the unstable and poorly controllable experimental conditions. Here, we designed a high performance TERS system based on a low-temperature ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (LT-UHV-STM) and combined with a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. It can be used for growing two-dimensional (2D) materials and for in situ STM and TERS characterization. Using a 2D silicene sheet on the Ag(111) surface as a model system, we achieved an unprecedented 109 Raman single enhancement factor in combination with a TERS spatial resolution down to 0.5 nm. The results show that TERS combined with a MBE system can be a powerful tool to study low dimensional materials and surface science.

  18. Molecular dynamics modeling of bonding two materials by atomic scale friction stir welding at different process parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko S., Iv.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Using the molecular dynamics method, we simulated the atomic scale butt friction stir welding on two crystallites and varied the onset FSW tool plunge depth. The effects of the plunge depth value on the thermomechanical evolution of nanosized crystallites and mass transfer in the course of FSW have been studied. The increase of plunge depth values resulted in more intense heating and reducing the plasticized metal resistance to the tool movement. The mass transfer intensity was hardly dependent on the plunge depth value. The plunge depth was recommended to be used as a FSW process control parameter in addition to the commonly used ones.

  19. Infrared (1-12 μm) atomic and molecular emission signatures from energetic materials using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumi Barimah, E.; Hömmerich, U.; Brown, E.; Yang, C. S.-C.; Trivedi, S. B.; Jin, F.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Samuels, A. C.; Snyder, A. P.

    2013-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful analytical technique to detect the elemental composition of solids, liquids, and gases in real time. For example, recent advances in UV-VIS LIBS have shown great promise for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive sensing. The extension of conventional UVVIS LIBS to the near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and long wave infrared (LWIR) regions (~1-12 μm) offers the potential to provide additional information due to IR atomic and molecular signatures. In this work, a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1064 nm was employed as the excitation source and focused onto several chlorate and nitrate compounds including KClO3, NaClO3, KNO3, and NaNO3 to produce intense plasma at the target surface. IR LIBS studies on background air, KCl , and NaCl were also included for comparison. All potassium and sodium containing samples revealed narrow-band, atomic-like emissions assigned to transitions of neutral alkali-metal atoms in accordance with the NIST atomic spectra database. In addition, first evidence of broad-band molecular LIBS signatures from chlorate and nitrate compounds were observed at ~10 μm and ~7.3 μm, respectively. The observed molecular emissions showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the investigated materials.

  20. Triphenylamine-Thienothiophene Organic Charge-Transport Molecular Materials: Effect of Substitution Pattern on their Thermal, Photoelectrochemical, and Photovoltaic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thi Huong; Dao, Quang-Duy; Nghiêm, Mai-Phuong; Péralta, Sébastien; Guillot, Regis; Pham, Quoc Nghi; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori; Goubard, Fabrice; Bui, Thanh-Tuân

    2018-04-25

    Two readily accessible thienothiophene-triphenylamine charge-transport materials have been synthesized by simply varying the substitution pattern of the triphenylamine groups on a central thienothiophene π-linker. The impact of the substitution pattern on the thermal, photoelectrochemical, and photovoltaic properties of these materials was evaluated and, based on theoretical and experimental studies, we found that the isomer in which the triphenylamine groups were located at the 2,5-positions of the thienothiophene core (TT-2,5-TPA) had better π-conjugation than the 3,6-isomer (TT-3,6-TPA). Whilst the thermal, morphological, and hydrophobic properties of the two materials were similar, their optoelectrochemical and photovoltaic properties were noticeably impacted. When applied as hole-transport materials in hybrid perovskite solar cells, the 2,5-isomer exhibited a power-conversion efficiency of 13.6 %, much higher than that of its 3,6-counterpart (0.7 %) under the same standard conditions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Solution-processed, molecular photovoltaics that exploit hole transfer from non-fullerene, n-type materials

    KAUST Repository

    Douglas, Jessica D.; Chen, Mark S.; Niskala, Jeremy R.; Lee, Olivia P.; Yiu, Alan T.; Young, Eric P.; Frechet, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices containing p-type and non-fullerene n-type small molecules obtain power conversion efficiencies as high as 2.4%. The optoelectronic properties of the n-type material BT(TTI-n12)2 allow these devices

  2. 25 years and still going strong: 2'-O-(pyren-1-yl)methylribonucleotides - versatile building blocks for applications in molecular biology, diagnostics and materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdlicka, Patrick J; Karmakar, Saswata

    2017-11-29

    Oligonucleotides (ONs) modified with 2'-O-(pyren-1-yl)methylribonucleotides have been explored for a range of applications in molecular biology, nucleic acid diagnostics, and materials science for more than 25 years. The first part of this review provides an overview of synthetic strategies toward 2'-O-(pyren-1-yl)methylribonucleotides and is followed by a summary of biophysical properties of nucleic acid duplexes modified with these building blocks. Insights from structural studies are then presented to rationalize the reported properties. In the second part, applications of ONs modified with 2'-O-(pyren-1-yl)methyl-RNA monomers are reviewed, which include detection of RNA targets, discrimination of single nucleotide polymorphisms, formation of self-assembled pyrene arrays on nucleic acid scaffolds, the study of charge transfer phenomena in nucleic acid duplexes, and sequence-unrestricted recognition of double-stranded DNA. The predictable binding mode of the pyrene moiety, coupled with the microenvironment-dependent properties and synthetic feasibility, render 2'-O-(pyren-1-yl)methyl-RNA monomers as a promising class of pyrene-functionalized nucleotide building blocks for new applications in molecular biology, nucleic acid diagnostics, and materials science.

  3. A novel molecularly imprinted material based on magnetic halloysite nanotubes for rapid enrichment of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Shian; Zhou, Chengyun; Zhang, Xiaona; Zhou, Hui; Li, Hui; Zhu, Xiaohong; Wang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Successful preparation of a novel type of magnetic halloysite molecularly imprinted material. • Rapid enrichment for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in water. • This material possesses high adsorption capacity and specific recognition to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. • Magnetic halloysite were synthesized by co-precipitation method. - Abstract: A new type of magnetic halloysite nanotubes molecularly imprinted polymer (MHNTs@MIP) based on halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) with embedded magnetic nanoparticles was introduced in this study. MHNTs@MIP was prepared through surface imprinting technology, using 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) as a template, 4-vinylpyridine as the monomer, divinylbenzene as cross-linking agents, and 2,2-azodiisobutyronitrile as initiator. MHNTs@MIP was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer. MHNTs@MIP exhibited rapid and reliable analysis with supermagnetic properties, as well as repeated use and template-specific recognition. The adsorption capacity of magnetic halloysite nanotubes non-imprinted polymer (MHNTs@NIP) and MHNTs@MIP was 10.3 mg/g and 35.2 mg/g, respectively. In the detailed discussion on specific selectivity, MHNTs@MIP can be applied as an adsorbent for sample pretreatment extraction and obtain high recoveries of about 85–94%. After extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography was used to detect 2,4-D residue in water

  4. A novel molecularly imprinted material based on magnetic halloysite nanotubes for rapid enrichment of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shian; Zhou, Chengyun; Zhang, Xiaona [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Zhou, Hui [Cancer Hospital of Xiangya Medical College, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Li, Hui; Zhu, Xiaohong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Wang, Yan, E-mail: yanwangcsu@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Successful preparation of a novel type of magnetic halloysite molecularly imprinted material. • Rapid enrichment for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in water. • This material possesses high adsorption capacity and specific recognition to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. • Magnetic halloysite were synthesized by co-precipitation method. - Abstract: A new type of magnetic halloysite nanotubes molecularly imprinted polymer (MHNTs@MIP) based on halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) with embedded magnetic nanoparticles was introduced in this study. MHNTs@MIP was prepared through surface imprinting technology, using 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) as a template, 4-vinylpyridine as the monomer, divinylbenzene as cross-linking agents, and 2,2-azodiisobutyronitrile as initiator. MHNTs@MIP was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer. MHNTs@MIP exhibited rapid and reliable analysis with supermagnetic properties, as well as repeated use and template-specific recognition. The adsorption capacity of magnetic halloysite nanotubes non-imprinted polymer (MHNTs@NIP) and MHNTs@MIP was 10.3 mg/g and 35.2 mg/g, respectively. In the detailed discussion on specific selectivity, MHNTs@MIP can be applied as an adsorbent for sample pretreatment extraction and obtain high recoveries of about 85–94%. After extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography was used to detect 2,4-D residue in water.

  5. Novel sponge-like molecularly imprinted mesoporous silica material for selective isolation of bisphenol A and its analogues from sediment extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jiajia [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Yun; Wang, Jincheng [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Xiaoli [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shah, Syed Mazhar [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Cao, Rong [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Jiping, E-mail: chenjp@dicp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel sponge-like molecularly imprinted mesoporous silica was synthesized. • Extraordinarily large specific surface area and highly interconnected 3-D porous network. • High specific adsorption capacity and fast adsorption kinetics for BPA. • Good class-selectivity and clean-up effect for bisphenols in sediment under SPE mode. • Good recoveries and sensitivity for bisphenols using the MISMS–SPE coupled with HPLC–DAD method. - Abstract: Bisphenol A (BPA) imprinted sponge mesoporous silica was synthesized using a combination of semi-covalent molecular imprinting and simple self-assembly process. The molecularly imprinted sponge mesoporous silica (MISMS) material obtained was characterized by FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption measurements. The results show that the MISMS possessed a large specific surface area (850.55 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and a highly interconnected 3-D porous network. As a result, the MISMS demonstrated a superior specific adsorption capacity of 169.22 μmol g{sup −1} and fast adsorption kinetics (reaching equilibrium within 3 min) for BPA. Good class selectivity for BPA and its analogues (bisphenol F, bisphenol B, bisphenol E and bisphenol AF) was also demonstrated by the sorption experiment. The MISMS as solid-phase extraction (SPE) material was then evaluated for isolation and clean-up of these bisphenols (BPs) from sediment samples. An accurate and sensitive analytical method based on the MISMS–SPE coupled with HPLC–DAD has been successfully established for simultaneous determination of five BPs in river sediments with detection limits of 0.43–0.71 ng g{sup −1} dry weight (dw). The recoveries of BPs for lyophilizated sediment samples at two spiking levels (50 and 500 ng g{sup −1} dw for each BP) were in the range of 75.5–105.5% with RSD values below 7.5%.

  6. Novel sponge-like molecularly imprinted mesoporous silica material for selective isolation of bisphenol A and its analogues from sediment extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jiajia; Li, Yun; Wang, Jincheng; Sun, Xiaoli; Shah, Syed Mazhar; Cao, Rong; Chen, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel sponge-like molecularly imprinted mesoporous silica was synthesized. • Extraordinarily large specific surface area and highly interconnected 3-D porous network. • High specific adsorption capacity and fast adsorption kinetics for BPA. • Good class-selectivity and clean-up effect for bisphenols in sediment under SPE mode. • Good recoveries and sensitivity for bisphenols using the MISMS–SPE coupled with HPLC–DAD method. - Abstract: Bisphenol A (BPA) imprinted sponge mesoporous silica was synthesized using a combination of semi-covalent molecular imprinting and simple self-assembly process. The molecularly imprinted sponge mesoporous silica (MISMS) material obtained was characterized by FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption measurements. The results show that the MISMS possessed a large specific surface area (850.55 m 2 g −1 ) and a highly interconnected 3-D porous network. As a result, the MISMS demonstrated a superior specific adsorption capacity of 169.22 μmol g −1 and fast adsorption kinetics (reaching equilibrium within 3 min) for BPA. Good class selectivity for BPA and its analogues (bisphenol F, bisphenol B, bisphenol E and bisphenol AF) was also demonstrated by the sorption experiment. The MISMS as solid-phase extraction (SPE) material was then evaluated for isolation and clean-up of these bisphenols (BPs) from sediment samples. An accurate and sensitive analytical method based on the MISMS–SPE coupled with HPLC–DAD has been successfully established for simultaneous determination of five BPs in river sediments with detection limits of 0.43–0.71 ng g −1 dry weight (dw). The recoveries of BPs for lyophilizated sediment samples at two spiking levels (50 and 500 ng g −1 dw for each BP) were in the range of 75.5–105.5% with RSD values below 7.5%

  7. Development of Nanostructured Water Treatment Membranes Based on Thermotropic Liquid Crystals: Molecular Design of Sub-Nanoporous Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takafumi; Nada, Hiroki; Nakatsuji, Koji; Mitani, Masato; Soberats, Bartolome; Kawata, Ken; Yoshio, Masafumi; Tomioka, Hiroki; Sasaki, Takao; Kimura, Masahiro; Henmi, Masahiro; Kato, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Supply of safe fresh water is currently one of the most important global issues. Membranes technologies are essential to treat water efficiently with low costs and energy consumption. Here, the development of self-organized nanostructured water treatment membranes based on ionic liquid crystals composed of ammonium, imidazolium, and pyridinium moieties is reported. Membranes with preserved 1D or 3D self-organized sub-nanopores are obtained by photopolymerization of ionic columnar or bicontinuous cubic liquid crystals. These membranes show salt rejection ability, ion selectivity, and excellent water permeability. The relationships between the structures and the transport properties of water molecules and ionic solutes in the sub-nanopores in the membranes are examined by molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that the volume of vacant space in the nanochannel greatly affects the water and ion permeability.

  8. A New Class of Octahedral Molecular Sieve Materials for the Selective Removal and Sequestration of 90Sr2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, May D.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Parise, John B.; Maxwell, Robert S.; Harrison, William T.A.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of Na 16 Nb 12.8 Ti 3.2 O 44.8 (OH) 3.2 · 8H 2 O, a member of a new family of Sandia Octahedral Molecular Sieves (SOMS) having a Nb/Na/M IV (M= Ti, Zr) oxide framework and exchangeable Na and water in open channels, was determined from Synchrotron X-ray data. The SOMS phases are isostructural with variable M IV :Nb(1:50--1:4) ratios. The SOMS are extremely selective for sorption of divalent cations, particularly Sr 2+ . The ion-exchanged SOMS undergo direct thermal conversion to a perovskite-type phase, indicating this is a promising new method for removal and sequestration of radioactive Sr-90 from mixed nuclear wastes

  9. Molecular hydrogen in the z = 2.811 absorbing material toward the quasar PKS 0528-250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levshakov, S.A.; Varshalovich, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Among the previously unidentified absorbtion features in the spectrum of the quasar PKS 0528-250 obtained by previous authors tentative evidence has been found for H 2 lines at the same redshift (z = 2.811) as that of the well-known absorption-line system. The column density of molecules has been estimated from the curve of growth; the fraction of H 2 appears to be about 2 x 10 -5 . The ortho- to para-H 2 ratio corresponds to the excitation temperature of Tsub(ex)(H 2 ) = 300 +- 150 K, though the upper rotational levels J >= 3 turn out be overpopulated. The results obtained seem to provide substantial evidence for the existence of molecular hydrogen at the early cosmological epoch with z approx. 3. (author)

  10. Molecular Analysis of Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria of the β Subdivision of the Class Proteobacteria in Compost and Composted Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalchuk, George A.; Naoumenko, Zinaida S.; Derikx, Piet J. L.; Felske, Andreas; Stephen, John R.; Arkhipchenko, Irina A.

    1999-01-01

    Although the practice of composting animal wastes for use as biofertilizers has increased in recent years, little is known about the microorganisms responsible for the nitrogen transformations which occur in compost and during the composting process. Ammonia is the principle available nitrogenous compound in composting material, and the conversion of this compound to nitrite in the environment by chemolithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria is an essential step in nitrogen cycling. Therefore, the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing members of the β subdivision of the class Proteobacteria in a variety of composting materials was assessed by amplifying 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and 16S rRNA by PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), respectively. The PCR and RT-PCR products were separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and were identified by hybridization with a hierarchical set of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect ammonia oxidizer-like sequence clusters in the genera Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas. Ammonia oxidizer-like 16S rDNA was detected in almost all of the materials tested, including industrial and experimental composts, manure, and commercial biofertilizers. A comparison of the DGGE and hybridization results after specific PCR and RT-PCR suggested that not all of the different ammonia oxidizer groups detected in compost are equally active. amoA, the gene encoding the active-site-containing subunit of ammonia monooxygenase, was also targeted by PCR, and template concentrations were estimated by competitive PCR. Detection of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the composts tested suggested that such materials may not be biologically inert with respect to nitrification and that the fate of nitrogen during composting and compost storage may be affected by the presence of these organisms. PMID:9925559

  11. A molecular method to assess bioburden embedded within silicon-based resins used on modern spacecraft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Christina N.; Bruckner, James; Spry, J. Andy; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; La Duc, Myron T.

    2012-07-01

    Current assessments of bioburden embedded in spacecraft materials are based on work performed in the Viking era (1970s), and the ability to culture organisms extracted from such materials. To circumvent the limitations of such approaches, DNA-based techniques were evaluated alongside established culturing techniques to determine the recovery and survival of bacterial spores encapsulated in spacecraft-qualified polymer materials. Varying concentrations of Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores were completely embedded in silicone epoxy. An organic dimethylacetamide-based solvent was used to digest the epoxy and spore recovery was evaluated via gyrB-targeted qPCR, direct agar plating, most probably number analysis, and microscopy. Although full-strength solvent was shown to inhibit the germination and/or outgrowth of spores, dilution in excess of 100-fold allowed recovery with no significant decrease in cultivability. Similarly, qPCR (quantitative PCR) detection sensitivities as low as ~103 CFU ml-1 were achieved upon removal of inhibitory substances associated with the epoxy and/or solvent. These detection and enumeration methods show promise for use in assessing the embedded bioburden of spacecraft hardware.

  12. Bioanalytics of mycotoxins and development of dedicated analyte-selective molecularly imprinted materials for solid-phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodlbauer, H.J.

    2001-09-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by several fungal species, growing on agricultural products during cultivation, harvest, transport or storage. Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin of great natural abundance and can be found in various plant products. Due to its frequent occurrence and toxic properties many countries have set up tolerance levels for OTA. Thus, the need for sensitive analytical and in particular selective sample preparation methods for analyte enrichment and removal of interfering matrix compounds is obvious. Molecular imprinting generates polymeric matrices that can selectively recognize and bind target molecules. It was previously demonstrated that molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) can be employed in sample preparation. MIPs capable of recognizing OTA have been prepared using an analyte mimic approach. Crucial to the success was the introduction of a novel class of quinuclidine-derived functional monomers which utilize ionic binding increments and hydrophobic interactions for selective recognition of the target analyte and its mimics. Since optimization of SPE procedures demonstrated the convenient use of several solvent systems, the developed MIPs represents an enrichment for the field of mycotoxin analysis. Zeranol has been widely adopted as a growth stimulant for cattle and other animals due to its anabolic and estrogenic properties. Application of zeranol has been banned in the European Union since 1985. Researchers, however, found that the illegal administration of this anabolic agent may not be the only source of zeranol residues in biologically relevant matrices. Previously, it was demonstrated that zeranol was also formed in vivo from the mycotoxins zearalenone (ZON) and α-zearalenol that are carried over from mycotoxin contaminated feed into the animal body. A fast, robust and sensitive LC-MS method for the determination for these compounds in urine and tissue samples has been developed. Crucial for the achievement of low

  13. Formation of atomic clusters through the laser ablation of refractory materials in a supersonic molecular beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haufler, R.E.; Puretzky, A.A.; Compton, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Concepts which guide the design of atomic cluster supersonic beam sources have been developed. These ideas are founded on the knowledge of laser ablation dynamics and are structured in order to take advantage of certain features of the ablation event. Some of the drawbacks of previous cluster source designs become apparent when the sequence of events following laser ablation are clarified. Key features of the new cluster source design include control of the cluster size distribution, uniform performance with a variety of solid materials and elements, high beam intensity, and significant removal of internal energy during the supersonic expansion

  14. Solution-processed, molecular photovoltaics that exploit hole transfer from non-fullerene, n-type materials

    KAUST Repository

    Douglas, Jessica D.

    2014-05-12

    Solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices containing p-type and non-fullerene n-type small molecules obtain power conversion efficiencies as high as 2.4%. The optoelectronic properties of the n-type material BT(TTI-n12)2 allow these devices to display high open-circuit voltages (>0.85 V) and generate significant charge carriers through hole transfer in addition to the electron-transfer pathway, which is common in fullerene-based devices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Multi-scale multi-physics computational chemistry simulation based on ultra-accelerated quantum chemical molecular dynamics method for structural materials in boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Akira; Sato, Etsuko; Sato, Ryo; Inaba, Kenji; Hatakeyama, Nozomu

    2014-01-01

    In collaboration with experimental experts we have reported in the present conference (Hatakeyama, N. et al., “Experiment-integrated multi-scale, multi-physics computational chemistry simulation applied to corrosion behaviour of BWR structural materials”) the results of multi-scale multi-physics computational chemistry simulations applied to the corrosion behaviour of BWR structural materials. In macro-scale, a macroscopic simulator of anode polarization curve was developed to solve the spatially one-dimensional electrochemical equations on the material surface in continuum level in order to understand the corrosion behaviour of typical BWR structural material, SUS304. The experimental anode polarization behaviours of each pure metal were reproduced by fitting all the rates of electrochemical reactions and then the anode polarization curve of SUS304 was calculated by using the same parameters and found to reproduce the experimental behaviour successfully. In meso-scale, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulator was applied to an actual-time simulation of the morphological corrosion behaviour under the influence of an applied voltage. In micro-scale, an ultra-accelerated quantum chemical molecular dynamics (UA-QCMD) code was applied to various metallic oxide surfaces of Fe 2 O 3 , Fe 3 O 4 , Cr 2 O 3 modelled as same as water molecules and dissolved metallic ions on the surfaces, then the dissolution and segregation behaviours were successfully simulated dynamically by using UA-QCMD. In this paper we describe details of the multi-scale, multi-physics computational chemistry method especially the UA-QCMD method. This method is approximately 10,000,000 times faster than conventional first-principles molecular dynamics methods based on density-functional theory (DFT), and the accuracy was also validated for various metals and metal oxides compared with DFT results. To assure multi-scale multi-physics computational chemistry simulation based on the UA-QCMD method for

  16. Understanding the interface between silicon-based materials and water: Molecular-dynamics exploration of infrared spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Martinez-Gonzalez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-dynamics simulations for silicon, hydrogen- and hydroxyl-terminated silicon in contact with liquid water, at 220 and 300 K, display water-density ‘ordering’ along the laboratory z-axis, emphasising the hydrophobicity of the different systems and the position of this first adsorbed layer. Density of states (DOS of the oxygen and proton velocity correlation functions (VACFs and infrared (IR spectra of the first monolayer of adsorbed water, calculated via Fourier transformation, indicate similarities to more confined, ice-like dynamical behaviour (redolent of ice. It was observed that good qualitative agreement is obtained between the DOS for this first layer in all systems. The DOS for the lower-frequency zone indicates that for the interface studied (i.e., the first layer near the surface, the water molecules try to organise in a similar form, and that this form is intermediate between liquid water and ice. For IR spectra, scrutiny of the position of the highest-intensity peaks for the stretching and bending bands indicate that such water molecules in the first solvating layer are organised in an intermediate fashion between ice and liquid water.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock compressed heterogeneous materials. II. The graphite/diamond transition case for astrophysics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, N.; Soulard, L.; Colombet, L.; Carrard, T.; Pellé, A.; Gillet, Ph.; Clérouin, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a series of molecular dynamics simulations of the shock compression of copper matrices containing a single graphite inclusion: these model systems can be related to some specific carbon-rich rocks which, after a meteoritic impact, are found to contain small fractions of nanodiamonds embedded in graphite in the vicinity of high impedance minerals. We show that the graphite to diamond transformation occurs readily for nanometer-sized graphite inclusions, via a shock accumulation process, provided the pressure threshold of the bulk graphite/diamond transition is overcome, independently of the shape or size of the inclusion. Although high diamond yields (˜80%) are found after a few picoseconds in all cases, the transition is non-isotropic and depends substantially on the relative orientation of the graphite stack with respect to the shock propagation, leading to distinct nucleation processes and size-distributions of the diamond grains. A substantial regraphitization process occurs upon release and only inclusions with favorable orientations likely lead to the preservation of a fraction of this diamond phase. These results agree qualitatively well with the recent experimental observations of meteoritic impact samples.

  18. Molecular-wire behavior of OLED materials: exciton dynamics in multichromophoric Alq3-oligofluorene-Pt(II)porphyrin triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Victor A; Pérez-Bolívar, César; Agarwal, Neeraj; Shinar, Joseph; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2006-09-27

    Donor-bridge-acceptor triads consisting of the Alq3 complex, oligofluorene bridge, and PtII tetraphenylporphyrin (PtTPP) were synthesized. The triads were designed to study the energy level/distance-dependence in energy transfer both in a solution and in solid state. The materials show effective singlet transfer from the Alq3-fluorene fluorophore to the porphyrin, while the triplet energy transfer, owing to the shorter delocalization of triplet excitons, appears to take place via a triplet energy cascade. Using femtosecond transient spectroscopy, the rate of the singlet-singlet energy transfer was determined. The exponential dependence of the donor-acceptor distance and the respective energy transfer rates of 7.1 x 1010 to 1.0 x 109 s-1 with the attenuation factor â of 0.21 +/- 0.02 A-1 suggest that the energy transfer proceeds via a mixed incohererent wire/superexchange mechanism. In the OLEDs fabricated using the Alq3-oligofluorene-PtTPP triads with better triplet level alignment, the order of a magnitude increase in efficacy appears to be due to facile triplet energy transfer. The devices, where the triplet-triplet energy transfer is of paramount importance, showed high color purity emission (CIE X,Y: 0.706, 0.277), which is almost identical to the emission from thin films. Most importantly, we believe that the design principles demonstrated above are general and may be used to prepare OLED materials with enhanced quantum efficacy at lowered operational potentials, being crucial for improved lifespan of OLEDs.

  19. Data Evaluation for Atomic, Molecular and Plasma Material Interaction Processes in Fusion. Summary Report of a Joint IAEA-NFRI Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2012-12-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the Joint IAEA-NFRI Technical Meeting on 'Data Evaluation for Atomic, Molecular and Plasma Material Interaction Processes in Fusion' on 4-7 September 2012. Twenty five participants from 10 Member States and two from the IAEA attended the four-day meeting held at the Daejeon Convention Center in Daejeon, Republic of Korea hosted by the National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) in conjunction with the 8th International Symposium on Standard Reference Data. The report includes discussions on the issues of the critical assessment of fundamental data required for fusion and plasma applications, meeting conclusions and recommendations. The abstracts of presentations presented in the meeting are attached in the Appendix. (author)

  20. Resposta molecular do endotélio pulmonar à exposição aguda de material particulado  fino

    OpenAIRE

    Mirna Alameddine

    2010-01-01

    Estudos epidemiológicos estabelecem uma associação evidente entre poluição do ar e o aumento de morbimortalidade cardiovascular e respiratória. No entanto, os mecanismos moleculares subjacentes aos efeitos do material particulado fino (MP2,5) sobre o organismo ainda estão pouco esclarecidos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar o impacto da exposição ao MP2,5 sobre a biologia do endotélio pulmonar e do coração, através da avaliação do perfil de expressão gênica por microarray. Camundong...

  1. Molecular precursors for the phase-change material germanium-antimony-telluride, Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmgarth, Nicole; Zoerner, Florian; Engelhardt, Felix; Edelmann, Frank T. [Chemisches Institut, Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg (Germany); Liebing, Phil [Laboratorium fuer Anorganische Chemie, ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Burte, Edmund P.; Silinskas, Mindaugas [Institut fuer Mikro- und Sensorsysteme, Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg (Germany)

    2017-10-04

    This review provides an overview of the precursor chemistry that has been developed around the phase-change material germanium-antimony-telluride, Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST). Thin films of GST can be deposited by employing either chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques. In both cases, the success of the layer deposition crucially depends on the proper choice of suitable molecular precursors. Previously reported processes mainly relied on simple alkoxides, alkyls, amides and halides of germanium, antimony, and tellurium. More sophisticated precursor design provided a number of promising new aziridinides and guanidinates. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Preparation and Thermal Properties of Molecular-Bridged Expanded Graphite/Polyethylene Glycol Composite Phase Change Materials for Building Energy Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Chen, Meizhu; Liu, Quantao; Wan, Jiuming; Hu, Jinxuan

    2018-05-16

    Using phase change materials (PCMs) in building envelopes became a reliable method to improve indoor comfort and reduce buildings' energy consumption. This research developed molecular-bridged expanded graphite (EG)/polyethylene glycol (PEG) composite PCMs (m-EPs) to conserve energy in buildings. The m-EPs were prepared through a vacuum absorption technique, and a titanate coupling agent was used to build a molecular bridge between EG and PEG. SEM, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), the leakage test, microcalorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were conducted to characterize the morphology, pore structure, absorbability, and modifying effects of the m-EPs. The phase change temperature, latent heat, thermal stability, and thermal conductivity of the m-EPs were determined by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), TGA, and a thermal constants analyzer. Results showed that the maximum mass ratio of PEG to EG without leakage was 1:7, and a stable connection was established in the m-EPs after modification. Compared with the unmodified EPs, the supercooling degree of the m-EPs reduced by about 3 °C, but the latent heats and initial decomposition temperatures increased by approximately 10% and 20 °C, respectively, which indicated an improvement in the thermal energy storage efficiency. The thermal conductivities of the m-EPs were 10 times higher than those of the pristine PEGs, which ensured a rapid responding to building temperature fluctuations.

  3. Molecular and polymeric uranyl and thorium hybrid materials featuring methyl substituted pyrazole dicarboxylates and heterocyclic 1,3-diketones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Korey P.; Kerr, Andrew T.; Taydakov, Ilya V.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2018-02-01

    A series of seven novel f-element bearing hybrid materials have been prepared from either methyl substituted 3,4 and 4,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acids, or heterocyclic 1,3- diketonate ligands using hydrothermal conditions. Compounds 1, [UO2(C6H4N2O4)2(H2O)], and 3, [Th(C6H4N2O4)4(H2O)5]·H2O feature 1-Methyl-1H-pyrazole-3,4-dicarboxylate ligands (SVI-COOH 3,4), whereas 2, [UO2(C6H4N2O4)2(H2O)], and 4, [Th(C6H5N2O4)(OH)(H2O)6]2·2(C6H5N2O4)·3H2O feature 1-Methyl-1H-pyrazole-4,5-dicarboxylate moieties (SVI-COOH 4,5). Compounds 5, [UO2(C13H15N4O2)2(H2O)]·2H2O and 6, [UO2(C11H11N4O2)2(H2O)]·4.5H2O feature 1,3-bis(4-N1-methyl-pyrazolyl)propane-1,3-dione and 1,3-bis(4-N1,3-dimethyl-pyrazolyl)propane-1,3-dione respectively, whereas the heterometallic 7, [UO2(C11H11N4O2)2(CuCl2)(H2O)]·2H2O is formed by using 6 as a metalloligand starting material. Single crystal X-ray diffraction indicates that all coordination to either [UO2]2+ or Th(IV) metal centers is through O-donation as anticipated. Room temperature, solid-state luminescence studies indicate characteristic uranyl emissive behavior for 1 and 2, whereas those for 5 and 6 are weak and poorly resolved.

  4. Smart materials on the way to theranostic nanorobots: Molecular machines and nanomotors, advanced biosensors, and intelligent vehicles for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Ilya L; Cherkasov, Vladimir R; Tregubov, Andrey A; Buiucli, Sveatoslav R; Nikitin, Maxim P

    2017-06-01

    Theranostics, a fusion of two key parts of modern medicine - diagnostics and therapy of the organism's disorders, promises to bring the efficacy of medical treatment to a fundamentally new level and to become the basis of personalized medicine. Extrapolating today's progress in the field of smart materials to the long-run prospect, we can imagine future intelligent agents capable of performing complex analysis of different physiological factors inside the living organism and implementing a built-in program thereby triggering a series of therapeutic actions. These agents, by analogy with their macroscopic counterparts, can be called nanorobots. It is quite obscure what these devices are going to look like but they will be more or less based on today's achievements in nanobiotechnology. The present Review is an attempt to systematize highly diverse nanomaterials, which may potentially serve as modules for theranostic nanorobotics, e.g., nanomotors, sensing units, and payload carriers. Biocomputing-based sensing, externally actuated or chemically "fueled" autonomous movement, swarm inter-agent communication behavior are just a few inspiring examples that nanobiotechnology can offer today for construction of truly intelligent drug delivery systems. The progress of smart nanomaterials toward fully autonomous drug delivery nanorobots is an exciting prospect for disease treatment. Synergistic combination of the available approaches and their further development may produce intelligent drugs of unmatched functionality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of test models to quantify encapsulated bioburden in spacecraft polymer materials by cultivation-dependent and molecular methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, Anja; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Mahnert, Alexander; Probst, Alexander; Flier, Niwin; Auerbach, Anna; Weber, Christina; Haberer, Klaus; Boeker, Alexander

    Bioburden encapsulated in spacecraft polymers (such as adhesives and coatings) poses a potential risk to scientific exploration of other celestial bodies, but it is not easily detectable. In this study, we developed novel testing strategies to estimate the quantity of intrinsic encapsulated bioburden in polymers used frequently on spaceflight hardware. In particular Scotch-Weld (TM) 2216 B/A (Epoxy adhesive); MAP SG121FD (Silicone coating), Solithane (®) 113 (Urethane resin); ESP 495 (Silicone adhesive); and Dow Corning (®) 93-500 (Silicone encapsulant) were investigated. As extraction of bioburden from polymerized (solid) materials did not prove feasible, a method was devised to extract contaminants from uncured polymer precursors by dilution in organic solvents. Cultivation-dependent analyses showed less than 0.1-2.5 colony forming units (cfu) per cm³ polymer, whereas quantitative PCR with extracted DNA indicated considerably higher values, despite low DNA extraction efficiency. Results obtained by this method reflected the most conservative proxy for encapsulated bioburden. To observe the effect of physical and chemical stress occurring during polymerization on the viability of encapsulated contaminants, Bacillus safensis spores were embedded close to the surface in cured polymer, which facilitated access for different analytical techniques. Staining by AlexaFluor succinimidyl ester 488 (AF488), propidium monoazide (PMA), CTC (5-cyano-2,3-diotolyl tetrazolium chloride) and subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) demonstrated that embedded spores retained integrity, germination and cultivation ability even after polymerization of the adhesive Scotch-Weld™ 2216 B/A.

  6. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of [CrGe/MnGe/FeGe] superlattices: Toward artificial B20 skyrmion materials with tunable interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adam S.; Esser, Bryan D.; Rowland, James; McComb, David W.; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2017-06-01

    Skyrmions are localized magnetic spin textures whose stability has been shown theoretically to depend on material parameters including bulk Dresselhaus spin orbit coupling (SOC), interfacial Rashba SOC, and magnetic anisotropy. Here, we establish the growth of a new class of artificial skyrmion materials, namely B20 superlattices, where these parameters could be systematically tuned. Specifically, we report the successful growth of B20 superlattices comprised of single crystal thin films of FeGe, MnGe, and CrGe on Si(1 1 1) substrates. Thin films and superlattices are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are characterized through a combination of reflection high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) distinguishes layers by elemental mapping and indicates good interface quality with relatively low levels of intermixing in the [CrGe/MnGe/FeGe] superlattice. This demonstration of epitaxial, single-crystalline B20 superlattices is a significant advance toward tunable skyrmion systems for fundamental scientific studies and applications in magnetic storage and logic.

  7. A molecular dynamics investigation into the mechanisms of subsurface damage and material removal of monocrystalline copper subjected to nanoscale high speed grinding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Liu, Youwen; Zhang, Liangchi

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the mechanisms of subsurface damage and material removal of monocrystalline copper when it is under a nanoscale high speed grinding of a diamond tip. The analysis was carried out with the aid of three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations. The key factors that would influence the deformation of the material were carefully explored by analyzing the chip, dislocation movement, and workpiece deformation, which include grinding speed, depth of cut, grid tip radius, crystal orientation and machining angle of copper. An analytical model was also established to predict the emission of partial dislocations during the nanoscale high speed grinding. The investigation showed that a higher grinding velocity, a larger tip radius or a larger depth of cut would result in a larger chipping volume and a greater temperature rise in the copper workpiece. A lower grinding velocity would produce more intrinsic stacking faults. It was also found that the transition of deformation mechanisms depends on the competition between the dislocations and deformation twinning. There is a critical machining angle, at which a higher velocity, a smaller tip radius, or a smaller depth of cut will reduce the subsurface damage and improve the smoothness of a ground surface. The established analytical model showed that the Shockley dislocation emission is most likely to occur with the crystal orientations of (0 0 1)[1 0 0] at 45° angle.

  8. Consequences of Molecular-Scale Non-Equilibrium Activity on the Dynamics and Mechanics of Self-Assembled Actin-Based Structures and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall Mccall, Patrick

    Living cells are hierarchically self-organized forms of active soft matter: molecules on the nanometer scale form functional structures and organelles on the micron scale, which then compose cells on the scale of 10s of microns. While the biological functions of intracellular organelles are defined by the composition and properties of the structures themselves, how those bulk properties emerge from the properties and interactions of individual molecules remains poorly understood. Actin, a globular protein which self-assembles into dynamic semi-flexible polymers, is the basic structural material of cells and the major component of many functional organelles. In this thesis, I have used purified actin as a model system to explore the interplay between molecular-scale dynamics and organelle-scale functionality, with particular focus on the role of molecular-scale non-equilibrium activity. One of the most canonical forms of molecular-scale non-equilibrium activity is that of mechanoenzymes, also called motor proteins. These proteins utilized the free energy liberated by hydrolysis of ATP to perform mechanical work, thereby introducing non-equilibrium "active" stresses on the molecular scale. Combining experiments with mathematical modeling, we demonstrate in this thesis that non-equilibrium motor activity is sufficient to drive self-organization and pattern formation of the multimeric actin-binding motor protein Myosin II on 1D reconstituted actomyosin bundles. Like myosin, actin is itself an ATPase. However, nono-equilibrium ATP hydrolysis on actin is known to regulate the stability and assembly kinetics of actin filaments rather than generate active stresses per se. At the level of single actin filaments, the inhomogeneous nucleotide composition generated along the filament length by hydrolysis directs binding of regulatory proteins like cofilin, which mediate filament disassembly and thereby accelerate actin filament turnover. The concequences of this non

  9. Heterometallic molecular precursors for a lithium-iron oxide material: synthesis, solid state structure, solution and gas-phase behaviour, and thermal decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Haixiang; Wei, Zheng; Barry, Matthew C; Filatov, Alexander S; Dikarev, Evgeny V

    2017-05-02

    Three heterometallic single-source precursors with a Li : Fe = 1 : 1 ratio for a LiFeO 2 oxide material are reported. Heterometallic compounds LiFeL 3 (L = tbaoac (1), ptac (2), and acac(3)) have been obtained on a large scale, in nearly quantitative yields by one-step reactions that employ readily available reagents. The heterometallic precursor LiFe(acac) 3 (3) with small, symmetric substituents on the ligand (acac = pentane-2,4-dionate), maintains a 1D polymeric structure in the solid state that limits its volatility and prevents solubility in non-coordinating solvents. The application of the unsymmetrical ligands, tbaoac (tert-butyl acetoacetate) and ptac (1,1,1-trifluoro-5,5-dimethyl-2,4-hexanedionate), that exhibit different bridging properties at the two ends of the ligand, allowed us to change the connectivity pattern within the heterometallic assembly. The latter was demonstrated by structural characterization of heterometallic complexes LiFe(tbaoac) 3 (1) and LiFe(ptac) 3 (2) that consist of discrete heterocyclic tetranuclear molecules Li 2 Fe 2 L 6 . The compounds are highly volatile and exhibit a congruent sublimation character. DART mass spectrometric investigation revealed the presence of heterometallic molecules in the gas phase. The positive mode spectra are dominated by the presence of [M - L] + peaks (M = Li 2 Fe 2 L 6 ). In accord with their discrete molecular structure, complexes 1 and 2 are highly soluble in nearly all common solvents. In order to test the retention of the heterometallic structure in solution, the diamagnetic analog of 1, LiMg(tbaoac) 3 (4), has been isolated. Its tetranuclear molecular structure was found to be isomorphous to that of the iron counterpart. 1 H and 7 Li NMR spectroscopy unambiguously confirmed the presence of heterometallic molecules in solutions of non-coordinating solvents. The heterometallic precursor 1 was shown to exhibit clean thermal decomposition in air that results in phase-pure

  10. Myoglobin-biomimetic electroactive materials made by surface molecular imprinting on silica beads and their use as ionophores in polymeric membranes for potentiometric transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Felismina T C; Dutra, Rosa A F; Noronha, Joao P C; Sales, M Goreti F

    2011-08-15

    Myoglobin (Mb) is among the cardiac biomarkers playing a major role in urgent diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Its monitoring in point-of-care is therefore fundamental. Pursuing this goal, a novel biomimetic ionophore for the potentiometric transduction of Mb is presented. It was synthesized by surface molecular imprinting (SMI) with the purpose of developing highly efficient sensor layers for near-stereochemical recognition of Mb. The template (Mb) was imprinted on a silane surface that was covalently attached to silica beads by means of self-assembled monolayers. First the silica was modified with an external layer of aldehyde groups. Then, Mb was attached by reaction with its amine groups (on the external surface) and subsequent formation of imine bonds. The vacant places surrounding Mb were filled by polymerization of the silane monomers 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) and propyltrimethoxysilane (PTMS). Finally, the template was removed by imine cleavage after treatment with oxalic acid. The results materials were finely dispersed in plasticized PVC selective membranes and used as ionophores in potentiometric transduction. The best analytical features were found in HEPES buffer of pH 4. Under this condition, the limits of detection were of 1.3 × 10(-6)mol/L for a linear response after 8.0 × 10(-7) mol/L with an anionic slope of -65.9 mV/decade. The imprinting effect was tested by preparing non-imprinted (NI) particles and employing these materials as ionophores. The resulting membranes showed no ability to detect Mb. Good selectivity was observed towards creatinine, sacarose, fructose, galactose, sodium glutamate, and alanine. The analytical application was conducted successfully and showed accurate and precise results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a molecular dynamic based cohesive zone model for prediction of an equivalent material behavior for Al/Al2O3 composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sazgar, A. [Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Movahhedy, M.R., E-mail: movahhed@sharif.edu [Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahnama, M. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sohrabpour, S. [Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-02

    The interfacial behavior of composites is often simulated using a cohesive zone model (CZM). In this approach, a traction-separation (T-S) relation between the matrix and reinforcement particles, which is often obtained from experimental results, is employed. However, since the determination of this relation from experimental results is difficult, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation may be used as a virtual environment to obtain this relation. In this study, MD simulations under the normal and shear loadings are used to obtain the interface behavior of Al/Al2O3 composite material and to derive the T-S relation. For better agreement with Al/Al2O3 interfacial behavior, the exponential form of the T-S relation suggested by Needleman [1] is modified to account for thermal effects. The MD results are employed to develop a parameterized cohesive zone model which is implemented in a finite element model of the matrix-particle interactions. Stress-strain curves obtained from simulations under different loading conditions and volume fractions show a close correlation with experimental results. Finally, by studying the effects of strain rate and volume fraction of particles in Al(6061-T6)/Al2O3 composite, an equivalent homogeneous model is introduced which can predict the overall behavior of the composite.

  12. Fiscal 1998 research report. Industrial science and technology research project / R and D on creative advanced functional materials (structure-controlled materials) / Harmonized molecular materials; 1998 nendo dokusoteki kokino zairyo sosei gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu (kozo seigyo zairyo gijutsu kaihatsu) seika hokokusho. Bunshi kyocho zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    R and D on harmonized molecular materials aim at establishment of the technology fabricating self-assembled organic molecular films on solid surfaces which have potentials of mechanical response to electric fields, electroluminescence or optical functions. Molecule harmonization expresses new structures and functions difficult to be expressed by each molecule alone, by cooperative interaction between molecules due to noncovalent bond. Functional thin films were developed by controlling alignment and/or arrangement of molecules with an aid of self-assembling processes. Thiol compounds with larger dielectric anisotropy were synthesized as electric field responsive self-assembled films. {pi}-conjugated compounds composed of phenyl-capped oligothiophenes were synthesized as electroluminescent self-assembled films, and their high crystallinity and efficient electroluminescence were found. Heat- and solvent-resistant lyotropic liquid crystalline (LLC) aligning polymers such as polyamine and polyimine were synthesized as new optically functional LLC dye self-assembled films. (NEDO)

  13. Selective molecularly imprinted polymer combined with restricted access material for in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS of parabens in breast milk samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Israel D.; Melo, Lidervan P.; Jardim, Isabel C.S.F.; Monteiro, Juliana C.S.; Nakano, Ana Marcia S.; Queiroz, Maria Eugênia C.

    2016-01-01

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer modified with restricted access material (a hydrophilic external layer), (MIP-RAM) was synthesized via polymerization in situ in an open fused silica capillary. This stationary phase was used as sorbent for in-tube solid phase microextraction (in-tube SPME) to determine parabens in breast milk samples by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) illustrate MIP surface modification after glycerol dimethacrylate (hydrophilic monomer) incorporation. The interaction between parabens and MIP-RAM was investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The Scatchard plot for MIP-RAM presented two linear parts with different slopes, illustrating binding sites with high- and low-affinity. Endogenous compounds exclusion from the MIP-RAM capillary was demonstrated by in-tube SPME/LC-UV assays carried out with blank milk samples. The in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS method presented linear range from 10 ng mL"−"1 (LLOQ) to 400 ng mL"−"1 with coefficients of determination higher than 0.99, inter-assay precision with coefficient of variation (CV) values ranging from 2 to 15%, and inter-assay accuracy with relative standard deviation (RSD) values ranging from −1% to 19%. Analytical validation parameters attested that in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS is an appropriate method to determine parabens in human milk samples to assess human exposure to these compounds. Analysis of breast milk samples from lactating women demonstrated that the proposed method is effective. - Highlights: • Molecularly imprinted polymer modified with a hydrophilic external layer (RAM-MIP) was synthesized in a silica capillary. • RAM-MIP capillary, used as sorbent for in-tube SPME, established specific interaction with parabens present in milk samples. • The matrix components that interacted only with the hydrophilic external layer (non-adsorptive network) were excluded. • The

  14. Selective molecularly imprinted polymer combined with restricted access material for in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS of parabens in breast milk samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Israel D.; Melo, Lidervan P. [Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Jardim, Isabel C.S.F. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Monteiro, Juliana C.S.; Nakano, Ana Marcia S. [Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Queiroz, Maria Eugênia C., E-mail: mariaeqn@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2016-08-17

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer modified with restricted access material (a hydrophilic external layer), (MIP-RAM) was synthesized via polymerization in situ in an open fused silica capillary. This stationary phase was used as sorbent for in-tube solid phase microextraction (in-tube SPME) to determine parabens in breast milk samples by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) illustrate MIP surface modification after glycerol dimethacrylate (hydrophilic monomer) incorporation. The interaction between parabens and MIP-RAM was investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The Scatchard plot for MIP-RAM presented two linear parts with different slopes, illustrating binding sites with high- and low-affinity. Endogenous compounds exclusion from the MIP-RAM capillary was demonstrated by in-tube SPME/LC-UV assays carried out with blank milk samples. The in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS method presented linear range from 10 ng mL{sup −1} (LLOQ) to 400 ng mL{sup −1} with coefficients of determination higher than 0.99, inter-assay precision with coefficient of variation (CV) values ranging from 2 to 15%, and inter-assay accuracy with relative standard deviation (RSD) values ranging from −1% to 19%. Analytical validation parameters attested that in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS is an appropriate method to determine parabens in human milk samples to assess human exposure to these compounds. Analysis of breast milk samples from lactating women demonstrated that the proposed method is effective. - Highlights: • Molecularly imprinted polymer modified with a hydrophilic external layer (RAM-MIP) was synthesized in a silica capillary. • RAM-MIP capillary, used as sorbent for in-tube SPME, established specific interaction with parabens present in milk samples. • The matrix components that interacted only with the hydrophilic external layer (non-adsorptive network) were excluded.

  15. Fiscal 1999 R and D project for industrial science and technology. R and D of technology for creating innovative and high-functional material - development of technology for structural control material (Report on result of R and D of harmonized molecular material); 1999 nendo dokusoteki kokino zairyo sosei gijutsu no keknkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Kozo seigyo zairyo gijutsu kaihatsu (bunshi kyocho zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    With the aim of contributing to the development of optical elements, devices, sensors, high performance catalysts, etc., R and D was conducted on fundamental technologies for creating materials using harmonized molecular actions, and the fiscal 1999 results were reported. In the R and D of self-assembled molecular film materials, an electric-field sensitive self-assembled molecular film was experimentally manufactured, as were self-assembling electroluminescent and lyotropic liquid crystal pigmentary film materials. In the R and D of mesophase materials, for rod-like liquid crystal systems, a material was successfully developed possessing a transparency of 90% in the visible region accompanied with an optical phase difference of 4.0 microns. For disk-like liquid crystal systems, a diminishing tendency of obtainable photoelectric current was confirmed even with a small change in the orientation after photopolymerization. In the R and D of microporous materials, synthesis was performed for system-controlled metallosilicates and shape-controlled microporous materials. Further, structural correlation was examined for organic templates and microporous materials. (NEDO)

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy of GeTe-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} phase change materials studied by X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shayduk, Roman

    2010-05-20

    The integration of phase change materials into semiconductor heterostructures may lead to the development of a new generation of high density non-volatile phase change memories. Epitaxial phase change materials allow to study the detailed structural changes during the phase transition and to determine the scaling limits of the memory. This work is dedicated to the epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te phase change alloys on GaSb(001). We deposit Ge-Sb-Te (GST) films on GaSb(001) substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The film orientation and lattice constant evolution is determined in real time during growth using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID). The nucleation stage of the growth is studied in situ using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Four growth regimes of GST on GaSb(001) were observed: amorphous, polycrystalline, incubated epitaxial and direct epitaxial. Amorphous film grows for substrate temperatures below 100 C. For substrate temperatures in the range 100-160 C, the film grows in polycrystalline form. Incubated epitaxial growth is observed at temperatures from 180 to 210 C. This growth regime is characterized by an initial 0.6nm thick amorphous layer formation, which crystallizes epitaxially as the film thickness increases. The determined lattice constant of the films is 6.01 A, very close to that of the metastable GST phase. The films predominantly possess an epitaxial cube-on-cube relationship. At higher temperatures the films grow epitaxially, however the growth rate is rapidly decreasing with temperature. At temperatures above 270 C the growth rate is zero. The composition of the grown films is close to 2:2:5 for Ge, Sb and Te, respectively. The determined crystal structure of the films is face centered cubic (FCC) with a rhombohedral distortion. The analysis of X-ray peak widths gives a value for the rhombohedral angle of 89.56 . We observe two types of reflections in reciprocal space indicating two FCC sublattices in

  17. An ultrasensitive lysozyme chemiluminescence biosensor based on surface molecular imprinting using ionic liquid modified magnetic graphene oxide/β-cyclodextrin as supporting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huimin; Wang, Xiaojiao; Wang, Yanhui; Sun, Yuanling; Li, Jianbo; Luo, Chuannan

    2016-04-28

    In this work, ionic liquid modified Fe3O4@dopamine/graphene oxide/β-cyclodextrin (ILs-Fe3O4@DA/GO/β-CD) was used as supporting material to synthesize surface molecularly imprinted polymer (SMIP) which then was introduced into chemiluminescence (CL) to achieve an ultrasensitive and selective biosensor for determination of lysozyme (Lys). ILs and β-CD was applied to provide multiple binding sites to prepare Lys SMIP and Fe3O4@DA was designed to make the product separate easily and prevent the aggregation of GO which could improve absorption capacity for its large specific surface area. The ILs-Fe3O4@DA/GO/β-CD-SMIP showed high adsorption capacity (Q = 101 mg/g) to Lys in the adsorption isotherm assays. The adsorption equilibrium was reached within 10 min for all the concentrations, attributing to the binding sites situated exclusively at the surface, and the adsorption model followed Langmuir isotherm. Under the suitable CL conditions, the proposed biosensor could response Lys linearly in the range of 1.0 × 10(-9)-8.0 × 10(-8) mg/mL with a detection limit of 3.0 × 10(-10) mg/mL. When used in practical samples in determination of Lys, the efficient biosensor exhibited excellent result with the recoveries ranging from 94% to 112%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Selective molecularly imprinted polymer combined with restricted access material for in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS of parabens in breast milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Israel D; Melo, Lidervan P; Jardim, Isabel C S F; Monteiro, Juliana C S; Nakano, Ana Marcia S; Queiroz, Maria Eugênia C

    2016-08-17

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer modified with restricted access material (a hydrophilic external layer), (MIP-RAM) was synthesized via polymerization in situ in an open fused silica capillary. This stationary phase was used as sorbent for in-tube solid phase microextraction (in-tube SPME) to determine parabens in breast milk samples by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) illustrate MIP surface modification after glycerol dimethacrylate (hydrophilic monomer) incorporation. The interaction between parabens and MIP-RAM was investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The Scatchard plot for MIP-RAM presented two linear parts with different slopes, illustrating binding sites with high- and low-affinity. Endogenous compounds exclusion from the MIP-RAM capillary was demonstrated by in-tube SPME/LC-UV assays carried out with blank milk samples. The in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS method presented linear range from 10 ng mL(-1) (LLOQ) to 400 ng mL(-1) with coefficients of determination higher than 0.99, inter-assay precision with coefficient of variation (CV) values ranging from 2 to 15%, and inter-assay accuracy with relative standard deviation (RSD) values ranging from -1% to 19%. Analytical validation parameters attested that in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS is an appropriate method to determine parabens in human milk samples to assess human exposure to these compounds. Analysis of breast milk samples from lactating women demonstrated that the proposed method is effective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High frequency circular translation pin-on-disk method for accelerated wear testing of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikko, Vesa

    2015-01-21

    The temporal change of the direction of sliding relative to the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component of prosthetic joints is known to be of crucial importance with respect to wear. One complete revolution of the resultant friction vector is commonly called a wear cycle. It was hypothesized that in order to accelerate the wear test, the cycle frequency may be substantially increased if the circumference of the slide track is reduced in proportion, and still the wear mechanisms remain realistic and no overheating takes place. This requires an additional slow motion mechanism with which the lubrication of the contact is maintained and wear particles are conveyed away from the contact. A three-station, dual motion high frequency circular translation pin-on-disk (HF-CTPOD) device with a relative cycle frequency of 25.3 Hz and an average sliding velocity of 27.4 mm/s was designed. The pins circularly translated at high frequency (1.0 mm per cycle, 24.8 Hz, clockwise), and the disks at low frequency (31.4mm per cycle, 0.5 Hz, counter-clockwise). In a 22 million cycle (10 day) test, the wear rate of conventional gamma-sterilized UHMWPE pins against polished CoCr disks in diluted serum was 1.8 mg per 24 h, which was six times higher than that in the established 1 Hz CTPOD device. The wear mechanisms were similar. Burnishing of the pin was the predominant feature. No overheating took place. With the dual motion HF-CTPOD method, the wear testing of UHMWPE as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty can be substantially accelerated without concerns of the validity of the wear simulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Preparation and optical and electrical evaluation of bulk SiO2 sonogel hybrid composites and vacuum thermal evaporated thin films prepared from molecular materials derived from (Fe, Co) metallic phthalocyanines and 1,8 dihydroxiantraquinone compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Vergara, Maria Elena; Morales-Saavedra, Omar G.; Ontiveros-Barrera, Fernando G.; Torres-Zuniga, Vicente; Ortega-Martinez, Roberto; Ortiz Rebollo, Armando

    2009-01-01

    Semiconducting molecular material of PcFe(CN)L1 and PcCo(CN)L1 (L1 = 1,8 dihydroxianthraquinone), PcFe(CN)L2 and PcCo(CN)L2 (L2 = double potassium salt of 1,8 dihydroxianthraquinone) have been successfully used to prepare thin film and bulk sol-gel hybrid optical materials. These samples were developed according to the vacuum thermal evaporation technique and the catalyst-free sonogel route, respectively. Thin films samples were deposited on Corning glass substrates and crystalline silicon wafers and were characterized by infrared (FTIR), Raman and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopies. IR-spectroscopy and Raman studies unambiguously confirmed that the molecular material thin films exhibit the same intra-molecular bonds, which suggests that the thermal evaporation process does not alter these bonds significantly. These results show that it is possible to deposit molecular materials of PcFe(CN)L2 and PcCo(CN)L2 on Corning glass substrates and silicon wafers. From the UV-vis studies the optical band gap (E g ) was evaluated. The effect of temperature on conductivity was also evaluated in these samples. Finally, the studied molecular systems dissolved at different concentrations in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were successfully embedded into a highly pure SiO 2 sonogel network generated via sonochemical reactions to form several solid state, optically active sol-gel hybrid glasses. By this method, homogeneous and stable hybrid monoliths suitable for optical characterization can be produced. The linear optical properties of these amorphous bulk structures were determined by the Brewster angle method and by absorption-, Raman- and photoluminescent (PL)-spectroscopies, respectively

  1. Preparation and optical and electrical evaluation of bulk SiO{sub 2} sonogel hybrid composites and vacuum thermal evaporated thin films prepared from molecular materials derived from (Fe, Co) metallic phthalocyanines and 1,8 dihydroxiantraquinone compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Vergara, Maria Elena [Coordinacion de Ingenieria Mecatronica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Anahuac Mexico Norte. Avenida Universidad Anahuac 46, Col. Lomas Anahuac, 52786 Huixquilucan, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Morales-Saavedra, Omar G. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, CCADET-UNAM, A.P. 70-186, Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: omar.morales@ccadet.unam.mx; Ontiveros-Barrera, Fernando G.; Torres-Zuniga, Vicente; Ortega-Martinez, Roberto [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, CCADET-UNAM, A.P. 70-186, Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz Rebollo, Armando [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, IIM-UNAM, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-02-25

    Semiconducting molecular material of PcFe(CN)L1 and PcCo(CN)L1 (L1 = 1,8 dihydroxianthraquinone), PcFe(CN)L2 and PcCo(CN)L2 (L2 = double potassium salt of 1,8 dihydroxianthraquinone) have been successfully used to prepare thin film and bulk sol-gel hybrid optical materials. These samples were developed according to the vacuum thermal evaporation technique and the catalyst-free sonogel route, respectively. Thin films samples were deposited on Corning glass substrates and crystalline silicon wafers and were characterized by infrared (FTIR), Raman and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopies. IR-spectroscopy and Raman studies unambiguously confirmed that the molecular material thin films exhibit the same intra-molecular bonds, which suggests that the thermal evaporation process does not alter these bonds significantly. These results show that it is possible to deposit molecular materials of PcFe(CN)L2 and PcCo(CN)L2 on Corning glass substrates and silicon wafers. From the UV-vis studies the optical band gap (E{sub g}) was evaluated. The effect of temperature on conductivity was also evaluated in these samples. Finally, the studied molecular systems dissolved at different concentrations in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were successfully embedded into a highly pure SiO{sub 2} sonogel network generated via sonochemical reactions to form several solid state, optically active sol-gel hybrid glasses. By this method, homogeneous and stable hybrid monoliths suitable for optical characterization can be produced. The linear optical properties of these amorphous bulk structures were determined by the Brewster angle method and by absorption-, Raman- and photoluminescent (PL)-spectroscopies, respectively.

  2. Analysis of nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in Fe-base materials by means of small angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, G.

    2008-12-01

    of RAFM steels with Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of main expected nano-sized defects in irradiated pure Fe and Fe-He alloys, as model materials for RAFM steels, and simulations of their corresponding TEM images and SANS signals. In particular, the SANS signal of various types of defects was simulated for the first time. The methodology used in this work was the following: (i) SANS experiments were performed by applying a strong saturating magnetic field to unirradiated and irradiated specimens of three types of RAFM steels, namely the European EUROFER 97, the Japanese F82H and the Swiss OPTIMAX A steels. The available irradiated specimens included specimens which had been irradiated with 590 MeV protons in the Proton IRradiation EXperiment (PIREX) facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) at temperatures in the range of 50-350 °C to doses in the range of 0.3-2.0 dpa. SANS spectra as well as values of the so-called A ratio, which represents the ratio of the total scattered intensity to the nuclear scattered intensity, were obtained for the various irradiation doses and temperatures investigated. (ii) MD simulations of atomic displacement cascades in pure Fe and in Fe-He alloys were performed using Embedded Atom Method (EAM) many-body interatomic potentials. The main nano-sized defects that should be produced in RAFM steels under irradiation were created by means of MD in pure Fe. These included dislocation loops of various types, voids, helium bubbles with various He concentration and Cr precipitates. (iii) TEM images of cascade damage and all the defects created by MD were simulated in the dark field/weak beam imaging modes by using the Electron Microscopy Software (EMS) developed by P.A. Stadelmann (EPFL) and analyzed in terms of variations of contrast intensities versus depth inside the specimen. (iv) The SANS signal provided by cascade damage and all the defects created by MD was simulated by using a slightly modified version of EMS, accounting for

  3. Thin films of molecular materials synthesized from C{sub 32}H{sub 20}N{sub 10}M (M Co, Pb, Fe): Film formation, electrical and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Sanchez Vergara, M.E., E-mail: elena.sanchez@anahuac.mx [Coordinacion de Ingenieria Mecatronica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Anahuac del Norte, Avenida Lomas Anahuac 46, Colonia Lomas Anahuac, 52786, Huixquilucan, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia Montalvo, V. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez, J.R. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de Mexico, Calle del Puente 222, Colonia Ejidos de Huipulco, 14380 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-03-15

    In this work, the synthesis of molecular materials formed from metallic phthalocyanines and 1,4-phenylenediamine is reported. The powder and thin film ({approx}80-115 nm thickness) samples of the synthesized materials, deposited by vacuum thermal evaporation, show the same intra-molecular bonds in the IR spectroscopy studies, which suggests that the thermal evaporation process does not alter these bonds. The morphology of the deposited films was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and their optical and electrical properties were studied as well. The optical parameters have been investigated using spectrophotometric measurements of transmittance in the wavelength range 200-1200 nm. The absorption spectra recorded in the UV-vis region for the deposited samples showed two bands, namely the Q and Soret bands. The optical activation energy was calculated and found to be 3.41 eV for the material with cobalt, 3.34 eV for the material including lead and 3.5 eV for the material with iron. The effect of temperature on conductivity was measured for the thin films and the corresponding conduction processes are discussed in this work.

  4. Molecular plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a novel approach, this book provides a unique ""molecular perspective"" on plasmonics, concisely presenting the fundamentals and applications in a way suitable for beginners entering this hot field as well as for experienced researchers and practitioners. It begins by introducing readers to the optical effects that occur at the nanoscale and particularly their modification in the presence of biomolecules, followed by a concise yet thorough overview of the different methods for the actual fabrication of nanooptical materials. Further chapters address the relevant nanooptics, as well as

  5. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the School of Chemistry, ... Design and fabrication of molecular materials combines ... insights into materials gained through condensed matter ... The most important characteristic of liquid crystals is that they exhibit fluid nature and at the same.

  6. Fiscal 1997 project on the R and D of industrial scientific technology under consignment form NEDO. Report on the results of the R and D of technologies to invent original high-functional materials (technical development of structure control materials / R and D of molecular harmonized materials); 1997 nendo sangyo kagaku gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo Shin Energy Sangyo Gijutsu Sogo Kaihatsu Kiko itaku. Dokusoteki kokino zairyo sosei gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu (kozo seigyo zairyo gijutsu kaihatsu) bunshi kyocho zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    By establishing microtechnology using molecular-level bottoming-up (molecular harmonization) by imitating the system of living organism, the paper described the R and D of molecular harmonized materials aiming at developing high-functional/high-performance materials such as high-performance catalyst, photo-information functional materials and sensing materials. Under consignment from NEDO, Japan Chemical innovation Institute started the 5-year plan in fiscal 1997. Self-assembled molecular films, in which organic molecules are orderly arranged by self-assembly, aim at developing new memory/optical/sensing materials. Mesophase materials which are such materials as liquid crystal showing the intermediate state between solid and liquid, develop optical/photoconductive materials using precise molecular orientation controllability. Macroporous materials are such substances as zeolite having molecular size micro pores. The paper aims at establishment of synthesis techniques of them and development of high-performance catalyst, etc. using them. In the comprehensive investigational research, conducted was a survey of the trend overseas in addition to a study of subjects in question. Further, the supporting basic study was reconsigned to universities, etc. 57 refs., 62 figs., 17 tabs.

  7. Confirmation of Anopheles (Anopheles) calderoni Wilkerson, 1991 (Diptera: Culicidae) in Colombia and Ecuador Through Molecular and Morphological Correlation with Topotypic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Ministerio Salud Publica , Guayaquil, Ecuador 4Natural History Museum, London, England 5Programa Centroamericano de Maestría en Entomología...principales especies de Colombia, DCD, Ministe- rio de Salud , Bogotá, 120 pp. Tamura K, Dudley J, Nei M, Kumar S 2007. MEGA4: Molecular Evo- lutionary

  8. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  9. Molecular similarity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiora, Gerald M; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2011-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in chemistry. It is essential to many aspects of chemical reasoning and analysis and is perhaps the fundamental assumption underlying medicinal chemistry. Dissimilarity, the complement of similarity, also plays a major role in a growing number of applications of molecular diversity in combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, and related fields. How molecular information is represented, called the representation problem, is important to the type of molecular similarity analysis (MSA) that can be carried out in any given situation. In this work, four types of mathematical structure are used to represent molecular information: sets, graphs, vectors, and functions. Molecular similarity is a pairwise relationship that induces structure into sets of molecules, giving rise to the concept of chemical space. Although all three concepts - molecular similarity, molecular representation, and chemical space - are treated in this chapter, the emphasis is on molecular similarity measures. Similarity measures, also called similarity coefficients or indices, are functions that map pairs of compatible molecular representations that are of the same mathematical form into real numbers usually, but not always, lying on the unit interval. This chapter presents a somewhat pedagogical discussion of many types of molecular similarity measures, their strengths and limitations, and their relationship to one another. An expanded account of the material on chemical spaces presented in the first edition of this book is also provided. It includes a discussion of the topography of activity landscapes and the role that activity cliffs in these landscapes play in structure-activity studies.

  10. US-Latin American Workshop on Molecular and Materials Sciences: Theoretical and Computational Aspects Held at the University of Florida, Gainesville, on February 8-10, 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-09

    Observables During a Collision Inst. de Fisica , Cuernavaca, Mexico Ruben D. Santiago Acosta An Algebraic Model for 3-dimensional Atom-Diatom Inst C...STRUCTURES. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION M. C .Donnamaria and J. R. Grigera Instituto de Fisica de Liquidos y Sistemas Biologicos (IFLYSIB),CONICET...Crybiology, 1981, 18, 631. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This work has been partially funded by the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) of

  11. Synthesis, crystal growth and characterization of bioactive material: 2- Amino-1H-benzimidazolium pyridine-3-carboxylate single crystal- a proton transfer molecular complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, K. Saiadali; Kavitha, P.; Anitha, K.

    2017-09-01

    The 1:1 molecular adducts 2- Amino-1H-benzimidazolium pyridine-3-carboxylate (2ABPC) was synthesized and grown as single crystal where 2-aminobenzimidazole (ABI) acts as a donor and nicotinic acid (NA) acts as an acceptor. The presence of proton and carbon were predicted using 1H and 13C NMR spectral analysis. The molecular structure of the crystal was elucidated by subjecting the grown crystals to the single crystal x-ray diffraction analysis and was refined by full matrix least-squares method to R = 0.038 for 2469 reflections. The vibrational modes of functional group have been studied using FTIR and Raman spectroscopic analysis. The UV-Vis spectrum exhibited a visible band at 246 nm for 2ABPC due to the nicotinate anion of the molecule. Further, the antimicrobial activity of 2ABPC complex against B. subtilis, klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas eruginos and E. coli pathogens was investigated. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) for this crystal was obtained using UV spectrometer against MRSA pathogen. It was found that the benzimidazole with aminogroup at position 2 increases the general antimicrobial activities of 2ABPC crystal.

  12. Extended application of Kohn-Sham first-principles molecular dynamics method with plane wave approximation at high energy—From cold materials to hot dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Wang, Hongwei; Zhang, Ping; He, X. T.

    2016-01-01

    An extended first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method based on Kohn-Sham scheme is proposed to elevate the temperature limit of the FPMD method in the calculation of dense plasmas. The extended method treats the wave functions of high energy electrons as plane waves analytically and thus expands the application of the FPMD method to the region of hot dense plasmas without suffering from the formidable computational costs. In addition, the extended method inherits the high accuracy of the Kohn-Sham scheme and keeps the information of electronic structures. This gives an edge to the extended method in the calculation of mixtures of plasmas composed of heterogeneous ions, high-Z dense plasmas, lowering of ionization potentials, X-ray absorption/emission spectra, and opacities, which are of particular interest to astrophysics, inertial confinement fusion engineering, and laboratory astrophysics.

  13. Extended application of Kohn-Sham first-principles molecular dynamics method with plane wave approximation at high energy—From cold materials to hot dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei, E-mail: weikang@pku.edu.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Hongwei [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: zhang-ping@iapcm.ac.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); He, X. T., E-mail: xthe@iapcm.ac.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2016-04-15

    An extended first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method based on Kohn-Sham scheme is proposed to elevate the temperature limit of the FPMD method in the calculation of dense plasmas. The extended method treats the wave functions of high energy electrons as plane waves analytically and thus expands the application of the FPMD method to the region of hot dense plasmas without suffering from the formidable computational costs. In addition, the extended method inherits the high accuracy of the Kohn-Sham scheme and keeps the information of electronic structures. This gives an edge to the extended method in the calculation of mixtures of plasmas composed of heterogeneous ions, high-Z dense plasmas, lowering of ionization potentials, X-ray absorption/emission spectra, and opacities, which are of particular interest to astrophysics, inertial confinement fusion engineering, and laboratory astrophysics.

  14. Laccase-Catalyzed Synthesis of Low-Molecular-Weight Lignin-Like Oligomers and their Application as UV-Blocking Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jieyan; Sana, Barindra; Krishnan, Ranganathan; Seayad, Jayasree; Ghadessy, Farid J; Jana, Satyasankar; Ramalingam, Balamurugan

    2018-02-02

    The laccase-catalyzed oxidative polymerization of monomeric and dimeric lignin model compounds was carried out with oxygen as the oxidant in aqueous medium. The oligomers were characterized by using gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. Oxidative polymerization led to the formation of oligomeric species with a number-average molecular weight (M n ) that ranged from 700 to 2300 Da with a low polydispersity index. Spectroscopic analysis provided insight into the possible modes of linkages present in the oligomers, and the oligomerization is likely to proceed through the formation of C-C linkages between phenolic aromatic rings. The oligomers were found to show good UV light absorption characteristics with high molar extinction coefficient (5000-38 000 m -1  cm -1 ) in the UV spectral region. The oligomers were blended independently with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) by using solution blending to evaluate the compatibility and UV protection ability of the oligomers. The UV/Vis transmittance spectra of the oligomer-embedded PVC films indicated that these lignin-like oligomers possessed a notable ability to block UV light. In particular, oligomers obtained from vanillyl alcohol and the dimeric lignin model were found to show good photostability in accelerated UV weathering experiments. The UV-blocking characteristics and photostability were finally compared with the commercial low-molecular-weight UV stabilizer 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Coating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozeki, Takao; Kimura, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Juichi; Maeda, Yutaka; Nakamoto, Hideo.

    1969-01-01

    A non-solvent type coating material composition having properties as good as thermosetting acrylic or amino alkid resins is provided by employing active energy irradiation, particularly electron beams, using a radically polymerizable low molecular compound (A) (hereafter called an oligomer) containing at least two vinyl radicals in one molecule. This oligomer is produced by reacting an epoxy-containing vinyl monomer with alpha-, beta-ethylene unsaturated carboxylic acids or their anhydrides. The composition (I) contains 10% - 100% of this oligomer. In embodiments, an oligomer having a fiberous trivinyl construction is produced by reacting 180 parts by weight of glycidyl methacrylate ester with 130 parts of itaconic acid in the presence of a polymerization-inhibitor and an addition reaction catalyst at 90 0 C for 6 hours. In practice, the coating material compositions (1), consist of the whole oligomer [I-1]; (2), consist of 10-90% of (A) component and 90%-10% of vinyl monomers containing at least 30% (meth) acrylic monomer [I-2]; (3), 10%-90% of component (A) and 90%-10% of other monomers containing at least two vinyl radicals [I-3]; (4), a mixture of (I-2) and (I-3), [I-4]; and (5), consist of 50% or less unsaturated polyester of 500-5,000 molecular weight range or drying oil, or alkyd resin of 500-5,000 molecular weight range modified by drying oil, [I-5]. As a catalyst a tertiary amino vinyl compound is preferred. Five examples are given. (Iwakiri, K.)

  16. Theoretical molecular biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Philipp O J

    2017-01-01

    This book gives an introduction to molecular biophysics. It starts from material properties at equilibrium related to polymers, dielectrics and membranes. Electronic spectra are developed for the understanding of elementary dynamic processes in photosynthesis including proton transfer and dynamics of molecular motors. Since the molecular structures of functional groups of bio-systems were resolved, it has become feasible to develop a theory based on the quantum theory and statistical physics with emphasis on the specifics of the high complexity of bio-systems. This introduction to molecular aspects of the field focuses on solvable models. Elementary biological processes provide as special challenge the presence of partial disorder in the structure which does not destroy the basic reproducibility of the processes. Apparently the elementary molecular processes are organized in a way to optimize the efficiency. Learning from nature by means exploring the relation between structure and function may even help to b...

  17. Synthesis, Properties, Calculations and Applications of Small Molecular Host Materials Containing Oxadiazole Units with Different Nitrogen and Oxygen Atom Orientations for Solution-Processable Blue Phosphorescent OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hua; Wu, Hongyu; Chen, Liangyuan; Ma, Songhua; Zhou, Kaifeng; Yan, Guobing; Shen, Jiazhong; Chen, Dongcheng; Su, Shi-Jian

    2018-03-01

    A series of new small molecules based on symmetric electron-acceptor of 1,3,4-oxadiazole moiety or its asymmetric isomer of 1,2,4-oxadiazole unit were successfully synthesized and applied to solution-processable blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes for the first time, and their thermal, photophysical, electrochemical properties and density functional theory calculations were studied thoroughly. Due to the high triplet energy levels ( E T, 2.82-2.85 eV), the energy from phosphorescent emitter of iridium(III) bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinate- N,C2']picolinate (FIrpic) transfer to the host molecules could be effectively suppressed and thus assuring the emission of devices was all from FIrpic. In comparison with the para-mode conjugation in substitution of five-membered 1,3,4-oxadiazole in 134OXD, the meta-linkages of 1,2,4-isomer appending with two phenyl rings cause the worse conjugation degree and the electron delocalization as well as the lower electron-withdrawing ability for the other 1,2,4-oxadiazole-based materials. Noting that the solution-processed device based on 134OXD containing 1,3,4-oxadiazole units without extra vacuum thermal-deposited hole/exciton-blocking layer and electron-transporting layer showed the highest maximum current efficiency (CEmax) of 8.75 cd/A due to the excellent charge transporting ability of 134OXD, which far surpassed the similar devices based on other host materials containing 1,2,4-oxadiazole units. Moreover, the device based on 134OXD presented small efficiency roll-off with current efficiency (CE) of 6.26 cd/A at high brightness up to 100 cd/m2. This work demonstrates different nitrogen and oxygen atom orientations of the oxadiazole-based host materials produce major impact on the optoelectronic characteristics of the solution-processable devices.

  18. Plasmid DNA is released from nanosized acicular material surface by low molecular weight oligonucleotides: exogenous plasmid acquisition mechanism for penetration intermediates based on the Yoshida effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, N; Ide, K

    2008-10-01

    When a colloidal solution consisting of nanosized acicular material and bacterial cells is stimulated with sliding friction at the interface between the hydrogel and interface-forming material where the frictional coefficient increases rapidly, the nanosized acicular material accompanying the bacterial cells forms a penetration intermediate. This effect is known as the Yoshida effect in honor of its discoverer. Through the Yoshida effect, a novel property in which penetration intermediates incorporate exogenous plasmid DNA has been identified. This report proposes a possible mechanism for exogenous plasmid acquisition by penetration intermediates in the Yoshida effect. Escherichia coli cells, pUC18, and chrysotile were used as recipient cells, plasmid DNA, and nanosized acicular material, respectively. Even when repeatedly washing the mixture consisting of pUC18 and chrysotile, transformation efficiency by pUC18 was stable. Accordingly, pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile was introduced into recipient E. coli cells. At saturation, the amount of pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile was 0.8-1.2 microg/mg. To investigate whether pUC18 adsorbed on chrysotile is replicated by polymerase, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out with the chrysotile. Amplification of the beta-lactamase gene coded in pUC18, which was adsorbed onto chrysotile, was strongly inhibited. This suggests that DNA adsorbed onto chrysotile is not replicated in vivo. When we searched for substances to release pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile, we found that a 300-bp single- or double-stranded segment of DNA releases pUC18 from chrysotile. Competitive adsorption onto chrysotile between double-stranded DNA and pUC18 was then examined through the Yoshida effect. The 310- and 603-bp double-stranded nucleotides caused 50% competitive inhibition at the same molar ratio with pUC18. Hence, the adsorbed region of pUC18 is about 300 bp in length. As the culture period for recipient cells increases, transformation

  19. A novel molecularly imprinted material based on magnetic halloysite nanotubes for rapid enrichment of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shian; Zhou, Chengyun; Zhang, Xiaona; Zhou, Hui; Li, Hui; Zhu, Xiaohong; Wang, Yan

    2014-07-15

    A new type of magnetic halloysite nanotubes molecularly imprinted polymer (MHNTs@MIP) based on halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) with embedded magnetic nanoparticles was introduced in this study. MHNTs@MIP was prepared through surface imprinting technology, using 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) as a template, 4-vinylpyridine as the monomer, divinylbenzene as cross-linking agents, and 2,2-azodiisobutyronitrile as initiator. MHNTs@MIP was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer. MHNTs@MIP exhibited rapid and reliable analysis with supermagnetic properties, as well as repeated use and template-specific recognition. The adsorption capacity of magnetic halloysite nanotubes non-imprinted polymer (MHNTs@NIP) and MHNTs@MIP was 10.3mg/g and 35.2mg/g, respectively. In the detailed discussion on specific selectivity, MHNTs@MIP can be applied as an adsorbent for sample pretreatment extraction and obtain high recoveries of about 85-94%. After extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography was used to detect 2,4-D residue in water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Synthesis, crystal growth and characterization of bioactive material: 2-amino-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-3-ium salicylate single crystal-a proton transfer molecular complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, K. Saiadali; Anitha, K.

    2017-05-01

    The 1:1 molecular adducts 2-aminobenzimidazolium salicylate (ABIS) single crystal was synthesized and grown from 2-aminobenzimidazole (ABI) as a donor and salicylic acid (SA) as an acceptor. The cell parameter was determined using single crystal X-Ray diffraction method and the complex ABIS belongs to monoclinic system. The spectroscopic studies showed that ABIS crystal was an ion pair complex. The FTIR and Raman spectra showed that the presence of O-H, C=N, C=O vibration which confirms the proton transfer from SA to ABI. The UV-Vis spectrum exhibited a visible band at 359nm for ABIS due to the salicylate anion of the molecule. Further the antimicrobial activity of ABIS complex against Staphylococcus aureus, klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas eruginos and E.coli pathogens was investigated. So the complex molecule inhibits both Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial. It is found that benzimidazole with aminogroup at position 2 increases the general antimicrobial activities of ABIS crystal.

  1. Observing the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition in Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} non-volatile memory materials from ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.H.; Elliott, S.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    Phase-change memory is a promising candidate for the next generation of non-volatile memory devices. This technology utilizes reversible phase transitions between amorphous and crystalline phases of a recording material, and has been successfully used in rewritable optical data storage, revealing its feasibility. In spite of the importance of understanding the nucleation and growth processes that play a critical role in the phase transition, this understanding is still incomplete. Here, we present observations of the early stages of crystallization in Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} materials through ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. Planar structures, including fourfold rings and planes, play an important role in the formation and growth of crystalline clusters in the amorphous matrix. At the same time, vacancies facilitate crystallization by providing space at the glass-crystalline interface for atomic diffusion, which results in fast crystal growth, as observed in simulations and experiments. The microscopic mechanism of crystallization presented here may deepen our understanding of the phase transition occurring in real devices, providing an opportunity to optimize the memory performance of phase-change materials. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Part 1 of this series of articles the historical background of the development of molecular materials was presented. The subtle interactions exploited in their design and the various methods of fabrication were reviewed. Part 2 provided an overview ofliquid crystals and molecular semiconductors, conductors and.

  3. Molecular hematology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Provan, Drew; Gribben, John

    2010-01-01

    ... The molecular basis of hemophilia, 219 Paul LF Giangrande 4 The genetics of acute myeloid leukemias, 42 Carolyn J Owen & Jude Fitzgibbon 19 The molecular basis of von Willebrand disease, 233 Luciano Baronc...

  4. Study into the mechanisms of hydrogen contamination of niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency cavities. Molecular dynamics studies for simulation of the hydrogen diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, B.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency cavities were chosen for most of the future particle accelerators. In the case of pure niobium cavities, several laboratories have observed degradation of superconducting properties related to the conditions of the cooling down process. This effect seems to stem from hydrogen contamination which occurs during surface treatments. With the aim to study the influence of different surface treatments on the hydrogen contamination depth concentration profiling of the near surface region (the first 200 nm) was first carried out by the classical ERDA technique with 30 nm depth resolution. In order to better localize hydrogen, the initial particle selecting device (Teflon foil) was replaced by an electromagnetic (ExB) filter improving then the depth resolution by a factor three. This study reveals an hydrogen segregation at the niobium surface. Such a result is in contradiction with the relative high experimental value of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient given by the literature. To understand the trapping mechanism of hydrogen, a simulation by molecular dynamics of this impurity diffusion process was performed. This approach requires the knowledge of the interatomic potential. The potential parameters were fitted with static and dynamic tests. Nb-Nb interaction is based on many body potential. Nb-H is represented by two body potential. The Arrhenius diagram of the diffusion coefficient achieved by dynamic for a single crystal provides too small activation energy in comparison with experimental results. However, in presence of defects, a simulation proves a large increase of these values. It is only around 1000 K that the diffusion of hydrogen is not altered by defects. This conclusion confirms the experimental results concerning a good characteristic of superconducting cavities after thermal treatments. (orig.)

  5. Synthesis and characterization of titanium and yttrium precursors with unsaturated ligands: application to the doping of low-density micro-molecular materials oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamet-Cauro, L.-C.

    2001-01-01

    The laser-matter interaction experiments for high-power pulsed lasers require doped micro-targets. The ablator is a Low-Density Microcellular Material,foam namely a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer obtained by a HIPE process (High Internal Polymerisation Emulsion). The spectroscopic tracers selected for doping are titanium, yttrium and aluminium as oxides. For obtaining these hybrid organic-inorganic materials, precursors with polymerizable ligands were introduced during the emulsification step since the unsaturation of the ligands could participate in the copolymerization reaction. We report here in the synthesis and characterization of titanium and yttrium precursors with polymerizable ligands. The structures of [Ti(O i Pr) 3 (AMP)] 2 (HAMP allyl-methylphenol), [Ti(OEt) 3 (AAA)] 2 (HAAA allylacetoacetate), Y 8 O 2 (OH) 4 (OEt) 6 (AAA) 10 were established by X-ray diffraction. Ti 4 O 3 (OR) 8 (AAA) 2 (R Et, i Pr).[TiO(O i Pr)(oleate)] m , Y 4 (OH) 2 (AAA) 5 , Y 4 O(O i Pr) 5 (AAA) 5 , Y 4 (OH) 4 Cl 5 (AAA) 3 (THF) 3 have been prepared as well and characterized by FT-IR, 1 HNMR and elemental analysis. Micro-hydrolysis reactions of titanium derivatives were investigated. The rates of polymerisation and copolymerization with styrene were evaluated for the titanium precursors with polymerizable ligands. The parameters of the HIPE process were adapted to the fabrication of doped foams, only the dopant and initiator change. We discuss incorporation mechanisms of titanium oxide and yttrium oxo-hydroxides: precursor-surfactant interaction, copolymerization of precursors with unsaturated ligands and physical or chemical retention. The foams have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (morphology), elemental analysis and fluorescence X cartography (amount, distribution of metal oxide), adsorption isotherms (BET, texture), compression tests (mechanical strength). Due to this systematic study, a good control of doping has become possible and allowed us to develop

  6. Measurements of free radical in vitamin E-doped ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene: Dependence on materials processing and irradiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridley, M.D. [Department of Physics, Biomaterials Research Laboratory, University of Memphis, 216 Manning Hall, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Jahan, M.S. [Department of Physics, Biomaterials Research Laboratory, University of Memphis, 216 Manning Hall, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)], E-mail: mjahan@memphis.edu

    2007-12-15

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), doped with vitamin E ({alpha}-tocopherol ({alpha}-T)), was irradiated with gamma rays in nitrogen (N{sub 2}) or air, and the resulting free radicals were detected in air using an electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. Two groups of samples were investigated. In one group, samples were prepared from blends of {alpha}-T (20 wt%) and UHMWPE powder (PPE-{alpha}-T) and, in the other, from compression molded blocks (CMPE-{alpha}-T). The CMPE-{alpha}-T blocks contained 0% (control), 0.5%, 1.0%, 10.0%, 15.0%, 20.0% and 25.0% {alpha}-T by weight. When irradiation was performed in air, the ESR spectrum of powder samples showed the presence of only vitamin E radical (tocopheroxyl, {alpha}-T-O{sup {center_dot}}), and there was no detectable signal due to PE radicals (alkyl/allyl). Most likely, all PE radicals were quenched by vitamin E during irradiation in air. However, when irradiation was performed in N{sub 2}, composite ESR spectra showed the presence of both PE and {alpha}-T-O{sup {center_dot}} radicals. Compared to the control (PPE, 0% {alpha}-T) PE radicals in PPE-20% {alpha}-T were found to be significantly reduced or quenched by {alpha}-T. The presence of {alpha}-T in powder samples, however, did not affect the long-term (71 days in this study) oxidation behavior of the PE radicals. Compression molded samples, with and without {alpha}-T, produced identical ESR spectra irrespective of their irradiation environment N{sub 2} or air. However, radical concentration, measured immediately after irradiation, was found to be an order of magnitude less in CMPE-{alpha}-T than in the control (CMPE-0% {alpha}-T). They also evidenced identical structural changes in the respective ESR spectra during subsequent oxidation for 24 days in open air. These observations suggest that {alpha}-T can effectively quench a significant fraction of PE radicals during irradiation, but has no measurable effect on subsequent reactions. No

  7. Measurements of Free Radical in Vitamin E-Doped Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene: Dependence on Materials Processing and Irradiation Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridley, M. D.

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to combat oxidation of the load-bearing, polyethylene (PE) components of total hip- and knee-joint replacement devices, antioxidant such as vitamin E (α-Tocopherol (α-T)) has been introduced into polymer matrix. In this study we investigated effect of α-T on free radicals in medical grade ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), GUR 1020 resin. Since oxidation resistance depends on radical reaction, we used electron spin resonance (ESR) technique for direct detection of free radicals before and after irradiation. High concentration (20% by vol.) of α-T was used so its ESR signal (due to α-T-O degree radical) could be distinguished among the overwhelming signals due to PE radicals. Two groups of samples were investigated. In one group, samples were prepared from blends of α-T and UHMWPE powder (α-T-P), and in the second group, from compression molded blocks (α-T-B). In each group, samples were γ-irradiated in sealed packages filled with N 2 , or in open air, and free radicals were measured in open air environment as a function of time. Also included in this study were α-T, and powder resin and compression molded blocks without any α-T. Following irradiation in air, α-T-P and α-T produced identical ESR spectra showing characteristic feature of α-T-O degree radical. Absence of PE radicals in the ESR signals suggests quenching/repairing of PE radicals by α-T in presence of oxygen. However, when irradiation was performed in N 2 , ESR signals of α-T-P exhibited superimposed resonance lines due to PE and α-T-O degree radicals. Furthermore, presence of a-T or α-T-O degree radicals did not prevent subsequent oxidation of PE radicals in producing stable, oxygen-induced radicals (OIR). Post-irradiation oxidation index measured by FTIR, however, did not show any difference between these samples. Compression molded samples, with or without α-T, produced ESR spectra showing features characteristics of PE radicals only, and there was no

  8. Responses of Cell Renewal Systems to Long-term Low-Level Radiation Exposure: A Feasibility Study Applying Advanced Molecular Biology Techniques on Available Histological and Cytological Material of Exposed Animals and Men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliedner Theodor M.; Feinendegen Ludwig E.; Meineke Viktor; Fritz Thomas E.

    2005-02-28

    First results of this feasibility study showed that evaluation of the stored material of the chronically irradiated dogs with modern molecular biological techniques proved to be successful and extremely promising. Therefore an in deep analysis of at least part of the huge amount of remaining material is of outmost interest. The methods applied in this feasibility study were pathological evaluation with different staining methods, protein analysis by means of immunohistochemistry, strand break analysis with the TdT-assay, DNA- and RNA-analysis as well as genomic examination by gene array. Overall more than 50% of the investigated material could be used. In particular the results of an increased stimulation of the immune system within the dogs of the 3mSv group as both compared to the control and higher dose groups gives implications for the in depth study of the cellular events occurring in context with low dose radiation. Based on the findings of this study a further evaluation and statistically analysis of more material can help to identify promising biomarkers for low dose radiation. A systematic evaluation of a correlation of dose rates and strand breaks within the dog tissue might moreover help to explain mechanisms of tolerance to IR. One central problem is that most sequences for dog specific primers are not known yet. The discovery of the dog genome is still under progress. In this study the isolation of RNA within the dog tissue was successful. But up to now there are no gene arrays or gene chips commercially available, tested and adapted for canine tissue. The uncritical use of untested genomic test systems for canine tissue seems to be ineffective at the moment, time consuming and ineffective. Next steps in the investigation of genomic changes after IR within the stored dog tissue should be limited to quantitative RT-PCR of tested primer sequences for the dog. A collaboration with institutions working in the field of the discovery of the dog genome could

  9. Responses of Cell Renewal Systems to Long-term Low-Level Radiation Exposure: A Feasibility Study Applying Advanced Molecular Biology Techniques on Available Histological and Cytological Material of Exposed Animals and Men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner Theodor M.; Feinendegen Ludwig E.; Meineke Viktor; Fritz Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    First results of this feasibility study showed that evaluation of the stored material of the chronically irradiated dogs with modern molecular biological techniques proved to be successful and extremely promising. Therefore an in deep analysis of at least part of the huge amount of remaining material is of outmost interest. The methods applied in this feasibility study were pathological evaluation with different staining methods, protein analysis by means of immunohistochemistry, strand break analysis with the TdT-assay, DNA- and RNA-analysis as well as genomic examination by gene array. Overall more than 50% of the investigated material could be used. In particular the results of an increased stimulation of the immune system within the dogs of the 3mSv group as both compared to the control and higher dose groups gives implications for the in depth study of the cellular events occurring in context with low dose radiation. Based on the findings of this study a further evaluation and statistically analysis of more material can help to identify promising biomarkers for low dose radiation. A systematic evaluation of a correlation of dose rates and strand breaks within the dog tissue might moreover help to explain mechanisms of tolerance to IR. One central problem is that most sequences for dog specific primers are not known yet. The discovery of the dog genome is still under progress. In this study the isolation of RNA within the dog tissue was successful. But up to now there are no gene arrays or gene chips commercially available, tested and adapted for canine tissue. The uncritical use of untested genomic test systems for canine tissue seems to be ineffective at the moment, time consuming and ineffective. Next steps in the investigation of genomic changes after IR within the stored dog tissue should be limited to quantitative RT-PCR of tested primer sequences for the dog. A collaboration with institutions working in the field of the discovery of the dog genome could

  10. Understanding molecular simulation: from algorithms to applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.; Smit, B.

    2002-01-01

    Second and revised edition Understanding Molecular Simulation: From Algorithms to Applications explains the physics behind the "recipes" of molecular simulation for materials science. Computer simulators are continuously confronted with questions concerning the choice of a particular technique

  11. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Technology: A Powerful, Generic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    determined analyte (called template) in a polymeric matrix. The template directs the molecular positioning and orientation of the material's functional monomers. Cross-linking ensures polymer rigidity that “freezes” the 3-D molecular architecture of the ...

  12. Confirmation of Anopheles (Anopheles calderoni Wilkerson, 1991 (Diptera: Culicidae in Colombia and Ecuador through molecular and morphological correlation with topotypic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranulfo González

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The morphologically similar taxa Anopheles calderoni, Anopheles punctimacula, Anopheles malefactor and Anopheles guarao are commonly misidentified. Isofamilies collected in Valle de Cauca, Colombia, showed morphological characters most similar to An. calderoni, a species which has never previously been reported in Colombia. Although discontinuity of the postsubcostal pale spots on the costa (C and first radial (R1 wing veins is purportedly diagnostic for An. calderoni, the degree of overlap of the distal postsubcostal spot on C and R1 were variable in Colombian specimens (0.003-0.024. In addition, in 98.2% of larvae, seta 1-X was located off the saddle and seta 3-C had 4-7 branches in 86.7% of specimens examined. Correlation of DNA sequences of the second internal transcribed spacer and mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI barcodes (658 bp of the COI gene generated from Colombian progeny material and wild-caught mosquitoes from Ecuador with those from the Peruvian type series of An. calderoni confirmed new country records. DNA barcodes generated for the closely related taxa, An. malefactor and An. punctimacula are also presented for the first time. Examination of museum specimens at the University of the Valle, Colombia, revealed the presence of An. calderoni in inland localities across Colombia and at elevations up to 1113 m.

  13. Biocompatible Materials Based on Self-Assembling Peptides on Ti25Nb10Zr Alloy: Molecular Structure and Organization Investigated by Synchrotron Radiation Induced Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Secchi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we applied advanced Synchrotron Radiation (SR induced techniques to the study of the chemisorption of the Self Assembling Peptide EAbuK16, i.e., H-Abu-Glu-Abu-Glu-Abu-Lys-Abu-Lys-Abu-Glu-Abu-Glu-Abu-Lys-Abu-Lys-NH2 that is able to spontaneously aggregate in anti-parallel β-sheet conformation, onto annealed Ti25Nb10Zr alloy surfaces. This synthetic amphiphilic oligopeptide is a good candidate to mimic extracellular matrix for bone prosthesis, since its β-sheets stack onto each other in a multilayer oriented nanostructure with internal pores of 5–200 nm size. To prepare the biomimetic material, Ti25Nb10Zr discs were treated with aqueous solutions of EAbuK16 at different pH values. Here we present the results achieved by performing SR-induced X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (SR-XPS, angle-dependent Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS spectroscopy, FESEM and AFM imaging on Ti25Nb10Zr discs after incubation with self-assembling peptide solution at five different pH values, selected deliberately to investigate the best conditions for peptide immobilization.

  14. MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED POLYMER TECHNOLOGY: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    Cross-linking ensures polymer rigidity that “freezes” the 3-D molecular architecture of the binding cavity when the ... molecular technology applications whose potential is still .... recognition element is responsible for the selective ... organic treatments, making them superior ... efficiency with which such materials may be.

  15. Molecular semiconductors photoelectrical properties and solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Ch

    1985-01-01

    During the past thirty years considerable efforts have been made to design the synthesis and the study of molecular semiconductors. Molecular semiconductors - and more generally molecular materials - involve interactions between individual subunits which can be separately synthesized. Organic and metallo-organic derivatives are the basis of most of the molecular materials. A survey of the literature on molecular semiconductors leaves one rather confused. It does seem to be very difficult to correlate the molecular structure of these semiconductors with their experimental electrical properties. For inorganic materials a simple definition delimits a fairly homogeneous family. If an inorganic material has a conductivity intermediate between that of an 12 1 1 3 1 1 insulator « 10- n- cm- ) and that of a metal (> 10 n- cm- ), then it is a semiconductor and will exhibit the characteristic properties of this family, such as junction formation, photoconductivity, and the photovoltaic effect. For molecular compounds,...

  16. New concepts for molecular magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilawa, Bernd

    1999-03-01

    Miller and Epstein (1994) define molecular magnets as magnetic materials which are prepared by the low-temperature methods of the preparative chemistry. This definition includes molecular crystals of neutral radicals, radical salts and charge transfer complexes as well as metal complexes and polymers with unpaired spins (Dormann 1995). The challenge of molecular magnets consists in tailoring magnetic properties by specific modifications of the molecular units. The combination of magnetism with mechanical or electrical properties of molecular compounds promise materials of high technical interest (Gatteschi 1994a and 1994b, Möhwald 1996) and both the chemical synthesis of new molecular materials with magnetic properties as well as the physical investigation and explanation of these properties is important, in order to achieve any progress. This work deals with the physical characterization of the magnetic properties of molecular materials. It is organized as follows. In the first part molecular crystals of neutral radicals are studied. After briefly discussing the general magnetic properties of these materials and after an overview over the physical principles of exchange interaction between organic radicals I focus on the interplay between the crystallographic structure and the magnetic properties of various derivatives of the verdazyl and nitronyl nitroxide radicals. The magnetic properties of metal complexes are the subject of the second part. After an overview over the experimental and theoretical tools which are used for the investigation of the magnetic properties I shortly discuss the exchange coupling of transition metal ions and the magnetic properties of complexes of two and three metal ions. Special emphasis is given to spin cluster compounds. Spin cluster denote complexes of many magnetic ions. They are attractive as building blocks of molecular magnets as well as magnetic model compounds for the study of spin frustration, molecular super

  17. Device and materials modeling in PEM fuel cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paddison, Stephen J; Promislow, Keith

    2009-01-01

    .... Materials modeling include subjects relating to the membrane and the catalyst such as proton conduction, atomistic structural modeling, quantum molecular dynamics, and molecular-level modeling...

  18. Molecular Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Hyonmin; Deirmengian, Carl A.; Hickok, Noreen J.; Morrison, Tiffany N.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic infections are complex conditions that require immediate diagnosis and accurate identification of the causative organisms to facilitate appropriate management. Conventional methodologies for diagnosis of these infections sometimes lack accuracy or sufficient rapidity. Current molecular diagnostics are an emerging area of bench-to-bedside research in orthopaedic infections. Examples of promising molecular diagnostics include measurement of a specific biomarker in the synovial fluid...

  19. Molecular genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, D.R.; Krontiris, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    In this chapter the authors review new findings concerning the molecular genetics of malignant melanoma in the context of other information obtained from clinical, epidemiologic, and cytogenetic studies in this malignancy. These new molecular approaches promise to provide a more complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of melanoma, thereby suggesting new methods for its treatment and prevention

  20. Molecular Modeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 5. Molecular Modeling: A Powerful Tool for Drug Design and Molecular Docking. Rama Rao Nadendla. General Article Volume 9 Issue 5 May 2004 pp 51-60. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Tailored Porous Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARTON,THOMAS J.; BULL,LUCY M.; KLEMPERER,WALTER G.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCENANEY,BRIAN; MISONO,MAKOTO; MONSON,PETER A.; PEZ,GUIDO; SCHERER,GEORGE W.; VARTULI,JAMES C.; YAGHI,OMAR M.

    1999-11-09

    Tailoring of porous materials involves not only chemical synthetic techniques for tailoring microscopic properties such as pore size, pore shape, pore connectivity, and pore surface reactivity, but also materials processing techniques for tailoring the meso- and the macroscopic properties of bulk materials in the form of fibers, thin films and monoliths. These issues are addressed in the context of five specific classes of porous materials: oxide molecular sieves, porous coordination solids, porous carbons, sol-gel derived oxides, and porous heteropolyanion salts. Reviews of these specific areas are preceded by a presentation of background material and review of current theoretical approaches to adsorption phenomena. A concluding section outlines current research needs and opportunities.

  2. NASA Applications of Molecular Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Al; Bailey, David; Han, Jie; Jaffe, Richard; Levit, Creon; Merkle, Ralph; Srivastava, Deepak

    1998-01-01

    Laboratories throughout the world are rapidly gaining atomically precise control over matter. As this control extends to an ever wider variety of materials, processes and devices, opportunities for applications relevant to NASA's missions will be created. This document surveys a number of future molecular nanotechnology capabilities of aerospace interest. Computer applications, launch vehicle improvements, and active materials appear to be of particular interest. We also list a number of applications for each of NASA's enterprises. If advanced molecular nanotechnology can be developed, almost all of NASA's endeavors will be radically improved. In particular, a sufficiently advanced molecular nanotechnology can arguably bring large scale space colonization within our grasp.

  3. Ionic and Molecular Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, Vitaly V.; Prezhdo, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    Because of their outstanding versatility, room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are utilized in an ever increasing number of novel and fascinating applications, making them the Holy Grail of modern materials science. In this Perspective, we address the fundamental research and prospective...... applications of RTILs in combination with molecular liquids, concentrating on three significant areas: (1) the use of molecular liquids to decrease the viscosity of RTILs; (2) the role of RTIL micelle formation in water and organic solvents; and (3) the ability of RTILs to adsorb pollutant gases. Current...

  4. Molecularly Designed Ultrafine/Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-08

    voids in n-metals were identified using positron annihilation , it was assumed that voids are the primary scattering entity in the SANS experiments. Using...of natiocrvsmal line tn;’erials. Indirect techniques include X-ray diffraction 1191, Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) 121,. Mossbauer...Ti2p,12 and Ti2p3) of a) TiO2 , b) TiO 2 from 1, c) a sample of 1 with an oxidized sU race, d) Ti. 0.5 THF 1. n = number of recorded pulses. The lack of

  5. Molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rodger, Alison

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Geometry discusses topics relevant to the arrangement of atoms. The book is comprised of seven chapters that tackle several areas of molecular geometry. Chapter 1 reviews the definition and determination of molecular geometry, while Chapter 2 discusses the unified view of stereochemistry and stereochemical changes. Chapter 3 covers the geometry of molecules of second row atoms, and Chapter 4 deals with the main group elements beyond the second row. The book also talks about the complexes of transition metals and f-block elements, and then covers the organometallic compounds and trans

  6. Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Karsten Stein

    This thesis includes the synthesis and characterisation of organic compounds designed for molecular electronics. The synthesised organic molecules are mainly based on two motifs, the obigo(phenyleneethynylenes) (OPE)s and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as shown below. These two scaffolds (OPE and TTF......) are chemically merged together to form cruciform-like structures that are an essential part of the thesis. The cruciform molecules were subjected to molecular conductance measurements to explore their capability towards single-crystal field-effect transistors (Part 1), molecular wires, and single electron......, however, was obtained by a study of a single molecular transistor. The investigated OPE5-TTF compound was captured in a three-terminal experiment, whereby manipulation of the molecule’s electronic spin was possible in different charge states. Thus, we demonstrated how the cruciform molecules could...

  7. Molecular sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The research in molecular sciences summarized includes photochemistry, radiation chemistry, geophysics, electromechanics, heavy-element oxidizers , heavy element chemistry collisions, atoms, organic solids. A list of publications is included

  8. Molecular environmental geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Peggy A.

    1999-05-01

    The chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of contaminant species in the natural environment are controlled by reactions that occur in and among solid, aqueous, and gas phases. These reactions are varied and complex, involving changes in chemical form and mass transfer among inorganic, organic, and biochemical species. The field of molecular environmental geochemistry seeks to apply spectroscopic and microscopic probes to the mechanistic understanding of environmentally relevant chemical processes, particularly those involving contaminants and Earth materials. In general, empirical geochemical models have been shown to lack uniqueness and adequate predictive capability, even in relatively simple systems. Molecular geochemical tools, when coupled with macroscopic measurements, can provide the level of chemical detail required for the credible extrapolation of contaminant reactivity and bioavailability over ranges of temperature, pressure, and composition. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of molecular chemistry and reaction mechanisms at mineral surfaces and mineral-fluid interfaces spurred by the application of new spectroscopies and microscopies. These methods, such as synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques, vibrational and resonance spectroscopies, and scanning probe microscopies, provide direct chemical information that can elucidate molecular mechanisms, including element speciation, ligand coordination and oxidation state, structural arrangement and crystallinity on different scales, and physical morphology and topography of surfaces. Nonvacuum techniques that allow examination of reactions in situ (i.e., with water or fluids present) and in real time provide direct links between molecular structure and reactivity and measurements of kinetic rates or thermodynamic properties. Applications of these diverse probes to laboratory model systems have provided fundamental insight into inorganic and organic reactions at

  9. Nanotechnology Review: Molecular Electronics to Molecular Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approaches to the concepts of design and simulation of carbon nanotube based molecular electronic and mechanical devices will be presented. The concepts of nanotube based gears and motors will be discussed. The above is a non-technical review talk which covers long term precompetitive basic research in already published material that has been presented before many US scientific meeting audiences.

  10. Molecular fountain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  11. Why are carbon molecular sieves interesting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Erica C. de

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the production methods and the prospective uses of carbon molecular sieves. The main route to these materials is replication synthesis, where a silica or aluminosilicate molecular sieve is used as template to grow the carbonaceous phase in the voids. These materials may have applications as varied as in separation, adsorption and storage of gases, as electrodes in batteries, and as catalyst supports, all of them highly dependent on the molecular sieve porosity.

  12. Dictionary materials engineering, materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This dictionary contains about 9,500 entries in each part of the following fields: 1) Materials using and selection; 2) Mechanical engineering materials -Metallic materials - Non-metallic inorganic materials - Plastics - Composites -Materials damage and protection; 3) Electrical and electronics materials -Conductor materials - Semiconductors - magnetic materials - Dielectric materials - non-conducting materials; 4) Materials testing - Mechanical methods - Analytical methods - Structure investigation - Complex methods - Measurement of physical properties - Non-destructive testing. (orig.) [de

  13. Molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Garrett M; Lim-Wilby, Marguerita

    2008-01-01

    Molecular docking is a key tool in structural molecular biology and computer-assisted drug design. The goal of ligand-protein docking is to predict the predominant binding mode(s) of a ligand with a protein of known three-dimensional structure. Successful docking methods search high-dimensional spaces effectively and use a scoring function that correctly ranks candidate dockings. Docking can be used to perform virtual screening on large libraries of compounds, rank the results, and propose structural hypotheses of how the ligands inhibit the target, which is invaluable in lead optimization. The setting up of the input structures for the docking is just as important as the docking itself, and analyzing the results of stochastic search methods can sometimes be unclear. This chapter discusses the background and theory of molecular docking software, and covers the usage of some of the most-cited docking software.

  14. A triphenylamine-based push-pull – σ – C60 dyad as photoactive molecular material for single-component organic solar cells: synthesis, characterizations and photophysical properties

    KAUST Repository

    Labrunie, Antoine; Gorenflot, Julien; Babics, Maxime; Aleveque, Olivier; Dabos-Seignon, Sylvie; Balawi, Ahmed H.; Kan, Zhipeng; Wohlfahrt, Markus; Levillain, Eric; Hudhomme, Pietrick; Beaujuge, Pierre; Laquai, Fré dé ric; Cabanetos, Clé ment; Blanchard, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    A push-pull – σ – C60 molecular dyad was synthesized via Huisgen-type click-chemistry and used as photoactive material for single-component organic solar cells. Steady-state photoluminescence (PL) experiments of the dyad in solution show a significant quenching of the emission of the push-pull moiety. Spin-casting of a solution of the dyad results in homogenous and smooth thin-films, which exhibit complete PL quenching in line with ultrafast photo-induced electron-transfer in the solid-state. Spectro-electrochemistry reveals the optical signatures of radical cations and radical anions. Evaluation of the charge carrier mobility by space-charge limited current measurements gives an electron-mobility of μe = 4.3 × 10-4 cm2 V-1 s-1, ca. 50 times higher than the hole-mobility. Single-component organic solar cells yield an open-circuit voltage Voc of 0.73 V and a short-circuit current density of 2.1 mA cm-2 however, a poor fill-factor FF (29%) is obtained, resulting in low power conversion efficiency of only 0.4%. Combined TA and time-delayed collection field (TDCF) experiments show mostly ultrafast photon-to-charge conversion and a small component of diffusion-limited exciton dissociation, revealing the presence of pure fullerene domains. Furthermore, a strong field dependence of charge generation is observed, governing the device fill factor, which is further reduced by a competition between extraction and fast recombination of separated charges.

  15. A triphenylamine-based push-pull – σ – C60 dyad as photoactive molecular material for single-component organic solar cells: synthesis, characterizations and photophysical properties

    KAUST Repository

    Labrunie, Antoine

    2018-04-23

    A push-pull – σ – C60 molecular dyad was synthesized via Huisgen-type click-chemistry and used as photoactive material for single-component organic solar cells. Steady-state photoluminescence (PL) experiments of the dyad in solution show a significant quenching of the emission of the push-pull moiety. Spin-casting of a solution of the dyad results in homogenous and smooth thin-films, which exhibit complete PL quenching in line with ultrafast photo-induced electron-transfer in the solid-state. Spectro-electrochemistry reveals the optical signatures of radical cations and radical anions. Evaluation of the charge carrier mobility by space-charge limited current measurements gives an electron-mobility of μe = 4.3 × 10-4 cm2 V-1 s-1, ca. 50 times higher than the hole-mobility. Single-component organic solar cells yield an open-circuit voltage Voc of 0.73 V and a short-circuit current density of 2.1 mA cm-2 however, a poor fill-factor FF (29%) is obtained, resulting in low power conversion efficiency of only 0.4%. Combined TA and time-delayed collection field (TDCF) experiments show mostly ultrafast photon-to-charge conversion and a small component of diffusion-limited exciton dissociation, revealing the presence of pure fullerene domains. Furthermore, a strong field dependence of charge generation is observed, governing the device fill factor, which is further reduced by a competition between extraction and fast recombination of separated charges.

  16. Molecular modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to be tailored to decrease the harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modeling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported by the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  17. Use of Modular Approach to Obtain Molecular Glasses for Photonics: Triphenyl Moieties

    OpenAIRE

    Traskovskis, K; Kokars, V; Tokmakovs, A; Mihailovs, I; Rutkis, M

    2012-01-01

    Small molecular weight amorphous phase forming materials is a new emerging class of electro optical materials. While general principles linking molecular structure and material thermal and amorphous phase stability characteristics remain unresolved, molecular glasses have several considerable advantages such as relatively simple synthesis and purification, increased chromophore density and well defined structure. A wide spread strategy for obtaining molecular compounds capable of forming stab...

  18. Material Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Dong Yeon; Kim, Heung

    1987-08-15

    This book introduces material science, which includes key of a high-tech industry, new materials of dream like new metal material and semiconductor, classification of materials, microstructure of materials and characteristic. It mentions magic new materials such as shape memory alloy, fine ceramics, engineering fine ceramics, electronic ceramics, engineering plastic, glass, silicone conductor, optical fiber mixed materials and integrated circuit, challenge for new material and development of new materials.

  19. Material Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Dong Yeon; Kim, Heung

    1987-08-01

    This book introduces material science, which includes key of a high-tech industry, new materials of dream like new metal material and semiconductor, classification of materials, microstructure of materials and characteristic. It mentions magic new materials such as shape memory alloy, fine ceramics, engineering fine ceramics, electronic ceramics, engineering plastic, glass, silicone conductor, optical fiber mixed materials and integrated circuit, challenge for new material and development of new materials.

  20. Molecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokh, Eh.; Zonntag, B.

    1981-01-01

    The latest investigation results on molecular spectroscopy with application of synchrotron radiation in the region of vacuum ultraviolet are generalized. Some results on investigation of excited, superexcited and ionized molecule states with the use of adsorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, by fluorescent and mass-spectrometric methods are considered [ru

  1. Molecular Foundry

    Science.gov (United States)

    . New Study Indicates Greater Capacity for Carbon Storage in the Earth's Subsurface A team of Foundry minerals which make up the dominant clays in the Earth's deep subsurface. Doubling Down on Energy Storage identify molecular components within small volumes of biological samples, such as blood or urine. Industry

  2. Molecular farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merck, K.B.; Vereijken, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular Farming is a new and emerging technology that promises relatively cheap and flexible production of large quantities of pharmaceuticals in genetically modified plants. Many stakeholders are involved in the production of pharmaceuticals in plants, which complicates the discussion on the

  3. Molecular gastronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, cooks have been applying recipes without looking for the mechanisms of the culinary transformations. A scientific discipline that explores these changes from raw ingredients to eating the final dish, is developing into its own field, termed molecular gastronomy. Here, one of the founders of the discipline discusses its aims and importance.

  4. Molecular Star

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In molecular self-assembly, molecules put themselves together in a predefined way ... work has been already published in Chemistry- A European Jour- nal in the September ... prevalent in matter ranging from atoms to molecules to biomolecules; it is also ... erate chemical forces are reversible and dynamic in nature mean-.

  5. Molecular ferromagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    This past year has been one of substantial advancement in both the physics and chemistry of molecular and polymeric ferromagnets. The specific heat studies of (DMeFc)(TCNE) have revealed a cusp at the three-dimensional ferromagnetic transition temperature with a crossover to primarily 1-D behavior at higher temperatures. This paper discusses these studies

  6. Materials and material testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergens, H.

    1978-01-01

    A review based on 105 literature quotations is given on the latest state of development in the steel sector and in the field of non-ferrous metals and plastics. The works quoted also include, preparation, working, welding including simulation methods, improvement of weldability, material mechanics (explanation of defects mechanisms by means of fracture mechanics), defect causes (corrosion, erosion, hydrogen influence), mechanical-technological and non-destructive material testing. Examples from the field of reactor building are also given within there topics. (IHOE) [de

  7. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  8. Computational materials science: Nanoscale plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    How does plastic deformation of polycrystalline materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm look at the atomic scale? A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline alluminium reveals some surprising behaviour.......How does plastic deformation of polycrystalline materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm look at the atomic scale? A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline alluminium reveals some surprising behaviour....

  9. Environmental materials and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    A workshop that explored materials and interfaces research needs relevant to national environmental concerns was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purposes of the workshop were to refine the scientific research directions being planned for the Materials and Interface Program in the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) and further define the research and user equipment to the included as part of the proposed Environmental and Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL). Three plenary information sessions served to outline the background, objectives, and status of the MSRC and EMSL initiatives; selected specific areas with environmentally related materials; and the status of capabilities and facilities planned for the EMSL. Attention was directed to four areas where materials and interface science can have a significant impact on prevention and remediation of environmental problems: in situ detection and characterization of hazardous wastes (sensors), minimization of hazardous waste (separation membranes, ion exchange materials, catalysts), waste containment (encapsulation and barrier materials), and fundamental understanding of contaminant transport mechanisms. During all other sessions, the participants were divided into three working groups for detailed discussion and the preparation of a written report. The working groups focused on the areas of interface structure and chemistry, materials and interface stability, and materials synthesis. These recommendations and suggestions for needed research will be useful for other researchers in proposing projects and for suggesting collaborative work with MSRC researchers. 1 fig

  10. Basic Electromagnetism and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Moliton, André

    2007-01-01

    Basic Electromagnetism and Materials is the product of many years of teaching basic and applied electromagnetism. This textbook can be used to teach electromagnetism to a wide range of undergraduate science majors in physics, electrical engineering or materials science. However, by making lesser demands on mathematical knowledge than competing texts, and by emphasizing electromagnetic properties of materials and their applications, this textbook is uniquely suited to students of materials science. Many competing texts focus on the study of propagation waves either in the microwave or optical domain, whereas Basic Electromagnetism and Materials covers the entire electromagnetic domain and the physical response of materials to these waves. Professor André Moliton is Director of the Unité de Microélectronique, Optoélectronique et Polymères (Université de Limoges, France), which brings together three groups studying the optoelectronics of molecular and polymer layers, micro-optoelectronic systems for teleco...

  11. Molecular symmetry and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bunker, Philip; Jensen, Per

    2006-01-01

    The first edition, by P.R. Bunker, published in 1979, remains the sole textbook that explains the use of the molecular symmetry group in understanding high resolution molecular spectra. Since 1979 there has been considerable progress in the field and a second edition is required; the original author has been joined in its writing by Per Jensen. The Material of the first edition has been reorganized and much has been added. The molecular symmetry group is now introduced early on, and the explanation of how to determine nuclear spin statistical weights has been consolidated in one chapter, after groups, symmetry groups, character tables and the Hamiltonian have been introduced. A description of the symmetry in the three-dimensional rotation group K(spatial), irreducible spherical tensor operators, and vector coupling coefficients is now included. The chapters on energy levels and selection rules contain a great deal of material that was not in the first edition (much of it was undiscovered in 1979), concerning ...

  12. Molecular studies of achondroplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahar Risha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achondroplasia (ACH is the most frequent form of short-limbed dwarfi sm, caused by mutations in the FGFR3 gene. It follows an autosomal dominant inheritance, though most cases are sporadic. The molecular techniques are the only available methods to confi rm the diagnosis of a skeletal dysplasia. Clinical and radiological features are only suggestive and not confi rmatory. The present study was conducted to fi nd out how often the clinical diagnosis of achondroplasia is verifi ed on molecular studies. Materials and Methods: From 1998 through 2007, we carried out molecular analysis for the two common mutations in the FGFR3 gene in 130 cases clinically suspected to have ACH. Results: A diagnostic mutation was identifi ed in 53 (40.8% cases. The common mutation (1138G>A was present in 50 (94.7% of the positive cases, while the rare 1138 G>C substitution was found in three (5.3%. Conclusion: This study shows that confi rmation of clinical diagnosis of ACH by molecular genetic testing is essential to distinguish it from other skeletal dysplasias, to plan therapeutic options, and to offer genetic counseling. Management (medical and surgical in patients confi rmed to have ACH, is briefl y discussed.

  13. Molecular Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important
    tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and
    the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to tailored to
    decrease harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques
    employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modelling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported from
    the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  14. Molecular scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher H. Childers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript demonstrates the molecular scale cure rate dependence of di-functional epoxide based thermoset polymers cured with amines. A series of cure heating ramp rates were used to determine the influence of ramp rate on the glass transition temperature (Tg and sub-Tg transitions and the average free volume hole size in these systems. The networks were comprised of 3,3′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (33DDS and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF and were cured at ramp rates ranging from 0.5 to 20 °C/min. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and NIR spectroscopy were used to explore the cure ramp rate dependence of the polymer network growth, whereas broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS and free volume hole size measurements were used to interrogate networks’ molecular level structural variations upon curing at variable heating ramp rates. It was found that although the Tg of the polymer matrices was similar, the NIR and DSC measurements revealed a strong correlation for how these networks grow in relation to the cure heating ramp rate. The free volume analysis and BDS results for the cured samples suggest differences in the molecular architecture of the matrix polymers due to cure heating rate dependence.

  15. Activating the molecular spinterface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinchetti, Mirko; Dediu, V. Alek; Hueso, Luis E.

    2017-05-01

    The miniaturization trend in the semiconductor industry has led to the understanding that interfacial properties are crucial for device behaviour. Spintronics has not been alien to this trend, and phenomena such as preferential spin tunnelling, the spin-to-charge conversion due to the Rashba-Edelstein effect and the spin-momentum locking at the surface of topological insulators have arisen mainly from emergent interfacial properties, rather than the bulk of the constituent materials. In this Perspective we explore inorganic/molecular interfaces by looking closely at both sides of the interface. We describe recent developments and discuss the interface as an ideal platform for creating new spin effects. Finally, we outline possible technologies that can be generated thanks to the unique active tunability of molecular spinterfaces.

  16. Spintronics: The molecular way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornia, Andrea; Seneor, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Molecular spintronics is an interdisciplinary field at the interface between organic spintronics, molecular magnetism, molecular electronics and quantum computing, which is advancing fast and promises large technological payoffs.

  17. Molecular nanomagnets

    CERN Document Server

    Gatteschi, Dante; Villain, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Nanomagnetism is a rapidly expanding area of research which appears to be able to provide novel applications. Magnetic molecules are at the very bottom of the possible size of nanomagnets and they provide a unique opportunity to observe the coexistence of classical and quantum properties. The discovery in the early 90's that a cluster comprising twelve manganese ions shows hysteresis of molecular origin, and later proved evidence of quantum effects, opened a new research area whichis still flourishing through the collaboration of chemists and physicists. This book is the first attempt to cover

  18. Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-16

    Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White Martin H. Moore Brian J. Melde Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Interfacial...ABSTRACT Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White, Martin H. Moore, Brian J. Melde Center for Bio/Molecular Science

  19. Viscoelastic behavior of rubbery materials

    CERN Document Server

    Roland, C M

    2011-01-01

    The gigantic size of polymer molecules makes them viscoelastic - their behavior changes depending on how fast and for how long the material is used. This book looks at the latest discoveries in the field from a fundamental molecular perspective, in order to guide the development of better and new applications for soft materials.

  20. Molecular separation method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for separating a gaseous mixture of chemically identical but physically different molecules based on their polarities. The gaseous mixture of molecules is introduced in discrete quantities into the proximal end of a porous glass molecular sieve. The molecular sieve is exposed to microwaves to excite the molecules to a higher energy state from a lower energy state, those having a higher dipole moment being excited more than those with a lower energy state. The temperature of the sieve kept cold by a flow of liquid nitrogen through a cooling jacket so that the heat generated by the molecules colliding with the material is transferred away from the material. The molecules thus alternate between a higher energy state and a lower one, with the portion of molecules having the higher dipole moment favored over the others. The former portion can then be extracted separately from the distal end of the molecular sieve. 2 figs

  1. Optical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poker, D.B.; Ortiz, C.

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on: Diamond films, Synthesis of optical materials, Structure related optical properties, Radiation effects in optical materials, Characterization of optical materials, Deposition of optical thin films, and Optical fibers and waveguides

  2. Coating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozeki, Takao; Kimura, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Juichi; Maeda, Yutaka; Nakamoto, Hideo.

    1969-01-01

    A non-solvent type coating material composition is provided which can be hardened by irradiation with active energy, particularly electron beams, using a composition which contains 10%-100% of a radically polymerizable low molecular compound (A), (hereafter called an oligomer), having at least two vinyl radicals in one molecule. These compositions have a high degree of polymerization and characteristics equivalent to thermosetting acrylic or amino alkyd resin. The oligomer (A) is produced by reacting an epoxy-containing vinyl monomer with saturated polycarboxylic acids or anhydrides. In one embodiment, 146 parts by weight of adipic acid and 280 parts of glycidyl methacrylate ester undergo addition reaction in the presence of a polymerization-inhibitor and a catalyst at 90 0 C for 6 hours to produce an oligomer having a fiberous divinyl construction. The coating composition utilizes this oligomer in the forms of (I-1), a whole oligomer; (I-2), 0%-90% of this oligomer and 90%-10% of a vinyl monomer containing at least 30% of (meth) acrylic monomer; (I-3), 10%-90% of such oligomer and 90%-10% of other monomers containing at least two vinyl radicals in one molecule; (I-4), a mixture of (I-2) and (I-3) in proportion of 1/9 to 9/1, and (I-5), above four compositions each containing 50% or less unsaturated polyester or drying oil having 500-5,000 molecules or a drying oil-modified alkyd resin having 500-5,000 molecules. Four examples are given. (Iwakiri, K.)

  3. Strategic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buhler, Carl; Burke, Adrian; Davis, Kirk; Gerhard, Michelle; Heil, Valerie; Hulse, Richard; Kwong, Ralph; Mahoney, Michael; Moran, Scott; Peek, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Some materials possess greater value than others. Materials that provide essential support for the nation's economic viability or enable critical military capabilities warrant special attention in security studies...

  4. Gas Sensors Based on Molecular Imprinting Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Qingju

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imprinting technology (MIT); often described as a method of designing a material to remember a target molecular structure (template); is a technique for the creation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with custom-made binding sites complementary to the target molecules in shape; size and functional groups. MIT has been successfully applied to analyze; separate and detect macromolecular organic compounds. Furthermore; it has been increasingly applied in assays of biological mac...

  5. Molecular Dynamic Modeling and Simulation for Polymers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harrell, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    ... the mechanical properties of polymers. In particular, the goal was to develop insights as to how a molecular level structure is connected to the bulk properties of materials assuming homogeneity...

  6. Molecular motor assembly of a biomimetic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Active biological molecules and functional structures can be fabricated into a bio-mimetic system by using molecular assembly method. Such materials can be used for the drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy, and new nanodevice construction.

  7. Molecular self-assembly advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dequan, Alex Li

    2012-01-01

    In the past several decades, molecular self-assembly has emerged as one of the main themes in chemistry, biology, and materials science. This book compiles and details cutting-edge research in molecular assemblies ranging from self-organized peptide nanostructures and DNA-chromophore foldamers to supramolecular systems and metal-directed assemblies, even to nanocrystal superparticles and self-assembled microdevices

  8. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas J [Chapel Hill, NC; Sykora, Milan [Los Alamos, NM; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  9. Progress on molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Quan; Zhang Yongxue

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a new era of medical imaging,which can non-invasively monitor biological processes at the cellular and molecular level in vivo, including molecular imaging of nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance molecular imaging, ultrasound molecular imaging,optical molecular imaging and molecular imaging with X-ray. Recently, with the development of multi-subjects amalgamation, multimodal molecular imaging technology has been applied in clinical imaging, such as PET-CT and PET-MRI. We believe that with development of molecular probe and multi-modal imaging, more and more molecular imaging techniques will be applied in clinical diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  10. THE CALIFORNIA MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F.

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of wide-field infrared extinction maps of a region in Perseus just north of the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud complex. From this analysis we have identified a massive, nearby, but previously unrecognized, giant molecular cloud (GMC). Both a uniform foreground star density and measurements of the cloud's velocity field from CO observations indicate that this cloud is likely a coherent structure at a single distance. From comparison of foreground star counts with Galactic models, we derive a distance of 450 ± 23 pc to the cloud. At this distance the cloud extends over roughly 80 pc and has a mass of ∼ 10 5 M sun , rivaling the Orion (A) molecular cloud as the largest and most massive GMC in the solar neighborhood. Although surprisingly similar in mass and size to the more famous Orion molecular cloud (OMC) the newly recognized cloud displays significantly less star formation activity with more than an order of magnitude fewer young stellar objects than found in the OMC, suggesting that both the level of star formation and perhaps the star formation rate in this cloud are an order of magnitude or more lower than in the OMC. Analysis of extinction maps of both clouds shows that the new cloud contains only 10% the amount of high extinction (A K > 1.0 mag) material as is found in the OMC. This, in turn, suggests that the level of star formation activity and perhaps the star formation rate in these two clouds may be directly proportional to the total amount of high extinction material and presumably high density gas within them and that there might be a density threshold for star formation on the order of n(H 2 ) ∼ a few x 10 4 cm -3 .

  11. Polarons in advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Alexandre Sergeevich

    2008-01-01

    Polarons in Advanced Materials will lead the reader from single-polaron problems to multi-polaron systems and finally to a description of many interesting phenomena in high-temperature superconductors, ferromagnetic oxides, conducting polymers and molecular nanowires. The book divides naturally into four parts. Part I introduces a single polaron and describes recent achievements in analytical and numerical studies of polaron properties in different electron-phonon models. Part II and Part III describe multi-polaron physics, and Part IV describes many key physical properties of high-temperature superconductors, colossal magnetoresistance oxides, conducting polymers and molecular nanowires, which were understood with polarons and bipolarons. The book is written in the form of self-consistent reviews authored by well-established researchers actively working in the field and will benefit scientists and postgraduate students with a background in condensed matter physics and materials sciences.

  12. Molecular robots with sensors and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiya, Masami; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Saito, Hirohide; Murata, Satoshi

    2014-06-17

    -based computations. They also introduce novel computational models behind various kinds of molecular computers necessary for designing such computers. The amoeba robot team aims at constructing amoeba-like robots. The team is trying to incorporate motor proteins, including kinesin and microtubules (MTs), for use as actuators implemented in a liposomal compartment as a robot body. They are also developing a methodology to link DNA-based computation and molecular motor control. The slime robot team focuses on the development of slime-like robots. The team is evaluating various gels, including DNA gel and BZ gel, for use as actuators, as well as the body material to disperse various molecular devices in it. They also try to control the gel actuators by DNA signals coming from molecular computers.

  13. Isotope separation using molecular gases and molecular lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jetter, H.

    1975-01-01

    Isotope separation using molecular gas and molecular lasers offers several advantages over the alternative method which uses dye lasers and atomic vapour. These advantages are the easy handling of the raw material, the big isotopic shift in the IR, the good efficiency of the laser and the chemical extraction of the excited isotopes. In the case of uranium difficulties arise from the great number of superimposed lines in the absorption band of the UF 6 molecule. Several of these absorption bands were measured using laser spectrometers with ultra-high resolution. The conditions for selective excitation were estimated. (orig.) [de

  14. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  15. Molecular spintronics using single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Lapo; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    A revolution in electronics is in view, with the contemporary evolution of the two novel disciplines of spintronics and molecular electronics. A fundamental link between these two fields can be established using molecular magnetic materials and, in particular, single-molecule magnets. Here, we review the first progress in the resulting field, molecular spintronics, which will enable the manipulation of spin and charges in electronic devices containing one or more molecules. We discuss the advantages over more conventional materials, and the potential applications in information storage and processing. We also outline current challenges in the field, and propose convenient schemes to overcome them.

  16. Mathematical modeling of the crack growth in linear elastic isotropic materials by conventional fracture mechanics approaches and by molecular dynamics method: crack propagation direction angle under mixed mode loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Larisa; Bronnikov, Sergej

    2018-03-01

    The crack growth directional angles in the isotropic linear elastic plane with the central crack under mixed-mode loading conditions for the full range of the mixity parameter are found. Two fracture criteria of traditional linear fracture mechanics (maximum tangential stress and minimum strain energy density criteria) are used. Atomistic simulations of the central crack growth process in an infinite plane medium under mixed-mode loading using Large-scale Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), a classical molecular dynamics code, are performed. The inter-atomic potential used in this investigation is Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential. The plane specimens with initial central crack were subjected to Mixed-Mode loadings. The simulation cell contains 400000 atoms. The crack propagation direction angles under different values of the mixity parameter in a wide range of values from pure tensile loading to pure shear loading in a wide diapason of temperatures (from 0.1 К to 800 К) are obtained and analyzed. It is shown that the crack propagation direction angles obtained by molecular dynamics method coincide with the crack propagation direction angles given by the multi-parameter fracture criteria based on the strain energy density and the multi-parameter description of the crack-tip fields.

  17. The Role of Molecular Structure and Conformation in Polymer Electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Hauff, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Conjugated polymers have unique material properties that make them promising for a wide range of applications. The potential lies in the virtually infinite possibilities for creating new materials for specific applications by simply chemically tuning the molecular structure. Conjugated

  18. Molecular genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the nature and action of lethal and mutagenic lesions in DNA and the mechanisms by which these are produced in bacteria by ionizing radiation or by decay of radioisotopes incorporated in DNA. Studies of radioisotope decay provide the advantages that the original lesion is localized in the genetic material and the immediate physical and chemical changes that occur at decay are known. Specific types of DNA damage were related to characteristic decay properties of several radioisotopes. Incorporated 125 I, for example, induces a double-stranded break in DNA with almost every decay, but causes remarkably little damage of any other kind to the DNA. (U.S.)

  19. Contrast Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is mixed with water before administration liquid paste tablet When iodine-based and barium-sulfate contrast materials ... for patients with kidney failure or allergies to MRI and/or computed tomography (CT) contrast material. Microbubble ...

  20. Molecular Electronic Terms and Molecular Orbital Configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazo, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the molecular electronic terms which can arise from a given electronic configuration. Considered are simple cases, molecular states, direct products, closed shells, and open shells. Two examples are provided. (CW)

  1. Dirac materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wehling, T. O.; Black-Schaffer, A. M.; Balatsky, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of materials, like d-wave superconductors, graphene, and topological insulators, share a fundamental similarity: their low-energy fermionic excitations behave as massless Dirac particles rather than fermions obeying the usual Schrodinger Hamiltonian. This emergent behavior of Dirac fermions in condensed matter systems defines the unifying framework for a class of materials we call "Dirac materials''. In order to establish this class of materials, we illustrate how Dirac fermions ...

  2. Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic materials are the foundation of multi-billion dollar industries and the focus of intensive research across many disciplines. This book covers the fundamentals, basic theories and applications of magnetism and conventional magnetic materials. Based on a lecture course given by Nicola Spaldin in the Materials Department at University of California, Santa Barbara, the book is ideal for a one- semester course in magnetic materials. It contains numerous homework problems and solutions.

  3. Charge Transport Processes in Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher Eugene

    Molecular electronics (ME) has evolved into a rich area of exploration that combines the fields of chemistry, materials, electronic engineering and computational modeling to explore the physics behind electronic conduction at the molecular level. Through studying charge transport properties of single molecules and nanoscale molecular materials the field has gained the potential to bring about new avenues for the miniaturization of electrical components where quantum phenomena are utilized to achieve solid state molecular device functionality. Molecular junctions are platforms that enable these studies and consist of a single molecule or a small group of molecules directly connected to electrodes. The work presented in this thesis has built upon the current understanding of the mechanisms of charge transport in ordered junctions using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecular thin films. Donor and acceptor compounds were synthesized and incorporated into SAMs grown on metal substrates then the transport properties were measured with conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). In addition to experimentally measured current-voltage (I-V) curves, the transport properties were addressed computationally and modeled theoretically. The key objectives of this project were to 1) investigate the impact of molecular structure on hole and electron charge transport, 2) understand the nature of the charge carriers and their structure-transport properties through long (chemically gated to modulate the transport. These results help advance our understanding of transport behavior in semiconducting molecular thin films, and open opportunities to engineer improved electronic functionality into molecular devices.

  4. Composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sambrook, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    A superconductor composite is described comprising at least one longitudinally extending superconductor filament or bundle of sub-filaments, each filament or bundle of sub-filaments being surrounded by and in good electrical contact with a matrix material, the matrix material comprising a plurality of longitudinally extending cells of a metal of high electrical conductivity surrounded by a material of lower electrical conductivity. The high electrical conductivity material surrounding the superconducting filament or bundle of sub-filaments is interrupted by a radially extending wall of the material of the lower electrical conductivity, the arrangement being such that at least two superconductor filaments or sub-filaments are circumferentially circumscribed by a single annulus of the material of high electrical conductivity. The annulus is electrically interrupted by a radially extending wall of the material of low electrical conductivity

  5. Aerospace materials and material technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Wanhill, R

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive compilation of chapters on materials (both established and evolving) and material technologies that are important for aerospace systems. It considers aerospace materials in three Parts. Part I covers Metallic Materials (Mg, Al, Al-Li, Ti, aero steels, Ni, intermetallics, bronzes and Nb alloys); Part II deals with Composites (GLARE, PMCs, CMCs and Carbon based CMCs); and Part III considers Special Materials. This compilation has ensured that no important aerospace material system is ignored. Emphasis is laid in each chapter on the underlying scientific principles as well as basic and fundamental mechanisms leading to processing, characterization, property evaluation and applications. A considerable amount of materials data is compiled and presented in appendices at the end of the book. This book will be useful to students, researchers and professionals working in the domain of aerospace materials.

  6. Molecular Contamination Investigation Facility (MCIF) Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soules, David M.

    2013-01-01

    This facility was used to guide the development of ASTM E 1559 center dot Multiple Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), large sample and spectral effects capability center dot Several instrumented, high vacuum chamber systems are used to evaluate the molecular outgassing characteristics of materials, flight components and other sensitive surfaces. Test materials for spacecraft/instrument selection center.Test flight components for acceptable molecular outgas levels center dot Determine time/temperature vacuum bake-out requirements center. Data used to set limits for use of materials and specific components center. Provide Input Data to Contamination Transport Models -Applied to numerous flight projects over the past 20 years.

  7. Triphenylmethane, a possible moderator material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hügle, Th.; Mocko, M.; Hartl, M.A.; Daemen, L.L.; Muhrer, G.

    2014-01-01

    New challenges in neutron scattering result in an increased demand in novel moderator concepts. The most direct way to address the problem would be to change the moderator material itself. However the range of available neutron moderator materials is small. In this paper, we discuss triphenylmethane, a possible moderator material especially promising for cold neutron moderator applications. Our investigations include a parallel experimental and theoretical approach ranging from cross-section measurements and inelastic neutron spectroscopy to molecular modeling. -- Highlights: • Triphenylmethane as a potential moderator material is discussed. • Parallel theoretical and experimental approach. • Possibly very useful for cold neutrons

  8. Materials Discovery | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Materials Discovery Images of red and yellow particles NREL's research in materials characterization of sample by incoming beam and measuring outgoing particles, with data being stored and analyzed Staff Scientist Dr. Zakutayev specializes in design of novel semiconductor materials for energy

  9. Organic optoelectronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yongfang

    2015-01-01

    This volume reviews the latest trends in organic optoelectronic materials. Each comprehensive chapter allows graduate students and newcomers to the field to grasp the basics, whilst also ensuring that they have the most up-to-date overview of the latest research. Topics include: organic conductors and semiconductors; conducting polymers and conjugated polymer semiconductors, as well as their applications in organic field-effect-transistors; organic light-emitting diodes; and organic photovoltaics and transparent conducting electrodes. The molecular structures, synthesis methods, physicochemical and optoelectronic properties of the organic optoelectronic materials are also introduced and described in detail. The authors also elucidate the structures and working mechanisms of organic optoelectronic devices and outline fundamental scientific problems and future research directions. This volume is invaluable to all those interested in organic optoelectronic materials.

  10. Molecular characterization of FXI deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Ergul

    2011-02-01

    Factor XI (FXI) deficiency is a rare autosomal bleeding disease associated with genetic defects in the FXI gene. It is a heterogeneous disorder with variable tendency in bleeding and variable causative FXI gene mutations. It is characterized as a cross-reacting material-negative (CRM-) FXI deficiency due to decreased FXI levels or cross-reacting material-positive (CRM+) FXI deficiency due to impaired FXI function. Increasing number of mutations has been reported in FXI mutation database, and most of the mutations are affecting serine protease (SP) domain of the protein. Functional characterization for the mutations helps to better understand the molecular basis of FXI deficiency. Prevalence of the disease is higher in certain populations such as Ashkenazi Jews. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the molecular basis of congenital FXI deficiency.

  11. Gastronomic botany and molecular gastronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Urria Carril, Elena; Gómez Garay, Aranzazu; Ávalos García, Adolfo; Martín Calvarro, Luisa; Pintos López, Beatriz; Saco Sierra, M. Dolores; Martín Gómez, M. Soledad; Pérez Alonso, M. José; Puelles Gallo, María; Palá Paúl, Jesús; Cifuentes Cuencas, Blanca; Llamas Ramos, José Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Complutense University of Madrid through the "Vicerrectorado de Calidad" develops projects to innovate and improve teaching quality. Among these projects is "Gastronomic Botany and Molecular Gastronomy" which aims to develop new materials and tools for the Virtual Campus and consequently offer new possibilities for teaching and training. Also this project organize and structure a new teaching matter for post-graduate education that will be an example of approach, relationship and cooper...

  12. Síntese e caracterização de poliuretanos segmentados contendo blocos de peso molecular controlado: parte 1 preparação e caracterização dos materiais Synthesis and characterization of segmented polyurethanes containing blocks of controlled molecular weight: 1. Materials preparation and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Almeida

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Um novo método de síntese de poliuretanos segmentados foi desenvolvido, no qual segmentos de características bem definidas foram preparados separadamente e acoplados em uma etapa seguinte. O segmento flexível (SS foi preparado a partir da reação entre glicol polipropilênico comercial de peso molecular 3800 e diisocianato de 1,6 hexametileno (HDI. O peso molecular destes blocos variou de acordo com a razão NCO/OH usada nas sínteses, que foi sempre maior do que a unidade, fornecendo blocos com terminação NCO. O HDI não reagido foi removido à vácuo (10-6-10-8mbar. O peso molecular dos produtos SS foi determinado por GPC. O segmento rígido (HS foi preparado a partir da reação de HDI e 1,4 butanodiol (BDO usando-se razão NCO/OH igual à unidade. Ao término desta reação os produtos foram funcionalizados pela adição de um excesso de BDO, fornecendo segmentos com terminação -OH. O BDO não reagido foi removido por extração com solvente. O peso molecular dos produtos correspondentes aos segmentos HS foi determinado através da técnica de dessorção à laser (MALDI - Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption. O acoplamento dos segmentos flexíveis com os rígidos fornecendo os produtos SPU foi feito em solução de DMF. Um poliuretano convencional foi preparado pela técnica em duas etapas (produto PU para comparação de efeitos estrutura-propriedades. A espectroscopia no infravermelho foi usada com o intuito de se observar diferenças em interações intermoleculares referentes aos produtos PU e SPU, mas estas diferenças só foram acessíveis através de estudos morfológicos que serão publicados em continuação a este estudo.A new method for segmented polyurethanes synthesis (SPU was developed, in which segments of well-defined characteristics were prepared separately and coupled together in a further step. The soft segment was prepared from the reaction of commercially available anionic polyol-polyether, with an average

  13. Photopolymer holographic recording material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J. R.; O'Neill, F. T.; Sheridan, J. T.

    Photopolymers are promising materials for use in holography. They have many advantages, such as ease of preparation, and are capable of efficiencies of up to 100%. A disadvantage of these materials is their inability to record high spatial frequency gratings when compared to other materials such as dichromated gelatin and silver halide photographic emulsion. Until recently, the drop off at high spatial frequencies of the material response was not predicted by any of the diffusion based models available. It has recently been proposed that this effect is due to polymer chains growing away from their initiation point and causing a smeared profile to be recorded. This is termed a non-local material response. Simple analytic expressions have been derived using this model and fits to experimental data have allowed values to be estimated for material parameters such as the diffusion coefficient of monomer, the ratio of polymerisation rate to diffusion rate and the distance that the polymer chains spread during holographic recording. The model predicts that the spatial frequency response might be improved by decreasing the mean polymer chain lengths and/or by increasing the mobility of the molecules used in the material. The experimental work carried out to investigate these predictions is reported here. This work involved (a) the changing of the molecular weights of chemical components within the material (dyes and binders) and (b) the addition of a chemical retarder in order to shorten the polymer chains, thereby decreasing the extent of the non-local effect. Although no significant improvement in spatial frequency response was observed the model appears to offer an improved understanding of the operation of the material.

  14. Nano Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, In Ju; Lee, Ik Mo; Kwon, Yeung Gu

    2006-02-01

    This book introduces background of nano science such as summary, plenty room at the bottom, access way to nano technique, nanoparticles using bottom-up method which are a marvel of nature, and modern alchemy : chemical synthesis of artificial nano structure, understanding of quantum mechanics, STM/AFM, nano metal powder, ceramic nanoparticles, nano structure film, manufacture of nanoparticles using reverse micelle method, carbon nano tube, sol-gel material, nano energy material, nano catalyst nano bio material technology and spintronics.

  15. Material Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Brath; Mortensen, Henrik Rubæk; Mullins, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes and reflects upon the results of an investigative project which explores the setting up of a material system - a parametric and generative assembly consisting of and taking into consideration material properties, manufacturing constraints and geometric behavior. The project...... approaches the subject through the construction of a logic-driven system aiming to explore the possibilities of a material system that fulfills spatial, structural and performative requirements concurrently and how these are negotiated in situations where they might be conflicting....

  16. Material focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokoler, Tomas; Vallgårda, Anna K. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we build on the notion of computational composites, which hold a material perspective on computational technology. We argue that a focus on the material aspects of the technology could be a fruitful approach to achieve new expressions and to gain a new view on the technology's role...... in design. We study two of the computer's material properties: computed causality and connectability and through developing two computational composites that utilize these properties we begin to explore their potential expressions....

  17. Materializing Ethnography

    OpenAIRE

    Geismar, H.; Horst, H. A.

    2004-01-01

    The articles in this volume were originally presented in a panel entitled ‘Material Methodologies’ at the American Anthropological Association meeting in New Orleans (November 2002). The panel was devised to tie together theoretical advances in the study of the material with the creative possibilities of fieldwork practices. Through detailed ethnographic discussion, we highlighted the ways in which a focus on a specifically material world enabled us to discover new perspecti...

  18. Materials characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azali Muhammad

    2005-01-01

    Various nuclear techniques have been developed and employed by technologies and scientists worldwide to physically and chemically characterise the material particularly those that have applications in industry. These include small angle neutron scattering (SANS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) for the internal structural study of material, whereas, the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) for the chemical analysis, while the Moessbauer spectroscopy for the study on the magnetic properties and structural identity of material. Basic principle and instrumentations of the techniques are discussed in this chapter. Example of their applications in various disciplines particularly in characterisation of industrial materials also described

  19. Molecular beam epitaxy of InP single junction and InP/In0.53Ga0.47As monolithically integrated tandem solar cells using solid phosphorous source material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, A.; Chin, K.; Street, S.; Newman, F.; Aguilar, L.; Ignatiev, A.; Monier, C.; Velela, M.; Freundlich, A.

    1998-01-01

    This work reports the first InP solar cells, InP/In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As tandem solar cells and InP tunnel junctions to be grown using a solid phosphorous source cracker cell in a molecular beam epitaxy system. High p-type doping achieved with this system allowed for the development of InP tunnel junctions. These junctions which allow for improved current matching in subsequent monolithically integrated tandem devices also do not absorb photons which can be utilized in the InGaAs structure. Photocurrent spectral responses compared favorably to devices previously grown in a chemical beam epitaxy system. High resolution x-ray scans demonstrated good lattice matching between constituent parts of the tandem cell. AM0 efficiencies of both InP and InP/InGaAs tandem cells are reported

  20. Thermal decomposition of a molecular material {N(n-C4H94[FeIIFeIII(C2O43]}∞ leading to ferrite: A reaction kinetics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharjee Ashis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step thermal decomposition of a molecular precursor, {N(n-C4H94[FeIIFeIII(C2O43}∞ has been studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetry (TG measurements in the temperature range 300 to ~800 K at multiple heating rates (5, 10 and 20 K min-1. The thermal decomposition of the oxalate-based complex proceeds stepwise through a series of intermediate reactions. Two different isoconversional methods, namely, improved iterative method and model-free method are employed to evaluate the kinetic parameters: activation energy and rate of reaction, and the most probable reaction mechanism of thermal decomposition is also determined. The different reaction pathways leading to different steps in the TG profile have also been explored which are supplemented by earlier experimental observations of the present authors.

  1. Introduction Of Computational Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jun Geun

    2006-08-01

    This book gives, descriptions of computer simulation, computational materials science, typical three ways of computational materials science, empirical methods ; molecular dynamics such as potential energy, Newton's equation of motion, data production and analysis of results, quantum mechanical methods like wave equation, approximation, Hartree method, and density functional theory, dealing of solid such as pseudopotential method, tight-binding methods embedded atom method, Car-Parrinello method and combination simulation.

  2. Molecular HIV screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlet, Thomas; Memmi, Meriam; Saoudin, Henia; Pozzetto, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear acid testing is more and more used for the diagnosis of infectious diseases. This paper focuses on the use of molecular tools for HIV screening. The term 'screening' will be used under the meaning of first-line HIV molecular techniques performed on a routine basis, which excludes HIV molecular tests designed to confirm or infirm a newly discovered HIV-seropositive patient or other molecular tests performed for the follow-up of HIV-infected patients. The following items are developed successively: i) presentation of the variety of molecular tools used for molecular HIV screening, ii) use of HIV molecular tools for the screening of blood products, iii) use of HIV molecular tools for the screening of organs and tissue from human origin, iv) use of HIV molecular tools in medically assisted procreation and v) use of HIV molecular tools in neonates from HIV-infected mothers.

  3. New materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, S.K.; Rao, C.N.R.; Tsuruta, T.

    1992-01-01

    The book contains the state-of-the art lectures delivered at the discussion meeting on new materials, a field in which rapid advances are taking place. The main objective of the meeting was to bring active scientists in this area from Japan and India together. The topics covered diverse aspects of modern materials including high temperature superconducting compounds. (M.G.B.)

  4. Materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    the document is a collection of papers on different aspects of materials science. It discusses many items such as semiconductors, surface properties and interfaces, construction and civil engineering, metallic materials, polymers and composites, biology and biomaterials, metallurgy etc.. - 1 - Document1 Document1

  5. Wireless sensor for detecting explosive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Vincent E; Howell, Jr., Layton N; Mee, David K; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2014-10-28

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting explosive devices. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon absorption of vapor from an explosive material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The explosive device is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  6. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  7. Material Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Boer, Laurens; Tsaknaki, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    . Consequently we ask what the practice of programming and giving form to such materials would be like? How would we be able to familiarize ourselves with the dynamics of these materials and their different combinations of cause and effect? Which tools would we need and what would they look like? Will we program......, and color, but additionally being capable of sensing, actuating, and computing. Indeed, computers will not be things in and by themselves, but embedded into the materials that make up our surroundings. This also means that the way we interact with computers and the way we program them, will change...... these computational composites through external computers and then transfer the code them, or will the programming happen closer to the materials? In this feature we outline a new research program that floats between imagined futures and the development of a material programming practice....

  8. Composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Stacy A [Knoxville, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Solihull, GB; Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  9. Materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Materials Science Division is engaged in research on physical properties of materials and the effects of radiation upon them. This involves solid state materials undergoing phase transitions, energy storing materials, and biomaterials. The Division also offers research facilities for M.S. and Ph.D. thesis work in the fields of physics, chemistry, materials, and radiation sciences in cooperation with the various colleges and departments of the UPR Mayaguez Campus. It is anticipated that it will serve as a catalyst in starting energy-related research programs in cooperation with UPR faculty, especially programs involving solar energy. To encourage and promote cooperative efforts, contact is maintained with former graduate students and with visiting scientists from Latin American research institutions

  10. Touching Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén

    2012-01-01

    Dripping ink pens, colourful paint on skin, vegetables pots on a school roof. In interviews with three generations of former school pupils, memories of material objects bore a relation to everyday school life in the past. Interwoven, these objects entered the memorising processes, taking...... the interviewer and interviewee beyond an exclusively linguistic understanding of memory. This article analyses how the shifting objects of materiality in personal and generational school memories connects to material as well as sensuous experiences of everyday school life and its complex processes of learning....... Drawing on anthropological writings, the article argues that the objects of materiality are part of important but non-verbalised memories of schooling. The Dutch philosopher Eelco Runia’s notions of presence and metonymy are incorporated as tools for approaching objects of materiality in memory studies....

  11. Advanced Materials Growth and Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This most extensive of U.S. Army materials growth and processing facilities houses seven dedicated, state-of-the-art, molecular beam epitaxy and three metal organic...

  12. Molecular Electronics of Self-Assembled Monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xintai

    This thesis deals withmolecular electronic investigations on self-assembledmonolayers. The thesis is divided into seven chapters, as outlined below.Chapter 1 is a general introduction of the history of molecular electronics and its current state.Chapter 2 is separated into three parts. Part I...... providesa brief introduction toself-assembledmonolayers(SAMs), includingits structure, formation, and its role in molecular electronic investigations. Part II is an introduction of different molecular functions, which are interesting for designing real devices. Part III is an introduction of a novel carbon...... material: graphene, and how such material can be incorporated intothe field of molecular electronics.Chapter 3 is a brief introduction of important instruments used in this thesis.Chapter 4, 5 and 6 describe the major experimental work in this thesis. Chapter 4 introduces two novel anchoring...

  13. Monolayer atomic crystal molecular superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; He, Qiyuan; Halim, Udayabagya; Liu, Yuanyue; Zhu, Enbo; Lin, Zhaoyang; Xiao, Hai; Duan, Xidong; Feng, Ziying; Cheng, Rui; Weiss, Nathan O.; Ye, Guojun; Huang, Yun-Chiao; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Shakir, Imran; Liao, Lei; Chen, Xianhui; Goddard, William A., III; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2018-03-01

    Artificial superlattices, based on van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene or molybdenum disulfide, offer technological opportunities beyond the reach of existing materials. Typical strategies for creating such artificial superlattices rely on arduous layer-by-layer exfoliation and restacking, with limited yield and reproducibility. The bottom-up approach of using chemical-vapour deposition produces high-quality heterostructures but becomes increasingly difficult for high-order superlattices. The intercalation of selected two-dimensional atomic crystals with alkali metal ions offers an alternative way to superlattice structures, but these usually have poor stability and seriously altered electronic properties. Here we report an electrochemical molecular intercalation approach to a new class of stable superlattices in which monolayer atomic crystals alternate with molecular layers. Using black phosphorus as a model system, we show that intercalation with cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide produces monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattices in which the interlayer distance is more than double that in black phosphorus, effectively isolating the phosphorene monolayers. Electrical transport studies of transistors fabricated from the monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattice show an on/off current ratio exceeding 107, along with excellent mobility and superior stability. We further show that several different two-dimensional atomic crystals, such as molybdenum disulfide and tungsten diselenide, can be intercalated with quaternary ammonium molecules of varying sizes and symmetries to produce a broad class of superlattices with tailored molecular structures, interlayer distances, phase compositions, electronic and optical properties. These studies define a versatile material platform for fundamental studies and potential technological applications.

  14. Understanding molecular simulation from algorithms to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Frenkel, Daan

    2001-01-01

    Understanding Molecular Simulation: From Algorithms to Applications explains the physics behind the ""recipes"" of molecular simulation for materials science. Computer simulators are continuously confronted with questions concerning the choice of a particular technique for a given application. A wide variety of tools exist, so the choice of technique requires a good understanding of the basic principles. More importantly, such understanding may greatly improve the efficiency of a simulation program. The implementation of simulation methods is illustrated in pseudocodes and their practic

  15. Molecular trees: from syntheses towards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardoin, N.; Astruc, D.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular trees, also called dendrimers, arborols, cauliflowers, cascades or hyperbranched molecules, have been synthesized since their first observation in 1978 by divergent, convergent or combined methods, with various functions on the branches. The potential applications of these nanoscopic molecules are in the fields of biology (gene therapy, virus mimicking an vectorization) and molecular materials sciences (new polymers, adhesion, liquid crystals, etc). (authors). 236 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs., 8 schemes

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy a short history

    CERN Document Server

    Orton, J W

    2015-01-01

    This volume describes the development of molecular beam epitaxy from its origins in the 1960s through to the present day. It begins with a short historical account of other methods of crystal growth, both bulk and epitaxial, to set the subject in context, emphasising the wide range of semiconductor materials employed. This is followed by an introduction to molecular beams and their use in the Stern-Gerlach experiment and the development of the microwave MASER.

  17. Molecular clouds near supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootten, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The physical properties of molecular clouds near supernova remnants were investigated. Various properties of the structure and kinematics of these clouds are used to establish their physical association with well-known remmnants. An infrared survey of the most massive clouds revealed embedded objects, probably stars whose formation was induced by the supernova blast wave. In order to understand the relationship between these and other molecular clouds, a control group of clouds was also observed. Excitation models for dense regions of all the clouds are constructed to evaluate molecular abundances in these regions. Those clouds that have embedded stars have lower molecular abundances than the clouds that do not. A cloud near the W28 supernova remnant also has low abundances. Molecular abundances are used to measure an important parameter, the electron density, which is not directly observable. In some clouds extensive deuterium fractionation is observed which confirms electron density measurements in those clouds. Where large deuterium fractionation is observed, the ionization rate in the cloud interior can also be measured. The electron density and ionization rate in the cloud near W28 are higher than in most clouds. The molecular abundances and electron densities are functions of the chemical and dynamical state of evolution of the cloud. Those clouds with lowest abundances are probably the youngest clouds. As low-abundance clouds, some clouds near supernova remnants may have been recently swept from the local interstellar material. Supernova remnants provide sites for star formation in ambient clouds by compressing them, and they sweep new clouds from more diffuse local matter

  18. Nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In 1998, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) performed 38 inspections, 25 of them were performed in co-operation with IAEA inspectors. There is no fresh nuclear fuel at Bohunice A-1 NPP at present. Fresh fuel of Bohunice V-1 and V-2 NPPs is inspected in the fresh fuel storage.There are 327 fresh fuel assemblies in Mochovce NPP fresh fuel storage. In addition to that, are also 71 small users of nuclear materials in Slovakia. In most cases they use: covers made of depleted uranium for non-destructive works, detection of level in production plants, covers for therapeutical sources at medical facilities. In. 1995, NRA SR issued 4 new licences for nuclear material withdrawal. In the next part manipulation with nuclear materials, spent fuel stores and illegal trafficking in nuclear materials are reported

  19. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry......, viscoelastic behavior, and internal stress states. Other physical properties considered are thermal and electrical conductivities, diffusion coefficients, dielectric constants and magnetic permeability. Special attention is given to the effect of pore shape on the mechanical and physical behavior of porous....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro-thermal behavior...

  20. Hazardous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... substances that could harm human health or the environment. Hazardous means dangerous, so these materials must be ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  1. Utopian Materialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgaard-Jensen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    In various ways, this paper makes the counter-intuitive claim that the utopian and the material are thoroughlyinterdependent, rather than worlds apart. First, through a reading of Thomas More's Utopia, it is argued thatUtopia is the product of particular kinds of relations, rather than merely...... a detachment from the known world.Second, the utopianism of a new economy firm is examined. It is argued that the physical set-up of the firm -in particular the distribution of tables and chairs - evoke a number of alternatives to ordinary work practice.In this way the materialities of the firm are crucial...... to its persuasive image of being the office of the future.The notion that utopia is achieved through material arrangements is finally related to the analysis of facts andfictions in ANT. It is argued, that even though Utopias are neither fact nor fiction, they are both material andeffective...

  2. Propulsion materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Edward J. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Sullivan, Rogelio A. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Gibbs, Jerry L. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  3. Encountering Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2016-01-01

    DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016.......DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016....

  4. Background Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Hyytiäinen, Kari; Saraiva, Sofia

    This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders.......This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders....

  5. Carbon material for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlinos, Athanasios; Steriotis, Theodore; Stubos, Athanasios; Miller, Michael A

    2016-09-13

    The present invention relates to carbon based materials that are employed for hydrogen storage applications. The material may be described as the pyrolysis product of a molecular precursor such as a cyclic quinone compound. The pyrolysis product may then be combined with selected transition metal atoms which may be in nanoparticulate form, where the metals may be dispersed on the material surface. Such product may then provide for the reversible storage of hydrogen. The metallic nanoparticles may also be combined with a second metal as an alloy to further improve hydrogen storage performance.

  6. Synthesis and electrical, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of cobalt molecular materials obtained from PcCo(CN)L (L = ethylenediamine, 1,4-diaminebutane, 1,12-diaminododecane and 2,6-diamineanthraquinone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Saavedra, O.G., E-mail: omar.morales@ccadet.unam.mx [Lab. of Nonlinear Optics, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CCADET-UNAM, Apdo, Postal 70-186, C.P. 04510 Coyoacan, Cd. Universitaria, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Sanchez-Vergara, M.E. [Coordinacion de Ingenieria Mecatronica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Anahuac del Norte, Avenida Universidad Anahuac 46, Col. Lomas Anahuac, 52786 Huixquilucan, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Rodriguez-Rosales, A.A.; Ortega-Martinez, R. [Lab. of Nonlinear Optics, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CCADET-UNAM, Apdo, Postal 70-186, C.P. 04510 Coyoacan, Cd. Universitaria, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Ortiz-Rebollo, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, IIM-UNAM, A.P. 70-360 Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Frontana-Uribe, B.A. [Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable UAEM-UNAM Km. 14.5, Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, C.P. 50200 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia-Montalvo, V. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D. F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-10-01

    Novel PcCo(CN)L monomeric complexes were synthesized from [PcCoCN]{sub n} compounds and bidentate axial ligands (L) such as ethylenediamine, 1,4-diaminebutane, 1,12-diaminedodecane and 2,6-diamineanthraquinone. These complexes were implemented to fabricate pellets and thin films by the vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The obtained compounds and deposited thin films were characterized by different spectroscopic techniques. Measurements of the electrical conductivity and the electrical current as a function of temperature were also carried out. IR-spectroscopy studies showed that the ligand attaches to the [PcCoCN]{sub n} unit. The C=N vibrational band is found in the PcCo(et)CN and PcCo(bu)CN molecular solids, although it is displaced with respect to other reported values. Compounds PcCo(do){sub 2} and PcCo(an){sub 2} do not show C=N vibrational bands. This fact suggests a double bond between the ligand and the macrocycle and a coordination at the fifth and sixth position on the Co(III) atom. UV-vis spectra of the thin films exhibited higher conjugation degree for the CN-based samples. Electrical conductivity for the PcCo(an){sub 2} complex was consistently low for all temperature ranges under measurement, whereas the other synthesized compounds showed a semiconductor-like dependence of electric current with temperature. Additionally, cubic nonlinear optical (NLO) characterizations of the film samples were performed with the Z-Scan and third harmonic generation (THG) techniques, all samples exhibit outstandingly high nonlinear activity.

  7. Synthesis and electrical, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of cobalt molecular materials obtained from PcCo(CN)L (L = ethylenediamine, 1,4-diaminebutane, 1,12-diaminododecane and 2,6-diamineanthraquinone)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-Saavedra, O.G.; Sanchez-Vergara, M.E.; Rodriguez-Rosales, A.A.; Ortega-Martinez, R.; Ortiz-Rebollo, A.; Frontana-Uribe, B.A.; Garcia-Montalvo, V.

    2010-01-01

    Novel PcCo(CN)L monomeric complexes were synthesized from [PcCoCN] n compounds and bidentate axial ligands (L) such as ethylenediamine, 1,4-diaminebutane, 1,12-diaminedodecane and 2,6-diamineanthraquinone. These complexes were implemented to fabricate pellets and thin films by the vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The obtained compounds and deposited thin films were characterized by different spectroscopic techniques. Measurements of the electrical conductivity and the electrical current as a function of temperature were also carried out. IR-spectroscopy studies showed that the ligand attaches to the [PcCoCN] n unit. The C=N vibrational band is found in the PcCo(et)CN and PcCo(bu)CN molecular solids, although it is displaced with respect to other reported values. Compounds PcCo(do) 2 and PcCo(an) 2 do not show C=N vibrational bands. This fact suggests a double bond between the ligand and the macrocycle and a coordination at the fifth and sixth position on the Co(III) atom. UV-vis spectra of the thin films exhibited higher conjugation degree for the CN-based samples. Electrical conductivity for the PcCo(an) 2 complex was consistently low for all temperature ranges under measurement, whereas the other synthesized compounds showed a semiconductor-like dependence of electric current with temperature. Additionally, cubic nonlinear optical (NLO) characterizations of the film samples were performed with the Z-Scan and third harmonic generation (THG) techniques, all samples exhibit outstandingly high nonlinear activity.

  8. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakubo, Takamasa; Yamada, Fumiyuki; Nakazato, Kenjiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a material, which is used for printing a samples name and date on an X-ray photographic film at the same time an X-ray radiography. Constitution: A radiation shielding material of a large mass absorption coefficient such as lead oxide, barium oxide, barium sulfate, etc. is added to a solution of a radiation permeable substance capable of imparting cold plastic fluidity (such as microcrystalline wax, paraffin, low molecular polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, etc.). The resultant system is agitated and then cooled, and thereafter it is press fitted to or bonded to a base in the form of a film of a predetermined thickness. This radiation shielding layer is scraped off by using a writing tool to enter information to be printed in a photographic film, and then it is laid over the film and exposed to X-radiation to thereby print the information on the film. (Seki, T.)

  9. SimCP3—An Advanced Homologue of SimCP2 as a Solution-Processed Small Molecular Host Material for Blue Phosphorescence Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ting Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have overcome the synthetic difficulty of 9,9′,9′′,9′′′,9′′′′,9′′′′′-((phenylsilanetriyltris(benzene-5,3,1-triylhexakis(9H-carbazole (SimCP3 an advanced homologue of previously known SimCP2 as a solution-processed, high triplet gap energy host material for a blue phosphorescence dopant. A series of organic light-emitting diodes based on blue phosphorescence dopant iridium (III bis(4,6-difluorophenylpyridinatopicolate, FIrpic, were fabricated and tested to demonstrate the validity of solution-processed SimCP3 in the device fabrication.

  10. Molecular sensors and molecular logic gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, N.; Bojinov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The rapid grow of nanotechnology field extended the concept of a macroscopic device to the molecular level. Because of this reason the design and synthesis of (supra)-molecular species capable of mimicking the functions of macroscopic devices are currently of great interest. Molecular devices operate via electronic and/or nuclear rearrangements and, like macroscopic devices, need energy to operate and communicate between their elements. The energy needed to make a device work can be supplied as chemical energy, electrical energy, or light. Luminescence is one of the most useful techniques to monitor the operation of molecular-level devices. This fact determinates the synthesis of novel fluorescence compounds as a considerable and inseparable part of nanoscience development. Further miniaturization of semiconductors in electronic field reaches their limit. Therefore the design and construction of molecular systems capable of performing complex logic functions is of great scientific interest now. In semiconductor devices the logic gates work using binary logic, where the signals are encoded as 0 and 1 (low and high current). This process is executable on molecular level by several ways, but the most common are based on the optical properties of the molecule switches encoding the low and high concentrations of the input guest molecules and the output fluorescent intensities with binary 0 and 1 respectively. The first proposal to execute logic operations at the molecular level was made in 1988, but the field developed only five years later when the analogy between molecular switches and logic gates was experimentally demonstrated by de Silva. There are seven basic logic gates: AND, OR, XOR, NOT, NAND, NOR and XNOR and all of them were achieved by molecules, the fluorescence switching as well. key words: fluorescence, molecular sensors, molecular logic gates

  11. NATO Conference on Molecular Metals

    CERN Document Server

    1979-01-01

    During the past few years there has been intense research activity in the design, synthesis, and characterization of materials which are formed from molecular precursors, and which have high or metal-like electrical conductivities, i.e. dcr/dT < O. It has been widely supposed that these new materials, which are commonly called molecular metals, would be pressed into service, for example as devices. Up to now, widespread, practical applications of these sub­ stances have not developed. The NATO Advanced Research Institute on Molecular Metals at Les Arcs, France, September 10-16, 1978 was organized to discuss the scientific and technological potential of research and development in this field. The proceedings of the Institute constitute this book. Several lectures were devoted to the assessment of the present status of research on systems which serve to define major components of the field. The systems which were discussed included TTF-TCNQ, platinum chain compounds, (SN)x, polyacetylene, polydiacetylene, g...

  12. Charged hydrogels for post-loading, release, and molecular imprinting of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillemans, J.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304835137

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a technique to create template-shaped cavities in polymer matrices with memory of the template molecules, to be used in molecular recognition. Molecular imprinting of low molecular weight compounds is a well established technique used to create high affinity materials. On the

  13. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  14. Digitotalar dysmorphism: Molecular elucidation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    obtained for molecular studies. Since the distal arthrogryposes (DAs) are genetically heterogeneous, an unbiased approach to mutation ... Diseases and Molecular Medicine, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa, with an interest in molecular genetics of connective ...

  15. Artificial molecular motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassem, Salma; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S.; Wilson, Miriam R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Leigh, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Motor proteins are nature's solution for directing movement at the molecular level. The field of artificial molecular motors takes inspiration from these tiny but powerful machines. Although directional motion on the nanoscale performed by synthetic molecular machines is a relatively new

  16. Molecular, cellular, and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering. Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Engineering, the fourth volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in molecular biology, transport phenomena, physiological modeling, tissue engineering, stem cells, drug delivery systems, artificial organs, and personalized medicine. More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including DNA vaccines, biomimetic systems, cardiovascular dynamics, biomaterial scaffolds, cell mechanobiology, synthetic biomaterials, pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, nanobiomaterials for tissue engineering, biomedical imaging of engineered tissues, gene therapy, noninvasive targeted protein and peptide drug deliver...

  17. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  18. Electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kwok, H L

    2010-01-01

    The electronic properties of solids have become of increasing importance in the age of information technology. The study of solids and materials, while having originated from the disciplines of physics and chemistry, has evolved independently over the past few decades. The classical treatment of solid-state physics, which emphasized classifications, theories and fundamental physical principles, is no longer able to bridge the gap between materials advances and applications. In particular, the more recent developments in device physics and technology have not necessarily been driven by new conc

  19. Molecular tailoring of solid surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evenson, Simon Alan

    1997-07-01

    The overall performance of a material can be dramatically improved by tailoring its surface at the molecular level. The aim of this project was to develop a universal technique for attaching dendrimers (well-defined, nanoscale, functional polymers) and Jeffamines (high molecular weight polymer chains) to the surface of any shaped solid substrate. This desire for controlled functionalization is ultimately driven by the need to improve material compatibility in various biomedical applications. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used initially to study the packing and structure of Langmuir-Blodgett films on surfaces, and subsequently resulted in the first visualization of individual, spherically shaped, nanoscopic polyamidoamine dendrimers. The next goal was to develop a methodology for attaching such macromolecules to inert surfaces. Thin copolymer films were deposited onto solid substrates to produce materials with a fixed concentration of surface anhydride groups. Vapor-phase functionalization reactions were then carried out with trifluorinated amines to confirm the viability of this technique to bond molecules to surfaces. Finally, pulsed plasma polymerization of maleic anhydride took this approach one stage further, by forming well-adhered polymer films containing a predetermined concentration of reactive anhydride groups. Subsequent functionalization reactions led to the secure attachment of dendrimers and Jeffamines at any desired packing density. An alternative route to biocompatibilization used 1,2-ethanedithiol to yield thiolated surfaces containing very high polymeric sulfur : carbon ratios. (author)

  20. Molecular tailoring of solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evenson, Simon Alan

    1997-01-01

    The overall performance of a material can be dramatically improved by tailoring its surface at the molecular level. The aim of this project was to develop a universal technique for attaching dendrimers (well-defined, nanoscale, functional polymers) and Jeffamines (high molecular weight polymer chains) to the surface of any shaped solid substrate. This desire for controlled functionalization is ultimately driven by the need to improve material compatibility in various biomedical applications. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used initially to study the packing and structure of Langmuir-Blodgett films on surfaces, and subsequently resulted in the first visualization of individual, spherically shaped, nanoscopic polyamidoamine dendrimers. The next goal was to develop a methodology for attaching such macromolecules to inert surfaces. Thin copolymer films were deposited onto solid substrates to produce materials with a fixed concentration of surface anhydride groups. Vapor-phase functionalization reactions were then carried out with trifluorinated amines to confirm the viability of this technique to bond molecules to surfaces. Finally, pulsed plasma polymerization of maleic anhydride took this approach one stage further, by forming well-adhered polymer films containing a predetermined concentration of reactive anhydride groups. Subsequent functionalization reactions led to the secure attachment of dendrimers and Jeffamines at any desired packing density. An alternative route to biocompatibilization used 1,2-ethanedithiol to yield thiolated surfaces containing very high polymeric sulfur : carbon ratios. (author)

  1. Molecular computing origins and promises

    CERN Document Server

    Rambidi, Nicholas G

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Computing explores whether molecular primitives can prove to be real alternatives to contemporary semiconductor means. The text discusses molecular primitives and circuitry for information processing devices.

  2. Position Assignment and Oxidation State Recognition of Fe and Co Centers in Heterometallic Mixed-Valent Molecular Precursors for the Low-Temperature Preparation of Target Spinel Oxide Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberman, Craig M. [Department of Chemistry, University at Albany, Albany, New York 12222, United States; Barry, Matthew C. [Department of Chemistry, University at Albany, Albany, New York 12222, United States; Wei, Zheng [Department of Chemistry, University at Albany, Albany, New York 12222, United States; Rogachev, Andrey Yu. [Department; Wang, Xiaoping [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, United States; Liu, Jun-Liang [CNRS, CRPP, UPR 8641, F-33600 Pessac, France; Univ. Bordeaux, UPR 8641, F-33600 Pessac, France; MOE Key Lab of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry,; Clérac, Rodolphe [CNRS, CRPP, UPR 8641, F-33600 Pessac, France; Univ. Bordeaux, UPR 8641, F-33600 Pessac, France; Chen, Yu-Sheng [ChemMatCARS, Center for Advanced Radiation; Filatov, Alexander S. [Department; Dikarev, Evgeny V. [Department of Chemistry, University at Albany, Albany, New York 12222, United States

    2017-07-31

    A series of mixed-valent, heterometallic (mixed-transition metal) diketonates that can be utilized as prospective volatile single-source precursors for the low-temperature preparation of MxM'3–xO4 spinel oxide materials is reported. Three iron–cobalt complexes with Fe/Co ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 were synthesized by several methods using both solid-state and solution reactions. On the basis of nearly quantitative reaction yields, elemental analyses, and comparison of metal–oxygen bonds with those in homometallic analogues, heterometallic compounds were formulated as [FeIII(acac)3][CoII(hfac)2] (1), [CoII(hfac)2][FeIII(acac)3][CoII(hfac)2] (2), and [FeII(hfac)2][FeIII(acac)3][CoII(hfac)2] (3). In the above heteroleptic complexes, the Lewis acidic, coordinatively unsaturated CoII/FeII centers chelated by two hexafluoroacetylacetonate (hfac) ligands maintain bridging interactions with oxygen atoms of acetylacetonate (acac) groups that chelate the neighboring FeIII metal ion. Preliminary assignment of Fe and Co positions/oxidation states in 1–3 drawn from X-ray structural investigation was corroborated by a number of complementary techniques. Single-crystal resonant synchrotron diffraction and neutron diffraction experiments unambiguously confirmed the location of Fe and Co sites in the molecules of dinuclear (1) and trinuclear (2) complexes, respectively. Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry revealed the presence of FeIII- and CoII-based fragments in the gas phase upon evaporation of precursors 1 and 2 as well as of FeIII, FeII, and CoII species for complex 3. Theoretical investigation of two possible “valent isomers”, [FeIII(acac)3

  3. Molecular diagnostics of periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Siwiec, Radosław; Berger, Marcin; Malm, Anna; Szymańska, Jolanta

    2017-01-28

    The microorganisms that form dental plaque are the main cause of periodontitis. Their identification and the understanding of the complex relationships and interactions that involve these microorganisms, environmental factors and the host's health status enable improvement in diagnostics and targeted therapy in patients with periodontitis. To this end, molecular diagnostics techniques (both techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction and those involving nucleic acid analysis via hybridization) come increasingly into use. On the basis of a literature review, the following methods are presented: polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR), 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequencing, checkerboard and reverse-capture checkerboard hybridization, microarrays, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE), as well as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and next generation sequencing (NGS). The advantages and drawbacks of each method in the examination of periopathogens are indicated. The techniques listed above allow fast detection of even small quantities of pathogen present in diagnostic material and prove particularly useful to detect microorganisms that are difficult or impossible to grow in a laboratory.

  4. Molecular diagnostics of periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Korona-Głowniak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microorganisms that form dental plaque are the main cause of periodontitis. Their identification and the understanding of the complex relationships and interactions that involve these microorganisms, environmental factors and the host’s health status enable improvement in diagnostics and targeted therapy in patients with periodontitis. To this end, molecular diagnostics techniques (both techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction and those involving nucleic acid analysis via hybridization come increasingly into use. On the basis of a literature review, the following methods are presented: polymerase chain reaction (PCR, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR, 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequencing, checkerboard and reverse-capture checkerboard hybridization, microarrays, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE, temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE, as well as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP and next generation sequencing (NGS. The advantages and drawbacks of each method in the examination of periopathogens are indicated. The techniques listed above allow fast detection of even small quantities of pathogen present in diagnostic material and prove particularly useful to detect microorganisms that are difficult or impossible to grow in a laboratory.

  5. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. B P Singh. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 23 Issue 1 February 2000 pp 11-16 Molecular Magnets. Synthesis and magnetic properties of one-dimensional metal oxalate networks as molecular-based magnets · B P Singh B Singh · More Details Abstract ...

  6. Conjugated material self-assembly : towards supramolecular electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leclère, P.E.L.G.; Surin, M.; Cavallini, M.; Jonkheijm, P.; Henze, O.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.; Biscarini, F.; Grimsdale, A.C.; Feast, W.J.; Meijer, E.W.; Müllen, K.; Brédas, J.L.; Lazzaroni, R.

    2004-01-01

    Properties of organic electronic materials in solid-state are determined as individual molecules and molecular assembly. It is essential to optimize conjugated materials to control performance of molecular assembly that constitute electronic devices such as light-emitting diodes and solar cells, and

  7. Supplementary Material

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mraga

    1. Supplementary Material. A soluble-lead Redox Flow Battery with corrugated graphite sheet and reticulated vitreous carbon as positive and negative current collectors by A Banerjee et al (pp 163-. 170). Figure S1. SEM images for bare substrates: (a) graphite sheet, (b) 20 ppi RVC, (c) 30 ppi. RVC and (d) 45 ppi RVC.

  8. Emerging Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Breinbjerg, Morten; Pold, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The authors examine how materiality emerges from complex chains of mediation in creative software use. The primarily theoretical argument is inspired and illustrated by interviews with two composers of electronic music. The authors argue that computer mediated activity should not primarily be und...

  9. Atmospheric materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    experience and, consequently, to the conceptual and methodological shifts in the production of space, and hence in the way we think about materiality. In this context, architectural space is understood as a contingent construction – a space of engagement that appears to us as a result of continuous...

  10. Absorbant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quetier, Monique.

    1978-11-01

    Absorbants play a very important part in the nuclear industry. They serve for the control, shut-down and neutron shielding of reactors and increase the capacity of spent fuel storage pools and of special transport containers. This paper surveys the usual absorbant materials, means of obtainment, their essential characteristics relating to their use and their behaviour under neutron irradiation [fr

  11. Plasticity induced phase transformation in molecular crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Koslowski, Marisol

    2014-01-01

    Solid state amorphization (SSA) can be achieved in crystalline materials including metal alloys, intermetallics, semiconductors, minerals and molecular crystals. Even though the mechanisms may differ in different materials, the crystalline to amorphous transformation occurs when the crystal reaches a metastable state in which its free energy is higher than that of the amorphous phase. SSA is observed in metal alloys because of interdiffusion of the crystalline elements during mechanical milli...

  12. FY 1993 Report on the technical results. Research and development of extreme handling technologies at atomic/molecular levels (Development of technologies for forming highly functional stock materials for power generation environments); 1993 nendo genshi bunshi kyokugen sosa gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Hatsuden kankyoyo kokino sozai keisei gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    This research and development project is aimed at development of the technologies for observing/handling solid surfaces and organic molecules at the atomic level by the mechanical probe; forming the fine structures of optional atomic sequences using fine electron beams and surface chemical characteristics; simulation by the first principle calculation to theoretically predict the atom/molecule surface reactions in a process; and producing new materials substitutes for semiconductors, in order to develop the atom/molecule observing and handling technologies as the common basic technologies for the various industrial areas, e.g., new materials, electronics, biotechnology and chemical. The research/survey activities are directed to (1) development of the technologies for observing the atoms and molecules on solid surfaces, (2) development of technologies for observing/handling intra-spatial atom groups, (3) development of the theoretical technologies for the atomic/molecular processes, and (4) auxiliary activities. The item (2) is intended to obtain the basic knowledge of the principles and devices for handling atom groups in a free space by spatial electromagnetic field handling or the like, and principles of state observation methods, including their possibilities. The item (4) holds the information-exchange meetings. (NEDO)

  13. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  14. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  15. Molecular magnets physics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolomé, Juan; Fernández, Julio F

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the physical phenomena discovered in magnetic molecular materials over the last 20 years. It is written by leading scientists having made the most important contributions to this active area of research. The main topics of this book are the principles of quantum tunneling and quantum coherence of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), phenomena which go beyond the physics of individual molecules, such as the collective behavior of arrays of SMMs, the physics of one-dimensional singleâ€"chain magnets and magnetism of SMMs grafted on substrates.

  16. Black molecular adsorber coatings for spaceflight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-09-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  17. Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Materials Science Program is structured so that NASA s headquarters is responsible for the program content and selection, through the Enterprise Scientist, and MSFC provides for implementation of ground and flight programs with a Discipline Scientist and Discipline Manager. The Discipline Working Group of eminent scientists from outside of NASA acts in an advisory capacity and writes the Discipline Document from which the NRA content is derived. The program is reviewed approximately every three years by groups such as the Committee on Microgravity Research, the National Materials Advisory Board, and the OBPR Maximization and Prioritization (ReMaP) Task Force. The flight program has had as many as twenty-six principal investigators (PIs) in flight or flight definition stage, with the numbers of PIs in the future dependent on the results of the ReMaP Task Force and internal reviews. Each project has a NASA-appointed Project Scientist, considered a half-time job, who assists the PI in understanding and preparing for internal reviews such as the Science Concept Review and Requirements Definition Review. The Project Scientist also insures that the PI gets the maximum science support from MSFC, represents the PI to the MSFC community, and collaborates with the Project Manager to insure the project is well-supported and remains vital. Currently available flight equipment includes the Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) and Microgravity Science Glovebox. Ground based projects fall into one or more of several categories. Intellectual Underpinning of Flight Program projects include theoretical studies backed by modeling and computer simulations; bring to maturity new research, often by young researchers, and may include preliminary short duration low gravity experiments in the KC-135 aircraft or drop tube; enable characterization of data sets from previous flights; and provide thermophysical property determinations to aid PIs. Radiation Shielding and preliminary In

  18. Magnetocaloric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppesen, Stinus

    2008-10-15

    New and improved magnetocaloric materials are one of the cornerstones in the development of room temperature magnetic refrigeration. Magnetic refrigeration has been used since the 1930ies in cryogenic applications, but has since the discovery of room temperature refrigerants received enormous attention. This Ph.D. work has been mainly concerned with developing a new technique to characterize the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) and using this technique in the investigations on new and improved magnetocaloric materials. For this purpose a novel differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with applied magnetic fields was developed for measuring heat capacity as function of magnetic field. Measurements using the developed DSC demonstrate a very high sensitivity, fast measurements and good agreement with results obtained by other techniques. Furthermore, two material systems have been described in this work. Both systems take basis in the mixed-valence manganite system La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} well known from research on colossal magnetoresistance (CMR). The mixed-valence manganite crystallizes in the perovskite structure of general formula ABO{sub 3}. The first material system is designed to investigate the influence of low level Cu doping on the B-site. Six different samples were prepared with over-stoichiometric compositions La{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}Mn{sub 1.05}Cu{sub x}O{sub 3}, x=0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5%. All compositions crystallized well in the same perovskite structure, but the morphology of the samples changed drastically with doping. Investigation on the magnetocaloric properties revealed that small levels of Cu up to around 3% could improve the magnetocaloric performance of the materials. Furthermore, Cu could be used to tune the temperature interval without deteriorating the MCE, which is a much desired characteristic for potential use in magnetic refrigerators. A less comprehensive part of the work has been concerned with the investigation of doping on the A

  19. Materializing Superghosts

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrov, Victor; Krotov, Dmitry; Losev, Andrei; Lysov, Vyacheslav

    2007-01-01

    We construct the off-shell BV realization of N=1, d=10 SYM with 7 auxillary fields. This becomes possible due to materialized ghost phenomenon. Namely, supersymmetry ghosts are coordinates on a manifold B of 10-dimensional spinors with pure spinors cut out. Auxillary fields are sections of a bundle over B, and supersymmetry transformations are nonlinear in ghosts. By integrating out axillary fields we obtain on-shell supersymmetric BV action with terms quadratic in antifields. Exactly this on...

  20. Material monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotter, W.; Zirker, L.; Hancock, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) facilities are located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The overall goal for the Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization Unit is to identify and establish the correct amount of waste generated so that it can be reduced. Quarterly, the INEL Pollution Prevention (P2) Unit compares the projected amount of waste generated per process with the actual amount generated. Examples of waste streams that would be addresses for our facility would include be are not limited to: Maintenance, Upgrades, Office and Scrap Metal. There are three potential sources of this variance: inaccurate identification of those who generate the waste; inaccurate identification of the process that generates the waste; and inaccurate measurement of the actual amount generated. The Materials Monitoring Program was proposed to identify the sources of variance and reduce the variance to an acceptable level. Prior to the implementation of the Material Monitoring Program, all information that was gathered and recorded was done so through an informal estimation of waste generated by various personnel concerned with each processes. Due to the inaccuracy of the prior information gathering system, the Material Monitoring Program was established. The heart of this program consists of two main parts. In the first part potential waste generators provide information on projected waste generation process. In the second part, Maintenance, Office, Scrap Metal and Facility Upgrade wastes from given processes is disposed within the appropriate bin dedicated to that process. The Material Monitoring Program allows for the more accurate gathering of information on the various waste types that are being generated quarterly

  1. The cognitive life of mechanical molecular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Mathieu

    2013-12-01

    The use of physical models of molecular structures as research tools has been central to the development of biochemistry and molecular biology. Intriguingly, it has received little attention from scholars of science. In this paper, I argue that these physical models are not mere three-dimensional representations but that they are in fact very special research tools: they are cognitive augmentations. Despite the fact that they are external props, these models serve as cognitive tools that augment and extend the modeler's cognitive capacities and performance in molecular modeling tasks. This cognitive enhancement is obtained because of the way the modeler interacts with these models, the models' materiality contributing to the solving of the molecule's structure. Furthermore, I argue that these material models and their component parts were designed, built and used specifically to serve as cognitive facilitators and cognitive augmentations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microporous and meso porous molecular sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Antonio Souza de

    1999-01-01

    In this work, general aspects on the microporous and mesoporous molecular sieves using inorganic sources of aluminium, silicon, phosphorous, water and structural organic templates are reviewed. The nomenclature, synthesis, structure, acidity and chemical functionality of microporous zeolites and silico alumino phosphate, besides mesoporous MCM-41 material, will be emphasized. (author)

  3. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Phillip W.K.; Sauer, Stephan P.A.; Oddershede, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase...

  4. Towards molecular imaging by means of MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norek, M.

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in the thesis is focused on the design of highly efficient contrast agents for molecular imaging by means of MRI based on the detailed physical characterization of the given material. Specifically, attention is paid on the development of contrast agents for magnetic fields higher

  5. Thermoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Berkun, Isil; Schmidt, Robert D.; Luzenski, Matthew F.; Lu, Xu; Bordon Sarac, Patricia; Case, Eldon D.; Hogan, Timothy P.

    2014-06-01

    Mg2(Si,Sn) compounds are promising candidate low-cost, lightweight, nontoxic thermoelectric materials made from abundant elements and are suited for power generation applications in the intermediate temperature range of 600 K to 800 K. Knowledge on the transport and mechanical properties of Mg2(Si,Sn) compounds is essential to the design of Mg2(Si,Sn)-based thermoelectric devices. In this work, such materials were synthesized using the molten-salt sealing method and were powder processed, followed by pulsed electric sintering densification. A set of Mg2.08Si0.4- x Sn0.6Sb x (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.072) compounds were investigated, and a peak ZT of 1.50 was obtained at 716 K in Mg2.08Si0.364Sn0.6Sb0.036. The high ZT is attributed to a high electrical conductivity in these samples, possibly caused by a magnesium deficiency in the final product. The mechanical response of the material to stresses is a function of the elastic moduli. The temperature-dependent Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus, Poisson's ratio, acoustic wave speeds, and acoustic Debye temperature of the undoped Mg2(Si,Sn) compounds were measured using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy from 295 K to 603 K. In addition, the hardness and fracture toughness were measured at room temperature.

  6. Techniques for Investigating Molecular Toxicology of Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Chenchen; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Lei, Zhendong; Wu, Minghong

    2016-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been a rapidly developing field in the past few decades, resulting in the more and more exposure of nanomaterials to human. The increased applications of nanomaterials for industrial, commercial and life purposes, such as fillers, catalysts, semiconductors, paints, cosmetic additives and drug carriers, have caused both obvious and potential impacts on human health and environment. Nanotoxicology is used to study the safety of nanomaterials and has grown at the historic moment. Molecular toxicology is a new subdiscipline to study the interactions and impacts of materials at the molecular level. To better understand the relationship between the molecular toxicology and nanomaterials, this review summarizes the typical techniques and methods in molecular toxicology which are applied when investigating the toxicology of nanomaterials and include six categories: namely; genetic mutation detection, gene expression analysis, DNA damage detection, chromosomal aberration analysis, proteomics, and metabolomics. Each category involves several experimental techniques and methods.

  7. Molecular biodiversity of Red Sea demosponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpenbeck, Dirk; Voigt, Oliver; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; Berumen, Michael L; Büttner, Gabriele; Catania, Daniela; Guirguis, Adel Naguib; Paulay, Gustav; Schätzle, Simone; Wörheide, Gert

    2016-04-30

    Sponges are important constituents of coral reef ecosystems, including those around the Arabian Peninsula. Despite their importance, our knowledge on demosponge diversity in this area is insufficient to recognize, for example, faunal changes caused by anthropogenic disturbances. We here report the first assessment of demosponge molecular biodiversity from Arabia, with focus on the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, based on mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal molecular markers gathered in the framework of the Sponge Barcoding Project. We use a rapid molecular screening approach on Arabian demosponge collections and analyze results in comparison against published material in terms of biodiversity. We use a variable region of 28S rDNA, applied for the first time in the assessment of demosponge molecular diversity. Our data constitutes a solid foundation for a future more comprehensive understanding of sponge biodiversity of the Red Sea and adjacent waters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Gas Sensors Based on Molecular Imprinting Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Qingju

    2017-07-04

    Molecular imprinting technology (MIT); often described as a method of designing a material to remember a target molecular structure (template); is a technique for the creation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with custom-made binding sites complementary to the target molecules in shape; size and functional groups. MIT has been successfully applied to analyze; separate and detect macromolecular organic compounds. Furthermore; it has been increasingly applied in assays of biological macromolecules. Owing to its unique features of structure specificity; predictability; recognition and universal application; there has been exploration of the possible application of MIPs in the field of highly selective gas sensors. In this present study; we outline the recent advances in gas sensors based on MIT; classify and introduce the existing molecularly imprinted gas sensors; summarize their advantages and disadvantages; and analyze further research directions.

  9. Molecular biodiversity of Red Sea demosponges

    KAUST Repository

    Erpenbeck, Dirk; Voigt, Oliver; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.; Berumen, Michael L.; Bü ttner, Gabriele; Catania, Daniela; Guirguis, Adel Naguib; Paulay, Gustav; Schä tzle, Simone; Wö rheide, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Sponges are important constituents of coral reef ecosystems, including those around the Arabian Peninsula. Despite their importance, our knowledge on demosponge diversity in this area is insufficient to recognize, for example, faunal changes caused by anthropogenic disturbances. We here report the first assessment of demosponge molecular biodiversity from Arabia, with focus on the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, based on mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal molecular markers gathered in the framework of the Sponge Barcoding Project. We use a rapid molecular screening approach on Arabian demosponge collections and analyze results in comparison against published material in terms of biodiversity. We use a variable region of 28S rDNA, applied for the first time in the assessment of demosponge molecular diversity. Our data constitutes a solid foundation for a future more comprehensive understanding of sponge biodiversity of the Red Sea and adjacent waters.

  10. Molecular biodiversity of Red Sea demosponges

    KAUST Repository

    Erpenbeck, Dirk

    2016-01-07

    Sponges are important constituents of coral reef ecosystems, including those around the Arabian Peninsula. Despite their importance, our knowledge on demosponge diversity in this area is insufficient to recognize, for example, faunal changes caused by anthropogenic disturbances. We here report the first assessment of demosponge molecular biodiversity from Arabia, with focus on the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, based on mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal molecular markers gathered in the framework of the Sponge Barcoding Project. We use a rapid molecular screening approach on Arabian demosponge collections and analyze results in comparison against published material in terms of biodiversity. We use a variable region of 28S rDNA, applied for the first time in the assessment of demosponge molecular diversity. Our data constitutes a solid foundation for a future more comprehensive understanding of sponge biodiversity of the Red Sea and adjacent waters.

  11. FOREWORD: Materials metrology Materials metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Seton; Valdés, Joaquin

    2010-04-01

    It seems that so much of modern life is defined by the materials we use. From aircraft to architecture, from cars to communications, from microelectronics to medicine, the development of new materials and the innovative application of existing ones have underpinned the technological advances that have transformed the way we live, work and play. Recognizing the need for a sound technical basis for drafting codes of practice and specifications for advanced materials, the governments of countries of the Economic Summit (G7) and the European Commission signed a Memorandum of Understanding in 1982 to establish the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS). This project supports international trade by enabling scientific collaboration as a precursor to the drafting of standards. The VAMAS participants recognized the importance of agreeing a reliable, universally accepted basis for the traceability of the measurements on which standards depend for their preparation and implementation. Seeing the need to involve the wider metrology community, VAMAS approached the Comité International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM). Following discussions with NMI Directors and a workshop at the BIPM in February 2005, the CIPM decided to establish an ad hoc Working Group on the metrology applicable to the measurement of material properties. The Working Group presented its conclusions to the CIPM in October 2007 and published its final report in 2008, leading to the signature of a Memorandum of Understanding between VAMAS and the BIPM. This MoU recognizes the work that is already going on in VAMAS as well as in the Consultative Committees of the CIPM and establishes a framework for an ongoing dialogue on issues of materials metrology. The question of what is meant by traceability in the metrology of the properties of materials is particularly vexed when the measurement results depend on a specified procedure. In these cases, confidence in results requires not only traceable

  12. Artificially structured materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, A.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in crystal growth methods such as molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) allow us to artifically structure new materials on an atomic scale. These structures may have electrical or optical properties that cannot be obtained in bulk crystals. There has been a dramatic increase in the study of layered structures during the past decade which has led to the discovery of many unexpected physical phenomena and opened a completely new branch of device physics. Since the advanced crystal growth techniques can tailor the compositions and doping profiles of the material to atomic scales, it pushes the frontier of devices to the ultimate imagination of device physicists and engineers. It is likely that for the next century the new generation of devices will rely heavily on artifically structured materials. This article will be limited to a discussion of recent developments in the area of semiconductor thin epitaxial films which may have technological impact. 21 refs., 12 figs

  13. Intrinsic work function of molecular films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivančo, Ján

    2012-01-01

    The electronic properties of molecular films are analysed with the consideration of the molecular orientation. The study demonstrates that surfaces of electroactive oligomeric molecular films can be classified—analogously to the elemental surfaces—by their intrinsic work functions. The intrinsic work function of molecular films is correlated with their ionisation energies; again, the behaviour is analogous to the correlation existing between the first ionisation energy of elements and the work function of the corresponding elemental surfaces. The proposed intrinsic work-function concept suggests that the mechanism for the energy-level alignment at the interfaces associated with molecular films is virtually controlled by work functions of materials brought into the contact. - Highlights: ► Molecular films exhibit their own (intrinsic) work function. ► Intrinsic work function is correlated with ionisation energy of molecular films. ► Intrinsic work function determines dipole at interface with a particular surface. ► Surface vacuum-level change upon film growth does not relate to interfacial dipole.

  14. Applications of neutron scattering in molecular biological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nierhaus, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    The study of the molecular structure of biological materials by neutron scattering is described. As example the results of the study of the components of a ribosome of Escherichia coli are presented. (HSI) [de

  15. Molecular characterization of Azotobacter spp. nifH gene Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB. ISSN 1684–5315 ... Molecular characterization of Azotobacter spp. nifH .... MATERIALS AND METHODS ..... rapidly expanding and is currently composed of over.

  16. Molecular diodes in optical rectennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duché, David; Palanchoke, Ujwol; Terracciano, Luigi; Dang, Florian-Xuan; Patrone, Lionel; Le Rouzo, Judikael; Balaban, Téodore Silviu; Alfonso, Claude; Charai, Ahmed; Margeat, Olivier; Ackermann, Jorg; Gourgon, Cécile; Simon, Jean-Jacques; Escoubas, Ludovic

    2016-09-01

    The photo conversion efficiencies of the 1st and 2nd generat ion photovoltaic solar cells are limited by the physical phenomena involved during the photo-conversion processes. An upper limit around 30% has been predicted for a monojunction silicon solar cell. In this work, we study 3rd generation solar cells named rectenna which could direct ly convert visible and infrared light into DC current. The rectenna technology is at odds with the actual photovoltaic technologies, since it is not based on the use of semi-conducting materials. We study a rectenna architecture consist ing of plasmonic nano-antennas associated with rectifying self assembled molecular diodes. We first opt imized the geometry of plasmonic nano-antennas using an FDTD method. The optimal antennas are then realized using a nano-imprint process and associated with self assembled molecular diodes in 11- ferrocenyl-undecanethiol. Finally, The I(V) characterist ics in darkness of the rectennas has been carried out using an STM. The molecular diodes exhibit averaged rect ification ratios of 5.

  17. Rheology via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1982-10-01

    The equilibrium molecular dynamics formulated by Newton, Lagrange, and Hamilton has been modified in order to simulate rheologial molecular flows with fast computers. This modified Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) has been applied to fluid and solid deformations, under both homogeneous and shock conditions, as well as to the transport of heat. The irreversible heating associated with dissipation could be controlled by carrying out isothermal NEMD calculations. The new isothermal NEMD equations of motion are consistent with Gauss' 1829 Least-Constraint principle as well as certain microscopic equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical formulations due to Gibbs and Boltzmann. Application of isothermal NEMD revealed high-frequency and high-strain-rate behavior for simple fluids which resembled the behavior of polymer solutions and melts at lower frequencies and strain rates. For solids NEMD produces plastic flows consistent with experimental observations at much lower strain rates. The new nonequilibrium methods also suggest novel formulations of thermodynamics in nonequilibrium systems and shed light on the failure of the Principle of Material Frame Indifference

  18. Molecular heterogeneous catalysts derived from bipyridine-based organosilica nanotubes for C–H bond activation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, material characterization data, catalytic measurement details. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc00713b Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengbo; Wang, Hua; Li, Mei; Han, Jinyu

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous metal complex catalysts for direct C–H activation with high activity and durability have always been desired for transforming raw materials into feedstock chemicals. This study described the design and synthesis of one-dimensional organosilica nanotubes containing 2,2′-bipyridine (bpy) ligands in the framework (BPy-NT) and their post-synthetic metalation to provide highly active and robust molecular heterogeneous catalysts. By adjusting the ratios of organosilane precursors, very short BPy-NT with ∼50 nm length could be controllably obtained. The post-synthetic metalation of bipyridine-functionalized nanotubes with [IrCp*Cl(μ-Cl)]2 (Cp* = η5-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) and [Ir(cod)(OMe)]2 (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) afforded solid catalysts, IrCp*-BPy-NT and Ir(cod)-BPy-NT, which were utilized for C–H oxidation of heterocycles and cycloalkanes as well as C–H borylation of arenes. The cut-short nanotube catalysts displayed enhanced activities and durability as compared to the analogous homogeneous catalysts and other conventional heterogeneous catalysts, benefiting from the isolated active sites as well as the fast transport of substrates and products. After the reactions, a detailed characterization of Ir-immobilized BPy-NT via TEM, SEM, nitrogen adsorption, UV/vis, XPS, and 13C CP MAS NMR indicated the molecular nature of the active species as well as stable structures of nanotube scaffolds. This study demonstrates the potential of BPy-NT with a short length as an integration platform for the construction of efficient heterogeneous catalytic systems for organic transformations. PMID:28970878

  19. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed

  20. Silane and Germane Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Timothy A; Li, Haixing; Klausen, Rebekka S; Kim, Nathaniel T; Neupane, Madhav; Leighton, James L; Steigerwald, Michael L; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2017-04-18

    -induced breakdown properties of individual Si-Si, Ge-Ge, Si-O, Si-C, and C-C bonds. Building from these studies, we have prepared a system that has two different, alternative conductance pathways. In this wire, we can intentionally break a labile, strained silicon-silicon bond and thereby shunt the current through the secondary conduction pathway. This type of in situ bond-rupture provides a new tool to study single molecule reactions that are induced by electric fields. Moreover, these studies provide guidance for designing dielectric materials as well as molecular devices that require stability under high voltage bias. The fundamental studies on the structure/function relationships of the molecular wires have guided the design of new functional systems based on the Si- and Ge-based wires. For example, we exploited the principle of strain-induced Lewis acidity from reaction chemistry to design a single molecule switch that can be controllably switched between two conductive states by varying the distance between the tip and substrate electrodes. We found that the strain intrinsic to the disilaacenaphthene scaffold also creates two state conductance switching. Finally, we demonstrate the first example of a stereoelectronic conductance switch, and we demonstrate that the switching relies crucially on the electronic delocalization in Si-Si and Ge-Ge wire backbones. These studies illustrate the untapped potential in using Si- and Ge-based wires to design and control charge transport at the nanoscale and to allow quantum mechanics to be used as a tool to design ultraminiaturized switches.