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Sample records for rectal gastrointestinal stromal

  1. Laparoscopic local excision and rectoanal anastomosis for rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor: modified laparoscopic intersphincteric resection technique.

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    Akiyoshi, Takashi; Ueno, Masashi; Fukunaga, Yosuke; Nagayama, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Konishi, Tsuyoshi; Kuroyanagi, Hiroya

    2014-07-01

    Rectal GI stromal tumor is uncommon. Local excision with free resection margins provides adequate treatment, but extended surgery such as abdominoperineal resection has been frequently performed because of technical difficulties in the confined pelvic space. We aimed to report the technical details of a new method of local excision for rectal GI stromal tumor: the modified laparoscopic intersphincteric resection technique. This study was a retrospective analysis. This study was performed at a single institute. We included 3 patients with rectal GI stromal tumor who underwent this procedure following neoadjuvant imatinib therapy. Medial-to-lateral retroperitoneal dissection was begun near the sacral promontory, and rectal dissection while preserving autonomic nerves was performed down to the pelvic floor into the anal canal without dividing the inferior mesenteric artery. Dissection between the tumor and prostate was meticulously performed under laparoscopic magnified view. Next, circumferential connection between the laparoscopic and transanal dissections was performed through a transanal approach, and the rectum was extracted through the anus. Circular full-thickness local excision of the rectum and handsewn straight rectoanal anastomosis was performed. The safety and feasibility of this procedure were the primary outcomes measured by this study. The median operative time was 180 minutes, and the median estimated blood loss was 115 mL. There were no conversions or intraoperative complications, and there was 1 postoperative intestinal obstruction that recovered with conservative therapy. All patients had negative resection margins (R0), including 1 pathological complete response. The study was limited by the small number of patients. This modified laparoscopic intersphincteric resection technique is a novel and safe method for local excision of rectal GI stromal tumors located very close to the anus (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http

  2. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sufliarsky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumours of the digestive tract. Better understanding of the molecular characteristics of GISTs led to the clinical development of imatinib for treating patients with this disease. New immuno markers and mechanisms of primary and secondary resistance were discovered. Adjuvant imatinib in intermediate or high risk GIST has improved the recurrence-free survival. Sunitinib in patients with intolerance or progression on imatinib demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival versus placebo. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as sorafenib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, have shown activity in patients with imatinib- and sunitinib-resistant GIST. (author)

  3. GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMOR (GIST

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    Luigi eTornillo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild-type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other entities, have been discovered (e.g. succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data.

  4. Stromal gastrointestinal tumors (GIST)

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    Balev, B.; Boykova, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: GIST are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract with varying tumor grade and frequency of 1: 100 000 per year. Mazur and Clark introduced the term for the first time in 1983. GIST constitute approximately 2% of the tumors in the gastrointestinal tract. The average age is 60 years. The most common locations are the stomach (60%), small intestine (30%), esophagus (1%), and rectum (5%). Learning objective: to demonstrate the imaging characteristics of the disease according to the current ESMO guidelines and to present the diagnostic accuracy of different imaging modalitiesnbased on review of literature and on own observations. GIST originate from interstitial cells (of Cajal) in the GIT wall, belonging to the autonomic nervous system, which is responsible for motility. 90% of GIST show overexpression of the KIT receptor, also known as CD117 or stem cell factor receptor. those that do not express c-KIT mutations, activate mutations in PDGFRA gene. Tumor’s macromorphology determines the imaging features on different modalities. Most of these tumors are exophytic, subepithelial, reach large size and enhance inhomogeneous due to necrosis. They usually do not cause obstruction. Ultrasound as the initiation method shows low sensitivity and specificity in GIST detection, CT with intravenous contrast is the gold standard. MRI contributes with assessing the vascularisation, cellularity and pH. FDG-PET/CT registers the metabolism of intratumoral acidosis. CT is the method of choice in the early diagnosis and determination of resectability of GIST. MRI is an additional method. PET FDG-CT is useful for the monitoring of patients treated with Imatinib

  5. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Case Report

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    Palankezhe Sashidharan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the identification of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, its molecular and immunohiostochemical basis, and its management have been a watershed in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. This paradigm shift occurred over the last two decades and gastrointestinal stromal tumors have now come to be understood as rare gastrointestinal tract tumors with predictable behavior and outcome, replacing the older terminologies like leiomyoma, schwannoma or leiomyosarcoma. This report presents a case of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor operated recently in a 47-year-old female patient and the outcome, as well as literature review of the pathological identification, sites of origin, and factors predicting its behavior, prognosis and treatment.

  6. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sashidharan, Palankezhe; Matele, Apoorva; Matele, Usha; Al Felahi, Nowfel; Kassem, Khalid F.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the identification of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, its molecular and immunohiostochemical basis, and its management have been a watershed in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. This paradigm shift occurred over the last two decades and gastrointestinal stromal tumors have now come to be understood as rare gastrointestinal tract tumors with predictable behavior and outcome, replacing the older terminologies like leiomyoma, schwannoma or leiomyosarcoma. This report present...

  7. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

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    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-03-14

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs.

  8. Drugs Approved for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

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    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  9. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Shailaja; Singh, Sanjeet K; Pujani, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST. We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within the liver. Barium studies were suggestive of a neoplastic pathology of the distal ileum. A differential diagnosis of adenocarcinoma/lymphoma with metastases was entertained. Perioperative findings showed two large growths arising from the jejunum and the distal ileum, along with multiple smaller nodules on the serosal surface and adjoining mesentery of the involved bowel segments. Segmental resection of the involved portions of the intestine was performed. Histopathological features were consistent with those of multicentric malignant GIST-not otherwise specified (GIST-NOS). Follow-up examination three months after surgery showed no evidence of recurrence. (author)

  10. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Esophagus: Report of a Case

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Erol

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are rare neoplasms to be thought to arise from mesenchymal cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) of the esophagus are well documented but are very much rarer than gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach and small bowel. We describe a case of GIST of the esophagus that was resected with wide surgical resection.

  11. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour presenting as gastroduodenal intussusception.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, Mark H

    2012-08-01

    Gastroduodenal intussusception secondary to gastrointestinal stromal tumour is a very rare cause for intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis of this condition can be challenging, as symptoms are often non-specific and intermittent. This article reports a case where the diagnosis was made preoperatively with abdominal imaging and was treated by a combination of endoscopic reduction and laparoscopic resection.

  12. Computed tomography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanem, Nadir; Altehoefer, Carsten; Winterer, Jan; Schaefer, Oliver; Springer, Oliver; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Furtwaengler, Alex

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the imaging characteristics of primary and recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in computed tomography with respect to the tumor size. Computed tomography was performed in 35 patients with histologically confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumors and analyzed retrospectively by two experienced and independent radiologist. The following morphologic tumor characteristics of primary (n=20) and (n=16) recurrent tumors were evaluated according to tumor size, shape, homogeneity, density compared with liver, contrast enhancement, presence of calcifications, ulcerations, fistula or distant metastases and the anatomical relationship to the intestinal wall, and the infiltration of adjacent visceral organs. Small GIST ( 5-10 cm) demonstrated an irregular shape, inhomogeneous density on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images, a combined intra- and extraluminal tumor growth with aggressive findings, and infiltration of adjacent organs in 9 primary diagnosed and 2 recurrent tumors. Large GIST (>10 cm), which were observed in 8 primary tumors and 11 recurrent tumors, showed an irregular margin with inhomogeneous density and aggressive findings, and were characterized by signs of malignancy such as distant and peritoneal metastases. Small recurrent tumors had a similar appearance as compared with large primary tumors. Computed tomography gives additional information with respect to the relationship of gastrointestinal stromal tumor to the gastrointestinal wall and surrounding organs, and it detects distant metastasis. Primary and recurrent GIST demonstrate characteristic CT imaging features which are related to tumor size. Aggressive findings and signs of malignancy are found in larger tumors and in recurrent disease. Computed tomography is useful in detection and characterization of primary and recurrent tumors with regard to tumor growth pattern, tumor size, and varied appearances of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and indirectly

  13. The application of PET-CT in gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian Weijun; Feng Yanlin

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal neoplasm of uncertain malignant potential that arises predominantly in the gastrointestinal tract. Due to lack of specific physical signs, imagin g-x examination is an important auxiliary means in diagnosing gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Compared to other conventional imaging examinations, PET-CT has demonstrated unique superiority in staging, response evaluation and follow-up of gastrointestinal stromal tumor. And now it presents an overview of the application valuation of PET-CT and related imaging technology in gastrointestinal stromal tumor as follow. (authors)

  14. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Diagnosis and Prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M. T.; Olmedilla, P.; Gonzalez, S.; Oliver, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are mesenquimal tumors derived from cell precursors. They have the capacity for myogenic and neurogenic differentiation and are characterized by expression of KIT protein /tyrosine kinase growth factor). Clinically, they exhibit various biological behaviors. We present 8 cases of GIST, describing both their radiological manifestation through computerized tomography (CT) and most accepted criteria for benignity and malignancy. We also describe the response of one meta statically diagnosed tumor to tyrosine kinase inhibitor. (Author) 9 refs

  15. Characteristics of Emergency Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST).

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    Uçar, Ahmet Deniz; Oymaci, Erkan; Carti, Erdem Bariş; Yakan, Savaş; Vardar, Enver; Erkan, Nazif; Mehmet, Yildirim

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Importance of GISTs is increasing while surgeons are facing with more frequent either in emergency setting of elective cases. Delineating the presentation and management of emergency GIST is important. From 2005 to 2014, emergency cases with final diagnosis of GIST were examined retrospectively. Total of 13 operated cases were evaluated by patients characteristics, clinical presentation, operational findings and postoperative prognosis. There were 9 male and 4 female with the mean age of 48.15 years. The most frequent presentations are ileus and GIT hemorrhage both covering the 84% of patients. Small bowel was the dominating site with ileus. Stomach was the second frequent site of the disease with the finding of hemorrhage. Emergency patients are more likely to come with small bowel GIST and obstruction symptoms. Hemorrhage is the most frequent symptom for emergency GIST of stomach and duodenum.

  16. Imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, S.; Tam, K.F.; Kam, C.K.; Lui, C.Y.; Siu, C.W.; Lam, H.S.; Mak, K.L.

    2004-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) represents the most common kind of mesenchymal tumour that arises from the alimentary tract. GIST is currently defined as a gastrointestinal tract mesenchymal tumour containing spindle cells (or less commonly epithelioid cells or rarely both) and showing CD117 (c-kit protein) positivity. Targeted molecular therapy of non-resectable GIST using imatinib, a specific tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, represents a real milestone in the management of solid malignancy. Imaging studies, both anatomical and functional, are playing an increasingly important role in management of patients with GIST. This review illustrates the radiological appearance of GISTs and the site-specific roles of each imaging tool. Clinical features and radiological differential diagnosis of GIST are also discussed

  17. Update on gastrointestinal stromal tumors for radiologists

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    Tirumani, Sree Harsha; O' Neill, Alibhe; Jagannathan, Jyothi P. [Dept. of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (United States); Baheti, Akahay D. [Dept. of Radiology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India); Tirumani, Harika [Dept. of Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock (United States)

    2017-01-15

    The management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) has evolved significantly in the last two decades due to better understanding of their biologic behavior as well as development of molecular targeted therapies. GISTs with exon 11 mutation respond to imatinib whereas GISTs with exon 9 or succinate dehydrogenase subunit mutations do not. Risk stratification models have enabled stratifying GISTs according to risk of recurrence and choosing patients who may benefit from adjuvant therapy. Assessing response to targeted therapies in GIST using conventional response criteria has several potential pitfalls leading to search for alternate response criteria based on changes in tumor attenuation, volume, metabolic and functional parameters. Surveillance of patients with GIST in the adjuvant setting is important for timely detection of recurrences.

  18. [Risk factors for malignant evolution of gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

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    Andrei, S; Andrei, Adriana; Tonea, A; Andronesi, D; Becheanu, G; Dumbravă, Mona; Pechianu, C; Herlea, V; Popescu, I

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent non-epithelial digestive tumors, being classified in the group of primitive mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. These tumors have a non predictable evolution and where stratified regarding the risk for malignant behavior in 4 categories: very low risk, low risk, intermediate risk and high risk. We performed a retrospective non randomised study including the patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors treated in the Department of General Surgery and Liver Transplantation of Fundeni Clinical Institute in the period January 2002 - June 2007, to define the epidemiological, clinico-paraclinical, histological and especially evolutive features of the gastrointestinal stromal tumors from this group, with a special regard to the risk factors for their malignant behavior. The most important risk factors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the tumor size and the mitotic index, based on them being realised the classification of Fletcher in the 4 risk categories mentioned above. In our group all the local advanced or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors, regardless of their location, were classified in the group of high risk for the malignant behavior. The gastric location and the epithelioid type were positive prognostic factors, and the complete resection of the tumor, an other important positive prognostic feature, was possible in about 80% of the cases, probably because the gastrointestinal stromal tumors in our study were diagnosed in less advanced evolutive situations, only about one third being metastatic and about 14% being locally advanced at the time of diagnose. The association with other neoplasias was in our cases insignificant, only 5% of the patients presenting concomitant malignant digestive tumors and 7.6% intraabdominal benign tumors. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors remain a challenge for the medical staff, regarding their diagnose and therapeutical management, the stratification of the

  19. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST masquerading as an ovarian mass

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    Beneduce Pasquale

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST are rare mesenchymal tumors originating in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Myogenic gastrointestinal stromal tumor, a distinctive morphologic variant is characterized by an unusually prominent myxoid stromal background. Case presentation We report a case of myxoid variant of GIST in a 42 years old woman presenting as an epigastric mass associated to an ovarian cyst and elevated CA-125. Histologically, the lesions was composed of a proliferation of spindle cells in an abundant myxoid stroma, without evidence of atypia or anaplasia. Immunohistochemical stains showed strong positive staining with muscle actin, positive staining with CD34 and weak positive staining with CD117, while showed negative for S-100. Conclusion At surgery every effort should be made to identify the origin of the tumor. A complete surgical removal of the tumor should be obtained, as this is the only established treatment that offers long term survival.

  20. Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Diagnostic Complexity and Management Pitfalls

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    Charalampos G. Markakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the esophagus are rare. Case Presentation. This is a case of a 50-year-old male patient who was referred to our department complaining of atypical chest pain. A chest computed tomographic scan and endoscopic ultrasound revealed a submucosal esophageal tumor measuring 5 cm in its largest diameter. Suspecting a leiomyoma, we performed enucleation via right thoracotomy. The pathology report yielded a diagnosis of an esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The patient has shown no evidence of recurrence one year postoperatively. Conclusions. This report illustrates the complexity and dilemmas inherent in diagnosing and treating esophageal GISTs.

  1. Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Presenting as Mediastinal Mass

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    M. Kafeel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and are predominant in the stomach and intestine but rare in the esophagus. Here, we report a case of esophageal GIST which presented as a mediastinal mass on chest X-ray and dyspnea. The case was initially diagnosed as leiomyosarcoma, which could create a diagnostic dilemma. Therefore, recognizing this uncommon presentation as a mediastinal mass with esophageal GIST is important in the differential diagnosis.

  2. Rare case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the anal canal

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    Madhu Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GIST of anal canal is very rare representing only 3% of all anorectal mesenchymal tumors. We report an extremely rare case of GIST of the anal canal in 60-years-old man with history of irregular bowel habits with dark colored stool mixed with blood and constipation from 6 month. Diagnosis was made on the basis of histomorphological and immunohistochemical examination.

  3. Management of hemorrhage in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a review.

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    Liu, Qi; Kong, Fanmin; Zhou, Jianping; Dong, Ming; Dong, Qi

    2018-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are relatively common mesenchymal tumors. They originate from the wall of hollow viscera and may be found in any part of the digestive tract. The prognosis of patients with stromal tumors depends on various risk factors, including size, location, presence of mitotic figures, and tumor rupture. Emergency surgery is often required for stromal tumors with hemorrhage. The current literature suggests that stromal tumor hemorrhage indicates poor prognosis. Although the optimal treatment options for hemorrhagic GISTs are based on surgical experience, there remains controversy with regard to optimum postoperative management as well as the classification of malignant potential. This article reviews the biological characteristics, diagnostic features, prognostic factors, treatment, and postoperative management of GISTs with hemorrhage.

  4. Current management and prognostic features for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST

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    Lamba Gurpreet

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stromal or mesenchymal neoplasms affecting the gastrointestinal (GI tract have undergone a remarkable evolution in how they are perceived, classified, approached, diagnosed and managed over the last 30 years. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST account for approximately 1% to 3% of all malignant GI tumors. The clinical features can vary depending on the anatomic location, size and aggressiveness of the tumor. Metastatic GIST represents a successful example of molecular targeted therapy. In this comprehensive review, we discuss the epidemiology, clinical features and diagnostic modalities for GIST. We also describe treatment options for early stage, locally advanced and metastatic GIST. Indications for neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy along with duration of therapy are also explained. A brief discussion of latest biomarkers and updates from recent meetings is also provided.

  5. A large gastrointestinal stromal tumor of duodenum: a case report

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    Hadi Ahmadi Amoli

    2014-01-01

    Case presentation: The patient is a forty six years old man. He complained of frequent colic pain in left upper quadrant of abdomen for two months before admitting to the hospital. The pain resolved spontaneously after a few hours. This situation almost has been repeated every week. The patient had severe repeated melena and faint for two weeks. As soon as the patient was entered the Sina Hospital in 2012, supportive care was started. Then upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed for him and the bleeding point was detected. Also abdominal and pelvic computed tomography with oral and intravenous contrast was done. Finally the patient was operated on tumor diagnosis in duodenal area according to classic Whipple procedure. Conclusion: Gastrointestinal bleeding is the most common symptom of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The bleeding is minimal and chronic. It will be progress to sudden and severe bleeding. Diagnosis is done by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy. The large tumors with high mitotic

  6. Incidentally detected gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report

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    Tolga Canbak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST are mesenchymal tumors located primarily in the gastrointestinal tract. We aimed to present a case report of GIST incidentally detected during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.A 60-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room due to abdominal pain for one day. The physical examination revealed sensitivity on the right upper quadrant. In the laboratory examinations, white blood cell count 6,490 k/uL, hemoglobin 12 g/dL, hematocrit 35% and other biochemical tests were normal. Abdominal ultrasound revealed hydropic gallbladder, several gallstones with a maximum diameter of 15 mm and pericholecystic fluid collection was present. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was planned due to acute cholecystitis. In exploration, beside the presence of acute cholecystitis, a mass of approximately 5 cm, located 15 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz was detected. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. Conversion to open laparotomy was done; small intestine resection with end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor with CD117, CD34 and S100 positivity was detected on histopathologic examination.It is thought that GISTs are mesenchymal tumors originating from precursors of Kajal cells. GISTs are usually detected in their 60s. The first option for treatment is surgical resection.

  7. [Massive hemorrhage of upper gastrointestinal tract caused by gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach--case report].

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    Lalović, Nenad; Dukić Vladicić, Nikolina; Marić, Radmil; Cuk, Mirjana; Simatović, Milan; Jokanović, Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Acute bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal system is a medical emergency which is followed by high mortality rate, ranging from 6 to 15% in spite of modern diagnostic methods and treatment. Bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal system may be caused by gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach, which are mainly characterized by occult bleeding, while profuse bleeding rarely occurs accompanied by hemorrhagic shock. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors of stomach are the most common mesenchimal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. In our study we showed a 60-year-old female patient with profuse bleeding from the stomach and the clinical picture of severe hemorrhagic shock, caused by gastrointestinal stromal tumor. An ovoid junction, raised towards the lumen, covered with ulcerated mucosa in several places and followed by massive arterial bleeding was found intraoperatively, after the performed gastrotomy. Histopathological examination with immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that this was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach. Acute bleeding from the digestive system is a sudden and serious condition of the body. Urgent esophagogastroduodenoscopy is a sensitive and specific diagnostic and therapeutic method of choice. Massive bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract is very rarely caused by gastrointestinal stromal tumors, whose clinical picture is very heterogeneous and depends on tumor size and location. Abundant bleeding from the tumor is an indication for urgent surgical intervention. According to the literature massive hemorrhage of the upper digestive system can rarely be caused by gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach. It is shown that abundant hemorrhage of the upper digestive tract can be caused with gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Surgical resection is the main form of treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the digestive system and bleeding from these tumors caused by failure of endoscopic hemostasis.

  8. Could imatinib replace surgery in esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Salam, Suhail N.; El-Teraifi, Hassan A.; Taha, Mazen S.

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are cellular spindle, or epithelioid tumors that occur in the stomach, intestine and rarely in the esophagus. A 61-years-old man was complaining of resistant dry cough with dysphagia for one month duration. Upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopic examination showed a polypoid mass 30 cm from the incisors obstructing 50% of the lumen, where multiple biopsies were taken. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a mass in the wall of the esophagus extending into the thoracic cavity. Histologically, the stained sections with routine hematoxylin and eosin as well as the immunohistochemical stainsfor CD117, CD34, S100, vimentin and smooth muscle actin confirmed the diagnosis of esophageal GIST. The patient was treated with imatinib 400mg/day. There was a dramatic reduction in the size of the tumor with successful improvement of his symptoms after 2 months of treatment, which was confirmed by reapeated upper GIT endoscopy, and MRI. (author)

  9. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Diagnosis and Prognosis; Tumor estromal gastrointestinal: diagnostico y pronostico

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    Martin, M. T.; Olmedilla, P.; Gonzalez, S.; Oliver, J. M. [Fundacion Hospital de Alcorcon. Madrid (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are mesenquimal tumors derived from cell precursors. They have the capacity for myogenic and neurogenic differentiation and are characterized by expression of KIT protein (tyrosine kinase growth factor). Clinically, they exhibit various biological behaviors. We present 8 cases of GIST, describing both their radiological manifestation through computerized tomography (CT) and most accepted criteria for benignity and malignancy. We also describe the response of one meta statically diagnosed tumor to tyrosine kinase inhibitor. (Author) 9 refs.

  10. Pheochromocytoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors in patients with neurofibromatosis type I.

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    Vlenterie, Myrella; Flucke, Uta; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Timmers, Henri J L M; Gastmeier, Joerg; Aust, Daniela E; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Wesseling, Pieter; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Lenders, Jacques W M

    2013-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis I may rarely predispose to pheochromocytoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. A 59-year-old woman with neurofibromatosis I presented with pheochromocytoma of the left adrenal gland. During surgery, 3 gastrointestinal stromal tumors adjacent to the stomach and small intestine were removed. Despite appropriate thrombosis prophylaxis, the patient died of a pulmonary embolus 2 days postoperatively. The second patient, a 55-year-old man with neurofibromatosis I and bilateral pheochromocytomas, had several small gastrointestinal stromal tumors adjacent to the jejunum during surgery. A review of the literature was conducted to identify patients with neurofibromatosis I with concurrence of pheochromocytoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors and to define the specific clinical features of these patients. In addition to our 2 patients, 12 other cases of neurofibromatosis I with concomitant occurrence of pheochromocytomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors have been reported. Pheochromocytomas had adrenal locations in all patients. Two of the 14 patients had a mixed pheochromocytoma/ganglioneuroma. In 4 of the 14 patients, gastrointestinal stromal tumors were located along the stomach. The gastrointestinal stromal tumors in our 2 patients showed no somatic mutations in KIT and PDGFRA genes. A pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in 4 patients. The simultaneous occurrence of pheochromocytoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumor should be considered in all patients with neurofibromatosis I presenting with an abdominal mass with symptoms suggestive of pheochromocytoma. Therefore, a pheochromocytoma should be excluded before a patient with neurofibromatosis I undergoes surgery for a gastrointestinal stromal tumor because an undiagnosed pheochromocytoma carries a high risk of life-threatening cardiovascular complications during surgery. Finally, this combination may be associated with an increased risk for thromboembolic events, but more studies are necessary to

  11. Radiotherapy in the treament of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

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    Rebecca C. Heintzelman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST are uncommon mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Up to one-third of GISTs are malignant with a high rate of metastasis. Surgical resection is the mainstay of care for patients with resectable disease. Imatinib mesylate, a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the current standard of care for GISTs that cannot be completely resected or in cases of metastatic GIST. Although often overlooked, radiation therapy is a viable option for select patients with GIST. We report the case of a patient with unresectable GIST who was treated with local radiotherapy and achieved longterm response. We also present a review of the literature regarding the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of GIST. GIST has been shown to be a radiosensitive tumor. Radiotherapy can offer long-term local control and should be considered in the adjuvant or palliative setting. The role of radiotherapy delivered concurrently with imatinib in the treatment of GIST may warrant further investigation.

  12. Considering the role of radiation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumor

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    Corbin KS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly S Corbin,1 Hedy L Kindler,2 Stanley L Liauw31Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Medical Center, Springfield, IL, USA; 2Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare mesenchymal tumors arising in the gastrointestinal tract. Over the last decade, the management and prognosis of GISTs has changed dramatically with molecular characterization of the c-kit mutation and the adoption of targeted systemic therapy. Currently, the standard of care for resectable tumors is surgery, followed by adjuvant imatinib for tumors at high risk for recurrence. Inoperable or metastatic tumors are treated primarily with imatinib. Despite excellent initial response rates, resistance to targeted therapy has emerged as a common clinical problem, with relatively few therapeutic solutions. While the treatment of GISTs does not commonly include radiotherapy, radiation therapy could be a valuable contributing modality. Several case reports indicate that radiation can control locally progressive, drug-resistant disease. Further study is necessary to define whether radiation could potentially prevent or delay the onset of drug resistance, or improve outcomes when given in combination with imatinib.Keywords: GIST, imatinib, radiotherapy

  13. Evaluation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors by multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, Fabiano Elias; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao; Macedo, Antonio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Pelizon, Christina Helena de Toledo

    2005-01-01

    This article presents three cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors with clinical manifestations and pathological features, along with differential diagnoses, with special emphasis on multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. (author)

  14. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Leonardo Lopes de; Torres, Lucas Rios; Faucz, Rafael Artigas; Tornin, Olger de Souza; Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Fonseca, Carlos Alberto Marcovechio

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most common mesenchymal tumors and are characterized by expression of KIT (CD117), a tyrosine-kinase growth factor receptor. They occur in individuals over 50 years of age and commonly arise in stomach or in the small intestine. To emphasize our paper we report a case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor that showed the typical image and pathologic findings of the primary lesion and its metastases. (author)

  15. Advances and Challenges on Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Mei

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs originate from interstitial cells of Cajal and account for over 5,000 newly diagnosed cases in the United States. The discovery of activated KIT and PDGFRA mutations and introduction of imatinib revolutionized the treatment strategy and opened up the new era of target therapy for solid tumors. Although surgery remains the primary modality of treatment for curative purpose, almost half of the patients experienced disease recurrence. Tailoring (neo-adjuvant treatment with imatinib is ongoing to meet the need for an effective therapy. Currently, two drugs (sunitinib and regorafenib have obtained Food and Drug Administration approval for GISTs after imatinib failure. However, most of the patients eventually progress due to primary or secondary resistance. Deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms will guide us to develop personalized strategies in the future. Discussion in this review includes current standard management and the most recent advances and multiple ongoing clinical trials with different approaches. This review will provide further steps to be taken to conquer refractory disease.

  16. Targeting gastrointestinal stromal tumors: the role of regorafenib

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    Schroeder B

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Brett Schroeder,1 Zula Li,2,3 Lee D Cranmer,2,3 Robin L Jones,4 Seth M Pollack2,3 1College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI, 2Division of Medical Oncology, University of Washington, 3Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 4Royal Marsden Hospital, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK Abstract: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST is a devastating disease in the metastatic setting, but its natural history has been dramatically altered by the development of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, most notably imatinib. Although patients with advanced GIST live much longer today than they did in the past, imatinib-refractory disease remains a tremendous problem. For disease that is refractory to imatinib and sunitinib, regorafenib is an excellent option. In this review, we discuss the biology and clinical work establishing regorafenib as the standard of care for advanced GIST refractory to both imatinib and sunitinib. Keywords: regorafenib, GIST, refractory, imatinib

  17. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of Meckel's diverticulum: a rare cause of intestinal volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengız, Fevzi; Sun, Mehmet Ali; Esen, Özgür Sipahi; Erkan, Nazif

    2012-08-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract. Most cases are asymptomatic; however, when symptomatic, it is often misdiagnosed at presentation. Common complications presenting in adults include bleeding, obstruction, diverticulitis, and perforation. Tumors within a Meckel's diverticulum are rare. Herein, we present a gastrointestinal stromal tumor arising from the Meckel's diverticulum that led to intestinal obstruction by volvulus.

  18. Laparoscopic resection of large gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours

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    Sebastian Smolarek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs are a rare class of neoplasms that are seen most commonly in the stomach. Due to their malignant potential, surgical resection is the recommended method for management of these tumours. Many reports have described the ability to excise small and medium sized GISTs laparoscopically, but laparoscopic resection of GISTs greater than 5 cm is still a matter of debate. Aim: To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of laparoscopic surgical techniques for management of large gastric GISTs greater than 4 cm and to detail characteristics of this type of tumour. Material and methods: The study cohort consisted of 11 patients with suspected gastric GISTs who were treated from 2011 to April 2014 in a single institution. All patients underwent laparoscopic resection of a gastric GIST. Results : Eleven patients underwent laparoscopic resection of a suspected gastric GIST between April 2011 and April 2014. The cohort consisted of 6 males and 5 females. Mean age was 67 years (range: 43–92 years. Sixty-four percent of these patients presented with symptomatic tumours. Four (36.4% patients underwent laparoscopic transgastric resection (LTR, 3 (27.3% laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG, 3 (27.3% laparoscopic wedge resection (LWR and 1 (9% laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (LDG. The mean operative time was 215 min. The mean tumour size was 6 cm (range: 4–9 cm. The mean tumour size for LTR was 5.5 cm (range: 4–6.3 cm, for LWR 5.3 cm (range: 4.5–7 cm, for LSG 6.5 cm (range: 4–9 cm and for LDG 9 cm. We experienced only minor postoperative complications. Conclusions : Laparoscopic procedures can be successfully performed during management of large gastric GISTs, bigger than 4 cm, and should be considered for all non-metastatic cases. The appropriate approach can be determined by assessing the anatomical location of each tumour.

  19. Multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors in type I neurofibromatosis: a pathologic and molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantiss, Rhonda K; Rosenberg, Andrew E; Sarran, Lisa; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2005-04-01

    Multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors typically occur in familial form associated with KIT receptor tyrosine kinase or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFRA) germline mutations, but may also develop in the setting of type 1 neurofibromatosis. The molecular abnormalities of gastrointestinal stromal tumors arising in neurofibromatosis have not been extensively studied. We identified three patients with type 1 neuro-fibromatosis and multiple small intestinal stromal tumors. Immunostains for CD117, CD34, desmin, actins, S-100 protein, and keratins were performed on all of the tumors. DNA was extracted from representative paraffin blocks from separate tumor nodules in each case and subjected to a nested polymerase chain reaction, using primers for KIT exons 9, 11, 13, and 17 and PDGFRA exons 12 and 18, followed by direct sequencing. The mean patient age was 56 years (range: 37-86 years, male/female ratio: 2/1). One patient had three tumors, one had five, and one had greater than 10 tumor nodules, all of which demonstrated histologic features characteristic of gastrointestinal stromal tumors and stained strongly for CD117 and CD34. One patient died of disease at 35 months, one was disease free at 12 months and one was lost to follow-up. DNA extracts from 10 gastrointestinal stromal tumors (three from each of two patients and four from one patient) were subjected to polymerase chain reactions and assessed for mutations. All of the tumors were wild type for KIT exons 9, 13, and 17 and PDGFRA exons 12 and 18. Three tumors from one patient had identical point mutations in KIT exon 11, whereas the other tumors were wild type at this locus. We conclude that, although most patients with type 1 neurofibromatosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumors do not have KIT or PDGFRA mutations, KIT germline mutations might be implicated in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in some patients.

  20. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

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    Katie M O'Brien

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT. Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836 and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836. CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively. Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic

  1. Gastric schwannoma: a benign tumor often misdiagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumor

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    Apurva S. Shah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastric schwannomas are rare mesenchymal tumors that arise from the nerve plexus of gut wall. They present with nonspecific symptoms and are often detected incidentally. Preoperative investigation is not pathognomic and many are therefore misdiagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We report a rare case of a 37-year old woman who underwent laparotomy for complex bilateral ovarian cyst with resection of gastric-gastrointestinal stromal tumor preoperatively, but confirmed to have a gastric schwannomas postoperatively. This case underscores the differential diagnosis of submucosal, exophytic gastric mass as schwannoma.

  2. CT and MR imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumor of stomach: a pictorial review

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Jingshan; Kang, Wenyan; Zhu, Jin; Xu, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    This pictorial review illustrates CT and MR imaging appearance of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the stomach and other lesions with similar imaging appearance. GIST of the stomach appears as well-defined enhanced masses with characteristics of subeppthial neoplasms. Majority are exophytic growth, but can also be of intra-luminal growth. GIST can growth into a large mass without gastrointestinal tract obstruction. Necrosis is often seen in GIST and results in heterogeneous enhancemen...

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tümörler (GİST) - Patoloji ve yeni moleküler gelişimlerin klinik uygulamaları - Bir perspektif yorum

    OpenAIRE

    Dudani, Sharmila; Kalhan, Shivani; Sharma, Sonia; Gupta, Anshu

    2014-01-01

     Gastrointestinal stromal tumours ( GISTs) are the most common  mesenchymal tumours of the GI tract. They occur most frequently in stomach (60-70%), or small intestine(SI) ( 25-30%). Rare sites include colon, rectum, appendix and esophagus (<10%). On histology their appearance varies from cellular spindle cell tumours to epithelioid to pleomorphic tumours. Traditionally, three criteria have been used to determine malignancy, which include site of origin (SI and rectal tumours  are more...

  4. A rare case of primary mesenteric gastrointestinal stromal tumor with metastasis to the cervix uteri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nupur; Mittal, Suneeta; Lal, Neena; Misra, Renu; Kumar, Lalit; Bhalla, Sunita

    2007-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are CD117 (C Kit) positive mesenchymal neoplasms, that may arise anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Their current therapy is imatinib mesylate before or after surgery. Case presentation We describe a case of 17-year-old female with metastasis to the cervix uteri of a primary mesenteric gastrointestinal tumor. Conclusion Surgery remains the mainstay of known curative treatment. The manifestations of GIST are not restricted to the typical locations within the bowel; may have very unusual metastatic sites or infiltrations per continuitatem. PMID:18045506

  5. Laparoscopic total gastrectomy for a giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with acute massive gastrointestinal bleeding: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermansaravi, Mohammad; Rokhgireh, Samaneh; Darabi, Sattar; Pazouki, Abdolreza

    2017-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) include 80% of gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors that originate from interstitial Cajal cells and include 0.1-3% of GI malignancies, and the stomach is the most commonly involved organ. The only potentially curative treatment is surgical resection with clear margins. Although laparoscopic resection of small GISTs is a standard treatment, there is controversy about laparoscopic surgical resection for large and giant GISTs. A 52-year-old woman, a known case of large GIST of the stomach that was under neoadjuvant imatinib therapy, was admitted to the emergency department due to acute massive gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). The patient underwent laparoscopic total gastrectomy and received adjuvant imatinib after surgery. Laparoscopic resection is a safe and feasible method in large and giant GISTs with oncologic and long-term outcomes comparable to open surgery, and with better short-term outcomes.

  6. Promising novel therapeutic approaches in the management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, Zoltan; Thway, Khin; Fisher, Cyril; Bulusu, Ramesh; Constantinidou, Anastasia; Benson, Charlotte; van der Graaf, Winette Ta; Jones, Robin L

    2017-01-01

    Primary and secondary resistance to currently available licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors poses a real clinical challenge in the management of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Within the frame of early phase clinical trials novel systemic treatments are currently being evaluated to target both the well explored and novel emerging downstream effectors of KIT and PDGFRA signaling. Alternative therapeutic approaches also include exploring novel inhibitors of the KIT/PDGFRA receptors, immune checkpoint and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. The final clinical trial outcome data for these agents are highly anticipated. Integration of new diagnostic techniques into routine clinical practice can potentially guide tailored delivery of agents in the treatment of a highly polyclonal, heterogeneous disease such as heavily pretreated advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  7. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor masquerading as a lung neoplasm. A case presentation and literature review

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    Papagiannopoulos K

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Their incidence in the esophagus is 1%–3%. Never has a GIST been documented to directly invade the lung. We report a primary esophageal GIST with direct invasion into the lung parenchyma, presenting predominantly with respiratory symptoms. We include a retrospective literature review. Although the principle 'common things are common' usually guides our everyday clinical practice, this case emphasizes that rare entities can mimic common pathologies and underlines the importance of having a clearly defined differential diagnostic list which should be meticulously scrutinized.

  8. Synchronous Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor and Colon Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

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    Thivi Vasilakaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs represent the majority of primary mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. They are generally considered to be solitary tumors and therefore the synchronous occurrence with other primary malignancies of gastrointestinal track is considered a rare event. Here we present the case of a 75-year-old man admitted to our hospital with a 10-day history of gastrointestinal bleeding. Colonoscopy revealed an ulcerative mass of 4 cm in diameter in the ascending colon. Gastroscopy revealed a bulge in the gastric body measuring 1 cm in diameter with normal overlying mucosa. Surgical intervention was suggested and ileohemicolectomy with regional lymph node resection along with gastric wedge resection was performed. Pathologic examination of the ascending colon mass showed an invasive moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma stage III B (T3N1M0. Grossly resected wedge of stomach showed a well circumscribed intramural tumor which microscopically was consistent with essentially benign gastrointestinal stromal tumor (according to Miettinen criteria. The patient did not receive additional treatment. Two years later the patient showed no evidence of recurrence or metastasis.

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of large size, extragastrointestinal localization and different morphological features

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    Shpon’ka I.S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problems of accurate verification of the gastro¬intestinal stromal tumor are relevant today for many reasons. Thus, the histological diagnosis is complicated by the morphological similarity of other gastrointestinal tract mesenchymal neoplasms and by histologicaly different zones within the same investigation. We present the situation with the above issues: the differential diagnosis includes an analysis of morphological criteria and received immunohisto-chemical reactions. Between immunophenotypes of histologicaly different zones principal difference is not revealed.

  10. Pancreatic Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor after Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage and Performance of Whipple Procedure: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziret, Mehmet; Çetinkünar, Süleyman; Aktaş, Elife; İrkörücü, Oktay; Bali, İlhan; Erdem, Hasan

    2015-08-03

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors in the gastrointestinal system. These types of tumors originate from any part of the tract as well as from the intestine, colon, omentum, mesentery or retroperitoneum. GIST is a rare tumor compared to other types of tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all gastrointestinal tumors. A 56-year-old male patient was hospitalized due to an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and the start of abdominal pain on the same day. In the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that was performed, a solitary mass was found in the second section of the duodenum and a blood vessel (Forrest type 2a) was seen. The extent and location of the mass was detected by abdominal tomography. After hemodynamic recovery, a Whipple procedure was performed without any complications. A subsequent histopathological examination detected a c-kit-positive (CD117) pancreatic GIST with high mitotic index. The most effective treatment method for GISTs is surgical resection. In patients with a head of pancreatic GIST, the Whipple procedure can be used more safely and effectively.

  11. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors with Unusual Localization: Report of Three Cases with a Brief Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Sunar, Haldun; Hut, Adnan; Kocakusak, Ahmet; Pergel, Ahmet; Barut, Gul; Dikici, Suleyman

    2010-07-26

    The most common tumors derived from the mesenchyme of the gastrointestinal system are stromal tumors. These tumors are typically seen in the stomach and small intestine and less frequently in the colon, rectum and esophagus and are very rarely located outside the gastrointestinal system. Cure is provided with complete surgical resection with resection borders free of tumor. Tumor size, mitotic index, localization, CD117 and CD34 negativity in immunohistochemical studies, mucosal ulceration and presence of necrosis help to predict recurrence of the illness and patient survival. In high-risk gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) there is an increased rate of recurrence and shortened survival despite complete surgical resection. Thus patients with a high-risk GIST should be given adjuvant therapy with imatinib mesylate. Sunitinib maleate is another FDA-approved agent only for cases who cannot tolerate imatinib or who are resistant to it. Herein we present three cases with GISTs in different locations of the gastrointestinal system with a review of the relevant literature.

  12. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors with Unusual Localization: Report of Three Cases with a Brief Literature Review

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    Ahmet Fikret Yucel

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The most common tumors derived from the mesenchyme of the gastrointestinal system are stromal tumors. These tumors are typically seen in the stomach and small intestine and less frequently in the colon, rectum and esophagus and are very rarely located outside the gastrointestinal system. Cure is provided with complete surgical resection with resection borders free of tumor. Tumor size, mitotic index, localization, CD117 and CD34 negativity in immunohistochemical studies, mucosal ulceration and presence of necrosis help to predict recurrence of the illness and patient survival. In high-risk gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs there is an increased rate of recurrence and shortened survival despite complete surgical resection. Thus patients with a high-risk GIST should be given adjuvant therapy with imatinib mesylate. Sunitinib maleate is another FDA-approved agent only for cases who cannot tolerate imatinib or who are resistant to it. Herein we present three cases with GISTs in different locations of the gastrointestinal system with a review of the relevant literature.

  13. Laparoscopic resection of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors presenting as left adrenal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiu-Dong Chung; Jeff Shih-chieh Chueh; Hong-Jeng Yu

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare gastrointestinal malignancies. They are rarely seen near the urinary tract. In a literature review, only one case of GIST presenting as a left adrenal tumor was reported. We report two documented cases of gastric GISTs mimicking left adrenal tumors which were successfully treated with pure laparoscopic adrenalectomy and wedge resection of the stomach by excising the tumor from the stomach with serial firing of endoscopic gastrointestinal staplers. The surgical margins were clear, and the patients recovered smoothly. No adjuvant therapy with imatinib was prescribed. During the surveillance for 9 mo and 44 mo respectively, no tumor recurrence and metastasis were documented. Laparoscopic tumor excision, when adhering to the principles of surgical oncology, seems feasible and the prognosis is favorable for such tumors.

  14. The diagnostic importance of matrix metalloproteinase-7 and nestin in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Kemal; Sayar, Ilyas; Gelincik, İbrahim; Bulut, Gülay; Ünal, Tuba Dilay Kökenek; Şenol, Serkan; Gökçe, Aysun; Isik, Arda

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of the matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) and nestin immunomarkers, C-kit proto-oncogene (CD117), and the efficiency of the Ki-67 proliferation index for gastrointestinal stromal tumors were evaluated. Material/Methods This study was conducted by examining the microscope slides of 72 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors that were sent to the pathology laboratory between 2007 and 2012. Immunohistochemical staining for CD117, MMP-7, nestin, and marker of proliferation Ki-67 was performed. The correlations between the positive results for Ki-67, CD117, MMP-7, and nestin were evaluated relative to the tumor characteristics of size, localization, grade, cellular type, cellularity, cytology type, growth pattern, ulceration, necrosis, hemorrhage, invasion depth, and lymph node metastasis. Results The tumor was localized in the stomach in 42 of the patients, the intestines in 19, the colon in 7, and the rectum in 4. Comparisons among the groups showed that MMP-7 was correlated with the tumor grade (p<0.001), cellularity (p<0.009), cytologic atypia (p<0.001), ulceration (p=0.002), necrosis (p<0.001), and tumor size (p=0.001). Nestin was correlated with the tumor grade (p=0.013), and tumor size (p=0.024). Correlations among CD117, MMP-7, nestin, and Ki-67 were examined. Nestin and Ki-67 were both significantly correlated with CD117 and MMP-7 [(r=0.279, p=0.018), (r=0.322, p=0.006), (r=0.386, p=0.001), (r=0.386, p=0.002)], respectively. Conclusions MMP-7 and nestin may be beneficial as markers, given their sensitivity to gastrointestinal stromal tumors. PMID:24755685

  15. Extra-Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Presenting as an Anterior Chest Wall Mass

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    Junghyeon Lim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old man was referred for an anterior chest wall mass. Chest computed tomography (CT and positron emission tomography-CT suggested a malignant tumor. Surgical biopsy through a vertical subxiphoid incision revealed an extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGIST. En bloc resection of the tumor, including partial resection of the sternum, costal cartilage, pericardium, diaphragm, and peritoneum, was performed. Pathologic evaluation revealed a negative resection margin and confirmed the tumor as an EGIST. On postoperative day 17, the patient was discharged without any complications. At the 2-week follow-up, the patient was doing well and was asymptomatic.

  16. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour with Synchronous Bone Metastases: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Philippe Rochigneux

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs are mesenchymal tumours of the digestive tract, derived from Cajal interstitial cells. Bone metastases are very rare, and there is no consensus regarding their treatment. Here, we present the unusual case of a 66-year-old man with a gastric GIST with synchronous bone and liver metastases, fully documented at the pathological and molecular levels with a KIT exon 11 mutation. After 9 months of imatinib, the scanner showed a 33% partial response of target lesions. We also review the literature and describe the characteristics, treatment, and outcome of all cases previously reported.

  17. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour with Synchronous Bone Metastases: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochigneux, Philippe; Mescam-Mancini, Lénaig; Perrot, Delphine; Bories, Erwan; Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Sarran, Anthony; Guiramand, Jérôme; Bertucci, François

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal tumours of the digestive tract, derived from Cajal interstitial cells. Bone metastases are very rare, and there is no consensus regarding their treatment. Here, we present the unusual case of a 66-year-old man with a gastric GIST with synchronous bone and liver metastases, fully documented at the pathological and molecular levels with a KIT exon 11 mutation. After 9 months of imatinib, the scanner showed a 33% partial response of target lesions. We also review the literature and describe the characteristics, treatment, and outcome of all cases previously reported.

  18. Resistance to treatment in gastrointestinal stromal tumours: What radiologists should know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirumani, S.H.; Jagannathan, J.P.; Hornick, J.L.; Ramaiya, N.H.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour resistance to treatment with imatinib occurs due to pre-existing or acquired mutations. Computed tomography and positron-emission tomography play an essential role in prompt recognition of resistance to treatment. Primary resistance to treatment, which is encountered in the first 6 months of treatment, is associated with specific mutations. Imaging of these tumours shows no anatomical or metabolic response to treatment. Secondary resistance to treatment, which develops after an initial response, is associated with a variety of mutations acquired after the start of treatment. Imaging findings of secondary resistance are of disease progression

  19. Multifocal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the stomach in an 11-year-old girl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin; Rubinas, Tara C.; Fordham, Lynn A.; Phillips, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    A previously healthy 11-year-old girl presented with an 8-month history of anemia and left upper quadrant abdominal pain. US examination demonstrated a 9-cm cystic mass with a fluid-fluid level in the left upper quadrant with unclear organ of origin. Abdominal MR imaging demonstrated a complex cystic mass, likely arising from the stomach. Additional T2 hyperintense submucosal lesions were identified in the gastric wall. Surgical excision confirmed the diagnosis of multifocal gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). MR imaging was helpful in suggesting a gastric origin of the primary mass and in demonstrating multifocal disease within the stomach. (orig.)

  20. Current concepts in non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor soft tissue sarcomas: A primer for radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baheti, Akahay D. [Dept. of Radiology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India); Tirumani, Harika [Dept. of Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock (United States); O' Neill, Alibhe; Jagannathan, Jyothi P. [Dept. of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms whose classification and management continues to evolve with better understanding of their biologic behavior. The 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) has revised their classification based on new immunohistochemical and cytogenetic data. In this article, we will provide a brief overview of the revised WHO classification of soft tissue tumors, discuss in detail the radiology and management of the two most common adult non-GIST STS, namely liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma, and review some of the emerging histology-driven targeted therapies in non-GIST STS, focusing on the role of the radiologist.

  1. Current concepts in non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor soft tissue sarcomas: A primer for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baheti, Akahay D.; Tirumani, Harika; O'Neill, Alibhe; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms whose classification and management continues to evolve with better understanding of their biologic behavior. The 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) has revised their classification based on new immunohistochemical and cytogenetic data. In this article, we will provide a brief overview of the revised WHO classification of soft tissue tumors, discuss in detail the radiology and management of the two most common adult non-GIST STS, namely liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma, and review some of the emerging histology-driven targeted therapies in non-GIST STS, focusing on the role of the radiologist

  2. Spontaneous Rupture of Recurrent Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Associated with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Mae Wang

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST among neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1 patients is approximately 3.9–25%, and this relationship is generally considered to be non-coincidental. We report a patient with NF-1 who underwent laparotomy 3 times due to recurrent intra-abdominal tumor rupture with internal bleeding in the space of 13 years. The pathologic diagnoses were schwannoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and GIST. Because of the similar histologic features of these tumors, we considered them to be of the same nature. Immunohistochemical staining can help in the differential diagnosis. We suggest that NF-1 patients with gastrointestinal symptoms receive further survey to rule out GISTs.

  3. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors from minute specimens: cytomorphology, immunohistochemistry, and molecular diagnostic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layfield, Lester J; Wallander, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm arising from the gastrointestinal tract. Workup of these lesions includes morphologic study and immunohistochemical and often molecular diagnostic analysis. Historically, these neoplasms had been included under a number of diagnostic categories including leiomyoma, leiomyosarcoma, schwannoma, and leiomyoblastoma. The lesions that were clearly sarcomatous were difficult to treat and therapeutically refractory to chemotherapeutic agents. Significant progress in our understanding of these neoplasms and our ability to successfully treat them occurred following the discovery that they were immunoreactive for KIT protein and harbored activating mutations in the KIT gene. Many are initially diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) but workup may include mutational analysis to help direct therapy. This review outlines a practical approach to the cytologic diagnosis of GISTs and their molecular workup on small specimens obtained by FNA or core biopsy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Tomographic findings of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a 14-case study

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    Pelandre, Gustavo Lemos; Djahjah, Maria Celia; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Marchiori, Edson; Pereira, Bruno Vilhena; Valadao, Marcus; Linhares, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the tomographic findings of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with histopathologically and immunohistochemically confirmed gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors, who had already been submitted to computed tomography scans before the treatment, were evaluated in the period between January 1999 and December 2006. The following tomographic variables were analyzed: lesion topography, size/dimensions, homogeneity, contour, margins, morphology, pattern and intravenous contrast-enhancement intensity, growth pattern, invasion of adjacent organs, presence of ulceration, fistula, calcifications, mesenteric fat infiltration, lymphadenomegaly and presence of distant metastasis. Results: Tumors were found in the body (57.1%) or in the gastric fundus (42.9%), with sizes ranging between 6.0 cm and 23.0 cm (mean, 11.5 cm). Predominantly extra luminal growth was observed in 57.1% of cases and intra/extra luminal in 35.7%. Subtle contrast-enhancement was observed in 50%, moderate in 50%, and heterogeneous in 64.3% of cases. Additionally, central hypodensity was observed in 64.3%, invasion of adjacent organs in 42.9%, and hepatic metastasis in 7.2% of cases. Conclusion: In the present study, the majority of tumors were found in the gastric body, with an average size of 11.5 cm, presenting with central hypodensity, heterogeneous contrast-enhancement and predominantly extraluminal growth. (author)

  5. [Intestinal intussusception due to ileal gastrointestinal stromal tumor--a case report].

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    Andrei, S; Andrei, A; Tonea, A; Andronesi, D; Preda, C; Herlea, V; Popescu, I

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal occlusion due to intussusception produced by intestinal tumors is a very rare condition. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are also rare digestive neopasias, with an impredictable malignant behavior, which are usually growing outside the intestinal wall, being rarely the initiators of an intestinal intussusception. We present the case of a 59 years old female, admitted in our hospital to elucidate the etiology of her iron deficient anaemia, which developed an intestinal occlusion at the intestinal preparation for colonoscopy. The abdominal CT scan performed in emergency conditions highlighted occlusive intestinal tumor complicated with intestinal intussusception. We performed an emergency laparotomy that revealed intestinal occlusion due to ileo-ileal intussusception produced by an ileal tumor. The surgical intervention consisted in segmental ileal enterectomy including the tumor with latero-lateral entero-enteral anastomosis. The patient recovered without complications. The histopathological and immunohisto-chemical examinations established the diagnose of gastro-intestinal stromal tumor with high risk malignant behavior, therefore the patient was guided in the oncological department for specific treatment and oncological surveillance.

  6. A rare case with synchronous gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, and uterine leiomyoma.

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    Arabadzhieva, Elena; Yonkov, Atanas; Bonev, Sasho; Bulanov, Dimitar; Taneva, Ivanka; Vlahova, Alexandrina; Dikov, Tihomir; Dimitrova, Violeta

    2016-11-15

    Although gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, they comprise less than 1% of all gastrointestinal tumors. Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the gastro-enteropancreatic system are also rare, representing about 2% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Pancreatic localization of NET is extremely uncommon-these tumors are only 1-5% of all pancreatic cancers. We describe an unusual case with triple tumor localization-a gastric tumor, a formation in the pancreas, which involves the retroperitoneal space, and a uterine leiomyoma. The exact diagnosis was confirmed with immunohistochemical study after surgical treatment of the patient. Distal pancreatic resection, splenectomy, partial gastrectomy, omentectomy, and hysterectomy were performed. The histological examination proved an epithelioid type of gastric GIST. Immunostaining showed focal positive expression of c-kit and no mitotic figures per 50 HPF. Histology of the pancreatic and retroperitoneal formation proved a well-differentiated NET with origin from the islets of Langerhans. The immunohistochemical study demonstrated co-expression of chromogranin A and synaptophysin. This is the fourth case published so far of a patient with synchronous pancreatic NET and gastric GIST. The main objective of the study is to present a unique case because we have not found any reports for coexistence of the described three types of neoplasm, as in our patient, and we hope that it will be valuable in the future investigations about the genesis, diagnosis, and treatment of these types of tumors.

  7. Surgical Pathology of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Practical Implications of Morphologic and Molecular Heterogeneity for Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charville, Gregory W; Longacre, Teri A

    2017-11-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract, exhibits diverse histologic and clinical manifestations. With its putative origin in the gastrointestinal pacemaker cell of Cajal, GIST can arise in association with any portion of the tubular gastrointestinal tract. Morphologically, GISTs are classified as spindled or epithelioid, though each of these subtypes encompasses a broad spectrum of microscopic appearances, many of which mimic other histologic entities. Despite this morphologic ambiguity, the diagnosis of GIST is aided in many cases by immunohistochemical detection of KIT (CD117) or DOG1 expression. The natural history of GIST ranges from that of a tumor cured by surgical resection to that of a locally advanced or even widely metastatic, and ultimately fatal, disease. This clinicopathologic heterogeneity is paralleled by an underlying molecular diversity: the majority of GISTs are associated with spontaneous activating mutations in KIT, PDGFRA, or BRAF, while additional subsets are driven by genetic lesions-often inherited-of NF1 or components of the succinate dehydrogenase enzymatic complex. Specific gene mutations correlate with particular anatomic or morphologic characteristics and, in turn, with distinct clinical behaviors. Therefore, prognostication and treatment are increasingly dictated not only by morphologic clues, but also by accompanying molecular genetic features. In this review, we provide a comprehensive description of the heterogenous molecular underpinnings of GIST, including implications for the practicing pathologist with regard to morphologic identification, immunohistochemical diagnosis, and clinical management.

  8. Bone marrow stromal cell transplantation mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice.

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    Subhrajit Saha

    Full Text Available Nuclear accidents and terrorism presents a serious threat for mass casualty. While bone-marrow transplantation might mitigate hematopoietic syndrome, currently there are no approved medical countermeasures to alleviate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS, resulting from direct cytocidal effects on intestinal stem cells (ISC and crypt stromal cells. We examined whether bone marrow-derived adherent stromal cell transplantation (BMSCT could restitute irradiated intestinal stem cells niche and mitigate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.Autologous bone marrow was cultured in mesenchymal basal medium and adherent cells were harvested for transplantation to C57Bl6 mice, 24 and 72 hours after lethal whole body irradiation (10.4 Gy or abdominal irradiation (16-20 Gy in a single fraction. Mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid population were characterized by flow cytometry. Intestinal crypt regeneration and absorptive function was assessed by histopathology and xylose absorption assay, respectively. In contrast to 100% mortality in irradiated controls, BMSCT mitigated RIGS and rescued mice from radiation lethality after 18 Gy of abdominal irradiation or 10.4 Gy whole body irradiation with 100% survival (p<0.0007 and p<0.0009 respectively beyond 25 days. Transplantation of enriched myeloid and non-myeloid fractions failed to improve survival. BMASCT induced ISC regeneration, restitution of the ISC niche and xylose absorption. Serum levels of intestinal radioprotective factors, such as, R-Spondin1, KGF, PDGF and FGF2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were elevated, while inflammatory cytokines were down regulated.Mitigation of lethal intestinal injury, following high doses of irradiation, can be achieved by intravenous transplantation of marrow-derived stromal cells, including mesenchymal, endothelial and macrophage cell population. BMASCT increases blood levels of intestinal growth factors and induces regeneration of the irradiated

  9. New developments in management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: regorafenib, the new player in the team

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    Boichuk S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sergei Boichuk,1,2 Jessica L Rausch,1 Anette Duensing1,31Cancer Virology Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Kazan State Medical University, Kazan, Russia; 3Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and the most frequent single type of sarcoma, at least in some geographical regions. They arise from the interstitial cells of Cajal (or a common progenitor cell. The vast majority of GISTs are characterized by oncogenically activating mutations in the KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA receptor tyrosine kinase genes. This molecular feature has been successfully exploited for therapeutic purposes, and as of a decade ago, GISTs have become the prototype of a solid tumor that can be targeted with small molecule kinase inhibitors. Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec®/Glivec® benefits more than 85% of patients with unresectable and/or metastatic GIST. Unfortunately, the majority of patients develop resistance to imatinib within the first 2 years of treatment and new therapeutic options are needed. Although the broad-range kinase inhibitor sunitinib malate (Sutent® has been the second-line therapy approved by the US Food and Drug Administration since 2006, it was not until recently (February 2013 that regorafenib (Stivarga® was approved as a third-line therapeutic agent for GIST. This review summarizes the development process of regorafenib for GIST and highlights its biochemical, pharmacologic, and clinical properties.Keywords: gastrointestinal stromal tumors, GIST, regorafenib

  10. A Large Cystic Variant of Gastro-intestinal Stromal Tumour arising from the Jejunum: A Case Report

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    Shaikh, Salman Tehran; Upwanshi, Manish Harinarayan; Shetty, Tilakdas S.; Ghetla, Smruti R.; Gheewala, Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) represent a mesenchymal neoplasm arising from the interstitial cells of cajal occurring mainly in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we present a case of a large GIST arising from the jejunum with cystic presentation unlike the usual presentation as a solid mass. A 50-year-old male patient came with complaint of a painless mobile lump in abdomen of approximately 25 cm in size which had gradually increased over two years. Clinically mesenteric cyst was s...

  11. Abundant Fas expression by gastrointestinal stromal tumours may serve as a therapeutic target for MegaFasL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikhof, B.; van der Graaf, W. T. A.; Meijer, C.; Le, P. T. K.; Meersma, G. J.; de Jong, S.; Fletcher, J. A.; Suurmeijer, A. J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib has been shown to be an active agent in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours ( GIST), complete remissions are almost never seen and most patients finally experience disease progression during their course of treatment. An alternative

  12. Abundant Fas expression by gastrointestinal stromal tumours may serve as a therapeutic target for MegaFasL.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikhof, B.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Meijer, C.; Le, P.T.; Meersma, G.J.; Jong, S. de; Fletcher, J.A.; Suurmeijer, A.J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib has been shown to be an active agent in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST), complete remissions are almost never seen and most patients finally experience disease progression during their course of treatment. An alternative

  13. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumour of rare sarcomatoid epithelioid subtype: Case study and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Gustaw; Korcz, Wojciech; Kowalczyk, Emilia; Guzel, Tomasz; Radoch, Marcin; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, but they represent less than 3% of all gastrointestinal tract malignancies. This is a detailed case study of a 52-year-old male patient treated for very uncommon histological subtype of gastric GIST with atypical clinical presentation, asymptomatic progress and late diagnosis. The resected tumour, giant in diameters, was confirmed to represent the most rare histopathologic subtype of GISTs - sarcomatoid epithelioid GIST. We report this case and review the literature with a special focus on pathomorphological evaluation, biological aggressiveness and prognostic factors. To our knowledge this is the first report of giant GIST of very uncommon sarcomatoid epithelioid subtype. It is concluded that clinicians should pay attention to the fact that initial diagnosis may be delayed due to mildly asymptomatic and non-specific clinical presentation. Asymptomatic tumours diagnosed at a late stage, which is often the case, can be large on presentation. Prognosis for patients diagnosed with GIST depend on tumour size, mitotic rate, histopathologic subtype and tumour location. That is why early diagnosis and R0 resection, which is usually feasible and safe even in giant gastric sarcomatoid epithelioid subtype of GISTs, are the key factors for further treatment and good prognosis. PMID:25805949

  14. Duodenal Wedge Resection for Large Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour Presenting with Life-Threatening Haemorrhage

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    Alexander Shaw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs are an uncommon malignancy of the gastrointestinal (GI tract. We present a case of life-threatening haemorrhage caused by a large ulcerating duodenal GIST arising from the third part of the duodenum managed by a limited duodenal wedge resection. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old patient presented with acute life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. After oesophagogastroduodenoscopy failed to demonstrate the source of bleeding, a 5 cm ulcerating exophytic mass originating from the third part of the duodenum was identified at laparotomy. A successful limited wedge resection of the tumour mass was performed. Histopathology subsequently confirmed a duodenal GIST. The patient remained well at 12-month followup with no evidence of local recurrence or metastatic spread. Conclusion. Duodenal GISTs can present with life-threatening upper GI haemorrhage. In the context of acute haemorrhage, even relatively large duodenal GISTs can be treated by limited wedge resection. This is a preferable alternative to duodenopancreatectomy with lower morbidity and mortality but comparable oncological outcome.

  15. KIT-negative Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Child: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Se Woong; Lee, Young Hwan; Park, Sang Hyeon; Choi, Du young; Choi, Geum Ha [Wonkwang University School of Medicine and Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    We report here on the imaging findings of the case of KIT-negative gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the stomach of a 12-year-old girl. Radiologic studies revealed the presence of a huge exophytic growing mass that originated from the gastric wall and this mass consisted of solid and cystic components on USG, CT and MR. The cystic regions were mainly located at the periphery of the mass and they were revealed to be myxoid degeneration and hemorrhage on histopathologic examination. The tumor consisted of epithelioid and typical spindle cells and they showed negative immunoreactivity for KIT. Although KIT-negative GISTs are rare, they can be considered in the differential diagnosis when a large heterogeneous extraluminal mass that contains solid portions and various degrees of peripheral cystic regions is observed

  16. Survival of gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients in the imatinib era: life raft group observational registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Jerry; Walentas, Christopher D; Eickhoff, Jens C; Scherzer, Norman

    2012-03-19

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), one of the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, prior to routine immunohistochemical staining and the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, were often mistaken for neoplasms of smooth muscle origin such as leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas or leiomyoblastomas. Since the advent of imatinib, GIST has been further delineated into adult- (KIT or PDGFRα mutations) and pediatric- (typified by wild-type GIST/succinate dehydrogenase deficiencies) types. Using varying gender ratios at age of diagnosis we sought to elucidate prognostic factors for each sub-type and their impact on overall survival. This is a long-term retrospective analysis of a large observational study of an international open cohort of patients from a GIST research and patient advocacy's lifetime registry. Demographic and disease-specific data were voluntarily supplied by its members from May 2000-October 2010; the primary outcome was overall survival. Associations between survival and prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate Cox proportional hazard analyses, with backward selection at P diligence be taken with "young adults" (aged 18-35 at diagnosis) as pediatric-type GIST may present well beyond adolescence, particularly as these distinct sub-types have different causes, and consequently respond differently to treatments.

  17. Sunitinib in the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor: patient selection and perspectives

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    Mulet-Margalef N

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuria Mulet-Margalef, Xavier Garcia-del-Muro Sarcoma Multidisciplinary Unit and Medical Oncology Department, Institut Català d’Oncologia Hospitalet, IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. In advanced setting and after progression to imatinib, the multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib has clearly demonstrated a clinical benefit in terms of response rate and progression-free survival with an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended schedule for sunitinib administration is 50 mg per day 4 weeks ON and 2 weeks OFF; however, potential alternative schedules are also reviewed in the present article. Several biomarkers have been explored to better select candidates for sunitinib therapy, such as the value of early changes in standardized uptake value assessed by positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, circulating biomarkers, clinical biomarkers such as the appearance of arterial hypertension during treatment that correlates with better outcomes, and the GIST genotype. GISTs with KIT mutations at exon 9 and the so-called wild-type GISTs seem to better respond to sunitinib. Nonetheless, further investigation is required to confirm these findings as well as to understand the mechanisms of sunitinib resistance such as the development of new KIT mutations or conformational changes in KIT receptor. Keywords: sunitinib, GIST, KIT, refractory GIST

  18. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor’s dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection. PMID:27340363

  19. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: retrospective analysis of the computer-tomographic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupescu, Ioana G; Grasu, Mugur; Boros, Mirela; Gheorghe, Cristian; Ionescu, Mihnea; Popescu, Irinel; Herlea, Vlad; Georgescu, Serban A

    2007-06-01

    To describe the computer-tomographic (CT) aspects of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in correlation to their histology. The medical records of all patients at our hospital with a histologic diagnosis of GIST between January 2002 and June 2006, and investigated before surgery by CT, were reviewed. Two radiologists with knowledge of the diagnosis reviewed the CT findings. Amongst 15 cases of GISTs, 9 cases involved the stomach and 4 cases the small intestine. Location of the primary tumor could not be determined for 2 of 15 tumors, because of the presence of extensive peritoneal metastases. Most primary tumors were predominantly extraluminal (13 cases) while two were clearly endoluminal. The mean diameter of the primary tumor was 8 cm. The tumor margin was well defined in 12 patients and irregular in 3 cases. Central fluid attenuation was present in 11 tumors, while central gas was seen in two cases. Metastases were seen in 2 cases at presentation and in another 2 patients during follow-up. Spread was exclusive to the liver or peritoneum. Visceral obstruction was absent even in extensive peritoneal metastatic disease. Ascites was an unusual finding. CT plays an important role not only in the detection and the localization but also in the evaluation of the extension and follow-up of theses tumors. Using only CT aspects, we can only suspect the diagnosis to GISTs. Often other soft-tissue tumors with gastrointestinal involvement can mimic GISTs. In all cases histological diagnosis is essential.

  20. The standard diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of gastrointestinal stromal tumors based on guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Toshirou; Blay, Jean-Yves; Hirota, Seiichi; Kitagawa, Yuko; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2016-01-01

    Although gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are a rare type of cancer, they are the commonest sarcoma in the gastrointestinal tract. Molecularly targeted therapy, such as imatinib therapy, has revolutionized the treatment of advanced GIST and facilitates scientific research on GIST. Nevertheless, surgery remains a mainstay of treatment to obtain a permanent cure for GIST even in the era of targeted therapy. Many GIST guidelines have been published to guide the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. We review current versions of GIST guidelines published by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, by the European Society for Medical Oncology, and in Japan. All clinical practice guidelines for GIST include recommendations based on evidence as well as on expert consensus. Most of the content is very similar, as represented by the following examples: GIST is a heterogeneous disease that may have mutations in KIT, PDGFRA, HRAS, NRAS, BRAF, NF1, or the succinate dehydrogenase complex, and these subsets of tumors have several distinctive features. Although there are some minor differences among the guidelines--for example, in the dose of imatinib recommended for exon 9-mutated GIST or the efficacy of antigen retrieval via immunohistochemistry--their common objectives regarding diagnosis and treatment are not only to improve the diagnosis of GIST and the prognosis of patients but also to control medical costs. This review describes the current standard diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of GISTs based on the recommendations of several guidelines and expert consensus.

  1. Three cases of bone metastases in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors

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    Maurizio Zompatori

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare, but represent the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Tumor resection is the treatment of choice for localized disease. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, sunitinib are the standard therapy for metastatic or unresectable GISTs. GISTs usually metastasize to the liver and peritoneum. Bone metastases are uncommon. We describe three cases of bone metastases in patients with advanced GISTs: two women (82 and 54 years of age, and one man (62 years of age. Bones metastases involved the spine, pelvis and ribs in one patient, multiple vertebral bodies and pelvis in one, and the spine and iliac wings in the third case. The lesions presented a lytic pattern in all cases. Two patients presented with multiple bone metastases at the time of initial diagnosis and one patient after seven years during the follow-up period. This report describes the diagnosis and treatment of the lesions and may help clinicians to manage bones metastases in GIST patients.

  2. A malignant omental extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumor on a young man: a case report and review of the literature

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    Almaroof Babatunde

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST are uncommon intra-abdominal tumors. These tumors tend to present with higher frequency in the stomach and small bowel. In fewer than 5% of cases, they originate primarily from the mesentery, omentum, or peritoneum. Furthermore, these extra-gastrointestinal tumors (EGIST tend to be more common in patients greater than 50 years of age. Rarely do EGIST tumors present in those younger than 40 years of age. Case presentation We report a case of a large EGIST in a 27-year-old male. An abdominal pelvic computerized tomography imaging demonstrated an intra-abdominal mass of 22 cm, without invasion of adjacent viscera or liver lesions. This mass was resected en bloc with its fused omentum and an adherent portion of sigmoid colon. Pathology results demonstrated a malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor with positive CD117 (c-kit staining, and negative margins of resection, and no continuity of tumor with the sigmoid colon. Due to the malignant and aggressive nature of this patient's tumor, he was started on STI-571 as adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusion Stromal tumors of an extra-gastrointestinal origin are rare. Of the reported omental and mesenteric EGISTs in four published series, a total of 99 tumors were studied. Of the 99 patients in these series only 8 were under 40 years of age, none were younger than 30 years old; and only 5 were younger than 35 years old. Our patient's age is at the lower end of the age spectrum for the reported EGISTs. Young patients who present with an extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGIST, who have complete resection with negative margins, have a good prognosis. There is little data to support the role of STI-571 in adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy after curative resection. Given the lack of data, the use of STI-571 must be individualized.

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the duodenum in childhood: a rare case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarugi, Massimo; Galatioto, Christian; Lippolis, Piero; Zocco, Giuseppe; Seccia, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are uncommon primary mesenchymal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract mostly observed in the adults. Duodenal GISTs are relatively rare in adults and it should be regarded as exceptional in childhood. In young patients duodenal GISTs may be a source of potentially lethal haemorrhage and this adds diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas to the concern about the long-term outcome. A 14-year-old boy was referred to our hospital with severe anaemia due to recurrent episodes of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Endoscopy, small bowel series, scintigraphy and video capsule endoscopy previously done elsewhere were negative. Shortly after the admission, the patient underwent emergency surgery for severe recurrence of the bleeding. At surgery, a 4 cm solid mass arising from the wall of the fourth portion of the duodenum was identified. The invasion and the erosion of the duodenal mucosa was confirmed by intra-operative pushed duodenoscopy. The mass was resected by a full-thickness duodenal wall excision with adequate grossly free margins. Immunohistochemical analysis of the specimen revealed to be positive for CD117 (c-KIT protein) consistent with a diagnosis of GIST. The number of mitoses was < 5/50 HPF. Mutational analysis for c-KIT/PDGFRA tyrosine kinase receptor genes resulted in a wildtype pattern. The patient had an uneventful course and he has remained disease-free during two years of follow-up. Duodenal GISTs in children are very rare and may present with massive bleeding. Cure can be achieved by complete surgical resection, but even in the low-aggressive tumours the long-term outcome may be unpredictable

  4. Severe paraneoplastic hypoglycemia in a patient with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with an exon 9 mutation: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Guillermo A; Robinson, William A; Nydam, Trevor L; Heiple, Drew C; Weiss, Glen J; Buckley, Linda; Gonzalez, Rene; McCarter, Martin D

    2007-01-01

    Non-islet cell tumor induced hypoglycemia (NICTH) is a very rare phenomenon, but even more so in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. It tends to present in large or metastatic tumors, and can appear at any time in the progression of the disease. We present herein a case of NICTH in a GIST tumor and report an exon 9 mutation associated to it. A thirty nine year-old man with a recurrent, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor presented to the hospital with nausea, dizziness, loss of consciousness, and profound hypoglycemia (20 mg/dL). There was no evidence of factitious hypoglycemia. He was stabilized with a continuous glucose infusion and following selective vascular embolization, the patient underwent debulking of a multicentric 40 cm × 25 cm × 10 cm gastrointestinal stromal tumor. After resection, the patient became euglycemic and returned to his normal activities. Tumor analysis confirmed excessive production of insulin-like growth factor II m-RNA and the precursor protein, 'big' insulin-like growth factor II. Mutational analysis also identified a rare, 6 bp tandem repeat insert (gcctat) at position 1530 in exon 9 of KIT. Optimal management of gastrointestinal stromal tumor-induced hypoglycemia requires a multidisciplinary approach, and surgical debulking is the treatment of choice to obtain immediate symptom relief. Imatinib or combinations of glucocorticoids and growth hormone are alternative palliative strategies for symptomatic hypoglycemia. In addition, mutations in exon 9 of the tyrosine kinase receptor KIT occur in 11–20% of GIST and are often associated with poor patient outcomes. The association of this KIT mutation with non-islet cell tumor induced hypoglycemia has yet to be established

  5. Survival of gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients in the imatinib era: life raft group observational registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Call Jerry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST, one of the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, prior to routine immunohistochemical staining and the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, were often mistaken for neoplasms of smooth muscle origin such as leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas or leiomyoblastomas. Since the advent of imatinib, GIST has been further delineated into adult- (KIT or PDGFRα mutations and pediatric- (typified by wild-type GIST/succinate dehydrogenase deficiencies types. Using varying gender ratios at age of diagnosis we sought to elucidate prognostic factors for each sub-type and their impact on overall survival. Methods This is a long-term retrospective analysis of a large observational study of an international open cohort of patients from a GIST research and patient advocacy's lifetime registry. Demographic and disease-specific data were voluntarily supplied by its members from May 2000-October 2010; the primary outcome was overall survival. Associations between survival and prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate Cox proportional hazard analyses, with backward selection at P Results Inflections in gender ratios by age at diagnosis in years delineated two distinct groups: above and below age 35 at diagnosis. Closer analysis confirmed the above 35 age group as previously reported for adult-type GIST, typified by mixed primary tumor sites and gender, KIT or PDGFRα mutations, and shorter survival times. The pediatric group ( Conclusions Pediatric- and adult-type GIST have been previously characterized in clinical settings and these observations confirm significant prognostic factors for each from a diverse real-world cohort. Additionally, these findings suggest that extra diligence be taken with "young adults" (aged 18-35 at diagnosis as pediatric-type GIST may present well beyond adolescence, particularly as these distinct sub-types have different causes, and consequently

  6. Clinical practice and outcomes in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor: Experience from an Indian tertiary care center

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    Subhadeep Bose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of advanced Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST has been revolutionized with the use of Imatinib guided by mutation analysis. Data from India remains scarce. Materials and Methods: Patients with metastatic GIST who were treated at Department of Gastro-intestinal & Hepaticopancreaticobiliary Oncology Unit at Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai between December, 2004 and December 2015 were included in the analysis. Clinical and radiological data was retrieved from stored medical records and charts. Results: A total of 83 patients with metastatic GIST were available for analysis. Median age was 54 years with a 3:1 male predominance. Stomach was the most common site of primary with liver being the most common site of metastasis. c-Kit mutation analysis results were available for 44 patients with exon 11 mutant being the most common mutation. With a median follow up of 33 months, the 10 years estimated progression free and overall survival (OS was 18% and 51% respectively. Overall response rate to first line imatinib was 37.6% and estimated 3 years OS to first line therapy was significantly better for Exon 11 mutated patients (p=0.016. 34 patients received second line therapy in the form of either sunitinib, pazopanib or increased dose imatinib with a clinical benefit rate of 73.5%. C-Kit mutated patients had a better median OS compared to non mutated patients. Conclusions: GIST diagnosed and treated in the Indian subcontinent appears to show improved outcomes. The importance of c-Kit mutation analysis in determining the prognosis and outcomes of patients with advanced GIST is emphasized.

  7. Functional features of gene expression profiles differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumours according to KIT mutations and expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrowski, Jerzy; Dobosz, Anna Jerzak Vel; Jarosz, Dorota; Ruka, Wlodzimierz; Wyrwicz, Lucjan S; Polkowski, Marcin; Paziewska, Agnieszka; Skrzypczak, Magdalena; Goryca, Krzysztof; Rubel, Tymon; Kokoszyñska, Katarzyna; Rutkowski, Piotr; Nowecki, Zbigniew I

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) represent a heterogeneous group of tumours of mesenchymal origin characterized by gain-of-function mutations in KIT or PDGFRA of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family. Although mutations in either receptor are thought to drive an early oncogenic event through similar pathways, two previous studies reported the mutation-specific gene expression profiles. However, their further conclusions were rather discordant. To clarify the molecular characteristics of differentially expressed genes according to GIST receptor mutations, we combined microarray-based analysis with detailed functional annotations. Total RNA was isolated from 29 frozen gastric GISTs and processed for hybridization on GENECHIP ® HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays (Affymetrix). KIT and PDGFRA were analyzed by sequencing, while related mRNA levels were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Fifteen and eleven tumours possessed mutations in KIT and PDGFRA, respectively; no mutation was found in three tumours. Gene expression analysis identified no discriminative profiles associated with clinical or pathological parameters, even though expression of hundreds of genes differentiated tumour receptor mutation and expression status. Functional features of genes differentially expressed between the two groups of GISTs suggested alterations in angiogenesis and G-protein-related and calcium signalling. Our study has identified novel molecular elements likely to be involved in receptor-dependent GIST development and allowed confirmation of previously published results. These elements may be potential therapeutic targets and novel markers of KIT mutation status

  8. Comparison of Endoscopic and Open Resection for Small Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

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    Fan Feng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends conservative follow-up for gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs less than 2 cm. We have previously reported that the mitotic index of 22.22% of small gastric GISTs exceeded 5 per 50 high-power fields and recommended that all small gastric GISTs should be resected once diagnosed. The aim of the present study is to compare the safety and outcomes of endoscopic and open resection of small gastric GISTs. From May 2010 to March 2014, a total of 90 small gastric GIST patients were enrolled in the present study, including 40 patients who underwent surgical resection and 50 patients who underwent endoscopic resection. The clinicopathological characteristics, resection-related factors, and clinical outcomes were recorded and analyzed. The clinicopathological characteristics were comparable between the two groups except for tumor location and DOG-1 expression. Compared with the surgical resection group, the operation time was shorter (P = .000, blood loss was less (P = .000, pain intensity was lower (P < .05, duration of first flatus and defecation was shorter (P < .05, and medical cost of hospitalization was lower (P = .027 in the endoscopic resection group. The complications and postoperative hospital stay were comparable between the two groups. No in situ recurrence or liver metastasis was observed during follow-up. Endoscopic resection of small gastric GISTs is safe and feasible compared with surgical resection, although perforation could not be totally avoided during and after resection. The clinical outcome of endoscopic resection is also favorable.

  9. Regorafenib: A Review of Its Use in Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Matt; Keating, Gillian M

    2015-06-01

    Regorafenib (Stivarga(®)) is an orally administered small molecule inhibitor of multiple protein kinases, including kinases involved in oncogenesis and tumour angiogenesis. It was initially approved for use in patients with previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer. Based on the findings of the phase III GRID clinical trial, approval for regorafenib has been expanded to include the treatment of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) following the failure of imatinib and sunitinib. In the GRID trial, regorafenib significantly improved progression-free survival and was associated with a significantly higher disease control rate than placebo. No significant between-group difference was observed in overall survival (OS) in the trial; however, the high proportion of patients who crossed over from placebo to regorafenib likely impacted the OS analysis. Regorafenib has an acceptable tolerability profile, with most adverse events being manageable with dose modification and/or supportive measures. The most commonly reported drug-related adverse events among patients receiving regorafenib in the GRID trial were hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, diarrhoea and fatigue. In conclusion, regorafenib presents a valuable new tool in the treatment of patients with advanced GISTs following the failure of imatinib and sunitinib.

  10. The safety of regorafenib for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

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    Rutkowski, Piotr; Stępniak, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) evolved due to effective molecularly targeted therapy with imatinib and sunitinib which are used first- and second-line, respectively. However, due to the development of resistance to those drugs in the majority of patients, the need for third-line therapy arose. Regorafenib, an oral multitargeted inhibitor with activity against multiple kinases including KIT, RET, RAF1, BRAF, angiogenesis (VEGFR, TIE-2) and those involved in tumor microenvironment (PDGFR and FGFR) was introduced after the successful Phase III GRID (GIST - Regorafenib In progressive Disease) clinical trial. This study showed significant improvement in progression-free survival for patients receiving regorafenib compared to placebo (4.8 months vs 0.9 months). The treatment was reasonably well tolerated, with arterial hypertension, hand-foot syndrome, diarrhea being the most common grade ≥3 adverse events, which could be managed by dose reduction and supportive treatment. The aim of this paper is to describe, assess and advise on the safety of regorafenib as third-line therapy in GIST. Regorafenib has demonstrated clinical benefit in GIST patients after progression on prior treatment with at least imatinib/sunitinib and currently it is the approved standard third-line option in therapy of advanced GIST. The safety profile is similar to other multikinase inhibitors with anti-VEGFR activity and is manageable.

  11. Using molecular diagnostic testing to personalize the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

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    Bannon, Amber E; Klug, Lillian R; Corless, Christopher L; Heinrich, Michael C

    2017-05-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) has emerged as a paradigm for modern cancer treatment ('precision medicine'), as it highlights the importance of matching molecular defects with specific therapies. Over the past two decades, the molecular classification and diagnostic work up of GIST has been radically transformed, accompanied by the development of molecular therapies for specific subgroups of GIST. This review summarizes the developments in the field of molecular diagnosis of GIST, particularly as they relate to optimizing medical therapy. Areas covered: Based on an extensive literature search of the molecular and clinical aspects of GIST, the authors review the most important developments in this field with an emphasis on the differential diagnosis of GIST including mutation testing, therapeutic implications of each molecular subtype, and emerging technologies relevant to the field. Expert commentary: The use of molecular diagnostics to classify GIST has been shown to be successful in optimizing patient treatment, but these methods remain under-utilized. In order to facilitate efficient and comprehensive molecular testing, the authors have developed a decision tree to aid clinicians.

  12. Predictive features of CT for risk stratifications in patients with primary gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Cuiping; Zhang, Xiang; Duan, Xiaohui; Hu, Huijun; Wang, Dongye; Shen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    To determine the predictive CT imaging features for risk stratifications in patients with primary gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). One hundred and twenty-nine patients with histologically confirmed primary GISTs (diameter >2 cm) were enrolled. CT imaging features were reviewed. Tumour risk stratifications were determined according to the 2008 NIH criteria where GISTs were classified into four categories according to the tumour size, location, mitosis count, and tumour rupture. The association between risk stratifications and CT features was analyzed using univariate analysis, followed by multinomial logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. CT imaging features including tumour margin, size, shape, tumour growth pattern, direct organ invasion, necrosis, enlarged vessels feeding or draining the mass (EVFDM), lymphadenopathy, and contrast enhancement pattern were associated with the risk stratifications, as determined by univariate analysis (P < 0.05). Only lesion size, growth pattern and EVFDM remained independent risk factors in multinomial logistic regression analysis (OR = 3.480-100.384). ROC curve analysis showed that the area under curve of the obtained multinomial logistic regression model was 0.806 (95 % CI: 0.727-0.885). CT features including lesion size, tumour growth pattern, and EVFDM were predictors of the risk stratifications for GIST. (orig.)

  13. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors as an incidental finding in patients with a presumptive diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Mario; Ramirez, Pedro T; Echeverri, Carolina; Alvarez, Luis Guillermo; Palomino, Maria Alejandra; Pareja, Luis René

    2012-01-01

    To report the clinical presentation and oncologic outcomes of a series of patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass and were diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Data were obtained on all patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass between September 2007 and June 2010 and who were ultimately diagnosed with a GIST. The patients' medical records were reviewed. A literature review was also conducted. Six patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria. All six patients had a tumor in the intestinal tract arising from the small bowel. The mean tumor size was 12 cm (range, 6 to 22 cm). A complete resection was achieved in five of the six patients. There were no intraoperative complications; one patient had a postoperative complication. Two patients were treated with imatinib after surgery. The mean follow-up time was 32 months (range, 0.3 to 40 months). At the last follow-up, five of the six patients were without any evidence of disease. One patient died of an unrelated hepatic encephalopathy. The incidence in our institution is 3%. GISTs are uncommon; however, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with an abdominal or pelvic mass.

  14. Concurrent Male Gynecomastia and Testicular Hydrocele after Imatinib Mesylate Treatment of a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hawk; Chang, Heung-Moon; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Tae-Won; Sohn, Hee-Jung; Kim, So-Eun; Kang, Hye-Jin; Park, Sarah; Lee, Jung-Shin

    2005-01-01

    We report a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patient with male gynecomastia and testicular hydrocele after treatment with imatinib mesylate. A 42 yr-old male patient presented for management of hepatic masses. Two years earlier, he had undergone a small bowel resection to remove an intraabdominal mass later shown to be a GIST, followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. At presentation, CT scan revealed multiple hepatic masses, which were compatible with metastatic GIST, and he was prescribed imatinib 400 mg/day. During treatment, he experienced painful enlargement of the left breast and scrotal swelling. Three months after cessation of imatinib treatment, the tumors recurred, and, upon recommencing imatinib, he experienced painful enlargement of the right breast and scrotal swelling. He was diagnosed with male gynecomastia caused by decreased testosterone and non-communicative testicular hydrocele. He was given androgen support and a hydrocelectomy, which improved his gynecomastia. The mechanism by which imatinib induces gynecomastia and hydrocele is thought to be associated with an inhibition of c-KIT and platelet-derive growth factor. This is the first report, to our knowledge, describing concurrent male gynecomastia and testicular hydrocele after imatinib treatment of a patient with GIST. PMID:15953881

  15. Small Submucosal Tumors of the Stomach: Differentiation of Gastric Schwannoma from Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor with CT

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    Choi, Jin Wook; Choi, Dong Gil; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Sohn, Tae Sung; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Hee Jung; Lee, Soon Jin [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    To identify the CT features that help differentiate gastric schwannomas (GS) from small (5 cm or smaller) gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and to assess the growth rates of both tumors. We included 16 small GSs and 56 GISTs located in the stomach. We evaluated the CT features including size, contour, surface pattern, margins, growth pattern, pattern and degree of contrast enhancement, and the presence of intralesional low attenuation area, hemorrhage, calcification, surface dimpling, fistula, perilesional lymph nodes (LNs), invasion to other organs, metastasis, ascites, and peritoneal seeding. We also estimated the tumor volume doubling time. Compared with GISTs, GSs more frequently demonstrated a homogeneous enhancement pattern, exophytic or mixed growth pattern, and the presence of perilesional LNs (each p < 0.05). The intralesional low attenuation area was more common in GISTs than GSs (p < 0.05). Multivariate analyses indicated that a homogeneous enhancement pattern, exophytic or mixed growth pattern, and the presence of perilesional LNs were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Tumor volume doubling times for GSs (mean, 1685.4 days) were significantly longer than that of GISTs (mean, 377.6 days) (p = 0.004). Although small GSs and GISTs show similar imaging findings, GSs more frequently show an exophytic or mixed growth pattern, homogeneous enhancement pattern, perilesional LNs and grow slower than GISTs.

  16. Small Submucosal Tumors of the Stomach: Differentiation of Gastric Schwannoma from Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jin Wook; Choi, Dong Gil; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Sohn, Tae Sung; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Hee Jung; Lee, Soon Jin

    2012-01-01

    To identify the CT features that help differentiate gastric schwannomas (GS) from small (5 cm or smaller) gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and to assess the growth rates of both tumors. We included 16 small GSs and 56 GISTs located in the stomach. We evaluated the CT features including size, contour, surface pattern, margins, growth pattern, pattern and degree of contrast enhancement, and the presence of intralesional low attenuation area, hemorrhage, calcification, surface dimpling, fistula, perilesional lymph nodes (LNs), invasion to other organs, metastasis, ascites, and peritoneal seeding. We also estimated the tumor volume doubling time. Compared with GISTs, GSs more frequently demonstrated a homogeneous enhancement pattern, exophytic or mixed growth pattern, and the presence of perilesional LNs (each p < 0.05). The intralesional low attenuation area was more common in GISTs than GSs (p < 0.05). Multivariate analyses indicated that a homogeneous enhancement pattern, exophytic or mixed growth pattern, and the presence of perilesional LNs were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Tumor volume doubling times for GSs (mean, 1685.4 days) were significantly longer than that of GISTs (mean, 377.6 days) (p = 0.004). Although small GSs and GISTs show similar imaging findings, GSs more frequently show an exophytic or mixed growth pattern, homogeneous enhancement pattern, perilesional LNs and grow slower than GISTs.

  17. Pharmacogenetics of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in gastrointestinal stromal tumor and chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravegnini, Gloria; Sammarini, Giulia; Angelini, Sabrina; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are two tumor types deeply different from each other. Despite the differences, these disorders share treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. Despite the success of imatinib, the response rates vary among different individuals and pharmacogenetics may play an important role in the final clinical outcome. In this review, the authors provide an overview of the pharmacogenetic literature analyzing the role of polymorphisms in both GIST and CML treatment efficacy and toxicity. So far, several polymorphisms influencing the pharmacokinetic determinants of imatinib have been identified. However, the data are not yet conclusive enough to translate pharmacogenetic tests in clinical practice. In this context, the major obstacles to pharmacogenetic test validation are represented by the small sample size of most studies, ethnicity and population admixture as confounding source, and uncertainty related to genetic variants analyzed. In conclusion, a combination of different theoretical approaches, experimental model systems and statistical methods is clearly needed, in order to appreciate pharmacogenetics applied to clinical practice in the near future.

  18. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor: role of spiral CT in diagnosis and evaluation of treatment with STI571

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jiawang; Zhou Linjiang; Wei Jiangong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT appearance of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) after oral imatinib mesylate (STI571) treatment. Methods: CT scans of 58 cases of GISTs proven by histology and immunohistochemistry were retrospectively analyzed. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT of 8 patients after STI571 treatment was also evaluated. Results: The tumors originated from the stomach (n=28), small intestine (n=12), duodenum (n=6), colon (n=5), rectum (n=4), mesentery (n=2), and esophagus (n=2). Small GISTs appeared as round or oval, endo- or exophytic masses with well-defined margins and homogeneous contrast enhancement. Large lesions were often irregular infiltrative exophytic masses with heterogeneous enhancement. Ulceration, fistulization and neovascularity can be seen within the larger tumors. CT scans of 5 patients with good treatment response showed rapid transition form a heterogeneously hyper-attenuating pattern to homogeneously hypo-attenuating pattern with resolution of the enhancing tumor nodules and decreased tumor neovascularity. In 3 poor responders, CT showed enlarging or new enhancing nodules within the treated hypo-attenuating tumor, new lesions or metastasis outside the primary tumor. Conclusion: CT can demonstrate changes resulting from treatment of GISTs. It is valuable for guiding and assessing treatment response to STI571. (authors)

  19. Correlation of Dynamic PET and Gene Array Data in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

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    Ludwig G. Strauss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The results obtained with dynamic PET (dPET were compared to gene expression data obtained in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST. The primary aim was to assess the association of the dPET results and gene expression data. Material and Methods. dPET was performed following the injection of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG in 22 patients with GIST. All patients were examined prior to surgery for staging purpose. Compartment and noncompartment models were used for the quantitative evaluation of the dPET examinations. Gene array data were based on tumor specimen obtained by surgery after the PET examinations. Results. The data analysis revealed significant correlations for the dPET parameters and the expression of zinc finger genes (znf43, znf85, znf91, znf189. Furthermore, the transport of FDG (k1 was associated with VEGF-A. The cell cycle gene cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C was correlated with the maximum tracer uptake (SUVmax in the tumors. Conclusions. The data demonstrate a dependency of the tracer kinetics on genes associated with prognosis in GIST. Furthermore, angiogenesis and cell proliferation have an impact on the tracer uptake.

  20. Evidence mapping based on systematic reviews of therapeutic interventions for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Ballesteros

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (GISTs are the most common mesenchymal tumours. Currently, different pharmacological and surgical options are used to treat localised and metastatic GISTs, although this research field is broad and the body of evidence is scattered and expanding. Our objectives are to identify, describe and organise the current available evidence for GIST through an evidence mapping approach. Methods We followed the methodology of Global Evidence Mapping (GEM. We searched Pubmed, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library and Epistemonikos in order to identify systematic reviews (SRs with or without meta-analyses published between 1990 and March 2016. Two authors assessed eligibility and extracted data. Methodological quality of the included systematic reviews was assessed using AMSTAR. We organised the results according to identified PICO questions and presented the evidence map in tables and a bubble plot. Results A total of 17 SRs met eligibility criteria. These reviews included 66 individual studies, of which three quarters were either observational or uncontrolled clinical trials. Overall, the quality of the included SRs was moderate or high. In total, we extracted 14 PICO questions from them and the corresponding results mostly favoured the intervention arm. Conclusions The most common type of study used to evaluate therapeutic interventions in GIST sarcomas has been non-experimental studies. However, the majority of the interventions are reported as beneficial or probably beneficial by the respective authors of SRs. The evidence mapping is a useful and reliable methodology to identify and present the existing evidence about therapeutic interventions.

  1. The effect of surgery and grade on outcome of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierie, J P; Choudry, U; Muzikansky, A; Yeap, B Y; Souba, W W; Ott, M J

    2001-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are aggressive, rare, and difficult-to-cure gastrointestinal tumors. We believe that the clinical behavior of these tumors can be predicted by reproducible prognostic factors. A retrospective review of all patients (N = 70) with GIST treated at a tertiary care center from 1973 to 1998. Adequate data for evaluation were available for 69 patients. Male-female distribution was 40:29. Median age was 60 years. Median follow-up duration was 38 months. Tumor grade, stage, and histologic subtype at presentation; effect of grade, surgery and adjuvant therapy on recurrence, salvage, and survival. Tumor distribution included 61% in the upper, 23% in the middle, and 16% in the lower digestive tract, with a median tumor size of 7.9 cm (range, 1.8-25 cm). Tumors with more than 1 mitosis per 10 high-power fields constituted 57% of neoplasia in the series. Distant disease at initial visit occurred in 49% of patients. Complete gross resection occurred in 59% of patients. After complete resection, the 5-year survival rate was 42%, compared with 9% after incomplete resection (hazard ratio = 0.27, P<.001). Neither radiation nor chemotherapy demonstrated any significant benefit. Among 39 patients who were disease free after complete resection, 2% developed lymph node recurrence, 25% developed local recurrence, and 33% developed distant recurrences (54% liver, 20% peritoneum). By multivariate analysis the risk of local and/or distant metastases was significantly increased for tumors with more than 1 mitosis and size larger than 5 cm (P<.05). Multivariate analysis in all 69 patients revealed that incomplete resection, age greater than 50 years, non-smooth muscle histological feature, tumor with more than 1 mitosis, and tumor size larger than 5 cm significantly decreased survival. Complete gross surgical resection is presently the only means of cure for GIST. Tumors with more than 1 mitosis and a size larger than 5 cm have an especially poor

  2. Recommendations for diagnostics and therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, P.; Kulig, J.; Osuch, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Over the last years advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of GIST pathogenesis have resulted in the emerging of GIST as a distinct sarcoma entity. This paper presents the guidelines for diagnostics and therapy of these tumors based on scientific research and experts' experience, These guidelines are commonly accepted and worthy of recommendation. Overexpression of the KIT receptor, as a consequence of mutation of the KIT protooncogene is highly specific for GIST and enables immunohistochemical detection staining (CD117) in tumor specimens. It is the most important criterion in microscopic diagnostics and for indicating treatment with small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Sending material for molecular analysis is strongly recommended (for KIT and PDGFRA genotyping). Radical surgery is still the mainstay treatment for primary, localized, resectable GISTs, although although a significant ratio of patients after potentially curative operations develop recurrent or metastatic disease. In inoperable/metastatic lesions the treatment of choice is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor - imatynib mesylate - the first effective systemic therapy in advanced CD117(+) GIST. The recommended initial dose should be 400 mg daily (800 mg for exon 9 KIT mutants). Treatment monitoring should be based on serial computed tomography imaging of the abdominal cavity with the assessment of changes of tumor size and density. In case of disease progression the increase of imatynib dose to 800 mg daily is recommended and - if progression maintains - sunitinib in the initial dose of 50 mg daily should be introduced. Clinical trials evaluating the role of surgery combined with imatynib and the efficacy of other molecular targeted drugs in resistant cases are ongoing. Existing data indicate the beneficial role of adjuvant imatynib therapy in terms of relapse-free survival

  3. Survival of gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients in the imatinib era: life raft group observational registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Call, Jerry; Walentas, Christopher D; Eickhoff, Jens C; Scherzer, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), one of the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, prior to routine immunohistochemical staining and the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, were often mistaken for neoplasms of smooth muscle origin such as leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas or leiomyoblastomas. Since the advent of imatinib, GIST has been further delineated into adult- (KIT or PDGFRα mutations) and pediatric- (typified by wild-type GIST/succinate dehydrogenase deficiencies) types. Using varying gender ratios at age of diagnosis we sought to elucidate prognostic factors for each sub-type and their impact on overall survival. This is a long-term retrospective analysis of a large observational study of an international open cohort of patients from a GIST research and patient advocacy's lifetime registry. Demographic and disease-specific data were voluntarily supplied by its members from May 2000-October 2010; the primary outcome was overall survival. Associations between survival and prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate Cox proportional hazard analyses, with backward selection at P < 0.05 used to identify independent factors. Inflections in gender ratios by age at diagnosis in years delineated two distinct groups: above and below age 35 at diagnosis. Closer analysis confirmed the above 35 age group as previously reported for adult-type GIST, typified by mixed primary tumor sites and gender, KIT or PDGFRα mutations, and shorter survival times. The pediatric group (< age 18 at diagnosis) was also as previously reported with predominantly stomach tumors, females, wild-type GIST or SDH mutations, and extended survival. 'Young adults' however formed a third group aged 18-35 at diagnosis, and were a clear mix of these two previously reported distinct sub-types. Pediatric- and adult-type GIST have been previously characterized in clinical settings and these observations confirm significant prognostic factors for each

  4. Limited resection for duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Surgical management and clinical outcome

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    Hoeppner, Jens; Kulemann, Birte; Marjanovic, Goran; Bronsert, Peter; Hopt, Ulrich Theodor

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To analyze our experience in patients with duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and review the appropriate surgical approach. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients with duodenal GIST surgically treated at our medical institution between 2002 and 2011. Patient files, operative reports, radiological charts and pathology were analyzed. For surgical therapy open and laparoscopic wedge resections and segmental resections were performed for limited resection (LR). For extended resection pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. Age, gender, clinical symptoms of the tumor, anatomical localization, tumor size, mitotic count, type of resection resectional status, neoadjuvant therapy, adjuvant therapy, risk classification and follow-up details were investigated in this retrospective study. RESULTS: Nine patients (5 males/4 females) with a median age of 58 years were surgically treated. The median follow-up period was 45 mo (range 6-111 mo). The initial symptom in 6 of 9 patients was gastrointestinal bleeding (67%). Tumors were found in all four parts of the duodenum, but were predominantly located in the first and second part of the duodenum with each 3 of 9 patients (33%). Two patients received neoadjuvant medical treatment with 400 mg imatinib per day for 12 wk before resection. In one patient, the GIST resection was done by pancreatoduodenectomy. The 8 LRs included a segmental resection of pars 4 of the duodenum, 5 wedge resections with primary closure and a wedge resection with luminal closure by Roux-Y duodeno-jejunostomy. One of these LRs was done minimally invasive; seven were done in open fashion. The median diameter of the tumors was 54 mm (14-110 mm). Using the Fletcher classification scheme, 3/9 (33%) tumors had high risk, 1/9 (11%) had intermediate risk, 4/9 (44%) had low risk, and 1/9 (11%) had very low risk for aggressive behaviour. Seven resections showed microscopically negative transsection margins (R0), two

  5. Canine and human gastrointestinal stromal tumors display similar mutations in c-KIT exon 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory-Bryson, Emmalena; Bartlett, Elizabeth; Kiupel, Matti; Hayes, Schantel; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are common mesenchymal neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and dogs. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these tumors. This study evaluated the role of c-KIT in canine GISTs; specifically, we investigated activating mutations in exons 8, 9, 11, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide (PDGFRA), all of which have been implicated in human GISTs. Seventeen canine GISTs all confirmed to be positive for KIT immunostaining were studied. Exons 8, 9, 11, 13 and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA, were amplified from DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Of these seventeen cases, six amplicons of exon 11 of c-KIT showed aberrant bands on gel electrophoresis. Sequencing of these amplicons revealed heterozygous in-frame deletions in six cases. The mutations include two different but overlapping six base pair deletions. Exons 8, 9, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA had no abnormalities detected by electrophoresis and sequencing did not reveal any mutations, other than synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in exon 11 of c-KIT and exons 12 and 14 of PDGFRA. The deletion mutations detected in canine GISTs are similar to those previously found in the juxtamembrane domain of c-KIT in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors in our laboratory as well as to those reported in human GISTs. Interestingly, none of the other c-KIT or PDGFRA exons showed any abnormalities in our cases. This finding underlines the critical importance of c-KIT in the pathophysiology of canine GISTs. The expression of KIT and the identification of these activating mutations in c-KIT implicate KIT in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Our results indicate that mutations in c-KIT may be of prognostic significance and that targeting KIT may be a rational approach to treatment of these malignant tumors. This study further

  6. Leiomyomas in the gastric cardia: CT findings and differentiation from gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Hye Seung

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Gastric leiomyomas frequently involve the gastric cardia. • Gastric cardial leiomyomas and GISTs could be differentiated with CT. • Differentiation of cardial leiomyomas and GISTs can help choosing surgical procedure. - Abstract: Objective: To describe CT findings of leiomyomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in the gastric cardia and to identify their differentiating features. Materials and methods: CT images of pathologically proven leiomyomas (n = 26) and GISTs (n = 19) in the gastric cardia were retrospectively reviewed for esophagogastric junction (EGJ) involvement, contour, surface, growth pattern, enhancement pattern and degree of the tumor, and the presences of intralesional low attenuation, calcification and surface dimples or ulcers. The long (LD) and short diameters (SD), LD/SD ratio, and attenuation value of each lesion were measured. Results: EGJ involvement, homogeneous enhancement, intermediate or low enhancement, absences of intralesional low attenuation and surface dimples or ulcers, LD/SD ratio >1.2, and attenuation value ≤71.2 HU were significant findings for differentiating leiomyomas from GISTs (P < 0.05 for each finding). An LD/SD ratio of >1.2 and attenuation value of ≤71.2 HU yielded sensitivities of 84.6% and 61.5%, and specificities of 52.6% and 84.2%, respectively, on the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. When at least five of these seven criteria were used in combination, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing leiomyomas were 100% (26 of 26) and 89.5% (17 of 19), respectively. When any six of these criteria were used, a specificity of 100% was achieved. Conclusions: CT features including EGJ involvement, enhancement pattern and degree, presences of intralesional low attenuation and surface dimples or ulcers, LD/SD ratio, and attenuation value could help differentiating leiomyomas from GISTs in the gastric cardia, particularly in the manner of combination

  7. Downsizing Treatment with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Improved Resectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölund, Katarina; Andersson, Anna; Nilsson, Erik; Nilsson, Ola; Ahlman, Håkan

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) express the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT. Most GISTs have mutations in the KIT or PDGFRA gene, causing activation of tyrosine kinase. Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), is the first-line palliative treatment for advanced GISTs. Sunitinib was introduced for patients with mutations not responsive to imatinib. The aim was to compare the survival of patients with high-risk resected GISTs treated with TKI prior to surgery with historical controls and to determine if organ-preserving surgery was facilitated. Methods Ten high-risk GIST-patients had downsizing/adjuvant TKI treatment: nine with imatinib and one with sunitinib. The patients were matched with historical controls (n = 89) treated with surgery alone, from our population-based series (n = 259). Mutational analysis of KIT and PDGFRA was performed in all cases. The progression-free survival was calculated. Results The primary tumors decreased in mean diameter from 20.4 cm to 10.5 cm on downsizing imatinib. Four patients with R0 resection and a period of adjuvant imatinib had no recurrences versus 67% in the historical control group. Four patients with residual liver metastases have stable disease on continuous imatinib treatment after surgery. One patient has undergone reoperation with liver resection. The downsizing treatment led to organ-preserving surgery in nine patients and improved preoperative nutritional status in one patient. Conclusions Downsizing TKI is recommended for patients with bulky tumors with invasion of adjacent organs. Sunitinib can be used for patients in case of imatinib resistance (e.g., wild-type GISTs), underlining the importance of mutational analysis for optimal surgical planning. PMID:20512492

  8. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerich, Virginie; Fleck, Camille; Chaigneau, Loïc; Isambert, Nicolas; Borg, Christophe; Kalbacher, Elsa; Jary, Marine; Simon, Pauline; Pivot, Xavier; Blay, Jean-Yves; Limat, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    The management of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) has been modified considerably by the availability of costly tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs); however, the best therapeutic sequence in terms of cost and effectiveness remains unknown. The aim of this study was to compare four potential strategies (reflecting the potential daily practice), each including imatinib 400 mg/day, as first-line treatment: S1 (imatinib 400 /best supportive care [BSC]); S2 (imatinib 400 /imatinib 800 /BSC); S3 (imatinib 400 /sunitinib/BSC); and S4 (imatinib 400 /imatinib 800 /sunitinib/BSC). A Markov model was developed with a hypothetical cohort of patients and a lifetime horizon. Transition probabilities were estimated from the results of clinical trials. The analysis was performed from the French payer perspective, and only direct medical costs were included. Clinical and economic parameters were discounted, and the robustness of results was assessed. The least costly and effective strategy was S1, at a cost of €65,744 for 32.9 life months (reference). S3 was the most cost-effective strategy, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €48,277/life-year saved (LYS). S2 was dominated, and S4 yielded an ICER of €363,320/LYS compared with S3. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these results; however, when taking into account a price reduction of 80 % for imatinib, S2 and S4 become the most cost-effective strategies. Our approach is innovative to the extent that our analysis takes into account the sequential application of TKIs. The results suggest that the S1 strategy is the best cost-effective strategy, but a price reduction of imatinib impacts on the results. This approach must continue, including new drugs and their impact on the quality of life of patients with advanced GISTs.

  9. Gene expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is distinguished by KIT genotype and anatomic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonescu, Cristina R; Viale, Agnes; Sarran, Lisa; Tschernyavsky, Sylvia J; Gonen, Mithat; Segal, Neil H; Maki, Robert G; Socci, Nicholas D; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Besmer, Peter

    2004-05-15

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are specific KIT expressing and KIT-signaling driven mesenchymal tumors of the human digestive tract, many of which have KIT-activating mutations. Previous studies have found a relatively homogeneous gene expression profile in GIST, as compared with other histological types of sarcomas. Transcriptional heterogeneity within clinically or molecularly defined subsets of GISTs has not been previously reported. We tested the hypothesis that the gene expression profile in GISTs might be related to KIT genotype and possibly to other clinicopathological factors. An HG-U133A Affymetrix chip (22,000 genes) platform was used to determine the variability of gene expression in 28 KIT-expressing GIST samples from 24 patients. A control group of six intra-abdominal leiomyosarcomas was also included for comparison. Statistical analyses (t tests) were performed to identify discriminatory gene lists among various GIST subgroups. The levels of expression of various GIST subsets were also linked to a modified version of the growth factor/KIT signaling pathway to analyze differences at various steps in signal transduction. Genes involved in KIT signaling were differentially expressed among wild-type and mutant GISTs. High gene expression of potential drug targets, such as VEGF, MCSF, and BCL2 in the wild-type group, and Mesothelin in exon 9 GISTs were found. There was a striking difference in gene expression between stomach and small bowel GISTs. This finding was validated in four separate tumors, two gastric and two intestinal, from a patient with familial GIST with a germ-line KIT W557R substitution. GISTs have heterogeneous gene expression depending on KIT genotype and tumor location, which is seen at both the genomic level and the KIT signaling pathway in particular. These findings may explain their variable clinical behavior and response to therapy.

  10. Mutational profile of KIT and PDGFRA genes in gastrointestinal stromal tumors in Peruvian samples

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    José Buleje

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are mesenchymal neoplasms usually caused by somatic mutations in the genes KIT (c-KIT or PDGFRA. Mutation characterization has become an important exam for GIST patients because it is useful in predicting the response to the inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of KIT and PDGFRA mutations in 25 GIST samples collected over two years at two national reference hospitals in Peru. There were 21 samples collected from the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas (INEN, national cancer center and 4 samples collected from Hospital A. Loayza. Methods and materials: In this retrospective study, we performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing of KIT (exons 9, 11, 13, and 17 and PDGFRA (exons 12 and 18 genes in 20 FFPE (formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and 5 frozen GIST samples. Results: We report 21 mutations, including deletions, duplications, and missense, no mutations in 2 samples, and 2 samples with no useful DNA for further analysis. Eighty-six percent of these mutations were located in exon 11 of KIT, and 14 % were located in exon 18 of PDGFRA. Conclusions: Our study identified mutations in 21 out of 25 GIST samples from 2 referential national hospitals in Peru, and the mutation proportion follows a global tendency observed from previous studies (i.e., the majority of samples presented KIT mutations followed by a minor percentage of PDGFRA mutations. This study presents the first mutation data of the KIT and PDGFRA genes from Peruvian individuals with GIST.

  11. Pfetin as a Risk Factor of Recurrence in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

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    Hajime Orita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite complete resection of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST, recurrent and/or metastatic disease occurs, often depending on the grade of malignancy. As such, markers are needed that accurately predict patients at high risk for recurrence. Previously our group reported Pfetin as a prognostic biomarker for GIST. In order to create an approach for predicting risk of recurrence, we incorporated Pfetin expression with clinicopathological data to produce a predictive model. Object. Forty-five patients with localized primary GIST were treated with complete gross surgical resection surgically at our institution between 1995 and 2010 were included. The majority of tumors originated in the stomach (38 cases, as well as small intestine (6 cases and rectum (1 case. Method. (1 We performed retrospective analysis of the connection between Pfetin expression, clinicopathological data, and incidences of recurrence, using bivariate and multivariate analyses. (2 The reactivity of the monoclonal antibody against Pfetin was examined by immunohistochemistry. Pfetin. We have reported Pfetin, identified microarray technology, and compared between statistically different GISTs for good and poor prognoses and for prognostic marker. Results. There were 7 cases of recurrences. (1 By univariate analysis, tumor size, mitoses, exposure to abdominal cavity, and complete tumor removal predicted risk of recurrence. (2 Pfetin-negative cases were significantly related to recurrence (P = 0.002. Conclusions. This analysis demonstrates that lack of Pfetin expression is an additional predictor of recurrence in resected GIST. Further study may determine the role of this variable added to the current predictive model for selection of adjuvant therapy.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Regorafenib for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamoschus, David; Draexler, Katja; Chang, Jane; Ngai, Christopher; Madin-Warburton, Matthew; Pitcher, Ashley

    2017-06-01

    No study has compared the cost-effectiveness of active treatment options for unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumours in patients who progressed on or are intolerant to prior treatment with imatinib and sunitinib. The aim of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of regorafenib compared to imatinib rechallenge in this setting in Germany. Hazard ratios for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) with regorafenib versus imatinib rechallenge were estimated by indirect comparison. A state distribution model was used to simulate progression, mortality and treatment costs over a lifetime horizon. Drug acquisition costs and utilities were derived from clinical trial data and published literature; non-drug costs were not included. The outcomes measured were treatment costs, life-years (LYs) and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). The indirect comparison suggested that median PFS and OS were longer with regorafenib compared to imatinib but results were not statistically significant. Regorafenib versus imatinib rechallenge was estimated to have hazard ratios of 0.58 (95% CI 0.31-1.11) for PFS and 0.77 (95% CI 0.34-1.77) for OS, with substantial uncertainty due to the rarity of the disease and small number of patients within the trials. Regorafenib treatment per patient over a lifetime horizon provided an additional 0.61 LYs and 0.42 QALYs over imatinib rechallenge, with additional direct drug costs of €8,773. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was €21,127 per QALY gained. At a cost-effectiveness threshold of €50,000 per QALY, regorafenib had a 67% probability of being cost-effective. Based on the currently available clinical data, this analysis suggests that regorafenib is cost-effective compared with imatinib rechallenge in Germany.

  13. Leiomyomas in the gastric cardia: CT findings and differentiation from gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyun Kyung [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 82, Gumi-ro 173 Beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hoon, E-mail: yhkrad@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 82, Gumi-ro 173 Beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 82, Gumi-ro 173 Beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye Seung [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 82, Gumi-ro 173 Beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Gastric leiomyomas frequently involve the gastric cardia. • Gastric cardial leiomyomas and GISTs could be differentiated with CT. • Differentiation of cardial leiomyomas and GISTs can help choosing surgical procedure. - Abstract: Objective: To describe CT findings of leiomyomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in the gastric cardia and to identify their differentiating features. Materials and methods: CT images of pathologically proven leiomyomas (n = 26) and GISTs (n = 19) in the gastric cardia were retrospectively reviewed for esophagogastric junction (EGJ) involvement, contour, surface, growth pattern, enhancement pattern and degree of the tumor, and the presences of intralesional low attenuation, calcification and surface dimples or ulcers. The long (LD) and short diameters (SD), LD/SD ratio, and attenuation value of each lesion were measured. Results: EGJ involvement, homogeneous enhancement, intermediate or low enhancement, absences of intralesional low attenuation and surface dimples or ulcers, LD/SD ratio >1.2, and attenuation value ≤71.2 HU were significant findings for differentiating leiomyomas from GISTs (P < 0.05 for each finding). An LD/SD ratio of >1.2 and attenuation value of ≤71.2 HU yielded sensitivities of 84.6% and 61.5%, and specificities of 52.6% and 84.2%, respectively, on the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. When at least five of these seven criteria were used in combination, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing leiomyomas were 100% (26 of 26) and 89.5% (17 of 19), respectively. When any six of these criteria were used, a specificity of 100% was achieved. Conclusions: CT features including EGJ involvement, enhancement pattern and degree, presences of intralesional low attenuation and surface dimples or ulcers, LD/SD ratio, and attenuation value could help differentiating leiomyomas from GISTs in the gastric cardia, particularly in the manner of combination.

  14. Gynecomastia during imatinib mesylate treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a rare adverse event

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    Yan ZhongShu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imatinib mesylate has been the standard therapeutic treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia, advanced and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST. It is well tolerated with mild adverse effects. Gynecomastia development during the course of treatment has been rarely reported. Methods Ninety-eight patients with advanced or recurrent GIST were treated with imatinib mesylate. Among the fifty-seven male patients six developed gynecomastia during the treatment. The lesions were confirmed by sonography. Sex hormone levels were determined in six patients with and without the presence of gynecomastia respectively. The patients with gynecomatia were treated with tamoxifene and the sex hormones were assayed before and after tamoxifene treatment. Results In patients with gynecomastia the lump underneath the bilateral nipples was 2.5 to 5 centimeters in diameter. Their serum free testosterone levels ranged between 356.61 and 574.60 ng/dl with a mean ± SD of 408.64 ± 82.06 ng/dl (95% CI 343.03~474.25 ng/dl, which is within the normal range. The level of serum estradiol was 42.89 ± 16.54 pg/ml (95% CI 29.66~56.12 pg/ml. Three patients had higher levels (43.79~71.21 pg/ml and the others' were within normal range of 27.00~34.91 pg/ml. Six patients without the development of gynecomastia had normal free testosterone. One patient died because of large tumor burden. The sex hormones had no significant changes before and after tamoxifene treatment.(P > 0.05 Conclusions Testosterone levels were not decreased in the six GIST patients with gynecomastia. Three patients had increased serum estradiol level which suggests that imbalance of sex hormones may be the cause of gynecomastia during treatment with imatinib mesylate.

  15. Emergency surgery due to complications during molecular targeted therapy in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, P.; Nowecki, Z. I.; Dziewirski, W.; Ruka, W.; Siedlecki, J. A.; Grzesiakowska, U.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency and results of disease/treatment-related emergency operations during molecular targeted therapy of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Methods. We analyzed emergency operations in patients with metastatic/inoperable GISTs treated with 1 st -line imatinib - IM (group I: 232 patients; median follow-up time 31 months) and 2 nd -line sunitinib - SU (group II: 43 patients; median follow-up 13 months; 35 patients in trial A6181036) enrolled into the Polish Clinical GIST Registry. Results. In group I 3 patients (1.3%) underwent emergency surgery due to disease/treatment related complications: one due to bleeding from a ruptured liver tumor (1 month after IM onset) and two due to bowel perforation on the tumor with subsequent intraperitoneal abscess (both 2 months after IM onset). IM was restarted 5-8 days after surgery and no complications in wound healing were observed. In group II 4 patients (9.5%) underwent emergency operations due to disease/treatment related complications: three due to bowel perforations on the tumor (2 days, 20 days and 10 months after SU onset; 1 subsequent death) and one due to intraperitoneal bleeding from ruptured, necrotic tumor (3.5 months after SU start). SU was restarted 12-18 days after surgery and no complications in wound healing were observed. Conclusions. Emergency operations associated with disease or therapy during imatinib treatment of advanced GISTs are rare. The frequency of emergency operations during sunitinib therapy is considered to be higher than during first line therapy with imatinib which may be associated with more advanced and more resistant disease or to the direct mechanism of sunitinib action, i.e. combining cytotoxic and antiangiogenic activity and thus leading to dramatic tumor response. Molecular targeted therapy in GISTs should always be conducted in cooperation with an experienced surgeon. (authors)

  16. Imatinib induced severe skin reactions and neutropenia in a patient with gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Jun-Eul; Yoon, Ju-Young; Bae, Woo-Kyun; Shim, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Sang-Hee; Chung, Ik-Joo

    2010-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate has been used for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). The current recommended dose of imatinib is 400 mg/day that is increased to 800 mg/day in cases with disease progression. However, imatinib can be associated with diverse adverse events, which has limited its use. We report a case of severe adverse skin reactions with neutropenic fever during imatinib treatment in a patient with GIST. A 71-year-old man was admitted with a one month history of epigastric pain and a palpable mass in the right upper quadrant. An abdominal CT scan revealed a 20 × 19 cm intraabdominal mass with tumor invasion into the peritoneum. Needle biopsy was performed and the results showed spindle shaped tumor cells that were positive for c-KIT. The patient was diagnosed with unresectable GIST. Imatinib 400 mg/day was started. The patient tolerated the first eight weeks of treatment. However, about three months later, the patient developed a grade 4 febrile neutropenia and a grade 3 exfoliative skin rash. The patient recovered from this serious adverse events after discontinuation of imatinib with supportive care. However, the skin lesions recurred whenever the patient received imatinib over 100 mg/day. Therefore, imatinib 100 mg/day was maintained. Despite the low dose imatinib, follow up CT showed a marked partial response without grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The recommended dose of imatinib for the treatment of GIST is 400 mg/day but patients at risk for adverse drug reaction may benefit from lower doses. Individualized treatment is needed for such patients, and we may also try sunitinib as a alternative drug

  17. Aspects of surgical treatment for gastro-intestinal stromal tumors; Chirurgische Therapieaspekte gastrointestinaler Stromatumoren

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    Hohenberger, P. [Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, Universitaet Heidelberg, Sektion Chirurgische Onkologie und Thoraxchirurgie, Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik, Mannheim (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Gastro-intestinal stromal tumors (GIST) form the commonest subgroup of soft tissue sarcomas. They arise in the muscular layer of the esophagus, stomach, small intestines and rectum. Characteristic and important for the assessment of the extent of tumors is the peripheral rim vascularization of primary tumors and metastases. Indications for resection are given for tumors larger than 2 cm in size. Locally advanced GISTs can be advantageously treated with imatinib/sunitinib as neoadjuvant and it is often possible to select a low level of resection for this size of tumor and when the rim area is not hypervascularized. Even in the metastizing stage surgical treatment can be used for elimination of resistant metastases or for removal of residual tumor tissue in an attempt to counteract secondary tumor progression. The effect of this treatment is currently being tested in a randomized phase III study. (orig.) [German] Gastrointestinale Stromatumoren (GIST) stellen die haeufigste Subgruppe von Weichgewebesarkomen dar. Sie entstehen in der Muskularisschicht von Oesophagus, Magen, Duenndarm und Rektum. Charakteristisch und wichtig fuer die Einschaetzung des Tumorausmasses ist die Randvaskularisation von Primaertumoren und Metastasen. Die Indikation zur Resektion gilt fuer Tumoren ab 2 cm Groesse. Lokal fortgeschrittene GIST koennen sehr vorteilhaft mit Imatinib/Sunitinib neoadjuvant vorbehandelt werden, und es ist oft moeglich, bei der Tumorgroesse und wenn keine hypervaskularisierten Randbereiche vorliegen, ein geringeres Resektionsausmass zu waehlen. Auch im metastasierten Stadium hat die chirurgische Therapie einen Platz zur Eliminierung resistenter Metastasen bzw. zur Entfernung von Residualtumorgewebe als Versuch, einer sekundaeren Tumorprogression zu begegnen. Dieser Behandlungseffekt wird derzeit in einer randomisierten Phase-III-Studie ueberprueft. (orig.)

  18. Imatinib and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST: a selective targeted therapy Imatinib y tumor del estroma gastrointestinal (GIST: un tratamiento selectivo frente a una diana molecular

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    A. Fernández

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors in the gastrointestinal tract. They originate from the interstitial cells of Cajal and are characterized by an anomalous receptor for a growth factor with tyrosine-kinase activity (c-kit. This anomaly causes a permanent activation of the receptor and uncontrolled cell growth. These tumors show a poor response to traditional chemotherapy drugs, and are thus associated with low survival in cases of advanced disease. Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is an example of selective targeted oncologic therapy that induces improved survival in these patients. We discuss two cases of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors with a good response to imatinib, and also review the pathophysiology and treatment-related outcome of this type of tumors. We include results from clinical phase-III studies.Los tumores del estroma gastrointestinal son los tumores mesenquimales más frecuentes del tracto digestivo y se originan de las células intersticiales de Cajal. Se caracterizan por presentar un receptor para el factor de crecimiento con actividad tirosin kinasa (c-kit anómalo que condiciona su activación permanente y un crecimiento celular incontrolado. Tienen una baja supervivencia en casos de enfermedad avanzada, con escasa respuesta a los agentes quimioterápicos tradicionales. El imatinib es un fármaco inhibidor de la tirosín kinasa y un ejemplo de terapia oncológica selectiva que condiciona un importante aumento en la supervivencia de estos pacientes. Se presentan 2 casos de enfermedad metastásica con buena respuesta a imatinib, así como una revisión sobre la fisiopatología y evolución en el tratamiento de este tipo de tumores, incluyendo resultados de estudios en fase III.

  19. Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumour: What do we know in 2017? A systematic review protocol

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    Surennaidoo Naiken

    2018-01-01

    Ethics and dissemination: The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York acknowledged that this systematic review is within the register scope. This review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and will be presented at various national and international conferences.

  20. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) assessment using {sup 18}F-fluordeoxyglucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massardo, L T; Gonzalez, P; Jaimovich, R [Nuclear Medicine Section, Medicine Department University of Chile Clinical Hospital (Chile); Jofrea, M J; Canessa, J; Sierralta, P [Molecular Imaging PET Center, Military Hospital, Santiago (Chile)

    2007-11-15

    Introduction: Stromal gastrointestinal tumors (GIST) are relatively infrequent soft sarcomas, although correspond to the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract. Surgery is the main therapy during initial stages. Nearly a third of them could be malignant (higher risk) depending on the localization, size and histological parameters. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy have low therapeutic value. Specific molecular therapy associated to surgery using imatinib-mesylate (GLIVEC ) - a selective transductor signal inhibitor for some tyrosine-kinase receptors -is currently use. It is helpful in non-resecables, recurrent or metastatic tumors. Metabolic fluorine I8-deoxyglucose (FDG) allows to characterize tumor behavior demonstrating good predictive value. Promising results have been obtained using adjuvant and neoadjuvant protocols. There are some multicenter in-course trials including FDG in order to evaluate early response to GLIVEC therapy. Other recently developed molecules such as sunitinib malate (SUTENT) are used in non-responders. Method: We have performed 18 FDG studies to 15 GIST patients referred from different centers in a period of 48 months, corresponding approximately to 1% of all cancers in adults. and to 6% of gastrointestinal tumors. The mean age of the group was 57{+-}10.6 y.o., ranging from 33-72 years, 60% of the patients were male. GIST primary localization corresponded to jejunum or ileum (4), duodenum (3), esophagus, stomach (1) besides, 2 retroperitoneal/extra intestinal cases and 5 disseminated cases with no clear origin site. Eight out of fifteen patients presented known dissemination when FDG was performed. PET-FDG was performed to assess: a) medical therapy control in 9 cases: 7 with GLIVEC, 1 with SUTENT post GLIVEC and 1 post chemotherapy, b) re-staging in 6 and c) staging in the other 3 cases (1 submitted to surgery and l extensive tumor to decide GLIVEC therapy). All but one patients already had surgery performed with a mean

  1. Cerebral relapse of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor during treatment with imatinib mesylate: Case report

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    Waring Paul

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs has previously been difficult as they are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The development of imatinib mesylate has made a major impact on the management of advanced GISTs. It is apparent that there are sanctuary sites such as the central nervous system where imatinib does not achieve adequate concentrations. We describe the case of a man with metastatic GIST who experienced multiple cerebral relapses of disease while systemic disease progression appeared to be controlled by imatinib. Case presentation A 47-year-old man presented in July 1999 with a jejunal GIST with multiple hepatic metastases. The jejunal primary was resected and after unsuccessful cytoreductive chemotherapy, the liver metastases were also resected in December 1999. The patient subsequently relapsed in August 2001 with symptomatic hepatic, subcutaneous gluteal, left choroidal and right ocular metastases all confirmed on CT and PET scanning. Biopsy confirmed recurrent GIST. MRI and lumbar puncture excluded central nervous system involvement. The patient was commenced on imatinib 400 mg bd in September 2001 through a clinical trial. The symptoms improved with objective PET and CT scan response until December 2002 when the patient developed a right-sided foot drop. MRI scan showed a left parasagittal tumor which was resected and confirmed histologically to be metastatic GIST. Imatinib was ceased pre-operatively due to the trial protocol but recommenced in February 2003 on a compassionate use program. The left parasagittal metastasis recurred and required subsequent re-excision in September 2003 and January 2004. Control of the systemic GIST was temporarily lost on reduction of the dose of imatinib (due to limited drug supply but on increasing the dose back to 800 mg per day, systemic disease was stabilized for a period of time before generalised progression

  2. Cerebral relapse of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor during treatment with imatinib mesylate: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Brett; Yip, Desmond; Goldstein, David; Waring, Paul; Beshay, Victoria; Chong, Guan

    2004-01-01

    The management of unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) has previously been difficult as they are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The development of imatinib mesylate has made a major impact on the management of advanced GISTs. It is apparent that there are sanctuary sites such as the central nervous system where imatinib does not achieve adequate concentrations. We describe the case of a man with metastatic GIST who experienced multiple cerebral relapses of disease while systemic disease progression appeared to be controlled by imatinib. A 47-year-old man presented in July 1999 with a jejunal GIST with multiple hepatic metastases. The jejunal primary was resected and after unsuccessful cytoreductive chemotherapy, the liver metastases were also resected in December 1999. The patient subsequently relapsed in August 2001 with symptomatic hepatic, subcutaneous gluteal, left choroidal and right ocular metastases all confirmed on CT and PET scanning. Biopsy confirmed recurrent GIST. MRI and lumbar puncture excluded central nervous system involvement. The patient was commenced on imatinib 400 mg bd in September 2001 through a clinical trial. The symptoms improved with objective PET and CT scan response until December 2002 when the patient developed a right-sided foot drop. MRI scan showed a left parasagittal tumor which was resected and confirmed histologically to be metastatic GIST. Imatinib was ceased pre-operatively due to the trial protocol but recommenced in February 2003 on a compassionate use program. The left parasagittal metastasis recurred and required subsequent re-excision in September 2003 and January 2004. Control of the systemic GIST was temporarily lost on reduction of the dose of imatinib (due to limited drug supply) but on increasing the dose back to 800 mg per day, systemic disease was stabilized for a period of time before generalised progression occurred. This case illustrates that the brain can be a

  3. Small bowel Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors can physiologically alter gut motility before causing mechanical obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Kothari, Manish S; Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Meyrick-Thomas, John

    2005-01-01

    Background Gastro Intestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are rare stromal neoplasms that represent the most common mesenchymal tumor of the G.I. tract, accounting for 5% of all sarcomas [1,2]. Originating from interstitial cells of Cajal, which are regulators of gut peristalsis, they are preferentially located in the stomach and the small intestine [3] and clinical presentation is variable, ranging from vague complaints to major G.I. bleeding. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for pa...

  4. Predictive value and modeling analysis of MSCT signs in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) to pathological risk degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J-K

    2017-03-01

    By analyzing MSCT (multi-slice computed tomography) signs with different risks in gastrointestinal stromal tumors, this paper aimed to discuss the predictive value and modeling analysis of MSCT signs in GISTs (gastrointestinal stromal tumor) to pathological risk degree. 100 cases of primary GISTs with abdominal and pelvic MSCT scan were involved in this study. All MSCT scan findings and enhanced findings were analyzed and compared among cases with different risk degree of pathology. Then GISTs diagnostic model was established by using support vector machine (SVM) algorithm, and its diagnostic value was evaluated as well. All lesions were solitary, among which there were 46 low-risk cases, 24 medium-risk cases and 30 high-risk cases. For all high-risk, medium-risk and low-risk GISTs, there were statistical differences in tumor growth pattern, size, shape, fat space, with or without calcification, ulcer, enhancement method and peritumoral and intratumoral vessels (pvalue at each period (plain scan, arterial phase, venous phase) (p>0.05). The apparent difference lied in plain scan, arterial phase and venous phase for each risk degree. The diagnostic accuracy of SVM diagnostic model established with 10 imaging features as indexes was 70.0%, and it was especially reliable when diagnosing GISTs of high or low risk. Preoperative analysis of MSCT features is clinically significant for its diagnosis of risk degree and prognosis; GISTs diagnostic model established on the basis of SVM possesses high diagnostic value.

  5. An Intra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumor, Embedded in the Pancreas, Preoperatively Diagnosed as an Extragastric Growing Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

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    Mari Mizuno

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old woman was found to have a pancreatic tumor by abdominal ultrasound performed for a medical check-up. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a hypovascular tumor measuring 30 mm in diameter in the pancreatic tail. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration was performed. An extragastric growing gastrointestinal stromal tumor was thereby diagnosed preoperatively, and surgical resection was planned. Laparoscopic surgery was attempted but conversion to open surgery was necessitated by extensive adhesions, and distal pancreatectomy, splenectomy, and partial gastrectomy were performed. The histological diagnosis was an intra-abdominal desmoid tumor. A desmoid tumor is a fibrous soft tissue tumor arising in the fascia and musculoaponeurotic tissues. It usually occurs in the extremities and abdominal wall, and only rarely in the abdominal cavity. We experienced a case with an intra-abdominal desmoid tumor that was histologically diagnosed after laparotomy, which had been preoperatively diagnosed as an extragastric growing gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Although rare, desmoid tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intra-abdominal tumors. Herein, we report this case with a literature review.

  6. Surgical management of acutely presenting gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach among elderly: experience of an emergency surgery department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Luigi; Arru, Giovanni Maria Antonio; Piras, Mario; Fiume, Stefania; Gemini, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), requiring often an emergency surgical management, is extremely rare among elderly. We aimed to present the experience of the Emergency Surgery Department, Brotzu Hospital, in the management of elderly patients with GIST related emergencies. This study was carried out on 12 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors who presented to in an emergency situation during the period from January 2010 to December 2013. All patients' data, clinical presentations, surgical procedures, complications, and survival data were collected and analyzed. Between 2010 and 2013, 12 patients (8 males and 4 females), with a mean age of 70 years (range: 65-79 years) were admitted with different emergency presentations of clinically and radiologically suspected GISTs. The incidence of proximal obstruction was 41.7% of all gastric GIST cases, resulting acute gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation in 41.7% and 16.6% respectively. The mean length of hospitalization was 9.1 ± 2.3 days and there were no posterative complications or mortalities. At a mean follow-up of 21 months, 11 patients (91.6%) were alive and disease free. Although GISTs are uncommon among elderly, their incidence is increasing especially in their emergency presentation and surgeon should be prepared to treat this condition following the principles of GIST surgery as stated by the GIST consensus conference. In conclusion our data demonstrate that age itself does not affect the outcome of surgical treatment of GISTs in emergency situation. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bariatric surgery and incidental gastrointestinal stromal tumors - a single-center study: VSJ Competition, 1st place.

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    Walędziak, Maciej; Różańska-Walędziak, Anna; Kowalewski, Piotr K; Janik, Michał R; Brągoszewski, Jakub; Paśnik, Krzysztof

    2017-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), originating from Cajal cells, are most commonly located in the stomach; therefore they can be found in the specimens excised during bariatric operations. The global prevalence of GISTs is about 130 cases per million population. Morbidity differs depending on geographical latitude. Although surgery is the treatment of choice for GISTs, 40-50% of patients after radical surgical treatment will have a relapse or metastases. To analyze the incidence of GISTs in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and to verify whether an operation performed according to the bariatric protocol is oncologically radical in case of GIST. A single-center retrospective study. The study group comprised 1252 obese patients qualified for bariatric procedures, with no upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasms found during preoperative diagnostic examinations. In case of suspicious macroscopic pathologies (n = 81) present during the operation, tissue specimens underwent histopathological examination with further investigation performed if GISTs were found, including tumor size and localization, mitotic index and immunohistochemical analysis. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors were found in 16 cases, and benign tumors of various histological origin in 33 cases. All cases of GIST found came from stomach specimens, 7 from the gastric corpus vs. 9 from the fundus. Fourteen GISTs were found during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomies (LSGs) vs. 2 during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses (LRYGBs). In case of incidental findings of GISTs during bariatric surgery, tumor resection with negative margins of incision may be considered as complete oncological treatment if there was very low/low risk stratification of GIST's recurrence after surgery.

  8. Activity and side effects of imatinib in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors: data from a german multicenter trial

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    Schlemmer M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST are mesenchymal tumors that in the past were classified as leiomyosarcomas or leiomyomas not responding to standard sarcoma chemotherapy. In several phase I and II trials the efficacy and safety of imatinib was shown before the largest trial ever performed in a single sarcoma entity revealed response rates (CR/PR of 52%. This multicenter phase II trial presented here was performed to open access to imatinib for patients with unresectable or metastastatic GIST when the EORTC 62005 trial had been closed before imatinib was approved in Germany. It was designed to follow the best clinical response and to assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of imatinib 400 mg/d in patients with unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor. 95 patients were treated in this trial with Imatinib 400 mg/d. Four patients (4.6% attained a complete response and 26 patients (29.9% a partial response to imatinib treatment. Forty-one patients (47.1% revealed a stable disease and 16 patients (18.4% had a progressive disease. Of the progressive patients 22% showed a partial response and 67% showed stable disease after escalating the dose to 800 mg. According to SWOG tumor response classification, 66 patients (70% were free of progression within the first year of treatment. Seventy-one patients (74.7% experienced adverse events or severe adverse events with a suspected relationship to the study drug. Among these, the most common were nausea (n = 27 patients, 28.4%, eyelid edema and peripheral edema in 23 patients each (24.2%, diarrhea in 20 patients (21.1%, muscle cramps in 15 patients (15.8% and fatigue in 13 patients (13.7%. Imatinib 400 mg/d led to disease stabilisation in 81,6% of patients with unresectable or metastatic malignant GIST. Thirty-four percent of patients attained a tumor remission (partial or complete response. The safety profile of imatinib based on adverse event assessment is favorable

  9. Extra-Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of Retroperitoneal Origin: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Hyung Sik; Park, Yul Ri; Choi, Hye Young [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon Medical Center, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGIST) are relatively rare, and cases originating in the retroperitoneum even rarer. We report a 60-year-old woman who presented with an EGIST originating in the retroperitoneum. Computed tomography results demonstrated a soft tissue mass on the right side of the retroperitoneum. The tumor abutted the duodenum, head of the pancreas, and right kidney. The mass was surgically proven to be a retroperitoneal tumor and histopathologically proven to be a retroperitoneal EGIST.

  10. A Large Cystic Variant of Gastro-intestinal Stromal Tumour arising from the Jejunum: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Salman Tehran; Upwanshi, Manish Harinarayan; Shetty, Tilakdas S; Ghetla, Smruti R; Gheewala, Hussain

    2015-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) represent a mesenchymal neoplasm arising from the interstitial cells of cajal occurring mainly in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we present a case of a large GIST arising from the jejunum with cystic presentation unlike the usual presentation as a solid mass. A 50-year-old male patient came with complaint of a painless mobile lump in abdomen of approximately 25 cm in size which had gradually increased over two years. Clinically mesenteric cyst was suspected. Intra-operatively the mass was a 30x25 cm cyst with approximately 2500 ml serous fluid present inside it arising from the anti-mesenteric border of the jejunum, adherent to the jejunum, appendix and the dome of the bladder. The fluid was aspirated and the mass excised along with resection of the involved jejunal segment and appendectomy was done. Diagnosis was confirmed on immunohistochemistry study. Imatinib Mesylate 400 mg OD was started as adjuvant therapy in view of the high risk of metastasis.

  11. Robot-Assisted Excision of a Pararectal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Patient with Previous Ileal Neobladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ploumidis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract with surgical resection remaining the cornerstone of therapy. Pararectal lesions are considered to be technically difficult and pose in some cases a challenge. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first robotic-assisted pararectal GIST excision. A 43-year-old man was referred to our center with pararectal GIST recurrence, despite treatment with targeted therapy. Eleven years ago, he underwent extensive abdominal surgery including cystoprostatectomy with ileal neobladder diversion due to GIST resection in the rectoprostatic space. Robot-assisted surgical resection was successfully performed without the need for temporary colostomy. The postoperative course of the patient was uneventful, and the pathology report confirmed a GIST recurrence with negative surgical margins and pelvic lymph nodes free of any tumor. Robotic-assisted pelvic surgery can be extended to incorporate excision of pararectal GISTs, as a safe, less invasive surgical alternative with promising oncological results and minimal injury to adjacent structures.

  12. miRNA-218-loaded carboxymethyl chitosan - Tocopherol nanoparticle to suppress the proliferation of gastrointestinal stromal tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Lin; Wang, Ming; Zhao, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Zi-Zhen; Tang, De-Feng; Zhang, Ye-Qian [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Cao, Hui, E-mail: caohui10281@163.com [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Zhang, Zhi-Gang, E-mail: zhangzhiganggz@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Oncogenes and Related Genes, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are one of the most common forms of mesenchymal cancers of the gastrointestinal tract. Although chemotherapeutic drugs inhibited the proliferation of GIST, however, sizable proportion of people developed resistance and therefore difficult to treat. In the present study, O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMC)-tocopherol polymer conjugate was synthesized and formulated into stable polymeric nanoparticles. The main aim of present study was to increase the therapeutic efficacy of miR-218 in GIST. The mean size of nanoparticles was ~ 110 nm with a spherical shape. The miR-218 NP has been shown inhibit the cell proliferation and exhibited a superior cell apoptosis. The miR-218 NP inhibited the cell invasion and promoted the apoptosis of GIST cancer cells. In the present study, we have successfully showed that KIT1 is the target gene of miR-218 as shown by the luciferase reporter assay. These findings collectively suggest the miR-218 loaded nanoparticle by virtue of effective transfection could act as a tumor suppressor miRNA in the treatment of GIST. - Highlights: • O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMC)-tocopherol polymer conjugate was synthesized and formulated in nanoparticles. • The miR-218 NP has been shown inhibit the cell proliferation and exhibited a superior cell apoptosis. • We have successfully showed that KIT1 is the target gene of miR-218 as shown by the luciferase reporter assay.

  13. Dose–Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ronald C.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Killoran, Joseph H.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose–volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)–based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman’s correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU–based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

  14. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: A Genetic Mechanism of Imatinib Resistance in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor-Where Are We a Decade Later?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonescu, Cristina R; DeMatteo, Ronald P

    2015-08-01

    In the June 1, 2005, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, Antonescu and colleagues defined second-site KIT mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) as the leading mechanism of acquired resistance to imatinib. Secondary mutations were detectable mainly in KIT exon 11 mutant GISTs after prolonged initial clinical responses. These findings played a critical role in designing the next generation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach for pericardia with gastric posterior wall of gastrointestinal stromal tumor: analysis of 52 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Po; Zhao, Yongjie

    2014-12-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract and most frequently developed in the stomach, and surgical therapy is limited on removal of the tumor lesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical values of endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach for pericardial GISTs within gastric posterior wall. Surgical outcome and clinical data of 52 patients with pericardial GISTs within gastric posterior wall treated at Tianjin Peoples' Hospital from January 2004 to October 2013 were analyzed. Endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach was used as an operative procedure for tumor resection ranged from 10 to 50 mm. Endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography and microscopic findings all certified the gastric spindle type GIST locating in the submucosa to muscle proper. Endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach was attempted in 52 patients (male/female: 31/21) with median age of 51 years (25-71 years). The median operating time was 80 min (range: 40-120 min) and median intra-operative blood loss was 26 ml (range: 10-50 ml). The median hospital stay was 5 days (range: 4-6 days), while the median tumor size was 25 mm (range: 7-50 mm). All operative margins were clear. There were no recurrences or metastases of all patients in a median follow-up of 24 months (range: 6-36 months). Endo-laparoscopic rendezvous approach is considered to represent the next revolution in surgery. The new technique is reliable and effective in clinical application, due to the advantages of accurate and quick localization for pericardial GIST within gastric posterior wall.

  16. Imatinib mesylate induces responses in patients with liver metastases from gastrointestinal stromal tumor failing intra-arterial hepatic chemotherapy

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    Fiorentini Giammaria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imatinib mesylate represents a real major paradigm shift in cancer therapy, targeting the specific molecular abnormalities, crucial in the etiology of tumor. Intra-arterial hepatic chemotherapy (IAHC followed by embolization, has been considered an interesting palliative option for patients with liver metastases from gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST, due to the typically hypervascular pattern of the tumor. Aims: We report our experience with IAHC followed by Imatinib mesylate, in order to show the superiority of the specific molecular approach in liver metastases from GIST. Materials and Methods: Three patients (pts with pretreated massive liver metastases from GIST, received IAHC with Epirubicin 50 mg/mq, every 3 weeks for 6 cycles. At the evidence of progression, they received Imatinib mesylate. Results: We observed progressive diseases in all cases. In 1998, one patient underwent Thalidomide at 150 mg orally, every day for 4 months, with evidence of stable disease and clinical improvement. In 2001, two patients received Imatinib mesylate at 400 mg orally, every day, with evidence of partial response lasting 18+ months and 16 months. One of them had grade 3 neutropenia, with suspension of therapy for 3 weeks. Conclusion: No patient treated with IAHC, reported objective responses, but two of them obtained partial response after the assumption of Imatinib mesylate and one showed temporary stabilization with thalidomide. Imatinib mesylate represents a new opportunity in GIST therapy, targeting the specific molecular alteration. It seems to be superior to conventional intra arterial hepatic chemotherapy.

  17. Circulating levels of cell adhesion molecule L1 as a prognostic marker in gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zander, Hilke; Kaifi, Jussuf; Rawnaq, Tamina; Wedemeyer, Max von; Tachezy, Michael; Kunkel, Miriam; Wolters, Gerrit; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Schachner, Melitta; Izbicki, Jakob R

    2011-01-01

    L1 cell adhesion molecule (CD171) is expressed in many malignant tumors and its expression correlates with unfavourable outcome. It thus represents a target for tumor diagnosis and therapy. An earlier study conducted by our group identified L1 expression levels in primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) as a prognostic marker. The aim of the current study was to compare L1 serum levels of GIST patients with those of healthy controls and to determine whether levels of soluble L1 in sera could serve as a prognostic marker. Using a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), soluble L1 was measured in sera of 93 GIST patients und 151 healthy controls. Soluble L1 levels were then correlated with clinicopathological data. Median levels of soluble L1 were significantly higher (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U test) in sera of GIST patients compared to healthy individuals. Median soluble L1 levels were particularly elevated in patients with recurrence and relapse (p < 0.05; Mann Whitney U test). These results suggest that high soluble L1 levels predict poor prognosis and may thus be a promising tumor marker that can contribute to individualise therapy

  18. [Radical Resection of Huge Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Stomach Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with lmatinib - ACase Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Yoko; Kato, Hiroaki; Shiraishi, Osamu; Tanaka, Yumiko; Iwama, Mitsuru; Yasuda, Atsushi; Shinkai, Masayuki; Kimura, Yutaka; Imano, Motohiro; Imamoto, Haruhiko; Yasuda, Takushi

    2017-11-01

    The usefulness and safety of imatinibfor neoadjuvant chemotherapy for resectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor(GIST) has not been established. We reported a case of a huge GIST of the stomach that was safely resected following preoperative imatinibtherapy. A 69-year-old man was hospitalized with abdominal fullness which increased rapidly from a month ago. A CT scan showed a huge tumor containing solid and cystic component which was accompanied by an extra-wall nodule. The tumor was strongly suspected to be originated from the stomach and EUS-FNA revealed GIST. We diagnosed GIST of the stomach and initiated preoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib because there was a risk for the break of tumor capsule and composite resection of the other organs without prior chemotherapy. After the administration of imatinib4 00 mg/day for 6months, the solid component was decreased in size and its' activity by PET-CT had declined, but the size of the cystic component was not changed and the patient's complaint of fullness was not reduced. Then, after a week cessation of imatinib, we performed surgical removal of the tumor with partial gastrectomy without surgical complication during and after the operation. Imatinibwas resumed 2 weeks later postoperatively and 1 year and 8 months has passed since the operation without recurrence. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with imatinibhas the potential to become an important therapeutic option for the treatment of huge GISTs.

  19. Dose and volume effects of gastrointestinal toxicity during neoadjuvant IMRT for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, A. L.; Vogelius, I. R.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    . Materials and Methods: We explored dose metrics correlating with acute diarrhea and chemotherapy compliance for a single-institution cohort of rectal cancer patients (n=115) treated with IMRT. Acute diarrhea during treatment was scored prospectively by trained RT nurses (CTCAE v3.0). The highest toxicity.......03) and patients with diabetes (OR=7.29, 1.21-43.8, p=0.03). Age, brachytherapy boost, prior abdominal surgery, smoking history, or domestic status had no influence on any of the two endpoints, nor had concurrent chemotherapy on the risk of acute diarrhea. Conclusions: We found that dose to the intestinal cavity...

  20. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) of the Stomach: Retrospective Experience with Surgical Resection at the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NAGUIB, Sh.F.; ZAGHLOUL, A.S.; El MARAKBY, H.

    2008-01-01

    Gastric Gist's account for more than half of all gastrointestinal stromal tumors and represent less than 5% of all gastric tumors. The peak age for harboring Gist of the stomach is around 60 years and a slight male preponderance is reported. These tumors are identified by expression of CD117 or CD34 antigen. Symptoms at presentation usually include bleeding, ab¬dominal pain or abdominal mass. Endoscopically, they typically appear as a submucosal mass with or without ulceration and on CT scans an extra gastric mass is usually seen. Complete surgical resection provides the only chance for cure, with only l-2 cm free margins needed. However, local recurrence and/or metastases supervene in almost half the patients treated with surgery alone, even when no gross residual is left. Thereby imatinib mesylate was advocated as an adjuvant to surgery, which appears to have improved disease-free and overall survival. Aim of the Work: The aim of this work was to assess clinico-pathological features of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) of the stomach and to appraise the results of treatment by surgery in patients treated at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of Cairo between January 2002 and December 2007. Patients and Methods: Nineteen patients with histologically and immuno-histochemically proven GIST of the stomach were treated by surgery at the NCI during the 6-year study period. Preoperative assessment included detailed history, clinical examination, full laboratory tests, endoscopy, abdominal ultrasound and CT. General medical assessment included chest X-ray, ECG and echocardiography. Results: The patients' age ranged from 26 to 77 years with a median of 51 years. Obvious male/female preponderance was noticed (68.4% to 31.6%). Tumors were located at the upper 1/3 in 42.1%, at the middle 1/3 in 31.6% and at the lower 1/3 in 26.3%. The most common clinical presentation was related to bleeding (hematemesis, melena or anaemia) and was seen in 63.2%. No tumors were

  1. Functional role of the Ca2+-activated Cl− channel DOG1/TMEM16A in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, Erik; Akcakaya, Pinar; Berglund, David; Karlsson, Fredrik; Vukojević, Vladana; Lee, Linkiat; Bogdanović, Darko; Lui, Weng-Onn; Larsson, Catharina; Zedenius, Jan; Fröbom, Robin; Bränström, Robert

    2014-01-01

    DOG1, a Ca 2+ -activated Cl − channel (CaCC), was identified in 2004 to be robustly expressed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). It was rapidly included as a tumor marker in routine diagnostics, but the functional role remained unknown. CaCCs are important regulators of normal physiological functions, but also implicated in tumorigenesis, cancer progression, metastasis, cell migration, apoptosis, proliferation and viability in several malignancies. We therefore investigated whether DOG1 plays a role in the three latter in GIST by utilizing in vitro cell model systems. Confocal microscopy identified different subcellular localizations of DOG1 in imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant cells. Electrophysiological studies confirmed that DOG1-specific pharmacological agents possess potent activating and inhibiting properties. Proliferation assays showed small effects up to 72 h, and flow cytometric analysis of adherent cells with 7-AAD/Annexin V detected no pharmacological effects on viable GIST cells. However, inhibition of DOG1 conveyed pro-apoptotic effects among early apoptotic imatinib-resistant cells. In conclusion, DOG1 generates Cl − currents in GIST that can be regulated pharmacologically, with small effects on cell viability and proliferation in vitro. Inhibition of DOG1 might act pro-apoptotic on some early apoptotic GIST cell populations. Further studies are warranted to fully illuminate the function of DOG1 and its potential as therapeutic target. - Highlights: • Subcellular DOG1 localization varies between GIST cells. • DOG1 in GIST is voltage- and Ca 2+ -activated. • Known TMEM16A modulators, like A01 and Eact, modulate DOG1. • DOG1 has small effects on cell viability and proliferation in vitro. • DOG1 impact early apoptotic GIST cells to undergo late apoptosis

  2. SDHA loss of function mutations in a subset of young adult wild-type gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Italiano, Antoine; Chen, Chun-Liang; Sung, Yun-Shao; Singer, Samuel; DeMatteo, Ronald P; LaQuaglia, Michael P; Besmer, Peter; Socci, Nicholas; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2012-01-01

    A subset of KIT/PDGFRA wild-type gastrointestinal stromal tumors (WT GIST) have been associated with alteration of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex II function. A recent report identified four non-syndromic, KIT/PDGFRA WT GIST harboring compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations in SDHA encoding the main subunit of the SDH complex II. Next generation sequencing was applied on five pediatric and one young adult WT GIST, by whole exome capture and SOLiD 3-plus system sequencing. The putative mutations were first confirmed by Sanger sequencing and then screened on a larger panel of 11 pediatric and young adult WT GIST, including 5 in the context of Carney triad. A germline p.Arg31X nonsense SDHA mutation was identified in one of the six cases tested by SOLiD platform. An additional p.D38V missense mutation in SDHA exon 2 was identified by Sanger sequencing in the extended KIT/PDGFRA WT GIST patients cohort. Western blotting showed loss of SDHA expression in the two cases harboring SDHA mutations, while expression being retained in the other WT GIST tumors. Results were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry for both SDHA and SDHB, which showed a concurrent loss of expression of both proteins in SDHA-mutant lesions, while the remaining WT tumors showed only loss of SDHB expression. Germline and/or somatic aberrations of SDHA occur in a small subset of KIT/PDGFRA WT GISTs, outside the Carney’s triad and are associated with loss of both SDHA and SDHB protein expression. Mutations of the SDH complex II are more particularly associated with KIT/PDGFRA WT GIST occurring in young adults. Although pediatric GIST consistently display alterations of SDHB protein expression, further molecular studies are needed to identify the crucial genes involved in their tumorigenesis

  3. GSTT1 copy number gain and ZNF overexpression are predictors of poor response to imatinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Jin Lee

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs predict prognosis and therapeutic responses to imatinib. In wild-type GISTs, the tumor-initiating events are still unknown, and wild-type GISTs are resistant to imatinib therapy. We performed an association study between copy number alterations (CNAs identified from array CGH and gene expression analyses results for four wild-type GISTs and an imatinib-resistant PDGFRA D842V mutant GIST, and compared the results to those obtained from 27 GISTs with KIT mutations. All wild-type GISTs had multiple CNAs, and CNAs in 1p and 22q that harbor the SDHB and GSTT1 genes, respectively, correlated well with expression levels of these genes. mRNA expression levels of all SDH gene subunits were significantly lower (P≤0.041, whereas mRNA expression levels of VEGF (P=0.025, IGF1R (P=0.026, and ZNFs (P<0.05 were significantly higher in GISTs with wild-type/PDGFRA D842V mutations than GISTs with KIT mutations. qRT-PCR validation of the GSTT1 results in this cohort and 11 additional malignant GISTs showed a significant increase in the frequency of GSTT1 CN gain and increased mRNA expression of GSTT1 in wild-type/PDGFRA D842V GISTs than KIT-mutant GISTs (P=0.033. Surprisingly, all four malignant GISTs with KIT exon 11 deletion mutations with primary resistance to imatinib had an increased GSTT1 CN and mRNA expression level of GSTT1. Increased mRNA expression of GSTT1 and ZNF could be predictors of a poor response to imatinib. Our integrative approach reveals that for patients with wild-type (or imatinib-resistant GISTs, attempts to target VEGFRs and IGF1R may be reasonable options.

  4. Accuracy and feasibility of estimated tumour volumetry in primary gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours: validation using semiautomated technique in 127 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Shinagare, Atul B; O'Neill, Ailbhe C; Nishino, Mizuki; Rosenthal, Michael H; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2016-01-01

    To validate estimated tumour volumetry in primary gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) using semiautomated volumetry. In this IRB-approved retrospective study, we measured the three longest diameters in x, y, z axes on CTs of primary gastric GISTs in 127 consecutive patients (52 women, 75 men, mean age 61 years) at our institute between 2000 and 2013. Segmented volumes (Vsegmented) were obtained using commercial software by two radiologists. Estimate volumes (V1-V6) were obtained using formulae for spheres and ellipsoids. Intra- and interobserver agreement of Vsegmented and agreement of V1-6 with Vsegmented were analysed with concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and Bland-Altman plots. Median Vsegmented and V1-V6 were 75.9, 124.9, 111.6, 94.0, 94.4, 61.7 and 80.3 cm(3), respectively. There was strong intra- and interobserver agreement for Vsegmented. Agreement with Vsegmented was highest for V6 (scalene ellipsoid, x ≠ y ≠ z), with CCC of 0.96 [95 % CI 0.95-0.97]. Mean relative difference was smallest for V6 (0.6 %), while it was -19.1 % for V5, +14.5 % for V4, +17.9 % for V3, +32.6 % for V2 and +47 % for V1. Ellipsoidal approximations of volume using three measured axes may be used to closely estimate Vsegmented when semiautomated techniques are unavailable. Estimation of tumour volume in primary GIST using mathematical formulae is feasible. Gastric GISTs are rarely spherical. Segmented volumes are highly concordant with three axis-based scalene ellipsoid volumes. Ellipsoid volume can be used as an alternative for automated tumour volumetry.

  5. Spontaneous rupture of pedunculate gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor into the gastrocelic ligament presenting as a stalked mass surrounded by loculated hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Ahn, Sung Eun; Park, Seong Jin; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Dong Ho; Kim, Yong Ho [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is one of the most common mesenchymal tumors of the stomach, which may be asymptomatic or cause symptoms such as pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and obstruction. Hemoperitoneum due to spontaneous rupture of the tumor is an extremely rare complication. We described a case of a 52-year-old man with a large pedunculated GIST causing loculated hematoma within the gastrocolic ligament. The patient visited our hospital due to a 3 week history of epigastric pain. A computed tomography scan revealed a 10.3 x 7.5 x 9.4 cm sized mass that was growing exophytically from the greater curvature of the stomach and was surrounded by loculated hematoma within the gastrocolic ligament. Laparotomy revealed a large stalked gastric mass surrounded by loculated hematoma within the gastrocolic ligament and blood fluid in the peritoneal cavity. Pathologic examination confirmed a GIST, of the high risk group.

  6. Differentiation of large (≥5 cm) gastrointestinal stromal tumors from benign subepithelial tumors in the stomach: Radiologists’ performance using CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ye Ra [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung, E-mail: shkim7071@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun-Ah [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Cheong-il [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Seong Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To identify significant CT findings for the differentiation of large (≥5 cm) gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) from benign subepithelial tumors and to assess whether radiologists’ performance in differentiation is improved with knowledge of significant CT criteria. Materials and methods: One-hundred twenty patients with pathologically proven large (≥5 cm) GISTs (n = 99), schwannomas (n = 16), and leiomyomas (n = 5) who underwent CT were enrolled. Two radiologists (A and B) retrospectively reviewed their CT images in consensus for the location, size, degree and pattern of enhancement, contour, growth pattern and the presence of calcification, necrosis, surface ulceration, or enlarged lymph nodes. CT findings considered significant for differentiation were determined using uni- and multivariate statistical analyses. Thereafter, two successive review sessions for the differentiation of GIST from non-GIST were independently performed by two other reviewers (C and D) with different expertise of 2 and 9 years using a 5-point confidence scale. At the first session, reviewers interpreted CT images without knowledge of significant CT findings. At the second session, the results of statistical analyses were provided to the reviewers. To assess improvement in radiologists’ performance, a pairwise comparison of receiver operating curves (ROC) was performed. Results: Heterogeneous enhancement, presence of necrosis, absence of lymph nodes, and mean size of ≥6 cm were found to be significant for differentiating GIST from schwannoma (P < 0.05). Non-cardial location, heterogeneous enhancement, and presence of necrosis were differential CT features of GIST from leiomyoma (P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses indicated that absence of enlarged LNs was the only statistically significant variable for GIST differentiating from schwannoma. The area under the curve of both reviewers obtained using ROC significantly increased from 0.682 and 0.613 to 0.903 and 0

  7. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours: Correlation of modified NIH risk stratification with diffusion-weighted MR imaging as an imaging biomarker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Seong Hyun; Jang, Kyung Mi; Choi, Dongil; Ha, Sang Yun; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Min Ji

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Except size and necrosis, conventional MR findings of GISTs were not significantly different according to the modified NIH criteria. • The ADC values of GISTs were negatively correlated with the modified NIH criteria. • The ADC value can be helpful for the determination of intermediate or high-risk GISTs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlation of risk grade of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) based on modified National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria with conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging. Methods: We included 22 patients with histopathologically proven GISTs in the stomach or small bowel who underwent pre-operative gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging and DW imaging. We retrospectively assessed correlations between morphologic findings, qualitative (signal intensity, consensus from two observers) and quantitative (degree of dynamic enhancement using signal intensity of tumour/muscle ratio and apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC]) values, and the modified NIH criteria for risk stratification. Spearman partial correlation analysis was used to control for tumour size as a confounding factor. The optimal cut-off level of ADC values for intermediate or high risk GISTs was analyzed using a receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Except tumour size and necrosis, conventional MR imaging findings, including the degree of dynamic enhancement, were not significantly different according to the modified NIH criteria (p > 0.05). Tumour ADC values were negatively correlated with the modified NIH criteria, before and after adjustment of tumour size (ρ = −0.754; p < 0.001 and ρ = −0.513; p = 0.017, respectively). The optimal cut-off value for the determination of intermediate or high-risk GISTs was 1.279 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s (100% sensitivity, 69.2% specificity, 81.8% accuracy). Conclusion: Except tumour size and necrosis, conventional MR imaging findings did not correlate with

  8. Development of nano radiopharmaceutical based on Bevacizumab labelled with Technetium-99m for early diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Thais Ligiero

    2015-01-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is an essential activity to improve nuclear medicine, and essential for the early and effective diagnosis of oncological diseases. Among the various possibilities current research in the world, the radiopharmaceuticals to chemotherapeutic base may be the most effective in detecting tumors, particularly Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST), the Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors. However, difficulties in directing, as well as adhesion of the radiopharmaceutical in the desired location, are currently the main problems in the early detection and treatment of some of these tumors. Advances in the field of nanotechnology, particularly in recent years, indicate significant contribution to overcoming these obstacles, particularly in the implementation of molecular barriers as well as the functionalization of the nanoparticles, thereby improving targeting by the use of surface nucleotides, and the increased adhesion, which facilitates the release of the drug and therefore increases the chances of early diagnosis and more effective treatment. This study aimed to the production, characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity, as well as in vivo biodistribution test Bevacizumab nanoparticles labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide for detection of type GIST tumors. Bevacizumab was encapsulated in the form of nanoparticles by the emulsification method using double poly-acetic acid and polyvinyl alcohol polymers (PLA / PVA) at a concentration of 2% of the monoclonal antibody. The characterization of the nanoparticles was performed by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity assessment was performed by XTT assay with various cell lines of solid tumor cells. The labeling with technetium-99m was done by the direct method, and its yield determined by paper chromatography using paper Whatmam 1 as the stationary phase and acetone as mobile phase. In the biodistribution study

  9. The outcome and predictive factors of sunitinib therapy in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) after imatinib failure - one institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, Piotr; Osuch, Czesław; Mierzejewska, Ewa; Wasielewski, Kacper; Woźniak, Agnieszka; Grzesiakowska, Urszula; Nowecki, Zbigniew I; Siedlecki, Janusz A; Limon, Janusz; Bylina, Elżbieta; Klimczak, Anna; Świtaj, Tomasz; Falkowski, Sławomir; Kroc, Jacek; Ługowska, Iwona; Brzeskwiniewicz, Magdalena; Melerowicz, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) mutational status is recognized factor related to the results of tyrosine kinase inhibitors therapy such as imatinib (IM) or sunitinib (SU). Arterial hypertension (AH) is common adverse event related to SU, reported as predictive factor in renal cell carcinoma. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcomes and factors predicting results of SU therapy in inoperable/metastatic CD117(+) GIST patients after IM failure. We identified 137 consecutive patients with advanced inoperable/metastatic GIST treated in one center with SU (2 nd line treatment). Median follow-up time was 23 months. Additionally, in 39 patients there were analyzed selected constitutive single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of VEGFA and VEGFR2 genes. One year progression-free survival (PFS; calculated from the start of SU) rate was 42% and median PFS was 43 weeks. The estimated overall survival (OS, calculated both from start of SU or IM) was 74 weeks and 51 months, respectively. One-year PFS was 65% (median 74 weeks) in 55 patients with AH vs. 22% (median 17 weeks) in patients without AH. Patients with primary tumors carrying mutations in KIT exon 9 or wild-type had substantially better 1-year PFS (68% and 57%; median 65.5 and 50.5 weeks, respectively) than patients having tumors with KIT exon 11 or PDGFRA mutations (34% and 15%; median 36.8 and 9 weeks, respectively). We identified two independent factors with significant impact on PFS and OS in univariate and multivariate analysis: primary tumor genotype and presence of AH. The most common adverse events during therapy were: fatigue, AH, hypothyroidism, hand and foot syndrome, mucositis, skin reactions, dyspepsia, and diarrhea. Two deaths were assessed as related to tumor rupture caused by reaction to SU therapy. The presence of C-allele in rs833061 and the T-allele in rs3025039 polymorphism of VEGFA were associated with significantly higher risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 10.0 p = 0.041 and OR: 10.5; p = 0

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours: Correlation of modified NIH risk stratification with diffusion-weighted MR imaging as an imaging biomarker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Hyun, E-mail: kshyun@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Kyung Mi; Choi, Dongil [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sang Yun; Kim, Kyoung-Mee [Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Won Ki [Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Ji [Biostatics Unit, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Except size and necrosis, conventional MR findings of GISTs were not significantly different according to the modified NIH criteria. • The ADC values of GISTs were negatively correlated with the modified NIH criteria. • The ADC value can be helpful for the determination of intermediate or high-risk GISTs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlation of risk grade of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) based on modified National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria with conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging. Methods: We included 22 patients with histopathologically proven GISTs in the stomach or small bowel who underwent pre-operative gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging and DW imaging. We retrospectively assessed correlations between morphologic findings, qualitative (signal intensity, consensus from two observers) and quantitative (degree of dynamic enhancement using signal intensity of tumour/muscle ratio and apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC]) values, and the modified NIH criteria for risk stratification. Spearman partial correlation analysis was used to control for tumour size as a confounding factor. The optimal cut-off level of ADC values for intermediate or high risk GISTs was analyzed using a receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Except tumour size and necrosis, conventional MR imaging findings, including the degree of dynamic enhancement, were not significantly different according to the modified NIH criteria (p > 0.05). Tumour ADC values were negatively correlated with the modified NIH criteria, before and after adjustment of tumour size (ρ = −0.754; p < 0.001 and ρ = −0.513; p = 0.017, respectively). The optimal cut-off value for the determination of intermediate or high-risk GISTs was 1.279 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s (100% sensitivity, 69.2% specificity, 81.8% accuracy). Conclusion: Except tumour size and necrosis, conventional MR imaging findings did not

  11. The outcome and predictive factors of sunitinib therapy in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST after imatinib failure - one institution study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutkowski Piotr

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST mutational status is recognized factor related to the results of tyrosine kinase inhibitors therapy such as imatinib (IM or sunitinib (SU. Arterial hypertension (AH is common adverse event related to SU, reported as predictive factor in renal cell carcinoma. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcomes and factors predicting results of SU therapy in inoperable/metastatic CD117(+ GIST patients after IM failure. Methods We identified 137 consecutive patients with advanced inoperable/metastatic GIST treated in one center with SU (2nd line treatment. Median follow-up time was 23 months. Additionally, in 39 patients there were analyzed selected constitutive single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of VEGFA and VEGFR2 genes. Results One year progression-free survival (PFS; calculated from the start of SU rate was 42% and median PFS was 43 weeks. The estimated overall survival (OS, calculated both from start of SU or IM was 74 weeks and 51 months, respectively. One-year PFS was 65% (median 74 weeks in 55 patients with AH vs. 22% (median 17 weeks in patients without AH. Patients with primary tumors carrying mutations in KIT exon 9 or wild-type had substantially better 1-year PFS (68% and 57%; median 65.5 and 50.5 weeks, respectively than patients having tumors with KIT exon 11 or PDGFRA mutations (34% and 15%; median 36.8 and 9 weeks, respectively. We identified two independent factors with significant impact on PFS and OS in univariate and multivariate analysis: primary tumor genotype and presence of AH. The most common adverse events during therapy were: fatigue, AH, hypothyroidism, hand and foot syndrome, mucositis, skin reactions, dyspepsia, and diarrhea. Two deaths were assessed as related to tumor rupture caused by reaction to SU therapy. The presence of C-allele in rs833061 and the T-allele in rs3025039 polymorphism of VEGFA were associated with significantly higher risk of hypothyroidism

  12. Evaluation of the Novel Monoclonal Antibody Against DOG1 as a Diagnostic Marker for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hadi, M.; Hamam, S.M.; Bessa, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. With the growing effectiveness and availability of first and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) drugs, the accurate diagnosis of GIST has become imperative. The problem is that some GISTs with KIT or Alpha-type platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFRA) mutations may have low KIT expression by immunohistochemistry yet will still benefit from TKI drugs. Molecular analysis is a costly and laborious process. Therefore the emergence of a new sensitive immunohistochemical marker for GISTs would be ideal. Recently antibodies against D iscovered on GIST-1 ( DOG1) have been generated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the monoclonal DOG1.1 antibody as a diagnostic marker for GISTs and to compare immunohistochemical staining and diagnostic efficacy of DOG1.1 with that of KIT in GISTs. Materials and Methods: Forty seven paraffin embedded GISTs were immuno stained with both Kit and DOG1.1 antibodies. Immunoreactivity was graded semiquantitatively from 0 to 4. Some other mesenchymal tumors were included in the study and stained for both markers to test for their specificity. Results: Out of the 47 GISTs, 44 were immunoreactive for both KIT and DOG1.1 antibodies (93.62%). Two cases (4.25%) were KIT-positive DOG-negative and the remaining case was DOG-positive KIT-negative (2.13%). A statistically significant concordance was found between KIT and DOG1.1 immunoreactivity (p=0.004), with moderate agreement between immunostaining scores (kappa =0.379). As regards tumor site, a statistically significant association was found between high DOG1.1 scores and gastric GIST (p=0.008). High KIT and DOG1.1 immunostaining scores were significantly associated with high risk tumors (p=0.002 and p=0.002 respectively). DOG1.1 immunoreactivity was focal in more than half of the cases. The overall diagnostic accuracy of DOG1.1 was 96.5%, with a specificity and

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging for the clinical management of rectal cancer patients: recommendations from the 2012 European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) consensus meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Maas, Monique [Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barbaro, Brunella [Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Caseiro-Alves, Filipe; Curvo-Semedo, Luis [Coimbra University Hospitals, Coimbra (Portugal); Fenlon, Helen M. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Gourtsoyianni, Sofia [University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS FT, London (United Kingdom); Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart A. [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Hoeffel, Christine [Reims University Hospital, Reims (France); Kim, Seung Ho [Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Laghi, Andrea [Sapienza - University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Maier, Andrea [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Rafaelsen, Soeren R. [Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); Torkzad, Michael R. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Blomqvist, Lennart [Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach regarding the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. A consensus meeting of 14 abdominal imaging experts from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) was conducted following the RAND-UCLA Appropriateness Method. Two independent (non-voting) chairs facilitated the meeting. Two hundred and thirty-six items were scored by participants for appropriateness and classified subsequently as appropriate or inappropriate (defined by {>=} 80 % consensus) or uncertain (defined by < 80 % consensus). Items not reaching 80 % consensus were noted. Consensus was reached for 88 % of items: recommendations regarding hardware, patient preparation, imaging sequences, angulation, criteria for MRI assessment and MRI reporting were constructed from these. These expert consensus recommendations can be used as clinical guidelines for primary staging and restaging of rectal cancer using MRI. (orig.)

  14. Rectal duplication cyst presenting as rectal prolapse in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Zaiem

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Rectal duplication is a rare variety of gastrointestinal duplication. It accounts 4% of the total gastrointestinal duplications.In this paper, we are reporting a case of an 8 months old male who presented with rectal prolapse. Digital rectal examination revealed a soft mass bulging through the posterior wall of rectum. Computed tomography (CT scan showed a cystic mass compressing the posterior wall of the rectum. The mass was excised using a Muscle Complex Saving Posterior Sagittal approach (MCS-PSA. The pathology report confirmed the diagnosis of the rectal duplication cyst. The postoperative recovery was uneventful. Keywords: Intestinal duplication, Cystic rectal duplication, Rectal prolapse

  15. Fibromatosis of the Sigmoid Colon With CTNNB1 (β-Catenin) Gene Mutation, Arising at the Site of Ileocolic Anastomosis for Resection of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thway, Khin; Abou Sherif, Sara; Riddell, Angela M; Mudan, Satvinder

    2016-05-01

    We describe a case of intra-abdominal fibromatosis, which occurred in a 44-year-old woman who had a previous history of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the sigmoid mesocolon, which was treated with imatinib and resection. A mass was detected at the site of ileocolic anastomosis of the previous small bowel resection and sigmoid colectomy, nearly 3 years later. Clinically, this was suspected to represent recurrent GIST and was excised, but histology and mutational analysis showed desmoid-type fibromatosis with a mutation in codon 41 of exon 3 of the CTNNB1 (β-catenin) gene. The occurrence of fibromatosis at the site of excision of GIST is very rare, but its recognition is important as the treatment of the two neoplasms differs significantly. As imaging cannot reliably distinguish between these 2 entities, histological diagnosis is crucial for correct clinical management. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Imatinib for the treatment of patients with unresectable and/or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumours: systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J; Connock, M; Song, F; Yao, G; Fry-Smith, A; Raftery, J; Peake, D

    2005-07-01

    To assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of imatinib in the treatment of unresectable and/or metastatic, KIT-positive, gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), relative to current standard treatments. Electronic databases. As there were no randomised trials that have directly compared imatinib with the current standard treatment in patients with advanced GIST, this review included non-randomised controlled studies, cohort studies, and case series that reported effectiveness results of treatment with imatinib and/or other interventions in patients with advanced GIST. The effectiveness assessment was based on the comparison of results from imatinib trials and results from studies of historical control patients. Economic evaluation was mainly based on an assessment and modification (when judged necessary) of a model submitted by Novartis. Evidence from published uncontrolled trials involving 187 patients, and from abstracts reporting similar uncontrolled trials involving 1700 patients, indicates that approximately 50% of imatinib-treated individuals with advanced GIST experience a dramatic clinical response in terms of at least a 50% reduction in tumour mass. At present, although useful data are accumulating, it is not possible to predict which patients may respond in this way. Fifteen studies where possible GIST patients had been treated with therapies other than imatinib or best supportive care were also identified. All imatinib-treated patients experienced adverse effects, although they were relatively mild. Overall, imatinib was reported to be well tolerated. The most common serious events included unspecified haemorrhage and neutropenia. Skin rash, oedema and periorbital oedema were the common adverse events observed. Patients on the highest dose regimen (1000 mg per day in one trial) may experience dose-limiting drug toxicity. A structured assessment was carried out of the Novartis economic evaluation of imatinib for unresectable and/or metastatic GIST

  17. CTHRC1 Acts as a Prognostic Factor and Promotes Invasiveness of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors by Activating Wnt/PCP-Rho Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ze Ma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are the major gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors with a variable malignancy ranging from a curable disorder to highly malignant sarcomas. Metastasis and recurrence are the main causes of death in GIST patients. To further explore the mechanism of metastasis and to more accurately estimate the recurrence risk of GISTs after surgery, the clinical significance and functional role of collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 (CTHRC1 in GIST were investigated. We found that CTHRC1 expression was gradually elevated as the risk grade of NIH classification increased, and was closely correlated with disease-free survival and overall survival in 412 GIST patients. In vitro experiments showed that recombinant CTHRC1 protein promoted the migration and invasion capacities of primary GIST cells. A luciferase reporter assay and pull down assay demonstrated that recombinant CTHRC1 protein activated noncanonical Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling but inhibited canonical Wnt signaling. The pro-motility effect of CTHRC1 on GIST cells was reversed by using a Wnt5a neutralizing antibody and inhibitors of Rac1 or ROCK. Taken together, these data indicate that CTHRC1 may serve as a new predictor of recurrence risk and prognosis in post-operative GIST patients and may play an important role in facilitating GIST progression. Furthermore, CTHRC1 promotes GIST cell migration and invasion by activating Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling, suggesting that the CTHRC1-Wnt/PCP-Rho axis may be a new therapeutic target for interventions against GIST invasion and metastasis.

  18. The predictive value of preoperative {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET for postoperative recurrence in patients with localized primary gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Kanae Kawai; Nakamoto, Yuji; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mikami, Yoshiki [Kyoto University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Kyoto (Japan); Kumamoto University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Kumamoto (Japan); Tanaka, Shiro [Kyoto University, Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine and Public Health, Kyoto (Japan); Higashi, Tatsuya [Shiga Medical Center Research Institute, Shiga (Japan); Tadamura, Eiji [Sakazaki Clinic, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Saga, Tsuneo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Dianostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Minami, Shunsuke [Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Department of Radiology, Shiga (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    To assess the potential value of preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET to predict postoperative recurrence of solitary localized primary gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) after radical resection. A total of 46 patients with primary GIST who received preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET and underwent complete resection without neoadjuvant therapy were retrospectively studied. PET findings, including ring-shaped uptake and intense uptake, were compared with Joensuu risk grades using Fisher's exact test. The prognostic value of the preoperative clinico-imaging variables - age ≥60 years, male, ring-shaped uptake, intense uptake, tumour size >5 cm, heterogeneous CT attenuation and lower gastrointestinal origin - and Joensuu high risk for recurrence-free survival was evaluated using log-rank test and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Ring-shaped uptake and intense uptake were significantly associated with Joensuu high risk. Univariate analysis showed that ring-shaped uptake, intense uptake, size >5 cm and Joensuu high risk were significantly associated with inferior recurrence-free survival. Multivariate analysis showed that ring-shaped uptake (P = 0.004) and Joensuu high risk (P = 0.021) were independent adverse prognostic factors of postoperative recurrence. Ring-shaped uptake on preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET may be a potential predictor of postoperative tumour recurrence of localized primary GISTs. (orig.)

  19. 胃肠间质瘤KIT和PDGFRA基因突变的检测和意义%Detection of KIT and PDGFRA mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张信华; 何裕隆; 陈创奇; 蔡世荣; 吴晖; 马晋平; 宋武; 詹文华

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mutations of KIT and PDGFRA genes and their clinical significance in Chinese patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Methods Molecular analysis of KIT exons 9, 11, 13, 17 and PDGFRA exons 12, 18 was performed on 136 patients from a single institute. Specimens from imatinib-resistant tumors in 8 cases were studied to identify molecular correlations of imatinib resistance. Results KIT mutations was found in 111 patients (81.6% ) , among whom exons 11 and 9 were mutated in 95 (69.8% ) and 16 (11.8% ) patients, respectively. Wild types of KIT and PDGFRA was identified in the other 25 patients (18.4% ). Inflamed deletions in the 5 ' end were most common molecular changes in mutated exon 11 (60/95, 63.2% ), followed by point mutation (21/95, 23.1% ). Rare internal tandem duplications involving codon 501-502 of exon 9 were found in 2 cases (Ser501-Ala5O2dup, 2/16, 13.5% ). Compared to intestinal GIST, exon 11 mutation was more common in gastric and rectal GIST (P<0.01). Secondary point mutations on exon 17 of KIT were identified in an imatinib-resistant patient (Asp820Val +Tyr823Asp). Conclusion KIT mutations is common in Chinese GIST patients. Mutational status is different in varied primary tumor locations. Secondary mutations of KIT can be found in imatinib-resistant patients.%目的 探讨中国胃肠间质瘤(GIST)患者KIT和血小板源性生长受体α(PDGFRA)基因突变的特点,分析其临床意义.方法 对136例GIST患者肿瘤组织进行DNA抽提、聚合酶链反应(PCR)扩增和直接测序,检测KIT基因外显子9、11、13、17和PDGFRA基因12、18外显子突变;并对8例取得伊马替尼耐药瘤组织的患者进行2次检测.结果 在136例患者中,KIT突变111例(81.6%).其中外显子11突变95例(69.8%),外显子9突变16例(11.8%),未检测到PDGFRA突变的病例.KIT和PDGFRA野生型25例(18.4%).KIT外显子11突变最常见为5'缺失突变,共60例(60/95,63.2%),其次为点突变21例(21

  20. Tissue Pharmacologic and Virologic Determinants of Duodenal and Rectal Gastrointestinal-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Immune Reconstitution in HIV-Infected Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmuth, David M; Thompson, Corbin G; Chun, Tae-Wook; Ma, Zhong-Min; Mann, Surinder; Sainz, Talia; Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Utay, Netanya S; Garcia, Juan Carlos; Troia-Cancio, Paolo; Pollard, Richard B; Miller, Christopher J; Landay, Alan; Kashuba, Angela D

    2017-10-17

    Plasma, duodenal, and rectal tissue antiretroviral therapy (ART) drug concentrations, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA and HIV DNA copy numbers, and recovery of mucosal immunity were measured before and 9 months after initiation of 3 different ART regimens in 26 subjects. Plasma and tissue HIV RNA correlated at baseline and when 9-month declines were compared, suggesting that these compartments are tightly associated. Antiretroviral tissue:blood penetration ratios were above the 50% inhibitory concentration values in almost 100% of cases. There were no correlations between drug concentrations and HIV DNA/RNA. Importantly, no evidence was found for residual viral replication or deficient tissue drug penetration to account for delayed gastrointestinal-associated lymphoid tissue immune recovery. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of sunitinib as second-line treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumor in the People’s Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li J

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Jian Li,1 Hong Ye Ren,2 Juanjuan Zhang,2 Peng Dong,2 Yan Wang,3 Andrea L Stevens,3 Yi Han,3 Min Huang4 1Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research for the Ministry of National Education, Department of GI Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital & Institute, 2Pfizer Inc., Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3WG Consulting, New York, NY, USA; 4School of Pharmacy, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of sunitinib as a second-line treatment in patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors that no longer respond to imatinib 400 mg/d, compared with imatinib 600 mg/d, 800 mg/d, or best supportive care (BSC in the People’s Republic of China. Methods: This study was conducted from the government payer’s perspective with a time horizon of 5 years. Three health states were considered: progression-free survival, disease progression survival, and death, with a cycle length of 6 weeks. Probabilities of disease progression and death were estimated based on survival functions using exponential distribution and progression survival data in the clinical trials. Drug costs were based on drug retail prices and the patient assistance program in the People’s Republic of China, and adverse event management costs were based on published data and/or expert opinion. Uncertainties for parameters in the study were addressed through one-way deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results: When sunitinib was compared with imatinib 600 mg/d and BSC, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was RMB75,715 with RMB121,080 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY gained. Sunitinib demonstrated lower costs and higher QALYs than imatinib 800 mg/d. In the probabilistic sensitivity analysis, the willingness-to-pay per QALY gained was set to be three times the per capita gross domestic product of the People’s Republic of

  2. Clinical efficacy of second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in imatinib-resistant gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a meta-analysis of recent clinical trials

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    Wu L

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lile Wu, Zhongqiang Zhang, Hongliang Yao, Kuijie Liu, Yu Wen, Li Xiong Department of General Surgery, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, People's Republic of China Background: Primary and secondary resistance to imatinib, a selective receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, is a serious clinical problem in the control of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST. Here we report on a meta-analysis we performed to evaluate the efficacy of second-generation TKIs in the treatment of patients with imatinib-resistant GIST.Methods: Randomized controlled trials evaluating the clinical efficacy of second-generation TKIs were identified by searching PubMed and EMBASE from 2000 to February 2014. Outcomes subjected to analysis were progression-free survival and overall survival. Statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager version 5.1.0 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK. Weighted hazard ratios (HR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated for the outcomes. Fixed-effects or random-effects models were used, depending on the degree of heterogeneity across the selected studies.Results: Three randomized controlled trials were selected for meta-analysis. Among imatinib-resistant or imatinib-intolerant patients, 541 received second-generation TKIs (sunitinib, nilotinib, or regorafenib and 267 controls received placebo or best supportive care. Progression-free survival was significantly improved in the TKI-treated group (HR 0.38; 95% CI 0.24–0.59; P<0.0001. No statistically significant difference was detected in overall survival between the treatment group and the control group (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.71–1.03; P=0.09. In the subgroup of patients who were resistant or intolerant to both imatinib and sunitinib, TKI therapy (nilotinib or regorafenib improved progression-free survival (HR 0.40; 95% CI 0.19–0.84; P=0.02 but not overall survival (HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.63–1.08; P=0.17. Regorafenib was shown to be

  3. C-kit-targeted imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumor using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody in a mouse tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogawa, Chizuru; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Sudo, Hitomi; Sugyo, Aya; Yoshida, Chisato; Odaka, Kenichi; Uehara, Tomoya; Arano, Yasushi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Saga, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor arising from the gastrointestinal tract and highly expresses mutated c-kit. We aimed to develop a specific and sensitive method for detecting GISTs using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody. Methods: A mutated c-kit-expressing cell clone was established by transfecting an expressing vector of mutated c-kit gene into HEK293 human embryonic kidney cells. The tumors were developed by inoculating c-kit-expressing cells into nude mice. 125 I- and 111 In-labeled anti-c-kit antibodies (12A8 and 41A11) were evaluated in vitro by cell binding, competitive inhibition and cellular internalization assays, and in vivo by biodistribution and imaging studies in tumor-bearing mice. Results: Both 125 I- and 111 In-labeled antibodies showed specific binding with c-kit-expressing cells with high affinity (dissociation constants = 2.2-7.1x10 9 M -1 ). Internalization assay showed that 125 I-labeled antibodies were rapidly internalized and dehalogenated, with the release of 125 I from the cells, resulting in reduction of cell-associated radioactivity with time. In contrast, 111 In-labeled antibody was internalized but did not result in the reduced radioactivity associated with tumor cells. Reflecting this phenomenon, the in vivo tumor uptake of 125 I-labeled antibody was low on Day 1, further decreasing with time, while tumor uptake of 111 In-labeled antibody was high on Day 1, further increasing with time. The xenografted tumor was clearly visualized by scintigraphy after injection of 111 In-labeled antibody. Conclusion: The anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody labeled with a metal radionuclide would be promising for c-kit-targeted imaging of GISTs.

  4. Early Evaluation of Response Using 18F-FDG PET Influences Management in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Sheima; Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de; van der Graaf, Winette T; van Coevorden, Frits; Grunhagen, Dirk; Reyners, Anna K L; Boonstra, Pieter A; Desar, Ingrid; Gelderblom, Hans; Steeghs, Neeltje

    2018-02-01

    18 F-FDG PET has previously been proven effective as an early way to evaluate the response of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) to imatinib treatment. However, it is unclear whether early evaluation of response affects treatment decisions in GIST patients treated with neoadjuvant intent. Methods: We retrospectively scored changes in management based on early evaluation of response by 18 F-FDG PET in patients in the Dutch GIST registry treated with neoadjuvant imatinib. Results: Seventy 18 F-FDG PET scans were obtained for 63 GIST patients to evaluate for an early response to neoadjuvant imatinib. The scans led to a change in management in 27.1% of the patients. Change in management correlated strongly with lack of metabolic response ( P PET for early evaluation of response often results in a change of management in GIST patients harboring the non- KIT exon 11 mutation and should be considered the standard of care in GIST patients treated with neoadjuvant intent. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  5. Regorafenib for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors following imatinib and sunitinib treatment: a subgroup analysis evaluating Japanese patients in the phase III GRID trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Yoshito; Doi, Toshihiko; Sawaki, Akira; Kanda, Tatsuo; Yamada, Yasuhide; Kuss, Iris; Demetri, George D; Nishida, Toshirou

    2015-10-01

    The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled GRID trial tested the oral multikinase inhibitor regorafenib in 199 patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) following failure of at least imatinib and sunitinib, and showed a significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo [hazard ratio (HR) 0.27; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.19-0.39; p regorafenib 160 mg once daily with matching placebo, in combination with best supportive care. The primary study endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS); safety was evaluated through the incidence of adverse events (AEs). Seventeen Japanese patients were randomized to regorafenib (n = 12) or placebo (n = 5). Patient demographics were consistent with those of the overall study population. PFS was significantly longer with regorafenib than placebo (HR 0.08; 95 % CI 0.02-0.45; p = 0.000164). Centrally assessed disease control rates were 58 % and 20 % in the regorafenib and placebo groups, respectively (p = 0.080796). Treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were reported in all regorafenib-treated patients and 60 % of placebo recipients; the most frequent AE was hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) (92 % versus 20 %, respectively). Regorafenib showed efficacy and a manageable safety profile in Japanese patients with advanced GIST, consistent with the overall GRID study population. AEs, such as HFSR and maculopapular rash, were observed more frequently in Japanese patients. Although dose modification was frequently reported, only one patient with hepatic failure discontinued regorafenib because of AEs.

  6. The value of (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for prediction of treatment response in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh-Rad, Arman; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Katal, Sanaz; Asady, Hadi; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Moghadas Jafari, Ali; Hosseini, Mostafa

    2016-05-01

    Early detection of response to treatment is critically important in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Therefore, the present systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the value of (18) f-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18) FDG-PET) on prediction of therapeutic response of GIST patients to systemic treatments. The literature search was conducted using PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane, and Google Scholar databases, and review article references. Eligible articles were defined as studies included confirmed GIST patients who underwent (18) FDG-PET as well as assessing the screening role of it. Finally, 21 relevant articles were included. The analysis showed the pooled sensitivity and specificity of 18FDG-PET in evaluation of response to treatment of GIST patient were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.85-0.94; I(2)  = 52.59, P = 0.001) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.49-0.75; I(2)  = 69.7, P = 0.001), respectively. In addition, the pooled prognostic odds ratio of (18) FDG-PET for was 14.99 (95% CI, 6.42-34.99; I(2)  = 100.0, P present meta-analysis showed (18) FDG-PET has a significant value in predicting treatment response in GIST patients. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Imatinib as the first and only treatment in Europe for adult patients at significant risk of relapse following gastrointestinal stromal tumor removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffaud, F; Salas, S; Huyn, T; Deville, JL

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the KIT gene are the molecular hallmark of most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). GIST has become a model for targeted treatment of solid tumors, imatinib becoming the standard first-line treatment of these tumors in the advanced/metastatic phase. Because of the efficacy of imatinib treatment in the advanced setting, its role following resection of a primary non-metastatic GIST was investigated. The recently published phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter ACOSOG Z9001 study showed that adjuvant therapy is safe, and significantly improves recurrence-free survival compared to placebo when given after resection. To what extent imatinib will improve overall survival has yet to be answered. What is clear is that high-risk GIST patients definitely need adjuvant therapy, and that 1 year of imatinib is not enough for the patients who do need it. The questions of optimal duration of imatinib treatment in the adjuvant setting, adequate selection of risk patients and effect of imatinib on overall survival are currently being studied. PMID:21694845

  8. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Stomach with Narrow Stalk-Like Based, Uneven Protruding Appearance Presenting with Severe Acute Anemia despite Small Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomitsu Tahara

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 56-year-old woman who had a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST of the stomach. She was admitted to our hospital for epigastric pain, nausea, and severe acute anemia (hemoglobin level 4.3 g/dl. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a narrow stalk-like based, hemorrhagic and uneven protruding lesion in the lesser curvature of the gastric upper corpus. Although the tumor was less than 2 cm in diameter and was probably a benign GIST according to histology, laparoscopy-assisted local resection was needed because the patient had continuous severe anemia and epigastric pain. Histological assessment showed that the elongated spindle-like tumor cells originated from the intrinsic muscle layer, and was shown with growth to the mucosal side, cropping out to the surface in most areas of the protruding lesion. Only a small part of the tumor was within nontumoral gastric mucosa. Most of the tumor cells demonstrated immunoreactivity for KIT and CD34 in the cytoplasm but not for αSMA, S100, and desmin. Mitotic activity (0/50 high power field and the labeling index for MIB-1 (about 1% were low. The GIST of the stomach described in this report was a rare case with a narrow stalk-like based, uneven protruding mass presenting with severe acute anemia despite small size.

  9. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor during Pregnacy

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    Ilay Gözükara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs are mesenchymal neoplasms without connection to the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs and EGIST are similar according to their clinicopathologic and histomorphologic features. Both of them most often express immunoreactivity for CD-117, a c-kit proto-oncogene protein. The coexistence of GIST and pregnancy is very rare, with only two cases reported in the literature. In this paper, we presented the first EGIST case during pregnancy in the literature.

  10. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  11. Prognostic Factors of Patients with Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor after Curative Resection: A Retrospective Analysis of 406 Consecutive Cases in a Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Hwan; Kwak, Sang-Gyu; Chae, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have a highly variable clinical course, and recurrent disease sometimes develops despite curative surgery. This study was undertaken to investigate the surgical role in treating gastric GISTs and evaluate the clinicopathological features of a large series of patients who underwent curative resection for gastric GISTs to clarify which features were independent prognostic factors. The clinicopathological data of 406 patients with gastric GISTs who underwent curative resection at 4 university hospitals in Daegu, South Korea, from March 1998 to March 2012 were reviewed. All cases were confirmed as gastric GISTs by immunohistochemical staining, in which CD117 or CD34 was positive. Clinical follow-up was performed periodically, and disease-free survival rates were retrospectively investigated using the medical records. The mean follow-up period was 42.9 months (range: 2-166). There were 11 recurrent patients (2.7%). Due to the small number of recurrences, age, sex and location were controlled using propensity score matching before performing any statistical analysis. Tumor size, mitotic count, NIH classification, and cellularity were judged to be independent prognostic factors for recurrence by univariate analysis. In a multivariate analysis, tumor size and mitotic count were significantly and independently related to recurrence, and tumor size was determined to be the most important prognostic factor for recurrence after curative resection (hazard ratio: 1.204; p < 0.01). The results of this multicenter study demonstrate that disease-free survival rates are good. Tumor size was disclosed as the most important factor for recurrence in gastric GIST patients who underwent radical resection. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors in children and young adults: a clinicopathologic, molecular, and genomic study of 15 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Sonam; Sarran, Lisa; Socci, Nicholas; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Eisenstat, Jonathan; Greco, Alba M; Maki, Robert G; Wexler, Leonard H; LaQuaglia, Michael P; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2005-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are mesenchymal tumors of the intestinal tract that typically occur in adults over the age of 40 years. GISTs in younger patients are rare and not well characterized. The objective was to define the characteristics of GISTs in children and young adults (<30 years old). Clinicopathologic and molecular features, including KIT/PDGFRA genotype, in GISTs from 5 children and 10 young adults were analyzed. Gene expression analysis was performed on 5 gastric tumor samples from 2 children, 2 gastric tumors from young adults, and 10 gastric GISTs from older adults using an U133A Affymetrix platform (22,000 genes). All five pediatric GISTs occurred in girls, involved the stomach as multiple nodules, showed predominantly an epithelioid morphology, often involved lymph nodes, and lacked KIT or PDGFRA mutations. Although all five patients developed recurrence (four in the liver, three in the peritoneum, and two in both sites), four are still alive with disease. Of the 10 GISTs in young adults, half occurred in the small bowel and had spindle cell morphology, and one case had lymph node metastasis. KIT mutations were identified in seven cases, four in exon 11 and three in exon 9. Seven patients developed recurrence, and at last follow-up two patients had died of disease. Gene expression analysis showed high expression of PHKA1, FZD2, NLGN4, IGF1R, and ANK3 in the pediatric and young adult versus older adult cases. GISTs that occur in children are a separate clinicopathologic and molecular subset with predilection for girls, multifocal gastric tumors, and wild-type KIT/PDGFRA genotype. In contrast, GISTs in young adults are a more heterogeneous group, including cases that resemble either the pediatric or the older adult-type tumors. The distinct gene expression profile suggests avenues for investigation of pathogenesis and potential therapeutic strategies.

  13. MDCT of primary, locally recurrent, and metastatic duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): A single institution study of 25 patients with review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, J.M.; Tirumani, S.H.; Shinagare, A.B.; Jagannathan, J.P.; Hornick, J.L.; Raut, C.P.; Ramaiya, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To describe the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features of primary, locally recurrent, and metastatic duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). Materials and methods: In this institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)-compliant, retrospective study, 25 patients [13 men, 12 women; mean age 56 years (34–74 years)] with histopathologically confirmed duodenal GISTs seen at Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital from December 1999 to October 2009 were identified. The MDCT of primary tumours in six patients and follow-up imaging in all the 25 patients was reviewed by two radiologists in consensus. Electronic medical records were reviewed to document the clinical characteristics and management. Results: The mean size of the primary tumour was 3.7 cm (range 2.5–5.6 cm). Three of six primary tumours were in the second and third portions of the duodenum, one in the third portion, one in the third and fourth portions, and one in the fourth portion. Three of six of the tumours were exophytic, two were both exophytic and intraluminal, and one was intramural. The tumours were well-circumscribed, round or oval masses, with few lobulations, and were either homogeneously hyper-enhancing or heterogeneously isodense at MDCT. None of the tumours had necrosis, haemorrhage, calcification, or loco regional lymphadenopathy on imaging. Sixteen of 25 (64%) patients developed metastatic disease, the most common sites being liver (14/16; 87.5%) and peritoneum (5/16; 31%). Conclusion: Duodenal GISTs are well-circumscribed, round or oval masses, and occur in the second through fourth portions of the duodenum, without lymphadenopathy or duodenal obstruction. Duodenal GISTS metastasize frequently to the liver and peritoneum

  14. A phase II trial of regorafenib in patients with metastatic and/or a unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor harboring secondary mutations of exon 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chen, Ming-Huang; Chen, Yen-Yang; Yang, Ching-Yao; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Tzen, Chin-Yuan; Chen, Li-Tzong; Chen, Jen-Shi

    2017-07-04

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are caused by the constitutive activation of KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) mutations. Imatinib selectively inhibits KIT and PDGFR, leading to disease control for 80%-90% of patients with metastatic GIST. Imatinib resistance can occur within a median of 2-3 years due to secondary mutations in KIT. According to preclinical studies, both imatinib and sunitinib are ineffective against exon 17 mutations. However, the treatment efficacy of regorafenib for patients with GIST with exon 17 mutations is still unknown. Documented patients with GIST with exon 17 mutations were enrolled in this study. Patients received 160 mg of oral regorafenib daily on days 1-21 of a 28-day cycle. The primary end point of this trial was the clinical benefit rate (CBR; i.e., complete or partial response [PR], as well as stable disease [SD]) at 16 weeks. The secondary end points of this study included progression free survival (PFS), overall survival, and safety. Between June 2014 to May 2016, 18 patients were enrolled (15 of which were eligible for response evaluation). The CBR at 16 weeks was 93.3% (14 of 15; 6 PR and 8 SD). The median PFS was 22.1 months. The most common grade 3 toxicities were hand-and-foot skin reactions (10 of 18; 55.6%), followed by hypertension (5 of 18; 27.8%). Regorafenib significantly prolonged PFS in patients with advanced GIST harboring secondary mutations of exon 17. A phase III trial of regorafenib versus placebo is warranted. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov in November 2015, number NCT02606097.Key message: This phase II trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with GIST with exon 17 mutations. The results provide strong evidence that regorafenib significantly prolonged PFS in patients with advanced GIST harboring secondary mutations of exon 17.

  15. Efficacy and safety of regorafenib for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor after failure with imatinib and sunitinib treatment: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenan; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Wensheng; Piao, Daxun

    2017-12-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of regorafenib as a treatment for patients with advanced (metastatic and/or unresectable) gastrointestinal stromal tumor (AGIST) after developing resistance to imatinib and sunitinib. A literature search of databases such as PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library was conducted up to February 2017. The pooled percentages and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the Stata 11.0 software. Four studies involving 243 patients with AGIST were included. Results revealed that approximately 49% (95% CI 30-67), 14% (95% CI 5-23), and 41% (95% CI 21-61) of patients with AGIST showed clinical benefit (including complete response), partial response, and stable disease, respectively, after regorafenib treatment, which was given after failure with imatinib and sunitinib treatments. No complete response was found in the included studies. Pooled progression-free survival was 6.58 months (95% CI 4.62-8.54). Hypertension (20%; 95% CI 7-33), hand-foot skin reaction (22%; 95% CI 17-27), and hypophosphatemia (18%; 95% CI 5-41) were common grade ≥3 regorafenib-related adverse events in patients treated with regorafenib after failure with imatinib and sunitinib treatments. Forty-nine per cent of patients with AGIST benefited after regorafenib treatment after the development of resistance to imatinib and sunitinib. More studies should be performed to improve the clinical survival of patients with AGIST. Close monitoring and appropriate management of grade ≥3 regorafenib-related adverse events should be considered during treatment.

  16. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours of stomach: Robot-assisted excision with the da Vinci Surgical System regardless of size and location site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbetta, Niccolo; Palmeri, Matteo; Guadagni, Simone; Di Franco, Gregorio; Gianardi, Desirée; Latteri, Saverio; Marciano, Emanuele; Moglia, Andrea; Cuschieri, Alfred; Di Candio, Giulio; Mosca, Franco; Morelli, Luca

    2018-03-23

    The role of minimally invasive surgery of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) of the stomach remains uncertain especially for large and/or difficult located tumours. We are hereby presenting a single-centre series of robot-assisted resections using the da Vinci Surgical System (Si or Xi). Data of patients undergoing robot-assisted treatment of gastric GIST were retrieved from the prospectively collected institutional database and a retrospective analysis was performed. Patients were stratified according to size and location of the tumour. Difficult cases (DCs) were considered for size if tumour was> 50 mm and/or for location if the tumour was Type II, III or IV sec. Privette/Al-Thani classification. Between May 2010 and February 2017, 12 consecutive patients underwent robot-assisted treatment of GIST at our institution. DCs were 10/12 cases (83.3%), of which 6/10 (50%) for location, 2/10 (25%) for size and 2/10 (25%) for both. The da Vinci Si was used in 8 patients, of which 6 (75%) were DC, and the da Vinci Xi in 4, all of which (100%) were DC. In all patients, excision was by wedge resection. All lesions had microscopically negative resection margins. There was no conversion to open surgery, no tumour ruptures or spillage and no intraoperative complications. Our experience suggests a positive role of the robot da Vinci in getting gastric GIST removal with a conservative approach, regardless of size and location site. Comparative studies with a greater number of patients are necessary for a more robust assessment.

  17. Functional role of the Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel DOG1/TMEM16A in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, Erik, E-mail: erik.berglund@ki.se [Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Akcakaya, Pinar [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Cancer Center Karolinska, Stockholm (Sweden); Berglund, David [Section for Transplantation Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Karlsson, Fredrik [Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Vukojević, Vladana [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Lee, Linkiat [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Cancer Center Karolinska, Stockholm (Sweden); Bogdanović, Darko [Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Lui, Weng-Onn; Larsson, Catharina [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Cancer Center Karolinska, Stockholm (Sweden); Zedenius, Jan [Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Fröbom, Robin [Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Bränström, Robert [Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-08-15

    DOG1, a Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel (CaCC), was identified in 2004 to be robustly expressed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). It was rapidly included as a tumor marker in routine diagnostics, but the functional role remained unknown. CaCCs are important regulators of normal physiological functions, but also implicated in tumorigenesis, cancer progression, metastasis, cell migration, apoptosis, proliferation and viability in several malignancies. We therefore investigated whether DOG1 plays a role in the three latter in GIST by utilizing in vitro cell model systems. Confocal microscopy identified different subcellular localizations of DOG1 in imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant cells. Electrophysiological studies confirmed that DOG1-specific pharmacological agents possess potent activating and inhibiting properties. Proliferation assays showed small effects up to 72 h, and flow cytometric analysis of adherent cells with 7-AAD/Annexin V detected no pharmacological effects on viable GIST cells. However, inhibition of DOG1 conveyed pro-apoptotic effects among early apoptotic imatinib-resistant cells. In conclusion, DOG1 generates Cl{sup −} currents in GIST that can be regulated pharmacologically, with small effects on cell viability and proliferation in vitro. Inhibition of DOG1 might act pro-apoptotic on some early apoptotic GIST cell populations. Further studies are warranted to fully illuminate the function of DOG1 and its potential as therapeutic target. - Highlights: • Subcellular DOG1 localization varies between GIST cells. • DOG1 in GIST is voltage- and Ca{sup 2+}-activated. • Known TMEM16A modulators, like A01 and Eact, modulate DOG1. • DOG1 has small effects on cell viability and proliferation in vitro. • DOG1 impact early apoptotic GIST cells to undergo late apoptosis.

  18. Succinate Dehydrogenase Subunit B (SDHB Is Expressed in Neurofibromatosis 1-Associated Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (Gists: Implications for the SDHB Expression Based Classification of Gists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanny H. Wang, Jerzy Lasota, Markku Miettinen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the digestive tract. GISTs develop with relatively high incidence in patients with Neurofibromatosis-1 syndrome (NF1. Mutational activation of KIT or PDGFRA is believed to be a driving force in the pathogenesis of familial and sporadic GISTs. Unlike those tumors, NF1-associated GISTs do not have KIT or PGDFRA mutations. Similarly, no mutational activation of KIT or PDGFRA has been identified in pediatric GISTs and in GISTs associated with Carney Triad and Carney-Stratakis Syndrome. KIT and PDGFRA-wild type tumors are expected to have lesser response to imatinib treatment. Recently, Carney Triad and Carney-Stratakis Syndrome -associated GISTs and pediatric GISTs have been shown to have a loss of expression of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB, a Krebs cycle/electron transport chain interface protein. It was proposed that GISTs can be divided into SDHB- positive (type 1, and SDHB-negative (type 2 tumors because of similarities in clinical features and response to imatinib treatment. In this study, SDHB expression was examined immunohistochemically in 22 well-characterized NF1-associated GISTs. All analyzed tumors expressed SDHB. Based on SDHB-expression status, NF1-associated GISTs belong to type 1 category; however, similarly to SDHB type 2 tumors, they do not respond well to imatinib treatment. Therefore, a simple categorization of GISTs into SDHB-positive and-negative seems to be incomplete. A classification based on both SDHB expression status and KIT and PDGFRA mutation status characterize GISTs more accurately and allow subdivision of SDHB-positive tumors into different clinico-genetic categories.

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Safety and Efficacy in a Worldwide Treatment-use Trial of Sunitinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Peter; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Rutkowski, Piotr; Schuette, Jochen; Rosen, Lee S; Seddon, Beatrice; Yalcin, Suayib; Gelderblom, Hans; Williams, Charles C; Fumagalli, Elena; Biasco, Guido; Hurwitz, Herbert I; Kaiser, Pamela E; Fly, Kolette; Matczak, Ewa; Chen, Liang; Lechuga, Maria José; Demetri, George D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To provide sunitinib to patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who were otherwise unable to obtain sunitinib; to obtain broad safety and efficacy data from a large population of patients with advanced GIST after imatinib failure. METHODS Imatinib-resistant/intolerant patients with advanced GIST received sunitinib on an initial dosing schedule (IDS) of 50 mg/day in 6-week cycles (4 weeks on treatment, 2 weeks off). Tumor assessment frequency was per local practice, with response assessed by investigators per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors version 1.0. Overall survival (OS) and safety were assessed regularly. Post-hoc analyses evaluated different patterns of treatment management. RESULTS At final data cutoff, 1124 patients comprised the intent-to-treat population; 15% had a baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥2. Median treatment duration was 7.0 months. Median time to tumor progression was 8.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.0–9.4), and median OS was 16.6 months (95% CI, 14.9–18.0) with 36% of patients alive at the time of analysis. Patients in whom the IDS was modified exhibited longer median OS (23.5 months) than those treated strictly per the IDS (11.1 months). The most common treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs) were hand-foot syndrome (11%), fatigue (9%), neutropenia (8%), hypertension (7%), and thrombocytopenia (6%). Treatment-related AEs associated with cardiac function (eg, congestive heart failure and myocardial infarction) were reported at frequencies of ≤1% each. CONCLUSIONS This treatment-use study confirms the long-term safety and efficacy of sunitinib in a large international population of patients with advanced GIST after imatinib failure. PMID:25641662

  20. Accuracy and Feasibility of Estimated Tumour Volumetry in Primary Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours: Validation Using Semi-automated Technique in 127 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Shinagare, Atul B.; O’Neill, Ailbhe C.; Nishino, Mizuki; Rosenthal, Michael H.; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To validate estimated tumour volumetry in primary gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) using semi-automated volumetry. Materials and Methods In this IRB-approved retrospective study, we measured the three longest diameters in x, y, z axes on CTs of primary gastric GISTs in 127 consecutive patients (52 women, 75 men, mean age: 61 years) at our institute between 2000 and 2013. Segmented volumes (Vsegmented) were obtained using commercial software by two radiologists. Estimate volumes (V1–V6) were obtained using formulae for spheres and ellipsoids. Intra- and inter-observer agreement of Vsegmented and agreement of V1–6 with Vsegmented were analysed with concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and Bland-Altman plots. Results Median Vsegmented and V1–V6 were 75.9 cm3, 124.9 cm3, 111.6 cm3, 94.0 cm3, 94.4cm3, 61.7 cm3 and 80.3 cm3 respectively. There was strong intra- and inter-observer agreement for Vsegmented. Agreement with Vsegmented was highest for V6 (scalene ellipsoid, x≠y≠z), with CCC of 0.96 [95%CI: 0.95–0.97]. Mean relative difference was smallest for V6 (0.6%), while it was −19.1% for V5, +14.5% for V4, +17.9% for V3, +32.6 % for V2 and +47% for V1. Conclusion Ellipsoidal approximations of volume using three measured axes may be used to closely estimate Vsegmented when semi-automated techniques are unavailable. PMID:25991487

  1. Comparison of performance of various tumour response criteria in assessment of regorafenib activity in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours after failure of imatinib and sunitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagare, Atul B; Jagannathan, Jyothi P; Kurra, Vikram; Urban, Trinity; Manola, Judith; Choy, Edwin; Demetri, George D; George, Suzanne; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2014-03-01

    To compare performance of various tumour response criteria (TRCs) in assessment of regorafenib activity in patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) with prior failure of imatinib and sunitinib. Twenty participants in a phase II trial received oral regorafenib (median duration 47 weeks; interquartile range (IQR) 24-88) with computed tomography (CT) imaging at baseline and every two months thereafter. Tumour response was prospectively determined on using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) 1.1, and retrospectively reassessed for comparison per RECIST 1.0, World Health Organization (WHO) and Choi criteria, using the same target lesions. Clinical benefit rate [CBR; complete or partial response (CR or PR) or stable disease (SD)≥16 weeks] and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared between various TRCs using kappa statistics. Performance of TRCs in predicting overall survival (OS) was compared by comparing OS in groups with progression-free intervals less than or greater than 20 weeks by each TRC using c-statistics. PR was more frequent by Choi (90%) than RECIST 1.1, RECIST 1.0 and WHO (20% each), however, CBR was similar between various TRCs (overall CBR 85-90%, 95-100% agreement between all TRC pairs). PFS per RECIST 1.0 was similar to RECIST 1.1 (median 44 weeks versus 58 weeks), and shorter for WHO (median 34 weeks) and Choi (median 24 weeks). With RECIST 1.1, RECIST 1.0 and WHO, there was moderate concordance between PFS and OS (c-statistics 0.596-0.679). Choi criteria had less favourable concordance (c-statistic 0.506). RECIST 1.1 and WHO performed somewhat better than Choi criteria as TRC for response evaluation in patients with advanced GIST after prior failure on imatinib and sunitinib. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of Foley Catheter Instead of Digital Rectal Examination for Detection of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Infants and Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazish Baig

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A digital rectal examination is a highly important procedure carried out on infants and children during visits to the gastroenterology clinic, but is often accompanied with physiologic and psychologic trauma in patients, along with being diagnostically inaccurate in the results obtained from it. In order to avoid causing discomfort to the patients, and to improve the accuracy of the results obtained from a DRE, we have articulated a much safer and more precise method of conducting the examination. The use of a 16 French Foley Catheter in the collection of stool samples during a DRE has proved to be an innovative technique, which eliminates discomfort in patients, provides a less stressful environment for both the physician and the family of the patient, along with providing unambiguous results for the FOBT. The use of this technique will not only produce accurate results, but will also eliminate reasons to avoid such an important examination due to the uncomfortable situation a normal DRE would cause.

  3. Tumor Estromal Gastrintestinal de Localização Esofágica: Relato de Caso/ Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Location Esophageal: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Ribeiro Matsumoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: Os tumores estromais gastrintestinais (GIST são considerados as neoplasias mesenquimatosas mais comuns do trato gastrintestinal (TGI. São derivados das células intersticiais de Cajal, localizadas ao nível do plexo mioentérico e responsáveis pela motilidade gastrintestinal. Podem se originar em qualquer região do TGI, sendo apenas 5% provenientes do esôfago. Casuística: Foi relatado um caso de GIST de localização esofágica em um paciente que iniciou quadro de disfagia para alimentos sólidos e odinofagia, de caráter intermitente, acompanhado de náuseas e vômitos. Foram realizadas Seriografia contrastada de esôfago, Endoscopia Digestiva Alta, Tomografia Computadorizada de Abdome, o resultado histopatológico da biópsia da lesão foi inconclusivo e o diagnóstico foi confirmado pela imunohistoquímica que expressou CD117 (KIT pelas células neoplásicas. O serviço de oncologia de referência orientou a realização de cirurgia para ressecção tumoral, porém o paciente optou pela utilização do Mesilato de Imatinib (MI, tendo apresentado melhora progressiva do quadro clínico inicial. Discussão: O tratamento padrão para pacientes com GIST não metastático é a ressecção completa da lesão, pois oferece a maior chance de cura. Entretanto, o paciente optou somente pelo tratamento com o MI. Conclusão: Concluímos que o GIST deve ser considerado nas lesões exofíticas esofágicas e que o tratamento somente com o MI pode ser considerado, mesmo sabendo que o tratamento preconizado nestes casos é a ressecção cirúrgica, associada ao MI como terapia adjuvante, com melhora da sobrevida. Introduction: The gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST considered the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT. It is derived from interstitial cells of Cajal, located at the myenteric plexus and responsible for gastrointestinal motility. It can originate anywhere in the GI tract, and only 5% come from

  4. Test-positive rate at CT colonography is increased by rectal bleeding and/or unexplained weight loss, unlike other common gastrointestinal symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hock, D.; Materne, R.; Ouhadi, R.; Mancini, I.; Aouachria, S.A.; Nchimi, A.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the rate of significant colonic and extra-colonic abnormalities at computed tomography colonography (CTC), according to symptoms and age. We retrospectively evaluated 7361 consecutive average-risk subjects (3073 males, average age: 60.3 ± 13.9; range 18–96 years) for colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent CTC. They were divided into three groups according to clinical symptoms: 1343 asymptomatic individuals (group A), 899 patients with at least one “alarm” symptom for CRC, including rectal bleeding and unexplained weight loss (group C), and 5119 subjects with other gastrointestinal symptoms (group B). Diagnostic and test-positive rates of CTC were established using optical colonoscopy (OC) and/or surgery as reference standard. In addition, clinically significant extra-colonic findings were noted. 903 out of 7361 (12%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11–0.13) subjects had at least one clinically significant colonic finding at CTC. CTC true positive fraction and false positive fraction were respectively 637/642 (99.2%, 95%CI 0.98–0.99) and 55/692 (7.95%, 95%CI 0.05–0.09). The pooled test-positive rate in group C (138/689, 20.0%, 95%CI 0.17–0.23) was significantly higher than in both groups A (79/1343, 5.9%, 95%CI 0.04–0.07) and B (420/5329, 7.5%, 95%CI 0.07–0.08) (p < 0.001). Aging and male gender were associated to a higher test positive rate. The rate of clinically significant extra-colonic findings was significantly higher in group C (44/689, 6.4%, 95%CI 0.04–0.08) versus groups A (26/1343, 1.9%, 95%CI 0.01–0.02) and B (64/5329, 1.2%, 95%CI 0.01–0.02) (p < 0.001). Both test-positive and significant extra-colonic finding rates at CTC are significantly increased in the presence of “alarm” gastrointestinal symptoms especially in older patients

  5. Development of the rectal dosage form with silver-coated glass beads for local-action applications in lower sections of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siczek, Krzysztof; Fichna, Jakub; Zatorski, Hubert; Karolewicz, Bożena; Klimek, Leszek; Owczarek, Artur

    2018-03-01

    Recent findings indicating the anti-inflammatory action of silver preparations through modulation of the gut microbiota and apoptosis of inflammatory cells predestine silver use in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of our study was to validate the possibility of effective silver release from silver-coated glass beads for anti-inflammatory local application in the lower sections of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Silver-coated glass beads were prepared using magnetron method. Release of silver from the silver-coated glass bead surface was carried out in BIO-DIS reciprocating cylinder apparatus. Erosion of silver coating and indirect estimation of the silver release dynamics was assessed using scanning electron microscope. Rectal suppositories containing silver-coated glass beads were prepared using five different methods (M1-M5) and X-ray scanned for their composition. The XR microanalysis and the chemical composition analysis evidenced for a rapid (within 30 min) release of nearly 50% of silver from the coating of the glass beads, which remained stable up to 24 h of incubation. The most homogeneous distribution of beads in the entire volume of the suppository was obtained for formulation M5, where the molten base was poured into mold placed in an ice bath, and the beads were added after 10 s. Our study is the first to present the concept of enclosing silver-coated glass beads in the lipophilic suppository base to attenuate inflammation in the lower GI tract and promises efficient treatment with reduced side effects.

  6. Treatment of advanced gastrointestinal tumors with genetically modified autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (TREAT-ME1): study protocol of a phase I/II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niess, Hanno; von Einem, Jobst C; Thomas, Michael N; Michl, Marlies; Angele, Martin K; Huss, Ralf; Günther, Christine; Nelson, Peter J; Bruns, Christiane J; Heinemann, Volker

    2015-04-08

    Adenocarcinoma originating from the digestive system is a major contributor to cancer-related deaths worldwide. Tumor recurrence, advanced local growth and metastasis are key factors that frequently prevent these tumors from curative surgical treatment. Preclinical research has demonstrated that the dependency of these tumors on supporting mesenchymal stroma results in susceptibility to cell-based therapies targeting this stroma. TREAT-ME1 is a prospective, uncontrolled, single-arm phase I/II study assessing the safety and efficacy of genetically modified autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) as delivery vehicles for a cell-based gene therapy for advanced, recurrent or metastatic gastrointestinal or hepatopancreatobiliary adenocarcinoma. Autologous bone marrow will be drawn from each eligible patient after consent for bone marrow donation has been obtained (under a separate EC-approved protocol). In the following ~10 weeks the investigational medicinal product (IMP) is developed for each patient. To this end, the patient's MSCs are stably transfected with a gamma-retroviral, replication-incompetent and self-inactivating (SIN) vector system containing a therapeutic promoter - gene construct that allows for tumor-specific expression of the therapeutic gene. After release of the IMP the patients are enrolled after given informed consent for participation in the TREAT-ME 1 trial. In the phase I part of the study, the safety of the IMP is tested in six patients by three treatment cycles consisting of re-transfusion of MSCs at different concentrations followed by administration of the prodrug Ganciclovir. In the phase II part of the study, sixteen patients will be enrolled receiving IMP treatment. A subgroup of patients that qualifies for surgery will be treated preoperatively with the IMP to verify homing of the MSCs to tumors as to be confirmed in the surgical specimen. The TREAT-ME1 clinical study involves a highly innovative therapeutic strategy combining cell

  7. Association of KIT exon 9 mutations with nongastric primary site and aggressive behavior: KIT mutation analysis and clinical correlates of 120 gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonescu, Cristina R; Sommer, Gunhild; Sarran, Lisa; Tschernyavsky, Sylvia J; Riedel, Elyn; Woodruff, James M; Robson, Mark; Maki, Robert; Brennan, Murray F; Ladanyi, Marc; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Besmer, Peter

    2003-08-15

    Activating mutations of the KIT juxtamembrane region are the most common genetic events in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and have been noted as independent prognostic factors. The impact of KIT mutation in other regions, such as the extracellular or kinase domains, is not well-defined and fewer than 30 cases have been published to date. One hundred twenty GISTs, confirmed by KIT immunoreactivity, were evaluated for the presence of KIT exon 9, 11, 13, and 17 mutations. The relation between the presence/type of KIT mutation and clinicopathological factors was analyzed using Fisher's exact test and log-rank test. Forty-four % of the tumors were located in the stomach, 47% in the small bowel, 6% in the rectum, and 3% in the retroperitoneum. Overall, KIT mutations were detected in 78% of patients as follows: 67% in exon 11, 11% in exon 9, and none in exon 13 or 17. The types of KIT exon 11 mutations were heterogeneous and clustered in the classic "hot spot" at the 5' end of exon 11. Seven % of cases showed internal tandem duplications (ITD) at the 3' end of exon 11, in a region that we designate as a second hot spot for KIT mutations. Interestingly, these cases were associated with: female predominance, stomach location, occurrence in older patients, and favorable outcome. There were significant associations between exon 9 mutations and large tumor size (P < 0.001) and extragastric location (P = 0.02). Ten of these 13 patients with more than 1-year follow-up have developed recurrent disease. Most KIT-expressing GISTs show KIT mutations that are preferentially located within the classic hot spot of exon 11. In addition, we found an association between a second hot spot at the 3'end of exon 11, characterized by ITDs, and a subgroup of clinically indolent gastric GISTs in older females. KIT exon 9 mutations seem to define a distinct subset of GISTs, located predominantly in the small bowel and associated with an unfavorable clinical course.

  8. Efficacy and safety of regorafenib for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours after failure of imatinib and sunitinib: an international, multicentre, prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial (GRID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetri, George D; Reichardt, Peter; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Blay, Jean-Yves; Rutkowski, Piotr; Gelderblom, Hans; Hohenberger, Peter; Leahy, Michael; von Mehren, Margaret; Joensuu, Heikki; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Blackstein, Martin; Cesne, Axel Le; Schöffski, Patrick; Maki, Robert G; Bauer, Sebastian; Nguyen, Binh Bui; Xu, Jianming; Nishida, Toshirou; Chung, John; Kappeler, Christian; Kuss, Iris; Laurent, Dirk; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background To date, only two agents, imatinib and sunitinib, have shown clinical benefit in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), but almost all metastatic GISTs eventually develop resistance to these agents, resulting in fatal disease progression. This phase 3 trial assessed efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with metastatic and/or unresectable GIST progressing after failure of at least imatinib and sunitinib. Methods Patients were randomised 2:1 to receive either regorafenib 160 mg orally daily or placebo, plus best supportive care in both arms, for the first 3 weeks of each 4-week cycle. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Upon disease progression, patients on placebo could cross over to regorafenib. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), objective response rate, disease control rate (DCR: rate of durable stable disease lasting for ≥12 weeks plus complete or partial responses), and safety. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01271712). Results From January to August 2011, 240 patients were screened at 57 centres in 17 countries, and 199 patients were randomised to receive regorafenib (n=133) or matching placebo (n=66). Median PFS per independent blinded central review was 4·8 months and 0·9 months, respectively (hazard ratio [HR] 0·27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0·19–0·39; pregorafenib, resulting in no significant difference in OS between study arms (HR 0·77, 95% CI 0·42–1·41; p=0·199). A best response of partial response or stable disease was observed in 101/133 patients (75·9%) on regorafenib and 23/66 patients (34·8%) on placebo. DCR was 52·6% (70/133 patients) and 9·1% (6/66 patients), respectively. Drug-related adverse events were reported in 130 (98·5%) of 132 regorafenib patients and 45 (68·2%) of 66 placebo patients. The most common grade ≥3 regorafenib-related adverse events were hypertension (31/132, 23·5%), hand–foot skin reaction (26

  9. Correlation of KIT and PDGFRA mutational status with clinical benefit in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor treated with sunitinib in a worldwide treatment-use trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Peter; Demetri, George D; Gelderblom, Hans; Rutkowski, Piotr; Im, Seock-Ah; Gupta, Sudeep; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Schöffski, Patrick; Schuette, Jochen; Soulières, Denis; Blay, Jean-Yves; Goldstein, David; Fly, Kolette; Huang, Xin; Corsaro, Massimo; Lechuga, Maria Jose; Martini, Jean-Francois; Heinrich, Michael C

    2016-01-15

    Several small studies indicated that the genotype of KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRA) contributes in part to the level of clinical effectiveness of sunitinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patients. This study aimed to correlate KIT and PDGFRA mutational status with clinical outcome metrics (progression-free survival [PFS], overall survival [OS], objective response rate [ORR]) in a larger international patient population. This is a non-interventional, retrospective analysis in patients with imatinib-resistant or intolerant GIST who were treated in a worldwide, open-label treatment-use study (Study 1036; NCT00094029) in which sunitinib was administered at a starting dose of 50 mg/day on a 4-week-on, 2-week-off schedule. Molecular status was obtained in local laboratories with tumor samples obtained either pre-imatinib, post-imatinib/pre-sunitinib, or post-sunitinib treatment, and all available data were used in the analyses regardless of collection time. The primary analysis compared PFS in patients with primary KIT exon 11 versus exon 9 mutations (using a 2-sided log-rank test) and secondary analyses compared OS (using the same test) and ORR (using a 2-sided Pearson χ(2) test) in the same molecular subgroups. Of the 1124 sunitinib-treated patients in the treatment-use study, 230 (20%) were included in this analysis, and baseline characteristics were similar between the two study populations. Median PFS was 7.1 months. A significantly better PFS was observed in patients with a primary mutation in KIT exon 9 (n = 42) compared to those with a primary mutation in exon 11 (n = 143; hazard ratio = 0.59; 95 % confidence interval, 0.39-0.89; P = 0.011), with median PFS times of 12.3 and 7.0 months, respectively. Similarly, longer OS and higher ORR were observed in patients with a primary KIT mutation in exon 9 versus exon 11. The data available were limited to investigate the effects of additional KIT or PDGFRA mutations on the efficacy

  10. [New orientations in the management of advanced, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST): combination of surgery and systemic therapy with imatinib in a case of primary gastric location].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Marco; De Milito, Ritanna; Simi, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are rare neoplasms originating from connective tissue in the digestive tract with an incidence of less than 1% and account for most non-epithelial primitive digestive tumours. Metastasis diagnosed at the time of disease discovery confirms GIST malignancy. Kit protein, a trans-membrane tyrosine kinase receptor of staminal cells, is characteristically expressed by GIST. Most GIST have a mutation in the kit proto-oncogene. Resistance to conventional chemotherapy is commonly shown by malignant GIST. Most patients with advanced malignant GIST achieve clinical benefit with imatinib mesilate, an orally administered selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase receptor. We treated a 43-year-old male patient suffering from a gastric GIST diagnosed during a surgical emergency operation for peritonitis caused by gastric perforation. At the time of the first operation the patient had lost 10 kg body weight over the previous months and was seriously cachectic. During the emergency operation the perforation was sutured. The biopsy results showed the presence of CD1 17 (c-kit) and CD34 markers. A total body CT scan documented the substantial size of the gastric wall lesion, an increased volume of abdominal lymph nodes and compression of the splenic vein with alternative collateral circulation. The liver presented no less than 5 large metastases distributed in both the left and right lobes. There was also a pulmonary metastasis. Because of frequent spontaneous bleeding and starvation the patient was seriously anaemic. Considering the action mechanism of imatinib and the extent of the lesion we decided to perform a total gastrectomy procedure. At the time of the operation the stomach seemed to have a modified volume and shape: it appeared to be divided into two sacs, the larger and deeper of which was the original gastric cavity, while the superficial, smaller one seemed to be a protrusion of the organ. The stomach was indistinguishable from

  11. Development of nano radiopharmaceutical based on Bevacizumab labelled with Technetium-99m for early diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor; Desenvolvimento de nanorradiofarmaco a base de Bevacizumabe marcado com tecnecio-99m para diagnostico precoce do tumor estromal gastrointestinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Thais Ligiero

    2015-06-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is an essential activity to improve nuclear medicine, and essential for the early and effective diagnosis of oncological diseases. Among the various possibilities current research in the world, the radiopharmaceuticals to chemotherapeutic base may be the most effective in detecting tumors, particularly Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST), the Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors. However, difficulties in directing, as well as adhesion of the radiopharmaceutical in the desired location, are currently the main problems in the early detection and treatment of some of these tumors. Advances in the field of nanotechnology, particularly in recent years, indicate significant contribution to overcoming these obstacles, particularly in the implementation of molecular barriers as well as the functionalization of the nanoparticles, thereby improving targeting by the use of surface nucleotides, and the increased adhesion, which facilitates the release of the drug and therefore increases the chances of early diagnosis and more effective treatment. This study aimed to the production, characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity, as well as in vivo biodistribution test Bevacizumab nanoparticles labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide for detection of type GIST tumors. Bevacizumab was encapsulated in the form of nanoparticles by the emulsification method using double poly-acetic acid and polyvinyl alcohol polymers (PLA / PVA) at a concentration of 2% of the monoclonal antibody. The characterization of the nanoparticles was performed by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity assessment was performed by XTT assay with various cell lines of solid tumor cells. The labeling with technetium-99m was done by the direct method, and its yield determined by paper chromatography using paper Whatmam 1 as the stationary phase and acetone as mobile phase. In the biodistribution study

  12. Rectal cancer: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  13. Rectal Prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ball”. Rectal prolapse may be confused with significant hemorrhoid disease and can even be confusing at times ... and treating this problem. A = Rectal Prolapse B = Hemorrhoids Once a prolapse is apparent, fecal incontinence (inability ...

  14. Hydrocortisone Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also used to relieve itching and swelling from hemorrhoids and other rectal problems. Hydrocortisone is in a ... may improve within 5 to 7 days.For hemorrhoids, hydrocortisone rectal cream usually is used in adults ...

  15. Bisacodyl Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisac-Evac® Suppositories ... Dulcolax® Suppositories ... Rectal bisacodyl comes as a suppository and enema to use rectally. It is usually used at the time that a bowel movement is desired. The suppositories usually ...

  16. Anterior colorectal duplication presenting as rectal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Resendiz, Amador; Asz, Jose; Medina-Vega, F Antonio; Ortega-Salgado, J Arturo

    2007-09-01

    Duplications of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are rare. Only 5% of them are rectal and there are very few reports of rectal prolapse (RP) caused by a duplication. An 11 month-old female presented with a RP caused by a blind-ended anterior tubular colorectal duplication. The duplication was successfully opened and connected to the normal rectum without complications. Although infrequent, a rectal duplication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of RP.

  17. Isoosmolar enemas demonstrate preferential gastrointestinal distribution, safety, and acceptability compared with hyperosmolar and hypoosmolar enemas as a potential delivery vehicle for rectal microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Francisco J; Bakshi, Rahul P; Fuchs, Edward J; Li, Liye; Caffo, Brian S; Goldsmith, Arthur J; Ventuneac, Ana; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Du, Yong; Leal, Jeffrey P; Lee, Linda A; Torbenson, Michael S; Hendrix, Craig W

    2013-11-01

    Rectally applied antiretroviral microbicides for preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) of HIV infection are currently in development. Since enemas (rectal douches) are commonly used by men who have sex with men prior to receptive anal intercourse, a microbicide enema could enhance PrEP adherence by fitting seamlessly within the usual sexual practices. We assessed the distribution, safety, and acceptability of three enema types-hyperosmolar (Fleet), hypoosmolar (distilled water), and isoosmolar (Normosol-R)-in a crossover design. Nine men received each enema type in random order. Enemas were radiolabeled [(99m)Tc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)] to assess enema distribution in the colon using single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging. Plasma (99m)Tc-DTPA indicated mucosal permeability. Sigmoidoscopic colon tissue biopsies were taken to assess injury as well as tissue penetration of the (99m)Tc-DTPA. Acceptability was assessed after each product use and at the end of the study. SPECT/CT imaging showed that the isoosmolar enema had greater proximal colonic distribution (up to the splenic flexure) and greater luminal and colon tissue concentrations of (99m)Tc-DTPA when compared to the other enemas (pgood with no clear preferences among the three enema types. The isoosmolar enema was superior or similar to the other enemas in all categories and is a good candidate for further development as a rectal microbicide vehicle.

  18. Rectal duplication: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didden, K; Masereel, B; Geyskens, P

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract duplications are uncommon congenital abnormalities, that may occur anywhere along the alimentary tract. Most frequently they occur at the level of the small bowel tract and are symptomatic before the age of two. In our case we report the history of a 68-years old women with a colon duplication, especially a rectal duplication. This is very exceptional.

  19. External cystic rectal duplication: an unusual presentation of rectal duplication cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, I; Karaman, A; Arda, N; Cakmak, O

    2007-11-01

    Duplications of gastrointestinal tract are rare anomalies, and rectal duplications account for five percent of the alimentary tract duplications. We present an unusual case of rectal duplication, which was located externally in a newborn female, and discuss the types of distal hindgut duplications.

  20. Mesalamine Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rectal mesalamine comes as a suppository and an enema to use in the rectum. The suppository and the enema are usually used once a day at bedtime. ... rectal mesalamine without talking to your doctor.Mesalamine suppositories and enemas may stain clothing and other fabrics, ...

  1. Effects of gastrointestinal parasites on parasite burden, rectal temperature, and antibody titer responses to vaccination and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, J S; Carroll, J A; Gasbarre, L C; Shelton, T A; Nordstrom, S T; Hutcheson, J P; Van Campen, H; Engle, T E

    2012-06-01

    Thirty-three colostrum-deprived Holstein bull calves (initial BW of 131 ± 4 kg) were used to determine the effect of timing of anthelmintic administration relative to vaccination on antibody titer response to vaccine component antigens. When calves were at least 3 mo of age, they were sorted randomly into individual pens and assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups, treatments consisted of 1) dewormed 2 wk before vaccination (DPV), 2) dewormed at the time of vaccination (DV), or 3) control, vaccinated but not dewormed (CONT). All calves were inoculated with infective larvae of brown stomach worms (Ostertagia ostertagi) and intestinal worms (Cooperia spp.) on d 1, 7, 10, 14, and 18 for a total dose of 235,710 infective larvae per calf. Calves (DPV and DV) were dewormed on d 21 or 35 with a 10% fenbendazole suspension at 5 mg/kg of BW. On d 35, all calves were vaccinated with a modified-live virus respiratory vaccine containing IBRV (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus), BVDV-1 (bovine viral diarrhea virus genotype 1), BVDV-2 (BVDV genotype 2), PI-3 (parainfluenza-3), and BRSV (bovine respiratory syncytial virus). During the 103-d experiment, weekly fecal egg counts, blood, and rectal temperatures were collected and health status was recorded daily. Blood samples were obtained weekly to determine serum neutralizing (SN) antibody titers to IBRV, BVDV-1, BVDV-2, and PI-3 and cytokine levels for IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α), and IFN-γ (interferon-gamma). There was a tendency (P parasite burden and decreased rectal temperature increase after an IBRV challenge. Deworming strategy had no effect on antibody response to vaccination or IBRV challenge.

  2. Benign (solitary) ulcer of the rectum - another cause for rectal stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapa, H.J.; Smith, H.J.; Dickinson, T.A.

    1981-01-15

    Benign rectal ulcer syndrome is an uncommon cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients may present with mild, often recurrent, rectal bleeding frequently ascribed to hemorrhoids. Barium enema may be normal during the early, nonulcerative phase of proctitis. Single (or multiple) ulcers with or without rectal stricture are the hallmarks of the radiographic diagnosis. Radiologic demonstration of the ulcer(s) is not required, however, for the diagnosis. Benign rectal ulcer should be included in the differential diagnosis of benign-appearing rectal strictures.

  3. All-trans retinoic acid inhibits KIT activity and induces apoptosis in gastrointestinal stromal tumor GIST-T1 cell line by affecting on the expression of survivin and Bax protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taguchi Takahiro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imatinib, a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been used as a standard first-line therapy for irresectable and metastasized gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST patients. Unfortunately, most patients responding to imatinib will eventually exhibit imatinib-resistance, the cause of which is not fully understood. The serious clinical problem of imatinib-resistance demands alternative therapeutic strategy. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA on GIST cell lines. Methods Cell proliferation was determined by trypan blue dye exclusion test. Western blot analysis was performed to test the expression of activated KIT, its downstream proteins, and apoptosis associated proteins. The cytotoxic interactions of imatinib with ATRA were evaluated using the isobologram of Steel and Peckham. Results and conclusion In this work, for the first time we have demonstrated that ATRA affected on cell proliferation of GIST-T1 and GIST-882 cell line through inhibition of cell growth in a dose dependent manner and induced apoptosis. High dose of ATRA induced morphologic change in GIST-T1 cells, rounded-up cells, and activated the caspase-3 protein. In further examination, we found that the ATRA-induced apoptosis in GIST-T1 cells was accompanied by the down-regulated expression of survivin and up-regulated expression of Bax protein. Moreover, ATRA suppressed the activity of KIT protein in GIST-T1 cells and its downstream signal, AKT activity, but not MAPK activity. We also have demonstrated that combination of ATRA with imatinib showed additive effect by isobologram, suggesting that the combination of ATRA and imatinib may be a novel potential therapeutic option for GIST treatment. Furthermore, the scracht assay result suggested that ATRA was a potential reagent to prevent the invasion or metastasis of GIST cells.

  4. Guidelines for time-to-event end point definitions in sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) trials: results of the DATECAN initiative (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials)†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellera, C A; Penel, N; Ouali, M; Bonvalot, S; Casali, P G; Nielsen, O S; Delannes, M; Litière, S; Bonnetain, F; Dabakuyo, T S; Benjamin, R S; Blay, J-Y; Bui, B N; Collin, F; Delaney, T F; Duffaud, F; Filleron, T; Fiore, M; Gelderblom, H; George, S; Grimer, R; Grosclaude, P; Gronchi, A; Haas, R; Hohenberger, P; Issels, R; Italiano, A; Jooste, V; Krarup-Hansen, A; Le Péchoux, C; Mussi, C; Oberlin, O; Patel, S; Piperno-Neumann, S; Raut, C; Ray-Coquard, I; Rutkowski, P; Schuetze, S; Sleijfer, S; Stoeckle, E; Van Glabbeke, M; Woll, P; Gourgou-Bourgade, S; Mathoulin-Pélissier, S

    2015-05-01

    The use of potential surrogate end points for overall survival, such as disease-free survival (DFS) or time-to-treatment failure (TTF) is increasingly common in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in cancer. However, the definition of time-to-event (TTE) end points is rarely precise and lacks uniformity across trials. End point definition can impact trial results by affecting estimation of treatment effect and statistical power. The DATECAN initiative (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event End points in CANcer trials) aims to provide recommendations for definitions of TTE end points. We report guidelines for RCT in sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). We first carried out a literature review to identify TTE end points (primary or secondary) reported in publications of RCT. An international multidisciplinary panel of experts proposed recommendations for the definitions of these end points. Recommendations were developed through a validated consensus method formalizing the degree of agreement among experts. Recommended guidelines for the definition of TTE end points commonly used in RCT for sarcomas and GIST are provided for adjuvant and metastatic settings, including DFS, TTF, time to progression and others. Use of standardized definitions should facilitate comparison of trials' results, and improve the quality of trial design and reporting. These guidelines could be of particular interest to research scientists involved in the design, conduct, reporting or assessment of RCT such as investigators, statisticians, reviewers, editors or regulatory authorities. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Rectal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Rectal Prolapse in a Toddler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushbakht, Samreen; ul Haq, Anwar

    2015-12-01

    Rectal duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies. They constitute only 4% of the total gastrointestinal anomalies. They usually present in childhood. The common presenting symptoms are mass or pressure effects like constipation, tenesmus, urinary retention, local infection or bleeding due to presence of ectopic gastric mucosa. We are reporting a rare presenting symptom of rectal duplication cyst in a 4-year-old boy/toddler who presented with rectal prolapse. He also had bleeding per rectum. Rectal examination revealed a soft mass palpable in the posterior rectal wall. CT scan showed a cystic mass in the posterior wall of the rectum. It was excised trans-anally and the postoperative recovery was uneventful. Biopsy report showed rectal duplication cyst.

  6. Rectal lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucci, L.; Salfi, R.; Meraviglia, F.; Mazzeo, F.

    1984-01-01

    Regional lymph nodes of the rectum are not demonstrable by pedal lymphoscintigraphy. The authors have evaluated the technique of rectal lymphoscintigraphy, using a technique similar to that which has been used in the assessment of lymph nodes in breast and prostatic cancer. Thirty-five patients were studied: ten normal subjects and 25 patients with rectal cancer. In normal subjects, the lymph nodes accompanying the superior hemorrhoidal artery and the inferior mesenteric artery are demonstrable in succession; after three hours the aortic lymph nodes are demonstrable. The 25 patients with rectal cancer underwent resection of their primary tumor and the stage was defined according to Dukes (1932). In five patients (stage A) no alteration was demonstrable. In 11 patients (stage B) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed vs. the control group. In nine cases (stage C) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed and defective versus the control group

  7. Rectal duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni B

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Duplications of the alimentary tract are of a great rarity, particularly so in the rectum. Because of its rarity, the difficulty of making a correct diagnosis and of selection of proper approach for treatment, this entity bears a special significance. The present case report deals with a female newborn who presented with imperforate anus and a rectovestibular fistula and a mass prolapsing at the introitus. Complete excision of the mass was carried out through the perineal approach and the child then underwent, a PSARP for the correction of the rectal anomaly. Histology confirmed the mass to be a rectal duplication.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging for clinical management of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To update the 2012 ESGAR consensus guidelines on the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. METHODS: Fourteen abdominal imaging experts from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdomin...

  9. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) - A pilot study on the assessment of treatment response in comparison with 18F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Sabine; Koehli, Melanie; Meuli, Reto [Dept. of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Univ. of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)], e-mail: sabine.schmidt@chuv.ch; Dunet, Vincent; Prior, John O. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Uniausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Montemurro, Michael [Dept. of Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Univ. of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-10-15

    Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used for assessing the treatment success in oncology, but the real clinical value needs to evaluated by comparison with other, already established, metabolic imaging techniques. Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the clinical potential of diffusion-weighted MRI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) response to targeted therapy compared with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT). Material and Methods: Eight patients (mean age, 56{+-}11 years) known to have metastatic GIST underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI (T1Gd, DWI [b = 50,300,600], ADC mapping) simultaneously, before and after change in targeted therapy. MR and PET/CT examinations were first analyzed blindly. Second, PET/CT images were co-registered with T1Gd-MR images for lesion detection. Only 18F-FDG avid lesions were considered. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and the corresponding minimum ADC{sub min} were measured for the six largest lesions per patient, if any, on baseline and follow-up examinations. The relationship between changes in SUV{sub max} and ADCmin was analyzed (Spearman's correlation). Results: Twenty-four metastases (12 hepatic, 12 extra-hepatic) were compared on PET/CT and MR images. SUV{sub max} decreased from 7.7{+-}8.1 g/mL to 5.5{+-}5.4 g/mL (P = 0.20), while ADC{sub min} increased from 1.2{+-}0.3 X 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s to 1.5{+-}0.3 X 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s (P = 0.0002). There was a significant association between changes in SUV{sub max} and ADC{sub min} (rho = - 0.62, P = 0.0014), but not between changes in lesions size (P = 0.40). Conclusion: Changes in ADCmin correlated with the response of 18F-FDG avid GIST to targeted therapy. Thus, diffusion-weighted MRI may represent a radiation-free alternative for follow-up treatment for metastatic GIST patients.

  10. Rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fossati, V; Antognoni, P; Villa, E and others

    1985-01-01

    Records of 135 patients with rectal carcinoma were reviewed and correlations between survival rate, extent of tumor and radiotherapy were investigated. The survival rate at 5 years was 16% for C Astler Coller's stage patients and without metastases, but the prognosis was much less favourable for advanced tumors and/or subjects with distant metastases. Preliminary results of another series of patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy are discussed.

  11. Massive rectal bleeding from colonic diverticulosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Rapport De Cas: Nous mettons un cas d'un homme de 79 ans quiàprésente une hémorragie rectal massive ... cause of overt lower gastrointestinal (GI) ... vessels into the intestinal lumen results in ... placed on a high fibre diet, and intravenous.

  12. Molecular, Pathologic and MRI Investigation of the Prognostic and Redictive Importance of Extramural Venous Invasion in Rectal Cancer (MARVEL) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-08

    Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Diseases; Colorectal Neoplasms; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases

  13. Involvement of Bmi-1 gene in the development of gastrointestinal stromal tumor by regulating p16Ink4A/p14ARF gene expressions: An in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang-Li; Wu, Jiang-Hong; Hong, Cai; Wang, Ya-Nong; Zhou, Ye; Long, Zi-Wen; Zhou, Ying; Qin, Hai-Shu

    2017-12-01

    This study was conducted in order to explore the role that Bmi-1 plays during the development of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) by regulation of the p16 Ink4A and p14 ARF expressions. Eighty-six patients diagnosed with GIST were selected to take part in this experiment. The Bmi-1 protein expressions in GIST and adjacent normal tissues were detected using immunohistochemistry and further analyzed by using photodensitometry. To monitor and track the progression of the GIST, a 3-year follow-up was conducted for all affected patients. After cell transfection, the GIST cells were assigned into the control group (without transfection), the negative control (NC) group (transfected with Bmi-1-Scramble plasmid), and the Bmi-1 shRNA group (transfected with the pcDNA3.1-Bmi-1 shRNA plasmid). Protein and mRNA expressions collected from Bmi-1, p16 lnk4A , P14 ARF , cyclin D1, and CDK4 were measured using both the RT-qPCR and western blotting methods Cell senescence was assessed and obtained by using the β-Galactosidase (β-Gal) activity assay. The use of a Soft agar colony formation assay and CCK-8 assay were performed in order to detect the cell growth and subsequent proliferation. Cell invasion and migration were analyzed using the Transwell assay and scratch test. Bmi-1 in the GIST tissues was found to be significantly higher and the p16 lnk4A and P14 ARF expressions were lower than those in the adjacent normal tissues. Bmi-1 was negatively correlated with p16 lnk4A and P14 ARF expressions according to the correlation analysis. Bmi-1 expression was associated with the TNM stage, postoperative recurrence, metastasis, tumor size, and the 5-year survival rate. Area under ROC curve was calculated at 0.884, and sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Bmi-1 predicting the GIST were 67.44%, 97.67%, and 65.12%, respectively. Patients exhibiting a high Bmi-1 expression in the GIST tissues had lower survival rates than those with low Bmi-1 expression. In comparison with

  14. Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma Presenting as a Rectal Polyp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Fitzgerald

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Appendiceal adenocarcinoma typically presents as an incidentally noted appendiceal mass, or with symptoms of right lower quadrant pain that can mimic appendicitis, but local involvement of adjacent organs is uncommon, particularly as the presenting sign. We report on a case of a primary appendiceal cancer initially diagnosed as a rectal polyp based on its appearance in the rectal lumen. The management of the patient was in keeping with standard practice for a rectal polyp, and the diagnosis of appendiceal adenocarcinoma was made intraoperatively. The operative strategy had to be adjusted due to this unexpected finding. Although there are published cases of appendiceal adenocarcinoma inducing intussusception and thus mimicking a cecal polyp, there are no reports in the literature describing invasion of the appendix through the rectal wall and thus mimicking a rectal polyp. The patient is a 75-year-old female who presented with spontaneous hematochezia and, on colonoscopy, was noted to have a rectal polyp that appeared to be located within a diverticulum. When endoscopic mucosal resection was not successful, she was referred to colorectal surgery for a low anterior resection. Preoperative imaging was notable for an enlarged appendix adjacent to the rectum. Intraoperatively, the appendix was found to be densely adherent to the right lateral rectal wall. An en bloc resection of the distal sigmoid colon, proximal rectum and appendix was performed, with pathology demonstrating appendiceal adenocarcinoma that invaded through the rectal wall. The prognosis in this type of malignancy weighs heavily on whether or not perforation and spread throughout the peritoneal cavity have occurred. In this unusual presentation, an en bloc resection is required for a complete resection and to minimize the risk of peritoneal spread. Unusual appearing polyps do not always originate from the bowel wall. Abnormal radiographic findings adjacent to an area of

  15. Lower gastrointestinal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: This refresher course will review the current knowledge as well as ongoing and future research strategies in lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Radiation therapy has a significant role in the adjuvant treatment of lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Furthermore, there are data to suggest that radiation therapy is an integral component of the conservative management (organ preservation) of rectal and anal cancers. 1. Colon cancer. The standard adjuvant treatment for node positive or high risk transmural colon cancer is postoperative 5-FU and Levamisole. There are retrospective data to suggest that certain subsets of high risk patients may benefit from postoperative radiation therapy. 2. Rectal cancer. Randomized trials have revealed an advantage of postoperative radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer. In the adjuvant setting the use of continuous infusion 5-FU may be more beneficial compared with bolus 5-FU. Despite the improvement in survival, postoperative therapies are associated with an approximately 35% incidence of grade 3+ toxicity. Recent data suggest that the use of preoperative combined modality therapy may be associated with less toxicity as well as increase the chance of sphincter preservation. New Intergroup trials addressing these issues will be presented. In patients with locally advanced unresectable rectal cancer, the addition of intraoperative radiation therapy may further improve local control. 3. Anal cancer. The use of combined 5-FU/Mitomycin-C and pelvic radiation therapy is effective in the treatment of anal carcinoma. The RTOG has recently completed a randomized trial addressing the question of the effectiveness and toxicity of Mitomycin-C. The replacement Intergroup Phase III trial will be presented

  16. Lower gastrointestinal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: This refresher course will review the current knowledge as well as ongoing and future research strategies in lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Radiation therapy has a significant role in the adjuvant treatment of lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Furthermore, there are data to suggest that radiation therapy is an integral component of the conservative management (organ preservation) of rectal and anal cancers. 1. Colon cancer. The standard adjuvant treatment for node positive or high risk transmural colon cancer is postoperative 5-FU and Levamisole. There are retrospective data to suggest that certain subsets of high risk patients may benefit from postoperative radiation therapy. 2. Rectal cancer. Randomized trials have revealed an advantage of postoperative radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer. In the adjuvant setting the use of continuous infusion 5-FU may be more beneficial compared with bolus 5-FU. Despite the improvement in survival, postoperative therapies are associated with an approximately 35% incidence of grade 3+ toxicity. Recent data suggest that the use of preoperative combined modality therapy may be associated with less toxicity as well as increase the chance of sphincter preservation. New Intergroup trials addressing these issues will be presented. In patients with locally advanced unresectable rectal cancer, the addition of intraoperative radiation therapy may further improve local control. 3. Anal cancer. The use of combined 5-FU/Mitomycin-C and pelvic radiation therapy is effective in the treatment of anal carcinoma. The RTOG has recently completed a randomized trial addressing the question of the effectiveness and toxicity of Mitomycin-C. The replacement Intergroup Phase III trial will be presented

  17. Gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.D.; Pointon, R.C.S.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, radiotherapy is of only minor use in the management of adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract, for a number of reasons. First, an exploratory laparotomy is generally needed for diagnosis, and if possible the tumour is resected or by-passed. Second, radiotherapy planning in the upper abdomen is complicated by the proximity of small bowel, kidneys, and spinal cord. Third, it has been assumed that these tumours cause death largely as a result of distant metastases, so that local radiotherapy, even if effective, would contribute little to survival. The continued interest in radiotherapy for this group of tumours arises out of the poor survival rates following surgery, which have not changed for many years, and the morbidity associated with their resection. It was hoped that the addition of cytotoxic agents to radical surgery would improve survival rates in carcinoma of the stomach and intraperitoneal colon. Despite a large number of well-organised prospective trials, using a variety of cytotoxic drugs, there is so far no evidence that the addition of chemotherapy to radical surgery improves survival for either tumour site. The authors are therefore faced with a group of tumours which are not only common, but commonly fatal and many surgeons would accept that a new approach using modern radiotherapy techniques may well be justified. There is evidence that this movement is already taking place for carcinoma of the rectum, and the indications for radiotherapy in this condition will be dealt with below. Before considering these it is worth dwelling briefly on recent changes in surgical and radiological practices which, if they fulfil expectations, might allow radiotherapy to be used for carcinoma of the colon, stomach, and pancreas as it is now used for rectal cancer

  18. Benign (solitary) ulcer of the rectum - another cause for rectal stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapa, H.J.; Smith, H.J.; Dickinson, T.A.; Veterans Administration Hospital, Dallas, TX; Texas Univ., Dallas

    1981-01-01

    Benign rectal ulcer syndrome is an uncommon cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients may present with mild, often recurrent, rectal bleeding frequently ascribed to hemorrhoids. Barium enema may be normal during the early, nonulcerative phase of proctitis. Single (or multiple) uclers with or without rectal stricture are the hallmarks of the radiographic diagnosis. Radiologic demonstration of the ulcer(s) is not required, however, for the diagnosis. Benign rectal ulcer should be included in the differential diagnosis of benign-appearing rectal strictures. (orig.) [de

  19. Digital rectal exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  20. Anal and Rectal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess Anorectal Fistula Foreign Objects in the Rectum Hemorrhoids Levator Syndrome Pilonidal Disease Proctitis Rectal Prolapse The ... cancer Foreign objects in the anus and rectum Hemorrhoids Levator syndrome Pilonidal disease Proctitis Rectal prolapse Diagnosis ...

  1. Blødende gastrointestinal stromatumor i et Meckels divertikel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wennervaldt, Kasper; Bisgaard, Thue

    2009-01-01

    We present at rare case of severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a 57-year-old patient due to a gastrointestinal stromal tumour located in a Meckel's diverticulum (MD) without ectopic tissue. We discuss indications and pro et cons of prophylactic resection of MD. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Dec-7...

  2. Disseminated lung cancer presenting as a rectal mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Mia M; Stamp, Inger M H; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, and approximately 50% had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. A rectal mass and unintended weight loss are common manifestations of rectal cancer. Our case presented with a rectal mass, but workup revealed...... a metastatic lesion from lung cancer. Lung cancer metastases to the lower gastrointestinal tract imply reduced survival compared with the already poor mean survival of stage IV lung cancer. Despite relevant therapy, the patient died 5 months after referral....

  3. [Rectal carcinoma in a 24-year-old man with Hirschsprung's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Jeppe; Green, Charlotte; Ljungmann, Ken

    2018-06-18

    This case report presents an incident of rectal carcinoma in a 24-year-old man with Hirschsprung's disease, for which he was operated in his early childhood, with a Soave pull-through procedure. No direct association between Hirschsprung's disease and rectal cancer was found in our review of the literature. However, several case reports of rectal cancers following pull-through procedures exist. A low threshold for further clinical investigations is recommended, if these patients are presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms.

  4. Spectrum of rectal radiation lesions in cases of cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, V.K.; Rohatgi, V.K.; Gupta, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The study was carried out in 70 cases of carcinoma cervix uteri, showing varying degree of proctitis following radiotherapy treatment for cervical cancer. Grossly, the rectal mucosa showed oedema, congestion, granular proctitis, ulceration, and microscopically stromal connective tissue as well as epithelial changes. The stromal changes have been emphasised as useful diagnostic criteria of radiation reaction. The familarity of these changes is considered necessary because it is imperative to know categorically that a given lesion is entirely or in part due to radiation or due to extension of adjacent tumour in the cervix. Further, this issue is very important in management of cases of cancer cervix. The criteria of distinguishing the lesions in the rectal tissue have been laid down. (auth.)

  5. Rectal Metastases from Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cedrés

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents 85% of lung cancer. The most frequent sites of distant metastasis are the liver, adrenal glands, bones and brain. Gastrointestinal metastases are uncommon and rectal metastases are extremely rare. Here we report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung with rectal metastases.

  6. Adenocarcinoma arising in rectal duplication cyst: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivnani, Anand T; Small, William; Benson, Al; Rao, Sambasiva; Talamonti, Mark S

    2004-11-01

    Duplication cyst of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a rare congenital anomaly, and rectal duplication cysts comprise a small fraction these cases. Most patients present for the first time in adulthood, and the origin of rectal duplication cysts is unclear. Prior series document malignant transformation in approximately 20 per cent of cases. The following case report describes a carcinoma arising in a rectal duplication cyst. Given the lack of data demonstrating adequate control for patients with adenocarcinoma arising in a rectal duplication cyst and our experience with this patient, we recommend all patients undergo multidisciplinary evaluation prior to any therapy.

  7. Rectal prolapse in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Rasmussen, L; Klaaborg, K E

    1986-01-01

    In infancy there are two types of rectal prolapse. One type is less pronounced and intermittent. This type occurred in 9 out of 17 children referred for rectal prolapse and ceased after a few weeks' conservative treatment. The other type is a more pronounced prolapse occurring at nearly each...

  8. An unusual presentation of a rectal duplication cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Katharine L; Peche, William J; Rollins, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal duplications are rare developmental anomalies that can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. Rectal duplication cysts account for approximately 4% of all duplication cysts. They usually present in childhood with symptoms of mass effect, local infection or more rarely with rectal bleeding from ectopic gastric mucosa. A 26year old male presented with a history of bright red blood per rectum. On examination a mucosal defect with an associated cavity adjacent to the rectum was identified. This was confirmed with rigid proctoscopy and CT scan imaging. A complete transanal excision was performed. Rectal duplication cysts are more common in pediatric patients. They more frequently present with symptoms of mass effect or local infection than with rectal bleeding. In adult patients they are a rare cause of rectal bleeding. Definitive treatment is with surgical excision. A transanal, transcoccygeal, posterior sagittal or a combined abdominoperineal approach may be used depending on anatomic characteristics of the duplication cyst. We present a rare case of a rectal duplication cyst presenting in adulthood with rectal bleeding, managed with transanal excision. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduces rectal complications arising radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer; La Radioterapia con modulacion de intensidad (LMRT) reduce . Las complicaciones rectales derivadas del tratamiento radioterapico del cancer prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Vicente, F.; Zapatero Lobarda, A.; Rodriguez Martinez, G.; Martin de Vidales, C.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Leaman Alcibar, O.; Perez Gonzalez, L.; Cruz Conde, A.; Linan Diaz, O.; Torres Escobar, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this analysis is to assess with adequate follow the incidence of rectal complications and know quantitatively and statistical evidence if the pattern of gastrointestinal toxicity allows us to continue with the next level of dose escalation. (Author)

  10. Rectal drug administration: clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, A G; Moolenaar, F; de Leede, L G; Breimer, D D

    1982-01-01

    The human rectum represents a body cavity in which drugs can be easily introduced and retained and from which absorption is well possible. There are important therapeutic reasons why it is sometimes preferable to give a drug rectally rather than orally, e.g. in cases of nausea and vomiting. Drawbacks of rectal drug administration include the interruption of absorption by defaecation and lack of patient acceptability. The mechanism of drug absorption from the rectum is probably no different to that in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract, despite the fact that the physiological circumstances (e.g. pH, fluid content) differ substantially, Absorption from aqueous and alcoholic solutions may occur very rapidly, which has proved to be of considerable therapeutic value in the rapid suppression of acute convulsive attacks by diazepam (e.g. in children), but absorption from suppositories is generally slower and very much dependent on the nature of the suppository base, the use of surfactants or other additives, particle size of the active ingredient, etc. There is some evidence that hepatic first-pass elimination of high clearance drugs is partially avoided after rectal administration, e.g. lignocaine. This can be explained by the rectal venous blood supply: the upper part is connected with the portal system, whereas the lower part is directly connected with the systemic circulation. Plasma concentration data following rectal administration of representatives of several classes of drugs are reviewed: anticonvulsants, non-narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, hypnosedatives and anaesthetics, strong analgesics, theophylline and derivatives, corticosteroids, antibacterial agents, thiazinamium, promethazine, hyoscine-N-butyl-bromide, streptokinase, progesterone, ergotamine tartrate and levodopa. Only limited number of cases has it been adequately shown that the rectal route of administration gives plasma concentrations which are comparable to

  11. Equine corneal stromal abscesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, M. D. L.; Andersen, P. H.; Plummer, C. E.

    2013-01-01

    The last 30 years have seen many changes in the understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of equine corneal stromal abscesses (SAs). Stromal abscesses were previously considered an eye problem related to corneal bacterial infection, equine recurrent uveitis, corneal microtrauma and corneal....... Medical and surgical treatments are now directed towards elimination of fungal and bacterial infections, reduction and replacement of diseased corneal stroma, and suppression of iridocyclitis. If the abscess and anterior uveitis do not respond satisfactorily to medical therapy, full thickness or split...

  12. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, D J; Scott, R N

    1986-10-01

    In the developed countries gastrointestinal tuberculosis is no longer common in clinical practice. In this setting the importance of the condition lies in the vagaries of its presentation and the fact that it is eminently treatable, usually by a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. The clinical features and complications of gastrointestinal tuberculosis are highlighted by the seven cases which we report. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition is discussed and attention is drawn to the importance of case notification. Clinicians should bear in mind the diagnosis of gastrointestinal tuberculosis when dealing with any patient with non-specific abdominal symptoms.

  13. Synchronous Epithelioid Stromal Tumour and Lipoma in the Stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel Al-Brahim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An 82-year-old man presented with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A polypoid lesion of the distal stomach with focal ulceration was seen at endoscopy. This was treated by a partial gastrectomy. The resected stomach contained two separate tumours near the pylorus: a gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST and an adjacent lipoma. The literature includes case reports of synchronously occurring GIST and adenocarcinoma, GIST and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and GIST and carcinoid tumour. Herein is the first case report of two distinct mesenchymal tumors coexisting in the stomach.

  14. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sigmoidoscopy Alternative Names Lower GI bleeding; GI bleeding; Upper GI bleeding; Hematochezia Images GI bleeding - series Fecal occult blood test References Kovacs TO, Jensen DM. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ...

  15. Rectal culture (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  16. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Zheng, L. Q.; Jiang, X. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  17. Tumor del estroma gastrointestinal Tumor of the gastrointestinal stroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Felipe Montero León

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Los tumores del estroma gastrointestinal, conocidos según sus siglas en inglés como GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumors, son tumores mesenquimales que aparecen en cualquier lugar a lo largo del tracto intestinal. Este trabajo tiene el propósito de presentar una paciente de 60 años de edad que asiste a la consulta de ginecología del Instituto Nacional de Oncología y Radiobiología, por presentar dolor en el epigastrio, que se irradia al flanco derecho, con un aumento de volumen en la fosa iliaca derecha, y por ultrasonografía se plantea un tumor de ovario derecho, que se proyecta hacia el epigastrio y a hipocondrio derecho. Se describe la intervención quirúrgica y los hallazgos encontrados en estudios macro y microscópicos, así como en estudios posteriores por inmunohistoquímica de la lesión. Se concluye con un diagnóstico de tumor del estroma gastrointestinal y los resultados de las intervenciones quirúrgicas y medicamentosas realizadas. Se recomienda valorar la importancia de una estrecha relación entre cirujanos generales y ginecólogos frente a enfermedades inesperadas, por su difícil diagnóstico preoperatorio, que conllevan a un tratamiento quirúrgico adecuado, y que por la complejidad que requieren, necesitan de la competencia de ambas especialidades quirúrgicas.The tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma, known in English language as GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumors are mesenchymal tumors appearing in any place throughout the intestinal tract. The objective of present paper is to present the case of a female patient aged 60 came to Genecology consultation of the National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology due pain in epigastrium irradiating to right flank with increase of volume in the right iliac fossa and by ultrasonography it is a tumor of right ovarium projecting to epigastrium and the right hypochondrium. The surgical intervention is described as well as the findings noted in macro- and microscopic studies

  18. Malignant gastroduodenal stromal tumor imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Qiang; Wen Feng; Zhao Zhenguo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the imaging features of malignant gastroduodenal stromal tumor (mGDST)as an aid to its diagnosis. Methods: The unenhanced and multi-phasic contrast-enhanced CT scans of 24 patients with pathologically proven mGDST and air-contrast upper gastrointestinal studies(15 patients) were reviewed by two radiologists. The tumor location, size, contour, margin, growth type, contrast enhancement pattern and presence of ulcer were recorded. Results: The mGDST was located in the gastric fundus (15), gastric body(3), pylorus(2) and duodenum(4). The pathological types were submucosal(9), intramuscular(9) and subserosal(6). CT findings of mGDST included lobular shape(17), tumor size>5cm(14), central necrosis(15), large and deep ulcer(6), heterogeneous contrast enhancement(1), metastasis(1). The diagnostic accuracy of air-contrast upper gastrointestinal studies and CT for location of mGDST was 93.3% and 100% respectively, for malignant features was both 75.0%. Conclusion: Most mGDST have some characteristic appearances including large tumor size greater than 5 cm, lobular shape, central necrosis, large and deep ulcer, heterogeneous contrast enhancement and metastasis. Lymph node enlargement was uncommon. The diagnostic accuracy can be improved by CT scan combined with upper gastrointestinal barium examination. (authors)

  19. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  20. Gastrointestinal System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jepson, Mark A.; Bouwmeester, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) acts as a barrier to uptake of potentially dangerous material while allowing absorption of processed food. The gut may be exposed to a diverse range of engineered nanomaterials due to their deliberate addition to food and consumer products

  1. A Rare Case of Mesenteric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    regions. Abdominal ultrasound showed 18 cm × 15 cm mass with solid and cystic components arising from small bowel mesentery with loops of bowel adherent to it. A clinical diagnosis of mesenteric cyst with small bowel obstruction was made. Emergency laparotomy done for acute abdomen showed a huge mass of.

  2. Bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach complicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inferior vena cava filter insertion was not possible due to non-availability. Coexistence of DVT needing anticoagulation and bleeding gastric GIST requiring urgent resection presented a management dilemna. Despite the risk, the patient was taken for an emergency tumor resection primarily to stop the bleeding and facilitate ...

  3. Gastrointestinal scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    An easily prepared radiolabeled gastrointestinal scanning agent is described. Technetium-99m has ideal characteristics for imaging the upper and lower GI tract and determining stomach emptying and intestinal transit time when used with an insoluble particulate material. For example, crystalline and amorphous calcium phosphate particles can be effectively labeled in a one-step process using sup(99m)TcO 4 and SnCl 2 . These labeled particles have insignificant mass and when administered orally pass through the GI tract unchanged, without affecting the handling and density of the intestinal contents. Visualization of the esophageal entry into the stomach, the greater and lesser curvatures of the stomach, ejection into the duodenum, and rates of passage through the upper and lower GI tract are obtained. The slurry of sup(99m)TC particulate can be given rectally by enema. Good images of the cecum and the ascending, transverse, and descending colon are obtained. Mucosal folds and the splenic and hepatic flexures are visualized. The resilience of the large intestine is also readily visualized by pneumocolonographic techniques. (author)

  4. Management of radiation injuries of 10 cases of gastrointestinal tracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomida, Takashi; Yano, Takashi; Hidaka, Naoaki; Okada, Yoshikatsu; Iwasaki, Makoto; Goshima, Hiromichi.

    1984-01-01

    Ten cases of delayed radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tracts (consisting of 2 with peptic ulcer, 4 with intestinal obstruction, and 4 with rectal bleeding) are reported. Although conservative therapy or artificial colostomy was undertaken in all cases, satisfactory results were not obtained. In four cases in which subsequent resection of the gastrointestinal tracts was performed, the prognosis was favorable, but various symptoms still continued in the other non-resected cases. Delayed radiation injuries are progressive lesions involving the vasculo-connective tissue, so that cure can not be achieved. Resection of the damaged gastrointestinal tract is recommended, however, this is difficult to do in many cases. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Management of radiation injuries of 10 cases of gastrointestinal tracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomida, Takashi; Yano, Takashi; Hidaka, Naoaki; Okada, Yoshikatsu; Iwasaki, Makoto; Goshima, Hiromichi

    1984-11-01

    Ten cases of delayed radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tracts (consisting of 2 with peptic ulcer, 4 with intestinal obstruction, and 4 with rectal bleeding) are reported. Although conservative therapy or artificial colostomy was undertaken in all cases, satisfactory results were not obtained. In four cases in which subsequent resection of the gastrointestinal tracts was performed, the prognosis was favorable, but various symptoms still continued in the other non-resected cases. Delayed radiation injuries are progressive lesions involving the vasculo-connective tissue, so that cure can not be achieved. Resection of the damaged gastrointestinal tract is recommended, however, this is difficult to do in many cases. (Namekawa, K.).

  6. Rectal fistulas after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Audrey; Wallner, Kent; Merrick, Gregory; Seeberger, Jergen M.S.; Armstrong, Julius R.T.T.; Mueller, Amy; Cavanagh, William M.S.; Lin, Daniel; Butler, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the rectal and prostatic radiation doses for a prospective series of 503 patients, 44 of whom developed persistent rectal bleeding, and 2 of whom developed rectal-prostatic fistulas. Methods and Materials: The 503 patients were randomized and treated by implantation with 125 I vs. 103 Pd alone (n = 290) or to 103 Pd with 20 Gy vs. 44 Gy supplemental external beam radiotherapy (n = 213) and treated at the Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Medical Center (n = 227), Schiffler Cancer Center (n 242) or University of Washington (n = 34). Patients were treated between September 1998 and October 2001 and had a minimum of 24 months of follow-up. The patient groups were treated concurrently. Treatment-related morbidity was monitored by mailed questionnaires, using standard American Urological Association and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria, at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Patients who reported Grade 1 or greater Radiation Therapy Oncology Group rectal morbidity were interviewed by telephone to clarify details regarding their rectal bleeding. Those who reported persistent bleeding, lasting for >1 month were included as having Grade 2 toxicity. Three of the patients with rectal bleeding required a colostomy, two of whom developed a fistula. No patient was lost to follow-up. The rectal doses were defined as the rectal volume in cubic centimeters that received >50%, 100%, 200%, or 300% of the prescription dose. The rectum was considered as a solid structure defined by the outer wall, without attempting to differentiate the inner wall or contents. Results: Persistent rectal bleeding occurred in 44 of the 502 patients, 32 of whom (73%) underwent confirmatory endoscopy. In univariate analysis, multiple parameters were associated with late rectal bleeding, including all rectal brachytherapy indexes. In multivariate analysis, however, only the rectal volume that received >100% of the dose was significantly predictive of bleeding. Rectal fistulas occurred

  7. Gastric stromal tumors: clinical presentations diagnosis and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, D.; Zafar, H.; Raja, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the clinical presentations, of gastric stromal tumors with diagnostic methods, pathology and outcome after surgery. All patients of age 14 years and above, diagnosed histopathologically to have gastric stromal tumors were included. The data of these patients was collected retrospectively from January 1988 to December 1998, and prospectively from January 1999 to December 2002. All the patients were studied as a single group. There were 11 patients. Their mean age was 54 years, with 8 males and 3 females. Five patients presented with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and 4 with lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Eight patients had pain in epigastrium and 2 had vomiting. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was done in all patients, and ultrasound was done in 4 patients. CT scan was done in 7 patients. Preoperative diagnosis could be made in 6 patients. Only one patient had liver metastasis. Wedge resection was performed in 5 proximal gastrectomy with gastroesophageal anastomosis in 3, and partial gastrectomy with gastrojejunostomy in another 3 patients. The mean tumor size was 8.0 centimeters. Two patients had benign, 2 had intermediate and 7 had malignant tumors. The mean duration of followup was 41 months. Follow-up was completed in 8 patients, out of whom 6 were alive, and 2 patients expired due to other causes at the time of completion of this study. (author)

  8. Rectal toxicity profile after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy: Use of a comprehensive toxicity scoring system and identification of rectal dosimetric toxicity predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Jinesh N.; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To better understand rectal toxicity after prostate brachytherapy, we employed the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0), a comprehensive system with distinct and separately reported gastrointestinal adverse event items (unlike Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity scoring), to evaluate item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 135 patients treated with brachytherapy ± hormonal therapy, using CTCAE v3.0 to score acute/late rectal toxicities (median follow-up, 41 months). Dosimetric parameters were evaluated for ability to predict toxicities. Results: Use of CTCAE yielded a novel rectal toxicity profile consisting of diarrhea, incontinence, urgency, proctitis, pain, spasms, and hemorrhage event rates. No item had a 25 (percent of rectal volume receiving 25% of prescribed prostate dose) ≤ 25% vs. 60% for %V 25 > 25% (p 1 ≤ 40% vs. 44% for %V 1 > 40% (p = 0.007). Conclusions: A comprehensive understanding of item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities was obtained using CTCAE. Rectal %V 25 > 25% and %V 1 > 40% predicted worse late diarrhea and maximum toxicity, respectively

  9. gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolandas Vaicekauskas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Accurate diagnosis of subepithelial lesions (SELs in the gastrointestinal tract depends on a variety of methods: endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and different types of biopsy. Making an error-free diagnosis is vital for the subsequent application of an appropriate treatment. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of deep biopsy via the endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD technique for SELs in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Material and methods: It was a case series study. Deep biopsy via the ESD technique was completed in 38 patients between November 2012 and October 2014. Thirty-eight SELs in the upper gastrointestinal tract of varying size (very small ≤ 1 cm, small 1–2 cm and large ≥ 2 cm by means of the ESD technique after an incision with an electrosurgical knife of the overlying layers and revealing a small part of the lesion were biopsied under direct endoscopic view. Results: Deep biopsy via the ESD technique was diagnostic in 28 of 38 patients (73.3%; 95% CI: 59.7–89.7%. The diagnostic yield for SELs with a clear endophytic shape increased to 91.3%. An evident endophytic appearance of a subepithelial lesion, the mean number of biopsied samples (6.65 ±1.36 and the total size in length of all samples per case (19.88 ±8.07 mm were the main criteria influencing the positiveness of deep biopsy in the diagnostic group compared to the nondiagnostic one (p = 0.001; p = 0.025; p = 0.008. Conclusions : Deep biopsy via the ESD technique is an effective and safe method for the diagnosis of SELs especially with a clear endophytic appearance in a large number of biopsied samples.

  10. Morphometric study of uninvolved rectal mucosa 10 cm and 20 cm away from the malignant tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despotović, Sanja Z; Milićević, Novica M; Milosević, Dragoslav P; Despotović, Nebojsa; Erceg, Predrag; Bojić, Bozidar; Bojić, Danijela; Svorcan, Petar; Mihajlović, Gordana; Dorđević, Jelena; Lalić, Ivana M; Milićević, Zivana

    2014-02-01

    Recently, many details of the interplay between tumor cells and tumor-associated stromal elements leading to the progression of malignant disease were elucidated. In contrast, little is known about the role of uninvolved stromal tissue in the remote surrounding of the malignant tumor. Therefore, we performed a computer-aided morphometric study of rectal mucosa in samples taken 10 cm and 20 cm away from the malignant tumor during endoscopic examination of 23 patients older than 60 years. The samples of rectal mucosa from 10 healthy persons of corresponding age subjected to diagnostic rectoscopy during active screening for asymptomatic cancer were used as control. All structural elements of the rectal mucosa were studied and the number of nucleated cells in the lamina propria per 0.1 mm² of tissue was assessed. Our study revealed a reduced number of cells in the lamina propria of the rectal mucosa 10 cm and 20 cm away from the tumor lesion in both male and female patients. The decreased mucosal height and increased crypt number were registered in female patients 10 cm away from the tumor. The connective tissue of lamina propria showed a disorderly organization: the collagen fibers were frail, loosely arranged and signs of tissue edema were present. Small blood vessels and capillaries were much more frequently seen than in healthy tissue. Our results demonstrate the complex interactions between the cancer and remote mucosal tissue of the affected organ.

  11. Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome: A Biopsychosocial Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Daghaghzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS is a chronic disorder of the gastrointestinal tract and its etiology is not well understood. There is no specific treatment for this syndrome and patients with SRUS may, for years, experience many complications. The aim of the present research was the biopsychosocial study of patients with SRUS.Methods: The study participants consisted of 16 patients with SRUS (7 men and 9 women. Their medical records were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate the clinical spectrum of the patients along with the endoscopic and histological findings. Moreover, psychiatric and personality disorders [based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed, Text Revision (DSM IV-TR], psychosocial stressors, early life traumas, and coping mechanisms were assessed through structured interviews.Results: At presentation, mean age of the patients was 39 years (16 to 70. Common symptoms reported included rectal bleeding (93.8%, rectal self-digitations (81.2%, passage of mucous (75%, anal pain (75%, and straining (75%. Endoscopically, solitary and multiple lesions were present in 9 (60% and 4 (26.7% patients, respectively, and 87% of lesions were ulcerative and 13.3% polypoidal. The most common histological findings were superficial ulceration (92.85% and intercryptic fibromuscular obliteration (87.71%. Common psychosocial findings included anxiety disorders (50%, depression (37.5%, obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD or traits (62.5%, interpersonal problems (43.75%, marital conflicts (43.75%, occupational stress (37.5%, early life traumas, physical abuse (31.25%, sexual abuse (31.25%, dysfunctional coping mechanisms, emotional inhibition (50%, and non-assertiveness (37.5%.Conclusion: Given the evidence in this study, we cannot ignore the psychosocial problems of patients with SRUS and biopsychosocial assessment of SRUS is more appropriate than biomedical evaluation alone.

  12. Gastrointestinal Traumatic Injuries: Gastrointestinal Perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Maria A; Pugh, Marcia A; McGhee, Melanie

    2018-03-01

    The abdomen is a big place even in a small person. Gastrointestinal trauma can result in injury to the stomach, small bowel, colon, or rectum. Traumatic causes include blunt or penetrating trauma, such as gunshot wounds, stabbings, motor vehicle collisions, and crush injuries. Nontraumatic causes include appendicitis, Crohn disease, cancer, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, blockage of the bowel, and chemotherapy. The mechanism of injury will affect both the nature and severity of any resulting injuries. Treatment must address the critical and emergent nature of these injuries as well as issues that affect all trauma situations, which include management of hemodynamic instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rectal balloon use limits vaginal displacement, rectal dose, and rectal toxicity in patients receiving IMRT for postoperative gynecological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Chia; Wuu, Yen-Ruh; Yanagihara, Theodore; Jani, Ashish; Xanthopoulos, Eric P; Tiwari, Akhil; Wright, Jason D; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel

    2018-01-01

    /inferior 2.22 ± 2.04 mm, laterally 3.41 ± 3.62 mm, and anterior/posterior 3.86 ± 3.45 mm. The avg vector magnitude was 6.60 ± 4.14 mm. For acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, 50% experienced grade 1 toxicities and 18% grade 2 GI toxicities. For acute genitourinary (GU) toxicities, 21% had grade 1 and 18% had grade 2 toxicities. For late GU toxicities, 7% had grade 1 and 4% had grade 2 toxicities. RB for gynecological patients receiving IMRT in the postoperative setting can limit V40 rectal dose and vaginal displacement. Although V30 constraints were not met, patients had limited acute and late toxicities. Further studies are needed to validate these findings. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Breast metastases from rectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia; FANG Yu; LI Ang; LI Fei

    2011-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from extramammary neoplasms are very rare, constituting 2.7% of all malignant breast tumours. The most common primary tumor metastatic to the breast is primary breast cancer. Rectal cancer metastasizing to the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of aggressive rectal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast.

  15. Rectal carcinoids: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Frank D

    2014-07-01

    Rectal carcinoids are increasing in incidence worldwide. Frequently thought of as a relatively benign condition, there are limited data regarding optimal treatment strategies for both localized and more advanced disease. The aim of this study was to summarize published experiences with rectal carcinoids and to present the most current data.

  16. Frequency of rectal varices in patients with cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuberi, F.F; Khan, M.A.; Zuberi, B.F.; Khan, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To document the frequency of rectal varices in patients with cirrhosis of liver and compare it with that of oesophageal varices in liver and to compare the frequency of rectal varices with non-cirrhotic controls. Patients and Methods: All patients of confirmed cirrhosis of liver, presenting during the study period, were selected for initial workup. On the basis of upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, patients were segregated into those with oesophageal varices group-A) and those without them (Group-B). A matched control group (Group-C) was added, which consisted of patients of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who underwent sigmoidoscopic/colonoscopic examination during the study period. Fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy was done in all selected patients. Statistical analysis for continuous variables was done by student's 't' test while non-continuous variables were analyzed by Mann-Whitney-U test. Results: A total of 104 patients (males 61; females 43) were included. Hepatic encephalopathy grade was significantly lower in group-B (p < 0.0001). Grade-I varices were seen in 13 patients, Grade-II in 38 and Grade-III in 33 patients of Group-A. Rectal varices were present in 59.9% of patients in Group-A as compared to Group-B in which no one had them (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Rectal varices are common in patients of portal hypertension. (author)

  17. Irradiation of low rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardiet, J.M.; Coquard, R.; Romestaing, P.; Fric, D.; Baron, M.H.; Rocher, F.P.; Sentenac, I.; Gerard, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The low rectal cancers are treated by anorectal amputation and pose the problem of the sphincter conservation. Some authors extend the clinical definition to developed injuries until 12 cm from the anal margin. The rectal cancer is a frequent tumour which remains serious. When the tumour is low, the treatment consists in an anorectal amputation with a permanent colostomy. The radical non preserving surgery is the usual treatment of these injuries. Until 1960 the rectal adenocarcinoma was considered as a radioresistant tumour because of the impossibility to deliver an enough dose to the tumour by external radiotherapy. But other studies showed that those lesions were radiosensitive and often radiocurable. The medical treatments haven't yet demonstrated their efficiency in the treatment of the rectal cancer. We'll study the radiotherapy in the treatment of the low rectal cancer, solely radiotherapy, radiosurgical associations. 32 refs., 5 tabs

  18. Rectal duplication with sciatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Marzena; Golonka, Anna; Kalińska-Lipert, Anita; Nachulewicz, Paweł

    2015-07-01

    Rectal duplications represent 5% of all duplications in the alimentary tract, and they are very rarely diagnosed during the neonatal period. The authors present the method of investigation and the results of surgical treatment of a full-term neonate with a sciatic hernia containing a rectal duplication. The procedure started with three-port laparoscopy, but excision of the tubular duplication of the rectum was possible only by a transanal endorectal pull-through approach. The sciatic hernia was closed, and plastic sutures on the buttock finished the procedure. The coincidence of sciatic hernia with rectal duplication is extremely rare, and the method of treatment depends exclusively on the anatomical conditions.

  19. Enteric and rectal duplications and duplication cysts in the adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Abdurrahman; Zeybek, Nazif; Yagci, Gokhan; Kaymakcioglu, Nihat; Tas, Huseyin; Saglam, Mutlu; Cetiner, Sadettin

    2005-03-01

    Alimentary tract duplication and duplication cysts are rare congenital malformations. The ileum is the most frequently affected site. However, alimentary tract duplication and duplication cysts can occur at any point along the gastrointestinal tract. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment is the best way to prevent associated morbidity. This article presents the cases of three patients admitted to Gulhane Military Medical Academy with signs of acute abdomen, intra-abdominal mass and chronic abdominal pain. These patients were found to have enteric duplication, duplication cyst and/or retro-rectal cyst. The literature on alimentary tract duplications is reviewed.

  20. Metastasis of the gastrointestinal tract. FDG-PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayasaka, Kazumasa; Nihashi, Takashi; Matsuura, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01

    We assess the usefulness of F-18-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in the evaluation of gastrointestinal metastases. Four cases (five lesions) in which metastases from three lung cancers and one malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) of the femur were found in the gastrointestinal tract were reviewed (men/women 3:1, age 63-78 years, mean 72 years). The five lesions were duodenal, jejunal metastasis, and two stomach metastases from lung carcinoma, and rectal metastasis from MFH of the femur. FDG-PET was unable to detect small masses, but it was able to detect unforeseen lesions such as gastrointestinal metastases because FDG-PET is a whole-body scan in a single-operation examination. FDG-PET imaging provided valuable information for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal metastasis. (author)

  1. The association of rectal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) to late rectal toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharavichtikul, Ekkasit; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chitapanarux, Imjai [Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Meungwong, Pooriwat [Lampang Cancer Hospital, Lampang (Thailand); Traisathit, Patrinee [Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Galalae, Razvan [aculty of Medicine, Christian-Albrechts University at Kiel, Kiei (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate association between equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) to rectal point dose and gastrointestinal toxicity from whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) in cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University. Retrospective study was designed for the patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated by radical radiotherapy from 2004 to 2009 and were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy. The cumulative doses of WPRT and ICBT to the maximally rectal point were calculated to the EQD2 and evaluated the association of toxicities. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated for late rectal toxicity. The mean cumulative dose in term of EQD2 to rectum was 64.2 Gy. Grade 1 toxicities were the most common findings. According to endoscopic exam, the most common toxicities were congested mucosa (36 patients) and telangiectasia (32 patients). In evaluation between rectal dose in EQD2 and toxicities, no association of cumulative rectal dose to rectal toxicity, except the association of cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy to late effects of normal tissue (LENT-SOMA) scale > or = grade 2 (p = 0.022; odds ratio, 5.312; 95% confidence interval, 1.269-22.244). The cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy have association with > or = grade 2 LENT-SOMA scale.

  2. The association of rectal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) to late rectal toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharavichtikul, Ekkasit; Meungwong, Pooriwat; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Traisathit, Patrinee; Galalae, Razvan; Chitapanarux, Imjai

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate association between equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) to rectal point dose and gastrointestinal toxicity from whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) in cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University. Retrospective study was designed for the patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated by radical radiotherapy from 2004 to 2009 and were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy. The cumulative doses of WPRT and ICBT to the maximally rectal point were calculated to the EQD2 and evaluated the association of toxicities. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated for late rectal toxicity. The mean cumulative dose in term of EQD2 to rectum was 64.2 Gy. Grade 1 toxicities were the most common findings. According to endoscopic exam, the most common toxicities were congested mucosa (36 patients) and telangiectasia (32 patients). In evaluation between rectal dose in EQD2 and toxicities, no association of cumulative rectal dose to rectal toxicity, except the association of cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy to late effects of normal tissue (LENT-SOMA) scale ≥ grade 2 (p = 0.022; odds ratio, 5.312; 95% confidence interval, 1.269-22.244). The cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy have association with ≥ grade 2 LENT-SOMA scale.

  3. Relative quality of internet-derived gastrointestinal cancer information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David S Y; Willicombe, Anita; Reid, Thomas D; Beaton, Ceri; Arnold, David; Ward, James; Davies, I Llion; Lewis, Wyn G

    2012-12-01

    Internet-derived health care information is increasingly accessed by patients, yet its quality and accuracy is variable and unregulated. The aim of this study was to assess the information available regarding common gastrointestinal cancers via three internet search engines (Google, Yahoo and Bing). The top 30 websites for each of the terms: oesophageal, gastric, pancreatic, colon and rectal cancer were evaluated (University of Michigan Consumer Health Website Checklist) and scored [-80 (poor) to 90 (excellent)]. The median score was 53 (-7 to 81) and was significantly higher for oesophageal (61) and pancreatic (65) cancer websites, compared with gastric (49), colon (48) and rectal cancer (50) (p = 0.014). Median scores related to charitable organisations were significantly better than academic, commercial, news agency, care provider, layperson and medical information websites collectively (79 vs. 42, p < 0.0001). Overall quality of internet-derived gastrointestinal cancer information remains poor and patients and clinicians should be aware.

  4. Identifying and quantifying the stromal fibrosis in muscularis propria of colorectal carcinoma by multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sijia; Yang, Yinghong; Jiang, Weizhong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-10-01

    The examination of stromal fibrosis within colorectal cancer is overlooked, not only because the routine pathological examinations seem to focus more on tumour staging and precise surgical margins, but also because of the lack of efficient diagnostic methods. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) can be used to study the muscularis stroma of normal and colorectal carcinoma tissue at the molecular level. In this work, we attempt to show the feasibility of MPM for discerning the microstructure of the normal human rectal muscle layer and fibrosis colorectal carcinoma tissue practicably. Three types of muscularis propria stromal fibrosis beneath the colorectal cancer infiltration were first observed through the MPM imaging system by providing intercellular microstructural details in fresh, unstained tissue samples. Our approach also presents the capability of quantifying the extent of stromal fibrosis from both amount and orientation of collagen, which may further characterize the severity of fibrosis. By comparing with the pathology analysis, these results show that the MPM has potential advantages in becoming a histological tool for detecting the stromal fibrosis and collecting prognosis evidence, which may guide subsequent therapy procedures for patients into good prognosis.

  5. Lysyl oxidase activates cancer stromal cells and promotes gastric cancer progression: quantum dot-based identification of biomarkers in cancer stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng CW

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chunwei Peng,1 Jiuyang Liu,1 Guifang Yang,2 Yan Li3 1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors & Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 2Department of Pathology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuchang District, Wuhan, 3Department of Peritoneal Cancer Surgery, Cancer Center of Beijing Shijitan Hospital Affiliated to the Capital Medical University, Yangfangdian, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs are a promising alternative to organic fluorescent dyes for multiplexed molecular imaging of cancer stroma, which have great advantages in holistically analyzing the complex interactions among cancer stromal components in situ.Patients and methods: A QD probe-based multiplexed spectral molecular imaging method was established for simultaneous imaging. Three tissue microarrays (TMAs including 184 gastric cancer (GC tissues were constructed for the study. Multispectral analyses were performed for quantifying stromal biomarkers, such as lysyl oxidase (LOX. The stromal status including infiltrating of immune cells (high density of macrophages, angiogenesis (high density of microvessel density [MVD], low neovessel maturation and extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling (low density of type IV collagen, intense expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 [MMP-9] was evaluated.Results: This study compared the imaging features of the QD probe-based single molecular imaging method, immunohistochemistry, and organic dye-based immunofluorescent methods, and showed the advantages of the QD probe-based multiple molecular imaging method for simultaneously visualizing complex components of cancer stroma. The risk of macrophages in high density, high MVD, low neomicrovessel maturation, MMP-9 expression and low type IV collagen was significantly increased for the expression of LOX. With the advantages of the established QD probe

  6. Early rectal stenosis following stapled rectal mucosectomy for hemorrhoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuster Anja

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the last years, stapled rectal mucosectomy (SRM has become a widely accepted procedure for second and third degree hemorrhoids. One of the delayed complications is a stenosis of the lower rectum. In order to evaluate the specific problem of rectal stenosis following SRM we reviewed our data with special respect to potential predictive factors or stenotic events. Methods A retrospective analysis of 419 consecutive patients, which underwent SRM from December 1998 to August 2003 was performed. Only patients with at least one follow-up check were evaluated, thus the analysis includes 289 patients with a mean follow-up of 281 days (±18 days. For statistic analysis the groups with and without stenosis were evaluated using the Chi-Square Test, using the Kaplan-Meier statistic the actuarial incidence for rectal stenosis was plotted. Results Rectal stenosis was observed in 9 patients (3.1%, eight of these stenoses were detected within the first 100 days after surgery; the median time to stenosis was 95 days. Only one patient had a rectal stenosis after more than one year. 8 of the 9 patients had no obstructive symptoms, however the remaining patients complained of obstructive defecation and underwent surgery for transanal strictureplasty with electrocautery. A statistical analysis revealed that patients with stenosis had significantly more often prior treatment for hemorrhoids (p Conclusion Rectal stenosis is an uncommon event after SRM. Early stenosis will occur within the first three months after surgery. The majority of the stenoses are without clinical relevance. Only one of nine patients had to undergo surgery for a relevant stenosis. The predictive factor for stenosis in the patient-characteristics is previous interventions for hemorrhoids, severe postoperative pain might also predict rectal stenosis.

  7. Age and cellular context influence rectal prolapse formation in mice with caecal wall colorectal cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommelein, Joke; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; De Vlieghere, Elly; Wagemans, Glenn; Gespach, Christian; Boterberg, Tom; Demetter, Pieter; Ceelen, Wim; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2016-11-15

    In patients with rectal prolapse is the prevalence of colorectal cancer increased, suggesting that a colorectal tumor may induce rectal prolapse. Establishment of tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice after orthotopic inoculations of human colorectal cancer cells into the caecal wall is a widely used approach for the study of human colorectal cancer progression and preclinical evaluation of therapeutics. Remarkably, 70% of young mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor showed symptoms of intussusception of the large bowel associated with intestinal lumen obstruction and rectal prolapse. The quantity of the COLO320DM bioluminescent signal of the first three weeks post-inoculation predicts prolapse in young mice. Rectal prolapse was not observed in adult mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor or young mice carrying a HT29 caecal tumor. In contrast to HT29 tumors, which showed local invasion and metastasis, COLO320DM tumors demonstrated a non-invasive tumor with pushing borders without presence of metastasis. In conclusion, rectal prolapse can be linked to a non-invasive, space-occupying COLO320DM tumor in the gastrointestinal tract of young immunodeficient mice. These data reveal a model that can clarify the association of patients showing rectal prolapse with colorectal cancer.

  8. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F.; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Calciphylaxis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis • blood transfusions Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. Case Report: A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  9. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sonja; Skrovanek; Katherine; DiGuilio; Robert; Bailey; William; Huntington; Ryan; Urbas; Barani; Mayilvaganan; Giancarlo; Mercogliano; James; M; Mullin

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases.

  10. Synchronous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon and Rectal Carcinoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamshidhar Vootla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary colonic adenocarcinoma and synchronous rectal carcinoids are rare tumors. Whenever a synchronous tumor with a nonmetastatic carcinoid component is encountered, its prognosis is determined by the associate malignancy. The discovery of an asymptomatic gastrointestinal carcinoid during the operative treatment of another malignancy will usually only require resection without additional treatment and will have little effect on the prognosis of the individual. This article reports a synchronous rectal carcinoid in a patient with hepatic flexure adenocarcinoma. We present a case of a 46-year-old Hispanic woman with a history of hypothyroidism, uterine fibroids and hypercholesterolemia presenting with a 2-week history of intermittent abdominal pain, mainly in the right upper quadrant. She had no family history of cancers. Physical examination was significant for pallor. Laboratory findings showed microcytic anemia with a hemoglobin of 6.6 g/dl. CT abdomen showed circumferential wall thickening in the ascending colon near the hepatic flexure and pulmonary nodules. Colonoscopy showed hepatic flexure mass and rectal nodule which were biopsied. Pathology showed a moderately differentiated invasive adenocarcinoma of the colon (hepatic flexure mass and a low-grade neuroendocrine neoplasm (carcinoid of rectum. The patient underwent laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and chemotherapy. In patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the colon and rectum, carcinoids could be missed due to their submucosal location, multicentricity and indolent growth pattern. Studies suggest a closer surveillance of the GI tract for noncarcinoid synchronous malignancy when a carcinoid tumor is detected and vice versa.

  11. Rectal swabs for analysis of the intestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andries E Budding

    Full Text Available The composition of the gut microbiota is associated with various disease states, most notably inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and malnutrition. This underlines that analysis of intestinal microbiota is potentially an interesting target for clinical diagnostics. Currently, the most commonly used sample types are feces and mucosal biopsy specimens. Because sampling method, storage and processing of samples impact microbiota analysis, each sample type has its own limitations. An ideal sample type for use in routine diagnostics should be easy to obtain in a standardized fashion without perturbation of the microbiota. Rectal swabs may satisfy these criteria, but little is known about microbiota analysis on these sample types. In this study we investigated the characteristics and applicability of rectal swabs for gut microbiota profiling in a clinical routine setting in patients presenting with various gastro-intestinal disorders. We found that rectal swabs appeared to be a convenient means of sampling the human gut microbiota. Swabs can be performed on demand, whenever a patient presents; swab-derived microbiota profiles are reproducible, whether they are gathered at home by patients or by medical professionals in an outpatient setting and may be ideally suited for clinical diagnostics and large-scale studies.

  12. Association of rectal toxicity with thermal dose parameters in treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with radiation and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, Mark D.; Kaplan, Irving D.; Hansen, Jorgen L.; Prokopios-Davos, Savina; Topulos, George P.; Wishnow, Kenneth; Manola, Judith; Bornstein, Bruce A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Although hyperthermia has been used for more than two decades in the treatment of pelvic tumors, little is known about the potential impact of heat on rectal toxicity when combined with other treatment modalities. Because rectal toxicity is a concern with radiation and may be exacerbated by hyperthermia, definition of the association of thermal dose parameters with rectal toxicity is important. In this report, we correlate rectal toxicity with thermal dose parameters for patients treated with hyperthermia and radiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with T2b-T3b disease (1992 American Joint Committee On Cancer criteria) enrolled in a Phase II study of external beam radiation ± androgen-suppressive therapy with two transrectal ultrasound hyperthermia treatments were assessed for rectal toxicity. Prostatic and anterior rectal wall temperatures were monitored for all treatments. Rectal wall temperatures were limited to 40 deg. C in 19 patients, 41 deg. C in 3 patients, and 42 deg. C in 8 patients. Logistic regression was used to estimate the log hazard of developing National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 2 toxicity based on temperature parameters. The following were calculated: hazard ratios, 95% confidence intervals, p values for statistical significance of each parameter, and proportion of variability explained for each parameter. Results: Gastrointestinal toxicity was limited to Grade 2. The rate of acute Grade 2 proctitis was greater for patients with an allowable rectal wall temperature of >40 deg. C. In this group, 7 of 11 patients experienced acute Grade 2 proctitis, as opposed to 3 of 19 patients in the group with rectal wall temperatures limited to 40 deg. C (p=0.004). Preliminary assessment of long-term toxicity revealed no differences in toxicity. Hazard ratios for acute Grade 2 proctitis for allowable rectal wall temperature, average rectal wall Tmax, and average prostate Tmax were 9.33 (p=0.01), 3

  13. Immunohistochemical findings in rectal duplication mimicking rectal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, M G; Pucci, A; Macchieraldo, R; Sacco Casamassima, M G; Canavese, F

    2008-08-01

    Alimentary tract duplications represent rare anomalies, with only 5 % occurring in the rectum. The variety in clinical presentation may lead to a delay in diagnosis or to incorrect and multiple surgical procedures. We report the clinical, histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a rectal duplication occurring in a 3-month-old male with an unusual clinical presentation. Using routine histology and immunohistochemistry, the rectal duplication showed the diffuse presence of gastric mucosa with a characteristic immunophenotype (i.e., diffuse cytokeratin 7 positivity and scattered chromogranin immunoreactivity). As far as we know, this is the first report showing an immunohistochemical differentiation pattern of gastric lining in a rectal duplication. Our results, showing the presence of gastric mucosa, are suggestive of a possible origin from the embryonic foregut.

  14. Radiological imaging of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Lincender-Cvijetić

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibilities of diagnosing abdominal imaging in patients with rectal cancer, detecting lesions and assessing the stage of the lesions, in order to select the appropriate therapy. Before the introduction of imaging technologies, the diagnosis of colorectal pathology was based on conventional methods of inspecting intestines with a barium enema, with either a single or double contrast barium enema. Following the development of endoscopic methods and the wide use of colonoscopy, colonoscopy became the method of choice for diagnosing colorectal diseases. The improvement of Computerized Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, gave us new possibilities for diagnosing colorectal cancer. For rectal cancer, trans-rectal US (TRUS or endo-anal US (EAUS have a significant role. For staging rectal cancer, the Multi Slice Computed Tomography (MSCT is not the method of choice, but Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is preferred when it comes to monitoring the rectum. Therole of the MRI in the T staging of rectal cancer is crucial in preoperative assessment of: thickness – the width of the tumor, the extramural invasion, the circumference of resection margin (CRM, andthe assessment of the inclusion of mesorectal fascia. For successful execution of surgical techniques, good diagnostic imaging of the cancer is necessary in order to have a low level of recurrence. According to medical studies, the sensitivity of FDG-PET in diagnosing metastatic nodals is low, but for now it is not recommended in routine diagnosis of metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

  15. Predictive Biomarkers of Radiation Sensitivity in Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tut, Thein Ga

    repair (MMR) proteins, the insufficiency of which is characteristic of CRCs with microsatellite instability (MSI). MSI may enable unlimited replicative potential of malignant cell that leads to radiation injury resistance. Therefore, these proteins were characterized in both CRC cell lines (MMR proteins) and different (core and invasive front) rectal cancer tissues (Plk1, gammaH2AX and MMR proteins) exposed to radiation. Histopathological grading of tumour regression was performed following radiotherapy in rectal cancer as a marker of radiotherapy response and a surrogate indicator of patient prognosis. Though MMR protein expressions correlated with improved in vitro cell survival following radiation, these findings could only be partially replicated in patient tissue samples. This may not be entirely unexpected, given intratumoural heterogeneity in genetic profiles and oxygenation between individual cancer cells, their interaction with stromal environment and a multitude of other factors that cannot be adequately replicated in cell line experiments. In our rectal cancer patient cohort, histopathological regression following radiotherapy did appear to correlate with better clinical outcome, but certainly no replacement for the routine pTNM staging with which it was compared. Overexpression of Plk1 in the primary rectal cancer also correlates with poor tumour regression and reduced overall survival. High level of gammaH2AX correlates with higher tumour stage, perineural invasion and vascular invasion. However, interpretation of the results is limited by the small number of positivity amongst the cohort, with respect to gammaH2AX and MMR proteins. The combined analysis of all the proteins examined in this thesis revealed no interactions, possibly suggesting these biomarkers act individually within the DDR pathway, rather than in a demonstrably interdependent manner. Though our results are mixed, finding biomarkers predictive of radiation response is nonetheless critical

  16. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, W. Warren; Blackstock, A. William; Herman, Joseph; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007

  17. Synchronous association of rectal adenocarcinoma and three ileal carcinoids: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, Seamus M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Synchronous midgut carcinoids with gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma are a rare but recognised association. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient, a 74 year old woman, underwent anterior resection for a low rectal adenocarcinoma. Intra-operatively 3 serosal deposits of tumour were noted in the distal ileum. Histology revealed these to be ileal carcinoids. CONCLUSION: During resection of a gastrointestinal tumour, a thorough inspection of the abdominal cavity should be undertaken to investigate the possibility of metastatic secondaries or a synchronous tumour as is reported in this case.

  18. Synchronous association of rectal adenocarcinoma and three ileal carcinoids: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donnell Jill

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synchronous midgut carcinoids with gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma are a rare but recognised association. Case presentation The patient, a 74 year old woman, underwent anterior resection for a low rectal adenocarcinoma. Intra-operatively 3 serosal deposits of tumour were noted in the distal ileum. Histology revealed these to be ileal carcinoids. Conclusion During resection of a gastrointestinal tumour, a thorough inspection of the abdominal cavity should be undertaken to investigate the possibility of metastatic secondaries or a synchronous tumour as is reported in this case.

  19. A case of Churg-Strauss syndrome: tissue diagnosis established by sigmoidoscopic rectal biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, E J; Rees, P J; Sanderson, J D; Wilkinson, M L; Filipe, M I

    1996-01-01

    A case is presented of Churg-Strauss syndrome in a young man in whom the definitive diagnostic procedure was a full thickness sigmoidoscopic rectal biopsy, with submucosal sampling. Gastrointestinal changes in Churg-Strauss syndrome, a rare systemic illness characterised by asthma, blood and tissue eosinophilia, vasculitis, and granulomatous inflammation are common but poorly reported. The endoscopic and histopathological features of a case are described and emphasise the potential value of a limited sigmoidoscopy in establishing the diagnosis, when lower gastrointestinal symptoms are present. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8801216

  20. Fetal extraperitoneal rectal perforation: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Buttock swelling from a perineal hernia through a levator ani defect has been reported previously [12]. There have also been similar presentations due to rupture of rectal diverticular duplications [6]. Apart from the embryological causes, rectal perforation has been also reported because of rectal thermometers or probes and ...

  1. US and MRI Findings of Penile Metastasis from Rectal Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Ha Yeun [Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Metastatic tumors of the penis originating from the gastrointestinal tract are rare clinical conditions. We experienced a case of penile metastasis in a 59-year-old man who underwent an abdomino-peritoneal resection for a moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the rectum 4 years earlier. We report penile ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings on this uncommon metastatic penile tumor from a rectal adenocarcinoma and briefly review radiologic findings and relevant literature

  2. A Survey of Digital Rectal Examination Training in Canadian Medical Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alysha Nensi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The digital rectal examination (DRE is important for the diagnosis of a variety of gastrointestinal, urological and gynecological disorders. However, it appears that Canadian medical students may not be adequately taught nor provided the opportunity to practice their skills often enough. The present study was an analysis of the current practices in DRE teaching and evaluation in undergraduate medicine programs across Canada.

  3. Thrombosed hemorrhoid mimicking rectal carcinoma at CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Bar-Ziv, J.

    1992-01-01

    A 46-year-old male with cirrhosis and portal hypertension complained of lower pelvic pain. CT of the rectum raised a strong suspicion of a rectal tumor. However, rectal examination, anoscopy, direct rectoscopy, and, unfortunately, post-mortem dissection, failed to confirm its existence. Nevertheless, large flat hemorrhoids were evident. Review of the patient's chart disclosed the presence of large thrombosed hemorrhoids detected by rectal examination prior to the CT examination. It is suggested that rectal hemorrhoids be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal tumor shown by CT in patients with portal hypertension. (orig.)

  4. Thrombosed hemorrhoid mimicking rectal carcinoma at CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Bar-Ziv, J. (Dept. of Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel))

    1992-09-01

    A 46-year-old male with cirrhosis and portal hypertension complained of lower pelvic pain. CT of the rectum raised a strong suspicion of a rectal tumor. However, rectal examination, anoscopy, direct rectoscopy, and, unfortunately, post-mortem dissection, failed to confirm its existence. Nevertheless, large flat hemorrhoids were evident. Review of the patient's chart disclosed the presence of large thrombosed hemorrhoids detected by rectal examination prior to the CT examination. It is suggested that rectal hemorrhoids be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal tumor shown by CT in patients with portal hypertension. (orig.).

  5. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang; Golzarian, Jafar

    2007-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  6. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  7. rectal temp sajsm ver 5

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    impo

    temperature, heart rate (HR), and altitude during road and cycle racing. This technology has the potential to ... tion to rectal temperature, the logging time decreases in direct proportion to the time interval between heart ... with metabolic rate and course terrain, the former normally being a function of the latter. In addition ...

  8. CT diagnosis of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Hiroshi; Hachisuka, Kitao; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    1986-01-01

    Preoperative diagnosis of the depth of invasion and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer were studied using the findings of computed tomography (CT). Of one hundred and four cases operated on for rectal cancer over a period of 32 months, thirty five cases were examined by CT with the use of olive oil enema and contrast enhancement using a 60 % Conray drip infusion with reference to the histological findings. For direct invasion into the wall, the diagnoses by CT were coincident with microscopic findings in 75 % of cancers of the rectosigmoid, in 75 % of the upper rectum and in 84 % of the lower rectum. Of all cases, 28 (80 %) were diagnosed correctly. As to local lymph node metastasis, 74 % of all diagnoses by CT corresponded with the histological diagnosis. Moreover, seventeen cases were evaluated for lateral lymph node metastasis, and the diagnostic accuracy by CT was 88 %. In conclusion, preoperative CT evaluation of the extension into the rectal wall and lymph node metastasis in rectal cancer was considesed useful. (author)

  9. Approach to Rectal Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence C. Chua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal cancer is a distinct subset of colorectal cancer where specialized disease-specific management of the primary tumor is required. There have been significant developments in rectal cancer surgery at all stages of disease in particular the introduction of local excision strategies for preinvasive and early cancers, standardized total mesorectal excision for resectable cancers incorporating preoperative short- or long-course chemoradiation to the multimodality sequencing of treatment. Laparoscopic surgery is also increasingly being adopted as the standard rectal cancer surgery approach following expertise of colorectal surgeons in minimally invasive surgery gained from laparoscopic colon resections. In locally advanced and metastatic disease, combining chemoradiation with radical surgery may achieve total eradication of disease and disease control in the pelvis. Evidence for resection of metastases to the liver and lung have been extensively reported in the literature. The role of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal metastases is showing promise in achieving locoregional control of peritoneal dissemination. This paper summarizes the recent developments in approaches to rectal cancer surgery at all these time points of the disease natural history.

  10. Rectal Prolapse in An Emu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    was presented at the surgery clinic of the. INTRODUCTION. Rectal prolapsed is the protrusion of all layers of the rectum through the anal orifice as an elongated cylindrical mass. (Aronson 2003). It usually occurs in patients secondary to tenesmus from urogenital or anorectal disease. It has been reported in small animals ...

  11. Tumor estromal gastrointestinal de intestino delgado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Marivaldo Benício da Silva

    Full Text Available Stromal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (gists represent relatively rare lesions that arise from connective tissue elements located along the entire length of the gut. They were initially identified by immunohistochemical investigation, proving their origin from nondifferentiated mesenchymal cells. Only a minority of this lesions, mainly those confined to the esophagus and rectum, have been shown to correspond to mature, well-differentiated types of neoplasms such as leiomyoma or leiomyosarcoma. The majority of gists corresponds to a heterogeneous group of lesions that have as their common denominator an immature proliferation of epithelioid or spindle cells arising from its muscle layers, or between them, showing partial or incomplete myoide, neural, ganglionic, or mixed features of differentiation. This case report intends to show a gist of small bowel in a male, 46 years old, with a two-year of evolution.

  12. Extrauterine Low-Grade Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ju Chen

    2005-12-01

    Conclusions: Low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma typically has an indolent clinical course and favorable prognosis. Surgical resection is the primary therapeutic approach, and adjuvant therapy with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or progesterone therapy should be considered for the management of residual or recurrent low-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas.

  13. Gastrointestinal nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains paper grouped under the headings of: salivary scintigraphy, abscess detection with radionuclides; pediatric gastroenterology; liver spleen, and miscellaneous GI studies: gastrointestinal

  14. Stromal and epithelial cells react differentially to c-kit in fibroepithelial tumors of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logullo, Angela F; Nonogaki, Suely; Do Socorro Maciel, Maria; Mourão-Neto, Mário; Soares, Fernando Augusto

    2008-01-01

    The CD117 protein is a tyrosine-kinase receptor encoded by the c-kit gene that frequently bears activating mutations in gastrointestinal tumors. Conflicting findings regarding CD117 expression in other stromal tumors, including phyllodes tumors (PTs), have been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate c-kit expression in the stroma and epithelia of fibroepithelial breast tumors and its correlation with clinical pathological variables. Ninety-six fibroepithelial tumors of the breast, including 14 fibroadenomas (FAs), 12 juvenile FAs and 70 PTs, were classified according to stromal cellularity, atypia, epithelial hyperplasia, mitosis and borders into 45 benign (PTB), 17 borderline (PTBL) and 8 malignant (PTM) tumors. CD117 expression was identified in the stromal component in only two cases of PTBL. Overall, 38 cases (39.6%) showed positive CD117 in the epithelial component, including 20 FAs (10 regular, 10 juvenile) and 18 PTs (11 PTBs and 8 PTBLs). Other cases, including all PTMs, 6 FAs (4 regular, 2 juvenile), 34 PTBs and 10 PTBLs, showed no positivity in the epithelial component. Expression of c-kit did not correlate with diagnosis or malignancy (p>0.05). In conclusion, c-kit is expressed more often in the epithelial than in the stromal component in fibroepithelial tumors of the breast, and is associated with benign lesions.

  15. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  16. Ileocecal resection for massive rectal bleeding due to Yersinia enterocolitica: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azghari, Ilham; Bargach, Aicha; Billah, Nabil Moatassim; Essaoudi, Mohamed Amine; Jahid, Ahmed; Kabbaj, Nawal

    2016-01-19

    Massive gastrointestinal bleeding is an emergency that can sometimes require immediate surgery. We report the first case, to the best of our knowledge, of massive rectal bleeding due to Yersinia enterocolitica, requiring ileocecal resection. A 41-year-old North African woman was admitted to our emergency department for massive rectal bleeding. She had a history of an iron deficiency anemia of unknown cause, and diarrhea 2 months before the admission. On admission to our emergency unit, she was in a state of hemodynamic collapse. An examination showed discolored conjunctivas, massive rectal bleeding with clots and no abdominal pain. The first medical treatment included the use of noradrenaline. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed and did not show any lesions. Computed tomography of her abdomen showed significant and hypervascular wall thickening of her terminal ileum suggestive of a tumor. Because her massive rectal bleeding worsened and her collapse persisted, an exploratory laparotomy and ileocecal resection were immediately performed on the patient. Histopathological analysis showed enteritis caused by Yersinia enterocolitica. Her outcome was favorable. Enteritis due to Yersinia enterocolitica can take a pseudotumoral form and mislead the diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  18. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary

  19. Radiologic spectrum of rectal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, Y.; Hayakawa, K.; Nishimura, K.

    2000-01-01

    Rectal stenosis is a common condition caused by a wide variety of diseases, including both intrinsic and extrinsic disorders, as well as both malignant and benign pathologies. Barium enema, CT, and MRI are the primary modalities for the evaluation of the disease, and careful observation of the characteristic radiologic features usually leads to correct diagnosis. However, some of the lesions looks very similar and are difficult to differentiate from each other. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on diseases that cause rectal stenosis, to clarify the characteristics of radiologic features, and to suggest the limitations in differential diagnosis. Deliberate analysis of these imaging features and correlation with clinical manifestations can facilitate a more specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  20. Radiologic spectrum of rectal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, Y. [Department of Radiology, Fukui Medical University School of Medicine, Matsuoka-cho, Yoshida-gun, Fukui (Japan); Hayakawa, K.; Nishimura, K. [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    Rectal stenosis is a common condition caused by a wide variety of diseases, including both intrinsic and extrinsic disorders, as well as both malignant and benign pathologies. Barium enema, CT, and MRI are the primary modalities for the evaluation of the disease, and careful observation of the characteristic radiologic features usually leads to correct diagnosis. However, some of the lesions looks very similar and are difficult to differentiate from each other. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on diseases that cause rectal stenosis, to clarify the characteristics of radiologic features, and to suggest the limitations in differential diagnosis. Deliberate analysis of these imaging features and correlation with clinical manifestations can facilitate a more specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  1. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Pache, G.; Langer, M.; Wiech, T.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer is crucial for therapeutic decision making, as local tumor extent, nodal status, and patterns of metastatic spread are directly associated with different treatment strategies. Recently, treatment approaches have been widely standardized according to large studies and consensus guidelines. Introduced by Heald, total mesorectal excision (TME) is widely accepted as the surgical procedure of choice to remove the rectum together with its enveloping tissues and the mesorectal fascia. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy also plays a key role in the treatment of locally advanced stages, while the use of new drugs will lead to a further improvement in oncological outcome. Visualization of the circumferential resection margin is the hallmark of any preoperative imaging and a prerequisite for high-quality TME surgery. The aim of this article is to present an overview on current cross-sectional imaging with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. Future perspectives in rectal cancer imaging are addressed. (orig.)

  2. Computerized tomography using water to render the gastrointestinal tract opaque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaa, J.; Deininger, H.K.; Georgi, M.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the technical procedure and results of computerized tomography in the examination of various gastrointestinal disorders using water as an oral and rectal contrast medium. The experience gained so far points to the fact that water as a contrast medium is mainly suitable in the preoperative staging of malignant gastric and colorectal tumours. The rectal injection of water further appears to be favourable in investigations for recidivation following deep anterior resection without impairment of the excretory functions. Our own results were contrary to the findings of other authors in that we had no difficulty in visualizing distal sections of the small intestine in patients suffering from Crohn's disease. The use of water as a contrast medium can, however, not be recommended in the presence of intra-abdominal abscesses, ascites or cystic tumours, as such changes cannot clearly be differentiated from intestinal loops filled with water. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Gastrointestinal polyposis in Cowden disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kullnig, P.; Steiner, H.; Porsch, G.; Smolle, J.

    1987-01-01

    A case of Cowden disease (multiple hamartoma syndrome) with marked gastrointestinal polyposis is presented. The differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes is discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. An Unusual Cause of Rectal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Gruber

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS is a benign disease that is often misdiagnosed. It is characterized by a combination of symptoms, endoscopic findings and histology. Patients present with constipation, rectal bleeding, mucous discharge, pain and a sensation of incomplete defecation. There are many different manifestations of this disease, with or without rectal prolapse. We report an unusual presentation of SRUS as a circular stenosis in a middle-aged male.

  5. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified

  6. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Rectal duplication cyst in an adult: the laparoscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Jihad R; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I; Hilal, Raouf E; Essien, Francis A; Williams, Michael D; Barroso, Alberto O; Sweeney, John F; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2002-12-01

    Rectal duplication cyst (RDC) is a rare congenital anomaly representing 1% to 8% of all intestinal duplications. The case presented here is the first report of the laparoscopic resection of an RDC. We report the case of a 49-year-old white woman in whom a retrorectal cystic mass measuring 5 x 5.3 x 6 cm was diagnosed. The mass was completely resected by means of laparoscopic techniques. Pathologic findings revealed a cystic structure partially lined with squamous as well as respiratory- and gastrointestinal-type epithelium. Muscularis propria was identified in the outer portions of the wall of the specimen. No atypia or malignancy was identified. The overall findings were consistent with an RDC. Laparoscopic resection constitutes an excellent and patient-friendly approach to the management of large adult cystic duplication of the rectum.

  8. Treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kococik, Z.; Kococik, M.

    2007-01-01

    The suggested classifications of locally recurrent rectal cancer are based on the presence of symptoms and the degree of tumour fixation to the pelvic wall, or, otherwise, account for factor T in the TMN system. Although the results of rectal cancer treatment have improved, which may be attributed to total meso rectal excision and application of perioperative radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy, the ratio of cases of locally recurrent rectal cancer still amount from several to over a dozen percent. Among the available diagnostic methods for detecting locally recurrent rectal cancer after anterior rectal resection, endorectal sonography is of special importance. In the estimation of prognostic factors the lack of vascular invasion in recurrent cancer and the long period between the treatment of primary rectal cancer and the development of recurrence are a sign of good prognosis, while pain prior to recurrence treatment and male sex diminish the chances for cure. Locally recurrent rectal cancer impairs the patient's quality of life in all measurable aspects, but even after complete recovery we observe severe disturbances of sexual activity in most patients, and a number of patients require hygiene pads or suffer from chronic pain. Local recurrence of rectal cancer is more commonly qualified for excision after surgical treatment only, than after preoperative radiotherapy. The probability of total recurrent rectal cancer excision increases when the patient is younger, the primary tumours was less advanced and the first operation was sphincter-sparing surgery. Progress in the surgical treatment of recurrent rectal cancer was brought on by the introduction of the composite musculocutaneous flap to compensate the loss of perineal tissue. The application of intraoperative radiotherapy improves treatment results of recurrent rectal cancer, however at the cost of more frequent, serious postoperative complications and intense pain. In inoperable cases high dose regional

  9. Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma Arising in Colorectal Endometriosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extrauterine endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS arising in endometriosis is extremely rare, particularly in the colorectum. It should always be included in the differential diagnosis of primary tumors originating from gastrointestinal tract in females, given that preoperative endoscopical biopsy may reveal no specific changes. We reported a case of ESS arising in colorectal endometriosis and reviewed the previous 7 cases reported in the English literature. Our patient, who was unavailable for tumor resection and refused further adjuvant therapy, played a role in representing the natural history of low-grade extragenital ESS. This case was the only death from ESS arising in colorectal endometriosis.

  10. Evaluating the effect of rectal distension and rectal movement on prostate gland position using cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhani, Anwar R.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Suckling, John; Husband, Janet E.; Leach, Martin O.; Dearnaley, David P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dynamic interrelationship between rectal distension and rectal movements, and to determine the effect of rectal movement on the position of the prostatic gland using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with biopsy-proven or suspected prostate cancer were examined in the axial plane using repeated spoiled gradient-echo sequences every 10 seconds for 7 minutes. Twenty-four patients received bowel relaxants before imaging. Images were analyzed for the degree of rectal distension, for the incidence, magnitude, and number of rectal and prostate movements. Results: Rectal movements were seen in 28 (51%) patients overall, in 10 (42%) of those receiving bowel relaxants and in 18 (58%) not receiving bowel relaxants. The incidence of rectal movements correlated with the degree of rectal distension (p = 0.0005), but the magnitude of rectal movements did not correlate with the degree of rectal distension. Eighty-six rectal movements resulting in 33 anterior-posterior (AP) prostate movements were seen. The magnitude of rectal movements correlated well with degree of prostate movements (p < 0.001). Prostate movements in the AP direction were seen in 16 (29%) patients, and in 9 (16%) patients the movement was greater than 5 mm. The median prostate AP displacement was anterior by 4.2 (-5 to +14 mm). Conclusions: Cine MRI is able to demonstrate near real time rectal and associated prostate movements. Rectal movements are related to rectal distension and result in significant displacements of the prostate gland over a time period similar to that used for daily fractionated radiotherapy treatments. Delivery of radiotherapy needs to take into account these organ movements

  11. Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Ensinger, C., Tumer , Z., Tommerup, N. et al.: Hedgehog signaling in small-cell lung cancer : frequent in vivo but a rare event in vitro. Lung Cancer , 52...W81XWH-04-1-0157 TITLE: Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jingxian Zhang, Ph.D...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Feb 2004 – 14 Feb 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer

  12. Current opinion on PET for gastrointestinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederichs, C.G.; Schirrmeister, H.; Staib, L.

    2000-01-01

    The benefit of FDG-PET for restaging of colorectal carcinoma and for the differentiation of indeterminate hepatic lesions is well-documented. Accuracies of FDG-PET for recurrence, lymph node status and the detection of distant metastases are higher compared with computed tomography, for example. For other epithelial gastrointestinal tumors similar results have also been demonstrated in smaller trials or case presentations. The differentiation of recurrent rectal carcinoma from scar and PET for endocrine tumors are described elsewhere (Der Nuklearmediziner PET II, in preparation). Almost no data exist for rare tumors like anal carcinoma or tumors of the small intestines. For hepatocellular carcinoma, FDG-PET has a high positive predictive value, and the intensity of the uptake correlates well with grading. However, FDG-PET is not suitable for the exclusion of hepatocellular carcinoma due to insufficient sensitivity. The differentiation of benign and malignant pancreatic masses works well for selected patients. FDG-PET for lymph node staging is at least as accurate as conventional staging, and for the detection of distant metastases FDG-PET is superior compared with conventional staging. Few data exist on therapy control of gastrointestinal tumors. (orig.) [de

  13. Adjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy in gastrointestinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sendler, A.; Feldmann, H.J.; Fink, U.; Molls, M.; Siewert, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    In modern surgical oncology, adjuvant therapies are important complementary strategies. In local advanced carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, 5-year survival data are still disappointing despite standardized surgery. In this context, it has to be differentiated between adjuvant therapy following complete tumor exstirpation (so-called UICC R 0 resection) and additive therapies following incomplete tumor resections (UICC R 1 or R 2 resection). Modalities in the adjuvant setting are chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the combined radio-/chemotherapy. In esophageal and gastric cancer there is up to now no benefit of postoperative adjuvant therapy. In pancreatic cancer, there are studies indicating a benefit of combined radio-/chemotherapy after complete tumor resection. A standard adjuvant chemotherapeutic treatment is proven in colon cancer stage III (Dukes C) with levamisole and 5-FU. Completely resected rectal carcinoma should be treated postoperatively with combined radio-/chemotherapy. In the common clinical or practical setting, adjuvant therapy is indicated only in locally advanced gastrointestinal tumors following R 0 resection. Postoperative therapy following incomplete tumor resection has its reason only in a palliative intention. (orig.) [de

  14. Rectal Toxicity After Proton Therapy For Prostate Cancer: An Analysis of Outcomes of Prospective Studies Conducted at the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaco, Rovel J.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella [The University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McKibben, Brian T. [Baptist Health Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Henderson, Randal H.; Bryant, Curtis; Nichols, Romaine C.; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng; Su, Zhong [The University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [Baptist Health Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Mendenhall, Nancy P., E-mail: menden@floridaproton.org [The University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Study goals were to characterize gastrointestinal effects of proton therapy (PT) in a large cohort of patients treated for prostate cancer, identify factors associated with rectal bleeding (RB), and compare RB between patients receiving investigational protocols versus those in outcome-tracking protocols. Methods and Materials: A total of 1285 consecutive patients were treated with PT between August 2006 and May 2010. Potential pre-existing clinical and treatment-related risk factors for rectal toxicity were recorded. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to score toxicity. Results: Transient RB was the predominant grade 2 or higher (GR2+) toxicity after PT, accounting for 95% of gastrointestinal events. GR1 RB occurred in 217 patients (16.9%), GR2 RB in 187 patients (14.5%), and GR3 in 11 (0.9%) patients. There were no GR4 or GR5 events. Univariate analyses showed correlations between GR2+ RB and anticoagulation therapy (P=.008) and rectal and rectal wall dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, anticoagulation therapy (P=.0034), relative volume of rectum receiving 75 Gy (V75; P=.0102), and relative rectal wall V75 (P=.0017) were significant predictors for G2+ RB. Patients treated with investigational protocols had toxicity rates similar to those receiving outcome-tracking protocols. Conclusions: PT was associated with a low rate of GR2+ gastrointestinal toxicity, predominantly transient RB, which was highly correlated with anticoagulation and rectal DVH parameters. Techniques that limit rectal exposure should be used when possible.

  15. Rectal Toxicity After Proton Therapy For Prostate Cancer: An Analysis of Outcomes of Prospective Studies Conducted at the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colaco, Rovel J.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; McKibben, Brian T.; Henderson, Randal H.; Bryant, Curtis; Nichols, Romaine C.; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng; Su, Zhong; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Study goals were to characterize gastrointestinal effects of proton therapy (PT) in a large cohort of patients treated for prostate cancer, identify factors associated with rectal bleeding (RB), and compare RB between patients receiving investigational protocols versus those in outcome-tracking protocols. Methods and Materials: A total of 1285 consecutive patients were treated with PT between August 2006 and May 2010. Potential pre-existing clinical and treatment-related risk factors for rectal toxicity were recorded. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to score toxicity. Results: Transient RB was the predominant grade 2 or higher (GR2+) toxicity after PT, accounting for 95% of gastrointestinal events. GR1 RB occurred in 217 patients (16.9%), GR2 RB in 187 patients (14.5%), and GR3 in 11 (0.9%) patients. There were no GR4 or GR5 events. Univariate analyses showed correlations between GR2+ RB and anticoagulation therapy (P=.008) and rectal and rectal wall dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, anticoagulation therapy (P=.0034), relative volume of rectum receiving 75 Gy (V75; P=.0102), and relative rectal wall V75 (P=.0017) were significant predictors for G2+ RB. Patients treated with investigational protocols had toxicity rates similar to those receiving outcome-tracking protocols. Conclusions: PT was associated with a low rate of GR2+ gastrointestinal toxicity, predominantly transient RB, which was highly correlated with anticoagulation and rectal DVH parameters. Techniques that limit rectal exposure should be used when possible

  16. Project Gel a Randomized Rectal Microbicide Safety and Acceptability Study in Young Men and Transgender Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian McGowan

    Full Text Available The purpose of Project Gel was to determine the safety and acceptability of rectal microbicides in young men who have sex with men (MSM and transgender women (TGW at risk of HIV infection.MSM and TGW aged 18-30 years were enrolled at three sites; Pittsburgh, PA; Boston, MA; and San Juan, PR. Stage 1A was a cross-sectional assessment of sexual health and behavior in MSM and TGW. A subset of participants from Stage 1A were then enrolled in Stage 1B, a 12-week evaluation of the safety and acceptability of a placebo rectal gel. This was followed by the final phase of the study (Stage 2 in which a subset of participants from Stage 1B were enrolled into a Phase 1 rectal safety and acceptability evaluation of tenofovir (TFV 1% gel.248 participants were enrolled into Stage 1A. Participants' average age was 23.3 years. The most common sexually transmitted infection (STIs at baseline were Herpes simplex (HSV-2 (16.1% by serology and rectal Chlamydia trachomatis (CT (10.1% by NAAT. 134 participants were enrolled into Stage 1B. During the 12 week period of follow-up 2 HIV, 5 rectal CT, and 5 rectal Neisseria gonorrhea infections were detected. The majority of adverse events (AEs were infections (N = 56 or gastrointestinal (N = 46 and were mild (69.6% or moderate (28.0%. Of the participants who completed Stage 1B, 24 were enrolled into Stage 2 and randomized (1:1 to receive TFV or placebo gel. All participants completed Stage 2. The majority of AEs were gastrointestinal (N = 10 and of mild (87.2% or moderate (10.3% severity.In this study we were able to enroll a sexually active population of young MSM and TGW who were willing to use rectal microbicides. TFV gel was safe and acceptable and should be further developed as an alternative HIV prevention intervention for this population.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01283360.

  17. Health-related Quality of Life after complex rectal surgery for primary advanced rectal cancer and locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Henriette Vind

    2013-01-01

    postoperative morbidity, Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL) is an important issue. The overall aim of this thesis was therefore to evaluate HRQoL in patients with PARC and LRRC treated with COMP-RCS and curative intent. In study I a review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of HRQo......Advances in the treatment of rectal cancer, have made it possible to perform complex rectal cancer surgery (COMP-RCS) with curative intent in patients with primary advanced rectal caner (PARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Due to the complexity of the treatment and its high...... in the study was 164 (86%) patients treated with standard rectal cancer surgery (STAN-RCS). The Danish version showed satisfactory psychometric properties for the scales concerning body image, sexual functioning, male sexual problems and defecations problems. Reduced psychometric properties were found...

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associa...

  19. Neoadjuvant therapy in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Valle, A.; Roldán, G.; Suárez, L.; Rodríguez, R.; Quarneti, A.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Rectal cancer causes about 500 deaths a year in our country. Radio chemotherapy (RTCT) is part of the treatment of rectal tumors especially in stages II and III. The indication for neoadjuvant aims to preserve the sphincter at low tumors and potentially make initially unresectable tumors resectable. Objective: To analyze the indications, treatment, toxicity and development of adenocarcinoma patients receiving treatment rectum preoperative R T ± Q T. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 31 records of patients rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant in Oncology Services Hospital and Central Clinical Hospital of the Armed Forces between 1994 and , 2003. Results: Men / Women: 1.3. Median age 64 years. Eight patients (30%) endorectal ultrasound as preoperative staging were performed. patients matched 20 (65%) stage II, 6 (19%) stage III, 5 (16%) stage IV with potentially resectable liver metastases. The median dose of R T was 50 Gy (35.8-63 Gy) with a median duration was 5 weeks (4-12). One patient (3%) received exclusive R T. Plans Q T used: 5-F U in I / C 52%, 5-F U bolus and 42% leucovorin and 5-F U bolus 3%. Surgery was achieved with sphincter preservation in 7/31 cases (23%). The most common toxicity was diarrhea and radiodermatitis were the cause of discontinuation in 4 patients. Control hematologic weekly was 38% during the RTCT. Responses were achieved Full 5% partial 39%, 17% and stabilization lesion progression 39%. Discussion: The lack of information recorded in the medical records hindered the Analysis of this work. 70% of stage II and III patients were incompletely staged (30% endorectal ultrasound) and controls during treatment were suboptimal. Only 23% of patients achieved sphincter preservation, lower than the figures reported in the literature (65-

  20. Endocavitary radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schild, Steven E.; Martenson, James A.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This analysis was performed to evaluate the results of endocavitary radiotherapy (RT) administered for early rectal cancer at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed to determine the results of endocavitary RT regarding survival, local control, and complications. Between 1987 and 1994, 25 patients were treated with endocavitary RT for early rectal cancer. Twenty had early, low grade tumors and met the criteria for treatment with curative intent. Five had more advanced, high grade, or multiple recurrent tumors and were treated with palliative intent. The tumors were treated to between 20 and 155 Gy in one to four fractions with 50 KV x-rays given through a specialized proctoscope. Patients were followed for 5 to 84 months (median = 55 months) after therapy. Local control and survival were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control was achieved in 18 of the 20 patients treated with curative intent and 4 of 5 treated with palliative intent. For those patients treated with curative intent, the 5-year local control rate was 89% and the 5-year survival rate was 76%. The most significant toxicity was ulceration that occurred in 5 of the 25 patients. The ulcers were asymptomatic in three cases and associated with bleeding in one case. The fifth patient had pain. One ulcer was biopsied, resulting in perforation that was treated with an abdominal perineal resection (APR). There was no tumor found upon pathologic evaluation. Conclusions: Endocavitary RT can be used to treat patients with early, low-grade rectal cancers and will yield a high level of disease control and a low risk of serious complications. Major advantages of this treatment technique are that it requires neither general anesthesia nor hospitalization

  1. Rectal cancer surgery: volume-outcome analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Emmeline

    2010-12-01

    There is strong evidence supporting the importance of the volume-outcome relationship with respect to lung and pancreatic cancers. This relationship for rectal cancer surgery however remains unclear. We review the currently available literature to assess the evidence base for volume outcome in relation to rectal cancer surgery.

  2. Severe rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, Kent; Sutlief, Stephen; Bergsagel, Carl; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Some investigators have reported severe rectal complications after brachytherapy. Due to the low number of such events, their relationship to dosimetric parameters has not been well characterized. Methods and materials: A total of 3126 patients were treated with low dose rate brachytherapy from 1998 through 2010. 2464 had implant alone, and 313 had implant preceded by 44–46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Post-implant dosimetry was based on a CT scan obtained on the day of implant, generally within 30 min of the procedure. Every patient’s record was reviewed for occurrence of rectal complications. Results: Eight of 2464 patients (0.32%) treated with brachytherapy alone developed a radiation-related rectal fistula. Average prostatic and rectal dose parameters were moderately higher for fistula patients than for patients without a severe rectal complication. For instance, the average R100 was 1.2 ± 0.75 cc for fistula patients, versus 0.37 ± 0.88 cc for non-fistula patients. However, the fistula patients’ values were well within the range of values for patients without a rectal complication. Four patients had some attempt at repair or reconstruction, but long-term functional outcomes were not favorable. Conclusions: Rectal fistulas are a very uncommon potential complication of prostate brachytherapy, which can occur even in the setting of acceptable day 0 rectal doses. Their occurrence is not easily explained by standard dosimetric or clinical factors

  3. Rectal bleeding in children: endoscopic evaluation revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ridder, Lissy; van Lingen, Anna V.; Taminiau, Jan A. J. M.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Rectal bleeding is an alarming event both for the child and parents. It is hypothesized that colonoscopy instead of sigmoidoscopy and adding esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy in case of accompanying complaints, improves the diagnostic accuracy in children with prolonged rectal bleeding. Study

  4. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  5. Masquerading Mycobacterium: Rectal Growth or Tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: A 37-year old male presented to us with history of lower abdominal pain for 6 months. His physical examination revealed a rectal mass of approximately 1centimeter. He was investigated for possible rectal growth with sigmoidoscopy and biopsy. The histopathological examination (HPE) showed a non-specific ...

  6. Comparison of Rectal and Esophageal Sensitivity in Women With Functional Heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freede, Margaret; Leasure, A Renee; Proskin, Howard M; Hatch, Daniel; Edwards, Karethy; Pascucci, MaryAnn; Smith, Patsy R

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the primary hypothesis that there is a correlation of maximum pain threshold (MPT) in the esophagus and rectum in persons with functional heartburn. Secondary aims evaluated correlations with initial perception threshold (IPT) and pain threshold (PT). This study explored objective sensory endpoints of IPT, PT, and MPT in the esophagus and rectum of 14 females with functional heartburn to determine whether visceral hypersensitivity is generalized or organ-specific. Data on volume and pressure measurements at IPT, PT, and MPT with esophageal and rectal barostat distention were collected. The relationship of sensation and pain to volume, pressure, and compliance was analyzed. Esophageal and rectal IPT balloon volume scores were highly and significantly correlated (r = .61, p = .02). Esophageal and rectal PT balloon volume scores were highly and significantly correlated (r = .6, p = .02). Esophageal and rectal MPT balloon volume scores were not correlated (r = .35, p = .26). The correlation of visceral sensitivity in the esophagus and rectum in persons with functional heartburn supports the hypothesis that visceral sensory changes in functional gastrointestinal disorders are not organ specific.

  7. Angiography and the gastrointestinal bleeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, S.

    1982-01-01

    The role of angiography in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage is discussed. Three categories of gastrointestinal bleeding are considered: upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices, upper gastrointestinal bleeding of arterial or capillary origin, and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The advantages and disadvantages of angiography are compared with those of radionuclide scanning and endoscopy or colonoscopy. It is anticipated that, as radionuclide scans are more widely employed, angiography will eventually be performed only in those patients with positive scans

  8. Multiple lymphomatous polyposis of the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isete Fares Franco

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastrointestinal multiple lymphomatous polyposis is a rare type of malignant lymphoma that has aggressive biological behavior, early systemic dissemination and poor prognosis. It is considered to be a manifestation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and represents the gastrointestinal counterpart of mantle cell nodal lymphoma. OBJECTIVE: A case of gastrointestinal multiple lymphomatous polyposis is presented and the anatomopathological, clinical, diagnostic and treatment aspects of this unusual neoplasia are discussed. CASE REPORT: The patient was a 59-year-old white male with a complaint of asthenia, night sweating, alteration in intestinal habit and weight loss over the preceding two months. The physical examination showed pallid mucosa and a palpable mass in the epigastrium and mesogastrium. Endoscopy of the upper digestive tract showed the presence of gastric and duodenal polyps. An opaque enema showed multiple polypoid lesions, especially in the cecum. A rectal biopsy revealed infiltration of the mucosa and submucosa by diffuse lymphoma consisting of small cleaved cells. Immunohistochemical study showed lymphocytes that expressed the antibody CD20 (L-26 and light-chain kappa (k immunoglobulin, but not light-chain lambda (l immunoglobulin. The patient presented a condition of acute intestinal obstruction with the presence of a mesenteric mass formed by agglutinated lymph nodes that surrounded the proximal ileum, thereby obstructing its lumen. He was submitted to a segmental enterectomy and gastrotomy with excisional biopsies of the gastric polypoid lesions. After two cycles of chemotherapy there was a worsening of the general state, with an increase in the dimensions of the abdominal masses and sepsis, accompanied by progressive respiratory insufficiency, leading to death.

  9. Rectal duplication cyst in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kook, Peter H; Hagen, Regine; Willi, Barbara; Ruetten, Maja; Venzin, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    Enteric duplication is a rare developmental malformation in people, dogs and cats. The purpose of the present report is to describe the first case of a rectal duplication cyst in a 7-year-old domestic shorthair cat presenting for acute constipation and tenesmus. On rectal palpation a spherical mass compressing the lumen of the rectum could be felt in the dorsal wall of the rectum. A computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the presence of a well demarcated cystic lesion in the pelvic canal, dorsal to the rectum. The cyst was surgically removed via a perineal approach. No communication with the rectal lumen could be demonstrated. Histopathological examination was consistent with a rectal duplication cyst. Clinical signs resolved completely after excision of this conjoined non-communicating cystic rectal duplicate. Copyright © 2010 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tissue-associated bacterial alterations in rectal carcinoma patients revealed by 16S rRNA community profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Maltez Thomas

    2016-12-01

    by digital droplet PCR. Our findings point to increased bacterial richness and diversity in rectal cancer, along with several differences in microbial community composition. Our work is the first to present evidence for a possible role of bacteria such as Bacteroides fragilis and the phylum Parcubacteria in rectal cancer, emphasizing the need to study tissue-associated bacteria and specific regions of the gastrointestinal tract in order to better understand the possible links between the microbiota and rectal cancer.

  11. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  12. Colonic duplication in adults: Report of two cases presenting with rectal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C Fotiadis; M Genetzakis; I Papandreou; EP Misiakos; E Agapitos; GC Zografos

    2005-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplication is an uncommon congenital abnormality in two-thirds of cases manifesting before the age of 2 years. Ileal duplication is common while colonic duplication, either cystic or tubular, is a rather unusual clinical entity that remains asymptomatic and undiagnosed in most cases. Mostly occurring in pediatric patients,colonic duplication is encountered in adults only in a few cases. This study reports two cases of colonic duplication in adults. Both cases presented with rectal bleeding on admission. The study was focused on clinical, imaging,histological, and therapeutical aspects of the presenting cases. Gastrografin enema established the diagnosis in both cases. The cystic structure and the adjacent part of the colon were excised en-block. The study implies that colonic duplication, though uncommon, should be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal bleeding.

  13. Colonic duplication in adults: report of two cases presenting with rectal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiadis, C; Genetzakis, M; Papandreou, I; Misiakos, E P; Agapitos, E; Zografos, G C

    2005-08-28

    Gastrointestinal duplication is an uncommon congenital abnormality in two-thirds of cases manifesting before the age of 2 years. Ileal duplication is common while colonic duplication, either cystic or tubular, is a rather unusual clinical entity that remains asymptomatic and undiagnosed in most cases. Mostly occurring in pediatric patients, colonic duplication is encountered in adults only in a few cases. This study reports two cases of colonic duplication in adults. Both cases presented with rectal bleeding on admission. The study was focused on clinical, imaging, histological, and therapeutical aspects of the presenting cases. Gastrografin enema established the diagnosis in both cases. The cystic structure and the adjacent part of the colon were excised en-block. The study implies that colonic duplication, though uncommon, should be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal bleeding.

  14. Interstitial irradiation of rectal carcinoma with rectal template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Kinji; Tanaka, Ken; Nakanishi, Makoto; Inoue, Takehiro

    1984-01-01

    Using Iridium-192 wires through a rectal template after Syed, interstitial brachytherapy was conducted in a patient with inoperable adenocarcinoma of the rectum. 67-year-old man with constipation and change in the stool caliber underwent external radiotherapy (4,000cGy/4W) to the whole pelvis including the perineum, followed by interstitial implant using a template, at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Marked tumor regression, marked circumferential fibrosis and a remarkable decline of CEA titers (pre-RT: 35.8ng/ml, post-RT: 6.2ng/ml) were observed until 7 months post-RT. The domestic production of Iridium-192 wires has made possible the intergrated use of brachytherapy in the perineal region in Japan. (author)

  15. Procedural Sedation for the removal of a rectal foreign body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Costumbrado, MD, MPH

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 40-year-old male with a history of intravenous drug use presented to the emergency department (ED for one week of constant lower abdominal pain associated with bloody stool. He denied fever, nausea, vomiting, urinary symptoms, and testicular pain or swelling. On exam, vital signs were within normal limits. Abdominal exam was non-tender without rebound or guarding. Rectal exam was negative for occult blood but positive for a palpable firm, blunt object. A computed tomography (CT of the abdomen and pelvis was ordered to further investigate. Significant findings: Axial and coronal views on CT showed evidence of a large, tube-shaped foreign body in the rectum (see arrows without evidence of acute gastrointestinal tract disease. Discussion: While rectal foreign bodies (RFB are not uncommon to the ED, accurate epidemiological estimates are not available, due in part to underreporting.1 One study estimated an incidence of one patient per month that needed care for a RFB.2 Generally, patients can remove the object themselves; however, 20% of cases require endoscopic intervention and 1% require surgical intervention.3 RFBs can be removed via the transanal approach manually, instrument-assisted (eg, Kocher clamp, obstetric forceps, or endoscopically. In cases without intestinal perforation, transanal removal of a RFB is generally attempted as a first-line procedure in the ED, with an approximate success rate of 75%.4 However, the limitations of transanal removal depends on the location of the object, level of anal relaxation, and ability to grasp the object, which may be limited by the provider’s hand size and availability of instruments.Ways of facilitating bedside removal of RFBs include the Valsalva maneuver with proper positioning (i.e., lithotomy or prone knee-to-chest position or manual abdominal wall compression to help move the object closer to the anal orifice. Anoscopy may also be used to improve visualization of

  16. Serum Lipids and the Risk of Gastrointestinal Malignancies in the Swedish AMORIS Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulaningsih, W.; Garmo, H.; Holmberg, L.; Hemelrijck, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased cancer risk, but the role of dyslipidaemia in gastrointestinal malignancies is unclear. We aimed to assess the risk of oesophageal, stomach, colon, and rectal cancers using serum levels of lipid components. Methods. From the Swedish Apolipoprotein Mortality Risk (AMORIS) study, we selected 540,309 participants (>20 years old) with baseline measurements of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and glucose of whom 84,774 had baseline LDL cholesterol (LDL), HDL cholesterol (HDL), apolipoprotein B (apoB), and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess glucose and lipid components in relation to oesophageal, stomach, colon, and rectal cancer risk. Results. An increased risk of oesophageal cancer was observed in persons with high TG (e.g. HR: 2.29 (95% CI: 1.42-3.68) for the 4th quartile compared to the 1st) and low LDL, LDL/HDL ratio, TC/HDL ratio, log (TG/HDL), and apoB/apoA-I ratio. High glucose and TG were linked with an increased colon cancer risk, while high TC levels were associated with an increased rectal cancer risk. Conclusion. The persistent link between TC and rectal cancer risk as well as between TG and oesophageal and colon cancer risk in normoglycaemic individuals may imply their substantiality in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis.

  17. High-Resolution MRI in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution MRI is the best method of assessing the relation of the rectal tumor with the potential circumferential resection margin (CRM). Therefore it is currently considered the method of choice for local staging of rectal cancer. The primary surgery of rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision (TME), which plane of dissection is formed by the mesorectal fascia surrounding mesorectal fat and rectum. This fascia will determine the circumferential margin of resection. At the same time, high resolution MRI allows adequate pre-operative identification of important prognostic risk factors, improving the selection and indication of therapy for each patient. This information includes, besides the circumferential margin of resection, tumor and lymph node staging, extramural vascular invasion and the description of lower rectal tumors. All these should be described in detail in the report, being part of the discussion in the multidisciplinary team, the place where the decisions involving the patient with rectal cancer will take place. The aim of this study is to provide the information necessary to understand the use of high resolution MRI in the identification of prognostic risk factors in rectal cancer. The technical requirements and standardized report for this study will be describe, as well as the anatomical landmarks of importance for the total mesorectal excision (TME), as we have said is the surgery of choice for rectal cancer. (authors) [es

  18. Targeting cancers in the gastrointestinal tract: role of capecitabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Wasif SaifYale Cancer Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Capecitabine is currently the only novel, orally home-administered fluorouracil prodrug. It offers patients more freedom from hospital visits and less inconvenience and complications associated with infusion devices. The drug has been extensively studied in large clinical trials in many solid tumors, including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, and many others. Furthermore, the drug compares favorably with fluorouracil in patients with such cancers, with a safe toxicity profile, consisting mainly of gastrointestinal and dermatologic adverse effects. Whereas gastrointestinal events and hand-foot syndrome occur often with capecitabine, the tolerability profile is comparatively favorable. Prompt recognition of severe adverse effects is the key to successful management of capecitabine. Ongoing and future clinical trials will continue to examine, and likely expand, the role of capecitabine as a single agent and/or in combination with other anticancer agents for the treatment of gastrointestinal as well as other solid tumors, both in the advanced palliative and adjuvant settings. The author summarizes the current data on the role of capecitabine in the management of gastrointestinal cancers. Keywords: 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, chemotherapy, adjuvant, advanced, colon cancer, gastric cancer, hepatocellular cancer, pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, rectal cancer, anal cancer

  19. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  20. ENDOSCOPIC TECHNOLOGIES IN EARLY RECTAL CANCER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Samsonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mesorectal excision is the “golden standard” of surgical treatment for rectal cancer. Development of endoscopic technologies allowed to implement the benefits of minimally invasive surgery in early rectal cancer treatment, decrease morbidity and mortality, improve functional outcome and quality of life. Oncological safety of this method is still a subject for discussion due to lack of lymph node harvest. Endoscopic operations for early rectal cancer are being actively implemented in daily practice, but lack of experience does not allow to include this method in national clinical prac-tice guidelines.

  1. National and international guidelines for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Wille-Jørgensen, P

    2014-01-01

    , this might not be the case between guidelines. No formal evaluation of the contrasting guidance has been reported. METHOD: A systematic search for national and international guidelines on rectal cancer was performed. Eleven guidelines were identified for further analysis. RESULTS: There was no consensus...... concerning the definition of rectal cancer. Ten of the 11 guidelines use the TNM staging system and there was general agreement regarding the recommendation of MRI and CT in rectal cancer. There was consensus concerning a multidisciplinary approach, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal...

  2. Evidences in multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bari, B.; Bosset, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Valentini, V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 10 years, a number of important European randomized published studies investigated the optimal management of rectal cancer. In order to define an evidence-based approach of the clinical practice based, an international consensus conference was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO) and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). The aim of this article is to present highlights of multidisciplinary rectal cancer management and to compare the conclusions of the international conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) with the new National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. (authors)

  3. Local radiological staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, V.; Halligan, S.; Bartram, C.I.

    2004-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a common malignancy with a highly variable outcome. Local recurrence is dependent upon tumour stage and surgical technique. The role of pre-operative imaging is to determine which patients may be safely managed by surgery alone and which need additional therapy in order to facilitate surgery and improve outcome. This decision depends on the distinction between those with early and advanced disease. While trans-rectal ultrasound has traditionally been used to answer this question, a role for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly argued. This review will focus on the treatment options for rectal cancer and the clinical questions that subsequently arise for the radiologist to answer

  4. Gastrointestinal injuries from blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, E A; Nmadu, P T

    2004-04-01

    To determine the pattern, presentation and outcome of gastrointestinal injuries from blunt abdominal trauma in children. A retrospective study. Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria. Twenty one children managed for gastrointestinal injuries from blunt trauma from 1984-2002. The pattern, presentation, management and outcome of gastrointestinal injuries from blunt trauma. In the 19 year period, 1984-2002, 92 children were treated for blunt abdominal trauma, 21(23%) of who had injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. Three presenting after 24 hours had evidence of peritonitis. In six children with isolated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) injury who presented within two hours, abdominal signs were vague at initial evaluation but became marked over a few hours at repeated examination. In eight with associated intraabdominal injuries, abdominal signs were marked at initial examination and five presented with shock. Free peritoneal air was present on plain abdominal and chest radiograph in three of ten patients, dilated bowel loops in six and fluid levels in one. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage or paracentesis was positive in four patients with isolated GIT injuries and eight with associated intraabdominal injuries. There were 24 injuries in the 21 patients consisting of 15 perforations, five contusions, two seromuscular tears, and two gangrene from mesenteric injury. The small intestine was involved in 11 patients, colon six, stomach five, duodenum one and rectum one. Seven (35%) patients had associated extraabdominal injuries. Treatment consisted of simple closure of perforations, over sewing of contusions, resection and anastomosis for gangrene and repair with protective stoma for the rectal injury. One patient each developed prolonged ileus, urinary tract infection and chest infection, respectively postoperatively. Mortality was 28%, all of who had associated intraabdominal or extraabdominal injuries. Gastrointestinal injury from blunt abdominal trauma in

  5. Gastrointestinal cancers in India: Treatment perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Suresh Ghadyalpatil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GI cancer is not one cancer but is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system including gastric cancer (GC, colorectal cancer (CRC, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, esophageal cancer (EC, and pancreatic cancer (PC. Overall, the GI cancers are responsible for more cancers and more deaths from cancer than any other organ. 5 year survival of these cancers remains low compared to western world. Unlike the rest of the world where organ based specialities hepatobiliary, pancreatic, colorectal and esophagogastric exist , these cancers are managed in India by either a gastrointestinal surgeons, surgical oncologist, or a general surgeon with varying outcomes.The aim of this review was to collate data on GI cancers in indian continent. In colorectal cancers, data from tertiary care centres identifies the unique problem of mucinous and signet colorectal cancer. Results of rectal cancer resection in terms of technique (intersphincteric resection, extralevator aper, minimal invasive approach to be comparable with world literature. However long term outcome and data regarding colon cancers and nationally is needed. Gastric cancer at presentation are advanced and in surgically resected patients, there is need for a trial to compare chemoradiation vs chemotherapy alone to prevent loco regional recurrence. Data on minimal invasive gastric cancer surgery may be sparse for the same reason. Theree is a lot of data on surgical techniques and perioperatve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. There is a high volume of locally advanced gallbladder cancers with efforts on to decide whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is better for down staging. Considering GI cancers, a heterogeneous disease with site specific treatment options and variable outcomes, the overall data and outcomes are extremely variable. Young patients with pathology unique to the Indian subcontinent (for example, signet ring rectal cancer, GBCs need focussed

  6. Gastrointestinal cancers in India: Treatment perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadyalpatil, Nikhil Suresh; Supriya, Chopra; Prachi, Patil; Ashwin, Dsouza; Avanish, Saklani

    2016-01-01

    GI cancer is not one cancer but is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system including gastric cancer (GC), colorectal cancer (CRC), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), esophageal cancer (EC), and pancreatic cancer (PC). Overall, the GI cancers are responsible for more cancers and more deaths from cancer than any other organ. 5 year survival of these cancers remains low compared to western world. Unlike the rest of the world where organ based specialities hepatobiliary, pancreatic, colorectal and esophagogastric exist, these cancers are managed in India by either a gastrointestinal surgeons, surgical oncologist, or a general surgeon with varying outcomes. The aim of this review was to collate data on GI cancers in indian continent. In colorectal cancers, data from tertiary care centres identifies the unique problem of mucinous and signet colorectal cancer. Results of rectal cancer resection in terms of technique (intersphincteric resection, extralevator aper, minimal invasive approach) to be comparable with world literature. However long term outcome and data regarding colon cancers and nationally is needed. Gastric cancer at presentation are advanced and in surgically resected patients, there is need for a trial to compare chemoradiation vs chemotherapy alone to prevent loco regional recurrence. Data on minimal invasive gastric cancer surgery may be sparse for the same reason. Theree is a lot of data on surgical techniques and perioperatve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. There is a high volume of locally advanced gallbladder cancers with efforts on to decide whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is better for down staging. Considering GI cancers, a heterogeneous disease with site specific treatment options and variable outcomes, the overall data and outcomes are extremely variable. Young patients with pathology unique to the Indian subcontinent (for example, signet ring rectal cancer, GBCs) need focussed attention

  7. Perineal mass protrusion with rectal mucosa: a rectal duplication that underwent exstrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junjie; Vongphet, Soulithone; Zhang, Zhichong; Mo, Jiacong

    2011-08-01

    We present a rare case of a male neonate with a perineal mass with rectal mucosa, diagnosed as an exstrophic duplication of the rectum. It was accompanied by a cord that was deeply invested in the pelvic diaphragm and was composed of smooth muscle, fibrous tissue, and some rectal glands. The association of exstrophic rectal duplication with a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and normal anus has not been described previously in the literature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rectal perforation by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Jin

    2017-07-01

    As the use of compressed air in industrial work has increased, so has the risk of associated pneumatic injury from its improper use. However, damage of large intestine caused by compressed air is uncommon. Herein a case of pneumatic rupture of the rectum is described. The patient was admitted to the Emergency Room complaining of abdominal pain and distension. His colleague triggered a compressed air nozzle over his buttock. On arrival, vital signs were stable but physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and marked distension of the abdomen. Computed tomography showed a large volume of air in the peritoneal cavity and subcutaneous emphysema at the perineum. A rectal perforation was found at laparotomy and the Hartmann procedure was performed.

  9. Radiotherapy for early rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    A literature review of 10 series using electrocoagulation, fulguration, or local excision demonstrates that about 70% of all patients had tumors smaller than 3 cm and the remainder had tumors measuring between 4 cm and 7 cm. Although primary tumor size in rectal cancer has little prognostic value per se, it is obviously important when determining the appropriateness of local therapy. Selecting patients for local therapy based on tumor size alone seems reasonable, since the recurrence and survival rates for the patients are similar to those achieved with radical surgery. Since patients treated with local excision alone have predominantly T1 or T2 tumors, a comparison with the data of others illustrates the prognostic utility of the degree of bowel penetration and shows five-year survival rates of 71% to 76% for patients with limited disease. In this chapter, the author describes an additional group of patients who also did well following postoperative radiotherapy after conservative surgical treatment

  10. Transvaginal ultrasonography of rectal endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egekvist, Anne Gisselmann; Seyer-Hansen, Mikkel; Forman, Axel

    Objectives: The aim of this present study was to evaluate the interobserver variation of transvaginal ultrasonographic measurements of endometriosis infiltrating the rectosigmoid wall. Methods: Transvaginal ultrasonography was performed independently by two observers. Observer 1 had several years...... of experience in ultrasonography while observer 2 was a medical student with no prior experience in ultrasonography or endometriosis. In 24 patient length, width and depth of endometriosis infiltrating the rectosigmoid bowel was measured. The differences between the observers were analysed by Bland and Altman...... for a relatively short period gives comparable scanning results between the two observers. It seems that transvaginal ultrasound could be used as a diagnostic tool for rectal endometriosis in most departments. However, the irregular morphology of the lesions makes the measurements very complex, and a strict...

  11. The Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tencerova, Michaela; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment represents an important compartment of bone that regulates bone homeostasis and the balance between bone formation and bone resorption depending on the physiological needs of the organism. Abnormalities of BM microenvironmental dynamics can lead to metabolic bone...... diseases. BM stromal cells (also known as skeletal or mesenchymal stem cells) [bone marrow stromal stem cell (BMSC)] are multipotent stem cells located within BM stroma and give rise to osteoblasts and adipocytes. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms of BMSC lineage commitment to adipocytic lineage...

  12. Rectal cooling test in the differentiation between constipation due to rectal inertia and anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, A; Shafik, I; El Sibai, O; Shafik, A A

    2007-03-01

    The differentiation between constipation due to rectal inertia and that due to outlet obstruction from non-relaxing puborectalis muscle (PRM) is problematic and not easily achieved with one diagnostic test. Therefore, we studied the hypothesis that the rectal cooling test (RCT) can effectively be used to differentiate between those two forms of constipation. The study enrolled 28 patients with constipation and abnormal transit study in whom radio-opaque markers accumulated in the rectum; 15 healthy volunteers acted as controls. Electromyographic activity of the external anal sphincter (EAS) and PRM was initially recorded. Subsequently rectal wall tone was assessed by a barostat system during rectal infusion with normal saline at 30 degrees C and at 4 degrees C with simultaneous electromyography (EMG). There was a significant increase in EMG activity of the EAS and PRM on strain- ing (panismus, in 10 of 28 patients and 0 of 15 controls. Rectal tone in controls did not respond to saline infusion at 30 degrees C, but it increased at 4 degrees C (panismus (panismus while it had no effect in the remaining patients. Lack of increase of rectal tone may be secondary to rectal inertia. According to these preliminary observations, the rectal cooling test may be useful in differentiating between rectal inertia and anismus.

  13. Digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasonography in staging of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Kronborg, Ole; Fenger, Claus

    1994-01-01

    Staging of rectal carcinoma before surgical treatment was performed in a prospective blind study, comparing digital rectal exploration and transrectal linear ultrasonography (TRUS) with the resulting pathological examination. TRUS underestimated depth of penetration in 3 of 33 patients...... and overestimation resulted in 9 of 74. The figures for digital examination were 5 of 18 and 20 of 76, respectively. Penetration of the rectal wall was correctly identified in 56 of 61 patients by digital examination and in 59 of 61 by TRUS. Specimens without penetration of the rectal wall were identified in 26...

  14. Management of gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Hilsden, R. J.; Shaffer, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common problem that requires prompt recognition and management to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. Management goals are stabilization of the patient with vigorous fluid resuscitation followed by investigation and definitive treatment of the bleeding source. Endoscopy is often the initial diagnostic test and allows therapeutic measures to be performed at the same time.

  15. Tumor lymphocyte immune response to preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer: The LYMPHOREC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjolet, C; Charon-Barra, C; Ladoire, S; Arbez-Gindre, F; Bertaut, A; Ghiringhelli, F; Leroux, A; Peiffert, D; Borg, C; Bosset, J F; Créhange, G

    2018-01-01

    Introduction : Some studies have suggested that baseline tumor-infiltrating-lymphocytes (TILs), such as CD8+ and FoxP3+ T-cells, may be associated with a better prognosis in colorectal cancer. We sought to investigate modulation of the immune response by preoperative radiotherapy (preopRT) and its impact on survival in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Materials & Methods : We analyzed data for 237 patients with LARC who received RT. Density of TILS (CD8+ and FoxP3+) in intraepithelial (iTILs) and stromal compartments (sTILs) were evaluated from surgery pathological specimens and biopsies performed at baseline. The primary endpoint was to assess the impact of infiltration of the tumor or tumor site after preopRT on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were the impact of dose fractionation scheme on TILs. Results : In univariate analysis, several factors significantly correlated (pguide physicians in adjuvant treatment decision-making.

  16. The Rectal Cancer Female Sexuality Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyø, Anne; Emmertsen, Katrine J; Laurberg, Søren

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sexual dysfunction and impaired quality of life is a potential side effect to rectal cancer treatment. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a simple scoring system intended to evaluate sexual function in women treated for rectal cancer. DESIGN......: This is a population-based cross-sectional study. SETTINGS: Female patients diagnosed with rectal cancer between 2001 and 2014 were identified by using the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's database. Participants filled in the validated Sexual Function Vaginal Changes questionnaire. Women declared to be sexually active...... in the validation group. PATIENTS: Female patients with rectal cancer above the age of 18 who underwent abdominoperineal resection, Hartmann procedure, or total/partial mesorectal excision were selected. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measured was the quality of life that was negatively affected because...

  17. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  18. Meat and colo-rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M J

    1999-05-01

    In early epidemiological studies of diet and cancer the stress was on the search for causal factors. Population (ecological) studies tended to show a strong correlation between meat intake, particularly red meat, and the risk of colo-rectal cancer. They also tended to show meat to be strongly inversely correlated with cancers of the stomach and oesophagus and liver. Early case-control studies tended to support the postulated role for red meat in colo-rectal carcinogenesis, although more recent case-control studies, particularly those from Europe, have tended to show no relationship. The cohort studies in general failed to detect any relationship between meat intake and colo-rectal cancer risk. The available evidence points to the intake of protective factors such as vegetables and whole-grain cereals being the main determinants of colo-rectal cancer risk, with meat intake only coincidentally related.

  19. Management of Civilian Extraperitoneal Rectal Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaf J. Shatnawi

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Rectal injuries are serious additive mortality and morbidity factors in multi-injured patients. Regardless of treatment modality, wound infection is associated with shock at presentation and more than 6 hours' delay in treatment.

  20. Treatment of Rectal Hemorrhage by Coil Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, Craig Charles; Nicholson, Anthony A.

    1998-01-01

    Four patients, aged 54-84 years, presenting with life-threatening rectal bleeding from the superior hemorrhoidal artery, underwent percutaneous fibered platinum coil embolization via coaxial catheters. Pre-procedure sigmoidoscopy had failed to identify the source of hemorrhage, because the rectum was filled with fresh blood. Embolization was technically and clinically successful in all four patients. Subsequent sigmoidoscopy confirmed the diagnoses in three patients as a solitary rectal ulcer, iatrogenic traumatic ulceration following manual evacuation, and a rectal Dieulafoy's lesion. The other case was angiographically seen to be due to a rectal angiodysplasia. Embolization is an effective procedure in life-threatening superior hemorrhoidal arterial bleeding when endoscopic treatment fails, and should be preferred to rectosigmoid resection

  1. Rectal dihydroartemisinin versus intravenous quinine in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rectal dihydroartemisinin versus intravenous quinine in the treatment of severe malaria: A randomised clinical trial. F Esamai, P Ayuo, W Owino-Ongor, J Rotich, A Ngindu, A Obala, F Ogaro, L Quoqiao, G Xingbo, L Guangqian ...

  2. Defecography of rectal wall prolapse conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzano, A.; Muto, M.; De Rosa, A.; Ginolfi, F.; Carbone, M.; Amodio, F.; Rossi, E.; Tuccillo, M.

    1999-01-01

    Pelvic floor and rectal prolapse conditions have greatly benefited by new imaging and instrumental diagnostic approaches, and especially defecography, for both pathophysiological interpretation and differential diagnosis. The authors investigated the efficacy of defecography in the assessment of rectal prolapse, and in particular the role of videproctography in diagnosis such dynamic disorders. The dynamic changes of ampulla are well depicted by videoproctography, which showed anorectum normalization and spontaneous reduction of invagination after intussusception. Defecography exhibited good capabilities in showing rectal wall function abnormalities. Finally, some features of videoproctography such as low radiation dose, non-invasiveness and ease of execution, make the examination acceptable to patients with anorectal disorders and for the follow-up of rectal prolapse [it

  3. Wind sock deformity in rectal atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed M V; Ghahramani, Farhad; Shamsaeefar, Alireza; Razmi, Tannaz; Zarenezhad, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Rectal atresia is a rare anorectal deformity. It usually presents with neonatal obstruction and it is often a complete membrane or severe stenosis. Windsock deformity has not been reported in rectal atresia especially, having been missed for 2 years. A 2-year-old girl reported only a severe constipation despite having a 1.5-cm anal canal in rectal examination with scanty discharge. She underwent loop colostomy and loopogram, which showed a wind sock deformity of rectum with mega colon. The patient underwent abdominoperineal pull-through with good result and follow-up. This is the first case of the wind sock deformity in rectal atresia being reported after 2 years of age. (author)

  4. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric...

  5. Transcatheter arterial embolization with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere®) leads to life-threatening tumor lysis syndrome in a rectal carcinoid patient with hepatic metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Yuan-Hao; Tsai, Ming-Tsun; Kuo, Chen-Yu; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Li, Chung-Pin; Chen, Jinn-Yang; Chao, Yee

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal carcinoids appears to be increasing, and the rectum is the third most common location. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere ® ) has been reported as an effective method for hepatic metastases of rectal carcinoids. Complications are uncommon and usually of minor consequence. We report an unusual case of a 34-year-old man with tumor lysis syndrome following TAE with Embosphere ® in a patient with multiple hepatic metastases of a rectal carcinoid. Early detection and effective treatment are essential for this rare but potentially catastrophic complication

  6. Anterior rectal duplication: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjadi, K; Poenaru, D; Soboleski, D; Hurlbut, D; Kamal, I

    2000-04-01

    The authors present an anterior rectal cyst in a 14-month-old girl. This rare variant of rectal duplications presented with recurrent urinary infections. The diagnosis was challenging in view of the multiple differential diagnoses to be considered. Magnetic resonance imaging appeared to be the most accurate preoperative investigation. The cyst was removed uneventfully by partial excision and mucosal ablation. An awareness of this variant can lead to early diagnosis and curative resection.

  7. Nutritional status and related factors of patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyan; Lu, Yuhan; Fang, Yu

    2014-04-14

    The scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) is considered to be the most appropriate tool for detecting malnutrition in cancer patients. In particular, malignant tumours derived from the gastrointestinal tract may impair nutrient intake and absorption and cause malnutrition. We carried out a cross-sectional study to assess the nutritional status and related factors of patients with gastrointestinal cancer. Nutritional status was determined using the scored PG-SGA in patients (n 498) with advanced gastrointestinal cancer admitted to the Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology Unit at Beijing Cancer Hospital between 1 August 2012 and 28 February 2013. The possible related factors including age, sex, hospitalisation frequency and pathology were explored. We found that 98% of the patients required nutrition intervention and 54% of the patients required improved nutrition-related symptom management and/or urgent nutritional support (PG-SGA score ≥9). Factors related to malnutrition were age (r 0.103, Pcancer had a lower risk of malnutrition than patients with other types of gastrointestinal cancer (F=35.895, Pnutritional status of gastrointestinal patients, especially those at a higher risk of malnutrition, such as elderly patients, those hospitalised for the first time, male patients and those with other types of gastrointestinal cancer except rectal cancer. The nutritional status of these patients should be evaluated and they should be given proper nutrition education and nutritional support in a timely manner.

  8. Rectal Cancer Survivors' Participation in Productive Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, Mark C; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher; Bulkley, Joanna E; Mcmullen, Carmit K; Altschuler, Andrea; Temple, Larissa Kf; Herrinton, Lisa J; Krouse, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Rectal cancer and its treatment impair survivors' productivity. To assess determinants of market and nonmarket employment, job search, volunteering, and homemaking among survivors five years or longer after diagnosis. We mailed questionnaires to 1063 survivors who were members of Kaiser Permanente (Northern California, Northwest) during 2010 and 2011. Productive activities, functional health status, and bowel management at the time of the survey. Response rate was 60.5% (577/953). Higher comorbidity burdens were associated with lower productivity for men and women rectal cancer survivors. Productive survivors were younger and had lower disease stage and age at diagnosis, higher household income and educational attainment, and fewer comorbidity burdens and workplace adjustments than did nonproductive survivors (p < 0.05 each; 2-sided). Productive rectal cancer survivors were evenly split by sex. Staying productive is associated with better mental health for rectal cancer survivors. Rectal cancer survivors with multiple chronic conditions, higher disease stage, lower productive activities, and older age need better access to medical care and closer monitoring of the quality of their care, including self-care. To capture the full extent of the involvement of survivors in all types of productive activities, research should routinely include measures of employment, searching for employment, homemaking, and volunteering. Counting market and nonmarket productive activities is innovative and recognizes the continuum of contributions survivors make to families and society. Health care systems should routinely monitor rectal cancer survivors' medical care access, comorbidities, health-related quality of life, and productive activities.

  9. Staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Whan; Ryu, Sie Tae; Park, Ki Soon; Lee, Yul; Chung, Soo Young

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of preoperative staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US(7.5MHz linear array transducer), 17 cases with primary rectal cancer who were examined by transrectal US and histopathologically proven, were analyzed. We correlated the sonographic features of the depth of rectal wall invasion, perirectal fat infiltration and perirectal lymph node metastasis with histopathologic findings. The tumor staging was analyzed according to the TNM classification. The depth of rectal wall invasion was in accordance with histopathologic findings in 15 of 17 cases (accuracy:88.2%). The sensitivity and specificity of transrectal US in predicting perirectal lymph node metastasis were 20% and 75%, respectively (accuracy : 58.8%). The sensitivity and specificity in predicting perirectal fat infiltration were 92.9% and 100%, respectively (accuracy : 94%). Perirectal fat infiltration and depth of rectal wall invasion were preoperatively diagnosed with relatively high accuracy, while perirectal lymph node metastasis with low accuracy. In conclusion, transrectal US is a useful imaging modality for preoperative staging of rectal cancer

  10. A method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated and rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yong; Song, Paul Y.; Li Shidong; Spelbring, Danny R.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Haraf, Daniel J.; Chen, George T.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated and rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose-surface histograms of the rectum, which state the rectal surface area irradiated to any given dose, were calculated for a group of 27 patients treated with a four-field box technique to a total (tumor minimum) dose ranging from 68 to 70 Gy. Occurrences of rectal toxicities as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) were recorded and examined in terms of dose and rectal surface area irradiated. For a specified end point of rectal complication, the complication probability was analyzed as a function of dose irradiated to a fixed rectal area, and as a function of area receiving a fixed dose. Lyman's model of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was used to fit the data. Results: The observed occurrences of rectal complications appear to depend on the rectal surface area irradiated to a given dose level. The patient distribution of each toxicity grade exhibits a maximum as a function of percentage surface area irradiated, and the maximum moves to higher values of percentage surface area as the toxicity grade increases. The dependence of the NTCP for the specified end point on dose and percentage surface area irradiated was fitted to Lyman's NTCP model with a set of parameters. The curvature of the NTCP as a function of the surface area suggests that the rectum is a parallel structured organ. Conclusions: The described method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated yields interesting insight into understanding rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy. Application of the method to a larger patient data set has the potential to facilitate the construction of a full dose-surface-complication relationship, which would be most useful in guiding clinical practice

  11. Origin of hemopoietic stromal progenitor cells in chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chertkov, J.L.; Drize, N.J.; Gurevitch, O.A.; Samoylova, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    Intravenously injected bone marrow cells do not participate in the regeneration of hemopoietic stromal progenitors in irradiated mice, nor in the curetted parts of the recipient's marrow. The hemopoietic stromal progenitors in allogeneic chimeras are of recipient origin. The adherent cell layer (ACL) of long-term cultures of allogeneic chimera bone marrow contains only recipient hemopoietic stromal progenitors. However, in ectopic hemopoietic foci produced by marrow implantation under the renal capsule and repopulated by the recipient hemopoietic cells after irradiation and reconstitution by syngeneic hemopoietic cells, the stromal progenitors were of implant donor origin, as were stromal progenitors of the ACL in long-term cultures of hemopoietic cells from ectopic foci. Our results confirm that the stromal and hemopoietic progenitors differ in origin and that hemopoietic stromal progenitors are not transplantable by the intravenous route in mice

  12. Differential expression of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in human colorectal cancer: A comparison with colon and rectal cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, SHUAI; CHEN, YIJUN; ZHU, ZHANMENG; DING, YUNLONG; REN, SHUANGYI; ZUO, YUNFEI

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality, being the third most commonly diagnosed cancer among men and the second among women. Accumulating evidence regarding carbohydrate antigen (CA) demonstrated that tumor-associated antigens are clinically useful for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of human gastrointestinal cancers, particularly colorectal cancer. There has been an extensive investigation for sensitive and specific markers of this disease. Currently, the gastrointestinal cancer-associated carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) is the most widely applied tumor marker in cancer diagnosis. Despite a similar etiology and cancer incidence rates, there are anatomical and clinical differences between colon and rectal cancer, as well as differences regarding tumor progression and adjuvant treatments. To investigate whether CA19-9 is differentially expressed between colon and rectal cancer, we conducted a differential analysis of serum CA19-9 levels among 227 cases of colorectal cancer, analyzing gender, age, Dukes’ stage and distant metastasis for human colon and rectal cancer as a single entity, separately and as matched pairs. We demonstrated that the serum CA19-9 levels in colorectal cancer were upregulated in advanced stages with distant metastasis. By contrast, the serum CA19-9 levels in colon cancer displayed a differential and upregulated behavior in advanced stages with distant metastasis. By analyzing as matched pairs, the upregulated serum CA19-9 levels in rectal cancer during the early stages without distant metastasis further supported our hypothesis that the expression of CA19-9 displays a site-specific differential behavior. The integrative analysis suggested a significant difference between human colon and rectal cancer, justifying individualized therapy for these two types of cancer. PMID:24649295

  13. Determinación inmunohistoquímica y utilidad pronóstica del receptor del factor de crecimiento epidérmico en los tumores estromales gastrointestinales Immnunohistochemical expression of epidermal growth factor and its prognostic value for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Padilla

    2008-12-01

    ímicos: CD117+, 85,7%. PDGFRA+, 85,7%. CD34+, 77,1%. EGFR+, 62,9%. S100+, 34,3%. Actina+, 20%. Vimentina+, 100%. p53+, 40%. ki67+, 10,71 ± 10,82. La expresión de EGFR no se relacionó con la recidiva y/o mortalidad del enfermo, p = 0,156, y p = 0,332, respectivamente. El índice mitótico se relacionó con la mortalidad del enfermo, p = 0,02, y recidiva neoplásica, p = 0,013. Conclusión: en nuestra muestra no existió relación entre la inmunotinción de EGFR y el pronóstico del tumor estromal gastrointestinal.Introduction: the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR (HER-1, is a tyrosine kinase receptor. EGFR activation plays an important role in increased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and decreased apoptosis. Our objective was to study EGFR immunoexpression in GIST, as well as its prognostic value. Patients and method: a retrospective study that included all patients operated on with a histologic diagnosis of GIST at Department of Surgery, Hospital General, Ciudad Real, between 1995 and 2007. Clinical features: age, sex, manifestations, mortality, recurrence. Pathological features: origin, size, tumoral necrosis, mitotic index, cell type. Immunohistochemical features: vimentin, (V9, Dako A/s; smooth muscle actin (HHF-35, Biogenex; CD34 (QBEND/10; S100 (Policlonal Dako A/S, CD117, (c-kit Rabbit, antihuman polyclonal antibody, 1:600; PDGFR-alfa (Rabbit polyclonal antibody, 1:50, Sta. Cruz Biotechnology. Prognostic molecular features: P-53, PAb240 (DakoCytomation 1:75; Ki-67, clona MIB1 (Dako, 1:120 y (EGFR pharmDx™ Dako Autostainer (Dako, Denmark. Malignancy critera: Fletcher's critera. Results: from 1995 to 2007, 35 GISTs were resected in our Department. Mean age: 61.11 ± 11.02, with a female predominance of 62.9%. Initial clinical manifestation included digestive hemorrhage in 40%. Median follow-up was 28 months (3-133. Mortality was 54.3%, and recurrence rate was 40%. The most frequent origin was the stomach, 51.4%, (18. There was tumor necrosis in 57.1% (20

  14. Radiology illustrated. Gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-01-01

    Radiology Illustrated: Gastrointestinal Tract is the second of two volumes designed to provide clear and practical guidance on the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. The book presents approximately 300 cases with 1500 carefully selected and categorized illustrations of gastrointestinal tract diseases, along with key text messages and tables that will help the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis., Essential points are summarized at the end of each text message to facilitate rapid review and learning. Additionally, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by case studies of both common and uncommon pathologies that illustrate the roles of the different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. Radiology illustrated. Gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ihn (ed.) [Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-02-01

    Radiology Illustrated: Gastrointestinal Tract is the second of two volumes designed to provide clear and practical guidance on the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. The book presents approximately 300 cases with 1500 carefully selected and categorized illustrations of gastrointestinal tract diseases, along with key text messages and tables that will help the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis., Essential points are summarized at the end of each text message to facilitate rapid review and learning. Additionally, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by case studies of both common and uncommon pathologies that illustrate the roles of the different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Gastrointestinal Complications of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Malhi, Harmeet; Acosta, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Obesity usually is associated with morbidity related to diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are many gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases for which obesity is the direct cause (eg, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) or is a significant risk factor, such as reflux esophagitis and gallstones. When obesity is a risk factor, it may interact with other mechanisms and result in earlier presentation or complicated diseases. There are increased odds ratios or relative risks of several gastrointestinal complications of obesity: gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, erosive gastritis, gastric cancer, diarrhea, colonic diverticular disease, polyps, cancer, liver disease including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, gallstones, acute pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. Gastroenterologists are uniquely poised to participate in the multidisciplinary management of obesity as physicians caring for people with obesity-related diseases, in addition to their expertise in nutrition and endoscopic interventions. PMID:28192107

  17. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains a commonly encountered diagnosis for acute care surgeons. Initial stabilization and resuscitation of patients is imperative. Stable patients can have initiation of medical therapy and localization of the bleeding, whereas persistently unstable patients require emergent endoscopic or operative intervention. Minimally invasive techniques have surpassed surgery as the treatment of choice for most upper GI bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Orexins and gastrointestinal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccari, M C

    2010-03-01

    Orexin A (OXA) and orexin B (OXB) are recently discovered neuropeptides that appear to play a role in various distinct functions such as arousal and the sleep-wake cycle as well as on appetite and regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis. Orexins were first described as neuropeptides expressed by a specific population of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, a region classically implicated in feeding behaviour. Orexin neurons project to numerous brain regions, where orexin receptors have been shown to be widely distributed: both OXA and OXB act through two subtypes of receptors (OX1R and OX2R) that belong to the G protein-coupled superfamily of receptors. Growing evidence indicates that orexins act in the central nervous system also to regulate gastrointestinal functions: animal studies have indeed demonstrated that centrally-injected orexins or endogenously released orexins in the brain stimulates gastric secretion and influence gastrointestinal motility. The subsequent identification of orexins and their receptors in the enteric nervous system (including the myenteric and the submucosal plexuses) as well as in mucosa and smooth muscles has suggested that these neuropeptides may also play a local action. In this view, emerging studies indicate that orexins also exert region-specific contractile or relaxant effects on isolated gut preparations. The aim of the proposed review is to summarize both centrally- and peripherally-mediated actions of orexins on gastrointestinal functions and to discuss the related physiological role on the basis of the most recent findings.

  20. Trends of Incidence and Survival of Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors in the United States: A Seer Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki L. Tsikitis, Betsy C. Wertheim, Marlon A. Guerrero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine trends in detection and survival of hollow viscus gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs across time and geographic regions of the U.S.METHODS: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER database to investigate 19,669 individuals with newly diagnosed gastrointestinal NETs. Trends in incidence were tested using Poisson regression. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine survival.RESULTS: Incidence increased over time for NETs of all gastrointestinal sites (all P < 0.001, except appendix. Rates have risen faster for NETs of the small intestine and rectum than stomach and colon. Rectal NETs were detected at a faster pace among blacks than whites (P < 0.001 and slower in the East than other regions (P < 0.001. We observed that appendiceal and rectal NETs carry the best prognosis and survival of small intestinal and colon NETs has improved for both men and women. Colon NETs showed different temporal trends in survival according to geographic region (Pinteraction = 0.028. Improved prognosis was more consistent across the country for small intestinal NETs.CONCLUSIONS: Incidence of gastrointestinal NETs has increased, accompanied by inconsistently improved survival for different anatomic sites among certain groups defined by race and geographic region.

  1. Intracavitary radiation for rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basrur, V.R. (Ontario Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation, Hamilton (Canada). Hamilton Clinic); Knight, P.R. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-03-01

    Thirty-five patients with low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma have been treated with intra-cavitary radiation (Papillon's technique). Twenty-three were treated for cure and 12 for palliation. The indications for curative intracavity radiation were mobile polypoid tumors, less than 3 cm in diameter, with Broder's Grades 1 and 2 differentiation lying less than 11 cm from the anal verge. Doses between 2000 and 4000 cGy were delivered to a total of 7000 to 20000 cGy with complete resolution of the tumors. Eighty-seven per cent in the curative group are alive and well up to 42 months after treatment with a minimum follow-up of six months. Of the 23 patients treated for cure, three patients had recurrences within 18 months of therapy. Two of the three patients are alive following surgery. The third patient died in the postoperative period. The results of intracavitary radiation are comparable to ablative surgery and avoid a permanent colostomy. Age, frailty, or other medical conditions do not preclude this treatment. Anesthesia and hospitalization are not required. This method can also be used for palliation of recurrent tumors and in patients who are unsuitable for surgery.

  2. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokelaar RF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RF Kokelaar, MD Evans, M Davies, DA Harris, J Beynon Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK Abstract: Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer. Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0 resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. Keywords: rectal cancer, exenteration, pelvic sidewall, sacrectomy

  3. Importance of Preoperative Rectal Ultrasound and CT in Rectal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnellyova, T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The reason of high mortality of colorectal carcinoma is above all the fact, that majority of diseases are detected in progressive stage. Radical change in this unfavorable mortality rate can be achieved only by targeted search for early stages of the disease. Early diagnostics consists in rectoscopy and colonoscopy. Regarding X-ray methods it is X-ray irigography. Regarding CT examinations it is CT irigography, virtual colonoscopy. Another examination can be USG examination of abdomen and endo sonographic examination of rectum. Materials and methods: In the period from June 2006 to December 2010, in 60 patients out of the total number 106 examined patients, tumorous affection of rectum CT examination of pelvis and abdomen separately or pelvisand abdomen at one session was made in 3186 patients. In 115 patients we discovered malign tumorous illness of colon. Metastatic affection in the form of distant metastases was proven n 63 patients. 403 patients had CT irigography examination. In 77 out of them we diagnosed colon carcinoma. CT colonoscopy did not discover in our group of 30 patients examined the presence of colon carcinoma. Results: In the group of 60 patients who were diagnosed rectal carcinoma, in 29 patients expansive infiltrative affection was evaluated in endorectal sonography, histologically confirmed in 28 patients - 96,5 %, expansive affection in 41 patients with histological verification in 100 %. With CT we diagnosed 52 expansive tumorous processes, histologically confirmed in 47 patients - 90,38 %. In 63 patients expansive infiltrative process was evaluated, histologically confirmed in 52 patients 82,53 %. In total of 115 examinations there was conformance with histological examination in 99 patients - 86,08 %. In CT irigography we diagnosed colon tumour in 77 patients. Expansive growth was evaluated in 40 patients, histologically confirmed in 37 patients - 92,5 %. Expansive infiltrative expansion was evaluated in 37 patients, with

  4. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on rectal function and emotion in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Yuuichi; Morishita, Joe; Kano, Michiko; Mori, Takayuki; Izumi, Shin-ichi; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Fukudo, Shin; Tsutsui, Kenichiro; Iijima, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    A previous brain imaging study demonstrated activation of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during visceral nociception, and this activation was associated with anxiety. We hypothesized that functional modulation of the right DLPFC by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can reveal the actual role of right DLPFC in brain-gut interactions in humans. Subjects were 11 healthy males aged 23.5±1.4 (mean±spin echo (SE)) years. Viscerosensory evoked potential (VEP) with sham (0 mA) or actual (30 mA) electrical stimulation (ES) of the rectum was taken after sham, low frequency rTMS at 0.1 Hz, and high frequency rTMS at 10 Hz to the right DLPFC. Rectal tone was measured with a rectal barostat. Visceral perception and emotion were analyzed using an ordinate scale, rectal barostat, and VEP. Low frequency rTMS significantly reduced anxiety evoked by ES at 30 mA (p<0.05). High frequency rTMS-30 mA ES significantly produced more phasic volume events than sham rTMS-30 mA ES (p<0.05). We successfully modulated the gastrointestinal function of healthy individuals through rTMS to the right DLPFC. Thus, rTMS to the DLPFC appears to modulate the affective, but not direct, component of visceral perception and motility of the rectum. (author)

  5. [A Case Where Rectal Cancer Ileus Caused Perforation in the Ascending Colon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Tomohiko; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Sakai, Kazuki; Hiraoka, Kunihiko; Ichihara, Takao

    2016-11-01

    The patient was a 65-year-old man. He had not defecated for a week in early December 2015, and had noticed abdominal pain and abdominaldistension from 4 days prior. The pain and distension worsened, and the patient was rush transported to our hospital. Via abdominal CT we found free air in the upper abdomen, expansion of the small and large intestines, and notably, significant intestinal tract expansion and a gas reservoir in the ascending colon. We found significant narrowing as well as hypertrophy along the entire circumference of the rectum and suspected gastrointestinal perforation due to rectal cancer ileus. Inflammation findings were abnormally high and we performed emergency surgery. We found a laceration on the ascending colon, which had expanded markedly. We elevated that location and installed a colostomy. Following surgery the patient developed mild SSI and ileus, which were alleviated through conservative treatment. A month after the operation we performed a colonoscopy and found a tumor along the entire circumference of the rectum Rs. It was diagnosed as group V tub1-2 via biopsy. We performed surgery in late January 2016(colostomy closure, laparotomy rectal low anterior resection). We are reporting a rare case where rectal cancer ileus caused perforation in the ascending colon.

  6. Gastric stromal tumor presenting as a right upper quadrant abdominal mass. Importance of a correct radiological differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tudela, X.; Garcia-Vila, J. H.; Jornet, J.

    2001-01-01

    Stromal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract encompass a group of neoplasms representing 1% to 3% of all digestive system tumors. When located in the stomach, their tendency to exhibit and exophytic growth pattern makes it necessary to establish the differential diagnosis with respect to other gastric tumors (lymphoma, exophytic adenocarcinoma) and nongastrointestinal masses. We present a case that illustrated the difficulties associated with the imaging diagnosis of these lesions and the importance of modern radiological techniques (helical computed tomography and magnetic resonance) and the correct interpretation on the part of radiologists to orient pathologists and clinicians toward the diagnosis and proper treatment. (Author) 10 refs

  7. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dipetrillo, Tom; Pricolo, Victor; Lagares-Garcia, Jorge; Vrees, Matt; Klipfel, Adam; Cataldo, Tom; Sikov, William; McNulty, Brendan; Shipley, Joshua; Anderson, Elliot; Khurshid, Humera; Oconnor, Brigid; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Radie-Keane, Kathy; Husain, Syed [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States); Safran, Howard, E-mail: hsafran@lifespan.org [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, RI (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and pathologic complete response rate of induction bevacizumab + modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen followed by concurrent bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and radiation for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received 1 month of induction bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. Patients then received 50.4 Gy of radiation and concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15, and 29), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 6 weeks), and continuous infusion 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}/day). Because of gastrointestinal toxicity, the oxaliplatin dose was reduced to 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Resection was performed 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: The trial was terminated early because of toxicity after 26 eligible patients were treated. Only 1 patient had significant toxicity (arrhythmia) during induction treatment and was removed from the study. During chemoradiation, Grade 3/4 toxicity was experienced by 19 of 25 patients (76%). The most common Grade 3/4 toxicities were diarrhea, neutropenia, and pain. Five of 25 patients (20%) had a complete pathologic response. Nine of 25 patients (36%) developed postoperative complications including infection (n = 4), delayed healing (n = 3), leak/abscess (n = 2), sterile fluid collection (n = 2), ischemic colonic reservoir (n = 1), and fistula (n = 1). Conclusions: Concurrent oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, continuous infusion 5-FU, and radiation causes significant gastrointestinal toxicity. The pathologic complete response rate of this regimen was similar to other fluorouracil chemoradiation regimens. The high incidence of postoperative wound complications is concerning and consistent with other reports utilizing bevacizumab with chemoradiation before major surgical resections.

  8. Investigation of gastrointestinal parasites of dairy cattle around Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiu-Chen; Wang, Lian-Chen; Pan, Chien-Hung; Yang, Cheng-Hsiung; Lai, Cheng-Hung

    2014-02-01

    Parasitic nematodes are one of the most important causes of production losses in most cattle-producing countries of the world. The aim of the present study is to make a through estimate of helminth and protozoan infection prevalence in dairy cattle around Taiwan. Coprological techniques, including direct fecal smear, simple flotation, and simple sedimentation, were used to detect gastrointestinal helminths and protozoan in dairy cattle. A total of 1259 rectal fecal samples were collected from Holstein dairy cattle at 94 farms in 13 counties in Taiwan. The overall prevalence of gastrointestinal parasitic infection was 86.9%. The infection rates of protozoa, nematodes, trematodes, and cestodes were 81.3%, 7.9%, 1.6%, and 0.6%, respectively. Among all parasites, Buxtonella sulcata (61.7%) was the most predominant one, followed with Cryptosporidium spp. (32.6%) and Eimeria spp. (11.8%). There were significant differences in the prevalence of protozoa and nematodes between different age groups and distributional area groups. The present study demonstrated that gastrointestinal parasitic infections occur frequently in dairy cattle around Taiwan, especially protozoan infections. The results indicated that a superior management system and regular anthelmintic treatment should be used for the control of parasitic infections in dairy cattle farms. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Chablaney

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs has increased by almost ten-fold over the past 30 years. There has been a heightened awareness of the malignant potential of rectal NETs. Fortunately, many rectal NETs are discovered at earlier stages due to colon cancer screening programs. Endoscopic ultrasound is useful in assessing both residual tumor burden after retrospective diagnosis and tumor characteristics to help guide subsequent management. Current guidelines suggest endoscopic resection of rectal NETs ≤10 mm as a safe therapeutic option given their low risk of metastasis. Although a number of endoscopic interventions exist, the best technique for resection has not been identified. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD has high complete and en-bloc resection rates, but also an increased risk of complications including perforation. In addition, ESD is only performed at tertiary centers by experienced advanced endoscopists. Endoscopic mucosal resection has been shown to have variable complete resection rates, but modifications to the technique such as the addition of band ligation have improved outcomes. Prospective studies are needed to further compare the available endoscopic interventions, and to elucidate the most appropriate course of management of rectal NETs.

  10. Rectal and colon cancer : Not just a different anatomic site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamas, K.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.; de Vries, E. G. E.; van Vugt, M. A. T. M.; Beets-Tan, R. G.; van Etten, B.; de Groot, D. J. A.; Hospers, G. A. P.

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total

  11. The Quality-of-Life Effects of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Narang, Amol K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Department of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Reese, Jennifer B. [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gearhart, Susan L. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Azad, Nolifer S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chan, June; Olsen, Leah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Efron, Jonathan E. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Existing studies that examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer on patient quality of life (QOL) are limited. Our goals were to prospectively explore acute changes in patient-reported QOL endpoints during and after treatment and to establish a distribution of scores that could be used for comparison as new treatment modalities emerge. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled at 2 institutions. Validated cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-CR30) and colorectal cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-CR38 and EORTC QLQ-CR 29) QOL questionnaires were administered to patients 1 month before they began CRT, at week 4 of CRT, and 1 month after they had finished CRT. The questionnaires included multiple symptom scales, functional domains, and a composite global QOL score. Additionally, a toxicity scale was completed by providers 1 month before the beginning of CRT, weekly during treatment, and 1 month after the end of CRT. Results: Global QOL showed a statistically significant and borderline clinically significant decrease during CRT (-9.50, P=.0024) but returned to baseline 1 month after the end of treatment (-0.33, P=.9205). Symptoms during treatment were mostly gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting +9.94, P<.0001; and diarrhea +16.67, P=.0022), urinary (dysuria +13.33, P<.0001; and frequency +11.82, P=.0006) or fatigue (+16.22, P<.0001). These symptoms returned to baseline after therapy. However, sexual enjoyment (P=.0236) and sexual function (P=.0047) remained persistently diminished after therapy. Conclusions: Rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT may experience a reduction in global QOL along with significant gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms during treatment. Moreover, provider-rated toxicity scales may not fully capture this decrease in patient-reported QOL. Although most symptoms are transient

  12. Crosstalk between stromal cells and cancer cells in pancreatic cancer: New insights into stromal biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Han-Xiang; Zhou, Bin; Cheng, Yu-Gang; Xu, Jian-Wei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Guang-Yong; Hu, San-Yuan

    2017-04-28

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. Increasing evidence has confirmed the pivotal role of stromal components in the regulation of carcinogenesis, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance in PC. Interaction between neoplastic cells and stromal cells builds a specific microenvironment, which further modulates the malignant properties of cancer cells. Instead of being a "passive bystander", stroma may play a role as a "partner in crime" in PC. However, the role of stromal components in PC is complex and requires further investigation. In this article, we review recent advances regarding the regulatory roles and mechanisms of stroma biology, especially the cellular components such as pancreatic stellate cells, macrophages, neutrophils, adipocytes, epithelial cells, pericytes, mast cells, and lymphocytes, in PC. Crosstalk between stromal cells and cancer cells is thoroughly investigated. We also review the prognostic value and molecular therapeutic targets of stroma in PC. This review may help us further understand the molecular mechanisms of stromal biology and its role in PC development and therapeutic resistance. Moreover, targeting stroma components may provide new therapeutic strategies for this stubborn disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  14. Embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Aschoff, A.J.; Vogel, J.; Brambs, H.J.; Siech, M.

    2000-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of interventional embolization therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage over a long-term observation period from 1989 to 1997. Included in the study were 35 patients (age range 18-89 years) with gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) referred for radiological intervention either primarily or following unsuccessful endoscopy or surgery. Sources of GI bleeding included gastric and duodenal ulcers (n = 7), diverticula (n = 3), erosion of the intestinal wall secondary to malignancy (n = 6), vascular malformations (n = 4), and hemorrhoids (n = 2), as well as from postoperative (n = 6), posttraumatic (n = 2), postinflammatory (n = 4) or unknown (n = 1) causes. Ethibloc (12 cases) or metal coils (14 cases) were predominantly used as embolisates. In addition, combinations of tissue adhesive and gelfoam particles and of coils and Ethibloc were used (six cases). Finally, polyvinyl alcohol particles, a coated stent, and an arterial wire dissection were utilized in one case each. Bleeding was stopped completely in 29 of 35 cases (83 %). In one case (3 %) the source of bleeding was recognized but the corresponding vessel could not be catheterized. In five other cases (14 %) there was partial success with reduced, though still persistent, bleeding. The rate of complications was 14 %, including four instances of intestinal ischemia with fatal outcome in the first years, and, later, one partial infarction of the spleen without serious consequences. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage can be controlled in a high percentage of patients, including the seriously ill and those who had previously undergone surgery, with the use of minimally invasive interventional techniques. The availability of minicoils instead of fluid embolization agents has reduced the risk of serious complications. (orig.)

  15. Embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Aschoff, A.J.; Vogel, J.; Brambs, H.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Ulm (Germany); Siech, M. [Dept. of Abdominal Surgery, University of Ulm (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    Retrospective evaluation of interventional embolization therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage over a long-term observation period from 1989 to 1997. Included in the study were 35 patients (age range 18-89 years) with gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) referred for radiological intervention either primarily or following unsuccessful endoscopy or surgery. Sources of GI bleeding included gastric and duodenal ulcers (n = 7), diverticula (n = 3), erosion of the intestinal wall secondary to malignancy (n = 6), vascular malformations (n = 4), and hemorrhoids (n = 2), as well as from postoperative (n = 6), posttraumatic (n = 2), postinflammatory (n = 4) or unknown (n = 1) causes. Ethibloc (12 cases) or metal coils (14 cases) were predominantly used as embolisates. In addition, combinations of tissue adhesive and gelfoam particles and of coils and Ethibloc were used (six cases). Finally, polyvinyl alcohol particles, a coated stent, and an arterial wire dissection were utilized in one case each. Bleeding was stopped completely in 29 of 35 cases (83 %). In one case (3 %) the source of bleeding was recognized but the corresponding vessel could not be catheterized. In five other cases (14 %) there was partial success with reduced, though still persistent, bleeding. The rate of complications was 14 %, including four instances of intestinal ischemia with fatal outcome in the first years, and, later, one partial infarction of the spleen without serious consequences. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage can be controlled in a high percentage of patients, including the seriously ill and those who had previously undergone surgery, with the use of minimally invasive interventional techniques. The availability of minicoils instead of fluid embolization agents has reduced the risk of serious complications. (orig.)

  16. in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Uzman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : There is increasing interest in sedation for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE. Prospective randomized studies comparing sedation properties and complications of propofol and midazolam/meperidine in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE are few. Aim: To compare propofol and midazolam/meperidine sedation for UGE in terms of cardiopulmonary side effects, patient and endoscopist satisfaction and procedure-related times. Material and methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study of propofol versus midazolam and meperidine in 100 patients scheduled for diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The patients were divided into propofol and midazolam/meperidine groups. Randomization was generated by a computer. Cardiopulmonary side effects (hypotension, bradycardia, hypoxemia, procedure-related times (endoscopy time, awake time, time to hospital discharge, and patient and endoscopist satisfaction were compared between groups. Results: There was no significant difference between the groups with respect to the cost, endoscopy time, or demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients. Awake time and time to hospital discharge were significantly shorter in the propofol group (6.58 ±4.72 vs. 9.32 ±4.26 min, p = 0.030 and 27.60 ±7.88 vs. 32.00 ±10.54 min, p = 0.019. Hypotension incidence was significantly higher in the propofol group (12% vs. 0%, p = 0.027. The patient and endoscopist satisfaction was better with propofol. Conclusions : Propofol may be preferred to midazolam/meperidine sedation, with a shorter awake and hospital discharge time and better patient and endoscopist satisfaction. However, hypotension risk should be considered with propofol, and careful evaluation is needed, particularly in cardiopulmonary disorders.

  17. The Great Pretender: Rectal Syphilis Mimic a Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pisani Ceretti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal syphilis is a rare expression of the widely recognised sexual transmitted disease, also known as the great imitator for its peculiarity of being confused with mild anorectal diseases because of its vague symptoms or believed rectal malignancy, with the concrete risk of overtreatment. We present the case of a male patient with primary rectal syphilis, firstly diagnosed as rectal cancer; the medical, radiological, and endoscopic features are discussed below.

  18. Clinical target volume for rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorchel, F.; Bossel, J.F.; Baron, M.H.; Goubard, O.; Bartholomot, B.; Mantion, G.; Pelissier, E.P.; Maingon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The total meso-rectal excision allows the marked increase of the local control rate in rectal cancer. Therefore, the meso-rectal space is the usual field for the spread of rectal cancer cells. It could therefore be considered as the clinical target volume in the preoperative plan by the radiation oncologist. We propose to identify the mesorectum on anatomical structures of a treatment-position CT scan. (authors)

  19. Magnetic resonance in the diagnosing of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perczynski, W.; Walecki, J.; Schier, J.F.; Salamon, Z.

    1994-01-01

    MR has not yet come into widespread use for the staging of rectal cancer. However use of MR imaging in diagnosis of rectal cancer gains clinical acceptance. Use contrast media enables exact staging of rectal cancer. MR multiplaner and noninvasive imaging with excellent spatial and contrast resolution has rising popularity in diagnosis of rectal cancer, especially in cases where it is impossible to insert endorectal US-probe because of stenosis. (author)

  20. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Majid T Noghani; Hossein Rezaeizadeh; Sayed Mohammad Baqer Fazljoo; Mahmoud Yousefifard; Mansoor Keshavarz

    2016-01-01

    There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which or...

  1. Gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fifth in the series of short reviews of internet-based radiological learning resources and will focus on gastrointestinal (GI) and hepatobiliary radiology. Below are details of a few of the higher quality resources currently available. Most of the sites cater for medical students and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may be also be of interest to specialists, especially for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (May 2006)

  2. Rectally administered indomethacin to prevent post-ESWL-pancreatitis (RIPEP): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yang-Yang; Chen, Hui; Tang, Xin-Ying; Jiang, Xi; Qian, Wei; Zou, Wen-Bin; Xin, Lei; Li, Bo; Qi, Yan-Fen; Hu, Liang-Hao; Zou, Duo-Wu; Jin, Zhen-Dong; Wang, Dong; Du, Yi-Qi; Wang, Luo-Wei; Liu, Feng; Li, Zhao-Shen; Liao, Zhuan

    2017-11-02

    Pancreatic extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (P-ESWL) is the first-line therapy for large pancreatic duct stones. Although it is a highly effective and safe procedure for the fragmentation of pancreatic stones, it is still not complication-free. Just like endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), pancreatitis is the most common complication. To date, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have proven to be the only effective prophylactic medication for post-ERCP pancreatitis and the European, American and Japanese Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy guidelines have recommended prophylactic rectally administered indomethacin for all patients undergoing ERCP. Given the little research about effective prevention for post P-ESWL pancreatitis, we aim to determine whether rectally administered indomethacin can reduce post-ESWL-pancreatitis. The RIPEP study is a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. One thousand three hundred and seventy patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic stones (>5 mm in diameter) treated with P-ESWL at Changhai Hospital will be randomly allocated to rectally administered indomethacin or placebo therapy before the procedure. The primary endpoint is the incidence of post-ESWL pancreatitis. Secondary endpoints include the severity of pancreatitis, occurrence rate of asymptomatic hyperamylasemia and other complications. The RIPEP trial is designed to show that rectally administered indomethacin reduces the development and severity of post-ESWL pancreatitis and benefits patients treated with P-ESWL. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02797067 . Registered on 17 November 2016.

  3. Prostatic sarcoma after treatment of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Andrew G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between radiation exposure for treatment of cancer and occurrence of a second primary cancer at the irradiated site is well known. This phenomenon is however rare in prostate. Case presentation A 75-year-old farmer was treated for rectal cancer with preoperative 45 Gy of radiotherapy and abdominoperineal resection. Four years later he developed symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction and acute urinary retention. He underwent a transurethral resection of the prostate. Histological examination of the removed prostate tissue and immunohistochemistry revealed it to be a poorly differentiated sarcoma. Conclusion We believe this to be the first reported case of radiation-induced sarcoma following radiotherapy treatment for rectal cancer. Since radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in the contemporary treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma, it is relevant to be aware of the potential long-term carcinogenic complications of radiotherapy of the pelvis.

  4. Anorectal function orientated surgery for rectal prolapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Yoshihiko; Tsujizuka, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Okuda, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Until quite recently, rectal prolapse was regarded as being a simple condition to treat. Surgical control of the prolapse was largely regarded as a successful outcome. However, recent detailed clinical assessment indicate that many patients have a rectal prolapse which is successfully controlled by surgical operation, yet suffer severe symptoms of disordered defecation, which either persists, or develops as a result of operative treatment. Difficulty with rectal evacuation, persistent incontinence and continuing mucus discharge are recognized as important, despite successful repair of the prolapse itself. There are two major theory of the pathology; circumferential intussusception and sliding hernia. However, many other multifarious factors are concomitant with the condition. These factors often need to be balanced against one another. Usually, a single surgical procedure will not be able to solve the problems. Therefore, the choice of treatment tailored for the individual patient. (author)

  5. [Severe vaginal discharge following rectal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, L C; Bremers, A J A; Heesakkers, J P F A; Kluivers, K B

    2018-01-01

    Almost 50% of women who have had rectal surgery subsequently develop vaginal discharge. Due to the recurrent and unexpected nature of this heavy discharge, they often experience it as very distressing. Many of these women undergo extensive diagnostic tests that are mainly focused on identifying fistula formation. If no fistula is found, in most cases no other cause for severe vaginal discharge can be demonstrated. In our practice, we saw three patients (49-, 54- and 74-years-old, respectively) with similar severe vaginal discharge after rectal surgery and in whom no explanation for the vaginal discharge could be found. For this reason we conducted a literature search into this condition. Anatomical changes appear to be responsible for heavy vaginal discharge following rectal surgery. Changes in pelvic floor muscles and compression of the distal part of the vagina may lead to pooling of fluid in the proximal part of the vagina, resulting in severe discharge. Symptomatic treatment may reduce the symptoms.

  6. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  7. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelian, Jason M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Callister, Matthew D., E-mail: Callister.matthew@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Ashman, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Young-Fadok, Tonia M. [Division of Colorectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Borad, Mitesh J. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  8. Use of sequential endorectal US to predict the tumor response of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Dou, Lizhou; Zhang, Yueming; Jin, Jing; Wang, Guiqi; Xiao, Qin; Li, Yexiong; Wang, Xin; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui; Wang, Weihu; Wang, Shulian; Liu, Yueping; Song, Yongwen

    2017-03-01

    Accurate prediction of the response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) potentially assists in the individualized selection of treatment. Endorectal US (ERUS) is widely used for the pretreatment staging of rectal cancer, but its use for preoperatively predicting the effects of CRT is not well evaluated because of the inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis induced by CRT. This study assessed the value of sequential ERUS in predicting the efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Forty-one patients with clinical stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled prospectively. Radiotherapy was delivered to the pelvis with concurrent chemotherapy of capecitabine and oxaliplatin. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 to 8 weeks later. EUS measurements of primary tumor maximum diameter were performed before (ERUS1), during (ERUS2), and 6 to 8 weeks after (ERUS3) CRT, and the ratios of these were calculated. Correlations between ERUS values, tumor regression grade (TRG), T down-staging rate, and pathologic complete response (pCR) rate were assessed, and survival was analyzed. There was no significant correlation between ERUS2/ERUS1 and TRG. The value of ERUS3/ERUS1 correlated with pCR rate and TRG but not T down-staging rate. An ERUS3 value of 6.3 mm and ERUS3/ERUS1 of 52% were used as the cut-off for predicting pCR, and patients were divided into good and poor prognosis groups. Although not statistically significant, 3-year recurrence and survival rates of the good prognosis group were better than those of the poor prognosis group. Sequential ERUS may predict therapeutic efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT01582750.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Satisfaction with life after rectal prolapse surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarski, Michał; Jóźwiak, Daria; Pusty, Michal; Dziki, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of satisfaction with life, as a result of comparing own life situation with the individualised personal standards, is an important element for measuring satisfaction with life of the patients suffering from somatic disorders. Literature provides numerous data on satisfaction with life of different groups of patients suffering from somatic disorders. Little space is devoted to the study of the level of satisfaction of patients with rectal prolapse, which is particularly evident in relation to the Polish patient population. The aim of the study was planned to determine the level of satisfaction with life and its determinants among patients with full-thickness rectal prolapse surgery as well as to assess the improvement of continence after this surgery. The study group consisted of 20 patients operated on for full-thickness rectal prolapse in the Department of General and Colorectal Surgery, Medical University in Lódź. SWLS (Satisfaction with Life Scale) Diener et al. in the Polish adaptation by Juczyński was used to assess global life satisfaction. Assessment of the incontinence severity and the postoperative improvement was made with Jorge and Wexner scale. The average level of global life satisfaction among patients with rectal prolapse surgery is 21.05 (SD = 4.68) and it corresponds to the level of satisfaction of the total population. In the study group, there were no statistically significant differences in the level of global satisfaction with life depending on age, disease recurrence and continence improvement after surgery. The continence after rectal prolapse surgery improved significantly (plife satisfaction of patients operated on for rectal prolapse.

  10. Intestinal Obstruction Due to Rectal Endometriosis: A Surgical Enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razman Jarmin

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Obstructed rectal endometriosis is an uncommon presentation. The clinical and intraoperative presentation may present as malignant obstruction. The difficulty in making the diagnosis may delay the definitive management of the patient. We report a unique case of rectal endometriosis mimicking malignant rectal mass causing intestinal obstruction and discuss the management of the case.

  11. Clinical Fact of Rectal Duplication with gastric heterotopy | Atmani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enteric duplication could occur through the entire alimentary tract. A case of rectal duplication cyst with heterotopic gastric mucosa in a chid is described. MRI scan is shown useful in the diagnosis of the duplication. The treatment is the complete local resection of the rectal duplication. Keywords: duplication, rectal, MRI, ...

  12. Sphincter Saving Surgery in Low Rectal Carcinoma in a Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgery is the principal modality of treatment of rectal carcinoma in order to achieve cure. Sphincter saving surgery improves the quality of life of patients with low rectal carcinoma. Aim: To report a case of sphincter saving low anterior resection for low rectal cancer with hand sown colorectal anastomosis

  13. Innate lymphoid cells and their stromal microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermayer, Zoltán; Vojkovics, Dóra; Balogh, Péter

    2017-09-01

    In addition to the interaction between antigen presenting cells, T and B lymphocytes, recent studies have revealed important roles for a diverse set of auxiliary cells that profoundly influence the induction and regulation of immune responses against pathogens. Of these the stromal cells composed of various non-hematopoietic constituents are crucial for the creation and maintenance of specialized semi-static three-dimensional lymphoid tissue microenvironment, whereas the more recently described innate lymphoid cells are generated by the diversification of committed lymphoid precursor cells independently from clonally rearranged antigen receptor genes. Recent findings have revealed important contributions by innate lymphoid cells in inflammation and protection against pathogens in a tissue-specific manner. Importantly, lymphoid stromal cells also influence the onset of immune responses in tissue-specific fashion, raising the possibility of tissue-specific stromal - innate lymphoid cell collaboration. In this review we summarize the main features and interactions between these two cells types, with particular emphasis on ILC type 3 cells and their microenvironmental partners. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Gastrointestinal Sarcoma in a Dog – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Caicó Collares Araujo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Araujo D.C.C., dos Santos I.O.V., da Silva M.A., Pessoa C.C. da V., de Carvalho J.R.G., Lopes N.L. & Fernandes J.I. [Gastrointestinal Sarcoma in a Dog – Case Report.] Saroma Gastrointestinal em Cão – Relato de Caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(supl. 3:31-38, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinárias, Anexo 1, Instituto de Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465 Km 7, Campus Seropédica, RJ 23897-000, Brasil. E-mail: vetjulio@yahoo.com.br Gastric cancers in dogs are rare and represent less than 1% of all malignancies in this species. There is a higher incidence in male dogs, large, with an average age of eight years. The etiology is not well defined, but studies show a relationship with gastric infection by bacteria of the genus Helicobacter sp. The diagnosis is based on history, clinical signs such as vomiting, regurgitation and weight loss, ultrasound, endoscopy, histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The choice of therapy is surgery, performing the excision of the tumor with wide margins. Adjuvant chemotherapy does not work properly, except in cases of gastrointestinal lymphoma. The objective of this study was to report the occurrence of gastric cancer in a dog, male, tenyear-old German Shepherd that had as main complaint regurgitation and vomiting with evolution of a month. Surgery was performed and histopathological diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST. Subsequent immunohistochemical examination revealed fibrosarcoma. After surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy animal survival was eight months after diagnosis.

  15. Improved survival after rectal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, S; Harling, H; Iversen, L H

    2010-01-01

    Objective In 1995, an analysis showed an inferior prognosis after rectal cancer in Denmark compared with the other Scandinavian countries. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) was established with the aim of improving the prognosis, and in this study we present a survival analysis of patients...... treated from 1994 to 2006. Method The study was based on the National Rectal Cancer Registry and the National Colorectal Cancer Database, supplemented with data from the Central Population Registry. The analysis included actuarial overall and relative survival. Results A total of 10 632 patients were...

  16. UFT (tegafur-uracil) in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casado, E; Pfeiffer, P; Feliu, J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major achievements in the treatment of localised rectal cancer include the development of total mesorectal excision and the perioperative administration of radiotherapy in combination with continuous infusion (CI) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). This multimodal approach has resulted in extended...... and abstracts relating to clinical studies of UFT in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Pre- and postoperative studies carried out in patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent disease were included. RESULTS: The combination of UFT and radiotherapy was effective and well tolerated...

  17. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  18. Metanephric stromal tumor: A novel pediatric renal neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajalakshmi V

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Metanephric stromal tumor of kidney is a novel pediatric benign stromal specific renal neoplasm. A few cases have been reported in adults also. This tumor is usually centered in the renal medulla with a characteristic microscopic appearance which differentiates this lesion from congenital mesoblastic nephroma and clear cell sarcoma of the kidney. In most cases complete excision alone is curative. The differentiation of metanephric stromal tumor from clear cell sarcoma of the kidney will spare the child from the ill effects of adjuvant chemotherapy. In this communication we describe the gross and microscopic features of metanephric stromal tumor in a one-month-old child with good prognosis.

  19. Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjot Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing stromal tumors are benign ovarian neoplasms of the sex cord-stromal category, occurring predominantly in the second and third decades of life. Herein, we report a 23-year-old female who presented with pelvic pain, irregular menses but normal hormonal status and was diagnosed as having a right ovarian tumor. A right oophorectomy was performed, and microscopic examination revealed a sclerosing stromal tumor of the right ovary. We stress the importance of being familiar with sclerosing stromal tumors when evaluating ovarian neoplasms in young women, in order to contribute to the appropriate clinical management, preventing extensive and unnecessary surgery, and preserving fertility.

  20. Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary in a premenarchal female

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fefferman, Nancy R.; Pinkney, Lynne P.; Rivera, Rafael; Popiolek, Dorota; Hummel-Levine, Pascale; Cosme, Jaqueline

    2003-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumor (SST) is a rare benign ovarian neoplasm of stromal origin with less than 100 cases reported in the literature. Unlike the other stromal tumors, thecomas and fibromas, which tend to occur in the fifth and sixth decades, sclerosing stromal tumors predominantly affect females in the second and third decades. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound findings have been described, but have not been reported previously in the pediatric literature. We present a case of SST of the ovary in a 10-year-old premenarchal female, the youngest patient to our knowledge reported in the literature, and describe the ultrasound and CT findings with pathologic correlation. (orig.)

  1. Sclerosing Stromal Tumor of Ovary: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menka Khanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing stromal tumor (SST is an extremely rare and distinctive sex cord stromal tumor which occurs predominantly in the second and third decades of life. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman who developed a sclerosing stromal tumor of ovary and presented with irregular menstruation and pelvic pain. Her hormonal status was normal but CA-125 was raised. She was suspected to have a malignant tumor on computed tomography and underwent bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy. It is therefore necessary to keep in mind the possibility of sclerosing stromal tumor in a young woman.

  2. Gastrointestinal Eosinofilic Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Maria, Roberto; Bohorquez, Maria Amalia; Gonzalez, Irene; Torregroza, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    The gastrointestinal eosinofilic disorders are little frequent diseases, of etiopatogenia little clear, that are characterized by the presence of an infiltrated eosinofilo that can affect the different layers of the wall of the alimentary canal in absence of known causes of eosinofilia. The clinical manifestations are variable and the symptoms are conditioned by the degree of eosinofilia of the wall, the number of layers affected and the segment of the gastrointestinal tract implied. The presentations symptoms vary from diarrhea, vomits, abdominal pain and loss of weigh until the acute intestinal obstruction. They are characterized to present peripherical eosinofilia, although it is not a forced criterion. Its definite diagnosis is anatomopatologic. The steroid use is considered as the angular stone of the treatment. We present two cases, with different clinical presentation forms, with initial answer to steroids and later relapse after the suspension of these, remaining without symptoms actually with dependency of low doses of steroids. Next we will do the revision of the available literature emphasizing the pathophysiologic data, the clinical evaluation and the therapeutic aspects

  3. Gastrointestinal medications and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, T M

    1998-09-01

    Medications used to treat gastrointestinal symptoms are increasingly being used as more have been gained nonprescription status. Most of the gastrointestinal medications, such as laxatives, antacids, and antidiarrheal agents, are used short term. Women who breastfeed should be aware of the risks of taking any medications, whether prescription or nonprescription. There is little information describing transfer into breast milk for many of these products. Cimetidine, atropine, cascara, cisapride, loperamide, magnesium sulfate, and senna are the only products identified by the AAP as compatible with breast feeding. Metoclopramide is listed by the AAP as a drug whose effect on nursing infants is unknown but may be of potential concern, although studies published to date have not reported any adverse effects. The safest laxatives and antidiarrheals are those that are not absorbed and should be considered first-line therapy for conditions of constipation or loose stools. Famotidine and nizatidine are excreted into breast milk to a lesser extent than cimetidine or ranitidine and may be the preferred histamine antagonists. Despite the limited data on the use of cisapride in nursing women, it is considered safe by the AAP and may be preferred over metoclopramide for first-line prescription treatment of heartburn. Although most of these agents appear safe in the nursing infant, caretakers should be aware of the potential adverse reactions that may occur in infants whose mothers require these products.

  4. Hemangioma colorretal Colon rectal hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Pinheiro Barreto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O hemangioma colorretal (HCR é uma lesão vascular benigna rara, com manifestação clínica geralmente entre 5 e 25 anos de idade. Faz parte do diagnóstico diferencial das causas de hemorragia digestiva baixa, sendo confundido, na maioria das vezes, com entidades mais comuns, como hemorróidas e doenças inflamatórias intestinais. O retardo do diagnóstico ocorre freqüentemente devido ao desconhecimento da doença, com taxas de mortalidade alcançando 40 a 50% na presença de sangramento importante. O caso relatado é de uma paciente de 17 anos de idade, admitida no Serviço de Colo-proctologia do Hospital Universitário - HUUFMA, em setembro de 2005, com anemia e sangramento retal, desde a infância, de forma intermitente e não dolorosa. Apresentado sua história clínica e propedêutica diagnóstica, realizada por meio de exames laboratoriais, endoscopia digestiva alta, colonoscopia e arteriografia de mesentéricas e ilíacas internas. O tratamento cirúrgico realizado foi retossigmoidectomia convencional com anastomose colorretal baixa, com boa evolução pós-operatória, tendo o exame histopatológico da peça cirúrgica ressecada, confirmado o diagnostico.The colon and rectum hemangioma is a rare benign vascular lesion, with clinical features usually between 5 and 25 years of age. It is included in the differential diagnose of the lower digestive bleeding causes, and has been frequently misdiagnosed with other more common entities, like hemorrhoids and bowel inflammatory disease. The late diagnose occurs usually because of the rarity of the disease, with mortality rates reaching 40 to 50% in presence of severe bleeding. We report a case of a 17 years old girl who was admitted at the Coloproctology Service of the Academic Hospital - HUUFMA, in September 2005, with anemia and intermittent rectal bleeding since childhood. Laboratorial findings included laboratorial exams, GI endoscopy, colonoscopy and arteriography of mesenteric and

  5. Computed tomography features and predictive findings of ruptured gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Sil; Kim, Hyun Jin; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Ah Young; Ha, Hyun Kwon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the CT features of ruptured GISTs and factors that might be predictive of rupture through comparison with CTs taken prior to rupture and CTs of non-ruptured GIST. Forty-nine patients with ruptured GIST and forty-nine patients with non-ruptured GIST matched by age, gender and location were included. Clinical data including pharmacotherapy were reviewed. The imaging features were analyzed. Prior CT obtained before rupture were evaluated. The most common location of ruptured GIST was small bowel with mean size of 12.1 cm. Ruptured GIST commonly showed wall defects, >40 % eccentric necrosis, lobulated shaped, air density in mass, pneumoperitoneum, peritonitis, hemoperitoneum and ascites (p < 0.001-0.030). Twenty-seven of 30 patients with follow up imaging received targeted therapy. During follow-up, thickness of the tumour wall decreased. Increase in size and progression of necrosis were common during targeted therapy (p = 0.017). Newly developed ascites, peritonitis and hemoperitoneum was more common (p < 0.001-0.036). Ruptured GISTs commonly demonstrate large size, >40 % eccentric necrosis, wall defects and lobulated shape. The progression of necrosis with increase in size and decreased wall thickness during targeted therapy may increase the risk of rupture. Rupture should be considered when newly developed peritonitis, hemoperitoneum, or ascites are noted during the follow-up. (orig.)

  6. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: A Differential Diagnosis of Compressive Upper Abdominal Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Kimie Miyahira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGIST are rare mesenchymal tumor lesions located outside the gastrointestinal tract. A rare compressing tumor with difficult diagnosis is reported. Presentation of the Case. A male patient, 63 years old, was admitted in the emergency room complaining of stretching and continuous abdominal pain for one day. He took Hyoscine, with partial improvement of symptoms, but got worse due to hyporexia, and the abdominal pain persisted. The patient also reported early satiety and ten-pound weight loss over the last month. Discussion. EGIST could be assessed by CT-guided biopsy, leading to diagnosis and proper treatment with surgical resection or Imatinib. Conclusion. This case report highlights the importance of considering EGIST an important differential diagnosis of compressing upper abdominal tumors.

  7. Laparoscopic excision of a newborn rectal duplication cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartin, Charles W; Lau, Stanley T; Escobar, Mauricio A; Glick, Philip L

    2008-08-01

    Congenital rectal duplication cyst is a rare entity treated with surgical excision. Without treatment, a rectal duplication cyst may cause a variety of complications, most notably, transforming into a malignancy. We report on a 7-week-old girl who was found to have a rectal duplication cyst. The rectal duplication cyst was successfully excised laparoscopically. Rectal duplication cysts are rare alimentary tract anomalies generally discovered during childhood. Complications include symptoms arising from the cyst and the possibility of malignant degeneration. They are typically managed by surgical excision.

  8. Multifocal small bowel stromal tumours presenting with peritonitis in an HIV positive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    The most common mesenchymal tumour of the gastrointestinal tract is stromal tumours (GISTs). Symptomatic GISTs can present with complications such as haemorrhage, obstruction and perforation. Complete surgical resection with negative margins is the mainstay of treatment but may be imprudent on emergent occasion. Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been revolutionary in the treatment of GISTs and have resulted in improved outcomes. A 41 year old HIV positive male presented with an acute history of abdominal pain and obstructive symptoms. Clinical examination revealed sepsis and peritonitis. One of the several small bowel tumours discovered at exploratory laparotomy was necrotic and perforated. The perforated tumour alone was resected and a small bowel internal hernia reduced. The patient made an uneventful recovery and will be considered for TKI therapy with a view to later re-operation. GISTs very rarely perforate. The pathophysiology of stromal tumour necrosis is poorly understood. Multifocality and small bowel location are poor prognosticators and may occur in the setting of familial GISTs, specific syndromes and sporadic cases. There is no established association between HIV and GISTs. Perforation occurs infrequently in ≤8% of symptomatic cases and poses increased risk of local recurrence. The surgical management of perforation takes precedence in an emergency. The surgeon must however take cognisance of the adherence to ideal oncologic principles where feasible. TKI therapy is invaluable if a re-exploration is to be later considered. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid T Noghani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which originate from the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal disorders that are reported to be associated with primary headaches include dyspepsia, gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD, constipation, functional abdominal pain, inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS, inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD, celiac disease, and helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori infection. Some studies have demonstrated remission or improvement of headache following the treatment of the accompanying gastrointestinal disorders. Hypotheses explaining this association are considered to be central sensitization and parasympathetic referred pain, serotonin pathways, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, systemic vasculopathy, and food allergy. Traditional Persian physicians, namely Ebn-e-Sina (Avicenna and Râzi (Rhazes believed in a type of headache originating from disorders of the stomach and named it as an individual entity, the "Participatory Headache of Gastric Origin". We suggest providing a unique diagnostic entity for headaches coexisting with any gastrointestinal abnormality that are improved or cured along with the treatment of the gastrointestinal disorder.

  10. A Unique Case of a Patient with Rectal Cancer Who Developed Benign Esophageal Stenosis after Localized Rectal Radiation and Systemic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Chahla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute esophagitis and esophageal strictures typically occur after local radiation therapy to the thoracic field. Toxicity is usually limited to the field of radiation and potentially augmented by concomitant use of chemotherapy, however esophageal stricturing due to chemotherapy alone is exceedingly rare. Gastrointestinal toxicity has been previously reported in the setting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-based chemotherapy with abnormal thymidylate synthase or dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activities. We present a unique case of isolated chemotherapy-induced esophageal stricture in the setting of stage IIIa rectal adenocarcinoma which presented shortly after initiation of treatment with 5-FU-based chemotherapy in a patient with normal thymidylate synthase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase assays. These findings prompt further investigation of pathways and potential risk factors leading to esophageal toxicity in patients treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

  11. Stapled transanal rectal resection in solitary rectal ulcer associated with prolapse of the rectum: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccasanta, Paolo; Venturi, Marco; Calabro, Giuseppe; Maciocco, Marco; Roviaro, Gian Carlo

    2008-03-01

    At present, none of the conventional surgical treatments of solitary rectal ulcer associated with internal rectal prolapse seems to be satisfactory because of the high incidence of recurrence. The stapled transanal rectal resection has been demonstrated to successfully cure patients with internal rectal prolapse associated with rectocele, or prolapsed hemorrhoids. This prospective study was designed to evaluate the short-term and long-term results of stapled transanal rectal resection in patients affected by solitary rectal ulcer associated with internal rectal prolapse and nonresponders to biofeedback therapy. Fourteen patients were selected on the basis of validated constipation and continence scorings, clinical examination, anorectal manometry, defecography, and colonoscopy and were submitted to biofeedback therapy. Ten nonresponders were operated on and followed up with incidence of failure, defined as no improvement of symptoms and/or recurrence of rectal ulceration, as the primary outcome measure. Operative time, hospital stay, postoperative pain, time to return to normal activity, overall patient satisfaction index, and presence of residual rectal prolapse also were evaluated. At a mean follow-up of 27.2 (range, 24-34) months, symptoms significantly improved, with 80 percent of excellent/good results and none of the ten operated patients showed a recurrence of rectal ulcer. Operative time, hospital stay, and time to return to normal activity were similar to those reported after stapled transanal rectal resection for obstructed defecation, whereas postoperative pain was slightly higher. One patient complained of perineal abscess, requiring surgery. The stapled transanal rectal resection is safe and effective in the cure of solitary rectal ulcer associated with internal rectal prolapse, with minimal complications and no recurrences after two years. Randomized trials with sufficient number of patients are necessary to compare the efficacy of stapled transanal

  12. Effect of rectal enemas on rectal dosimetric parameters during high-dose-rate vaginal cuff brachytherapy. A prospective trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabater, Sebastia; Andres, Ignacio; Sevillano, Marimar; Berenguer, Roberto; Aguayo, Manuel; Villas, Maria Victoria; Gascon, Marina; Arenas, Meritxell; Rovirosa, Angeles; Camacho-Lopez, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of rectal enemas on rectal doses during postoperative high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB). This prospective trial included 59 patients. Two rectal cleansing enemas were self-administered before the second fraction, and fraction 1 was considered the basal status. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) values were generated for the rectum and correlated with rectal volume variation. Statistical analyses used paired and unpaired t-tests. Despite a significant 15 % reduction in mean rectal volume (44.07 vs. 52.15 cc, p = 0.0018), 35.6 % of patients had larger rectums after rectal enemas. No significant rectal enema-related DVH differences were observed compared to the basal data. Although not statistically significant, rectal cleansing-associated increases in mean rectal DVH values were observed: D 0.1 cc : 6.6 vs. 7.21 Gy; D 1 cc : 5.35 vs. 5.52 Gy; D 2 cc : 4.67 vs. 4.72 Gy, before and after rectal cleaning, respectively (where D x cc is the dose to the most exposed x cm 3 ). No differences were observed in DVH parameters according to rectal volume increase or decrease after the enema. Patients whose rectal volume increased also had significantly larger DVH parameters, except for D 5 % , D 25 % , and D 50 % . In contrast, in patients whose rectal volume decreased, significance was only seen for D 25 % and D 50 % (D x % dose covering x % of the volume). In the latter patients, nonsignificant reductions in D 2 cc , D 5 cc and V 5 Gy (volume receiving at least 5 Gy) were observed. The current rectal enemas protocol was ineffective in significantly modifying rectal DVH parameters for HDR-VCB. (orig.) [de

  13. Scintigraphic assessment of gastrointestinal motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2014-01-01

    intestinal and colonic transit. This article reviews current imaging techniques, methods for data processing and principles for evaluating results when scintigraphy is used to assess gastrointestinal motility. Furthermore, clinical indications for performing scintigraphy are reviewed.......Gastrointestinal transit reflects overall gastrointestinal motor activity and is regulated by a complex interplay between neural and hormonal stimuli. Thus, transit measurements provide a measure of the combined effects of gastrointestinal muscular activity and feedback from the gut and brain....... Dysmotility in the different major segments of the gastrointestinal tract may give rise to similar symptoms; hence, localizing transit abnormalities to a specific segment is a valuable element of diagnostic evaluation. Scintigraphy is an effective noninvasive tool to assess gastric emptying as well as small...

  14. Rectal Lipoma Associated with Genital Prolapse

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    female genital prolapse. In the present case, as the patient is post‑menopausal and with co‑existing partial rectal prolapse, vaginal hysterectomy was carried out. Diagnostic approaches usually include endoscopy, contrast‑enhanced CT scan of the abdomen, and barium enema. Endoscopic biopsies usually fail to diagnose ...

  15. Management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, D O

    2012-11-01

    Although well described, there is limited published data related to management on the coexistence of prostate and rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to describe a single institution\\'s experience with this and propose a treatment algorithm based on the best available evidence.

  16. Current management of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Laurberg, Søren; Holm, Thorbjörn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the surgical management of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken using PubMed, Embase, Web...

  17. [Severe vaginal discharge following rectal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, L.C.; Bremers, A.J.A.; Heesakkers, J.P.; Kluivers, K.B.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Almost 50% of women who have had rectal surgery subsequently develop vaginal discharge. Due to the recurrent and unexpected nature of this heavy discharge, they often experience it as very distressing. Many of these women undergo extensive diagnostic tests that are mainly focused on

  18. [Nutritional risk screening and nutrition assessment for gastrointestinal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan-ping; Li, Ling-ling; He, Qing; Li, Yun; Song, Hu; Lin, Yi-jia; Peng, Jun-sheng

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the nutritional status, and provide evidence for nutritional treatment option. A total of 452 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were selected, including 156 gastric cancer,117 colon cancer, and 180 rectal cancer. The nutritional risk screening 2002(NRS2002) was applied to grade the nutritional risk. A multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to measure the patients' body composition. Albumin (Alb), prealbumin(PA), transferring(Tf), retinol binding protein(RBP), red blood cell(RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), haematocrit(Hct) were measured after fasting. The rate of patients with NRS2002 score more than 3 was 70.5%(110/156) for gastric cancer, 53.8%(63/117) for colon cancer, and 46.7%(86/180) for rectal cancer. The score for impaired nutritional status more than 1 for gastric cancer was higher than that for colorectal cancer(Pgastric cancer(Pgastric cancer patients as compared to colorectal cancer patients(Pgastric cancer patients(Pgastric cancer and colon cancer(Pgastric cancer are prone to fat loss and therefore have a higher nutritional risk and malnutrition than those with colorectal cancer. Combination of body composition analysis and laboratory examination may achieve comprehensive evaluation of the nutritional status of patients, and provide the evidence of nutritional therapy by being combined with NRS2002 score.

  19. The gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else M.; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has always been and remains a major source of interest in terms of both its function, and its malfunction. Our current knowledge of age-related changes in this system, as well as drug-food interactions, however, remains relatively limited. Paradoxically, the GIT......-related GIT damage and dysfunction. New and novel aspects of drug delivery and drug-dietary supplement interactions are discusses and much needed areas of focus in terms of drug GIT testing are identified....... is not one of the core battery of tests that pharmaceutical companies are obliged to investigate as part of drug development. This review aims to cover the basics of GIT function before highlighting aspects of relevance for safety pharmacology in terms of age, cancerogenesis, and noth drug and diet...

  20. Gastrointestinal infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkemüller, K E; Wilcox, C M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in children are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Children living in developing countries are particularly susceptible to infectious diarrhea because of poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Although the magnitude of diarrheal illnesses in developed countries is less, costly hospital admissions are still frequent. The causal agent of infectious diarrhea is most frequently related to age, geographical location, lifestyle habits, use of antibiotics, associated medical conditions, social circumstances, and degree of immune competence. In this article we present some of the most important articles published in the field during the last year. The role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease has been shown in adults and children. Information about the natural history of H. pylori, symptomatology, and diagnostic therapeutic approaches for children are being generated constantly; we discuss some of the most relevant information in this review.

  1. Estrogen and gastrointestinal malignancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    The concept that E2 exerts an effect on the gastrointestinal tract is not new and its actions on intestinal mucosa have been investigated for at least three decades. An attempt to consolidate results of these investigations generates more questions than answers, thus suggesting that many unexplored avenues remain and that the full capabilities of this steroid hormone are far from understood. Evidence of its role in esophageal, gastric and gallbladder cancers is confusing and often equivocal. The most compelling evidence regards the protective role conferred by estrogen (or perhaps ERbeta) against the development and proliferation of colon cancer. Not only has the effect been described but also many mechanisms of action have been explored. It is likely that, along with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, hormonal manipulation will play an integral role in colon cancer management in the very near future.

  2. Rectal hydrocortisone during vomiting in children with adrenal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Chróinín, M; Fallon, M; Kenny, D; Moriarty, S; Hoey, H; Costigan, C

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate rectal hydrocortisone as an emergency glucocorticoid replacement therapy in adrenal insufficient children. A parental questionnaire evaluated preferred treatment, problems or benefits of i.m. and rectal hydrocortisone, frequency and indications for administration and who administered treatment. Admissions of children with adrenal insufficiency were monitored. There were 39/52 families who responded to the questionnaire. 93% (26/28) preferred rectal hydrocortisone. Parents or children who previously received emergency treatment from a doctor now self-administered rectal hydrocortisone. The cost of suppositories and i.m. hydrocortisone is similar; however, storage of suppositories was inconvenient. One girl presented with pneumonia and collapse despite rectal hydrocortisone and a hydrocortisone level at admission of >2000 nmol/l with normal electrolytes. Rectal hydrocortisone is an acceptable and safe emergency therapy. We still advise i.m. hydrocortisone if rectal administration is not possible or with suppository extrusion.

  3. MRI in staging of rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyianni, S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: MRI of the rectum is performed for initial local staging of primary rectal cancer in order to identify locally advanced rectal cancers and for assessment of treatment response after completion of neoadjuvant therapy. Introduction of new generation MRI scanners with optimal phased array body coils, resulting in improved contrast and spatial resolution images due to better signal to noise ratio, have contributed to production of high resolution images in which visualization of anatomical details such as the mesorectal fascia and the bowel wall layers are feasible. Pre-operative MRI of the rectum using mainly high resolution T2 weighted sequences has gained significant accreditation, especially after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and neoadjuvant therapy in the treatment regimen of rectal cancer. MR Imaging is so far the only method that can preoperatively identify patients most likely to benefit from neoadjuvant therapy as well as demonstrate high risk patients for local recurrence. Regarding N stage besides of mesorectal lymph nodes which are removed during TME, especially in case of low lying rectal cancers, MRI may provide information regarding external/internal iliac lymph node involvement. High resolution MRI images may demonstrate lymph nodes with a diameter down to 2 mm, however these are still characterized based on their morphological features. Patients identified at initial MRI staging as having locally advanced rectal cancer undergo neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in order for their tumor to be downsized and downstaged, especially in low rectal cancers so that sphincter sparing surgery may be performed. In 15-30% of patients complete pathological response is achieved. Reimaging with MRI at 6 weeks post treatment is of great importance for assessing tumor response. Conventional MRI has a reported moderate accuracy for prediction of mesorectal fascia (MF) involvement after CRT therapy, mainly due to its

  4. Comparison between core temperatures measured telemetrically using the CorTemp® ingestible temperature sensor and rectal temperature in healthy Labrador retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinchuk, Stephanie; Taylor, Susan M; Shmon, Cindy L; Pharr, John; Campbell, John

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the CorTemp(®) ingestible telemetric core body temperature sensor in dogs, to establish the relationship between rectal temperature and telemetrically measured core body temperature at rest and during exercise, and to examine the effect of sensor location in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract on measured core temperature. CorTemp(®) sensors were administered orally to fasted Labrador retriever dogs and radiographs were taken to document sensor location. Core and rectal temperatures were monitored throughout the day in 6 resting dogs and during a 10-minute strenuous retrieving exercise in 6 dogs. Time required for the sensor to leave the stomach (120 to 610 min) was variable. Measured core temperature was consistently higher than rectal temperature across all GI locations but temperature differences based on GI location were not significant (P = 0.5218). Resting dogs had a core temperature that was on average 0.4°C above their rectal temperature with 95% limits of agreement (LoA) between 1.2°C and -0.5°C. Core temperature in exercising dogs was on average 0.3°C higher than their concurrent rectal temperature, with LoA of +1.6°C and -1.1°C.

  5. Postirradiation Leiomyosarcoma of Rectum Presenting as a Polyp: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Rajeswari; Basu, Prithwijit Patrick; Huang, Tao; Axiotis, Constantine A

    2016-04-01

    Radiation-induced leiomyosarcomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. Very few cases have been documented to date. The histological similarity to gastrointestinal stromal tumor has raised doubts if many of the cases originally reported to be leiomyosarcoma before the widespread use of CD117 were indeed gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We present a case of post-irradiation leiomyosarcoma presenting as a rectal polyp and review the literature. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associated with the utility of MSC-based therapy such as biosafety, immunoprivilege, transfection methods, and distribution in the host. PMID:22530882

  7. Is It Time to Tailor the Prediction of Radio-Induced Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients? Building the First Set of Nomograms for Late Rectal Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Kattan, Michael W.; Rancati, Tiziana; Yu Changhong; Vavassori, Vittorio; Fellin, Giovanni; Cagna, Elena; Gabriele, Pietro; Mauro, Flora Anna; Baccolini, Micaela; Bianchi, Carla; Menegotti, Loris; Monti, Angelo F.; Stasi, Michele; Giganti, Maria Olga

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Development of user-friendly tools for the prediction of single-patient probability of late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity through self-assessed questionnaires (minimum follow-up, 36 months) by 718 adult men in the AIROPROS 0102 trial. Doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Nomograms were created based on multivariable logistic regression analysis. Three endpoints were considered: G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding (52/718 events), G3 late rectal bleeding (24/718 events), and G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence (LINC, 19/718 events). Results: Inputs for the nomogram for G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding estimation were as follows: presence of abdominal surgery before RT, percentage volume of rectum receiving >75 Gy (V75Gy), and nomogram-based estimation of the probability of G2 to G3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (continuous variable, which was estimated using a previously published nomogram). G3 late rectal bleeding estimation was based on abdominal surgery before RT, V75Gy, and NOMACU. Prediction of G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence was based on abdominal surgery before RT, presence of hemorrhoids, use of antihypertensive medications (protective factor), and percentage volume of rectum receiving >40 Gy. Conclusions: We developed and internally validated the first set of nomograms available in the literature for the prediction of radio-induced toxicity in prostate cancer patients. Calculations included dosimetric as well as clinical variables to help radiation oncologists predict late rectal morbidity, thus introducing the possibility of RT plan corrections to better tailor treatment to the patient’s characteristics, to avoid unnecessary worsening of quality of life, and to provide support to the patient in selecting the best therapeutic approach.

  8. Is It Time to Tailor the Prediction of Radio-Induced Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients? Building the First Set of Nomograms for Late Rectal Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Radiotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS - Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Kattan, Michael W. [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rancati, Tiziana, E-mail: tiziana.rancati@istitutotumori.mi.it [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Yu Changhong [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Vavassori, Vittorio [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, Humanitas - Gavazzeni, Bergamo (Italy); Fellin, Giovanni [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Cagna, Elena [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Gabriele, Pietro [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo (Italy); Mauro, Flora Anna; Baccolini, Micaela [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Villa Maria Cecilia, Lugo (Italy); Bianchi, Carla [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy); Menegotti, Loris [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Monti, Angelo F. [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Stasi, Michele [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo (Italy); Giganti, Maria Olga [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Dept. of Oncology, Ospedale Niguarda, Milan (Italy); and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Development of user-friendly tools for the prediction of single-patient probability of late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity through self-assessed questionnaires (minimum follow-up, 36 months) by 718 adult men in the AIROPROS 0102 trial. Doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Nomograms were created based on multivariable logistic regression analysis. Three endpoints were considered: G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding (52/718 events), G3 late rectal bleeding (24/718 events), and G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence (LINC, 19/718 events). Results: Inputs for the nomogram for G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding estimation were as follows: presence of abdominal surgery before RT, percentage volume of rectum receiving >75 Gy (V75Gy), and nomogram-based estimation of the probability of G2 to G3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (continuous variable, which was estimated using a previously published nomogram). G3 late rectal bleeding estimation was based on abdominal surgery before RT, V75Gy, and NOMACU. Prediction of G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence was based on abdominal surgery before RT, presence of hemorrhoids, use of antihypertensive medications (protective factor), and percentage volume of rectum receiving >40 Gy. Conclusions: We developed and internally validated the first set of nomograms available in the literature for the prediction of radio-induced toxicity in prostate cancer patients. Calculations included dosimetric as well as clinical variables to help radiation oncologists predict late rectal morbidity, thus introducing the possibility of RT plan corrections to better tailor treatment to the patient's characteristics, to avoid unnecessary worsening of quality of life, and to provide support to the patient in selecting the best therapeutic approach.

  9. Physical Activity and Gastrointestinal Cancers: Primary and Tertiary Preventive Effects and Possible Biological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Steindorf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal cancers account for 37% of all cancer deaths worldwide, underlining the need to further investigate modifiable factors for gastrointestinal cancer risk and prognosis. This review summarizes the corresponding evidence for physical activity (PA, including, briefly, possible biological mechanisms. Despite high public health relevance, there is still a scarcity of studies, especially for tertiary prevention. Besides the convincing evidence of beneficial effects of PA on colon cancer risk, clear risk reduction for gastroesophageal cancer was identified, as well as weak indications for pancreatic cancer. Inverse associations were observed for liver cancer, yet based on few studies. Only for rectal cancer, PA appeared to be not associated with cancer risk. With regard to cancer-specific mortality of the general population, published data were rare but indicated suggestive evidence of protective effects for colon and liver cancer, and to a lesser extent for rectal and gastroesophageal cancer. Studies in cancer patients on cancer-specific and total mortality were published for colorectal cancer only, providing good evidence of inverse associations with post-diagnosis PA. Overall, evidence of associations of PA with gastrointestinal cancer risk and progression is promising but still limited. However, the already available knowledge further underlines the importance of PA to combat cancer.

  10. Uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma located in uterine myometrium: MRI appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, M.; Otsuka, M.; Hatakenaka, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Beppu (Japan); Torii, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Saga Prefectural Hospital (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Two cases of uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma whose main mass was located in uterine myometrium are reported. They mimicked uterine leiomyoma with cystic degeneration or uterine leiomyosarcoma. Endometrial stromal sarcoma should be suggested in the differential diagnosis of mass lesion in uterine myometrium. (orig.)

  11. An exceptional collision tumor: gastric calcified stromal tumor and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors report an exceptional case of collision tumor comprised of a gastric calcified stromal tumor and a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The pancreatic tumor was detected fortuitously on the histological exam of resection specimen. Key words: Collision tumor, stromal tumor, adenocarcinoma ...

  12. Modelling the variation in rectal dose due to inter-fraction rectal wall deformation in external beam prostate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, Jeremy; Zavgorodni, Sergei

    2005-01-01

    Prostate radiotherapy inevitably deposits radiation dose in the rectal wall, and the dose delivered to prostate is limited by the expected rectal complications. Accurate evaluation of the rectal dose is non-trivial due to a number of factors. One of these is variation of the shape and position of the rectal wall (with respect to the clinical target volume (CTV)), which may differ daily from that taken during planning CT acquisition. This study uses data currently available in the literature on rectal wall motion to provide estimates of mean population rectal wall dose. The rectal wall geometry is characterized by a population mean radius of the rectum as well as inter-patient and inter-fraction standard deviations in rectum radius. The model is used to evaluate the range of inter-fraction and inter-patient rectal dose variations. The simulation of individual patients with full and empty rectum in the planning CT scan showed that large variations in rectal dose (>15 Gy) are possible. Mean calculated dose accounting for treatment and planning uncertainties in the rectal wall surface was calculated as well as the map of planning dose over/underpredictions. It was found that accuracy of planning dose is dependent on the CTV-PTV margin size with larger margins producing more accurate estimates. Over a patient population, the variation in rectal dose is reduced by increasing the number of pre-treatment CT scans

  13. Mammary fibroadenoma with pleomorphic stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Najla; Kallel, Rim; Ellouze, Sameh; Mellouli, Manel; Gouiaa, Naourez; Mnif, Héla; Boudawara, Tahia

    2015-01-01

    The presence of enlarged and pleomorphic nuclei is usually regarded as a feature of malignancy, but it may on occasion be seen in benign lesions such as mammary fibroadenomas. We present such a case of fibroadenoma occurring in a 37-year-old woman presenting with a self-palpable right breast mass. Histological examination of the tumor revealed the presence of multi and mononucleated giant cells with pleomorphic nuclei. The recognition of the benign nature of these cells is necessary for differential diagnosis from malignant lesions of the breast. fibroadenoma - pleomorphic stromal cells - atypia - breast.

  14. Hemangioblastomas: histogenesis of the stromal cell studied by immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurco, S; Nadji, M; Harvey, D G; Parker, J C; Font, R L; Morales, A R

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-one cases of hemangioblastoma from the cerebellum, spinal cord and retina were studied using the unlabeled antibody peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique with antibodies directed against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and factor VIII related antigen (VIIIR:Ag). In 19 of 21 cases studied with anti-GFAP, astrocytes were identified peripherally, and in 13 cases they were found centrally within the tumor. In no instance did stromal cells react positively for GFAP. Sixteen cases with anti-VIIIR:Ag antibody were examined, and in all cases many stromal cells showed positive staining. It is concluded that the stromal cells were of endothelial origin. The occasional stromal cells that other investigators have identified as reacting positively for GFAP may represent stromal cells capable of ingesting extracellular GFAP derived from reactive astrocytes within the tumor, or they may be lipidized astrocytes.

  15. National proficiency-gain curves for minimally invasive gastrointestinal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, H; Markar, S R; Askari, A; Ni, M; Faiz, O; Hanna, G B

    2016-01-01

    Minimal access surgery for gastrointestinal cancer has short-term benefits but is associated with a proficiency-gain curve. The aim of this study was to define national proficiency-gain curves for minimal access colorectal and oesophagogastric surgery, and to determine the impact on clinical outcomes. All adult patients undergoing minimal access oesophageal, colonic and rectal surgery between 2002 and 2012 were identified from the Hospital Episode Statistics database. Proficiency-gain curves were created using risk-adjusted cumulative sum analysis. Change points were identified, and bootstrapping was performed with 1000 iterations to identify a confidence level. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality; secondary outcomes were 90-day mortality, reintervention, conversion and length of hospital stay. Some 1696, 15 008 and 16 701 minimal access oesophageal, rectal and colonic cancer resections were performed during the study period. The change point in the proficiency-gain curve for 30-day mortality for oesophageal, rectal and colonic surgery was 19 (confidence level 98·4 per cent), 20 (99·2 per cent) and three (99·5 per cent) procedures; the mortality rate fell from 4·0 to 2·0 per cent (relative risk reduction (RRR) 0·50, P = 0·033), from 2·1 to 1·2 per cent (RRR 0·43, P curve for reintervention in oesophageal, rectal and colonic resection was 19 (98·1 per cent), 32 (99·5 per cent) and 26 (99·2 per cent) procedures respectively. There were also significant proficiency-gain curves for 90-day mortality, conversion and length of stay. The introduction of minimal access gastrointestinal cancer surgery has been associated with a proficiency-gain curve for mortality and major morbidity at a national level. Unnecessary patient harm should be avoided by appropriate training and monitoring of new surgical techniques. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding after low anterior resection for middle rectal cancer – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Beuran

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Angiography with angioembolization is an effective tool in emergency setting, avoiding the morbidity and associated mortality of a surgical reinervention. In early postoperative hemorrhages, only a rapid clinical recognition, a personalized diagnostic workup and an agressive intervention may offer the patient the best chances for cure.

  17. Evaluation of rectal bleeding factors associated with prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Manabu; Miki, Kenta; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Kido, Masato; Shirahama, Jun; Takagi, Sayako; Kobayashi, Masao; Honda, Chikara; Kanehira, Chihiro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze rectal bleeding prognostic factors associated with prostate brachytherapy (PB) or in combination with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and to examine dosimetric indications associated with rectal bleeding. The study included 296 patients followed up for >36 months (median, 48 months). PB was performed alone in 252 patients and in combination with EBRT in 44 patients. PB combined with EBRT is indicated for patients with a Gleason score >6. The prescribed dose was 144 Gy for monotherapy and 110 Gy for PB+EBRT (44-46 Gy). Although 9.1% who received monotherapy had 2.3% grade 2 rectal bleeding, 36.3% who received combined therapy had 15.9% grade 2 rectal bleeding. Combined therapy was associated with higher incidence of rectal bleeding (P=0.0049) and higher percentage of grade 2 bleeding (P=0.0005). Multivariate analysis revealed that R-150 was the only significant factor for rectal bleeding, and modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade in monotherapy and biologically equivalent dose (BED) were significant for combined therapy. Moreover, grade 2 rectal bleeding increased significantly at D90 >130 Gy. Although R-150 was the significant prognostic factor for rectal bleeding and modified RTOG rectal toxicity grade, BED was the significant prognostic factor for modified RTOG rectal toxicity grade. (author)

  18. Lower gastrointestinal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepper, Joel E.

    1997-01-01

    A great deal of new information has been generated in the past decade regarding the prevention, diagnosis, etiology, biology and treatment of cancers of the colon and rectum. Screening strategies have been demonstrated to be effective in preventing the occurrence of these tumors by finding and removing neoplasms in their premalignant state. If widely implemented this should result in an overall decrease in mortality from these diseases. Genetic predisposition syndromes and the molecular abnormalities associated with them have been defined. A large number of molecular abnormalities have been elucidated which are associated with the development of sporadic tumors of the colon and rectum. These issues will be discussed including the relevance to the practicing oncologist. In addition to the enormous changes in our basic understanding of the biology of these tumors, there have also been substantial changes in the management of rectal cancer and there is a gradually changing role of radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is now standardly combined with chemotherapy in the management of patients with tumors that are through the bowel wall or with nodal positivity. The integration of the two modalities is in evolution, and issues of radiation enhancement by 5-fluoruracil is important in design of these strategies. At the present time the relative value of preoperative vs postoperative radiation therapy is not defined, and there is disagreement as to whether a short course of preoperative radiation therapy may be as effective as the more standard longer courses. The use of preoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy to enhance the incidence of sphincter preservation has gained more widespread acceptance, but needs to be combined with surgeons experienced in these surgical approaches. For patients with early stage disease, there is more general acceptance of the use of sphincter preserving surgery and radiation therapy, but the criteria for which patients can be

  19. Gastrointestinal tract spindle cell lesions--just like real estate, it's all about location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltaggio, Lysandra; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of gastrointestinal tract mesenchymal lesions is simplified merely by knowing in which anatomic layer they are usually found. For example, Kaposi sarcoma is detected on mucosal biopsies, whereas inflammatory fibroid polyp is nearly always in the submucosa. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are generally centered in the muscularis propria. Schwannomas are essentially always in the muscularis propria. Mesenteric lesions are usually found in the small bowel mesentery. Knowledge of the favored layer is even most important in interpreting colon biopsies, as many mesenschymal polyps are encountered in the colon. Although GISTs are among the most common mesenchymal lesions, we will concentrate our discussion on other mesenchymal lesions, some of which are in the differential diagnosis of GIST, and point out some diagnostic pitfalls, particularly in immunolabeling.

  20. Gastrointestinal nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koblik, P.D.; Hornof, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    General localization of gastrointestinal bleeding through the use of labeled red blood cells may be performed in children, or (99m)Tc-pertechnetate may be used if a Meckel's diverticulum is suspected. As in adults, cholecystitis and biliary leak may be assessed in children via (99m)Tc-IDA derivatives. Gastroesophageal reflux can be evaluated by oral consumption of the child's usual diet labeled with (99m)Tc sulfur colloid. For the scintigraphic determination of pulmonary aspiration, a relatively high concentration of tracer within a drop of liquid is placed beneath the child's tongue followed by dynamic imaging of the respiratory tract. Colonic transit scintigraphy can aid in the identification and therapeutic decision-making in patients with functional fecal retention, the most common cause of chronic constipation in children. (18)F-DOPA positron emission tomography is useful for classifying pancreatic involvement in infantile hyperinsulinism as focal or diffuse, thereby differentiating between patients who should receive curative focal pancreatic resection versus those who should receive medical management. Assessment of protein-losing enteropathy can be conducted scintigraphically and, compared with fecal alpha-1 antitrypsin collection, the scintigraphic method can detect esophageal and gastric protein loss. Also, scintigraphic quantification of protein loss can be performed without the requirement for fecal collection. Intestinal inflammation in children with inflammatory bowel disease can be evaluated using (99m)Tc white blood cells. The scintigraphic method is safe, accurate, well-tolerated by children and complementary to endoscopy in most patients

  1. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Tai; Lee, Choon Keun; Lee, Sun Wha; Choi, Woo Suk; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1988-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major diagnostic problem. Although advances have been made in the medical and surgical methods of managing gastrointestinal bleeding, the commonly employed techniques of barium radiography, endoscopy, and angiography may not successfully localize the site and define the cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two widely available technetium-99m-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, sulfur colloid and red blood cells are currently used in the evaluation of patients who are bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract. Surgically confirmed 19 patients with use of 99m Tc-sulfur colloid (7 cases) and 99m Tc-RBC (12 cases) were retrospectively evaluated. The overall sensitivity of scintigraphy in detection of bleeding and localization of bleeding site was 68% and 84%, respectively. The authors conclude that bleeding scintigraphy is a safe, sensitive, and non-invasive method as an effective screening test before performing angiography or surgery.

  2. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases.

  3. Radiological Atlas of Gastrointestinal Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book is a reference to gastrointestinal disease and radiographic methods. It provides complete information for diagnosis and management and includes coverage of plain radiography, barium studies, water-soluble contrast studies, and more

  4. GASTROINTESTINAL INJURIES FROM BLUNT ABDOMINAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-04-04

    Apr 4, 2004 ... Subjects: Twenty one children managed for gastrointestinal injuries from blunt trauma ... ileus, urinary tract infection and chest infection, respectively postoperatively. .... predictive value with CT scan, (9) the positive predictive.

  5. CT of acute gastrointestinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittenberg, J.

    1991-01-01

    The application of computerized tomography in gastrointestinal tract diseases are presented, including advantages in surgical belly that are: anatomic clarity, wide survey and rapid performance. (C.G.C.)

  6. Is the renal excretion of orally applied diatrizoate (Gastrografin copyright) a reliable marker of gastrointestinal perforation or dehiscence of a gastrointestinal anastomosis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Born, M.; Axmann, C.; Kader, R.; Falkenhausen, M. von; Manka, C.; Willinek, W.A.; Schild, H.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Renal excretion of orally or rectally applied Gastrografin is reported to be a reliable indicator of a perforation or a post-operative anastomotic dehiscence of the GI-tract. The study was conducted to determine whether increased attenuation of the urine measured by CT after oral or rectal application of Gastrografin can give reliable evidence of any leakage from the gastrointestinal tract. Materials and Methods: Urine samples of 33 patients, who underwent a Gastrografin-enhanced fluoroscopic examination of the esophagus or the GI-tract for different clinical reasons, were examined by CT. The samples had been taken immediately before and 60 to 90 minutes after application of 100 ml Gastrografin. The results were compared with those of 5 healthy volunteers, who took urine samples before, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after drinking 100 ml of Gastrografin. Results: Maximal attenuation of the volunteers' urine samples was achieved 60 to 90 minutes after Gastrografin application with a mean of 50 Hounsfield units (HU), SD=17 HU. The urine of three patients with radiologically proven fistula or dehiscence of a GI-tract anastomosis had no relevant increase in attenuation. Three other cases without any clinical or radiological evidence of an anastomotic leak had a substantial increase in the attenuation of the urine probes (87, 110, and 290 HU, respectively). Conclusion: The CT-measured urine samples as evidence of renal excretion of orally or rectally applied Gastrografin are not reliable for the detection of leaks from the GI-tract. (orig.)

  7. Changes in mouse gastrointestinal microbial ecology with ingestion of kale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyeno, Y; Katayama, S; Nakamura, S

    2014-09-01

    Kale, a cultivar of Brassica oleracea, has attracted a great deal of attention because of its health-promoting effects, which are thought to be exerted through modulation of the intestinal microbiota. The present study was performed to investigate the effects of kale ingestion on the gastrointestinal microbial ecology of mice. 21 male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups and housed in a specific pathogen-free facility. The animals were fed either a control diet or experimental diets supplemented with different commercial kale products for 12 weeks. Contents of the caecum and colon of the mice were processed for the determination of active bacterial populations by a bacterial rRNA-based quantification method and short-chain fatty acids by HPLC. rRNAs of Bacteroides-Prevotella, the Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale group, and Clostridium leptum subgroup constituted the major fraction of microbiota regardless of the composition of the diet. The ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes was higher in the colon samples of one of the kale diet groups than in the control. The colonic butyrate level was also higher with the kale-supplemented diet. Overall, the ingestion of kale tended to either increase or decrease the activity of specific bacterial groups in the mouse gastrointestinal tract, however, the effect might vary depending on the nutritional composition.

  8. Evidence and research in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Beets-Tan, Regina; Borras, Josep M.; Krivokapic, Zoran; Leer, Jan Willem; Pahlman, Lars; Roedel, Claus; Schmoll, Hans Joachim; Scott, Nigel; Velde, Cornelius Van de; Verfaillie, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The main evidences of epidemiology, diagnostic imaging, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and follow-up are reviewed to optimize the routine treatment of rectal cancer according to a multidisciplinary approach. This paper reports on the knowledge shared between different specialists involved in the design and management of the multidisciplinary ESTRO Teaching Course on Rectal Cancer. The scenario of ongoing research is also addressed. In this time of changing treatments, it clearly appears that a common standard for large heterogeneous patient groups have to be substituted by more individualised therapies based on clinical-pathological features and very soon on molecular and genetic markers. Only trained multidisciplinary teams can face this new challenge and tailor the treatments according to the best scientific evidence for each patient

  9. Postoperative radiotherapy for rectal and rectosigmoid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, B.M.P.; Lebesque, J.V.; Hart, A.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1988, 206 patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy after macroscopically complete surgery for rectal or (recto)sigmoid cancer. Depending on an estimation of the amount of small bowel in the intended treatment volume a total dose was, in general, 45 or 50 Gy. An additional boost of 10 Gy was given to 6 patients because of microscopically involved surgical margins. For tumor stage B a statistically significant trend (p=0.017) for higher local control with higher total dose was observed comparing patients treated with a total dose of 45 Gy or less, with more than 45 Gy but less than 50 Gy or with a total dose of 50 Gy or more. This finding illustrates the impact of total dose on local control for postoperative radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma. (author). 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. Management of rectal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT is an uncommon mesenchymal neoplasm of intermediate malignant potential. It may occur in various anatomic locations, but rarely in the rectum. This is a case discussion of a 36-year-old male patient with IMT of the rectum. After the patient underwent radical surgery, recurrence was seen after 18 months. Because the tumor was very close to the surrounding tissue, palliative tumor resection was performed followed by concurrent chemo-radiation and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID. After 2-year follow-up, the patient has no evidence of recurrence or metastasis. Surgical resection is very important for patient with rectal IMT, even in relapse cases. And adjuvant chemoradiotherapy and NSAID are in favor of the incompletely resected tumors as our case. But perhaps, the adjuvant treatments could be helpful after radical resection of rectal tumor.

  11. Follow-up after rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovdenak Jakobsen, Ida; Juul, Therese; Bernstein, Inge

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main treatment for non-metastatic rectal cancer (RC) is surgical resection. Late adverse effects that are highly prevalent and negatively impact patients' symptom burden and quality of life are: bowel-, urological and sexual dysfunctions; psychological distress; fear of recurrence....... As a consequence, the randomized controlled trial Follow-up after Rectal Cancer (FURCA) has been launched, testing the effect of a new patient-led, follow-up program. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology used in the FURCA study and to report results from the development of the patient-led, follow......, or a control group following the current follow-up program with routine medicals. The primary outcomes are symptom burden and quality of life, measured by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Colorectal (FACT-C) questionnaire. Other outcome and demographic data are collected as patient...

  12. Histology and cell kinetics of rectal mucosa of A/HeJ mice administered syngeneic rectal antigen and its effects on radiation induced rectal cancer, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Yoritaka

    1980-01-01

    1. Four-week-old A/HeJ mice were immunized by rectal antigen and at the age of 6 weeks the pelvic region was exposed to 2,000 rad of X-ray for two times. They were observed for a maximum period of 84 weeks. The first rectal cancer detected 36 days after irradiation was histologically found to be mucous-secreting-adenocarinoma. Within 32 weeks after irradiation, rectal cancer was observed in 21 (61.76%) of the 34 autopsied mice. During the entire period of observation, rectal cancer was observed in 25 (55.56%) of the 45 mice. 2. On the other hand, among the mice whose pelvic region was exposed to 2,000 rad for two times, the first cancer was observed 56 days after irradiation. Within 32 weeks after irradiation, rectal cancer was observed in 4 (18.18%) of the 22 autopsied mice. During the entire period of observation, rectal cancer was observed in 12 (33.33%) of the 36 mice. 3. In the group of 51 non-irradiated mice, no rectal cancer was observed. 4. The stainability of HID-AB stain of the histologically normal mucosa near irradiated site was compared between cancer induced cases and normal cases. In 22 (84.62%) mice among 26 with induced cancer and in 9 (45%) among 20 mice without cancer, rectal crypt with AB positive goblet cells could be observed. (author)

  13. Drug therapy for gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballinger, Anne; Farthing, M. J. G. (Michael J. G.)

    2001-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Gastrointestinal bleeding Matthew R Banks, Peter D Fairclough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Inflammatory bowel...

  14. Antioxidant supplements for preventing gastrointestinal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, G; Nikolova, D; Simonetti, R G

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory.......Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory....

  15. Local resection of early rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Qvist, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the National Danish screening programme for colorectal cancer will result in the detection of more early rectal cancers (ERC), which may be considered for local excision. For the low risk≤T1 cancer, the oncological outcome at local excision in smaller patient series has shown......, where rescue surgery may be considered. The establishment of a regional or national clinical database is necessary to improve the local treatment of ERC....

  16. [Rectal duplication cyst--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyna, R; Horák, L; Kucera, E; Hejda, V; Krofta, L; Feyereisl, J

    2009-06-01

    The authors demonstrate a rare case of duplication anomaly of the rectum. Case report. Institute for the Care of Mother and Child, Prague. We present a rare case of cystic rectal duplication in adult, completely removed and histologically confirmed. A literature review was summarized. The case was complicated by delay in diagnosis, multiple operations, and by the association with endometriosis, as well. Mentioned anomaly is published in the Czech literature for the very first time.

  17. Spreading characteristics of proprietary rectal steroid preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Three types of rectal steroid preparation were labelled with Technetium 99 or Indium 111, and the extent of spread of each within the bowel was followed, immediately after administration and at 2hrs, using a gamma camera. Patients with ulcerative colitis were compared with controls. Results indicate that 'Colifoam' enema and 'Predsol' suppository act mainly in the rectum, but 'Predsol retention' enema spreads further into the colon, making it more useful for patients with extensive ulcerative colitis. (U.K.)

  18. Foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Kefeli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ingested foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract are a common event which can cause serious morbidity and mortality in the children and adult population. For this reason, early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for preventing these life threatening complications. In this study, we aimed to analyze the characteristics of the patients with upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies that were treated in our department. Methods: Patients diagnosed with upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies who were admitted to our hospital between February 2010 and August2013 were evaluated retrospectively. The data regarding their age, gender, clinical profile, type and localization of the esophageal foreign body, performed endoscopic procedure and initial symptoms of the patients were noted and analyzed statistically. Results: Thirty-eight patients with a diagnosis of gastrointestinal foreign body were included in this study. Of these patients, 21 were male and 17 were female. The youngest patient was 17 years old and the oldest patient was 79 years old. Most of the foreign bodies (%55.3 detected in the stomach. Food waste and metallic objects in 21 and 16 patients respectively. The most common complaint was dysphagia (%50. After endoscopic intervention three of the patients were directed to surgery. Conclusion: Early recognition and treatment of gastrointestinal foreign bodies is important as their complications are life threatening. The best method of removal of foreign bodies is controversial. Early management with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most efficient and safe treatment method in current conditions.

  19. Rectal Sedation with Thiopental in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, Ana Maria; Levy, Wilma; Badiel, Marisol; Cruz Libreros, Alejandro; Toro Gutierrez, Juan Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Objective: to determine the effectiveness of a rectal sedation protocol with sodium thiopental in children undergoing diagnostic imaging studies in a level-four-complexity health care facility. Materials and Methods: this case series observational study was developed between the months of January and March 2004 in the Fundacion clinica Valle del Lili. All pediatric patients between the ages of three months and eight years of age who underwent an imaging study were included. A dose of 25-40 mg/kg of sodium thiopental was administered rectally. Successful sedation was defined as one that allowed the successful completion of the study with the least number of motion artifacts. The features of the sedation and the adverse effects were evaluated. Results: the study population included 103 children with a median age of two years. The imaging studies were successfully concluded in 97% of the patients. The average total time until complete awakening was 2.9 hours. With respect to the interruption of sedation, we found statistically significant differences between the children who were kept awake the night before the procedure and those who were not. The most common adverse effect was diarrhea, which was recorded in 13 patients. Five of the patients required a supplemental dose of the sedative. There were two cases of increased salivation and one of vomiting, yet they resolved spontaneously. Conclusions: this rectal sodium thiopental protocol is a safe and effective procedure for the completion of diagnostic imaging studies in the pediatric population at our health care center.

  20. Function-preserving surgery for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    When total mesorectal excision (TME) is accurately performed, dysfunction, theoretically, does not occur. However, there are differences among individuals in the running patterns and the volumes of nerve fibers, and if obesity or a narrow pelvis is present, nerve identification is difficult. Currently, the rate of urinary dysfunction after rectal surgery ranges from 33% to 70%. Many factors other than nerve preservation play a role in minor incontinence. Male sexual function shows impotence rates ranging from 20% to 46%, while 20%-60% of potent patients are unable to ejaculate. In women, information on sexual function is not easily obtained, and there are more unknown aspects than in men. As urinary, sexual, and defecation dysfunction due to adjuvant radiotherapy have been reported to occur at a high frequency, the creation of a protocol that enables analysis of long-term functional outcome will be essential for future clinical trials. In the treatment of rectal cancer, surgeon-related factors are extremely important, not only in achieving local control but also in preserving function. This article reviews findings from recent studies investigating urinary, sexual, and defecation dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery and discusses questions to be studied in the future. (author)

  1. PHD-2 Suppression in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Enhances Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sae Hee; Nauta, Allison C; Morrison, Shane D; Hu, Michael S; Zimmermann, Andrew S; Chung, Michael T; Glotzbach, Jason P; Wong, Victor W; Walmsley, Graham G; Peter Lorenz, H; Chan, Denise A; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Giaccia, Amato J; Longaker, Michael T

    2018-01-01

    Cell therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells is a promising strategy for tissue repair. Restoration of blood flow to ischemic tissues is a key step in wound repair, and mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to be proangiogenic. Angiogenesis is critically regulated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) superfamily, consisting of transcription factors targeted for degradation by prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD)-2. The aim of this study was to enhance the proangiogenic capability of mesenchymal stromal cells and to use these modified cells to promote wound healing. Mesenchymal stromal cells harvested from mouse bone marrow were transduced with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against PHD-2; control cells were transduced with scrambled shRNA (shScramble) construct. Gene expression quantification, human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube formation assays, and wound healing assays were used to assess the effect of PHD knockdown mesenchymal stromal cells on wound healing dynamics. PHD-2 knockdown mesenchymal stromal cells overexpressed HIF-1α and multiple angiogenic factors compared to control (p cells treated with conditioned medium from PHD-2 knockdown mesenchymal stromal cells exhibited increased formation of capillary-like structures and enhanced migration compared with human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with conditioned medium from shScramble-transduced mesenchymal stromal cells (p cells healed at a significantly accelerated rate compared with wounds treated with shScramble mesenchymal stromal cells (p cells (p cells augments their proangiogenic potential in wound healing therapy. This effect appears to be mediated by overexpression of HIF family transcription factors and up-regulation of multiple downstream angiogenic factors.

  2. Radiologic features of the solitary rectal ulcer syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagnone, D.; Ranzi, T.; Velio, P.; Polli, E.E.; Bianchi, P.

    1984-05-01

    A radiologic study of 4 biopsy-proven cases of the solitary rectal ulcer (S.R.U.) syndrome was undertaken. The radiologic findings of S.R.U. were rectal stenosis (one with ulcer), polypoid rectal mass, and multiple sub-mucosal defects with shallow ulcers. The S.R.U., which is benign and requires only dietetic treatment, must be differentiated from other more serious entities such as neoplastic and inflammatory bowel disease.

  3. Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health; Social Services and Public Safety

    2004-01-01

    The Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams has been produced under the auspices of the Northern Ireland Regional Advisory Committee on Cancer. It contains details of the full membership of the clinical teams providing care for colon and rectal cancer in each of Health and Social Services Board Area. Lead Clinicians For Colon and Rectal Cancer Services (PDF 74 KB) EHSSB (PDF 198 KB) NHSSB (PDF 107 KB) SHSSB (PDF 130 KB) WHSSB (PDF 131 KB)

  4. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for chronic myocardial ischemia (MyStromalCell Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue represents an abundant, accessible source of multipotent adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs). Animal studies have suggested that ADSCs have the potential to differentiate in vivo into endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. This makes ADSCs a promising new cell source...... for regenerative therapy to replace injured tissue by creating new blood vessels and cardiomyocytes in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. The aim of this special report is to review the present preclinical data leading to clinical stem cell therapy using ADSCs in patients with ischemic heart disease....... In addition, we give an introduction to the first-in-man clinical trial, MyStromalCell Trial, which is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using culture-expanded ADSCs obtained from adipose-derived cells from abdominal adipose tissue and stimulated with VEGF-A(165) the week...

  5. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  6. Comparison of the preventive analgesic effect of rectal ketamine and rectal acetaminophen after pediatric tonsillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Morteza Heidari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is a little data about rectal administration of Ketamine as a postoperative analgesic, so we compared the efficacy of rectal ketamine with rectal acetaminophen, which is applied routinely for analgesia after painful surgeries like tonsillectomy. Methods: In this single-blinded comparative trial, we enrolled 70 children undergoing elective tonsillectomy, and divided them randomly in two groups. Patients received rectal ketamine (2 mg / kg or rectal acetaminophen (20 mg / kg at the end of surgery. The children′s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain scale was used to estimate pain in children. Also the vital signs, Wilson sedation scale, and side effects in each group were noted and compared for 24 hours. Results: The ketamine group had a lower pain score at 15 minutes and 60 minutes after surgery in Recovery (6.4 ± 0.8, 7.4 ± 1 vs. 7.1 ± 1.2, 7.8 ± 1.2 in the acetaminophen group, P < 0.05 and one hour and two hours in the ward (7.2 ± 0.7, 7 ± 0.5 vs. 7.9 ± 1.2, 7.5 ± 1.2 in the acetaminophen group, P < 0.05, with no significant differences till 24 hours. Dreams and hallucinations were not reported in the ketamine group. Systolic blood pressure was seen to be higher in the ketamine group (104.4 ± 7.9 vs. 99.8 ± 7.7 in the acetaminophen group and nystagmus was reported only in the ketamine group (14.2%. Other side effects were equivalent in both the groups. Conclusions: With low complications, rectal ketamine has analgesic effects, especially in the first hours after surgery in comparison with acetaminophen, and it can be an alternative analgesic with easy administration in children after tonsillectomy.

  7. Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is effective for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome when associated with rectal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, C; Ong, E; Jones, O M; Cunningham, C; Lindsey, I

    2014-03-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is uncommon and its management is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with SRUS who underwent laparoscopic ventral rectopexy (LVR). A review was performed of a prospective database at the Oxford Pelvic Floor Centre to identify patients between 2004 and 2012 with a histological diagnosis of SRUS. All were initially treated conservatively and surgical treatment was indicated only for patients with significant symptoms after failed conservative management. The primary end-point was healing of the ulcer. Secondary end-points included changes in the Wexner Constipation Score and Faecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI). Thirty-six patients with SRUS were identified (31 women), with a median age of 44 (15–81) years. The commonest symptoms were rectal bleeding (75%) and obstructed defaecation (64%). The underlying anatomical diagnosis was internal rectal prolapse (n = 20), external rectal prolapse (n = 14) or anismus (n = 2). Twenty-nine patients underwent LVR and one a stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) procedure. Nine (30%) required a further operation, six required posterior STARR for persistent SRUS and two a per-anal stricturoplasty for a narrowing at the healed SRUS site. Healing of the SRU was seen in 27 (90%) of the 30 patients and was associated with significant improvements in Wexner and FISI scores at a 3-year follow-up. Almost all cases of SRUS in the present series were associated with rectal prolapse. LVR resulted in successful healing of the SRUS with good function in almost all patients, but a significant number will require further surgery such as STARR for persistent obstructed defaecation.

  8. Sex cord-gonadal stromal tumor of the rete testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Kamran P; Dalton, Rory R; Brown, James A

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old tetraplegic patient with suppurative epididymitis was found on follow-up examination and ultrasonography to have a testicular mass. The radical orchiectomy specimen contained an undifferentiated spindled sex cord-stromal tumor arising in the rete testis. Testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are far less common than germ cell neoplasms and are usually benign. The close relationship between sex cords and ductules of the rete testis during development provides the opportunity for these uncommon tumors to arise anatomically within the rete tesis. This undifferentiated sex cord-stromal tumor, occurring in a previously unreported location, is an example of an unusual lesion mimicking an intratesticular malignant neoplasm.

  9. Rectal motility after sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, H B; Worsøe, J; Krogh, K

    2010-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is effective against faecal incontinence, but the mode of action is obscure. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of SNS on fasting and postprandial rectal motility. Sixteen patients, 14 women age 33-73 (mean 58), with faecal incontinence of various...... contractions, total time with cyclic rectal contractions, the number of aborally and orally propagating contractions, the number of anal sampling reflexes or rectal wall tension during contractions. Postprandial changes in rectal tone were significantly reduced during SNS (P

  10. [Anterior rectal duplication in adult patient: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cabrera, J; Villanueva-Sáenz, E; Bolaños-Badillo, L E

    2009-01-01

    To report a case of rectal duplication in the adult and make a literature review. The intestinal duplications are injuries of congenital origin that can exist from the base of the tongue to the anal verge, being the most frequent site at level of terminal ileum (22%) and at the rectal level in 5% To date approximately exist 80 reports in world-wide Literature generally in the pediatric population being little frequent in the adult age. Its presentation could be tubular or cystic. The recommended treatment is the surgical resection generally in block with coloanal anastomosis. A case review of rectal duplication in the adult and the conducted treatment. The case of a patient appears with diagnose of rectal duplication with tubular type,whose main symptom was constipation and fecal impactation. In the exploration was detect double rectal lumen (anterior and posterior) that it above initiates by of the anorectal ring with fibrous ulcer of fibrinoid aspect of 3 approx cm of length x 1 cm wide, at level of the septum that separates both rectal lumina. The rectal duplication is a rare pathology in the adult nevertheless is due to suspect before the existence of alterations in the mechanics of the defecation, rectal prolapse and rectal bleeding,the election treatment is a protectomy with colonic pouch in "J" and coloanal anastomosis.

  11. Rectal mucosal electrosensitivity - what is being tested?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, A P; Kennedy, M L; Lubowski, D Z

    1996-01-01

    The results of rectal mucosal electrosensitivity (RME) testing have been used to support theories regarding the aetiology of both idiopathic constipation and bowel dysfunction following rectopexy. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of tests of RME. Sixty-eight patients, comprising three groups (group 1: 50 patients undergoing assessment in the Anorectal Physiology Unit, group 2: 10 patients with coloanal or ileoanal anastomosis, group 3: 8 patients with a stoma) underwent mucosal electrosensitivity testing, with the threshold stimulus required to elicit sensation being recorded. In addition the RME was measured in groups 1 and 2 when placing the electrode, mounted on a catheter with a central wire, against the anterior, posterior, right and left rectal or neorectal walls. To asses the influence on this test of loss of mucosal contact due to faeces, a further 8 cases with a normal rectum had RME performed with and without a layer of water soaked gauze around the electrode to stimulate faeces and prevent the electrode from making contact with the rectal mucosa. There was marked variance in the sensitivity of the different regions of rectal wall tested (P < 0.001). In group 1 patients the mean sensitivities were: central 36.6 mA, anterior 27.4 mA, posterior 37.9 mA, right 22.3 mA and left 25.6 mA. This circumferential variation suggests that the pelvic floor rather than rectal mucosa was being stimulated. All patients in group 2 had recordable sensitivities, and the mean sensitivity threshold was significantly higher than group 1 patients in the central (P = 0.03), right (P = 0.03) and left (P = 0.007) positions. In group 3 the sensitivity was greater within the stoma at the level of the abdominal wall muscle than intra-abdominally or subcutaneously, again suggesting an extra-colonic origin of the sensation. The sensitivity threshold was significantly greater with the electrode wrapped in gauze (P < 0.01), and loss of mucosal contact was not detected by

  12. Conservative treatment of premature rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The largest radical resections in rectal cancer with significant morbidity and mortality (Urinary dysfunction, sexual dysfunction, permanent colostomy, etc.), on certain occasions and with high selectivity, they can be avoided with the implementation of local resections. Our intention is to assess the results of conservative treatment of rectal cancer early. Material and Methods: Between 01.01.89 and 31.12.09 14 consecutive patients were treated carriers rectal adenocarcinoma who had never received prior cancer treatment and a second simultaneous showed no neoplasia. The age of the patients presented a range between 44 and 72 years with a mean of 60.4 years; sex similarly partitioned and according to ECOG performance status was 0≤2. All patients were operated through a anal resection of which 4 were performed a submucosal tumor excision (T1) and 10 excision was entire rectal wall and tumor invaded the muscularis propria (T2). For this one type of surgery patients were selected the following criteria: tumor ≤6 cm. the anal verge, size ≤3 cm., GH I-II, vegetative, mobile, and T1-2, N0 by EER. After intervention, the pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed that 4 patients GH III, lymphovascular invasion and / or peri neural, or close surgical margins (+) (≤3 mm.) And T3, so underwent Miles operation (March 1 T1 and T2). Subsequently the rest of the patients (10) underwent concomitant radio chemotherapy. Radiation therapy was similar all using megavoltage photons (CO-60, 18mV) to the entire pelvic volume in a normofraccionamiento to complete 50.40 Gy (1.8 Gy / 28) using multiple fields (box technique). Chemotherapy was prepared 5FU + LV in the first patient (4), in following (4) was used 5FU continuous infusion (1st and 5th week) and the remaining (2) Capecitabine. Follow up was complete. Results: In our sample we extract local failure was 4 (29%), distant failure 3 (20%) and two local and distant failures (14%) so it follows that

  13. Pure NOTES rectosigmoid resection: transgastric endoscopic IMA dissection and transanal rectal mobilization in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Jin; Lee, Kil Yeon; Choi, Sung Il; Kang, Byung Mo; Huh, Chang; Choi, Dong Hyun; Lee, Chang Kyun

    2013-07-01

    We report a pure natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES(®); American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy [Oak Brook, IL] and the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons [Los Angeles, CA]) rectosigmoidectomy in animal models using transgastric endoscopic inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) dissection and transanal rectal mobilization. Ten live animals (2 pigs weighing 35-40 kg each and 8 dogs weighing 25-30 kg each) were used. A gastrotomy was made using a needle-knife puncture and the balloon dilatation technique or following the creation of a submucosal tunnel. A circular stapler shaft was transanally inserted up to the sigmoid colon for spatial orientation and traction of the mesocolon. The IMA was endoscopically dissected using a Coagrasper™ (Olympus, Tokyo, Japan) and then clipped. Endoscopic division of the sigmoid mesocolon was conducted laterally toward the marginal artery. Transanal full-thickness circumferential rectal and mesorectal dissections were performed, and a colorectal anastomosis was performed using a circular stapler with a single stapling technique. During the transanal approach, the gastrotomy was closed using four endoscopic clips. Endoscopic dissection of the IMA was successful in all cases, but minor bleedings occurred in 3 cases. The mean time from dissection and clipping to division of the IMA was 36.7 minutes (range, 25-45 minutes). The mean operation time was 180.5 minutes (range, 145-210 minutes). There were no intraoperative complications or hemodynamic instability. The mean length of the resected specimen was 11.2 cm (range, 9-17 cm). A pure NOTES approach to rectosigmoid resection using transgastric endoscopic IMA dissection is technically feasible in animal models.

  14. Cryopreservation and revival of mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    initiated. As there has been a precedent for the use of bone marrow stem cells in the treatment of hematological malignancies and ischemic heart diseases through randomized clinical safety and efficacy trials, the development of new therapies based on culture-expanded human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs......Over the past few years, the pace of preclinical stem cell research is astonishing and adult stem cells have become the subject of intense research. Due to the presence of promising supporting preclinical data, human clinical trials for stem cell regenerative treatment of various diseases have been......) opens up new possibilities for cell therapy. To facilitate these applications, cryopreservation and long-term storage of MSCs becomes an absolute necessity. As a result, optimization of this cryopreservation protocol is absolutely critical. The major challenge during cellular cryopreservation...

  15. Stromal infrastructure of the lymph node and coordination of immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jonathan E; Turley, Shannon J

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of adaptive immune responses depends upon the careful maneuvering of lymphocytes and antigen into and within strategically placed lymph nodes (LNs). Non-hematopoietic stromal cells form the cellular infrastructure that directs this process. Once regarded as merely structural features of lymphoid tissues, these cells are now appreciated as essential regulators of immune cell trafficking, fluid flow, and LN homeostasis. Recent advances in the identification and in vivo targeting of specific stromal populations have resulted in striking new insights to the function of stromal cells and reveal a level of complexity previously unrealized. We discuss here recent discoveries that highlight the pivotal role that stromal cells play in orchestrating immune cell homeostasis and adaptive immunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intestinal stromal cells in mucosal immunity and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, B M J; Simmons, A

    2013-03-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that non-hematopoietic stromal cells of the intestine have multiple roles in immune responses and inflammation at this mucosal site. Despite this, many still consider gut stromal cells as passive structural entities, with past research focused heavily on their roles in fibrosis, tumor progression, and wound healing, rather than their contributions to immune function. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of stromal cells in intestinal immunity, highlighting the many immunological axes in which stromal cells have a functional role. We also consider emerging data that broaden the potential scope of their contribution to immunity in the gut and argue that these so-called "non-immune" cells are reclassified in light of their diverse contributions to intestinal innate immunity and the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis.

  17. Engineering epithelial-stromal interactions in vitro for toxicology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells drives the morphogenesis of ectodermal organs during development and promotes normal mature adult epithelial tissue function. Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) have been examined using mammalian models, ex vivo t...

  18. Cryopreservation and revival of human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Ekblond, Annette; Kastrup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising and innovative new treatment for different degenerative and autoimmune diseases, and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the bone marrow have demonstrated great therapeutic potential due to their immunosuppressive and regenerative capacities. The establishment ...

  19. Safe and successful birth following pelvic radiotherapy for rectal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Aoki, Masahiko; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2017-02-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas can occur in various parts of the body, and half of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas occur in the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is the most common lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract and primary rectal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is very rare. Because of the high radiosensitivity of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas, this condition can be controlled with radiotherapy of approximately 30 Gy alone. However, ovarian dysfunction as an adverse event of radiotherapy for pelvic lesions can become a problem in girls and women. We report a case of a 28-year-old woman with rectal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma who safely gave birth to a baby following 30.6 Gy radiotherapy to her whole rectum. A 28-year-old Japanese woman became aware of bloody stools and was diagnosed as having Lugano I rectal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. She was referred to our institute and initiated on radiotherapy. However, she expressed a desire to bear children. We used horizontally opposed pair fields for radiotherapy to minimize the irradiation to her endometrium and ovary. A total dose of 30.6 Gy was given in 17 fractions of 1.8 Gy by 10-Megavolt X-ray linear accelerator. As a result, one-third of her uterus and half of her ovary were outside the irradiation field. After approximately 1 year of treatment, positive pregnancy was confirmed and finally she safely gave birth to a baby girl without congenital abnormalities. This report provides hope for girls and women who have undergone irradiation for pelvic mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas and who desire to bear children.

  20. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, V.; Aristei, C.; Glimelius, B.; Minsky, B.D.; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Borras, J.M.; Haustermans, K.; Maingon, P.; Overgaard, J.; Pahlman, L.; Quirke, P.; Schmoll, H.J.; Sebag-Montefiore, D.; Taylor, I.; Cutsem, E. van; Velde, C. van de; Cellini, N.; Latini, P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the first decade of the 21st century a number of important European randomized studies were published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence from the literature, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer