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Sample records for rectal carcinoma patients

  1. Rectal carcinoma

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    Fossati, V; Antognoni, P; Villa, E and others

    1985-01-01

    Records of 135 patients with rectal carcinoma were reviewed and correlations between survival rate, extent of tumor and radiotherapy were investigated. The survival rate at 5 years was 16% for C Astler Coller's stage patients and without metastases, but the prognosis was much less favourable for advanced tumors and/or subjects with distant metastases. Preliminary results of another series of patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy are discussed.

  2. Endocavitary radiotherapy in patients with rectal carcinoma. Endokavitaer straalebehandling ved cancer recti

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    Tanum, G.; Tveit, K.M.; Giercksky, K.E. (Det Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo (Norway))

    1992-05-01

    Most patients with rectal carcinomas undergo surgery, either a resection with anastomosis or Miles' operation with permanent colostomy. Endocavitary radiotherapy is an alternative to surgery in patients with small carcinomas (Dukes' A) or adenovillous adenomas. The treatment is cheap, simple, gives good local tumour control, has low morbidity and does not require hosptialization. The Norwegian Radium Hospital has recently startet to use this method in selected cases of rectal carcinomas. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  3. CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN LEVELS IN THE PERIPHERAL AND MESENTERIC VENOUS BLOOD OF PATIENTS WITH RECTAL CARCINOMA

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    Herminio Cabral de REZENDE JUNIOR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA is an important prognostic factor in colorectal cancer, however the rectum presents different routes of venous drainage, stating that the level of CEA in peripheral and mesenteric rectal tumors may be different, depending on the location of the tumor in the rectal segment. Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the peripheral and mesenteric venous levels of CEA and the association between these levels and the tumour location in the rectums of patients successfully operated on for rectal carcinoma. Methods Thirty-two patients who were surgically treated for rectal carcinoma were divided into patients with tumours located in the upper rectum (n = 11 or lower rectum (n = 21. The CEA values were assessed by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Serum and mesenteric CEA levels were associated with the tumour anatomopathological characteristics: location, histological type, cellular differentiation grade, depth of invasion into the rectal wall, angiolymphatic invasion, tumour, node, and metastasis staging; and the CEA index (≤1.0 or ≥1.0 ng /mL. Results Analysis of the serum CEA values using clinical and anatomopathological parameters revealed no significant association with tumour location, histological type, cellular differentiation grade, depth of invasion into the intestinal wall, and tumour, node, and metastasis staging. The mesenteric CEA levels were significantly associated with the tumour location (P = 0.01. The CEA values in the mesenteric venous blood and the presence of angiolymphatic invasion (P = 0.047 were significantly different. A significant relationship was found between the CEA index value and the rectal tumour location (P = 0.0001. Conclusions The CEA levels were higher in the mesenteric vein in tumours located in the upper rectum and in the presence of angiolymphatic invasion. CEA drainage from lower rectum adenocarcinomas preferentially occurs

  4. The possibilities of radioimmune and radiologic monitoring of the treatment of patients with rectal carcinoma

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    Navruzov, S.N.; Kim, L.V.; Daminova, E.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The method of dynamic control (monitoring) of the treatment efficiency of the patients with rectal carcinoma was developed. Data of dynamic examination (every 10 days) of 174 patients with rectal carcinoma received a specific treatment at the clinic of NOSC of Uzbekistan (Tashkent) were presented. Complex examination of the patients included the data of conventional clinical, special and radionuclide methods (RIA CEA, AFP, IRI ACTH in serum, gamma scintigraphy of liver) was carried out. For a selection of 17 parameters the factor analysis was used. Diagnostic significance of every parameter was determined. CEA and AFP markers were included as indices of tumor activity, ACTH and IRI markers were used as characterization of an organism's response to therapy. In the results of the multifactor investigations the monitoring programs 'Diagnosis-1' and 'Diagnosis-2' were developed. These programs permit to evaluate the treatment efficiency and correct the treatment schemes the case of the absence of the effect. Programmes 'Diagnosis-1' and D iagnosis-2' have a high both the diagnostic (89.9 ± 0.9% and 87.1 ± 0.9 %) and the prognostic (85.2 ± 1.3 % and 83.2 ± 1.3 %) significance. It is concluded that use of radionuclide methods permit to provide an adequate treatment in every case of rectal carcinoma. We suggesting: Use the D iagnosis-1' for evaluation of efficiency of different methods of treatment (CEA-produced tumors of rectum). Use the 'Diagnosis-2' for evaluation of efficiency of treatment of the CEA un-produced tumors of rectum. For objective and quantitative evaluation of the cancer of rectum it is necessary to determine the CEA and AKTH level in blood serum

  5. Sphincter Saving Surgery in Low Rectal Carcinoma in a Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgery is the principal modality of treatment of rectal carcinoma in order to achieve cure. Sphincter saving surgery improves the quality of life of patients with low rectal carcinoma. Aim: To report a case of sphincter saving low anterior resection for low rectal cancer with hand sown colorectal anastomosis

  6. Breast metastases from rectal carcinoma

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    LI Jia; FANG Yu; LI Ang; LI Fei

    2011-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from extramammary neoplasms are very rare, constituting 2.7% of all malignant breast tumours. The most common primary tumor metastatic to the breast is primary breast cancer. Rectal cancer metastasizing to the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of aggressive rectal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast.

  7. Comparing Histopathological and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based Mesorectal Fascia Status in Patients with Rectal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, U.; Khan, R.; Mehmood, M. T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare mesorectal fascia status on histopathological findings with MRI based radiological mesorectal fascia status in patients with rectal carcinoma taking histopathology finding as gold standard. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, from January 2011 to April 2012. Methodology: Biopsy proven cases of rectal adenocarcinoma undergoing abdominoperineal resection were included in this study. Microscopic examination of slides was done to determine mesorectal fascia status as involved or otherwise without knowing the results of mesorectal fascia status on MRI. Mesorectal fascia status of MRI was determined by a radiologist who was not aware of the histopathological assessment of mesorectal fascia. Mean and standard deviation was calculated for age. Frequency and percentage were calculated for gender and mesorectal fascia status. 2 x 2 table was generated to calculate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values and diagnostic accuracy of MRI for mesorectal fascia involvement taking histopathology as gold standard. Results: The sensitivity of MRI to detect mesorectal fascia involvement was 23.07% and specificity was 70.5%. Positive predictive value of MRI was 10% and negative predictive value was 54.54%. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI for mesorectal fascia involvement was calculated as 50%. Conclusion: MRI findings regarding mesorectal fascia status as involved or otherwise are not helpful when compared with histopathological findings which is the gold standard. (author)

  8. Evaluation of stapled versus hand-sewn techniques for colo- rectal anastomosis after low anterior resection of mid-rectal carcinoma: a study on 50 patients.

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    Fayek, Ihab Samy

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of stapled versus sutured colo-rectal anastomosis after low anterior resection of mid-rectal carcinoma. A prospective study of fifty patients who underwent colo-rectal anastomosis following low anterior resection (LAR) of T2 mid-rectal cancers at the Egyptian National Cancer Institute during the time period from June 2010 to June 2013 was conducted. Classification was into two groups; a stapled anastomosis group I (25 patients) and a hand-sewn anastomosis group II (25 patients). All operations are evaluated regarding intra-operative complications such as anastomotic line bleeding, visceral injuries or major blood loss. The anastomotic time and operative time are documented for each operation. All patients are evaluated post-operatively for anastomotic leakage (AL), wound infection and ileus. The distance of the tumor from the anal verge was 9.6 ± 2.0 cm in group I and 9.9 ± 2.4 cm in group II. The mean operative time was 191.5 ± 16.2 min in the stapled group and 208 ± 18.6 min in the sutured group (p=0.002). The mean anastomotic times were 9.0 ± 1.9 min and 19.7 ± 12.2 min (p=0.001). Anastomotic leakage developed in three (12.0%) patients in the stapled group and in four (16.0%) patients in the sutured group (p=1.000). Post-operative ileus was observed in 3 patients in group I and one patient in group II. Wound infection developed in three (12.0%) patients in the stapled group and four (16.0%) patients in the sutured group (p=1.000). Colo-rectal anastomosis after low anterior resection for mid rectal carcinoma can be conducted safely either by stapling or hand-sewn techniques; however the stapling technique showed shorter anastomotic and operative times with no significant advantages regarding intra- or post-operative complications or hospital stay.

  9. The prediction of late rectal complications in patients treated with high dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Brenda G.; Souhami, Luis; Roman, Ted N.; Chappell, Rick; Evans, Michael D.C.; Fowler, Jack F.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to investigate an unusually high rate of late rectal complications in a group of 43 patients treated with concomitant irradiation and chemotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix between December 1988 and April 1991, with a view to identifying predictive factors. Methods and Materials: The biologically effective dose received by each patient to the rectal reference point defined by the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements, Report 38, were calculated. Radiotherapy consisted of 46 Gy external beam irradiation plus three high dose-rate intracavitary treatments of 10 Gy each prescribed to point A. Cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 was given weekly throughout the duration of the irradiation. The results have been compared to data from 119 patients treated with irradiation alone to assess the confounding effect of the cisplatin. Results: The relationship between the biologically effective dose delivered to the rectal reference point and the development of late complications shows a strong dose-response with a threshold for complications occurring at approximately 125 Gy 3 corresponding to a brachytherapy dose of approximately 8 Gy per fraction. This value is approximately the same biologically effective dose threshold as that found for external beam irradiation in the head and neck region. The data from the group of patients treated without cisplatin is comparable to the data from the first group of patients in the lower dose ranges; the higher doses were not used and thus are not available for comparison. Conclusion: Using the linear quadratic model applied to our clinical results, we have established a threshold for late rectal complications for patients treated with external beam irradiation and high dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix. This threshold is consistent with similar data for external beam irradiation in the head and neck region

  10. Sensory and motor dysfunction assessed by anorectal manometry in uterine cervical carcinoma patients with radiation-induced late rectal complication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwi Eon; Lim, John Jihoon; Park, Won; Park, Hee Chul; Chung, Eun Ji; Seong, Jinsil; Suh, Chang Ok; Lee, Yong Chan; Park, Hyo Jin

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of radiation on anorectal function in patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Methods and Materials: Anorectal manometry was carried out on 24 patients (complication group) with late radiation proctitis. All of the manometric data from these patients were compared with those from 24 age-matched female volunteers (control group), in whom radiation treatment had not yet been performed. Results: Regardless of the severity of proctitis symptoms, 25% of patients demonstrated all their manometric data within the normal range, but 75% of patients exhibited one or more abnormal manometric parameters for sensory or motor functions. Six patients (25%) had an isolated sensory dysfunction, eight patients (33.3%) had an isolated motor dysfunction, and four patients (16.7%) had combined disturbances of both sensory and motor functions. The maximum tolerable volume, the minimal threshold volume, and the urgent volume in the complication group were significantly reduced compared with those in the control group. The mean squeeze pressure in the complication group was significantly reduced, whereas the mean resting pressure and anal sphincter length were unchanged. Conclusions: Physiologic changes of the anorectum in patients with late radiation proctitis seem to be caused by a variety of sensory and/or motor dysfunctions in which many different mechanisms are working together. The reduced rectal reservoir capacity and impaired sensory functions were crucial factors for functional disorder in such patients. In addition, radiation damage to the external anal sphincter muscle was considered to be an important cause of motor dysfunction

  11. Thrombosed hemorrhoid mimicking rectal carcinoma at CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Bar-Ziv, J.

    1992-01-01

    A 46-year-old male with cirrhosis and portal hypertension complained of lower pelvic pain. CT of the rectum raised a strong suspicion of a rectal tumor. However, rectal examination, anoscopy, direct rectoscopy, and, unfortunately, post-mortem dissection, failed to confirm its existence. Nevertheless, large flat hemorrhoids were evident. Review of the patient's chart disclosed the presence of large thrombosed hemorrhoids detected by rectal examination prior to the CT examination. It is suggested that rectal hemorrhoids be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal tumor shown by CT in patients with portal hypertension. (orig.)

  12. Thrombosed hemorrhoid mimicking rectal carcinoma at CT

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    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Bar-Ziv, J. (Dept. of Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel))

    1992-09-01

    A 46-year-old male with cirrhosis and portal hypertension complained of lower pelvic pain. CT of the rectum raised a strong suspicion of a rectal tumor. However, rectal examination, anoscopy, direct rectoscopy, and, unfortunately, post-mortem dissection, failed to confirm its existence. Nevertheless, large flat hemorrhoids were evident. Review of the patient's chart disclosed the presence of large thrombosed hemorrhoids detected by rectal examination prior to the CT examination. It is suggested that rectal hemorrhoids be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal tumor shown by CT in patients with portal hypertension. (orig.).

  13. Intracavitary radiation for rectal carcinoma

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    Basrur, V.R. (Ontario Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation, Hamilton (Canada). Hamilton Clinic); Knight, P.R. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-03-01

    Thirty-five patients with low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma have been treated with intra-cavitary radiation (Papillon's technique). Twenty-three were treated for cure and 12 for palliation. The indications for curative intracavity radiation were mobile polypoid tumors, less than 3 cm in diameter, with Broder's Grades 1 and 2 differentiation lying less than 11 cm from the anal verge. Doses between 2000 and 4000 cGy were delivered to a total of 7000 to 20000 cGy with complete resolution of the tumors. Eighty-seven per cent in the curative group are alive and well up to 42 months after treatment with a minimum follow-up of six months. Of the 23 patients treated for cure, three patients had recurrences within 18 months of therapy. Two of the three patients are alive following surgery. The third patient died in the postoperative period. The results of intracavitary radiation are comparable to ablative surgery and avoid a permanent colostomy. Age, frailty, or other medical conditions do not preclude this treatment. Anesthesia and hospitalization are not required. This method can also be used for palliation of recurrent tumors and in patients who are unsuitable for surgery.

  14. Tissue-associated bacterial alterations in rectal carcinoma patients revealed by 16S rRNA community profiling

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    Andrew Maltez Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group. High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4-V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified

  15. The Value of High-Resolution MRI Technique in Patients with Rectal Carcinoma: Pre-Operative Assessment of Mesorectal Fascia Involvement, Circumferential Resection Margin and Local Staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algebally, Ahmed Mohamed; Mohey, Nesreen; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Kohla, Samah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the accuracy of high-resolution MRI in the pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumfrential resection margin (CRM) and local staging in patients with rectal carcinoma. The study included 56 patients: 32 male and 24 female. All patients underwent high-resolution MRI and had confirmed histopathological diagnosis of rectal cancer located within 15 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery. MRI findings were compared with pathological and surgical results. The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI-based T-staging were 92.8, 88.8%, 96.5%, 96%, and 90.3%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based assessment of CRM were 94.6%, 84.6%, 97.6%, 91.4, and 94.6%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based N-staging were 82.1%, 75%, 67.3%, 60%, and 86.1%, respectively. Preoperative high-resolution rectal MRI is accurate in predicting tumor stage and CRM involvement. MRI is a precise diagnostic tool to select patients who may benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy and to avoid overtreatment in those patients who can proceed directly to surgery

  16. Monitoring of tumor microcirculation during fractionated radiotherapy in patients with rectal carcinomas: a clinical study using contrast enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, A. de; Judmaier, W.; Griebel, J.; Kremser, Ch.; Gneiting, T.; Peer, S.; Aichner, F.; Lukas, P.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Combined radio chemotherapy is a frequently used treatment scheme for malignant neoplasms. The purpose of using chemotherapeutics such as 5-FU during radiotherapy is to enhance the effectiveness of radiation. The effectiveness of this approach depends on the accumulation of the drugs within the tumor, which is governed by micro circulatory parameters. However, to date scheduling of chemotherapy application is based on empirical data. There is no clinical study available monitoring tumor microcirculation during fractionated radiotherapy. Contrast enhanced MR imaging in tumors provides not only a better understanding of tumor micro vascularity but is also a method to characterize the substance accumulation within the tumor matrix during radiotherapy. This could help to optimize the scheduling of chemotherapy application. Materials and Methods: Patients with clinical and histological proven rectal carcinoma underwent a preoperative combined radio chemotherapy up to a total dose of 39,4Gy, hyperfractionated with b.i.d., single dose 1,1Gy. The fields in box-technique included the rectal canal and adjacent lymph nodes. 5-FU (300mg/m 2 per treatment day) was given continuously parallel to irradiation. To evaluate the Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, Schering, Germany) concentration time curve after i.v. constant rate infusion (0,05 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA) we used an ultrafast T1-mapping sequence on a 1,5-T whole body imager (Magneton Vision, Siemens, Germany). The transaxial slice (thickness 5 mm) was chosen so that both tumor and arterial vessels could be clearly identified. Before, during and after the infusion 53 T1 maps were obtained within 40 min in intervals of 14s (35 scans) and 120s (15 scans). Assuming a linear relation between relaxation rate, R1=1/T1, and Gd-DTPA concentration, concentration time curves were evaluated for arterial blood and tumor. The patients underwent MR imaging before and in constant intervals during fractionated radiotherapy. As a first

  17. [Rectal carcinoma in a 24-year-old man with Hirschsprung's disease].

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    Henriksen, Jeppe; Green, Charlotte; Ljungmann, Ken

    2018-06-18

    This case report presents an incident of rectal carcinoma in a 24-year-old man with Hirschsprung's disease, for which he was operated in his early childhood, with a Soave pull-through procedure. No direct association between Hirschsprung's disease and rectal cancer was found in our review of the literature. However, several case reports of rectal cancers following pull-through procedures exist. A low threshold for further clinical investigations is recommended, if these patients are presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms.

  18. MRI in staging of rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyianni, S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: MRI of the rectum is performed for initial local staging of primary rectal cancer in order to identify locally advanced rectal cancers and for assessment of treatment response after completion of neoadjuvant therapy. Introduction of new generation MRI scanners with optimal phased array body coils, resulting in improved contrast and spatial resolution images due to better signal to noise ratio, have contributed to production of high resolution images in which visualization of anatomical details such as the mesorectal fascia and the bowel wall layers are feasible. Pre-operative MRI of the rectum using mainly high resolution T2 weighted sequences has gained significant accreditation, especially after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and neoadjuvant therapy in the treatment regimen of rectal cancer. MR Imaging is so far the only method that can preoperatively identify patients most likely to benefit from neoadjuvant therapy as well as demonstrate high risk patients for local recurrence. Regarding N stage besides of mesorectal lymph nodes which are removed during TME, especially in case of low lying rectal cancers, MRI may provide information regarding external/internal iliac lymph node involvement. High resolution MRI images may demonstrate lymph nodes with a diameter down to 2 mm, however these are still characterized based on their morphological features. Patients identified at initial MRI staging as having locally advanced rectal cancer undergo neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in order for their tumor to be downsized and downstaged, especially in low rectal cancers so that sphincter sparing surgery may be performed. In 15-30% of patients complete pathological response is achieved. Reimaging with MRI at 6 weeks post treatment is of great importance for assessing tumor response. Conventional MRI has a reported moderate accuracy for prediction of mesorectal fascia (MF) involvement after CRT therapy, mainly due to its

  19. Rectal complications in carcinoma of the uterine cervix by RALS-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Harada, Kenji

    1982-01-01

    Between July 1979 and January, 1980, we treated 24 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix with RALS-TRON-20B, using the rapid processing system of pretreatment dose calculation. The incidence of rectal complications (3/24) was the same as that of a historical control group (5/28). According to ROC curve analysis, 5 rectal complications were related to the measured rectal dose, not to the point A dose or mg-hrs. Our findings suggest that hemorrhagic tendency, syphilis and diabetes mellitus influence the rectal complications. (author)

  20. Interstitial irradiation of rectal carcinoma with rectal template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Kinji; Tanaka, Ken; Nakanishi, Makoto; Inoue, Takehiro

    1984-01-01

    Using Iridium-192 wires through a rectal template after Syed, interstitial brachytherapy was conducted in a patient with inoperable adenocarcinoma of the rectum. 67-year-old man with constipation and change in the stool caliber underwent external radiotherapy (4,000cGy/4W) to the whole pelvis including the perineum, followed by interstitial implant using a template, at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Marked tumor regression, marked circumferential fibrosis and a remarkable decline of CEA titers (pre-RT: 35.8ng/ml, post-RT: 6.2ng/ml) were observed until 7 months post-RT. The domestic production of Iridium-192 wires has made possible the intergrated use of brachytherapy in the perineal region in Japan. (author)

  1. The review of 134 cases colon and rectal carcinoma

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    Kim, Chung Kyu; Choi, Byung Sook [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-10-15

    Barium Enema study for colon examination is of great importance in the health care of our people and its value can be increased by a wide understanding of the attendant difficulties and limitation. Since the incidence of the colon and rectal carcinoma is increasing, the barium enema examination is more valuable. Radiologically diagnosed 134 cases of colon and rectal carcinoma from January 1964 to June 1970 have been reviewed at Yensei Univ., College of Medicine. Among the total admission during these years, the ratio of the colon and rectal carcinoma was 0.29 percent, and the incidence among barium enema examination was 5.3%. The peak age range was between 40 and 50 years. The average age of the patients was 46 years. It was more common in male. The clinical picture was rather vague in some cases, especially in the lesions of right colon. The large number of cases has bowel habit change, tarry or bloody stool and abdominal pain. About 60% of the lesions were located in rectum and 40% was proximal portion from the rectum, which could not be completely diagnosed only by digital examination and proctosigmoidoscopy. On roentgenogram, the most common form was encircling type, next was fungating. The positivity for accuracy of the barium enema examination was 90%. Majority of cancers of the colon, particularly those that produce symptoms are relative gross lesions. In daily practise we have to eager to find out small lesions by repeat and complete barium enema examination, including double contrast study. Early diagnosis is an aid immediate, logical objective in attempts to decrease the morbidity and mortality from carcinoma of colon.

  2. The review of 134 cases colon and rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Kyu; Choi, Byung Sook

    1971-01-01

    Barium Enema study for colon examination is of great importance in the health care of our people and its value can be increased by a wide understanding of the attendant difficulties and limitation. Since the incidence of the colon and rectal carcinoma is increasing, the barium enema examination is more valuable. Radiologically diagnosed 134 cases of colon and rectal carcinoma from January 1964 to June 1970 have been reviewed at Yensei Univ., College of Medicine. Among the total admission during these years, the ratio of the colon and rectal carcinoma was 0.29 percent, and the incidence among barium enema examination was 5.3%. The peak age range was between 40 and 50 years. The average age of the patients was 46 years. It was more common in male. The clinical picture was rather vague in some cases, especially in the lesions of right colon. The large number of cases has bowel habit change, tarry or bloody stool and abdominal pain. About 60% of the lesions were located in rectum and 40% was proximal portion from the rectum, which could not be completely diagnosed only by digital examination and proctosigmoidoscopy. On roentgenogram, the most common form was encircling type, next was fungating. The positivity for accuracy of the barium enema examination was 90%. Majority of cancers of the colon, particularly those that produce symptoms are relative gross lesions. In daily practise we have to eager to find out small lesions by repeat and complete barium enema examination, including double contrast study. Early diagnosis is an aid immediate, logical objective in attempts to decrease the morbidity and mortality from carcinoma of colon

  3. The TME trial after a median follow-up of 6 years: increased local control but no survival benefit in irradiated patients with resectable rectal carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, K.C.; Marijnen, C.A.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Kranenbarg, E.K.; Putter, H.; Wiggers, T.; Rütten, H.; Pahlman, L.; Glimelius, B.; Leer, J.W.H.; Velde, C.J. van de

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of preoperative short-term radiotherapy in patients with mobile rectal cancer undergoing total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Local recurrence is a major problem in rectal cancer treatment. Preoperative short-term radiotherapy has

  4. The TME trial after a median follow-up of 6 years - Increased local control but no survival benefit in irradiated patients with resectable rectal carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Koen C. M. J.; Marijnen, Corrie A. M.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Kranenbarg, Elma Klein; Putter, Hein; Wiggers, Theo; Rutten, Harm; Pahlman, Lars; Glimelius, Bengt; Leer, Jan Willem; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of preoperative short-term radiotherapy in patients with mobile rectal cancer undergoing total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery. Summary Background Data: Local recurrence is a major problem in rectal cancer treatment. Preoperative short-term radiotherapy has

  5. The volume effect in radiation-related late small bowel complications. Results of a clinical study of the EORTC Radiotherapy Cooperative Group in patients treated for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letschert, J.G.J.; Lebesque, J.V.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Bartelink, H.; Bosset, J.F.; Horiot, J.C.; Cionini, L.; Hamers, J.P.; Leer, J.W.H.; van Glabbele, M.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the correlation between irradiated small bowel volume and late occurring small bowel complications. Methods: Small bowel volumes in the high-dose region were measured using orthogonal barium films for 203 patients treated for rectal carcinoma with pelvic postoperative radiotherapy to 50 Gy in an EORTC multicentric study. Results: The 5-year estimate of lat pelvic small bowel obstruction requiring surgery was 11%. No correlation between the irradiated small bowel volume and obstruction was detected. The actuarial 5-year estimate of chronic diarrhea varied from 31% in patients with irradiated small bowel volumes below 77 cm 3 to 42% in patients with volumes over 328 cm 3 . This correlation was significant in the univariate and multivariate analysis (p=0.025). The type of rectal surgery significantly influenced the incidence of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption, the actuarial 5-year estimate being 49% and 26% after low anterior resection and abdominoperineal resection, respectively (p=0.04). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that there is a volume-effect in radiation-induced diarrhea atr a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. No volume-effect for small bowel obstruction was detected at this dose-level in pelvic postoperative radiotherapy. A review of the literature data on small bowel obstruction indicates that the volume effect at this dose level can only be demonstrated in patients who were treated with extended field radiotherapy (estimated small bowel volume 800 cm 3 ) after intra-abdominal surgery. (author). 22 refs., 5 tabs

  6. Late rectal sequelae following definitive radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a dosimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeske, John C.; Mundt, Arno J.; Halpern, Howard; Sweeney, Patrick; Sutton, Harold; Powers, Claire; Rotmensch, Jacob; Waggoner, Steve; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study attempted to correlate patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors with the risk of late rectal sequelae in patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 183 patients with cervical carcinoma (67 Stage I, 93 Stage II, and 23 Stage III) treated with definitive RT with a minimum of 2 years follow-up were evaluated. Treatment consisted of external beam pelvic RT (EBRT) followed by intracavitary RT (ICRT) consisting of one or two insertions. Complications were scored and analyzed as a function of 25 patient and treatment factors. Conventional total rectal doses were obtained by adding together the EBRT and ICRT rectal doses. To account for differences in dose rate between the ICRT and EBRT, and variations in EBRT fractionation schemes, biologically equivalent rectal doses (BED) were calculated using a linear quadratic model. In addition, the influence of the varying proportions of EBRT and ICRT rectal doses were evaluated. Results: Twenty-eight patients (15.3%) developed late rectal sequelae (13 Grade 1, 3 Grade 2, and 12 Grade 3). Diabetes (p = 0.03), Point A dose (p = 0.04), and conventional EBRT dose (p = 0.03) were the most significant factors on multivariate analysis. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a low risk (<10%) of late rectal sequelae below conventional and biological rectal doses of 75 Gy and 135 BED, respectively. The percentage of rectal dose delivered by the EBRT significantly influenced the dose-response relationship. A defined threshold percentage above which rectal sequelae were more common was identified over the range of doses evaluated. This threshold was 87% at a total rectal dose of 60 Gy and decreased to 60% at 80 Gy. Conclusion: Diabetes, Point A, and EBRT doses are the most significant factors associated with the risk of late rectal sequelae in patients treated with RT for cervical carcinoma. The percentage of rectal dose delivered by the EBRT significantly

  7. Palliative reirradiation of recurrent rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingareddy, Vasudha; Ahmad, Neelofur; Mohiuddin, Mohammed

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This report will summarize symptom palliation, complication rate, and survival outcome of an aggressive reirradiation policy for patients with recurrent rectal cancer. MATERIALS and METHODS: From 1987 - 1993, 83 patients with recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma following previous pelvic irradiation (RT) underwent reirradiation. Thirty-one patients were treated with radical intent, and underwent reirradiation followed by planned surgical resection. The remaining fifty-two patients underwent reirradiation alone and are the basis of this study. Median initial RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range 40.0 - 70.2 Gy), and median time to recurrence was 24 months. Reirradiation was delivered with two lateral fields (7x7 - 12x10 cm) encompassing recurrent tumor with a minimum of 2 cm margin and excluding all small bowel. Thirty patients received 1.8 - 2.0 Gy daily fractions, and 22 patients received 1.2 Gy BID fractions. Median reirradiation dose was 30.6 Gy (range 19.8 - 40.8 Gy). Median total cumulative dose was 84.6 Gy (range 66.6 - 104.9 Gy). Forty-seven of the 52 patients received concurrent 5-FU based chemotherapy. Median follow up for the entire group was 16 months (range 2 - 53 months). Eight patients who remain alive at the time of this study had a median follow up of 22 months (range 13 - 48 months). RESULTS: Patients' presenting symptoms included bleeding, pain and mass effect. Results of treatment are shown in Table 1. Treatment was well tolerated. Using the RTOG toxicity scale, 16 patients required a treatment break for grade 3 toxicity including severe diarrhea, moist desquamation, and mucositis. No patient developed grade 4 acute toxicity. Eighteen patients (35%) developed late grade 3 or 4 morbidity, including bowel obstruction in 9 patients, cystitis in 3 patients, fistula in 4 patients and skin ulceration in 1 patient. There was no difference in incidence of late complications by time to recurrence, reirradiation dose, or total cumulative dose. However, there was

  8. Metastatic nonpalpable invasive lobular breast carcinoma presenting as rectal stenosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaku, Tadatoshi; Ogata, Hideaki; Magoshi, Shunsuke; Kubota, Yorichika; Saito, Fumi; Kanazawa, Shinsaku; Kaneko, Hironori

    2015-04-24

    Invasive lobular carcinomas have an increased propensity for distant metastases, particularly to the peritoneum, ovaries, and uterus. In contrast, distant metastases of nonpalpable lobular carcinomas are extremely rare, and the causes of underlying symptoms of primary carcinomas remain unclear. We report a case of an asymptomatic invasive lobular carcinoma with a primary mammary lesion in a patient with rectal stenosis. A 69-year-old Japanese woman presented to our hospital for treatment of constipation. Although rectal stenosis was confirmed, thorough testing of her lower digestive tract did not identify its cause. Thus, an exploratory laparotomy and tissue biopsy was performed, and the presence of an invasive lobular carcinoma was confirmed. Subsequent breast examinations showed that the invasive lobular carcinoma that led to the rectal stenosis was a metastatic lesion from a primary lesion of the breast duct. As the present breast lobular carcinoma was asymptomatic and nonpalpable, we did not initially consider metastatic breast cancer as a cause of her symptoms, and the final diagnosis was delayed. Peritoneal metastasis from nonpalpable invasive lobular carcinomas is very rare. However, breast cancer metastasis should be considered when carcinomatous peritonitis is present in a patient with an unknown primary cancer.

  9. Daily low-dose/continuous capecitabine combined with neo-adjuvant irradiation reduces VEGF and PDGF-BB levels in rectal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loven, David; B e'Ery, Einat; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Koren, Claude; Sulkes, Aaron; Fenig, Eyal; Lavi, Idit; Shaked, Yuval

    2008-01-01

    Metronomic low-dose chemotherapy regimen was found to have an antiangiogenic effect in tumors. However, its effect on levels of circulating pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors is not fully explored. Materials and methods. The levels of both VEGF and PDGF-BB were measured in three time points, in the serum of 32 rectal carcinoma patients receiving daily reduced-dose/continuous capecitabine in combination with preoperative pelvic irradiation. Results. We found a significant decrease in VEGF and PDGF-BB serum levels during the combination treatment (p<0.0001), followed by an increase in the successive rest-period (p<0.0001). In addition, substantial changes in platelets counts were observed during treatment in correlation with the changes of VEGF and PDGF-BB serum levels. Discussion. These results suggest that combined chemo-irradiation affect levels of pro-angiogenic factors during treatment, and may reflect an anti-angiogenic window induced during this treatment. The potential implications of this inducible phenomenon, including a possible clinical benefit from the administration of long lasting metronomic chemotherapy immediately following combined chemo-irradiation, would warrant further investigation

  10. Management of Liver Metastasis from Colo-Rectal Carcinoma with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Worldwide, colo-rectal carcinoma is the second most common cancer with liver metastases as its major cause of mortality.This malignant condition is now seen more frequently in our environment typically at a late stage with distant metastasis especially to the liver. This study aims at highlighting the current use ...

  11. Results of external beam irradiation for rectal carcinomas locally recurrent after local excision or electrocoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shun Wong, C.; Cummings, B.J.; Keane, T.J.; O'Sullivan, Brian; Catton, C.N.

    1991-01-01

    The outcome of 42 patients who developed locally recurrent rectal carcinoma after initial local excision or electrocoagulation was presented. Five patients received combined surgery and radiotherapy (XRT). The remaining 37 patients were managed by XRT alone. The overall 5 years actuarial survival and local control rates were 21 and 22 percent, respectively. For patients who received XRT alone, the 5 year actuarial survival and local control rates were 20 and 15 percent, resp. The corresponding figures were 35 and 40 percent for patients who received a total XRT dose of 50 Gy or more. One patient who underwent combined treatment developed rectal and bladder incontinence requiring surgery. For patients with rectal recurrence after initial conservative surgery, XRT is an alternative to abdominoperipheral resection if major resection is contraindicated. (author). 13 refs.; 2 tabs

  12. Rectal necrosis following external radiation therapy for carcinoma of the prostate: report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, S.H.Q.; O'Kelly, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the use of radiation therapy in the management of primary carcinoma of the prostate. Since 1965, radical radiation therapy has been used at Memorial Hospital to treat primary carcinoma of the prostate. Small primary tumors are treated by implantation with radioactive iodine ( 125 I) seeds and larger tumors considered unsuitable for implantation are treated by external supervoltage beam therapy. Fifty patients had been treated by implantation and 30 by external beam therapy at the time of this report. None of the patients treated by implantation developed rectal symptoms. Proctitis developed in all patients treated by external radiation therapy and in half the patients chronic proctitis ensued, accompanied by the passage of mucus. The constant leaking of mucus through the anal sphincter produces irritation of the skin and intermittent attacks of pruritus ani, a discomfiting sequel. Apart from the proctitis, most patients tolerated treatment well, with one notable exception, in whom rectal necrosis developed. This case is described

  13. Pre- and postoperative radiation therapy of operable rectal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latini, P.; Ceccaglini, F.; Panizza, B.M.; Maranzano, E.; Aristei, C.; Perrucci, E.; Trancanelli, P.; Mercati, V.

    1991-01-01

    This was a non-randomized prospective study on the 'sandwich' radiosurgical treatment of resectable rectal and rectosigmoid carcinomas. From December 1984 to December 1989. 100 patients were treated 86 of them are now evaluable. mean follow-up was 38 months (range: 9-69). Surgery was abdomino-perineal resection in 33 cases and anterior resection in 53 cases. Radiotherapy was preoperative pelvic irradiation, with a single 500-Gy fraction, the day before surgery. To stages B2, C1 and C2 patients (Astler and Coller) postoperative radiotherapy was administred for a total dose of 4500 Gy (180 Gy/ fraction, 5 fraction/week), with box technique, from a Co 60 unit or Linear Accelerator (photon 18 MV). Preliminary results indicate 8% (7/86) local recurrences and 9.3% (8/86) distant metastates. Five-year actuarial disease-free survival is 63.2% ± 8 for stage B1, 55.6% ±19 for stage B2 and 40.2% ±13 for stages C1+C2. Overall 5-year actuarial disease-free survival is 53% ± 10. No lethal or severe complications were observed following treatment

  14. Rectal Injuries after Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Jin

    1983-01-01

    47 out of 56 cases of intact uterine cervix cancer treated by radiation at the Hanyang University Hospital were followed 18 months or more after treatment. (7 patients died before 18 months, 2 cases lost to follow-up). Age distribution reveal 5 cases in 30's, 18 cases in 40's, 17 cases in 50's, 7 cases in 60's. Histologically, all cases were squamous cell type except one case of adenocarcinoma. 1. 45 cases were treated by combined external Co-60 irradiation and intracavitary irradiation by Cs-137 small sources. 1 case was treated by external irradiation only, and 1 case by intracavitary only. 2. Rectal injuries were observed in 13 cased (27.6%), 4 cases in Grade 1, 8 cased in Grade 2 and 1 cases in Grade 3 which needed surgical management. 3. Average intervals of rectal injury and point A dose reveal 6 cases between 7000-7999 rad and 6 cases between 8000-8999 rad and 1 case above 9000 rad. Even though there is no direct relation between point A dose and rectal injury, it is expected that rectal injury increases as point A dose increase. 4. In the normal condition, rectal injury can't be attributed to one major cause. Radiation dose, small source distribution, general condition of patients, local anatomy of the individual patient, history of PID and previous surgery, all play complex roles

  15. CEA-producing urothelial cell carcinoma with metastasis presenting as a rectal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsin Yang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a case study of a 61-year-old male who presented with difficult defecation for 1 month. A circumferential submucosal rectal tumor was noted on a digital rectal examination and colonoscopy. Laboratory examination revealed high serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; 43.75 ng/mL and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9; 11,790 U/mL. In addition, tumor biopsies revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the rectum with intact mucosa. The patient had history of advanced stage-T2 urothelial cell carcinoma of bladder, which had been downstaged to T0 by neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy 1 year prior. After investigating the initial bladder tumor specimens, a small portion of the tumor with high CEA expression comparable to the submucosal rectal tumor was found. The size of the tumor was reduced and the levels of the tumor markers decreased after administering FOLFIRI chemotherapy targeted at the adenocarcinoma. Although neoadjuvant chemotherapy may have a selective pressure to eliminate most urothelial cell carcinoma, physicians should be aware that it can lead to rectal metastasis via CEA-producing components.

  16. Rectal Cancer: Mucinous Carcinoma on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Poor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberholzer, Katja; Menig, Matthias; Kreft, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Junginger, Theodor; Heintz, Achim; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Hötker, Andreas M.; Hansen, Torsten; Düber, Christoph; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess response of locally advanced rectal carcinoma to chemoradiation with regard to mucinous status and local tumor invasion found at pretherapeutic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients were included in this prospective study of patients with advanced mrT3 and mrT4 carcinomas. Carcinomas were categorized by MRI as mucinous (mucin proportion >50% within the tumor volume), and as nonmucinous. Patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation consisting of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and 5-fluorouracil on Days 1 to 5 and Days 29 to 33. Therapy response was assessed by comparing pretherapeutic MRI with histopathology of surgical specimens (minimum distance between outer tumor edge and circumferential resection margin = CRM, T, and N category). Results: A mucinous carcinoma was found in 21 of 88 patients. Pretherapeutic mrCRM was 0 mm (median) in the mucinous and nonmucinous group. Of the 88 patients, 83 underwent surgery with tumor resection. The ypCRM (mm) at histopathology was significantly lower in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (p ≤ 0.001). Positive resection margins (ypCRM ≤ 1 mm) were found more frequently in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous ones (p ≤ 0.001). Treatment had less effect on local tumor stage in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (for T downsizing, p = 0.012; for N downstaging, p = 0.007). Disease progression was observed only in patients with mucinous carcinomas (n = 5). Conclusion: Mucinous status at pretherapeutic MRI was associated with a noticeably worse response to chemoradiation and should be assessed by MRI in addition to local tumor staging to estimate response to treatment before it is initiated.

  17. Results of external beam irradiation for rectal carcinomas locally recurrent after local excision or electrocoagulation; Short communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shun Wong, C.; Cummings, B.J.; Keane, T.J.; O' Sullivan, Brian; Catton, C.N. (Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    1991-10-01

    The outcome of 42 patients who developed locally recurrent rectal carcinoma after initial local excision or electrocoagulation was presented. Five patients received combined surgery and radiotherapy (XRT). The remaining 37 patients were managed by XRT alone. The overall 5 years actuarial survival and local control rates were 21 and 22 percent, respectively. For patients who received XRT alone, the 5 year actuarial survival and local control rates were 20 and 15 percent, resp. The corresponding figures were 35 and 40 percent for patients who received a total XRT dose of 50 Gy or more. One patient who underwent combined treatment developed rectal and bladder incontinence requiring surgery. For patients with rectal recurrence after initial conservative surgery, XRT is an alternative to abdominoperipheral resection if major resection is contraindicated. (author). 13 refs.; 2 tabs.

  18. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy of rectal carcinoma. Baseline hematologic parameters influencing outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodek, Miroslav; Sirak, Igor; Paluska, Petr; Kopecky, Jindrich; Petera, Jiri; Vosmik, Milan [University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Ferko, Alexander; Oerhalmi, Julius [University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Surgery, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hovorkova, Eva; Hadzi Nikolov, Dimitar [University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Fingerland Department of Pathology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2016-09-15

    The link between the blood count and a systemic inflammatory response (SIR) is indisputable and well described. Pretreatment hematological parameters may predict the overall clinical outcomes in many types of cancer. Thus, this study aims to systematically evaluate the relationship between baseline blood count levels and treatment response in rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. From 2009-2015, 173 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were retrospectively enrolled in the study and analyzed. The baseline blood count was recorded in all patients 1 week before chemoradiation. Tumor response was evaluated through pathologic findings. Blood count levels which included RBC (red blood cells), Hb (hemoglobin), PLT (platelet count), neutrophil count, WBC (white blood cells), NLR (neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio), and PLR (platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio) were analyzed in relation to tumor downstaging, pCR (pathologic complete response), OS (overall survival), and DFS (disease-free survival). Hb levels were associated with a response in logistic regression analysis: pCR (p = 0.05; OR 1.04, 95 % CI 1.00-1.07); T downstaging (p = 0.006; OR 1.03, 95 % CI 1.01-1.05); N downstaging (p = 0.09; OR 1.02, 95 % CI 1.00-1.04); T or N downstaging (p = 0.007; OR 1.04, 95 % CI 1.01-1.07); T and N downstaging (p = 0.02; OR 1.02, 95 % CI 1.00-1.04); Hb and RBC were the most significant parameters influencing OS; PLT was a negative prognostic factor for OS and DFS (p = 0.008 for OS); an NLR value of 2.8 was associated with the greatest significance for OS (p = 0.03) and primary tumor downstaging (p = 0.02). Knowledge of pretreatment hematological parameters appears to be an important prognostic factor in patients with rectal carcinoma. (orig.) [German] Die Verbindung zwischen dem Blutbild und der systemischen Entzuendungsreaktion (''systemic inflammatory response'', SIR) ist unbestreitbar und gut beschrieben. Aufgrund der

  19. High dose rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix: risk factors for late rectal complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun; Aruga, Moriyo; Kotaka, Kikuo; Fujimoto, Hajime; Minoura, Shigeki

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the incidence of late rectal complications in patients treated with high dose rate brachytherapy for FIGO stage IIB, IIIB carcinoma of the uterine cervix, and to evaluate the treatment factors associated with an increased probability of treatment complications. Materials and Methods: Records of 100 patients with FIGO IIB or IIIB cervical carcinoma treated with definitive irradiation using high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICR) between 1977 and 1994 were retrospectively reviewed. For each HDR-ICR session, 6 Gy isodose volume was reconstructed three dimensionally and the following three parameters were determined to represent this isodose volume, length (L); maximum longitudinal distance of 6 Gy isodose area in an oblique frontal plane containing the intrauterine applicator, width (W); maximum width of 6 Gy isodose area in the same plane, height (H); maximum dimension of 6 Gy isodose area perpendicular to the intrauterine applicator determined in the oblique sagittal plane. Point P/Q (2 cm ventral/dorsal from the proximal retention point of the intrauterine source) and point R/S (2 cm ventral/dorsal from the midpoint of the ovoid sources) were also defined retrospectively and HDR-ICR dose at these points were calculated. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the treatment factors predictive of late rectal complications. Results: The 5-year cumulative cause-specific disease-free survival rate was 50% for all, 74% for Stage IIB, and 38% for Stage IIIB, with a significant difference between two FIGO Stages (p=0.0004). Of patients treated for both stages, 30% and 36% had experienced moderate to severe (Grade 2-4) complications at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Average H value (p=0.013) and cumulative point S dose by HDR-ICR (p=0.020) were significantly correlated with the incidence of late rectal complications (Student's t-test), whereas these factors did not significantly affect the probability of pelvic control. No

  20. Rectal Metastases from Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cedrés

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents 85% of lung cancer. The most frequent sites of distant metastasis are the liver, adrenal glands, bones and brain. Gastrointestinal metastases are uncommon and rectal metastases are extremely rare. Here we report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung with rectal metastases.

  1. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mylona, Sophia, E-mail: mylonasophia@yahoo.com; Karagiannis, Georgios, E-mail: gekaragiannis@yahoo.gr; Patsoura, Sofia, E-mail: sofia.patsoura@yahoo.gr [Hellenic Red Cross Hospital ' Korgialenio-Benakio' (Greece); Galani, Panagiota, E-mail: gioulagalani@yahoo.com [Amalia Fleming Hospital (Greece); Pomoni, Maria, E-mail: marypomoni@gmail.com [Evgenidion Hospital (Greece); Thanos, Loukas, E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.com [Sotiria Hospital (Greece)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  2. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mylona, Sophia; Karagiannis, Georgios; Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8–10 min at 80–110°C and a power of 90–110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n − 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  3. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  4. Pre-operative irradiation with rectal carcinoma - clinical practices and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendl, H.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this work is to portray the effect of a high-dosed short-timed pre-irradiation on intra- and post-operative therapy of rectal carcinoma and the appearance of recidivistic tumors, respectively distant metastasis. This intermediate balance should help make the decision easier as to whether to continue to use this combined treatment form. The subjects consisted of 65 rectal carcinoma patients - pre-irradiated and operated - and 95 only operated patients. The irradiation was completed using a 8 MeV linear accelerator with ultra hard x-radiation. Dosing - (more than 80%) as short-timed irradiation with 16 Gy (4 x 4 Gy in 2 days) - 25 Gy (10 x 2,5 Gy in 12 days); average field size 150 mm x 150 mm. There were no significant differences with regard to intra- and post-operative complications, late complications or distant metastasis, but there was with tumor recidivision reduced with pre-irradiated. Regarding the survival rate, there was a slight tendency in favor of the pre-irradiated. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Rectal and urinary morbidity in patients undergoing prostate I-125 implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Kenneth; Wallner, Kent

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the risk of urinary incontinence or severe rectal complications in patients who have TURP/TUIP or rectal bleeding after I-125 prostate brachytherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred nine patients with T1-T2 prostatic carcinoma were treated with I-125 implantation from 1988 through 1994. Ten patients underwent TURP/TUIP after brachtherapy to relieve urinary obstruction refractory to non-surgical management. Twenty-two developed rectal morbidity and were subsequently followed with endoscopy and serial clinical evaluation. RESULTS: Permanent urinary incontinence following TURP/TUIP developed in seven of 10 patients. Urinary incontinence was mild in three patients (LENT score = 1) and severe in 4 additional patients (LENT score = 3). There was no relationship between the degree of incontinence and the use of TURP versus TUIP, mass of tissue resected, or time between brachytherapy and TURP/TUIP. Urethral doses were higher than we generally recommend (> 140 Gy) in the 5 patients for whom detailed urethral radiation dose information was available, Rectal morbidity developed in twenty-two patients. Twenty experienced radiation proctitis-related bright red blood per rectum (BRBPR), the majority of which ((15(20))) were mild (RTOG score = 1) and treated with medical management. The other 5 developed either a rectal ulcer ((3(5))) or fistula ((2(5))). The two patients without significant BRBPR developed a fistula and ulcer. Two of three patients with fistulas had predisposing conditions (pre-implant history of fistula and previous pelvic radiation for rectal cancer). All four rectal ulcers healed with conservative management. CONCLUSION: Permanent urinary incontinence is common in patients who require a TURP/TUIP after prostate brachytherapy. Its cause is multifactorial and may include surgically-related damage to the urinary sphincters and radiation dose to the uretha. Rectal morbidity after prostate brachtherapy is mild in the majority of cases and

  6. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeoh, Eric, E-mail: eric.yeoh@health.sa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark [School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle [School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  7. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction

  8. Prognostic significance of clinical and pathological stages on locally advanced rectal carcinoma after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Bixiu; Zhang, Luning; Wang, Chengtao; Huang, Rong; Peng, Haihua; Zhang, Tian; Dong, Jun; Xiao, Weiwei; Zeng, Zhifan; Liu, Mengzhong; Gao, Yuanhong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate prognostic significance of clinical and pathological stages in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (neo-CRT) and total mesorectal excision. 210 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma (cT3-4 or cN+) treated with neo-CRT followed by total mesorectal excision. Treatment outcomes were compared according to clinical and pathological stage. Overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS) among patients with different clinical stage and pathological stage after neo-CRT. The median follow-up time was 47 months (range, 14–98 months). Clinical T stage was associated with 5 year OS (p = 0.042) and 5 year DFS (p = 0.014) while clinical N stage was not associated with 5 year OS (p = 0.440), 5 year DFS (p = 0.711). Pathological T stage was associate with 5 year OS (p = 0.001) and 5 year DFS (p = 0.046); and N stage was associated with 5 year OS (p = 0.001), 5 year DFS (p = 0.002). The pathological stage was further classified into three groups: ypT0–2N0 in 91 patients (43.3 %), ypT3–4N0 in 69 patients (32.9 %) and ypT0–4N+ in 50 patients (23.8 %). While pathological stage (ypT0–2 vs ypT3–4N0 vs ypT0–4N+) was associated with 5 year OS (87.9 %, 75.5 %, 56.7 %, p = 0.000), 5 year DFS (74.5 %, 77.4 %, 50.5 %, p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that ypN stage was an independent prognostic factor for patients 5 year DFS. Pathological stage is strongly associated with treatment outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with neo-CRT followed by total mesorectal excision, which may be used as guidance for further individualized treatment

  9. Evidence based medicine (EBM) and evidence based radiology (EBR) in the follow-up of the patients after surgery for lung and colon-rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovagnoni, Andrea; Ottaviani, Letizia; Mensa', Anna; Durastanti, Martina; Floriani, Irene; Cascinu, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: a) To define the role of diagnostic imaging modalities in the follow-up of patients after surgery for solid cancer, using an Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) approach; b) to asses the possible discrepancies between the theoretical model and the clinical protocols currently used for the follow-up of treated patients; c) to compare the real costs of the radiological examinations performed in a group of cancer patients followed up after surgery and the theoretical costs that would have been incurred had the patients been followed up according to the theoretical (evidence-based) follow-up programme. Materials and methods: We searched traditional and secondary databases for research papers and guidelines by international scientific societies published in the last 10 years and concerning the clinical impact of follow-up programs in patients operated on for colorectal and lung carcinoma. The papers were selected based on level of evidence using the systematic review approach of EBM. In each paper selected, we considered the overall survival and disease-free survival, quality of life, side and toxic effects of therapy, cost and psychological aspects to formulate a judgement on the usefulness the radiological tests. Subsequently, the clinical and imaging follow-up of 40 patients who had undergone surgical resection for colorectal cancer (20 patients) and lung cancer (20 patients) between 1998 and 2004 were retrospectively reviewed, and the costs of the follow-up programs for the two groups, were analysed and compared with those of the theoretical evidence-based programmes. Results: Of the 41 papers selected after systematic review only nine datasets were considered for our final analysis. The majority of papers (7 out of 9) and all the guidelines published by International Scientific Societies agreed on the poor value of closed imaging in the follow-up of patients who have undergone surgery for colorectal and lung cancer. A significant difference was found between the

  10. Diagnosis of local tumor recidivations after continence excision of rectal carcinoma by means of CAT scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrup, W.; Schlueter, B.; Wedell, J.; Banzhaf, G.

    1984-05-01

    On a patient collective of 19 with recurrent rectal carcinomas following previous resection and one patient with tumor recidivation after local excision of a villiferous adenoma, the demonstration of the different intra and extraluminal tumor infiltration paths by means of CAT scanning is investigated. After thorough cleaning of the intestine and additional application of a contrast enema using a watery contrast medium it is even possible to demonstrate tumor stenoses or a circumscribed thickening of the intestinal wall. With the majority of patients the tumor extends mainly outside the region of the anastomosis in the perirectal area. Early diagnosis of such perirectal infiltration therefore is decisive for the further treatment. As the possibilities of X-ray investigations of the colon and endoscopy for judging the extraluminal growth are limited, CAT scanning is an essential method in tumor aftercare.

  11. Clinical results of tumor shrinkage and evaluation of quality of life in low rectal carcinoma after preoperative combined treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Osamu; Suganuma, Yasushi; Tamura, Takao; Ohnishi, Kazuyoshi; Nishiue, Takashi; Itoh, Masahiko; Horie, Hiroshi; Sawai, Seiji; Takahashi, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    To improve the surgical rate and the quality of life (QOL) for patients with advanced low rectal carcinoma, we investigated whether preoperative treatments (irradiation and hyperthermia and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) suppository, irradiation and hyperthermia, irradiation and 5-FU suppository, irradiation alone and 5-FU suppository alone) were useful. The tumor shrinkage rate after preoperative treatments was highest in the irradiation, hyperthermia and 5-FU suppository group. Pathologically complete regression was observed in the 2 of 18 cases (12%). According to our criteria of histological changes, the irradiation, hyperthermia and 5-FU suppository group showed the greatest effectiveness. The 4 year postoperative survival rate and the 4 year local recurrence rate were 100% and 8% in the irradiation, hyperthermia and 5-FU suppository group and the data suggest that these results were the best of the 5 treatments. After the carcinoma was shrunk after irradiation, hyperthermia and 5-FU suppository, the patients could receive curatively a sphincter-saving operation (super-low anterior resection and transanal rectal resection). The fecal continence of 7 patients after sphincter-saving operations was increased as good by manometric study, defecography and clinical evaluation. In conclusion, our data suggest that the preoperative combined treatment of irradiation, hyperthermia and 5-FU suppository prevents local recurrence and increases the possibility of a sphincter-saving operation for advanced rectal carcinoma. (author)

  12. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zauber, N. Peter; Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  13. Acute treatment-related diarrhea during postoperative adjuvant therapy for high-risk rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Robert C.; Martenson, James A.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Kahn, Michael J.; Krook, James E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The combination of pelvic radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is associated with an increase in acute gastrointestinal toxicity during rectal adjuvant therapy, most notably an increased incidence of diarrhea. Previous randomized, prospective studies have limited their analysis to presenting rates of severe and life-threatening diarrhea (Grade 3 or greater), and few data are available detailing the extent of mild to moderate diarrhea. To provide baseline data for future studies, we conducted a detailed analysis of diarrhea from a prior clinical trial of adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: In a multiinstitutional clinical trial, 204 eligible patients with rectal carcinoma that either was deeply invasive (T3-T4) or involved regional lymph nodes were randomized to receive either postoperative pelvic radiotherapy alone (45 to 50.4 Gy) or pelvic radiotherapy and bolus 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Toxicity was assessed prospectively. Results: For the 99 eligible patients who received pelvic radiotherapy alone, rates of Grades 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 diarrhea during treatment were 59, 20, 17, 4, and 0%, respectively. For the 96 eligible patients who received radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil, the overall rates of grades 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 diarrhea were 21, 34, 23, 20, and 2%, respectively. The increased rates of diarrhea during adjuvant rectal therapy were manifested across all toxicity levels for patients receiving chemotherapy and pelvic radiotherapy. Of primary clinical importance is the substantial increase in severe or life-threatening diarrhea (Grade 3 or more) (22 vs. 4%, p = 0.001) Additionally, increased rates of any diarrhea and also severe or life-threatening diarrhea were observed in patients who had a low anterior resection compared with those who had an abdominoperineal resection (p < 0.001 and p = 0.006, respectively). Conclusion: These results will be of value as a baseline for investigators who want to use

  14. Improved local control with neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma: Long-term analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakfoor, Bruce M.; Willett, Christopher G.; Kaufman, S. Donald; Shellito, Paul C.; Daly, William J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Since 1979, our institution has treated locally advanced rectal cancer with preoperative irradiation followed by resection with or without intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). In 1986, our preoperative treatment policy was changed to include bolus 5-FU chemotherapy concurrent with irradiation in hopes of improving resectability, downstaging and/or local control rates. We report the long-term results with the addition of 5-FU chemotherapy to preoperative irradiation. Materials and Methods: From 1979 - 1994, 200 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma (primary or recurrent) received preoperative irradiation, resection and IORT if indicated. Bolus 5-FU (500mg/m 2 /day) chemotherapy was administered for three days during weeks one and five of irradiation. The change in treatment policy was limited to the addition of 5-FU chemotherapy: the radiation techniques (four-field), doses (50.4 Gy), and indications for intraoperative radiation (microscopic residual, gross residual, tumor adherence) remained constant. The median follow-up for the entire group of patients was 33 months (.95 months - 199 months), and the minimum follow-up was 1.5 years. Tabular results are 5-year actuarial calculations. Results: One hundred and five patients received preoperative 5-FU chemotherapy and irradiation whereas 95 patients underwent preoperative irradiation alone. Sixty-five percent of the patients were able to undergo complete resections, and 53% had transmural disease upon pathologic examination. The addition of chemotherapy did not affect the rates of resectability or tumor downstaging. However, the 10-year local control rate was significantly improved for those patients who received preoperative chemotherapy: 77% vs. 44% (p<0.01) (see figure). When stratified by extent of resection and stage, those patients who underwent complete resections or had transmural disease had significantly improved local control rates when compared to the non-chemotherapy group: No

  15. Carcinoma microsatellite instability status as a predictor of benefit from fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Sun, Yan; Huang, Xin-En; Yu, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Jian-Nong; Zhou, Xin; Li, Dong-Zheng; Guan, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancers with high microsatellite-instable have clinical and pathological features that differentiate them from microsatellite-stable or low- frequency carcinomas, which was studied rarely in stage II rectal cancer, promoting the present investigation of the usefulness of microsatellite-instability status as a predictor of the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluorouracil in stage II rectal cancer. Data of 460 patients who underwent primary anterior resection with a double stapling technique for rectal carcinoma at a single institution from 2008 to 2012 were retrospectively collected. All patients experienced a total mesorectal excision (TME) operation. Survival analysis were analyzed using the Cox regression method. Five-year rate of disease-free survival (DFS) was noted in 390 (84.8%) of 460 patients with stage II rectal cancer. Of 460 tissue specimens, 97 (21.1%) exhibited high-frequency microsatellite instability. Median age of the patients was 65 (50-71) and 185 (40.2%) were male. After univariate and multivariate analysis, microsatellite instability (p= 0.001), female sex (pchemotherapy (pchemotherapy, those cancers displaying high-frequency microsatellite instability had a better 5-year rate of DFS than tumors exhibiting microsatellite stability or low-frequency instability (HR, 13.61 [95% CI, 1.88 to 99.28]; p= 0.010), while in 259 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, there was no DFS difference between the two groups (p= 0.145). Furthermore, patients exhibiting microsatellite stability or low-frequency instability who received adjuvant chemotherapy had a better 5-year rate of DFS than patients did not (HR, 5.16 [95% CI, 2.90 to 9.18]; pchemotherapy and gender. Fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy benefits patients of stage II rectal cancer with microsatellite-stable or low microsatellite-instable, but not those with high microsatellite- instable. Additionally, free of adjuvant chemotherapy, carcinomas with high microsatellite

  16. CT-guided interstitial 125I seed implantation for intractable pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Zhenwen; Chu Hong; Kong Jian; Dou Yongchong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of CT-guided interstitial 125 I seed implantation in treating intractable pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinomas. Methods: During the period from April 2010 to September 2010 CT-guided interstitial 125 I seed implantation was carried out in 11 patients with pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinoma which developed after the patients had received comprehensive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical symptoms, the tumor size and the quality of life (QOL) before the treatment and at two and six months after the treatment were recorded, and the complications were observed. The results were compared. All the patients were followed up for six months. Results: At two and six months after the treatment, the improvement rate of the clinical symptoms was 100.0% (11/11) and 90.9% (10/11) respectively, while the effective reduction of the tumor size was 90.9% (10/11) and 81.8% (9/11) respectively. At two and six months after the treatment the QOL score was (56.0±3.66) and (54.4±5.41) respectively, both of which were higher than the QOL score determined before the treatment (42.5±6.93), the difference between them was statistically significant (P 125 I seed implantation has satisfactory short-term effect. This treatment is also quite safe and effective for patients who are unbearable to external radiation therapy due to the tissue dose restriction. (authors)

  17. Locally Advanced Rectal Carcinoma: Curative Surgery Alone vs. postoperative Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Sang Hee

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the effects of postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the pattern of failure and survival for locally advanced rectal carcinoma, we analyzed the two groups of patients who received curative resection only and who received postoperative radiochemotherapy retrospectively. Materials and Methods : From June 1989 to December 1992, ninety nine patients with rectal cancer were treated by curative resection and staged as B2-3 or C. Group I(25) patients received curative resection only and group II(74) patients postoperative adjuvant therapy. Postoperative adjuvant group received radiation therapy (4500 cGy/ 25fx to whole pelvis)with 5-FU (500 mg/m 2 , day 1-3 IV infusion) as radiosensitizer and maintenance chemotherapy with 5-FU(400mg/m 2 for 5 days) and leucovorin (20mg/m 2 for 5 days) for 6 cycles. Results : The patients in group I and group II were comparable in terms of age, sex, performance status, but in group II 74% of patients showed stage C compared with 56% of group I. All patients were flowed from 6 to 60 months with a median follow up of 29 months. Three year overall survival rates and disease free survival rates were 68%, 64% respectively in group I and 64%, 61%, respectively in group II. There was no statistical difference between the two treatment groups in overall survival rate and disease free survival rate. Local recurrences occurred in 28% of group I, 21% of group II (p>.05) and distant metastases occurred in 20% of group I, 27% of group II(p>.05). The prognostic value of several variables other that treatment modality was assessed. In multivariate analysis for prognostic factors stage and histologic grade showed statistically significant effect on local recurrences, and lymphatic or vessel invasion on distant metastasis. Conclusion : This retrospective study showed no statistical difference between two groups on the pattern of failure and survival. But considering that group II had more advanced stage and poor prognostic

  18. Rectal squamous cell carcinoma in immunosuppressed populations: is this a distinct entity from anal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    COGHILL, Anna E.; SHIELS, Meredith S.; RYCROFT, Randi K.; COPELAND, Glenn; FINCH, Jack L.; HAKENEWERTH, Anne M.; PAWLISH, Karen S.; ENGELS, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the rectum is rare, but as with anal cancer, risk may be increased among immunosuppressed individuals. We assessed risk of rectal SCC in HIV-infected people. Design Population-based registry Methods We utilized the HIV/AIDS Cancer Match, a linkage of US HIV and cancer registries (1991–2010), to ascertain cases of anal SCC, rectal SCC, rectal non-SCC, and colon non-SCC. We compared risk in HIV-infected persons to the general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and evaluated risk factors using Poisson regression. We reviewed cancer registry case notes to confirm site and histology for a subset of cases. Results HIV-infected persons had an excess risk of rectal SCC compared to the general population (SIR=28.9; 95%CI 23.2–35.6), similar to the increase for anal SCC (SIR=37.3). Excess rectal SCC risk was most pronounced among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM, SIR=61.2). Risk was not elevated for rectal non-SCC (SIR=0.88) or colon non-SCC (SIR=0.63). Individuals diagnosed with AIDS had higher rectal SCC rates than those with HIV-only (incidence rate ratio=1.86; 95%CI 1.04–3.31). Based on available information, one-third of rectal SCCs were determined to be misclassified anal cancer. Conclusions HIV-infected individuals, especially with advanced immunosuppression, appear to have substantially elevated risk for rectal SCC. As for anal SCC, rectal SCC risk was highest in MSM, pointing to involvement of a sexually transmitted infection such as human papillomavirus. Site misclassification was present, and detailed information on tumor location is needed to prove that rectal SCC is a distinct entity. PMID:26372482

  19. Giant sigmoid diverticulum with coexisting metastatic rectal carcinoma: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sasi, Walid

    2010-01-01

    Giant diverticulum of the colon is a rare but clinically significant condition, usually regarded as a complication of an already existing colonic diverticular disease. This is the first report of a giant diverticulum of the colon with a co-existing rectal carcinoma.

  20. Radical resection for low rectal carcinoma combined with infusion pump chemotherapy via internal iliac artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo YANG

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effects and practicability of radical resection for low rectal carcinoma with infusion pump chemotherapy via internal iliac artery,and explore the correlation factors influencing the therapeutic effects.Methods Data of 316 patients with low rectal carcinoma,admitted from Oct.1997 to Mar.2008,were retrospectively analyzed and assigned into 2 groups according to the treatment: Patients received infusion pump chemotherapy via internal iliac artery to target area combined with intravenous systemic chemotherapy were assigned into group A(n=249,and those receiving systemic chemotherapy alone following radical resection were assigned to group B(n=67.The timing of pump chemotherapy to target area in group A was set at day 12 after recovery of digestive function,with regimen of 5-FU at 0.5g per dose plus hydroxycamptothecin at 10-15mg per dose,twice a week,four times as a treatment course for a total of 6 courses,and it was followed by intravenously systemic chemotherapy with a regimen of FOLFIRI or FOLFOX.In group B,at day 12 right after recovery of digestive function,the intravenous sytemic chemotherapy was started with the same regimen as in group A.The local recurrence rate,metastasis rate and survival rate after 1,3 and 5 years in the two groups were respectively observed and compared,and the correlation between the clinicopathological features and the 5 year local recurrence rates and survival rates was analyzed in patients of group A.Results In group A,the local recurrence rate at year 1,3 and 5 was 0,1.68%(4/238 and 3.79%(8/211,respectively,the metastasis rate was 0.80%(2/249,4.62%(11/238 and 10.90%(23/211,respectively,and the survival rate was 100%,77.73%(185/238 and 72.04%(152/211,respectively.In group B,the local recurrence rate at year 1,3 and 5 was 0,9.52%(6/63 and 16.36%(9/55,respectively,the metastasis rate was 1.49%(1/67,15.87%(10/63 and 27.27%(15/55,respectively,and the survival rate was 100

  1. [Anterior rectal duplication in adult patient: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cabrera, J; Villanueva-Sáenz, E; Bolaños-Badillo, L E

    2009-01-01

    To report a case of rectal duplication in the adult and make a literature review. The intestinal duplications are injuries of congenital origin that can exist from the base of the tongue to the anal verge, being the most frequent site at level of terminal ileum (22%) and at the rectal level in 5% To date approximately exist 80 reports in world-wide Literature generally in the pediatric population being little frequent in the adult age. Its presentation could be tubular or cystic. The recommended treatment is the surgical resection generally in block with coloanal anastomosis. A case review of rectal duplication in the adult and the conducted treatment. The case of a patient appears with diagnose of rectal duplication with tubular type,whose main symptom was constipation and fecal impactation. In the exploration was detect double rectal lumen (anterior and posterior) that it above initiates by of the anorectal ring with fibrous ulcer of fibrinoid aspect of 3 approx cm of length x 1 cm wide, at level of the septum that separates both rectal lumina. The rectal duplication is a rare pathology in the adult nevertheless is due to suspect before the existence of alterations in the mechanics of the defecation, rectal prolapse and rectal bleeding,the election treatment is a protectomy with colonic pouch in "J" and coloanal anastomosis.

  2. A comparison of pelvic retroperitoneal pneumography and computed tomography in the assessment of extramural invasion of rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaibara, Nobuaki; Kimura, Osamu; Nishidoi, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Masahide; Sugezawa, Akira; Sumi, Kenichi; Ohta, Michio; Koga, Shigemasa

    1988-01-01

    Pelvic retroperitoneal pneumography (PRP) and pelvic computed tomography (CT) were performed on 33 patients with rectal carcinoma in order to compare the usefulness of the two diagnostic procedures in the preoperative assessment of local malignant extramural invasion. Six PRP-negative patients in whom no free air was visualized in the retroperitoneal space surrounding the mass, were all assessed as having extramural invasion by CT scan and all had histologic evidence of invasion. Of 27 PRP-positive patients in whom free air was seen surrounding the mass, 18 were diagnosed as having extramural invasion on CT, 15 of whom had histologic proof of invasion. In the remaining 9 PRP-positive patients, there was no evidence of extramural invasion on the CT scans, but 5 patients showed evidence of invasion histologically. PRP, when positive, had an unacceptably high rate of being false positive and was therefore unreliable in assessing extramural invasion, whereas CT was able to detect, to some extent, extramural invasion which PRP failed to demonstrate. Based on these findings, we conclude that CT is more useful than PRP in the preoperative assessment of extramural invasion of rectal carcinoma, but is of limited diagnostic value when negative. (author)

  3. Thallium-201 chloride per-rectal scintigraphy in primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonami, Norihisa; Nakajima, Kenichi; Hisada, Kinichi; Matsui, Osamu; Kadoya, Masumi; Takashima, Tsutomu

    1985-10-01

    The results of Thallium-201(Tl-201) per-rectal scintigraphy in 10 patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) were presented with other clinical findings of contrast hepatic angiography, computed tomography and ultrasonography. Tl-201 accumulation within the tumor was seen in 7 of 10 patients. This accumulation was thought to be due to Tl-201 supply not from the portal vein but from the hepatic artery since significant high heart to liver uptake ratio(H/L) from 0.71 to 1.21(mean 0.95) was observed. Clear visualization of the heart and kidneys indicated the presence of abundant portal-to-systemic shunting. Other 3 patients showed negative Tl-201 accumulation within the tumor and near-normal H/L from 0.32 to 0.47(mean 0.37)which indicates a little portal-to-systemic shunting. This finding reveals the evidence of the lack of Tl-201 supply to the tumor from the portal vein. The results support the idea that HCC does not receive any significant amount of blood flow from the portal system.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based indication for neoadjuvant treatment of rectal carcinoma and the surrogate endpoint CRM status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassburg, Joachim; Junginger, Theo; Trinh, Trong; Püttcher, Olaf; Oberholzer, Katja; Heald, Richard J; Hermanek, Paul

    2008-11-01

    Is it possible to reduce the frequency of neoadjuvant therapy for rectal carcinoma and nevertheless achieve a rate of more than 90% circumferential resection margin (CRM)-negative resection specimens by a novel concept of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based therapy planning? One hundred eighty-one patients from Berlin and Mainz, Germany, with primary rectal carcinoma, without distant metastasis, underwent radical surgery with curative intention. Surgical procedures applied were anterior resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) or partial mesorectal excision (PME; PME for tumours of the upper rectum) or abdominoperineal excision with TME. With MRI selection of the highest-risk cases, neoadjuvant therapy was given to only 62 of 181 (34.3%). The rate of CRM-negative resection specimens on histology was 170 of 181 (93.9%) for all patients, and in Berlin, only 1 of 93 (1%) specimens was CRM-positive. Patients selected for primary surgery had CRM-negative specimens on histology in 114 of 119 (95.8%). Those selected for neoadjuvant therapy had a lower rate of clear margin: 56 of 62 (90%). By applying a MRI-based indication, the frequency of neoadjuvant treatment with its acute and late adverse effects can be reduced to 30-35% without reduction of pathologically CRM-negative resection specimens and, thus, without the danger of worsening the oncological long-term results. This concept should be confirmed in prospective multicentre observation studies with quality assurance of MRI, surgery and pathology.

  5. A case of Fournier's gangrene following local radiation for the recurrence of rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hideyuki; Okuno, Tetsuo; Mizuo, Toshiyuki

    1993-01-01

    A case of Fournier's gangrene in a 69-year-old man was reported. He had diabetes mellitus and had received 30 Gy radiation for local recurrence of rectal carcinoma. Immediately after the irradiation the disease of scrotum began as redness and swelling, and developed ulcer and necrosis. Antibiotics and local drainage were not of benefit, so we performed debridement and obtained good result. We described our experience of the gangrene from the early phase to recovery. (author)

  6. Quality of Life After "Total Mesorectal Excision (TME)" for Rectal Carcinoma: a Study from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Rauf Ahmad; Bhat, Ikhlaq-Ul-Aziz; Parray, Fazl Qadir; Chowdri, Nisar Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is a key element in rectal cancer (RC) patients. There is not much data regarding this from North India. This study assesses QoL following low anterior resection (LAR) and abdominoperineal resection (APR), operated for low rectal tumors at a high-volume center in northern India. One-hundred-thirty patients of rectal carcinoma were prospectively assessed for quality of life using the European Organization for Cancer QLQ-30 and CR29 questionnaires and compared with reference data population. There was no significant difference in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 functional or symptom score between the study group and reference data population. Specific functional and symptom QoL scores of the study group were comparable to that of reference data population. There was no significant difference in the EORTC QLQ-C30 functional or symptom score between APR and LAR groups, except for the symptom of nausea and vomiting which was reported significantly more by the LAR group patients than APR group ( p  = 0.001). LAR patients had significantly higher scores with regard to nausea and vomiting than patients with an APR ( p  Quality of life after APR and LAR for rectal carcinoma was found to be comparable to the reference data population, and the QoL after APR was similar to that after LAR barring a few symptoms.

  7. The effect of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, hyperthermia and chemotherapy for rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Fumio; Furuta, Kazuhiro; Saito, Yukio; Kataoka, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Hiroshi; Okada, Masaki; Kanazawa, Kyotaro; Sugahara, Tadashi; Shinohara, Naohiro (Jichi Medical School, Minamikawachi, Tochigi (Japan))

    1994-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, chemotherapy and hyperthermia for rectal carcinoma, two groups were compared. Group A consisted of 18 patients in whom hyperthermia, radiation and chemotherapy were performed. Group B consisted of 18 patients in whom only chemotherapy and radiation were performed. The total dose of radiation in both of the two groups was 40.5 Gy, and a radiation field covering the whole pelvis was used. Hyperthermia was performed using 8 MHz radiofrequency waves (Thermotron RF8, Yamamoto Vinyter, Japan), and tumors were heated at about 42 degrees C for 50 minutes. Hyperthermia was repeated five times during the preoperative treatment. Chemotherapy was performed by giving 5-fluorouracil suppositories to a total dose of 3400 mg. Mean tumor reduction rates on barium enema were 31.8% in group A and 18.2% in group B. The difference was statistically significant. The result of the histological assessment of tumor necrosis showed that there was a significantly higher degree of necrosis in group A than in group B. These results showed that the addition of hyperthermia enhanced tumor necrosis. It was concluded that the addition of hyperthermia would be an effective preoperative treatment of rectal carcinoma. (author).

  8. The effect of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, hyperthermia and chemotherapy for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Fumio; Furuta, Kazuhiro; Saito, Yukio; Kataoka, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Hiroshi; Okada, Masaki; Kanazawa, Kyotaro; Sugahara, Tadashi; Shinohara, Naohiro

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, chemotherapy and hyperthermia for rectal carcinoma, two groups were compared. Group A consisted of 18 patients in whom hyperthermia, radiation and chemotherapy were performed. Group B consisted of 18 patients in whom only chemotherapy and radiation were performed. The total dose of radiation in both of the two groups was 40.5 Gy, and a radiation field covering the whole pelvis was used. Hyperthermia was performed using 8 MHz radiofrequency waves (Thermotron RF8, Yamamoto Vinyter, Japan), and tumors were heated at about 42 degrees C for 50 minutes. Hyperthermia was repeated five times during the preoperative treatment. Chemotherapy was performed by giving 5-fluorouracil suppositories to a total dose of 3400 mg. Mean tumor reduction rates on barium enema were 31.8% in group A and 18.2% in group B. The difference was statistically significant. The result of the histological assessment of tumor necrosis showed that there was a significantly higher degree of necrosis in group A than in group B. These results showed that the addition of hyperthermia enhanced tumor necrosis. It was concluded that the addition of hyperthermia would be an effective preoperative treatment of rectal carcinoma. (author)

  9. Prostate specific antigen, digital rectal examination, transrectal ultrasound: how accurate are they in determining prostate carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, John Anthony M.; Pagdanganan, Ernest Jerome A.; Caedo, Florencio Gerardo O.; Magsino, Benjamin C.; Rivera, Eduardo Ll.; Songco, Jaime S.D.

    1998-01-01

    Prostate cancer is an increasing problem. It is the most frequent malignancy in men past the age of 65 years. In the Philippines, 10-20% of males operated for prostatic obstruction had prostate cancer. The potential for cure is optimized by early detection and treatment of organ confined disease. Digital rectal examination, serum prostatic specific antigen and transrectal ultrasound of the prostate have been advocated individually and collectively to determine prostatic cancer. Our study involved forty-nine males who underwent all three screening modalities. Results of the study showed a statistically significant association between the presence of a nodule and occurrence of prostate cancer, a statistically significant association between hardness in consistency and cancer, a statistically significant difference in mean weight between those with Ca and BPH; a statistically significant difference in mean PSA levels between those with Ca and with BPH; statistically significant association between abnormal PSA levels and Ca; and a statistically significant association between a composite positive result and cancer. On the other hand, there was no statistically significant difference in mean age between those with cancer and those with BPH; there is no statistically significant association between the presence of prostatism and whether the patient has Ca or BPH; and there is no statistically significant difference in the mean duration between those with cancer and those with BPH. The study advocates the use of DRE, serum PSA in determining prostatic Ca as well as TRUS for determining occult carcinoma. (Author)

  10. Rectal balloon use limits vaginal displacement, rectal dose, and rectal toxicity in patients receiving IMRT for postoperative gynecological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Chia; Wuu, Yen-Ruh; Yanagihara, Theodore; Jani, Ashish; Xanthopoulos, Eric P; Tiwari, Akhil; Wright, Jason D; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel

    2018-01-01

    Pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies traditionally used a 4-field box technique. Later trials have shown the feasibility of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) instead. But vaginal movement between fractions is concerning when using IMRT due to greater conformality of the isodose curves to the target and the resulting possibility of missing the target while the vagina is displaced. In this study, we showed that the use of a rectal balloon during treatment can decrease vaginal displacement, limit rectal dose, and limit acute and late toxicities. Little is known regarding the use of a rectal balloon (RB) in treating patients with IMRT in the posthysterectomy setting. We hypothesize that the use of an RB during treatment can limit rectal dose and acute and long-term toxicities, as well as decrease vaginal cuff displacement between fractions. We performed a retrospective review of patients with gynecological malignancies who received postoperative IMRT with the use of an RB from January 1, 2012 to January 1, 2015. Rectal dose constraint was examined as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1203 and 0418. Daily cone beam computed tomography (CT) was performed, and the average (avg) displacement, avg magnitude, and avg magnitude of vector were calculated. Toxicity was reported according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Acute toxicity was defined as less than 90 days from the end of radiation treatment. Late toxicity was defined as at least 90 days after completing radiation. Twenty-eight patients with postoperative IMRT with the use of an RB were examined and 23 treatment plans were reviewed. The avg rectal V40 was 39.3% ± 9.0%. V30 was65.1% ± 10.0%. V50 was 0%. Separate cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images (n = 663) were reviewed. The avg displacement was as follows: superior 0.4 + 2.99 mm, left 0.23 ± 4.97 mm, and anterior 0.16 ± 5.18 mm. The avg magnitude of displacement was superior

  11. Basaloid large cell lung carcinoma presenting as cutaneous metastasis at the colostomy site after abdominoperineal resection for rectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater-Marco, Vicente; García-García, José Angel; Roig-Vila, José Vicente

    2013-08-01

    The occurrence of a tumor at the colostomy site after abdominoperineal resection for rectal carcinoma is rare and it may be related to a previously resected carcinoma or another primary tumor. We report a 61-year-old man who developed an ulcerated skin nodule at her colostomy site 6 years after resection of a rectal adenocarcinoma. Histopathologically, the skin nodule was composed of atypical large and pleomorphic cells with high mitotic rate and they were arranged in nests and within lymphatic channels in the dermis. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for cytokeratin (CK) AE1/3, CK7, CK34ßE12, epithelial membrane antigen and vimentin while detection of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA was negative. A diagnosis of basaloid large cell carcinoma of pulmonary origin was suggested and it was confirmed by computed tomography-guided fine needle aspiration of a right subpleural mass. A metastatic tumor at the colostomy site is an exceptional finding and may be the first manifestation of lung cancer, especially if it consist of pleomorphic large cells with high mitotic rate and basaloid immunophenotype. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Frequency of rectal varices in patients with cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuberi, F.F; Khan, M.A.; Zuberi, B.F.; Khan, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To document the frequency of rectal varices in patients with cirrhosis of liver and compare it with that of oesophageal varices in liver and to compare the frequency of rectal varices with non-cirrhotic controls. Patients and Methods: All patients of confirmed cirrhosis of liver, presenting during the study period, were selected for initial workup. On the basis of upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, patients were segregated into those with oesophageal varices group-A) and those without them (Group-B). A matched control group (Group-C) was added, which consisted of patients of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who underwent sigmoidoscopic/colonoscopic examination during the study period. Fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy was done in all selected patients. Statistical analysis for continuous variables was done by student's 't' test while non-continuous variables were analyzed by Mann-Whitney-U test. Results: A total of 104 patients (males 61; females 43) were included. Hepatic encephalopathy grade was significantly lower in group-B (p < 0.0001). Grade-I varices were seen in 13 patients, Grade-II in 38 and Grade-III in 33 patients of Group-A. Rectal varices were present in 59.9% of patients in Group-A as compared to Group-B in which no one had them (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Rectal varices are common in patients of portal hypertension. (author)

  13. The role of apparent diffusion coefficient value in evaluation of the response to preoperative chemoradiation in rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yingshi; Zhang Xiaopeng; Tang Lei; Li Jie; Cao Kun; Cui Yong; Qi Liping; Wang Ning

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess response of rectal carcinoma to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) using DWI and tumor ADC values, and to investigate the value of ADC in predicting and monitoring therapeutic effect of CRT. Methods: Twenty-six patients with primary rectal carcinoma undergoing preoperative CRT were recruited to the study. DWI was performed on a 1.5 T MR scanner in all patients at the time point of pre-therapy, the end of the 1st, 2nd week of therapy and pre-operation, respectively. ADC values of the tumors were calculated on the workstation. Randomized block design was applied to analyze cange in ADCs following treatment. Results All patients were divided into T-downstaging group (n=12) and T-non-downstaging group (n=14). In T-downstaging group, the mean tumor ADC values were (1.10 ± 0.13) x10 -3 , (1.32 ± 0.19) x 10 -3 , (1.35 ± 0.13) x 10 -3 , (1.32 ± 1.00) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s at the time point of pretreatment, week 1, week 2, pre-operation, respectively (F =16.420, P -3 mm 2 /s to (1.23 ± 0.13) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s at the time of week 1 (P>0.05). The ADC value in T-non-downstaging group continuously increased to (1.30 ± 0.16) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s at the end of the 2nd week of CRT (F=5.023, P st week as a diagnostic marker of tumor downstaging, when it was set as 11.6%, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value is 75.0%, 78.6%, 75.0% and 78.6% respectively, the area under curve (Az) was 0.774 (95% confidence interval: 0.583 to 0.964). Conclusions: An early significant increase of mean tumor ADC value in rectal carcinoma has a potential to predict therapeutic effect of CRT. One week after beginning CRT is an early time point to monitor therapy efficacy. (authors)

  14. Locoregional recurrence of rectal carcinoma. A CT-analysis and a target volume concept in adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagatzounis, A.; Koelbl, O.; Mueller, G.; Oppitz, U.; Willner, J.; Flentje, M.

    1997-01-01

    Patients and method: 155 patients with the diagnosis of rectal carcinoma recurrences were treated in our institution between 1980 and 1995. To determine the extension of the recurrent tumor within the pelvic levels (praesacral levels S1-S5, precoccygeal-, pelvic floor level and perineal level) and the tumor infiltration of pelvic organs and muscles we analysed the pretherapeutic CT-images. The lymphnode recurrences were classified as: Pararectal-, presacral-, iliac internal-, iliac external-, iliac communis- and paraaortal recurrences. Results: Sixty-one percent of the patients with rectum exstirpation and 66% with anterior resection showed a combined local and nodal recurrence. Isolated lymph node recurrences were rare (4% and 5%). The local recurrence was mostly situated in the presacral pelvis, predominantly there was an infiltration of the presacral space at the level of S4, S5 and os coccygis regardless of the operating method and the primary tumor location. The anastomosis was involved in the tumor recurrence in 93% of the anteriorly resected patients. In 9 out of 96 patients after rectum exstirpation the pelvic region caudal of the tip of the coccyx was the origin of the recurrent tumor. Primarily all 9 patients had a deep-seated carcinoma ( [de

  15. Ultrasound elastography in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, S R; Vagn-Hansen, C; Sørensen, T

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current literature has described several predictive markers in rectal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation, but so far none of them have been validated for clinical use. The purpose of the present study was to compare quantitative elastography based on ultrasound measurements...... in the course of chemoradiation with tumor response based on T stage classification and the Mandard tumor regression grading (TRG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 31 patients with rectal cancer planned for high dose radiochemotherapy. The tumor and the mesorectal fat elasticity were measured...

  16. Hospital variation in sphincter preservation for elderly rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgion, Christopher M; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2014-09-01

    The primary goal of an operation for rectal cancer is to cure cancer and, where possible, preserve continence. A wide range of sphincter preservation rates have been reported. This study evaluated hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE), and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of elderly rectal cancer patients. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked data, we identified 4959 patients older than 65 y with stage I-III rectal cancer diagnosed from 2000-2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly patients with rectal cancer. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which combined explained 31% of procedure variation. Receipt of LE is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Giant sigmoid diverticulum with coexisting metastatic rectal carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Aidan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant diverticulum of the colon is a rare but clinically significant condition, usually regarded as a complication of an already existing colonic diverticular disease. This is the first report of a giant diverticulum of the colon with a co-existing rectal carcinoma. Case presentation We report a case of a 66-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with lower abdominal pain, chronic constipation and abdominal swelling. Preoperative abdominal computed tomography revealed a giant diverticulum of the colon with a coexisting rectal carcinoma and pulmonary metastasis revealed on a further thoracic computed tomography. An en bloc anterior resection of the rectum along with sigmoid colectomy, partial hysterectomy and right salpingoophorectomy was subsequently performed due to extensive adhesions. Conclusion This report shows that the presence of a co-existing distal colorectal cancer can potentially lead to progressive development of a colonic diverticulum to become a giant diverticulum by increasing colonic intra-luminal pressure and through the ball-valve mechanism. This may be of interest to practising surgeons and surgical trainees.

  18. Comparison of tympanic and rectal temperature in febrile patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Arvind; Dubey, N K; Jyothi, M C; Jain, Shilpa

    2002-04-01

    To compare tympanic membrane temperature and rectal temperature in febrile pediatric patients. Sixty febrile children were enrolled as continuous enrollment at initial triage. Two readings of ear temperature were taken in each child with Thermoscan infrared thermometer. Rectal temperature was recorded by a digital electronic thermometer. Comparison of both the techniques was done and co-relation co-efficients calculated. Parental preference for both techniques was assessed. It was observed that mean ear temperature was 38.9+/-0.90 C and that for rectal temperature was 38.8+/-0.80 degrees C. The correlation coefficient between the two was 0.994 (p rays emitted from the surface of tympanic membrane. Ear temperatures correlates well with rectal temperatures which have long been considered as "core" temperatures. Parents prefer the technique of ear thermometry which is quick (2 sec), safe and non-invasive and patient resistance for this is also less. A non-invasive, non-mucous device which is accurate over a wide range of temperature could be very useful.

  19. Comparison of rectal volume definition techniques and their influence on rectal toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy: a dose-volume analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan; Efe, Esma; Yavuz, Melek; Sonmez, Serhat; Yavuz, Aydin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of four different rectum contouring techniques and rectal toxicities in patients with treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Clinical and dosimetric data were evaluated for 94 patients who received a total dose 3DCRT of 70 Gy, and rectal doses were compared in four different rectal contouring techniques: the prostate-containing CT sections (method 1); 1 cm above and below the planning target volume (PTV) (method 2); 110 mm starting from the anal verge (method 3); and from the anal verge to the sigmoid flexure (method 4). The percentage of rectal volume receiving RT doses (30–70 Gy) and minimum, mean rectal doses were assessed. Median age was 69 years. Percentage of rectal volume receiving high doses (≥ 70 Gy) were higher with the techniques that contoured smaller rectal volumes. In methods 2 and 3, the percentage of rectal volume receiving ≥ 70 Gy was significantly higher in patients with than without rectal bleeding (method 2: 30.8% vs. 22.5%, respectively (p = 0.03); method 3: 26.9% vs. 18.1%, respectively (p = 0.006)). Mean rectal dose was significant predictor of rectal bleeding only in method 3 (48.8 Gy in patients with bleeding vs. 44.4 Gy in patients without bleeding; p = 0.02). Different techniques of rectal contouring significantly influence the calculation of radiation doses to the rectum and the prediction of rectal toxicity. Rectal volume receiving higher doses (≥ 70 Gy) and mean rectal doses may significantly predict rectal bleeding for techniques contouring larger rectal volumes, as was in method 3

  20. Prediction of nodal involvement in primary rectal carcinoma without invasion to pelvic structures: accuracy of preoperative CT, MR, and DWIBS assessments relative to histopathologic findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the accuracy of preoperative computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance (MR imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS in the prediction of nodal involvement in primary rectal carcinoma patients in the absence of tumor invasion into pelvic structures. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifty-two subjects with primary rectal cancer were preoperatively assessed by CT and MRI at 1.5 T with a phased-array coil. Preoperative lymph node staging with imaging modalities (CT, MRI, and DWIBS were compared with the final histological findings. RESULTS: The accuracy of CT, MRI, and DWIBS were 57.7%, 63.5%, and 40.4%. The accuracy of DWIBS with higher sensitivity and negative predictive value for evaluating primary rectal cancer patients was lower than that of CT and MRI. Nodal staging agreement between imaging and pathology was fairly strong for CT and MRI (Kappa value = 0.331 and 0.348, P<0.01 but was relatively weaker for DWIBS (Kappa value = 0.174, P<0.05. The accuracy was 57.7% and 59.6%, respectively, for CT and MRI when the lymph node border information was used as the criteria, and was 57.7% and 61.5%, respectively, for enhanced CT and MRI when the lymph node enhancement pattern was used as the criteria. CONCLUSION: MRI is more accurate than CT in predicting nodal involvement in primary rectal carcinoma patients in the absence of tumor invasion into pelvic structures. DWIBS has a great diagnostic value in differentiating small malignant from benign lymph nodes.

  1. Principia of cancer therapy, 19. Effects of per rectum carmofur on radiotherapeutic efficacy of rectal carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, Hitoshi; Okuyama, Shinichi

    1987-12-01

    Radiotherapy combined with bleomycin in oil and tegafur and/or carmofur has already been shown markedly effective in those patients having rectal cancer as studied histologically (Okuyama et al. Tohoku J. Exp. Med. 143 : 503, 1984) as well as clinically (Hariu et al. Jap. Assoc. Gastrenterol. Surg., Hiroshima, 1983). In search for attainment of better effectiveness, carmofur suppositories were developed. Their pharmacokinetic analysis revealed a ten-time increment in the blood concentration of 5-FU as compared with tegafur suppositories. The clinical results in terms of reduction in tumor size, CEA titers and survival appeared to be improved. Histological studies on the surgical materials seemed promising, too. The probable clinical significance of carmofur suppositories may be that pre-operative radiotherapy of rectal cancers, and possibly those patients having their metastases to the liver organ be greatly expedited.

  2. Rectal diaphragm in a patient with imperforate anus and rectoprostatic fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakur Ashokanand

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The association of rectal diaphragm in an imperforate anus has not been reported until now. A 1-year-old male presented with right transverse colostomy for high anorectal malformation. The patient had imperforate anus and a recto-prostatic fistula with rectal diaphragm. We managed the case by an ano-rectal pull through with excision of the diaphragm.

  3. Managing anemia with epoetin alfa in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velenik, V.; Oblak, I.; Kodre, V.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Anemia is one of the most challenging problems in clinical oncology due to its high prevalence among the patients with malignant diseases. The purposes of our study were: (1) to assess the potential of epoetin alfa therapy to prevent the decline in Hb concentrations that typically accompanies chemotherapy/ radiotherapy (ChT/RT) of the patients with rectal cancer; (2) to test the hypothesis that the use of epoetin alfa significantly reduces the transfusion requirements in the patients with rectal cancer treated with ChT/RT after surgery, and (3) to evaluate the safety profile of the administration of epoetin alfa in the clinical setting. Methods. Sixty patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. Group A consisted of 39 patients with Hb concentrations ≤13 g/dl at the start of ChT/RT following surgery, and group B of 17 patients with Hb concentrations ≥13 g/dl at the start of ChT/RT following surgery, but whose Hb concentrations fell below 13 g/dl during the ChT/RT protocol. The starting dose of epoetin alfa in both groups was 10,000 IU subcutaneously (sc) three times a week (tiw). The following major parameters were evaluated: (1) change in Hb concentrations relative to the baseline as measured at 4-week intervals, (2) allogenic blood transfusion requirements in relation to Hb concentrations, and (3) incidence and severity of adverse events and their potential relationship to epoetin alfa administration. Results. The study protocol was completed in 56/60 patients. In group A, a statistically significant increase in Hb concentration (p<0.001) was observed after the first 4 weeks of epoetin alfa treatment compared to the baseline values, with the mean increase of Hb concentration of 1.97 g/dl ± 0.91 g/dl and Hb concentrations remained significantly increased through the whole study (p=0.0017). In group B, a continuous decrease in Hb concentrations was observed during the first weeks of therapy, reaching the level of

  4. Treatment tactics in patient with rectal cancer complicating ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Barsukov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A successful treatment of a young patient with a 15-year anamnesis of ulcerative colitis, who has been diagnosed with rectal cancer, is presented in this case report. A non-standard surgical intervention has been performed following all principles of oncologic surgery. A subtotal colectomy has been performed with ultra-low anterior resection of rectum. Ascendoanal anastomosis has been performed forming the neo-rectum. There were no complications in postoperative period. Considering disease stage (T3N1M0 adjuvant XELOX was administered for 6 months along with 2 cycles of prophylactic treatment with 5-aminosalycilic acid. During 2-years follow-up there are no signs of rectal cancer and ulcerative colitis progression. After pelvic electrostimulation defecation frequency decreased to 3–4 times per day, a patient has complete social rehabilitation.

  5. MR imaging, CT and CEA scintigraphy in the diagnosis of local recurrence of rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, L.; Holm, T.; Goeranson, H.; Jacobsson, H.; Ohlsen, H.; Larsson, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To compare advanced imaging techniques in the diagnosis of recurrent rectal cancer. Material and Methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients with either suspected or verified recurrence were examined by CT (n=25), MR with phased-array capabilities (n=24) and CEA scintigraphy (n=16). Three experienced radiologists (who were blinded to results obtained at surgery and histopathology) independently evaluated the films, one observer for each modality. Results: The MR radiologist arrived at a correct diagnosis in 87.5% of the examinations, the CT radiologist in 76% and the CEA radiologist in 75%. The MR radiologist's results correlated more often with reported pathology than did those of the CT radiologist with regard to the relation of recurrent tumor to surrounding structures in the pelvis. Conclusion: MR imaging is the most effective of the 3 modalities in the diagnosis of recurrent rectal cancer. (orig.)

  6. [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} PET/CT imaging of integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} levels in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withofs, Nadia; Hustinx, Roland [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Martinive, Philippe; Vanderick, Jean; Coucke, Philippe [CHU Liege, Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Bletard, Noella; Scagnol, Irene; Delvenne, Philippe [CHU Liege, Department of Pathology, Liege (Belgium); Mievis, Frederic; Giacomelli, Fabrice [University of Liege, CYCLOTRON Research Centre, Liege (Belgium); Cataldo, Didier [University of Liege, Laboratory of Tumour and Developmental Biology, GIGA-Research, Liege (Belgium); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Radiology Department, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Our primary objective was to determine if [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} PET/CT performed at baseline and/or after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) could predict tumour regression grade (TRG) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Secondary objectives were to compare baseline [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake, to evaluate the correlation between posttreatment [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} uptake and tumour microvessel density (MVD) and to determine if [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} and FDG PET/CT could predict disease-free survival. Baseline [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} and FDG PET/CT were performed in 32 consecutive patients (23 men, 9 women; mean age 63 ± 8 years) with LARC before starting any therapy. A posttreatment [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} PET/CT scan was performed in 24 patients after the end of CRT (median interval 7 weeks, range 3 - 15 weeks) and before surgery (median interval 4 days, range 1 - 15 days). All LARC showed uptake of both [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} (SUV{sub max} 5.4 ± 1.5, range 2.7 - 9) and FDG (SUV{sub max} 16.5 ± 8, range 7.1 - 36.5). There was a moderate positive correlation between [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} and FDG SUV{sub max} (Pearson's r = 0.49, p = 0.0026). There was a moderate negative correlation between baseline [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} SUV{sub max} and the TRG (Spearman's r = -0.37, p = 0.037), and a [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} SUV{sub max} of >5.6 identified all patients with a complete response (TRG 0; AUC 0.84, 95 % CI 0.68 - 1, p = 0.029). In the 24 patients who underwent a posttreatment [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} PET/CT scan the response index, calculated as [(SUV{sub max}1 - SUV{sub max}2)/SUV{sub max}1] x 100 %, was not associated with TRG. Post-treatment [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} uptake was not correlated with tumour MVD. Neither [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} nor FDG uptake predicted disease-free survival. Baseline [{sup 18}F]FPRGD{sub 2} uptake was correlated with the pathological response in patients with LARC treated with CRT. However, the

  7. Polyethylene glycol hydrogel rectal spacer implantation in patients with prostate cancer undergoing combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jekwon; Lehrich, Brandon; Tran, Carolyn; Mesa, Albert; Baghdassarian, Ruben; Yoshida, Jeffrey; Torrey, Robert; Gazzaniga, Michael; Weinberg, Alan; Chalfin, Stuart; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    To present rectal toxicity rates in patients administered a polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel rectal spacer in conjunction with combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Between February 2010 and April 2015, 326 prostate carcinoma patients underwent combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy of 16 Gy (average dose 15.5 Gy; standard deviation [SD] = 1.6 Gy) and external beam radiotherapy of 59.4 Gy (average dose 60.2 Gy; SD = 2.9 Gy). In conjunction with the radiation therapy regimen, each patient was injected with 10 mL of a PEG hydrogel in the anterior perirectal fat space. The injectable spacer (rectal spacer) creates a gap between the prostate and the rectum. The rectum is displaced from the radiation field, and rectal dose is substantially reduced. The goal is a reduction in rectal radiation toxicity. Clinical efficacy was determined by measuring acute and chronic rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Center Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 grading scheme. Median followup was 16 months. The mean anterior-posterior separation achieved was 1.6 cm (SD = 0.4 cm). Rates of acute Grade 1 and 2 rectal toxicity were 37.4% and 2.8%, respectively. There were no acute Grade 3/4 toxicities. Rates of late Grade 1, 2, and 3 rectal toxicity were 12.7%, 1.4%, and 0.7%, respectively. There were no late Grade 4 toxicities. PEG rectal spacer implantation is safe and well tolerated. Acute and chronic rectal toxicities are low despite aggressive dose escalation. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In search of a dose-response relationship with radiotherapy in the management of recurrent rectal carcinoma in the pelvis: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Rebecca; Thomas, Gillian; Cummings, Bernard; Froud, Peter; Shelley, Wendy; Withers, Rodney; Williams, Jack

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to address the question: ''What is the most effective dose fractionation schedule for the relief of symptoms in patients with pelvic recurrence from rectal or colorectal carcinoma?'' Methods and Materials: Cancerlit/Medline-computerized databases were searched between the years 1966-1996. Studies that explored the response to radiotherapy in patients with pelvic recurrence from rectal/rectosigmoid carcinoma were included. Factors that may contribute to differences in results were postulated in advance and the variations encountered between articles were presented. Articles with data applicable to recurrent disease only were included in the primary analysis. The effect of including articles that reported outcomes of recurrences with unresectable primaries and residual disease was presented as a sensitivity analysis. Results: Only retrospective series (level V evidence) were available. The many sources of potential bias inherent in retrospective analyses make the data suitable for hypothesis generation only. Comparison of response was made between 'lower' vs. 'higher' doses, using 45-50 Gy as the dividing dose, base on the primary analysis. There were no significant differences observable in terms of initial response and the proportion maintaining a response at 6 months, within the range of doses employed. When data from articles that reported outcomes of recurrent disease with primary untreated cancers and postoperative residual disease were included, there was a suggestion for a more favorable response with higher doses. This requires cautious interpretation within the methodological limitations of the data. Conclusion: The optimal dose fractionation schedule for the palliation of pelvic recurrence from rectal carcinoma remains undefined. Well-designed randomized studies, with study arms that are sufficiently diverse biologically to allow the detection of a dose-response relationship if one existed

  9. Haemostatis activity in rectal cancer patients exposed to preoperative radiotherapy: a clinical prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Mogens T; Larsen, Torben B; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether markers of haemostasis activity increased during preoperative radiotherapy and whether postoperative marker levels were increased in irradiated rectal cancer patients when compared with nonirradiated rectal and colon cancer patients. In 45 rectal cancer patients, we measured...... plasma levels of prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer during radiotherapy. Postoperative levels of F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer in irradiated patients were compared with postoperative levels in 123 nonirradiated colon and rectal cancer...... for activation of the haemostatic system during preoperative radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. Some evidence was provided for increased postoperative haemostatic activity among rectal cancer patients who received short-term high-intensity radiotherapy, when compared with patients who received long...

  10. Rectal carcinoma under 40 years of age: seven-year post-treatment follow-up at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haroon, N.; Khan, S.; Alvi, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine epidemiological characteristics, clinical presentation, histopathological features, and long-term follow-up of patients below 40 years of age with carcinoma rectum. Methods: The retrospective case series comprised all patients presenting with histopathological diagnosis of carcinoma rectum with age 15-40 years at the Aga Khan University Hospital between January 1994 and December 2004. Details regarding patient demographics, pre-operative assessment, management and tumour grade and stage were obtained from a prospectively maintained database. Continuous and categorical variables in the data were analysed. Results: Of the 23 patients in the study, 14 (60.89%) were male and 9 (39.13%) were female. Mean age of the subjects was 31+-5 years. Overall, 22 (95.6%) patients presented with rectal bleeding and 12 (52%) had altered bowel habit. The most common site for the tumour was lower rectum (n=20; 87%) and 13 (56.5%) required abdominoperineal resection. Local recurrence rate was 13% (n=3) and distant metastasis occurred in 2 (8.6%) patients during the seven year follow-up. Two (8.6%) patients died, and both had distant metastasis. Conclusion: Carcinoma rectum is uncommon but an important malignancy in patients aged below 40 years. The clinician should have a high index of suspicion in young patients presenting with bleeding per rectum, altered bowel habit and weight-loss. (author)

  11. The Prognostic Value of Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Patients with Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Woo; Shin, Jin Yong; Oh, Sung Jin; Park, Jong Kwon; Yu, Hyeon; Ahn, Min Sung; Bae, Ki Beom; Hong, Kwan Hee; Ji, Yong Il

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic influence of circumferential resection margin (CRM) status in extraperitoneal rectal cancer probably differs from that of intraperitoneal rectal cancer because of its different anatomical and biological behaviors. However, previous reports have not provided the data focused on extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of the CRM status in patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 248 patients were treated for extraperitoneal rectal cancer and enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Extraperitoneal rectal cancer was defined based on tumors located below the anterior peritoneal reflection, as determined intraoperatively by a surgeon. Cox model was used for multivariate analysis to examine risk factors of recurrence and mortality in the 248 patients, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of recurrence and mortality in 135 patients with T3 rectal cancer. CRM involvement for extraperitoneal rectal cancer was present in 29 (11.7%) of the 248 patients, and was the identified predictor of local recurrence, overall recurrence, and death by multivariate Cox analysis. In the 135 patients with T3 cancer, CRM involvement was found to be associated with higher probability of local recurrence and mortality. In extraperitoneal rectal cancer, CRM involvement is an independent risk factor of recurrence and survival. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer is considered an indicator for (neo)adjuvant therapy rather than conventional TN status.

  12. A case of Fournier's gangrene following local radiation for the recurrence of rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Hideyuki; Okuno, Tetsuo; Mizuo, Toshiyuki (Tokyo Rosai Hospital (Japan))

    1993-02-01

    A case of Fournier's gangrene in a 69-year-old man was reported. He had diabetes mellitus and had received 30 Gy radiation for local recurrence of rectal carcinoma. Immediately after the irradiation the disease of scrotum began as redness and swelling, and developed ulcer and necrosis. Antibiotics and local drainage were not of benefit, so we performed debridement and obtained good result. We described our experience of the gangrene from the early phase to recovery. (author).

  13. The correlation of acute toxicity and late rectal injury in radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma: Evidence suggestive of consequential late effect (CQLE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-J.; Leung, Stephen Wan; Chen, H.-C.; Sun, L.-M.; Fang, F.-M.; Huang, E.-Y.; Hsiung, C.-Y.; Changchien, C.-C.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate the acute toxicity during pelvic irradiation and the development of late rectal injury following radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Two hundred and twenty patients treated with curative-intent radiation therapy between November 1987 and January 1992 were analyzed. Patients were treated initially with external beam irradiation, 40-44 Gy/20-22 fractions to whole pelvis, followed by high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy, 7.2 Gy to point A for 3 fractions. Severity of diarrhea during radiation therapy was scored according to six criteria: fecal characteristics, frequency, onset, prescription of antidiarrheal agents, body weight loss during irradiation, and extramedical care needed. Patients were categorized as group ND (no obvious diarrhea), group MD (moderate diarrhea), and group SD (severe diarrhea) for sum score 0-1, 2-5, and ≥6, respectively. The rate of radiation proctitis was expressed, analyzed, and compared with actuarial proctitis-free rate and prevalence. Results: 1) According to the score, 76 (35%), 89 (40%), and 55 (25%) patients were categorized as group ND, group MD, and group SD, respectively. Distribution of patients and treatment characteristics among the three groups appeared similar. Patients treated with a larger field size, ≥16.5 cm 2 , tended to have increased severity of diarrhea. 2) Overall, 103 patients (47%, 103 of 220) developed radiation proctitis. Twenty-one patients were in group ND (28%, 21 of 76), 43 in group MD (48%, 43 of 89), and 39 in group SD (71%, 39 of 55). 3) The five-year actuarial proctitis-free rate was 72, 52, and 29% for group ND, MD, and SD, respectively (p s = 0.229, p = 0.098). 6) Cox's multivariate analysis revealed that severity of diarrhea was the only factor that significantly correlated with the development of radiation proctitis. Conclusion: Patients with increased acute toxicity and diarrhea during radiation therapy of cervical carcinoma significantly

  14. Digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasonography in staging of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Kronborg, Ole; Fenger, Claus

    1994-01-01

    Staging of rectal carcinoma before surgical treatment was performed in a prospective blind study, comparing digital rectal exploration and transrectal linear ultrasonography (TRUS) with the resulting pathological examination. TRUS underestimated depth of penetration in 3 of 33 patients...... and overestimation resulted in 9 of 74. The figures for digital examination were 5 of 18 and 20 of 76, respectively. Penetration of the rectal wall was correctly identified in 56 of 61 patients by digital examination and in 59 of 61 by TRUS. Specimens without penetration of the rectal wall were identified in 26...

  15. Therapeutic Results of Radiotherapy in Rectal Carcinoma -Comparison of Sandwich Technique Radiotherapy with Postoperative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Gil Cha; Suh, Hyun Suk; Lee, Hyuk Sang; Kim, Re Hwe; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Hong Yong; Kim, Sung Rok

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the potential advantage for 'sandwich' technique radiotherapy compared to postoperative radiotherapy in respectable rectal cancer. Between January 1989 and May 1994, 60 patients with respectable rectal cancer were treated at Inje University Seoul and Sanggye Paik Hospital.Fifty one patients were available for analysis : 20 patients were treated with sandwich technique radiotherapy and 31 patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. In sandwich technique radiotherapy(RT), patients were treated with preoperative RT 1500 cGy/5fx followed by immediate curative resection. Patients staged as Astler-Coller B2, C were considered for postoperative RT with 2500-4500 cGy. In postoperative RT, total radiation dose of 4500-6120 cGy, 180 cGy daily at 4-6 weeks was delivered. Patients were followed for median period of 25 months. Results : The overall 5-year survival rates for sandwich technique RT group and postoperative RT group were 60% and 71%, respectively(p>0.05). The 5-year disease free survival rates for each group were 63%. There was no difference in local failure rate between two groups(11% versus 7%). Incidence of distant metastasis was 11%(2/20) in the sandwich technique RT group and 20%(6/31) in the postoperative RT group(p>0.05). The frequencies of acute and chronic complications were comparable in both groups. Conclusion : The sandwich technique radiotherapy group shows local recurrence and survival similar to those of postoperative RT alone group but reduced distant metastasis compared to postoperative RT group. But long term follow-up and large number of patients is needed to make an any firm conclusion regarding the value of this sandwich technique RT

  16. Hepatocellular carcinoma in Danish patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansdottir, Jenna; Christensen, Erik; Schiødt, Frank Vinholt

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cause of cancer, and most HCC patients have underlying cirrhosis. Retrospectively, we aimed to characterize patients with newly diagnosed HCC at a Danish hospital and to investigate survival and identify predictive factors for survival. METHODS...

  17. High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-IC) in treatment of cervical carcinoma: 5-year results and implication of increased low-grade rectal complication on initiation of an HDR-IC fractionation scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chongjong; Wan Leung, Stephen; Chen Huichun; Sun Limin; Fang Fumin; Changchien Chanchao; Huang Engyen; Wu Jiaming; Chen Chuhnchih

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report the treatment results and rectal/bladder complications of cervical carcinoma radically treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-IC). The current policy of using three-fraction scheme was examined. Methods and Materials: Between November 1987 and August 1990, 173 patients with cervical carcinoma were treated with curative-intent radiation therapy. Whole pelvic irradiation was administered with 10-MV X ray. Dose to the central cervix was 40-44 Gy in 20-22 fractions, following by pelvic wall boost 6-14 Gy in three to seven fractions with central shielding. 60 Co sources were used for HDR-IC, and 7.2 Gy was given to Point A for three applications, 1-2 weeks apart. Duration of follow-up was 5-7.8 years. Results: Twenty-eight patients (16%) developed central-regional recurrences. Overall 5-year actuarial pelvic control rate was 83%. By stage, 5-year actuarial pelvic control rates were 94%, 87%, and 72% for Stages IB + IIA, IIB + IIIA, and IIIB + IVA, respectively. Thirty-one patients (18%) developed distant metastasis. Overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 58%. By stage, 5-year actuarial survival rates were 79%, 59%, and 41% for Stages IB + IIA, IIB + IIIA, and IIIB + IVA, respectively. Sixty-six (38%) and 19 patients (11%) developed rectal and bladder complications, respectively. For rectal complication, the overall actuarial rate was 38% at 5 years. By grade, 5-year actuarial rectal complication rates were 24%, 15%, 4%, and 3% for Grades 1-4, respectively. Overall prevalence of rectal complications was 37% and 14% at 2 and 5 years, respectively. Prevalence of low-grade rectal complication (Grades 1 and 2) was dominant at 2 years (30%), but declined to 8% at 5 years. Prevalence of high-grade, severe rectal complication (Grades 3 and 4) remained steady at 2 and 5 years (7% and 6%, respectively). Five-year actuarial bladder complication was 9%. Five-year prevalence of bladder complication was 2%. Conclusion: Using a three

  18. Peculiarities of plasma homeostasis in the patients with rectal cancer according to laser correlation spectroscopy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byilenko, O.A.; Bazhora, Yu.Yi.; Sokolov, V.M.; Andronov, D.Yu.

    1997-01-01

    Laser correlation spectroscopy was used to investigate plasma homeostasis in 82 patients with rectal cancer. The spectra of the blood plasma from 21 donors of the transfusion station were used as the control. The blood plasma homeostasis changes reheated with laser correlation spectrometry in the patients with rectal cancer allow to use them for diagnosis of this pathology

  19. Quality of life in rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purposes: The aim of this study was to observe the quality of life (QOL) in rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy in different periods after operation. Methods: A 1-,3-,6-month prospective study of QOL in 51 rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy and 50 ones without permanent colostomy was assessed ...

  20. Rectal Lymphogranuloma Venereum in HIV-infected Patients Can Mimic Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickx, Etienne; Meignin, Véronique; Gérard, Laurence; Plantier-Colcher, Isabelle; Walker-Combrouze, Francine; Boutboul, David; Galicier, Lionel; Fieschi, Claire; Oksenhendler, Eric

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of rectal lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) has been reported since 2003 in men who have sex with men, most of them being infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In these patients, unusual clinical presentations such as rectal tumor or intense lymphoproliferation on rectal biopsies may lead to an erroneous diagnosis of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Three patients were referred to our center for the management of rectal B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma on the basis of a rectal pathologic specimen showing intense lymphoproliferation, the very suspect of lymphoma. Because of anamnesis of anal intercourses and venereal diseases, additional study revealed that all 3 had a positive Chlamydia trachomatis polymerase chain reaction on the rectal biopsy specimen. Rectal LGV was therefore considered and successfully treated with antibiotics. We propose that all patients presenting with a suspected rectal lymphoma should have a careful anamnesis of sexual behavior and a specific detection of C. trachomatis using polymerase chain reaction analysis on biopsy specimen to rule out the possibility of rectal LGV.

  1. Diffusion-weighted MRI - a new parameter for advanced rectal carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, P.A.; Lukas, P.; DeVries, A.F.; Pfeiffer, K.-P.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the predictive value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on therapy outcome of combined chemoradiation in patients with primary carcinoma of the rectum. Materials and Method: Prior to standardized, combined, neoadjuvant chemoradiation, 16 patients with primary carcinoma of the rectum (cT3) were examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diffusion weighted spin echo echo-planar images (SE-EPI) and contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted spin echo (SE) images at 1.5 Tesla were obtained. The mean ADC of the tumor region was calculated and correlated with the therapy outcome substantiated by postsurgical histopathologic staging. Results: Tumor downstaging (pT0-2) occurred in 9 patients (therapy responders) and no down-staging (pT3) in 7 patients (therapy non-responders). The mean ADC measured 0.476±0.114 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in the responder group and 0.703±0.085 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s in the non-responder group. Comparison of the mean ADC between the groups reached statistical significance (p=0.001). Conclusion: The mean ADC might be a new quantitative parameter to predict therapy outcome of combined preoperative chemoradiation in patients with primary carcinoma of the rectum. (orig.) [de

  2. High dose rate afterloading intraluminal brachytherapy for advanced inoperable rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskin, Peter J.; Canha, Sandra M. de; Bownes, Peter; Bryant, Linda; Jones, Rob Glynne

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: High dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy for tumours of the rectal and anal canal which were inoperable either because of the age and frailty of the patient or because of advanced disease has been evaluated. Patients and methods: In a retrospective review of 50 consecutive patients the two main indications for brachytherapy were as part of a radical radiation programme in those unfit for major surgery (26 patients) or as palliation for advanced or metastatic disease (22 patients). Radical treatment was either sole treatment delivering 6 Gy fraction 2 to 3 times weekly up to 36 Gy or as a boost of 12 Gy after 45 Gy in 25 fractions external beam chemoradiation. Palliative treatments were given predominantly as a single dose of 10 Gy. Results: This was predominantly a group of frail elderly patients with a median age of 82 years (range 35-91). Local tumour response was seen in 21/25 assessable patients with 14 complete responses. Median survival for the entire population was 6 months (range 1-54 months); in patients treated with 'radical' intent this was 25 months (range 1.5-54) and in the palliative group 7.2 months (range 1-37). The most common presenting symptom was bleeding per rectum for which a 64% response rate was obtained with 57% complete responses. Mucous discharge responded in 64% with 28% complete responses. The median duration of response was 7 months. Conclusion: Intraluminal HDR brachytherapy is an effective local treatment for patients otherwise unfit for radical surgery both as a component of radical treatment, or as a simple single palliative procedure

  3. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT: differences in target volumes and improvement in clinically relevant doses to small bowel in rectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delclos Marc E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong dose-volume relationship exists between the amount of small bowel receiving low- to intermediate-doses of radiation and the rates of acute, severe gastrointestinal toxicity, principally diarrhea. There is considerable interest in the application of highly conformal treatment approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, to reduce dose to adjacent organs-at-risk in the treatment of carcinoma of the rectum. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive dosimetric evaluation of IMRT compared to 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in standard, preoperative treatment for rectal cancer. Methods Using RTOG consensus anorectal contouring guidelines, treatment volumes were generated for ten patients treated preoperatively at our institution for rectal carcinoma, with IMRT plans compared to plans derived from classic anatomic landmarks, as well as 3DCRT plans treating the RTOG consensus volume. The patients were all T3, were node-negative (N = 1 or node-positive (N = 9, and were planned to a total dose of 45-Gy. Pairwise comparisons were made between IMRT and 3DCRT plans with respect to dose-volume histogram parameters. Results IMRT plans had superior PTV coverage, dose homogeneity, and conformality in treatment of the gross disease and at-risk nodal volume, in comparison to 3DCRT. Additionally, in comparison to the 3DCRT plans, IMRT achieved a concomitant reduction in doses to the bowel (small bowel mean dose: 18.6-Gy IMRT versus 25.2-Gy 3DCRT; p = 0.005, bladder (V40Gy: 56.8% IMRT versus 75.4% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, pelvic bones (V40Gy: 47.0% IMRT versus 56.9% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, and femoral heads (V40Gy: 3.4% IMRT versus 9.1% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, with an improvement in absolute volumes of small bowel receiving dose levels known to induce clinically-relevant acute toxicity (small bowel V15Gy: 138-cc IMRT versus 157-cc 3DCRT; p = 0.005. We found that the IMRT treatment volumes were typically larger than that

  4. The severity of late rectal and recto-sigmoid complications related to fraction size in irradiation treatment of carcinoma cervix stage III B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deore, S.M.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Viswanathan, P.S.; Dinshaw, K.A.; Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of late rectal and recto-sigmoid complications was carried out of the 203 patients with stage III B carcinoma of uterine cervix, treated using radiation therapy alone during January 1979 to December 1983. The patients were treated with a combination of external irradiation and single intracavitary insertion. External irradiation was randomised to one of the four different fractionation regimes having dose per fraction of 2 Gy, 3 Gy, 4 Gy and 5.4 Gy, delivering with five fractions/week, three fractions/week, two fractions/week and one fraction/week, respectively. The total doses in four different regimens were adjusted using the TDF model. There were 39 cases of late radiation induced rectal and recto-sigmoid complications. The complication rate was correlated with the dose per fraction and TDFs delivered in each regimen. The complication rate of 8.2% for 2 Gy per fraction was increased to 33.33% for 5.4 Gy per fraction. It was found that there is strong correlation (P [de

  5. Exercise and cancer: return to work as a firefighter with ostomy after rectal carcinoma - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskemann, Joachim; Schommer, Kai; Jaeger, Dirk; Scharhag-Rosenberger, Friederike

    2016-07-01

    Colorectal cancer survivors are deconditioned through anticancer therapy. Furthermore, about 10% of them have a permanent ostomy which is associated with weakened abdominal muscles and an increased risk of a hernia. This case study reports on how a firefighter with rectal carcinoma and ostomy was trained to regain operational fitness. A 44-year-old firefighter (178 cm, 82 kg) with an adenocarcinoma of the rectum (diagnosed 24 months prior) had been treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and surgery. After 2 temporary ileostomies, a permanent colostomy was performed 14 weeks before the start of a 9-months training program. The program included sensorimotor, endurance, and strength training of increasing volume and intensity. Endurance, strength, and patient reported outcomes were assessed every 2 to 3 months. Training frequency varied from 1 to 3 sessions/week, although 3 to 5 sessions/week were prescribed. Peak power output was 150, 158, 167, 192, and 175 watts at baseline, 2, 4, 6, and 9 months. Maximal oxygen uptake increased from 1.56 L/min (19.0 mL/min/kg) to 2.39 L/min (28.8 mL/min/kg) after 6 months. Maximal isokinetic peak torque (MIPT) of the knee extensors were 138.0 and 196.5 Nm (Newton meter) at baseline and 6 months. MIPT of the elbow and hip flexors increased from 51.8 to 66.0 Nm and 213.8 to 239.7 Nm, respectively, after 6 months. Physical fatigue decreased by 65% and distress by about 50% after 9 months. The firefighter passed a test for occupational fitness after 6 months and was permitted to work with an exterior crew on a pump truck. It is possible for colorectal cancer survivors with ostomy to regain occupational fitness for physically demanding tasks like firefighting through an individually tailored and supervised training program.

  6. MRI and endosonography in preoperative staging of advanced rectal carcinomas after hypothermoradiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, R.J.; Pegios, W.; Huenerbein, M.; Vogl, T.J.; Hidajat, N.; Gellermann, J.; Wust, P.; Rau, B.; Schlag, P.; Felix, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of staging of endorectal sonography (ES) and body coil MRI after preoperative hyperthermoradiochemotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Prospective analysis of MRI and ES in 30 patients after hyperthermoradiochemotherapy and correlation with histopathological patterns. Results: T-staging by MRI was correct in 47% and by ES in 53% of the cases. Despite similar accuracy of staging in T 0 - and T 1 -tumours, we found different accuracies concerning T 2 -tumour staging about 63% versus 73% (MRI/ES), concerning perirectal infiltration 70% for both techniques, concerning invasion of adjacent organs 90% versus 87%, and concerning lymph node metastases without respect to the N-stage 63% versus 63%. Conclusion: Both imaging modalities provide useful information for operation planning despite limited accuracy after hyperthermoradiochemotherapy. The body coil MRI does not seem to be severely inferior to ES in posttherapeutic staging, despite better contour line imaging by ES. With respect to the determination of invasion of other organs, MRI seems to be more useful. (orig.) [de

  7. HPV Carcinomas in Immunocompromised Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Reusser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide and can result in pre-malignancies or overt malignancies of the skin and mucosal surfaces. HPV-related illnesses are an important personal and public health problem causing physical, mental, sexual and financial detriments. Moreover, this set of malignancies severely affects the immunosuppressed population, particularly HIV-positive patients and organ-transplant recipients. There is growing incidence of HPV-associated anogenital malignancies as well as a decrease in the average age of affected patients, likely related to the rising number of high-risk individuals. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of HPV-related malignancy. Current treatment options for HPV infection and subsequent disease manifestations include imiquimod, retinoids, intralesional bleomycin, and cidofovir; however, primary prevention with HPV vaccination remains the most effective strategy. This review will discuss anogenital lesions in immunocompromised patients, cutaneous warts at nongenital sites, the association of HPV with skin cancer in immunocompromised patients, warts and carcinomas in organ-transplant patients, HIV-positive patients with HPV infections, and the management of cutaneous disease in the immunocompromised patient.

  8. Risk factors of circumferential resection margin involvement in the patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sung Jin; Shin, Jin Yong

    2012-03-01

    Currently, circumferential resection margins (CRM) are used as a clinical endpoint in studies on the prognosis of rectal cancer. Although the concept of a circumferential resection margin in extraperitoneal rectal cancer differs from that in intraperitoneal rectal cancer due to differences in anatomical and biologic behaviors, previous reports have provided information on CRM involvement in all types of rectal cancer including intraperitoneal lesions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze risk factors of CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 306 patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer were enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of CRM involvement. The overall rate of CRM involvement was found to be 16.0%. Multivariate analysis showed that male sex, larger tumor size (≥4 cm), stage higher than T3, nodal metastasis, tumor perforation and non-sphincter preserving proctectomy (NSPP) were risk factors for CRM involvement. Male sex, larger tumor size (≥4 cm), advanced T stage, nodal metastasis, tumor perforation, and NSPP are significant risk factors of CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Given that postoperative chemoradiotherapy is recommended for patients with a positive CRM, further oncologic studies are warranted to ascertain which patients with these risk factors would require adjuvant therapy.

  9. Radiation therapy for pre-sacral recurrence of rectal carcinoma following primary surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanashi, Shunji; Yokoyama, Suguru; Kirita, Maruyuki; Katou, Yasuharu; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Between April 2002 and December 2005, we treated 15 patients who were suffering from pre-sacral recurrence of rectal cancer with or without liver metastases, using multi-portal irradiation and oral intake of tegafur-uracil (UFT) (300 mg/day), to assess pain relief and local control. Radiation therapy was given 2.1 to 2.4 Gy daily fractions, and total tumor dose was set up at a landmark of 66 Gy/30 fractions/6 weeks (time-dose-fractionation (TDF)=115, corresponding to 70 Gy), varying by recurrent tumor volume. The follow-up time was ranged from 3 to 37 months (median=14.7 months), and median survival was 14.8 months. Pain remission time was 3 to 36 months (median=10.4 months). No severe morbidity which induced by radiation therapy was observed in follow-up duration. The median survival has become unfavorite, but the multi-portal irradiation of high dose delivery is useful for improvement of quality of life (QOL) and beneficial as a palliative therapy. To improvement of local control and prognosis, combined modality with more effective regimen of chemotherapy is expected. (author)

  10. Impact of KRAS, BRAF and PI3KCA mutations in rectal carcinomas treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbel, Olfa; La Fouchardière, Christelle de; Wang, Qing; Desseigne, Françoise; Rivoire, Michel; Meeus, Pierre; Peyrat, Patrice; Stella, Mattia; Martel-Lafay, Isabelle; Lemaistre, Anne-Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Conventional treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer usually combines neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and surgery. Until recently, there have been limited predictive factors (clinical or biological) for rectal tumor response to conventional treatment. KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations are commonly found in colon cancers. In this study, we aimed to determine the mutation frequencies of KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA and to establish whether such mutations may be used as prognostic and/or predictive factors in rectal cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and biological data of 98 consecutive operated patients between May 2006 and September 2009. We focused in patients who received surgery in our center after radiochemotherapy and in which tumor samples were available. In the 98 patients with a rectal cancer, the median follow-up time was 28.3 months (4–74). Eight out of ninety-eight patients experienced a local recurrence (8%) and 17/98 developed distant metastasis (17%). KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA were identified respectively in 23 (23.5%), 2 (2%) and 4 (4%) patients. As described in previous studies, mutations in KRAS and BRAF were mutually exclusive. No patient with local recurrence exhibited KRAS or PIK3CA mutation and one harbored BRAF mutation (12.5%). Of the seventeen patients with distant metastasis (17%), 5 were presenting KRAS mutation (29%), one BRAF (5%) and one PIK3CA mutation (5%). No relationship was seen between PIK3CA, KRAS or BRAF mutation and local or distant recurrences. The frequencies of KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations in our study were lower than the average frequencies reported in colorectal cancers and no significant correlation was found between local/distant recurrences and KRAS, BRAF or PIK3CA mutations. Future studies with greater number of patients, longer follow-up time and greater power to predict associations are necessary to fully understand this relationship

  11. Mesorectal Invasion Depth in Rectal Carcinoma Is Associated With Low Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino-Silva, Leonardo S; Loaeza-Belmont, Reynaldo; Gómez Álvarez, Miguel A; Vela-Sarmiento, Itzel; Aguilar-Romero, José M; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge A; Salcedo-Hernández, Rosa A; Ruiz-García, Erika B; Maldonado-Martínez, Héctor A; Herrera-Gómez, Ángel

    2017-03-01

    Most cases of rectal cancer (RC) in our institution are in pathologic stage T3. They are a heterogeneous group but have been classified in a single-stage category. We performed the present study to validate the prognostic significance of the mesorectal extension depth (MED) in T3 RC measured in millimeters beyond the muscularis propria plane. We performed a retrospective analysis of 104 patients with T3 RC who had undergone curative surgery after a course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy at a tertiary referral cancer hospital. The patients were grouped by MED (T3a,  5-10 mm; and T3d > 10 mm). The clinicopathologic data and disease-free survival were analyzed. The 5-year disease-free survival rate according to the T3 subclassification was 87.5% for those with T3a, 57.9% for T3b, 38.7% for T3c, and 40.3% for those with T3d tumors (P = .050). On univariate and multivariate analysis, the prognostic factors affecting survival were overall recurrence (hazard ratio [HR], 3.670; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.710-7.837; P = .001), histologic grade (HR, 2.204; 95% CI, 1.156-4.199; P = .016), mesorectal invasion depth (HR, 1.885; 95% CI, 1.164-3.052; P = .010), and lymph node metastasis (HR, 1.211; 95% CI, 1.015-1.444; P = .033). MED is a significant prognostic factor in patients with T3 RC who have undergone neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, especially when the MED is > 5 mm. The MED could be as important as other clinicopathologic factors in predicting disease-specific survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Meta-analysis of elective surgical complications related to defunctioning loop ileostomy compared with loop colostomy after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hong Zhi; Nasier, Dilidan; Liu, Bing; Gao, Hua; Xu, Yi Ke

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Defunctioning loop ileostomy (LI) and loop colostomy (LC) are used widely to protect/treat anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. However, it is not known which surgical approach has a lower prevalence of surgical complications after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma (LARRC). Methods We conducted a literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases to identify studies published between 1966 and 2013 focusing on elective surgical complications related to defunctioning LI and LC undertaken to protect a distal rectal anastomosis after LARRC. Results Five studies (two randomized controlled trials, one prospective non-randomized trial, and two retrospective trials) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Outcomes of 1,025 patients (652 LI and 373 LC) were analyzed. After the construction of a LI or LC, there was a significantly lower prevalence of sepsis (p=0.04), prolapse (p=0.03), and parastomal hernia (p=0.02) in LI patients than in LC patients. Also, the prevalence of overall complications was significantly lower in those who received LIs compared with those who received LCs (p<0.0001). After closure of defunctioning loops, there were significantly fewer wound infections (p=0.006) and incisional hernias (p=0.007) in LI patients than in LC patients, but there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of overall complications. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis show that a defunctioning LI may be superior to LC with respect to a lower prevalence of surgical complications after LARRC.

  13. Merkel cell carcinoma in an immunosuppressed patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góes, Heliana Freitas de Oliveira; Lima, Caren Dos Santos; Issa, Maria Cláudia de Almeida; Luz, Flávio Barbosa; Pantaleão, Luciana; Paixão, José Gabriel Miranda da

    2017-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an uncommon neuroendocrine carcinoma with a rising incidence and an aggressive behavior. It predominantly occurs in older patients, with onset occurring at a mean age of 75-80 years. Recognized risk factors are ultraviolet sunlight exposure, immunosuppression, and, more recently, Merkel cell polyomavirus. We report a case of Merkel cell carcinoma in a young HIV positive patient with Merkel Cell polyomavirus detected in the tumor.

  14. Proposed Rectal Dose Constraints for Patients Undergoing Definitive Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Linda W.; Xia Ping; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Akazawa, Michelle; Scala, Matthew; Pickett, Barby M.S.; Hsu, I-C.; Speight, Joycelyn; Roach, Mack

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although several institutions have reported rectal dose constraints according to threshold toxicity, the plethora of trials has resulted in multiple, confusing dose-volume histogram recommendations. A set of standardized, literature-based constraints for patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer would help guide the practice of prostate RT. The purpose of this study was to develop these constraints, demonstrate that they are achievable, and assess the corresponding rectal toxicity. Methods and Materials: An extensive literature search identified eight key studies relating dose-volume histogram data to rectal toxicity. A correction factor was developed to address differences in the anatomic definition of the rectum across studies. The dose-volume histogram constraints recommended by each study were combined to generate the constraints. The data from all patients treated with definitive intensity-modulated RT were then compared against these constraints. Acute rectal toxicity was assessed. Results: A continuous, proposed rectal dose-constraint curve was generated. Intensity-modulated RT not only met this constraint curve, but also was able to achieve at least 30-40% lower dose to the rectum. The preliminary clinical results were also positive: 50% of patients reported no acute bowel toxicity, 33% reported Grade 1 toxicity, and 17% reported Grade 2 toxicity. No patients reported Grade 3-4 acute rectal toxicity. Conclusions: In this study, we developed a set of proposed rectal dose constraints. This allowed for volumetric assessment of the dose-volume relationship compared with single dose-volume histogram points. Additional research will be performed to validate this threshold as a class solution for rectal dose constraints

  15. Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer in central and northern Denmark, 1998-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenfeld, Eva B; Erichsen, Rune; Iversen, Lene H; Gandrup, Per; Nørgaard, Mette; Jacobsen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The prognosis for colon and rectal cancer has improved in Denmark over the past decades but is still poor compared with that in our neighboring countries. We conducted this population-based study to monitor recent trends in colon and rectal cancer survival in the central and northern regions of Denmark. Using the Danish National Registry of Patients, we identified 9412 patients with an incident diagnosis of colon cancer and 5685 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer between 1998 and 2009. We determined survival, and used Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to compare mortality over time, adjusting for age and gender. Among surgically treated patients, we computed 30-day mortality and corresponding mortality rate ratios (MRRs). The annual numbers of colon and rectal cancer increased from 1998 through 2009. For colon cancer, 1-year survival improved from 65% to 70%, and 5-year survival improved from 37% to 43%. For rectal cancer, 1-year survival improved from 73% to 78%, and 5-year survival improved from 39% to 47%. Men aged 80+ showed most pronounced improvements. The 1- and 5-year adjusted MRRs decreased: for colon cancer 0.83 (95% confidence interval CI: 0.76-0.92) and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78-0.90) respectively; for rectal cancer 0.79 (95% CI: 0.68-0.91) and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.73-0.89) respectively. The 30-day postoperative mortality after resection also declined over the study period. Compared with 1998-2000 the 30-day MRRs in 2007-2009 were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53-0.87) for colon cancer and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.37-0.96) for rectal cancer. The survival after colon and rectal cancer has improved in central and northern Denmark during the 1998-2009 period, as well as the 30-day postoperative mortality.

  16. Health-Seeking Behavior and Barriers to Care in Patients With Rectal Bleeding in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun I. Alatise

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Colorectal cancer (CRC incidence rates are steadily increasing in Nigeria. Organized screening is still largely unused because of financial and logistical barriers; most CRCs are detected by symptoms. One symptom of CRC is rectal bleeding. This study sought to determine health-seeking behavior and barriers to care in patients with rectal bleeding in Nigeria. This study also surveyed physicians to determine major breakdowns in access to care. Methods: The recruitment process for this study involved patients referred for colonoscopy because of rectal bleeding as well as response to a media advertisement for a free colonoscopy. Physicians were recruited at the African Research Group for Oncology meeting. Patient responses were scored on the basis of knowledge of rectal bleeding. The physician questionnaire was supporting information and mainly descriptive in nature. Results: A total of 82 patients and 45 physicians participated in this study. Less than 40% of patients knew that rectal bleeding could be caused by cancer. Major barriers to care were resolution of the symptom (42%, no consideration of the bleeding as problematic (40%, and financial constraint (22%. Education was strongly correlated with knowledge of rectal bleeding and health-seeking behavior. Although physicians regularly saw patients with rectal bleeding, most of them provided a differential diagnosis of hemorrhoids and few referred patients for colonoscopy. Conclusion: General awareness about the signs of colorectal cancer is lacking. This demonstrates the strong need for patient education programs about this issue. Physicians should also receive additional training on differentiation of a potential cancer diagnosis from something more benign, such as hemorrhoids.

  17. Health-Seeking Behavior and Barriers to Care in Patients With Rectal Bleeding in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatise, Olusegun I; Fischer, Sara E; Ayandipo, Omobolaji O; Omisore, Akinlolu G; Olatoke, Samuel A; Kingham, T Peter

    2017-12-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates are steadily increasing in Nigeria. Organized screening is still largely unused because of financial and logistical barriers; most CRCs are detected by symptoms. One symptom of CRC is rectal bleeding. This study sought to determine health-seeking behavior and barriers to care in patients with rectal bleeding in Nigeria. This study also surveyed physicians to determine major breakdowns in access to care. Methods The recruitment process for this study involved patients referred for colonoscopy because of rectal bleeding as well as response to a media advertisement for a free colonoscopy. Physicians were recruited at the African Research Group for Oncology meeting. Patient responses were scored on the basis of knowledge of rectal bleeding. The physician questionnaire was supporting information and mainly descriptive in nature. Results A total of 82 patients and 45 physicians participated in this study. Less than 40% of patients knew that rectal bleeding could be caused by cancer. Major barriers to care were resolution of the symptom (42%), no consideration of the bleeding as problematic (40%), and financial constraint (22%). Education was strongly correlated with knowledge of rectal bleeding and health-seeking behavior. Although physicians regularly saw patients with rectal bleeding, most of them provided a differential diagnosis of hemorrhoids and few referred patients for colonoscopy. Conclusion General awareness about the signs of colorectal cancer is lacking. This demonstrates the strong need for patient education programs about this issue. Physicians should also receive additional training on differentiation of a potential cancer diagnosis from something more benign, such as hemorrhoids.

  18. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n=12 previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83% patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119. Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p<0.001 and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p=0.032. Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14 g/dL to 13 (10–15 g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p=0.008. Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  19. Impact of diabetes on oncologic outcome of colorectal cancer patients: colon vs. rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Y Jeon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of diabetes on outcomes in colorectal cancer patients and to examine whether this association varies by the location of tumor (colon vs. rectum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study includes 4,131 stage I-III colorectal cancer patients, treated between 1995 and 2007 (12.5% diabetic, 53% colon, 47% rectal in South Korea. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine the prognostic influence of DM on survival endpoints. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer patients with DM had significantly worse disease-free survival (DFS [hazard ratio (HR 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.00-1.37] compared with patients without DM. When considering colon and rectal cancer independently, DM was significantly associated with worse overall survival (OS (HR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.11-1.92, DFS (HR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15-1.84 and recurrence-free survival (RFS (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.98-1.76 in colon cancer patients. No association for OS, DFS or RFS was observed in rectal cancer patients. There was significant interaction of location of tumor (colon vs. rectal cancer with DM on OS (P = 0.009 and DFS (P = 0.007. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that DM negatively impacts survival outcomes of patients with colon cancer but not rectal cancer.

  20. Role of MRI in rectal carcinoma after chemo irradiation therapy with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nehal Mohamed Elmashad

    2014-12-04

    Dec 4, 2014 ... Abstract Rectal cancer is associated with a high risk of metastases and local recurrence; ... was less operator dependent, it enabled evaluation of anal infil- ... Sex. Female. 14. 20.59. 6. 8.82. 20 29.41 0.639 0.424. Male. 38.

  1. Role of MRI in rectal carcinoma after chemo irradiation therapy with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rectal cancer is associated with a high risk of metastases and local recurrence; local recurrence rates after surgical treatment being up to 32% (1). Local recurrence is directly related to incomplete tumor resection (2, 3) and also related to the circumferential safety of resection (4, 5). An accurate local staging at the time of ...

  2. Local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma: Value of various diagnostic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabbe, E.; Winkler, R.

    1985-05-01

    The authors reviewed 51 cases of local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma to assess the sensitivity of current diagnostic procedures. A combination of followup serum CEA levels and rectoscopy was found to be most efficient during the first two years after surgery in terms of the time frequency, and location of the recurrence as well as the cost-benefit ratio. On the other hand, almost all recurrent lesions developed extraluminally, infiltrating the suture line secondarily; moreover, one fourth extended outside the bowel wall. Thus in addition to endoscopy, CT is useful as a means of defining the entire mass at the anastomosis as well as detecting pericolic recurrence and is essential if repeat resection is contemplated.

  3. Local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma: Value of various diagnostic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabbe, E.; Winkler, R.

    1985-01-01

    The authors reviewed 51 cases of local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma to assess the sensitivity of current diagnostic procedures. A combination of followup serum CEA levels and rectoscopy was found to be most efficient during the first two years after surgery in terms of the time frequency, and location of the recurrence as well as the cost-benefit ratio. On the other hand, almost all recurrent lesions developed extraluminally, infiltrating the suture line secondarily; moreover, one fourth extended outside the bowel wall. Thus in addition to endoscopy, CT is useful as a means of defining the entire mass at the anastomosis as well as detecting pericolic recurrence and is essential if repeat resection is contemplated

  4. Reporting Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Curative Radiation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Souhami, Luis; Joshua, Bosede; Vuong, Te; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Long-term rectal toxicity is a concern for patients with prostate cancer treated with curative radiation. However, comparing results of late toxicity may not be straightforward. This article reviews the complexity of reporting long-term side effects by using data for patients treated in our institution with hypofractionated irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy alone to a dose of 66 Gy in 22 fractions were prospectively assessed for late rectal toxicity according to the Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3, scoring system. Ninety percent of patients had more than 24 months of follow-up. Results are compared with data published in the literature. Results: We found an actuarial incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 27% at 30 months and a crude incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 18%. This was mostly severe toxicity documented during follow-up. The incidence of Grade 3 rectal toxicity at the last visit was 3% compared with 13% documented at any time during follow-up. Conclusion: Comparison of late toxicity after radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer must be undertaken with caution because many factors need to be taken into consideration. Because accurate assessment of late toxicity in the evaluation of long-term outcome after radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer is essential, there is a need to develop by consensus guidelines for assessing and reporting late toxicity in this group of patients

  5. Metachronous presentation of small-cell rectal carcinoma on an 18F-FDG PET/CT follow-up for follicular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Yousuf; Fair, Joanna; Behnia, Sanaz; Elojeimy, Saeed

    2017-09-01

    We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with history of follicular lymphoma in remission presenting for an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for suspected recurrence. Imaging showed widespread hypermetabolic lymphadenopathy consistent with lymphoma recurrence. A 3-month 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography follow-up after chemotherapy showed resolution of hypermetabolic lymphadenopathy but multiple new hepatic lesions and a new subtle rectal lesion. Biopsies of both hepatic and rectal lesions revealed new diagnosis of metachronous high-grade small-cell carcinoma.

  6. Metachronous presentation of small-cell rectal carcinoma on an 18F-FDG PET/CT follow-up for follicular lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuf Qaseem, BS

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with history of follicular lymphoma in remission presenting for an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for suspected recurrence. Imaging showed widespread hypermetabolic lymphadenopathy consistent with lymphoma recurrence. A 3-month 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography follow-up after chemotherapy showed resolution of hypermetabolic lymphadenopathy but multiple new hepatic lesions and a new subtle rectal lesion. Biopsies of both hepatic and rectal lesions revealed new diagnosis of metachronous high-grade small-cell carcinoma.

  7. Decision-Making Strategy for Rectal Cancer Management Using Radiation Therapy for Elderly or Comorbid Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang-Jui; Hathout, Lara; Malhotra, Usha; Maloney-Patel, Nell; Kilic, Sarah; Poplin, Elizabeth; Jabbour, Salma K

    2018-03-15

    Rectal cancer predominantly affects patients older than 70 years, with peak incidence at age 80 to 85 years. However, the standard treatment paradigm for rectal cancer oftentimes cannot be feasibly applied to these patients owing to frailty or comorbid conditions. There are currently little information and no treatment guidelines to help direct therapy for patients who are elderly and/or have significant comorbidities, because most are not included or specifically studied in clinical trials. More recently various alternative treatment options have been brought to light that may potentially be utilized in this group of patients. This critical review examines the available literature on alternative therapies for rectal cancer and proposes a treatment algorithm to help guide clinicians in treatment decision making for elderly and comorbid patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Livin expression is an independent factor in rectal cancer patients with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Olsson, Birgit; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression significance of Livin in relation to radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological and biological factors of rectal cancer patients. This study included 144 primary rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Tissue microarray samples from the excised primary rectal cancers, normal mucosa and lymph node metastases were immunostained with Livin antibody. The proliferation of colon cancer cell lines SW620 and RKO was assayed after Livin knock-down. The expression of Livin was significantly increased from adjacent (P = 0.051) or distant (P = 0.028) normal mucosa to primary tumors. 15.4% (2/13) and 39.7% (52/131) patients with Livin-negative and positive tumors died at 180 months after surgery, and the difference tended to be statistically significant (P = 0.091). In multivariate analyses, the difference achieved statistical significance, independent of TNM stage, local and distant recurrence, grade of differentiation, gender, and age (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% CI: 1.01-25.64, P = 0.048). The in vitro study indicated colon cancer cells with Livin knock-down exhibited decreased proliferation compared with controls after RT. The expression of Livin was was independently related to survival in rectal cancer patients, suggesting Livin as a useful prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients

  9. Increased concentrations of L-lactate in the rectal lumen in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Jørgensen, V L; Poulsen, T D

    2005-01-01

    Gut ischaemia may contribute to morbidity in patients after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), but little is known about the metabolic state of the large bowel in such patients. Therefore we estimated the concentrations of L-lactate and Pco(2) in rectal mucosa in patients undergoing cardiac surgery...

  10. The pre, post brachytherapy and postoperative CEA serum concentration of 53 rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thanh Danh; Nguyen Kim Luu; Phan Van Dan

    2008-01-01

    CEA serum concentration level of 53 rectal cancer patients was measured at moments pre, post brachytherapy (45 Gy), post surgery one week, 6 months and 12 months. Response to radiation with reduce CEA serum concentration was achieved in 20/53 patients (37,7%), mainly at staging Dukes B, C. Postoperative CEA level of patients significantly decreased, especially in resection group. (author)

  11. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  12. Adenocarcinoma arising in rectal duplication cyst: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivnani, Anand T; Small, William; Benson, Al; Rao, Sambasiva; Talamonti, Mark S

    2004-11-01

    Duplication cyst of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a rare congenital anomaly, and rectal duplication cysts comprise a small fraction these cases. Most patients present for the first time in adulthood, and the origin of rectal duplication cysts is unclear. Prior series document malignant transformation in approximately 20 per cent of cases. The following case report describes a carcinoma arising in a rectal duplication cyst. Given the lack of data demonstrating adequate control for patients with adenocarcinoma arising in a rectal duplication cyst and our experience with this patient, we recommend all patients undergo multidisciplinary evaluation prior to any therapy.

  13. The Meaning and Experience of Patients Undergoing Rectal High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Samara; Néron, Sylvain; Benc, Renata; Rosberger, Zeev; Vuong, Té

    2016-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a precise form of radiation therapy that targets cancerous tumors by directly applying the radiation source at the site or directly next to the tumor. Patients often experience but underreport pain and anxiety related to cancer treatments. At present, there is no research available concerning the pervasiveness and intensity of patients' pain and anxiety during rectal brachytherapy. The aim of this study was to examine patients' thoughts, emotions, coping strategies, physical sensations, and needs during rectal HDR brachytherapy treatment. Twenty-five patients with rectal cancer were interviewed using a semi-structured qualitative interview following the completion of their brachytherapy treatment delivered at a Montreal-based hospital in Quebec, Canada. The experiences of pain and discomfort varied greatly between patients and were linked to the meaning patients attributed to the treatment itself, sense of time, the body's lithotomic position, insertion of the treatment applicator, and the patients' sense of agency and empowerment during the procedure. Patients drew upon a variety of internal and external resources to help them cope with discomfort. Staff need to know about the variation in the physical and emotional experiences of patients undergoing this treatment. Clinical teams can tailor their procedural behavior (eg, using certain language, psychosocial interventions) according to patients' needs to increase patients' comfort and ultimately improve their experience of HDR rectal brachytherapy.

  14. Severe Fournier's gangrene in a patient with rectal cancer: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yu; Funahashi, Kimihiko; Okada, Rei; Miura, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Takayuki; Koda, Takamaru; Yoshida, Kimihiko; Koike, Junichi; Shiokawa, Hiroyuki; Ushigome, Mitsunori; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Nagashima, Yasuo; Goto, Mayu; Kurihara, Akiharu; Kaneko, Hironori

    2016-09-01

    Fournier's gangrene in the setting of rectal cancer is rare. Treatment for Fournier's gangrene associated with rectal cancer is more complex than other cases of Fournier's gangrene. We report on a patient with severe Fournier's gangrene in the setting of locally advanced rectal cancer who was treated with a combined modality therapy. A 65-year-old man presented with general fatigue and anal pain. The medical and surgical histories were unremarkable. A black spot on the perineal skin surrounded by erythema was found on physical examination, suspicious for Fournier's gangrene. Computed tomography scan showed a rectal tumor invading into the bladder (clinically T4bN2M0) and abscess formation with emphysema around the rectum. He was thus diagnosed with locally advanced rectal cancer and Fournier's gangrene with a severity index score of 12 points. We created a diverting loop colostomy of the transverse colon and performed extensive debridement of the perineum and perianal area. Fifty days later, the patient underwent radical total pelvic exenteration with sacrectomy. In addition, reconstruction of the soft tissue defect was performed using the rectus muscle, the gluteus maximus muscle, and the femoral muscle. Histopathological findings of the specimen were as follows: the tumor was a moderately adenocarcinoma with invasion to the bladder and the prostate (T4b), metastases to four resected lymph nodes (N2), and lymphovascular invasion. There were no major postoperative complications, and the patient was discharged 108 days postoperatively. We report a rare case of locally invasive rectal cancer associated with Fournier's gangrene. This case highlights a usual cause of Fournier's gangrene. Physicians should be cognizant not only of the more common condition but also of the rare presentations including those associated with rectal cancer.

  15. A case of small bowel injury induced by preoperative irradiation for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Noguchi, Tomoyoshi; Akimoto, Shin

    1988-01-01

    A 54-year-old man underwent anterior resection with intraoperative radiation following preoperative irradiation for carcinoma of the rectum in August 1984, and subsequently was suffering from severe diarrhea and abdominal pain. One year and two months later he was admitted to our hospital with a sudden onset of lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomitting. The symptoms were so severe that emergency laparotomy was performed. There was no evidence of recurrent tumor, but the terminal ileum, from a point 30 cm. proximal to the cecum was found to be dark red, constricted and fixed to the urinary bladder. In addition, another two parts of the ileum from a point 50 cm. to that segment showed dark red. These damaged ileum were resected. Pathological examination revealed that there was thickness of the endothelium of arteriole and thromboses of the venule and mucosal damage (ie, ulceration, necroses). These vascular changes had resulted in radiation enteritis induced by preoperative radiotherapy. After the operation severe diarrhea continued until March 1986, when the granning diarrhea and pain became unbearable. At reoperation, another part of ileum was found to be dark red and constricted. There was a recurrent episode of radiation injury of small intestine. We report this case for the recognition of high-risk clinical factors and attention to careful selection or preparation of the patients with cancer for radiotherapy. (author)

  16. CT-Guided Transgluteal Biopsy for Systematic Random Sampling of the Prostate in Patients Without Rectal Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenka, Ajit H; Remer, Erick M; Veniero, Joseph C; Thupili, Chakradhar R; Klein, Eric A

    2015-09-01

    The objective of our study was to review our experience with CT-guided transgluteal prostate biopsy in patients without rectal access. Twenty-one CT-guided transgluteal prostate biopsy procedures were performed in 16 men (mean age, 68 years; age range, 60-78 years) who were under conscious sedation. The mean prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value was 11.4 ng/mL (range, 2.3-39.4 ng/mL). Six had seven prior unsuccessful transperineal or transurethral biopsies. Biopsy results, complications, sedation time, and radiation dose were recorded. The mean PSA values and number of core specimens were compared between patients with malignant results and patients with nonmalignant results using the Student t test. The average procedural sedation time was 50.6 minutes (range, 15-90 minutes) (n = 20), and the mean effective radiation dose was 8.2 mSv (median, 6.6 mSv; range 3.6-19.3 mSv) (n = 13). Twenty of the 21 (95%) procedures were technically successful. The only complication was a single episode of gross hematuria and penile pain in one patient, which resolved spontaneously. Of 20 successful biopsies, 8 (40%) yielded adenocarcinoma (Gleason score: mean, 8; range, 7-9). Twelve biopsies yielded nonmalignant results (60%): high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (n = 3) or benign prostatic tissue with or without inflammation (n = 9). Three patients had carcinoma diagnosed on subsequent biopsies (second biopsy, n = 2 patients; third biopsy, n = 1 patient). A malignant biopsy result was not significantly associated with the number of core specimens (p = 0.3) or the mean PSA value (p = 0.1). CT-guided transgluteal prostate biopsy is a safe and reliable technique for the systematic random sampling of the prostate in patients without a rectal access. In patients with initial negative biopsy results, repeat biopsy should be considered if there is a persistent rise in the PSA value.

  17. Patient-centered outcomes to decide treatment strategy for patients with low rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Michitaka; Akiyoshi, Takashi; Noma, Hisashi; Ogura, Atsushi; Nagasaki, Toshiya; Konishi, Tsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Nagayama, Satoshi; Fukunaga, Yosuke; Ueno, Masashi

    2016-10-01

    For patients with low-lying rectal cancer, the feasibility of anus-preserving surgery in combination with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) has been not well established from the perspective of patient-centered outcomes. We investigated 278 patients with low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma from 2005 to 2012. We compared their symptoms and QOL scores of patients who underwent anus-preserving surgery with (n = 88) and without (n = 143) NACRT according to the Wexner scale, EORTC QLQ C-30, CR29, and the modified fecal incontinence quality life scale (mFIQL). Furthermore, to assess the rationale for intersphincteric resection (ISR) with NACRT, we also compared QOL of patients who underwent ISR with NACRT (n = 31) and abdominoperineal resection (APR, n = 47). The adjusted mean differences of the Wexner score estimates of the patients who underwent ISR and very low anterior resection (VLAR) with or without NACRT were 5.29 (P = 0.004) and 2.67 (P = 0.009), respectively. No significant difference was observed in the QOL scores of two treatment groups. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in the QOL or function scores of patients who underwent ISR with NACRT and APR. The incontinence was significantly worse in patients who receive NACRT. However, there were no significant differences in their QOL or function scores. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:630-636. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to pre-CRT in patients of stage II/III rectal cancer. Materials and Methods. Questionnaires regarding the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of pre-CRT were mailed to 145 rectal cancer patients in II/III stage between January 2012 and December 2014, and 111 agreed to participate and returned completed questionnaires to the researcher. Logistic regression model was used to compare sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, and attitude with practice, respectively. Results. A total of 145 patients were approached for interview, of which 111 responded and 48.6% (54 had undergone pre-CRT. Only 31.5% of the participants knew that CRT is a treatment of rectal cancer and 39.6% were aware of the importance of CRT. However, the vast majority of participants (68.5% expressed a positive attitude toward rectal cancer. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that knowledge level (p=0.006 and attitudes (p=0.001 influence the actual practice significantly. Furthermore, age, gender, and income were potential predictors of practice (all p<0.05. Conclusion. This study shows that, despite the fact that participants had suboptimal level of knowledge on rectal cancer, their attitude is favorable to pre-CRT. Strengthening the professional health knowledge and realizing the importance of attitudes may deepen patients’ understanding of preoperative therapy.

  19. Early Closure of a Temporary Ileostomy in Patients With Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Anne K; Park, Jennifer; Jansen, Jens E

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study morbidity and mortality associated with early closure (8-13 days) of a temporary stoma compared with standard procedure (closure after > 12 weeks) after rectal resection for cancer. BACKGROUND: A temporary ileostomy may reduce the risk of pelvic sepsis after .......0001. CONCLUSIONS: It is safe to close a temporary ileostomy 8 to 13 days after rectal resection and anastomosis for rectal cancer in selected patients without clinical or radiological signs of anastomotic leakage.......OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study morbidity and mortality associated with early closure (8-13 days) of a temporary stoma compared with standard procedure (closure after > 12 weeks) after rectal resection for cancer. BACKGROUND: A temporary ileostomy may reduce the risk of pelvic sepsis after...... creation) of a temporary ileostomy was compared with late closure (>12 weeks) in a multicenter randomized controlled trial, EASY (www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01287637) including patients undergoing rectal resection for cancer. Patients with a temporary ileostomy without signs of postoperative complications...

  20. Diagnostic and interventional radiology in the post-operative period and follow-up of patients after rectal resection with coloanal anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severini, A.; Civelli, E.M.; Uslenghi, E.; Cozzi, G.; Salvetti, M.; Milella, M.; Gallino, G.; Bonfanti, G.; Belli, F.; Leo, E.

    2000-01-01

    Surgical treatment of carcinoma of the distal third of the rectum with anal sphincter preservation is increasingly used in accredited cancer centers. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of radiological investigations in the management of patients who had undergone resection with coloanal anastomosis for carcinoma of the rectum, in the immediate post-operative period, during closure of the protective colostomy and in the follow-up of symptomatic recanalized patients. A total of 175 patients who had undergone total rectal resection with end-to-side anastomosis for carcinoma of the distal third of the rectal ampulla, most of whom had received postoperative radiotherapy, were evaluated radiologically. In the postoperative period radiological investigation was ordered only for symptomatic patients to detect pathology of the anastomosis and the pouch sutures and was used direct film abdominal radiography and contrast-enhanced radiography of the rectal stump with a water-soluble radio-opaque agent. Before closure of the colostomy, 2 months after rectal excision or approximately 4 months after if postoperative radiotherapy was given, the anastomosis and pouch of all patients, even asymptomatic ones, were studied with water-soluble contrast enema to check for normal canalization. In the follow-up after recanalization radiological examinations were done to complete the study of the large intestine if the endoscopist was not able to examine it up to the cecum. Of the 175 patients examined radiologically during the postoperative period and/or subsequent follow-up, 95 showed no pathological findings. Seventy-nine patients had fistulas of the coloanal anastomosis or the pouch, 23 of which supplied a presacral collection. In the absence of severe sepsis, the only therapeutic measures were systemic antibiotics and washing of the surgical catheters to maintain efficient operation. In 2 patients in whom transanal drainage was performed radiologically the fistula

  1. Diagnostic and interventional radiology in the post-operative period and follow-up of patients after rectal resection with coloanal anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severini, A.; Civelli, E.M.; Uslenghi, E.; Cozzi, G.; Salvetti, M.; Milella, M. [Department of Radiology, National Cancer Institute of Milan, via Venezian 1, I-23100 Milan (Italy); Gallino, G.; Bonfanti, G.; Belli, F.; Leo, E. [Department of Surgery, National Cancer Institute of Milan, via Venezian 1, I-23100 Milan (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Surgical treatment of carcinoma of the distal third of the rectum with anal sphincter preservation is increasingly used in accredited cancer centers. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of radiological investigations in the management of patients who had undergone resection with coloanal anastomosis for carcinoma of the rectum, in the immediate post-operative period, during closure of the protective colostomy and in the follow-up of symptomatic recanalized patients. A total of 175 patients who had undergone total rectal resection with end-to-side anastomosis for carcinoma of the distal third of the rectal ampulla, most of whom had received postoperative radiotherapy, were evaluated radiologically. In the postoperative period radiological investigation was ordered only for symptomatic patients to detect pathology of the anastomosis and the pouch sutures and was used direct film abdominal radiography and contrast-enhanced radiography of the rectal stump with a water-soluble radio-opaque agent. Before closure of the colostomy, 2 months after rectal excision or approximately 4 months after if postoperative radiotherapy was given, the anastomosis and pouch of all patients, even asymptomatic ones, were studied with water-soluble contrast enema to check for normal canalization. In the follow-up after recanalization radiological examinations were done to complete the study of the large intestine if the endoscopist was not able to examine it up to the cecum. Of the 175 patients examined radiologically during the postoperative period and/or subsequent follow-up, 95 showed no pathological findings. Seventy-nine patients had fistulas of the coloanal anastomosis or the pouch, 23 of which supplied a presacral collection. In the absence of severe sepsis, the only therapeutic measures were systemic antibiotics and washing of the surgical catheters to maintain efficient operation. In 2 patients in whom transanal drainage was performed radiologically the fistula

  2. Reirradiation, surgery and IORT for recurrent rectal cancer in previously irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J.M.E.; Ferenschild, Floris T.J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M.M.; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de

    2008-01-01

    A total of 11 patients with recurrent rectal cancer who had been previously irradiated were treated with preoperative reirradiation (median dose 30 Gy), surgery and IORT. This treatment was related with high morbidity, a short pain-free survival (5 months) and poor local control (27% after 3 years), although some patients have long-term distant control and survival

  3. Elastography and diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Vagn-Hansen, Chris Aksel; Sørensen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    -weighted coefficient (ADC). The purpose of the present study was to compare quantitative elastography based on ultrasound shear wave measurements with MRI ADC. METHODS: We prospectively examined 52 patients with histopathologically proven rectal cancer. The mean age was 67 years (range 42-90 years). Males: 39, females...... a correlation between tissue elasticity and diffusion in rectal cancer.......OBJECTIVE: The current literature has described the usefulness of elastography and diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with cancer, but to the best of our knowledge so far none of them has compared the two new methods. The tumour cell density is related to the MRI-measured apparent diffusion...

  4. Radiographic findings of post-operative double stapled trans anal rectal resection (STARR) in patient with obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Roberto; Romano, Stefania; Micera, Osvaldo; Fioroni, Claudio; Boller, Brigitta

    2005-03-01

    Longo's procedure of double stapled trans anal rectal resection (STARR) has been evocated as surgical treatment of the obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS) in patients with rectal mucosal prolapse. The aim of this study was to investigate the post-interventional findings of this technique, to help radiologist in knowledge of the changed morphology of the rectal lumen, also in attempt to recognize some potential related complications.

  5. The preoperative reaction and decision-making process regarding colostomy surgery among Chinese rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-E; Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Zheng, Mei-Chun

    2017-06-01

    Patients with rectal cancer have issues in adjusting to their permanent colostomy after surgery, and support is required to help them resume normal life. However, few studies have explored the experience and factors that affect a patient's decision-making and maladjustment prior to colostomy surgery. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of rectal cancer patients who have to undergo colostomy surgery. A descriptive, qualitative design was used. We studied a purposive sample of 18 patients who had received a diagnosis of primary rectal cancer and were expecting permanent colostomy surgery. The thematic analysis approach was used to analyze the data collected using semi-structured, open-ended questions. The overriding theme that emerged was 'stoma dilemma: a hard decision-making process'. From this main theme, three themes were derived: the resistance stage, the hesitation stage, and the acquiescence stage. It is hard for preoperative rectal patients to choose to undergo stoma surgery or a sphincter-saving operation. From the initial stage of definitive diagnosis to the final consent to stoma surgery, most patients experience the resistance and hesitation stages before reaching the acquiescence stage. Arriving at a decision is a process that nurses can facilitate by eliminating unnecessary misunderstanding surrounding colostomy surgery and by fully respecting patients' right to choose at the various stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rectal lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucci, L.; Salfi, R.; Meraviglia, F.; Mazzeo, F.

    1984-01-01

    Regional lymph nodes of the rectum are not demonstrable by pedal lymphoscintigraphy. The authors have evaluated the technique of rectal lymphoscintigraphy, using a technique similar to that which has been used in the assessment of lymph nodes in breast and prostatic cancer. Thirty-five patients were studied: ten normal subjects and 25 patients with rectal cancer. In normal subjects, the lymph nodes accompanying the superior hemorrhoidal artery and the inferior mesenteric artery are demonstrable in succession; after three hours the aortic lymph nodes are demonstrable. The 25 patients with rectal cancer underwent resection of their primary tumor and the stage was defined according to Dukes (1932). In five patients (stage A) no alteration was demonstrable. In 11 patients (stage B) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed vs. the control group. In nine cases (stage C) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed and defective versus the control group

  7. Rectal methadone in cancer patients with pain. A preliminary clinical and pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, C; Zecca, E; Brunelli, C; Rizzio, E; Saita, L; Lodi, F; De Conno, F

    1995-10-01

    Cancer pain can be treated in most cases with oral analgesics. However, during their clinical history, 53% to 70% of patients will need alternative routes of opioid administration. The rectal administration of opioids is a simple alternative route for many patients. There are no data in the literature regarding the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of rectal methadone. We evaluated the analgesia, tolerability and absorption profile of methadone hydrochloride in six opioid-naive cancer patients with pain. A blood sample was collected before administration of a single dose of drug (10 mg) and then again after fixed times. At these fixed times the patients were asked about pain, nausea and drowsiness by means of a visual analogue scale of 0-100 mm (VAS). Pain relief was statistically significant as early as 30 minutes and up to eight hours after methadone administration. None of the patients reported significant side effects. The pharmacokinetics of rectal methadone showed rapid and extensive distribution phases followed by a slow elimination phase. Rectal methadone can be considered an effective analgesic therapy for patients with cancer pain for whom oral and/or parenteral opioids are not indicated or available.

  8. [Parametric monitoring of the quality of total mesorectal excision and surgical treatment of rectal carcinoma results of a multicenter study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, J; Ferko, A; Bláha, M; Ryška, A; Čapov, I; Dušek, L; Feit, J; Grega, M; Hermanová, M; Hovorková, E; Chmelová, R; Kala, Z; Klos, D; Kodet, R; Langer, D; Hadži-Nikolov, D; Örhalmi, J; Páral, J; Tichý, M; Tučková, I; Vjaclovský, M; Vlček, P

    Tumour size and the quality of its complete surgical removal are the main prognostic factors in rectal cancer treatment. The number of postoperative local recurrences depends on whether the mesorectum has been completely removed - total mesorectal excision (TME) - and whether tumour-free resection margins have been achieved. The surgery itself and its quality depend on the accuracy of preoperative diagnosis and detection of risk areas in the rectum and mesorectum, on the surgeons skills, and finally on pathological assessment evaluating whether complete tumour excision has been accomplished including circumferential margins of the tumour, and whether mesorectal excision is complete. The aim of our study was to implement and standardize a new method of evaluation of the quality of the surgical procedure - TME - in rectal cancer treatment using an assessment of its circumferential margins (CRO) and completeness of the excision. The study consisted of two parts. The first, multi-centre retrospective phase with 288 patients analysed individual partial parameters of the diagnosis, operations and histological examinations of the rectal cancer. Critical points were identified and a unified follow-up protocol was prepared. In the second, prospective part of this study 600 patients were monitored parametrically focusing on the quality of the TME and its effect on the oncological treatment results. The proportion of patients with restaging following neoadjuvant therapy increased from 60.0% to 81.7% based on preoperative diagnosis. The number of specimens missing an assessment of the mesorectal excision quality decreased from 52.9% in the retrospective part of to the study to 22.8% in the prospective part. The proportion of actually complete TMEs rose from 22.6% to 26.0%, and that of nearly complete TMEs from 10.1% to 24.0%. The introduction of parametric monitoring into routine clinical practice improved the quality of pre-treatment and preoperative diagnosis, examination of

  9. Fournier gangrene presenting in a patient with undiagnosed rectal adenocarcinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Mohammd Kazem; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Moslemi, Ali Akbar; Arabshahi, Ali

    2009-12-03

    Fournier gangrene is a rare necrotising fascitis of the perineum and genitals caused by a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. The first case was described by Baurienne in 1764 but the condition was named by Fournier in 1883 who reported the cases of five men with the condition with no apparent etiology. Infection most commonly arises from the skin, urethra, or rectal regions. Despite appropriate therapy, mortality in this disease is still high. We report a case of a low rectal malignancy presenting as Fournier gangrene. This case report serves to highlight an extremely unusual presentation of rectal cancer, a common surgical pathology. The patient is a 48 years old Afghanian male that admitted with Fournier gangrene. In the course of medical and surgical treatment the presence of extensive rectal adenocarcinoma was discovered. After partial recovery, standard loop colostomy was inserted. Skin grafting of necrotic areas was performed and systemic rectal cancer chemotherapy initiated after full stabilization. Fournier gangrene is an uncommon but life threatening condition with high associated mortality and morbidity. Usually there is an underlying cause for the development of Fournier gangrene, that if addressed correctly, can lead to a good outcome. Early diagnosis and treatment decrease the morbidity and mortality of this life threatening condition. Good management is based on aggressive debridement, broad spectrum antibiotics and intensive supportive care.

  10. Rectal dose assessment in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jetro Pereira de; Batista, Delano Valdivino Santos; Bardella, Lucia Helena; Carvalho, Arnaldo Rangel

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at developing a thermoluminescent dosimetric system capable of assessing the doses delivered to the rectum of patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. Materials and methods: LiF:Mg,Ti,Na powder was the thermoluminescent material utilized for evaluating the rectal dose. The powder was divided into small portions (34 mg) which were accommodated in a capillary tube. This tube was placed into a rectal probe that was introduced into the patient's rectum. Results: The doses delivered to the rectum of six patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer evaluated by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters presented a good agreement with the planned values based on two orthogonal (anteroposterior and lateral) radiographic images of the patients. Conclusion: The thermoluminescent dosimetric system developed in the present study is simple and easy to be utilized as compared to other rectal dosimetry methods. The system has shown to be effective in the evaluation of rectal doses in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. (author)

  11. Radiological imaging of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Lincender-Cvijetić

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibilities of diagnosing abdominal imaging in patients with rectal cancer, detecting lesions and assessing the stage of the lesions, in order to select the appropriate therapy. Before the introduction of imaging technologies, the diagnosis of colorectal pathology was based on conventional methods of inspecting intestines with a barium enema, with either a single or double contrast barium enema. Following the development of endoscopic methods and the wide use of colonoscopy, colonoscopy became the method of choice for diagnosing colorectal diseases. The improvement of Computerized Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, gave us new possibilities for diagnosing colorectal cancer. For rectal cancer, trans-rectal US (TRUS or endo-anal US (EAUS have a significant role. For staging rectal cancer, the Multi Slice Computed Tomography (MSCT is not the method of choice, but Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is preferred when it comes to monitoring the rectum. Therole of the MRI in the T staging of rectal cancer is crucial in preoperative assessment of: thickness – the width of the tumor, the extramural invasion, the circumference of resection margin (CRM, andthe assessment of the inclusion of mesorectal fascia. For successful execution of surgical techniques, good diagnostic imaging of the cancer is necessary in order to have a low level of recurrence. According to medical studies, the sensitivity of FDG-PET in diagnosing metastatic nodals is low, but for now it is not recommended in routine diagnosis of metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

  12. Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer in central and northern Denmark, 1998–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenfeld, Eva B; Erichsen, Rune; Iversen, Lene H; Gandrup, Per; Nørgaard, Mette; Jacobsen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Objective The prognosis for colon and rectal cancer has improved in Denmark over the past decades but is still poor compared with that in our neighboring countries. We conducted this population-based study to monitor recent trends in colon and rectal cancer survival in the central and northern regions of Denmark. Material and methods Using the Danish National Registry of Patients, we identified 9412 patients with an incident diagnosis of colon cancer and 5685 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer between 1998 and 2009. We determined survival, and used Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to compare mortality over time, adjusting for age and gender. Among surgically treated patients, we computed 30-day mortality and corresponding mortality rate ratios (MRRs). Results The annual numbers of colon and rectal cancer increased from 1998 through 2009. For colon cancer, 1-year survival improved from 65% to 70%, and 5-year survival improved from 37% to 43%. For rectal cancer, 1-year survival improved from 73% to 78%, and 5-year survival improved from 39% to 47%. Men aged 80+ showed most pronounced improvements. The 1- and 5-year adjusted MRRs decreased: for colon cancer 0.83 (95% confidence interval CI: 0.76–0.92) and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78–0.90) respectively; for rectal cancer 0.79 (95% CI: 0.68–0.91) and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.73–0.89) respectively. The 30-day postoperative mortality after resection also declined over the study period. Compared with 1998–2000 the 30-day MRRs in 2007–2009 were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53–0.87) for colon cancer and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.37–0.96) for rectal cancer. Conclusion The survival after colon and rectal cancer has improved in central and northern Denmark during the 1998–2009 period, as well as the 30-day postoperative mortality. PMID:21814467

  13. Survival of patients with colon and rectal cancer in central and northern Denmark, 1998–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostenfeld EB

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Eva B Ostenfeld1, Rune Erichsen1, Lene H Iversen1,2, Per Gandrup3, Mette Nørgaard1, Jacob Jacobsen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Department of Surgery P, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 3Department of Surgery A, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkObjective: The prognosis for colon and rectal cancer has improved in Denmark over the past decades but is still poor compared with that in our neighboring countries. We conducted this population-based study to monitor recent trends in colon and rectal cancer survival in the central and northern regions of Denmark.Material and methods: Using the Danish National Registry of Patients, we identified 9412 patients with an incident diagnosis of colon cancer and 5685 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer between 1998 and 2009. We determined survival, and used Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to compare mortality over time, adjusting for age and gender. Among surgically treated patients, we computed 30-day mortality and corresponding mortality rate ratios (MRRs.Results: The annual numbers of colon and rectal cancer increased from 1998 through 2009. For colon cancer, 1-year survival improved from 65% to 70%, and 5-year survival improved from 37% to 43%. For rectal cancer, 1-year survival improved from 73% to 78%, and 5-year survival improved from 39% to 47%. Men aged 80+ showed most pronounced improvements. The 1- and 5-year adjusted MRRs decreased: for colon cancer 0.83 (95% confidence interval CI: 0.76–0.92 and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78–0.90 respectively; for rectal cancer 0.79 (95% CI: 0.68–0.91 and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.73–0.89 respectively. The 30-day postoperative mortality after resection also declined over the study period. Compared with 1998–2000 the 30-day MRRs in 2007–2009 were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53–0.87 for colon cancer and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.37–0.96 for rectal cancer.Conclusion: The survival after colon and rectal

  14. Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudaira Miwako

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed to test the hypothesis that FAPS would show altered visceral sensation compared to healthy controls or IBS. The present study determined the rectal perceptual threshold, intensity of sensation using visual analogue scale (VAS, and rectal compliance in response to rectal balloon distention by a barostat in FAPS, IBS, and healthy controls. Methods First, the ramp distention of 40 ml/min was induced and the thresholds of discomfort, pain, and maximum tolerance (mmHg were measured. Next, three phasic distentions (60-sec duration separated by 30-sec intervals of 10, 15 and 20 mmHg were randomly loaded. The subjects were asked to mark the VAS in reference to subjective intensity of sensation immediately after each distention. A pressure-volume relationship was determined by plotting corresponding pressures and volumes during ramp distention, and the compliance was calculated over the linear part of the curve by calculating from the slope of the curve using simple regression. Results Rectal thresholds were significantly reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. The VAS ratings of intensity induced by phasic distention (around the discomfort threshold of the controls were increased in IBS but significantly decreased in FAPS. Rectal compliance was reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. Conclusion An inconsistency of visceral sensitivity between lower and higher pressure distention might be a key feature for understanding the pathogenesis of FAPS.

  15. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingxing; Lin, Ruifang; Li, Huifang; Su, Meng; Zhang, Wenyi; Deng, Xia; Zhang, Ping; Zou, Changlin

    2016-01-01

    Background . The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to pre-CRT in patients of stage II/III rectal cancer. Materials and Methods . Questionnaires regarding the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of pre-CRT were mailed to 145 rectal cancer patients in II/III stage between January 2012 and December 2014, and 111 agreed to participate and returned completed questionnaires to the researcher. Logistic regression model was used to compare sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, and attitude with practice, respectively. Results . A total of 145 patients were approached for interview, of which 111 responded and 48.6% (54) had undergone pre-CRT. Only 31.5% of the participants knew that CRT is a treatment of rectal cancer and 39.6% were aware of the importance of CRT. However, the vast majority of participants (68.5%) expressed a positive attitude toward rectal cancer. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that knowledge level ( p = 0.006) and attitudes ( p = 0.001) influence the actual practice significantly. Furthermore, age, gender, and income were potential predictors of practice (all p pre-CRT. Strengthening the professional health knowledge and realizing the importance of attitudes may deepen patients' understanding of preoperative therapy.

  16. Impact of Comorbidities on the Outcomes of Older Patients Receiving Rectal Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ru Chang

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Older patients with comorbidities are at a higher risk of in-hospital complications following rectal cancer surgery, whereas the presence of comorbidities did not show a significant adverse effect on 1-year mortality in the present study. We suggest using population-based data to establish effective therapeutic strategies for treating each comorbidity.

  17. Quality of life in rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... 1 Xiuxiu Yangand Qin Li contributed equally to this work. ... characteristics of permanent colostomy patients of rectal cancer (n=49) variables n. %. Gender. Male. 31. 63.3. Female. 18 ... Marriage. Not married. 0. 0.0. Married. 49. 100.0. Education ..... mainly include urinary incontinence, urinary retention,.

  18. Prognostic factors of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer after radical resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaobin; Yuan Zhiyong; You Jinqiang; Zhang Bailin; Zhu Li; Zhao Peng; Liu Jianzhong; Wang Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prognostic factors and the clinical outcome of locally recurrent rectal cancer after radical resection. Methods: From April 2000 to April 2004, 105 patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer after radical resection were re-treated in Tianjin cancer hospital. Thirty-four patients were re-treated with surgery combined with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (group 1), 35 with surgery alone (group 2), and 36 with chemoradiotherapy (group 3). The impact of 17 clinico pathological factors and treatment modalities on the survival was analyzed. Results: The follow-up rate was 95. 2%. The median survival time was 23 months. The 1-, 3-and 5-year survival rates of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were 63% ,34% and 19%, respectively. The 1-, 3-and 5-year survival rates were 79%, 55% and 32% in group 1 ; 68%, 40% and 14% in group 2; and 64%, 36% and 11% in group 3; respectively (χ 2 =7. 96, P =0. 019). The univariate analysis showed that the degree of differentiation, depth of tumor invasion, number of metastatic lymph nodes, initial TNM stage, recurrent location, time to recurrence, and surgery combined with adjuvant therapy were significant prognostic factors, with the last 4 being the independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: Surgery combined with chemoradiotherapy may improve the survival of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. (authors)

  19. Cerrobend shielding stents for buccal carcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karma Yangchen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Buccal carcinoma is one of the most common oral malignant neoplasms, especially in the South Asian region. Radiotherapy, which plays a significant role in the treatment of this carcinoma, has severe adverse effects. Different types of prosthesis may be constructed to protect healthy tissues from the adverse effects of treatment and concentrate radiation in the region of the tumor mass. However, the technique for fabrication of shielding stent with Lipowitz's alloy (cerrobend/Wood's alloy has not been well documented. This article describes detailed technique for fabrication of such a stent for unilateral buccal carcinoma patients to spare the unaffected oral cavity from potential harmful effects associated with radiotherapy.

  20. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelian, Jason M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Callister, Matthew D., E-mail: Callister.matthew@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Ashman, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Young-Fadok, Tonia M. [Division of Colorectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Borad, Mitesh J. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  1. Trends in the Treatment of Metastatic Colon and Rectal Cancer in Elderly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J; Yabroff, K Robin; Warren, Joan L; Zeruto, Christopher; Chawla, Neetu; Lamont, Elizabeth B

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about the use and costs of antineoplastic regimens for elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We report population-based trends over a 10-year period in the treatment, survival, and costs in mCRC patients, stratified by ages 65-74 and 75+. We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare data for persons diagnosed with metastatic colon (N=16117) or rectal cancer (N=4008) between 2000 and 2009. We estimated the adjusted percent of patients who received antineoplastic agents, by type, number, and their costs 12 months following diagnosis. We report the percent of patients who received 3 or more of commonly prescribed agents and estimate survival for the 24-month period following diagnosis by age and treatment. The percentage that received 3 or more agents increased from 3% to 73% in colon patients aged 65-74 and from 2% to 53% in patients 75+. Similar increases were observed in rectal patients. Average 1-year costs per patient in 2009 were $106,461 and $102,680 for colon and rectal cancers, respectively, reflecting an increase of 32% and 20%, for patients who received antineoplastic agents. Median survival increased by about 6 and 10 months, respectively, for colon and rectal patients aged 65-74 who received antineoplastic agents, but an improvement of only 1 month of median survival was observed for patients 75+. Expensive multiple agent regimens are increasingly used in older mCRC patients. For patients aged 64-75 years, these treatments may be associated with several months of additional life, but patients aged 75+ may incur considerable expense without any survival benefit.

  2. Liver transplantation in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polak, Wojciech G.; Soyama, Akihiko; Slooff, Maarten J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation has a definitive place in the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a cirrhotic liver. Patients with a tumor load within the Milan criteria have excellent survival comparable to survival in patients with benign indications. When tumor load exceeds the

  3. Endothelial dysfunction in rectal cancer patients chronically exposed to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Pak, Laura; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Manambayeva, Zukhra; Tokanova, Sholpan; Madiyeva, Madina [Semey State Medical University, Semey (Kazakhstan); Inoue, Ken [Kochi University, Health Service Center, Kochi (Japan); Kawano, Noriyuki; Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Takeichi, Nobuo [Takeichi Clinic, Hiroshima (Japan); Noso, Yoshihiro [Shimane University, Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane (Japan); Khozhayev, Arman; Molgazhdarov, Maulen [The Kazakh National Medical University of S.D.Asfendiyarov, Department of Oncology, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Olzhaev, Sayakhat [Almaty Regional Oncologic Hospital, Department of Oncology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2017-08-15

    We sought to identify the features of endothelial function in rectal cancer patients who were exposed to chronic ionizing radiation from a nuclear test site in Kazakhstan. We examined 146 individuals, 76 of whom were rectal cancer patients. The existence of a complex of disturbances of the endothelium and hemostasis systems in patients vs non-patients was revealed. Endothelial dysfunction was expressed as an increase of nitric oxide (NO) production along with decreases in vasodilatation function, and increased levels of von Willebrand factor in blood, along with an increase in the number of circulating endotheliocytes. Significant correlations between indicators of endothelial function and vascular-platelet hemostasis were observed. These changes and their interrelations were expressed more strongly in the patients who lived in the contaminated area around the nuclear test site. Such patients could have an increased risk of thrombosis and other complications after the treatment of a malignant neoplasm. (orig.)

  4. Considering patient values and treatment preferences enhances patient involvement in rectal cancer treatment decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunneman, Marleen; Marijnen, Corrie A M; Baas-Thijssen, Monique C M; van der Linden, Yvette M; Rozema, Tom; Muller, Karin; Geijsen, Elisabeth D; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Pieterse, Arwen H

    2015-11-01

    The shared decision making (SDM) model states that patients' values and preferences should be clarified to choose a strategy that best fits the patient. This study aimed to assess whether values and preferences of rectal cancer patients are voiced and considered in deciding about preoperative radiotherapy (PRT), and whether this makes patients feel more involved in treatment decision making. Pre-treatment consultations of radiation oncologists and patients eligible for PRT were audiotaped (N=90). Tapes were transcribed and coded to identify patients' values and treatment preferences. Patients filled in a post-consultation questionnaire on their perceived involvement in decision making (N=60). Patients' values were voiced for 62/611 of benefits/harms addressed (10%), in 38/90 consultations (42%; maximum 4 values per consultation), and most often related to major long-term treatment outcomes. Patients' treatment preferences were discussed in 20/90 consultations (22%). In 16/90 consultations (18%), the oncologists explicitly indicated to consider patients' values or preferences. Patients perceived a significantly more active role in decision making if their values or preferences had been voiced or considered. Patients' values and treatment preferences are voiced or considered in a minority of consultations. If they are, this increases patients' perceived involvement in the decision making process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pretreatment clinical findings predict outcome for patients receiving preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerson, Robert J.; Singh, Anurag; Birnbaum, Elisa H.; Fry, Robert D.; Fleshman, James W.; Kodner, Ira J.; Lockett, Mary Ann; Picus, Joel; Walz, Bruce J.; Read, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    Background: As a sole modality, preoperative radiation for rectal carcinoma achieves a local control comparable to that of postoperative radiation plus chemotherapy. Although the addition of chemotherapy to preoperative treatment improves the pathologic complete response rate, there is also a substantial increase in acute and perioperative morbidity. Identification of subsets of patients who are at low or high risk for recurrence can help to optimize treatment. Methods: During the period 1977-95, 384 patients received preoperative radiation therapy for localized adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Ages ranged from 19 to 97 years (mean 64.4), and there were 171 females. Preoperative treatment consisted of conventionally fractionated radiation to 3600-5040 cGy (median 4500 cGy) 6-8 weeks before surgery in 293 cases or low doses of <3000 cGy (median 2000 cGy) immediately before surgery in 91 cases. Concurrent preoperative chemotherapy was given to only 14 cases in this study period. Postoperative chemotherapy was delivered to 55 cases. Results: Overall 93 patients have experienced recurrence (including 36 local failures). Local failures were scored if they occurred at any time, not just as first site of failure. For the group as a whole, the actuarial (Kaplan-Meier) freedom from relapse (FFR) and local control (LC) were 74% and 90% respectively at 5 years. Univariate analysis of clinical characteristics demonstrated a significant (p<0.05) adverse effect on both LC and FFR for the following four clinical factors: (1) location <5 cm from the verge, (2) circumferential lesion, (3) near obstruction, (4) tethered or fixed tumor. Size, grade, age, gender, ultrasound stage, CEA, radiation dose, and the use of chemotherapy were not associated with outcome. Background of the surgeon was significantly associated with outcome, colorectal specialists achieving better results than nonspecialist surgeons. We assigned a clinical score of 0 to 2 on the basis of how many of the above four

  6. Association of perioperative blood pressure with long-term survival in rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-Chuan; Luo, Yan-Xin; Peng, Hui; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Zi-Huan; Huang, Mei-Jin; Kang, Liang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-04-11

    Several studies suggested that hypertension is positively related to cancer incidence and mortality. In this study, we investigated the association between perioperative blood pressure (BP) and long-term survival outcomes in patients with rectal cancer. This study included a cohort of 358 patients with stages I-III rectal cancer who underwent a curative resection between June 2007 and June 2011. Both pre- and postoperative BPs were measured, by which patients were grouped (low BP: cancer-specific survival (CSS). Univariate analysis showed that patients with high preoperative systolic BP had lower 3-year DFS (67.2% vs. 82.1%, P = 0.041) and CSS rates (81.9% vs. 94.8%, P = 0.003) than patients with low preoperative systolic BP, and the associations remained significant in the Cox multivariate analysis, with the adjusted hazard ratios equal to 1.97 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08-3.60, P = 0.028] and 2.85 (95% CI = 1.00-8.25, P = 0.050), respectively. Similarly, in postoperative evaluation, patients with high systolic BP had significantly lower 3-year CSS rates than those with low systolic BP (78.3% vs. 88.9%, P = 0.032) in univariate analysis. Moreover, high pre- and/or postoperative systolic BP presented as risk factors for CSS in the subgroups of patients who did not have a history of hypertension, with and/or without perioperative administration of antihypertensive drugs. High preoperative systolic BP was an independent risk factor for both CSS and DFS rates, and high postoperative systolic BP was significantly associated with a low CSS rate in rectal cancer patients. Additionally, our results suggest that rectal cancer patients may get survival benefit from BP control in perioperative care. However, further studies should be conducted to determine the association between BP and CSS and targets of BP control.

  7. Expression of FXYD-3 is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Rectal Cancer Patients With Preoperative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftas, Per; Onnesjoe, Sofia; Widegren, Emma; Adell, Gunnar; Kayed, Hany; Kleeff, Joerg; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Sun Xiaofeng

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: FXYD-3 (MAT-8) is overexpressed in several types of cancers; however, its clinical relevance in rectal cancers has not been studied. Therefore, we examined FXYD-3 expression in rectal cancers from the patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to determine whether FXYD-3 was overexpressed in rectal cancers and correlated with RT, survival, and other clinicopathologic variables. Methods and Materials: The study included 140 rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT, 65 with and 75 without RT before surgery. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 70) and adjacent (n = 101) normal mucosa, primary tumors (n = 140), and lymph node metastasis (n = 36). Results: In the whole cohort, strong FXYD-3 expression was correlated with infiltrative tumor growth (p = 0.02). In the RT group, strong FXYD-3 expression alone (p = 0 .02) or combined with phosphatase of regenerating liver was associated with an unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.02), independent of both TNM stage and tumor differentiation. In tumors with strong FXYD-3 expression, there was less tumor necrosis (p = 0.02) and a trend toward increased incidence of distant metastasis (p = 0.08) after RT. None of these effects was seen in the non-RT group. FXYD-3 expression in the primary tumors tended to be increased compared with normal mucosa regardless of RT. Conclusion: FXYD-3 expression was a prognostic factor independent of tumor stage and differentiation in patients receiving preoperative RT for rectal cancer.

  8. EFFICACY OF THE ANTERIOR RESECTION IN MANAGMENT OF ACUTE COLONIC OBSTRUCTION IN PATIENTS WITH RECTAL CANCER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minasyan, A; Sargsyan, R

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to improve the results of surgical treatment of acute bowel obstruction caused by rectal cancer and to reduce the period of full recovery of patients. The presented research included 73 patients (study group) with rectal cancer who underwent emergent anterior resection of rectum with loop ileostomy and intra-operative decompression of colon. Patients of this group were compared to a group of 68 patients (control group) with the same diagnosis who underwent Hartmann's procedure. There was no essential difference between the two groups in the quantity of postoperative complications. However the results indicate significant difference in reversal rates and time to reversal. Thus, the technique of low anterior resection with intraoperative decompression and ileostomy that we used improves outcomes, significantly reduces the period of full recovery.

  9. Excess mortality after curative surgery for colorectal cancer changes over time and differs for patients with colon versus rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedrebø, Bjørn Steinar; Søreide, Kjetil; Eriksen, Morten Tandberg; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Søreide, Jon Arne; Kørner, Hartwig

    2013-06-01

    Improved management of colorectal cancer patients has resulted in better five-year survival for rectal cancer compared with colon cancer. We compared excess mortality rates in various time intervals after surgery in patients with colon and rectal cancer. We analysed all patients with curative resection of colorectal cancers reported in the Cancer Registry of Norway before (1994-1996) and after (2001-2003) national treatment guidelines were introduced. Excess mortality was analysed in different postoperative time intervals within the five-year follow-up periods for patients treated in 1994-1996 vs. 2001-2003. A total of 11 437 patients that underwent curative resection were included. For patients treated from 1994 to 1996, excess mortality was similar in colon and rectal cancer patients in all time intervals. For those treated from 2001 to 2003, excess mortality was significantly lower in rectal cancer patients than in colon cancer patients perioperatively (in the first 60 days: excess mortality ratio = 0.46, p = 0.007) and during the first two postoperative years (2-12 months: excess mortality ratio = 0.54, p = 0.010; 1-2 years: excess mortality ratio = 0.60, p = 0.009). Excess mortality in rectal cancer patients was significantly greater than in colon cancer patients 4-5 years postoperatively (excess mortality ratio = 2.18, p = 0.003). Excess mortality for colon and rectal cancer changed substantially after the introduction of national treatment guidelines. Short-term excess mortality rates was higher in colon cancer compared to rectal cancer for patients treated in 2001-2003, while excess mortality rates for rectal cancer patients was significantly higher later in the follow-up period. This suggests that future research should focus on these differences of excess mortality in patients curatively treated for cancer of the colon and rectum.

  10. Merkel cells carcinoma of the aged patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, A.; Assouline, A.; Mazeron, J.J.; Chargari, C.; Krzisch, C.

    2009-01-01

    The carcinoma at Merkel cells is a rare and aggressive skin cancer, principally of the aged adult. The surgery is the fundamental treatment. The interest of the adjuvant radiotherapy is discussed for the aged patient. In the limits of this retrospective analysis, the postoperative radiotherapy appeared to bring a similar benefit as for younger patients. (N.C.)

  11. The ESTRO Breur Lecture 2010: Toward a tailored patient approach in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haustermans, Karin; Debucquoy, Annelies; Lambrecht, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    The last decades have been characterized by tremendous improvements in the treatment of rectal cancer. Based on the evidence gathered in these years, the standard treatment of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer has now become preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision. Although the locoregional control with this treatment regimen is quite favorable for the majority of the patients, there is still room for further improvement. For those patients with a good response to preoperative chemoradiation (CRT), extensive surgery could be avoided and replaced by minimal invasive surgery or no surgery at all. To date however, the only way to ascertain a complete remission is pathologic examination of the resection specimen. Early response prediction of the tumor to preoperative CRT is essential for further selection of patients who could be spared invasive surgery. This could be achieved by assessing molecular markers present in the tumor tissue and blood of the patients or by non invasive functional imaging before and during preoperative treatment. For those patients with a less favorable response, treatment intensification might be the way to go. This could be accomplished by dose painting on resistant tumor regions or by the addition of molecular targeted agents to the standard treatment. In this article, we review the current standard of care and the remaining challenges in the treatment of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

  12. Quality of life in rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy in Xi'an.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuxiu; Li, Qin; Zhao, Haihong; Li, Junhua; Duan, Jiaobo; Wang, Dandan; Fang, Ningning; Zhu, Ping; Fu, Jufang

    2014-03-01

    To observe the quality of life (QOL) in rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy in different periods after operation. A 1-,3-,6-month prospective study of QOL in 51 rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy and 50 without permanent colostomy was assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QOL-30 and CR38 questionnaires. The variation of QOL in different periods was "v" type. In the 1st postoperative month, these patients had the lowest quality of life scores, accompanied significantly varied functions and severe symptoms. Almost of all indexes of these patients had improved consistently in the postoperative period. The scores of global QOL even better than pre-operative level at 6th months post-operation, but the social function, body image, chemotherapy side effects and financial difficulties had not restored to the baseline level. Patients without permanent colostomy had a better score in most of categories of QOL-30 and CR38. The 1st postoperative month was crucial for patients' recovery, in which we should pay great attention to these problems which relate to the recovery of rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy.

  13. Fournier Gangrene in a patient receiving chemo-radiation for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaka, Maria; Georgiou, Chrysanthos; Polyviou, Petros; Kountourakis, Pantelis; Loizou, Panayiotis; Constantinou, Ifigenia; Andreopoulos, Demetris; Vassiliou, Vassilios P

    2018-02-01

    We herein present a case of a 24-year-old patient with a cT4N+ rectal cancer who developed Fournier's gangrene (FG) 1 week after the completion of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The patient was promptly referred to the surgical department where she was treated with antibiotics and repeated surgical debridement. FG is a rare and life-threatening situation that needs to be managed aggressively with no delay. The clinical image above is unique and characteristic of this clinical entity.

  14. SU-F-J-122: Rectal Sparing Reproducibility in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Hydrogel Spacer and Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedrick, S; Robison, B; Blakey, M; Artz, M; Renegar, J; Schreuder, A; Fagundes, M [Provision Center for Proton Therapy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Case, S [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Rectal hydrogel spacer has been shown to improve rectal sparing in prostate radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of rectal sparing throughout treatment in patients undergoing proton therapy. Methods: At our facility, prostate cancer patients are treated with pencil beam scanning proton therapy, utilizing an endorectal balloon (ERB) or rectal spacer hydrogel (Gel) “SpaceOAR” implant. All patients were treated with a full bladder and empty rectum (low residue diet and stool softeners). A quality assurance CT (QACT) was performed periodically throughout treatment to ensure rectal filling consistency and sparing in 41 patients treated with Gel. The treatment planning (TP) dose was calculated on each QACT and the rectum V90%, V75%, V65%, V50%, and V40% were recorded. QACT scans were acquired on day 0, week 1, week 3, and week 5. Results: 144 QACT scans were analyzed, each patient receiving 3–4 QACTs. Rectum V90% was within +/−1% of the TP dose in 70% of the QACTs and within +/−5% in 95% of scans. From previous data analyses, our ERB rectum V90% average is 6%. This value was used as an upper threshold for the Gel QACT analysis. 5 of the 41 patients (12%), corresponding to 7 QACTs, had a rectum V90% that exceeded 6% on one or more QACTs. However, the average rectal V90% measured over multiple QACTs never exceeded 6%. 55% of the QACTs had a rectum volume within 5cc of the TPCT volume, 68% were within 10cc. Conclusion: In this study, we have shown that a majority of our prostate patients can maintain consistent rectal sparing when treated with a hydrogel spacer. QACT rectal V90% exceeding our threshold was most often related to increased rectal filling and gas, which was addressed with improved dietary compliance and the intensification of stool softeners or laxatives.

  15. SU-F-J-122: Rectal Sparing Reproducibility in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Hydrogel Spacer and Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedrick, S; Robison, B; Blakey, M; Artz, M; Renegar, J; Schreuder, A; Fagundes, M; Case, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Rectal hydrogel spacer has been shown to improve rectal sparing in prostate radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of rectal sparing throughout treatment in patients undergoing proton therapy. Methods: At our facility, prostate cancer patients are treated with pencil beam scanning proton therapy, utilizing an endorectal balloon (ERB) or rectal spacer hydrogel (Gel) “SpaceOAR” implant. All patients were treated with a full bladder and empty rectum (low residue diet and stool softeners). A quality assurance CT (QACT) was performed periodically throughout treatment to ensure rectal filling consistency and sparing in 41 patients treated with Gel. The treatment planning (TP) dose was calculated on each QACT and the rectum V90%, V75%, V65%, V50%, and V40% were recorded. QACT scans were acquired on day 0, week 1, week 3, and week 5. Results: 144 QACT scans were analyzed, each patient receiving 3–4 QACTs. Rectum V90% was within +/−1% of the TP dose in 70% of the QACTs and within +/−5% in 95% of scans. From previous data analyses, our ERB rectum V90% average is 6%. This value was used as an upper threshold for the Gel QACT analysis. 5 of the 41 patients (12%), corresponding to 7 QACTs, had a rectum V90% that exceeded 6% on one or more QACTs. However, the average rectal V90% measured over multiple QACTs never exceeded 6%. 55% of the QACTs had a rectum volume within 5cc of the TPCT volume, 68% were within 10cc. Conclusion: In this study, we have shown that a majority of our prostate patients can maintain consistent rectal sparing when treated with a hydrogel spacer. QACT rectal V90% exceeding our threshold was most often related to increased rectal filling and gas, which was addressed with improved dietary compliance and the intensification of stool softeners or laxatives.

  16. Patterns of Pelvic Radiotherapy in Patients with Stage II/III Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    High-level evidence supports adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer. We examined the influence of socio demographic factors on patterns of adjuvant radiotherapy for resected Stage II/III rectal cancer. Methods. Patients undergoing surgical resection for stage II/III rectal cancer were identified in SEER registry. Results. A total of 21,683 patients were identified. Majority of patients were male (58.8%), white (83%), and with stage III (54.9%) and received radiotherapy (66%). On univariate analysis, male gender, stage III, younger age, year of diagnosis, and higher socioeconomic status (SES) were associated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered in 84.4% of patients <50; however, only 32.8% of those are >80 years. Logistic regression demonstrated a significant increase in the use of radiotherapy in younger patients who are 50 (OR, 10.3), with stage III (OR, 1.21), males (OR, 1.18), and with higher SES. Conclusions. There is a failure to conform to standard adjuvant radiotherapy in one-third of patients, and this is associated with older age, stage II, area-level of socioeconomic deprivation, and female sex.

  17. [Short-term efficacy of da Vinci robotic surgical system on rectal cancer in 101 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Dong-Zhu; Shi, Yan; Lei, Xiao; Tang, Bo; Hao, Ying-Xue; Luo, Hua-Xing; Lan, Yuan-Zhi; Yu, Pei-Wu

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility and safety of da Vinci robotic surgical system in rectal cancer radical operation, and to summarize its short-term efficacy and clinical experience. Data of 101 cases undergoing da Vinci robotic surgical system for rectal cancer radical operation from March 2010 to September 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Evaluation was focused on operative procedure, complication, recovery and pathology. All the 101 cases underwent operation successfully and safely without conversion to open procedure. Rectal cancer radical operation with da Vinci robotic surgical system included 73 low anterior resections and 28 abdominoperineal resections. The average operative time was (210.3±47.2) min. The average blood lose was (60.5±28.7) ml without transfusion. Lymphadenectomy harvest was 17.3±5.4. Passage of first flatus was (2.7±0.7) d. Distal margin was (5.3±2.3) cm without residual cancer cells. The complication rate was 6.9%, including anastomotic leakage(n=2), perineum incision infection(n=2), pulmonary infection (n=2), urinary retention (n=1). There was no postoperative death. The mean follow-up time was(12.9±8.0) months. No local recurrence was found except 2 cases with distant metastasis. Application of da Vinci robotic surgical system in rectal cancer radical operation is safe and patients recover quickly The short-term efficacy is satisfactory.

  18. Consolidating Risk Estimates for Radiation-Induced Complications in Individual Patient: Late Rectal Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, Phillip; Devisetty, Kiran; Tarima, Sergey S.; Lawton, Colleen A.F.; Semenenko, Vladimir A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a new approach to synthesize published normal tissue complication data using late rectal toxicity in prostate cancer as an example. Methods and Materials: A data survey was performed to identify the published reports on the dose–response relationships for late rectal toxicity. The risk estimates for Grade 1 or greater, Grade 2 or greater, and Grade 3 or greater toxicity were obtained for a test cohort of patients treated at our institution. The influence of the potential factors that might have affected the reported toxicity levels was investigated. The studies that did not conform to the general data trends were excluded, and single, combined risk estimates were derived for each patient and toxicity level. Results: A total of 21 studies of nonoverlapping patient populations were identified. Three studies provided dose–response models for more than one level of toxicity. Of these 21 studies, 6, 14, and 5 were used to derive the initial risk estimates for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. A comparison of risk estimates between the studies reporting rectal bleeding and rectal toxicity (bleeding plus other symptoms) or between studies with follow-up <36 months and ≥36 months did not reveal significant differences (p ≥ .29 for all comparisons). After excluding three reports that did not conform to the general data trends, the combined risk estimates were derived from 5 reports (647 patients), 11 reports (3,369 patients), and 5 reports (1,330 patients) for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed approach is feasible and allows for more systematic use of published dose–response data to estimate the complication risks for the individual patient.

  19. Consolidating Risk Estimates for Radiation-Induced Complications in Individual Patient: Late Rectal Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, Phillip; Devisetty, Kiran [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Tarima, Sergey S. [Division of Biostatistics, Institute for Health and Society, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lawton, Colleen A.F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Semenenko, Vladimir A., E-mail: vsemenenko@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a new approach to synthesize published normal tissue complication data using late rectal toxicity in prostate cancer as an example. Methods and Materials: A data survey was performed to identify the published reports on the dose-response relationships for late rectal toxicity. The risk estimates for Grade 1 or greater, Grade 2 or greater, and Grade 3 or greater toxicity were obtained for a test cohort of patients treated at our institution. The influence of the potential factors that might have affected the reported toxicity levels was investigated. The studies that did not conform to the general data trends were excluded, and single, combined risk estimates were derived for each patient and toxicity level. Results: A total of 21 studies of nonoverlapping patient populations were identified. Three studies provided dose-response models for more than one level of toxicity. Of these 21 studies, 6, 14, and 5 were used to derive the initial risk estimates for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. A comparison of risk estimates between the studies reporting rectal bleeding and rectal toxicity (bleeding plus other symptoms) or between studies with follow-up <36 months and {>=}36 months did not reveal significant differences (p {>=} .29 for all comparisons). After excluding three reports that did not conform to the general data trends, the combined risk estimates were derived from 5 reports (647 patients), 11 reports (3,369 patients), and 5 reports (1,330 patients) for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed approach is feasible and allows for more systematic use of published dose-response data to estimate the complication risks for the individual patient.

  20. Pre-operative radio-chemo-thermotherapy for advanced (T3-4) and/or recurrent rectal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wust, P.; Gremmler, M.; Rau, B.; Loeffel, J.; Gellermann, J.; Stahl, H.; Vogl, T.; Riess, H.; Schlag, P.; Felix, R.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies suggest that pre-operative radio-chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer can increase resectability and local control (T4 stages), and might facilitate sphincter-preserving surgery (T3 stages). However, response rates are still unsatisfactory for radiotherapy alone, and are only slightly better for radio-chemotherapy. Radiofrequency hyperthermia has now achieved a technical stage already suitable for treating this tumor entity effectively in clinical practice. Therefore, a trimodal pre-operative approach for T3-4 rectal carcinomas has been investigated in a phase I/II study. Materials and Methods: A phase I/II study was conducted on 30 pts with advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer. (7(30)) pts had recurrences, (9(30)) uT3, (14(30)) T4-stage of the primary. Initial tumor stage was assessed by endosonography, CT and occasionally MRI (T1-w ± Echovist, T2-w, proton density). Radiotherapy was delivered in prone position using a belly-board, three-field technique, standard blocks, 5x1.8 → 45 Gy in 5 weeks. In parallel, 5-FU (300-350 mg/kg, dose escalation) and folinic acid (50 mg) on days 1-5 and days 22-28. Regional hyperthermia was administered using the annular phased array applicator SIGMA-60 once a week. Index temperatures T x were deduced from thermal mapping scans in endocavitary/intratumoral catheters. Re-staging was done by endosonography and CT. Four weeks after radiotherapy, surgery was performed with preference to continence preserving operations. If the tumor remained unresectable, a boost to a total tumor dose of 60 Gy was claimed. Results: (7(30)) pts (23%) did not undergo resection because their tumors remained technically non-resectable: 4 pts with persistent local control of 12-18 mts, 2 pts with progressive disease, 1 pt with too short observation time. (23(30)) pts underwent surgery: only 1 R2-resection, 22 R0-resections. The patho-histological analysis documented 4 CR (17%) at the primary tumor, 12 PR

  1. Perioperative Colonic Evaluation in Patients with Rectal Cancer; MR Colonography Versus Standard Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Michael Patrick; Løgager, Vibeke; Lund Rasmussen, Vera

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Preoperative colonic evaluation is often inadequate because of cancer stenosis making a full conventional colonoscopy (CC) impossible. In several studies, cancer stenosis has been shown in up to 16%-34% of patients with colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study...... was to prospectively evaluate the completion rate of preoperative colonic evaluation and the quality of perioperative colonic evaluation using magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) in patients with rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were randomized to either group A: standard...... preoperative diagnostic work-up or group B: preoperative MR diagnostic work-up (standard preoperative diagnostic work-up + MRC). A complete and adequate perioperative clean-colon evaluation (PCE) was defined as either a complete preoperative colonic evaluation or a complete colonic evaluation within 3 months...

  2. Anorectal function in patients with complete rectal prolapse. Differences between continent and incontinent individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, J V; Buch, E; Alós, R; Solana, A; Fernández, C; Villoslada, C; García-Armengol, J; Hinojosa, J

    1998-11-01

    A study is made of the alterations in anorectal physiology among rectal prolapse patients, evaluating the differences between fecal continent and incontinent individuals. Eighteen patients with complete rectal prolapse were divided into two groups: Group A (8 continent individuals) and Group B (10 incontinent women), while 22 healthy women were used as controls (Group C). Clinical exploration and perineal level measurements were performed, along with anorectal manometry, electrophysiology, and anorectal sensitivity to electrical stimuli. The main antecedents of the continent subjects were excess straining efforts, while the incontinent women presented excess straining and complex deliveries. Pathological perineal descent was a frequent finding in both groups, with a hypotonic anal canal at rest (p rest than the continent women (p rest, regardless of whether they are continent to feces or not. Continent patients have less pudendal neuropathy and therefore less pressure alterations at voluntary sphincter squeeze than incontinent individuals.

  3. Prognostic Role of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level after Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients with Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Seok Hyung; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2018-05-29

    The prognostic role of post-chemoradiotherapy (CRT) carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level is not clear. We evaluated the prognostic significance of post-CRT CEA level in patients with rectal cancer after preoperative CRT. We reviewed 659 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative CRT and total mesorectal excision for non-metastatic rectal cancer. Patients were categorized into two groups according to post-CRT serum CEA level: low CEA (level was 1.7 ng/mL (range, 0.1-207.0). A high post-CRT level was significantly associated with ypStage, ypT category, tumor regression grade, and pre-CRT CEA level. The 5-year overall survival rate of the 659 patients was 87.8% with a median follow-up period of 57.0 months (range, 1.4-176.4). When the post-CRT CEA groups were divided into groups according to pre-CRT CEA level, the 5-year overall survival rates were significantly different (P level was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that operation method, differentiation, perineural invasion, postoperative chemotherapy, tumor regression grade, and post-CRT CEA level were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. The level of serum CEA after preoperative CRT was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with rectal cancer.

  4. Exercise motivation in rectal cancer patients during and after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morielli, Andria R; Usmani, Nawaid; Boulé, Normand G; Severin, Diane; Tankel, Keith; Nijjar, Tirath; Joseph, Kurian; Courneya, Kerry S

    2016-07-01

    Aerobic exercise is safe and feasible for rectal cancer patients during and after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT), but their motivation to perform such exercise is unknown. Here, we explore the motivational outcomes, perceived benefits and harms, and perceived barriers to exercise during and after NACRT. Rectal cancer patients (n = 18) participated in supervised aerobic exercise during NACRT followed by unsupervised exercise after NACRT. Using the theory of planned behavior, we assessed perceived benefits, harms, enjoyment, support, difficulty, and barriers for exercise both during and after NACRT. Patients reported that exercise during NACRT was more enjoyable (p = 0.003) and less difficult (p = 0.037) than initially anticipated. The most common perceived benefits of exercise during NACRT were cardiovascular endurance (75 %), quality of life (75 %), and self-esteem (65 %). After NACRT, the most common perceived benefits were physical functioning (93 %), cardiovascular endurance (86 %), and quality of life (79 %). The most common perceived harms of exercise during NACRT were fatigue (31 %), diarrhea (31 %), and skin irritation (24 %). After NACRT, the most common perceived harms were fatigue (21 %) and hand-foot-syndrome (15 %). Side effects from NACRT were the most common exercise barrier during NACRT (88 %) whereas lack of motivation was the most common barrier after NACRT (79 %). Rectal cancer patients reported aerobic exercise during NACRT to be more enjoyable and less difficult than anticipated despite significant barriers. This positive motivational response may facilitate recruitment and adherence in future interventions. Moreover, rectal cancer patients identified potential benefits and harms that should be closely monitored in future interventions.

  5. Post Graduate Multidisciplinary Development Programme – Impact on the Interpretation of Pelvic MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bodil Ginnerup; Blomqvist, Lennart; Brown, Gina

    2011-01-01

    . Conclusions: Performance and reporting of pelvic MRI in rectal cancer patients can be improved significantly through multidisciplinary development courses and on-site-visits while improvements in image interpretation with regard to treatment stratification may demand more intensive efforts....

  6. Efficacy and toxicity of rectal cancer reirradiation using IMRT for patients who have received prior pelvic radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fady F. Youssef, MS

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: Rectal cancer reirradiation using IMRT is well-tolerated in the setting of prior pelvic radiation therapy. Given significant risk of local progression, further dose escalation may be warranted for patients with life expectancy exceeding 1 year.

  7. Radiation therapy induced changes in male sex hormone levels in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueland, Svein; Groenlie Guren, Marianne; Rune Olsen, Dag; Poulsen, Jan Peter; Magne Tveit, Kjell

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose:To determine the effect of curative radiation therapy (46-50 Gy) on the sex hormone levels in male rectal cancer patients. Materials and methods:Twenty-five male rectal cancer patients (mean age 65 years), receiving pelvic radiation therapy (2 Gyx23-25 fractions in 5 weeks) were included. Serum testosterone, FSH and LH were determined before start of treatment, at the 10th and 25th fractions, and 4-6 weeks after completed radiotherapy. The testicular dose was determined by thermoluminescent dosimetry. Results:Five weeks of radiation therapy (46-50 Gy) resulted in a 100% increase in serum FSH, a 70% increase in LH, and a 25% reduction in testosterone levels. After treatment, 35% of the patients had serum testosterone levels below lower limit of reference. The mean radiation dose to the testicles was 8.4 Gy. A reduction in testosterone values was observed already after a mean dose of 3.3 Gy (10th fraction). Conclusion:Radiation therapy (46-50 Gy) for rectal cancer resulted in a significant increase in serum FSH and LH and a significant decrease in testosterone levels, indicating that sex hormone production is sensitive to radiation exposure in patients with a mean age of 65 years

  8. [Covering stoma in anterior rectum resection with TME for rectal cancer in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Barillaro, Ivan; Cacurri, Alban; Koltraka, Bledar; Coccette, Marco; Sciannameo, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate the advisability of covering stoma in Anterior Rectum Resection with TME in elderly patients. A research of both the Ministry of Health and Terni Hospital databases has been conducted so as to collect information about patients with rectal tumor. Such research allowed to identify the amount of patients diagnosed with rectal cancer, the type of intervention, and the average hospitalization time. Between January 1997 and June 2008, 209 patients have undergone chirurgical surgery at Terni hospital's General and Emergency Surgical Clinic. An Anterior Rectum Resection with TME has been performed in 135 patients out of the sample (64.59%). The average hospitalization time of geriatric patients does not show significant differences compared to that of younger patients. An age-cohort analysis has been performed among patients who have been subject to stomia and those who have not. The former have been further split up between those who underwent ileostomy and those subject to colostomy. While ileostomy patients face a similar hospitalization time across all age cohorts, geriatric colostomy patients face longer hospitalizations than younger patients. Patients subject to Anterior Rectum Resection show no meaningful differences, in terms of hospitalization time, across all age cohorts. In geriatric patients the construction of covering stoma has resulted in longer hospitalizations only when a loop colostomy was executed, as opposed to loop ileostomy.

  9. The association of rectal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) to late rectal toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharavichtikul, Ekkasit; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chitapanarux, Imjai [Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Meungwong, Pooriwat [Lampang Cancer Hospital, Lampang (Thailand); Traisathit, Patrinee [Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Galalae, Razvan [aculty of Medicine, Christian-Albrechts University at Kiel, Kiei (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate association between equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) to rectal point dose and gastrointestinal toxicity from whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) in cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University. Retrospective study was designed for the patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated by radical radiotherapy from 2004 to 2009 and were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy. The cumulative doses of WPRT and ICBT to the maximally rectal point were calculated to the EQD2 and evaluated the association of toxicities. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated for late rectal toxicity. The mean cumulative dose in term of EQD2 to rectum was 64.2 Gy. Grade 1 toxicities were the most common findings. According to endoscopic exam, the most common toxicities were congested mucosa (36 patients) and telangiectasia (32 patients). In evaluation between rectal dose in EQD2 and toxicities, no association of cumulative rectal dose to rectal toxicity, except the association of cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy to late effects of normal tissue (LENT-SOMA) scale > or = grade 2 (p = 0.022; odds ratio, 5.312; 95% confidence interval, 1.269-22.244). The cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy have association with > or = grade 2 LENT-SOMA scale.

  10. The association of rectal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) to late rectal toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharavichtikul, Ekkasit; Meungwong, Pooriwat; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Traisathit, Patrinee; Galalae, Razvan; Chitapanarux, Imjai

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate association between equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) to rectal point dose and gastrointestinal toxicity from whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) in cervical cancer patients who were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University. Retrospective study was designed for the patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated by radical radiotherapy from 2004 to 2009 and were evaluated by rectosigmoidoscopy. The cumulative doses of WPRT and ICBT to the maximally rectal point were calculated to the EQD2 and evaluated the association of toxicities. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated for late rectal toxicity. The mean cumulative dose in term of EQD2 to rectum was 64.2 Gy. Grade 1 toxicities were the most common findings. According to endoscopic exam, the most common toxicities were congested mucosa (36 patients) and telangiectasia (32 patients). In evaluation between rectal dose in EQD2 and toxicities, no association of cumulative rectal dose to rectal toxicity, except the association of cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy to late effects of normal tissue (LENT-SOMA) scale ≥ grade 2 (p = 0.022; odds ratio, 5.312; 95% confidence interval, 1.269-22.244). The cumulative rectal dose in EQD2 >65 Gy have association with ≥ grade 2 LENT-SOMA scale.

  11. The evaluation for usefulness of the custom made immobilization device for the anteroperitoneal resection patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Oh Nam; Lee, Woo Seok; Hong, Tae Kyun; Jo, Young Pih; Yun, Hwa Ryong; Kim, Jung Man

    2003-01-01

    Patient immobilization is essential factor for successful radiation therapy and major problem is reproducibility to maintain patient position during total radiation therapy period. Purpose of this study is evaluation for usefulness of the custom made immobilization device for the anteroperitoneal resection patients with rectal cancer. The object of this study were patients who underwent anteroperitoneal resection and undergo radiation therapy at present with rectal cancer. We made immobilization device for patient individually and analyzed its set up reproducibility, patient position deviation and errors. There was 5 mm-10 mm deviation in patient position without individual immobilization device, but we improved the deviation within few mm limitation with individual immobilization device. Custom made immobilization device was very helpful for anteroperitoneal resection patient with rectal cancer. We improved the patient position deviation within few mm limitation, shorten the set up time and we could give the comfort to patients.

  12. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced ≥Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, ≥Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  13. Can diet combined with treatment scheduling achieve consistency of rectal filling in patients receiving radiotherapy to the prostate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNair, Helen A.; Wedlake, Linda; McVey, Gerard P.; Thomas, Karen; Andreyev, Jervoise; Dearnaley, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: This pilot study investigates whether an individualized fluid and fibre prescription combined with a constant treatment can improve rectal filling consistency during radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Fibre, fluid intake and bowel function were assessed in 22 patients at a standard planning scan (SCT) and individualized dietary advice was prescribed to regularize bowel habit. Patients were requested to record frequency and type of bowel movements, fibre and fluid intake daily. Two subsequent CT scans were acquired at 7 (CCT1) and 10 days (CCT2) after SCT at a similar time. Rectal volume and gas were measured planning CT’s and ‘on treatment’ cone beam CT scans. We hypothesised that the difference in volume between CCT1 and CCT2 would be less than the difference between SCT and CCT1. Results: The mean (SD) change in volume between SCT to CCT1 and CCT1 to CCT2 was 5.68 cm 3 (26.2) and −8.6 cm 3 (40.1), respectively (p = 0.292). Of the 22 patients scanned 20 provided a complete record of dietary intake and bowel motion. The majority of patients either achieved or exceeded prescription. Change in rectal gas was the only correlation with change in rectal volume. Conclusion: Patient self reporting of bowel motion, fibre, fluid intake was achievable but consistency of rectal filling was not improved. Improved understanding of the aetiology and management of rectal gas is indicated.

  14. Circumferential resection margin (CRM) positivity after MRI assessment and adjuvant treatment in 189 patients undergoing rectal cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, G S; Eardley, N; McNicol, F; Healey, P; Hughes, M; Rooney, P S

    2014-05-01

    The management of rectal cancer relies on accurate MRI staging. Multi-modal treatments can downstage rectal cancer prior to surgery and may have an effect on MRI accuracy. We aim to correlate the findings of MRI staging of rectal cancer with histological analysis, the effect of neoadjuvant therapy on this and the implications of circumferential resection margin (CRM) positivity following neoadjuvant therapy. An analysis of histological data and radiological staging of all cases of rectal cancer in a single centre between 2006 and 2011 were conducted. Two hundred forty-one patients had histologically proved rectal cancer during the study period. One hundred eighty-two patients underwent resection. Median age was 66.6 years, and male to female ratio was 13:5. R1 resection rate was 11.1%. MRI assessments of the circumferential resection margin in patients without neoadjuvant radiotherapy were 93.6 and 88.1% in patients who underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Eighteen patients had predicted positive margins following chemoradiotherapy, of which 38.9% had an involved CRM on histological analysis. MRI assessment of the circumferential resection margin in rectal cancer is associated with high accuracy. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has a detrimental effect on this accuracy, although accuracy remains high. In the presence of persistently predicted positive margins, complete resection remains achievable but may necessitate a more radical approach to resection.

  15. Determining the efficiency of a commercial belly board device in reducing small bowel volume in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukarski, Dusko; Petkovska, Sonja; Angelovska, Natalija; Grozdanovska, Biljana; Mitrevski, Nenad

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this treatment planning study was to evaluate the efficiency of a commercial belly board device in reducing the irradiated volume of the small bowel. In this study 10 patients with rectal carcinoma receiving postoperative radiotherapy were included. For each of them we made two computer tomography series in prone position. In the first one the patients were lying on the flat table top, and in the second one they were lying on the belly board device which is under investigation. On both series we calculated and optimized plans according to the standing protocol of our department. From the dose-volume histograms of these plans we compared the volumes of the small bowel irradiated to three dose levels 15, 30 and 45 Gy. The results showed that the absolute irradiated volumes were significantly smaller in the plans with the belly board device. Based on these results we believe that the employment of this belly board device will reduce the acute and late small bowel toxicity. This should be verified with a clinical study.(Author)

  16. Determining the efficiency of a commercial belly board device in reducing small bowel volume in rectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukarski, Dusko; Petkovska, Sonja; Angelovska, Natalija; Grozdanovska, Biljana; Mitrevski, Nenad [University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Skopje(Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this treatment planning study was to evaluate the efficiency of a commercial belly board device in reducing the irradiated volume of the small bowel. In this study 10 patients with rectal carcinoma receiving postoperative radiotherapy were included. For each of them we made two computer tomography series in prone position. In the first one the patients were lying on the flat table top, and in the second one they were lying on the belly board device which is under investigation. On both series we calculated and optimized plans according to the standing protocol of our department. From the dose-volume histograms of these plans we compared the volumes of the small bowel irradiated to three dose levels 15, 30 and 45 Gy. The results showed that the absolute irradiated volumes were significantly smaller in the plans with the belly board device. Based on these results we believe that the employment of this belly board device will reduce the acute and late small bowel toxicity. This should be verified with a clinical study.(Author)

  17. The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor results in a worse prognosis for patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy: a multicenter, retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giralt, Jordi; Heras, Manuel de las; Cerezo, Laura; Eraso, Aranzazu; Hermosilla, Edurado; Velez, Dolores; Lujan, Juan; Espin, Eloi; Rossello, Jose; Majo, Joaquin; Benavente, Sergi; Armengol, Manel; Torres, I. de

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is observed in 50-70% of colorectal carcinoma and is associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of EGFR status before radiotherapy in a group of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy. Patients and methods: Eighty-seven patients were studied retrospectively. Treatment consisted of pelvic radiotherapy, in 50 patients with concomitant chemotherapy and surgical resection. Immunohistochemistry for EGFR was determined at the preradiation biopsy and in the resected specimens. Immunohistochemical analysis for EGFR expression was evaluated according to extension and staining intensity. We defined positive staining (EGFR positive), when extension was 5% or more. Results: A total of 52 of 87 tumors showed EGFR positive status at biopsy (60%) and EGFR expression was associated neither with clinical tumor stage nor with clinical nodal stage. EGFR positive expression was linked to a lack of pathologic complete response to preoperative radiotherapy (P=0.006). Disease-free survival was lower among patients with EGFR positive status before radiotherapy (P=0.003). In a multivariate analysis EGFR expression at biopsy was a statistically significant predictor of disease-free survival, RR=2.88 (1.1-7.8), P=0.036. Conclusions: EGFR is expressed in a significant number of rectal tumors. EGFR-positive expression before radiotherapy is an indicator for poor response and low disease-free survival

  18. Bone scanning in patients with breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Y.; Nishi, T.; Hirose, T.; Schichijo, Y.; Ibukuro, K.

    1985-01-01

    Skeletal imaging using radionuclides has proved to be a sensitive method for the detection of early bony metastases from breast carcinoma. Recent studies have found a relatively low rate of abnormal scans in patients with stage I and II breast cancers, and therefore it is open to question whether bone scanning should be part of the preoperative evaluation of any patient prior to breast surgery. We reviewed our experience with bone scans in 329 patients out of 406 histologically proven breast cancer patients to determine if any or all patients should have this procedure done routinely prior to breast surgery. (orig.) [de

  19. Cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC offers similar outcomes in patients with rectal peritoneal metastases compared to colon cancer patients: a matched case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkens, Geert A; van Oudheusden, Thijs R; Braam, Hidde J; Wiezer, Marinus J; Nienhuijs, Simon W; Rutten, Harm J; van Ramshorst, Bert; de Hingh, Ignace H

    2016-04-01

    The effect of cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in patients with rectal peritoneal metastases (PM) is unclear. This case-control study aims to assess the results of cytoreduction and HIPEC in patients with rectal PM compared to colon PM patients. Colorectal PM patients treated with complete macroscopic cytoreduction and HIPEC were included. Two colon cancer patients were case-matched for each rectal cancer patient, based on prognostic factors (T stage, N stage, histology type, and extent of PM). Short- and long-term outcomes were compared between both groups. From 317 patients treated with complete macroscopic cytoreduction and HIPEC, 29 patients (9.1%) had rectal PM. Fifty-eight colon cases were selected as control patients. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Major morbidity was 27.6% and 34.5% in the rectal and colon group, respectively (P = 0.516). Median disease-free survival was 13.5 months in the rectal group and 13.6 months in the colon group (P = 0.621). Two- and five-year overall survival rates were 54%/32% in rectal cancer patients, and 61%/24% in colon cancer patients (P = 0.987). Cytoreduction and HIPEC in selected patients with rectal PM is feasible and provides similar outcomes as in colon cancer patients. Rectal PM should not be regarded a contra-indication for cytoreduction and HIPEC in selected patients. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:548-553. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Marital status and survival in patients with rectal cancer: A population-based STROBE cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuyue; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Xuemei; Wen, Jin

    2018-05-01

    To examine the impact of marital status on overall survival (OS) and rectal cancer-specific survival (RCSS) for aged patients.We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database to identify aged patients (>65 years) with early stage rectal cancer (RC) (T1-T4, N0, M0) in the United States from 2004 to 2010. Propensity score matching was conducted to avoid potential confounding factors with ratio at 1:1. We used Kaplan-Meier to compare OS and RCSS between the married patients and the unmarried, respectively. We used cox proportion hazard regressions to obtain hazard rates for OS, and proportional subdistribution hazard model was performed to calculate hazard rates for RCSS.Totally, 5196 patients were included. The married (2598 [50%]) aged patients had better crude 5-year overall survival rate (64.2% vs 57.3%, P vs 75.9%, P unmarried (2598 (50%)), respectively. In multivariate analyses, married patients had significantly lower overall death than unmarried patients (HR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.71-0.83, P married patients had no cancer-specific survival benefit versus the unmarried aged patients (HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.81-1.04, P = .17).Among old population, married patients with early stage RC had better OS than the unmarried, while current evidence showed that marital status might have no protective effect on cancer-specific survival.

  1. The prognostic value of lymph node ratio in a national cohort of rectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, J; Jess, P; Roikjaer, O

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prognostic implications of the lymph node ratio (LNR) in curative resected rectal cancer. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: It has been proposed that the LNR has a high prognostic impact in colorectal cancer, but the lymph node ratio has not been evaluated exclusively for rectal......-adjuvant treatment had been given. RESULTS: In a multivariate analysis the pN status, ypN status and lymph node yield were found to be independent prognostic factors for overall survival, irrespective of neo-adjuvant therapy. The LNR was also found to be a significant prognostic factor with a Hazard Ratio ranging...... cancer in a large national cohort study. METHODS: All 6793 patients in Denmark diagnosed with stage I to III adenocarcinoma of the rectum, and so treated in the period from 2003 to 2011, were included in the analysis. The cohort was divided into two groups according to whether or not neo...

  2. Second harmonic generation for collagen I characterization in rectal cancer patients with and without preoperative radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockhuys, Stéphanie; Agarwal, Nisha Rani; Hildesjö, Camilla; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2017-10-01

    Rectal cancer is treated with preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to downstage the tumor, reduce local recurrence, and improve patient survival. Still, the treatment outcome varies significantly and new biomarkers are desired. Collagen I (Col-I) is a potential biomarker, which can be visualized label-free by second harmonic generation (SHG). Here, we used SHG to identify Col-I changes induced by RT in surgical tissue, with the aim to evaluate the clinical significance of RT-induced Col-I changes. First, we established a procedure for quantitative evaluation of Col-I by SHG in CDX2-stained tissue sections. Next, we evaluated Col-I properties in material from 31 non-RT and 29 RT rectal cancer patients. We discovered that the Col-I intensity and anisotropy were higher in the tumor invasive margin than in the inner tumor and normal mucosa, and RT increased and decreased the intensity in inner tumor and normal mucosa, respectively. Furthermore, higher Col-I intensity in the inner tumor was related to increased distant recurrence in the non-RT group but to longer survival in the RT group. In conclusion, we present a new application of SHG for quantitative analysis of Col-I in surgical material, and the first data suggest Col-I intensity as a putative prognostic biomarker in rectal cancer.

  3. WRAP53 is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer- a study of Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Da-Wei; Adell, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Expression of WRAP53 protein has oncogenic properties and it is up regulated in several types of tumors. We examined expression of WRAP53 protein in rectal cancers and analyzed its relationship to the response to preoperative radiotherapy and patient survival. The WRAP53 protein was examined by immunohistochemistry in normal mucosa, primary tumors and lymph node metastases from 143 rectal cancer patients participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Frequency of WRAP53 protein expression was increased in primary rectal cancer compared to the normal mucosa (p < 0.05). In non-radiotherapy group positive WRAP53 in primary tumors (p = 0.03, RR, 3.73, 95% CI, 1.13-11.89) or metastases (p = 0.01, RR, 4.11, 95% CI, 1.25-13.14), was associated with poor prognosis independently of stages and differentiations. In radiotherapy group, positive WRAP53 in the metastasis correlated with better survival (p = 0.04). An interaction analysis showed that the correlations of WRAP53 with the prognostic significance with and without radiotherapy in the metastasis differed (p = 0.01). In the radiotherapy group, expression of WRAP53 in metastases gave a better outcome (p = 0.02, RR, 0.32, 95% CI, 0.13-0.84), and an interaction analysis showed significance between the two groups (p = 0.01). WRAP53 may be a new biomarker used to predict prognosis and to select suitable patients for preoperative radiotherapy

  4. Methods of comprehensive geriatric assessment of older patients with rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Gordeev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a literature review on application of modern risk predictors of complications and morbidity necessary for selection of oncologically justified treatment methods for older patients with rectal cancer taking into account advancement of the disease and concomitant pathology. Use of modern scales, calculators, and questionnaires for evaluation of functional and physical status of this complex patient category by a multidisciplinary team allows to personalize therapy approach, minimize complications and morbidity after specific treatment. Application of the developed algorithms of assessment of older patients creates satisfactory conditions for their treatment based on oncological adequacy, functionality, and safety.  

  5. Tolerability of Combined Modality Therapy for Rectal Cancer in Elderly Patients Aged 75 Years and Older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margalit, Danielle N.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Kobayashi, Wendy; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Clark, Jeffrey; Willett, Christopher G.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of treatment deviations during combined modality therapy for rectal cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years and older. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of consecutively treated patients with rectal cancer aged 75 years and older treated with combined modality therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital from 2002 to 2007. The primary endpoint was the rate of treatment deviation, defined as a treatment break, dose reduction, early discontinuation of therapy, or hospitalization during combined modality therapy. Patient comorbidity was rated using the validated Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 Test (ACE-27) comorbidity index. Fisher’s exact test and the Mantel–Haenszel trend test were used to identify predictors of treatment tolerability. Results: Thirty-six eligible patients had a median age of 79.0 years (range, 75–87 years); 53% (19/36) had no or mild comorbidity and 47% (17/36) had moderate or severe comorbidity. In all, 58% of patients (21/36) were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and 33% (12/36) with postoperative CRT. Although 92% patients (33/36) completed the planned radiotherapy (RT) dose, 25% (9/36) required an RT-treatment break, 11% (4/36) were hospitalized, and 33% (12/36) had a dose reduction, break, or discontinuation of concurrent chemotherapy. In all, 39% of patients (14/36) completed ≥4 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, and 17% (6/36) completed therapy without a treatment deviation. More patients with no to mild comorbidity completed treatment than did patients with moderate to severe comorbidity (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.66). The rate of deviation did not differ between patients who had preoperative or postoperative CRT (19% vs. 17%, p = 1.0). Conclusions: The majority of elderly patients with rectal cancer in this series required early termination of treatment, treatment interruptions, or dose reductions. These data suggest that further intensification

  6. Diffusion weighted imaging in patients with rectal cancer: Comparison between Gaussian and non-Gaussian models.

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    Georgios C Manikis

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of four diffusion models, including mono and bi-exponential both Gaussian and non-Gaussian models, in diffusion weighted imaging of rectal cancer.Nineteen patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent MRI examination of the rectum before chemoradiation therapy including a 7 b-value diffusion sequence (0, 25, 50, 100, 500, 1000 and 2000 s/mm2 at a 1.5T scanner. Four different diffusion models including mono- and bi-exponential Gaussian (MG and BG and non-Gaussian (MNG and BNG were applied on whole tumor volumes of interest. Two different statistical criteria were recruited to assess their fitting performance, including the adjusted-R2 and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE. To decide which model better characterizes rectal cancer, model selection was relied on Akaike Information Criteria (AIC and F-ratio.All candidate models achieved a good fitting performance with the two most complex models, the BG and the BNG, exhibiting the best fitting performance. However, both criteria for model selection indicated that the MG model performed better than any other model. In particular, using AIC Weights and F-ratio, the pixel-based analysis demonstrated that tumor areas better described by the simplest MG model in an average area of 53% and 33%, respectively. Non-Gaussian behavior was illustrated in an average area of 37% according to the F-ratio, and 7% using AIC Weights. However, the distributions of the pixels best fitted by each of the four models suggest that MG failed to perform better than any other model in all patients, and the overall tumor area.No single diffusion model evaluated herein could accurately describe rectal tumours. These findings probably can be explained on the basis of increased tumour heterogeneity, where areas with high vascularity could be fitted better with bi-exponential models, and areas with necrosis would mostly follow mono-exponential behavior.

  7. Elevated platelet count as predictor of recurrence in rectal cancer patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-02-01

    The impact of systemic inflammatory response (SIR) on prognostic and predictive outcome in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has not been fully investigated. This retrospective study enrolled 89 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and for whom platelet (PLT) counts and SIR status [neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR)] were available. Both clinical values of PLT and SIR status in rectal cancer patients were investigated. Elevated PLT, NLR, PLR, and pathologic TNM stage III [ypN(+)] were associated with significantly poor overall survival (OS). Elevated PLT, NLR, and ypN(+) were shown to independently predict OS. Elevated PLT and ypN(+) significantly predicted poor disease-free survival (DFS). Elevated PLT was identified as the only independent predictor of DFS. PLT counts are a promising pre-CRT biomarker for predicting recurrence and poor prognosis in rectal cancer.

  8. SPARCL1 Expression Increases With Preoperative Radiation Therapy and Predicts Better Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients

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    Kotti, Angeliki, E-mail: angkotti@yahoo.gr; Holmqvist, Annica; Albertsson, Maria; Sun, Xiao-Feng, E-mail: xiao-feng.sun@liu.se

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is expressed in various normal tissues and many types of cancers. The function of SPARCL1 and its relationship to a patient's prognosis have been studied, whereas its relationship to radiation therapy (RT) is not known. Our aim was to investigate the expression of SPARCL1 in rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: The study included 136 rectal cancer patients who were randomized to undergo preoperative RT and surgery (n=63) or surgery alone (n=73). The expression levels of SPARCL1 in normal mucosa (n=29), primary tumor (n=136), and lymph node metastasis (n=35) were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: Tumors with RT had stronger SPARCL1 expression than tumors without RT (P=.003). In the RT group, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival than weak expression in patients with stage III tumors, independent of sex, age, differentiation, and margin status (P=.022; RR = 18.128; 95% confidence interval, 1.512-217.413). No such relationship was found in the non-RT group (P=.224). Further analysis of interactions among SPARCL1 expression, RT, and survival showed statistical significance (P=.024). In patients with metastases who received RT, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival compared to weak expression (P=.041) but not in the non-RT group (P=.569). Conclusions: SPARCL1 expression increases with RT and is related to better prognosis in rectal cancer patients with RT but not in patients without RT. This result may help us to select the patients best suited for preoperative RT.

  9. Carcinoma of the prostate treated by pelvic node dissection, iodine-125 seed implant and external irradiation; a study of rectal complications

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    Abadir, R.; Ross, G. Jr.; Weinstein, S.H. (Missouri Univ., Columbia (USA). Hospital and Clinics)

    1984-09-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia protocol for localised cancer of the prostate calls for pelvic node dissection, 10 000 cGy at the periphery of the prostate from /sup 125/I and 4000 cGy in 20 fractions to the whole pelvis using supervoltage X-ray therapy. Rectal complications were studied in 104 patients; acute and chronic reactions were defined. During external irradiation 54% did not develop diarrhoea, 43% had mild diarrhoea and 3% had severe diarrhoea. In the chronic stage 77% did not have diarrhoea, 12% had delayed, non-distressing rectal bleeding which did not need specific treatment or needed only simple treatment, 7% had prolonged distressing proctitis and 4% had rectal ulceration or recto-urethral fistula necessitating colostomy. Each of the four patients who had colostomy had an additional aetiological factor (arterial disease, pelvic inflammation, additional radiation, pelvic malignancy or second operation). None of the patients entered in the combined brachytherapy and teletherapy programme, and in whom 0.5 cm space was maintained between the closest seed and the rectal mucosa, developed prolonged proctitis.

  10. Feasibility of mesorectal vascular invasion in predicting early distant metastasis in patients with stage T3 rectal cancer based on rectal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Jai Keun; Lee, Jei Hee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University Health system, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute of Gastroenterology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Bae [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Jae [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of mesorectal vascular invasion (MVI) in predicting early distant metastasis developed within 1 year of diagnosis of T3 rectal cancer using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Sixty-five patients with T3 rectal cancer (early metastasis, n = 28; non-metastasis, n = 37) were enrolled in this study. Early distant metastases developed in 28 patients (liver, n = 15; lung, n = 9; both, n = 4). Logistic regression was used to determine the independent predictors for early distant metastasis. In univariate analysis, tumour location, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), MRI-detected MVI, and mesorectal fat infiltration (MFI) (odds ratio [OR], 4.533, 9.583, 5.539, 27.046, and 5.539, respectively) were associated with early distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that MVI (OR, 29.949; P < 0.002) and LVI (OR, 6.684; P = 0.033) were independent factors for early distant metastasis. Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of MVI (94.59 %, and 89.47 %, respectively) were significantly higher than those of LVI (64.86 %, and 61.76 %), but sensitivity and negative predictive value were not significantly different between MVI (60.71 %, and 76.09 %) and LVI (75.00 %, and 77.42 %). While sensitivity of MRI-detected MVI was equal to that of CEA in predicting early distant metastasis from T3 rectal cancer, specificity and PPV may be improved by assessing MVI. (orig.)

  11. Early Postoperative Low Expression of RAD50 in Rectal Cancer Patients Associates with Disease-Free Survival

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    Vincent Ho

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular biomarkers have the potential to predict response to the treatment of rectal cancer. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic and clinicopathological implication of RAD50 (DNA repair protein RAD50 homolog expression in rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 266 rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery and received chemo- and radiotherapy between 2000 and 2011 were involved in the study. Postoperative RAD50 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in surgical samples (n = 266. Results: Using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis, we found that low RAD50 expression in postoperative samples was associated with worse disease free survival (p = 0.001 and overall survival (p < 0.001 in early stage/low-grade tumors. In a comparison of patients with low vs. high RAD50 expression, we found that low levels of postoperative RAD50 expression in rectal cancer tissues were significantly associated with perineural invasion (p = 0.002. Conclusion: Expression of RAD50 in rectal cancer may serve as a prognostic biomarker for long-term survival of patients with perineural invasion-positive tumors and for potential use in early stage and low-grade rectal cancer assessment.

  12. Effect of leukocyte alteration on treatment outcomes following preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer

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    Kim, Tae Gyu; Park, Won; Choi, Doo Ho [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-09-15

    Hematotoxicity following anti-cancer treatment is known to be related to treatment efficacy in several malignancies. The purpose of this study was to examine the hematologic parameters related to the tumor response and survival in patients treated with curative surgery following preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. Four hundred eighteen patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CRT and curative surgery were analyzed, retrospectively. The main clinical factors and blood cell counts before and after CRT were investigated with respect to their relationships with tumor downstaging and patient survival. The post-CRT leukocyte count was significantly different between the tumor downstaging group and the nondownstaging group (median, 4740/uL vs. 5130/uL; p = 0.013). Multivariate analysis showed that histological grade, circumferential extent, and post-CRT leukocyte count were related to tumor downstaging. In addition, histological grade, post-CRT leukocyte count, and tumor downstaging were related to disease-free survival. The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival in patients with post-CRT leukocyte count ≤3730/uL, which is the cut-off value derived from the receiver operation characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, were significantly higher than those with higher counts (88.0% vs. 71.6%, p = 0.001; 94.4% vs. 84.1%, p = 0.024). Post-CRT leukocyte count of ≤3730/uL could be regarded as a good prognostic factor for tumor response and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative CRT.

  13. A case of cetuximab-related tumour lysis syndrome in metastatic rectal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Muhammad; Kwong, Whye Yan; Cantwell, Brian; Walker, Frank

    2010-01-01

    A 60-year-old man was diagnosed with a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma in November 2006. The computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and whole-body positron emission tomography–CT (PET–CT) scan showed the presence of multiple liver metastases which were confined to its right lobe. He had the first session of a combined therapy with cetuximab and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in March 2009; however, soon afterwards, he presented with the symptoms, signs and biochemistry suggestive of tumour lysis syndrome. Our unusual case highlights that tumour lysis syndrome can also develop in ‘low risk’ category tumours, and that clinicians should be vigilant in identifying at-risk patients. PMID:28657052

  14. Blood biomarkers are helpful in the prediction of response to chemoradiation in rectal cancer: A prospective, hypothesis driven study on patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buijsen, Jeroen; Stiphout, Ruud G. van; Menheere, Paul P.C.A.; Lammering, Guido; Lambin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/objective: Chemoradiation (CRT) has been shown to lead to downsizing of an important portion of rectal cancers. In order to tailor treatment at an earlier stage during treatment, predictive models are being developed. Adding blood biomarkers may be attractive for prediction, as they can be collected very easily and determined with excellent reproducibility in clinical practice. The hypothesis of this study was that blood biomarkers related to tumor load, hypoxia and inflammation can help to predict response to CRT in rectal cancer. Material/methods: 295 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were planned to undergo CRT were prospectively entered into a biobank protocol ( (NCT01067872)). Blood samples were drawn before start of CRT. Nine biomarkers were selected, based on a previously defined hypothesis, and measured in a standardized way by a certified lab: CEA, CA19-9, LDH, CRP, IL-6, IL-8, CA IX, osteopontin and 25-OH-vitamin D. Outcome was analyzed in two ways: pCR vs. non-pCR and responders (defined as ypT0-2N0) vs. non-responders (all other ypTN stages). Results: 276 patients could be analyzed. 20.7% developed a pCR and 47.1% were classified as responders. In univariate analysis CEA (p = 0.001) and osteopontin (p = 0.012) were significant predictors for pCR. Taking response as outcome CEA (p < 0.001), IL-8 (p < 0.001) and osteopontin (p = 0.004) were significant predictors. In multivariate analysis CEA was the strongest predictor for pCR (OR 0.92, p = 0.019) and CEA and IL-8 predicted for response (OR 0.97, p = 0.029 and OR 0.94, p = 0.036). The model based on biomarkers only had an AUC of 0.65 for pCR and 0.68 for response; the strongest model included clinical data, PET-data and biomarkers and had an AUC of 0.81 for pCR and 0.78 for response. Conclusion: CEA and IL-8 were identified as predictive biomarkers for tumor response and PCR after CRT in rectal cancer. Incorporation of these blood biomarkers leads to an additional accuracy of

  15. Total mesorectal excision (TME) in rectal patients - experiences of the Lower Silesian Oncology in Wroclaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bebenek, M.; Pudelko, M.; Cisarz, K.

    2006-01-01

    The prognosis in rectal cancer has improved significantly with the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Therapeutic results have also improved in Poland, but the survival rates are still lower and local recurrences more frequent when compared to western countries. The aim of this study was to show that, unless improperly performed, TME might significantly improve the results of oncological treatment throughout Poland. The clinical records of 370 rectal cancer patients treated surgically at Lower Silesian Oncology Center, Wroclaw between April 1 st , 1998, and May 6 th , 2004 were subjected to retrospective analysis. The material was divided into two groups on the basis of the surgical procedure emploved: 1) TME (n=260, 70%) another (undefined) technique (n=110, 30%). The following parameters were compared between both groups: 1) the percentage of one- and five-year observed survivals, 2) the average time of survival during the initial year surgery (in months), 3) the average time of survival during five years following surgery (in years), 4) the percentage of five-year relative survivals, and 5) the percentage of isolated local recurrences demonstrated during five years following the surgery. The study has shown that both the average survival times during a five-year follow-up and rates of five-year relative survival were significantly better in the series of TME-operated patients, as compared to those who underwent other type of rectal surgery. Fifty-seven patients who underwent TME had achieved five year survival, which corresponds to 63.3% and 81.6% of observed and relative survivals, respectively. In contrast, in the group operated by a non-TME technique, the percentages of observed and relative five year survival amounted to 36.7% and 45.5%, respectively. Moreover, isolated local recurrence developed in 6.7% of the TME-treated patients only, which contrasted with 23% observed in the group in which the old approach was used. Our study proves that

  16. Population Pharmacokinetics of Artesunate and Dihydroartemisinin following Intra-Rectal Dosing of Artesunate in Malaria Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Julie A; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Barnes, Karen I; Perri, Gianni Di; Folb, Peter; Gomes, Melba; Krishna, Sanjeev; Krudsood, Srivicha; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Mansor, Sharif; McIlleron, Helen; Miller, Raymond; Molyneux, Malcolm; Mwenechanya, James; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Nosten, Francois; Olliaro, Piero; Pang, Lorrin; Ribeiro, Isabela; Tembo, Madalitso; van Vugt, Michele; Ward, Steve; Weerasuriya, Kris; Win, Kyaw; White, Nicholas J

    2006-01-01

    Background Intra-rectal artesunate has been developed as a potentially life-saving treatment of severe malaria in rural village settings where administration of parenteral antimalarial drugs is not possible. We studied the population pharmacokinetics of intra-rectal artesunate and the relationship with parasitological responses in patients with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Methods and Findings Adults and children in Africa and Southeast Asia with moderately severe malaria were recruited in two Phase II studies (12 adults from Southeast Asia and 11 children from Africa) with intensive sampling protocols, and three Phase III studies (44 children from Southeast Asia, and 86 children and 26 adults from Africa) with sparse sampling. All patients received 10 mg/kg artesunate as a single intra-rectal dose of suppositories. Venous blood samples were taken during a period of 24 h following dosing. Plasma artesunate and dihydroartemisinin (DHA, the main biologically active metabolite) concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The pharmacokinetic properties of DHA were determined using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Artesunate is rapidly hydrolysed in vivo to DHA, and this contributes the majority of antimalarial activity. For DHA, a one-compartment model assuming complete conversion from artesunate and first-order appearance and elimination kinetics gave the best fit to the data. The mean population estimate of apparent clearance (CL/F) was 2.64 (l/kg/h) with 66% inter-individual variability. The apparent volume of distribution (V/F) was 2.75 (l/kg) with 96% inter-individual variability. The estimated DHA population mean elimination half-life was 43 min. Gender was associated with increased mean CL/F by 1.14 (95% CI: 0.36–1.92) (l/kg/h) for a male compared with a female, and weight was positively associated with V/F. Larger V/Fs were observed for the patients requiring early rescue treatment compared

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin following intra-rectal dosing of artesunate in malaria patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Simpson

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Intra-rectal artesunate has been developed as a potentially life-saving treatment of severe malaria in rural village settings where administration of parenteral antimalarial drugs is not possible. We studied the population pharmacokinetics of intra-rectal artesunate and the relationship with parasitological responses in patients with moderately severe falciparum malaria.Adults and children in Africa and Southeast Asia with moderately severe malaria were recruited in two Phase II studies (12 adults from Southeast Asia and 11 children from Africa with intensive sampling protocols, and three Phase III studies (44 children from Southeast Asia, and 86 children and 26 adults from Africa with sparse sampling. All patients received 10 mg/kg artesunate as a single intra-rectal dose of suppositories. Venous blood samples were taken during a period of 24 h following dosing. Plasma artesunate and dihydroartemisinin (DHA, the main biologically active metabolite concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The pharmacokinetic properties of DHA were determined using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Artesunate is rapidly hydrolysed in vivo to DHA, and this contributes the majority of antimalarial activity. For DHA, a one-compartment model assuming complete conversion from artesunate and first-order appearance and elimination kinetics gave the best fit to the data. The mean population estimate of apparent clearance (CL/F was 2.64 (l/kg/h with 66% inter-individual variability. The apparent volume of distribution (V/F was 2.75 (l/kg with 96% inter-individual variability. The estimated DHA population mean elimination half-life was 43 min. Gender was associated with increased mean CL/F by 1.14 (95% CI: 0.36-1.92 (l/kg/h for a male compared with a female, and weight was positively associated with V/F. Larger V/Fs were observed for the patients requiring early rescue treatment compared with the remainder

  18. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin following intra-rectal dosing of artesunate in malaria patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Julie A; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Barnes, Karen I; Di Perri, Gianni; Folb, Peter; Gomes, Melba; Krishna, Sanjeev; Krudsood, Srivicha; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Mansor, Sharif; McIlleron, Helen; Miller, Raymond; Molyneux, Malcolm; Mwenechanya, James; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Nosten, Francois; Olliaro, Piero; Pang, Lorrin; Ribeiro, Isabela; Tembo, Madalitso; van Vugt, Michele; Ward, Steve; Weerasuriya, Kris; Win, Kyaw; White, Nicholas J

    2006-11-01

    Intra-rectal artesunate has been developed as a potentially life-saving treatment of severe malaria in rural village settings where administration of parenteral antimalarial drugs is not possible. We studied the population pharmacokinetics of intra-rectal artesunate and the relationship with parasitological responses in patients with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Adults and children in Africa and Southeast Asia with moderately severe malaria were recruited in two Phase II studies (12 adults from Southeast Asia and 11 children from Africa) with intensive sampling protocols, and three Phase III studies (44 children from Southeast Asia, and 86 children and 26 adults from Africa) with sparse sampling. All patients received 10 mg/kg artesunate as a single intra-rectal dose of suppositories. Venous blood samples were taken during a period of 24 h following dosing. Plasma artesunate and dihydroartemisinin (DHA, the main biologically active metabolite) concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The pharmacokinetic properties of DHA were determined using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Artesunate is rapidly hydrolysed in vivo to DHA, and this contributes the majority of antimalarial activity. For DHA, a one-compartment model assuming complete conversion from artesunate and first-order appearance and elimination kinetics gave the best fit to the data. The mean population estimate of apparent clearance (CL/F) was 2.64 (l/kg/h) with 66% inter-individual variability. The apparent volume of distribution (V/F) was 2.75 (l/kg) with 96% inter-individual variability. The estimated DHA population mean elimination half-life was 43 min. Gender was associated with increased mean CL/F by 1.14 (95% CI: 0.36-1.92) (l/kg/h) for a male compared with a female, and weight was positively associated with V/F. Larger V/Fs were observed for the patients requiring early rescue treatment compared with the remainder, independent

  19. Diagnostic accuracy and prognostic impact of restaging by magnetic resonance imaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Soon Jin; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prognostic role of restaging rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with preoperative CRT has not been established. The goal of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic role of radiological staging by rectal MRI after preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 231 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CRT and radical resection from January 2008 to December 2009 were prospectively enrolled. The diagnostic accuracy and prognostic significance of post-CRT radiological staging by MRI was evaluated. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiological diagnosis of good responders (ypTNM stage 0–I) were 32%, 90%, 65%, and 69%, respectively. The overall accuracy of MRI restating for good responders was 68%. The 5-year disease-free survival rates of patients with radiological and pathological TNM stage 0, stage I, and stage II–III were 100%, 94%, and 76%, respectively (P = 0.037), and 97%, 87%, and 73%, respectively (P = 0.007). On multivariate analysis, post-CRT radiological staging by MRI was an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival. Conclusion: Radiological staging by MRI after preoperative CRT may be an independent predictor of survival in patients with rectal cancer

  20. The predictive and prognostic potential of plasma telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) RNA in rectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampazzo, Enrica; Del Bianco, Paola; Bertorelle, Roberta; Boso, Caterina; Perin, Alessandro; Spiro, Giovanna; Bergamo, Francesca; Belluco, Claudio; Buonadonna, Angela; Palazzari, Elisa; Leonardi, Sara; De Paoli, Antonino; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; De Rossi, Anita

    2018-01-01

    Background: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by surgery is the standard care for locally advanced rectal cancer, but tumour response to CRT and disease outcome are variable. The current study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of plasma telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) levels in predicting tumour response and clinical outcome. Methods: 176 rectal cancer patients were included. Plasma samples were collected at baseline (before CRT=T0), 2 weeks after CRT was initiated (T1), post-CRT and before surgery (T2), and 4–8 months after surgery (T3) time points. Plasma TERT mRNA levels and total cell-free RNA were determined using real-time PCR. Results: Plasma levels of TERT were significantly lower at T2 (P<0.0001) in responders than in non-responders. Post-CRT TERT levels and the differences between pre- and post-CRT TERT levels independently predicted tumour response, and the prediction model had an area under curve of 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–0.87). Multiple analysis demonstrated that patients with detectable TERT levels at T2 and T3 time points had a risk of disease progression 2.13 (95% CI 1.10–4.11)-fold and 4.55 (95% CI 1.48–13.95)-fold higher, respectively, than those with undetectable plasma TERT levels. Conclusions: Plasma TERT levels are independent markers of tumour response and are prognostic of disease progression in rectal cancer patients who undergo neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:29449673

  1. Management of penetrating colon and rectal injuries in the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haut, Elliott R; Nance, Michael L; Keller, Martin S; Groner, Jonathan I; Ford, Henri R; Kuhn, Ann; Tuchfarber, Barbara; Garcia, Victor; Schwab, C William; Stafford, Perry W

    2004-09-01

    Management of civilian penetrating colon injuries in the adult has evolved from the universal use of fecal diversion to the highly selective use of colostomy. We hypothesized that a similar management approach was appropriate for the pediatric population. A retrospective review of pediatric patients (age trauma centers for the period January 1990 through June 2001. For the period of review, 53 children with a penetrating colorectal injury were identified. Firearms caused 89 percent of the injuries. The colon was injured in 83 percent (n = 44) of patients and the rectum in 17 percent (n = 9) of patients. The colorectal injury was managed without colostomy in 62 percent (n = 33) and with colostomy in 38 percent (colon = 11, rectum = 9). All rectal injuries were treated with colostomy. The hospital length of stay was longer in the colostomy group (17.6 days vs. 11.4 days). The complication rate was higher in the colostomy group (55 percent vs. 27 percent), which included two patients with stoma-related complications. There was no mortality in this series. Primary repair was used safely in most cases of civilian penetrating colon injuries in the pediatric population. All rectal injuries were treated with colostomy in this series. Fecal diversion was used selectively. Colostomy was performed for selected cases of colon wounds associated with shock, multiple blood transfusions, multiple other injuries, extensive contamination, and high-velocity weapons. In the absence of these associated factors, primary repair appears justified.

  2. Nuclear expression of lysyl oxidase enzyme is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Na; Cox, Thomas R; Cui, Weiyingqi

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence has implicated a pivotal role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in cancer progression and metastasis. Whilst the majority of work has focused on the extracellular matrix cross-linking role of LOX, the exact function of intracellular LOX localisation remains unclear. In this study, we anal...... the nucleus of colon cancer cell lines by confocal microscopy and Western blot. Our results show a powerful link between nuclear LOX expression in tumours and patient survival, and offer a promising prognostic biomarker for rectal cancer patients....... analysed the LOX expression patterns in the nuclei of rectal cancer patient samples and determined the clinical significance of this expression. Nuclear LOX expression was significantly increased in patient lymph node metastases compared to their primary tumours. High nuclear LOX expression in tumours......Emerging evidence has implicated a pivotal role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in cancer progression and metastasis. Whilst the majority of work has focused on the extracellular matrix cross-linking role of LOX, the exact function of intracellular LOX localisation remains unclear. In this study, we...

  3. Nursing care for patients with local recurrent rectal cancer after CT-guided 125I seed implantation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Li; Wei Fan; Ren Caifeng; Tu Mingmei; Qian Guixiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the nursing care strategy for patients with local recurrent rectal cancer who has been treated with CT-guided 125 I seed implantation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients with local recurrent rectal cancer received a series of nursing interventions, including comfort care and pain care. The clinical results were observed and analyzed. Results: The therapy was smoothly accomplished in all patients. The pain was remarkably relived and the anxiety was alleviated. No displacement of implanted 125 I seed occurred. Conclusion: For patients with local recurrent rectal cancer occurred after CT-guided 125 I seed implantation therapy, careful nursing can effectively relieve the pain and anxiety feeling,and the living quality can also be markedly improved. (authors)

  4. Patient-reported genitourinary dysfunction after laparoscopic and open rectal cancer surgery in a randomized trial (COLOR II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, J; Abis, G; Gellerstedt, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article reports on patient-reported sexual dysfunction and micturition symptoms following a randomized trial of laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer. METHODS: Patients in the COLOR II randomized trial, comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer, completed...... laparoscopic and open approaches. An improvement in sexual dysfunction was seen in the first year, but some male sexual problems persisted. Before operation 64·5 per cent of men in the laparoscopic group and 55·6 per cent in the open group reported some degree of erectile dysfunction. This increased to 81...... radiotherapy, did not change these results. CONCLUSION: Sexual dysfunction is common in patients with rectal cancer, and treatment (including surgery) increases the proportion of patients affected. A laparoscopic approach does not change this. REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT0029779 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov)....

  5. Anogenital squamous cell carcinoma in neglected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svecova, D; Havrankova, M; Weismanova, E; Babal, P

    2012-01-01

    Skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) are arguably the second most common carcinoma of the skin and are responsible for the majority of non-melanoma skin cancer deaths. Gynecologist treated a Caucasian 56-years old female patient for genital wart with podophyllotoxin cream. She did not achieve complete response and therefore she has interrupted the therapy and the collaboration with the gynecologist. At the time of evaluation the lesion had a size of man's palm in anogenital region and showed characteristic features of neoplasm. The regional lymph nodes have produced infiltrated painful bubo. PCR analysis for HPV proved negative. Histopathology revealed well-differentiated squamous cell keratinizing carcinoma from the tumor as well as from the regional lymph node packet. Staging computed tomography scans proved negative and pelvis scans disclosed regional lymphadenopathy underlying the tumor. Palliative radiation therapy (by linear accelerator) was administered for the oversized tumor to the total TD 50.0Gy. The patient died 6 months after diagnostic assessment from cardio-respiratory failure. Staging computed tomography before her death did not disclose distinct metastases in her inner organs. Well-differentiated squamous cell keratinizing carcinoma could be growing endophytically affecting the underlying adipose tissue and musculature, with spreading into the regional lymph nodes. The rate of metastases into inner organs seems to vary according to the aggressiveness and metastatic behavior of each SCC. The case report calls for attention to the importance of collaboration among various specialists assisting in the diagnosis and management of skin neoplasm (Fig. 5, Ref. 12). Full Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  6. Rectal dose estimation for cervical cancer patients at the radiotherapy department of Komfo Anokye teaching hospital, using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahadzie, C.

    2012-12-01

    The research was aimed at evaluating the rectal dose of cervical cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi. This was done by using TLD, anthropomorphic phantom and a cohort of patients selected on consent. TLD chips of dimension 0.125x0.125x0.35mm were placed on each patient and external treatment was planned to deliver 200 cGy of radiation to each patient as prescribed by the Radiation Oncologist. The result shows a 3.39 percentage difference between the predicted dose by the TPS and that measured by the TLD. This percentage difference is below the limit of 5 percent set by Hanson et al. Rectal dose was evaluated using anthromorphic phantom and a cohort of patients. The pelvic section of the phantom was located; TLD chips inserted into the plugs at the positions of the rectal volume for each of the 8 sections of the anthropomorphic phantom and exposure of 200 cGy of radiation for 25 fractions of external beam. The dose was measured as 213.28 cGy and was used to calculate the biological effective dose (BED). The BED was added to the rectal dose from intracavitary brachytherapy to get the total rectal dose (TRD) for each patient. The least rectal dose from the patient studied is 22.123Gy which is far below the TD 5/5 and TD 5 0 /5 for the volumes of 1/3, 2/3 and 3/3. Emami et al. gave a threshold doses of 85Gy for 1/3 volume, 70 Gy for 2/3 and 60 Gy for 3/3 volume. The highest rectal dose was 63.76 Gy comparing to the TD 5/5 (Gy) values shows as that the measured rectal dose is on the high size. Emami et al. gave for 1/3 volume 61.38 Gy, 2/3 volume 60.50 Gy and 60 Gy for 3/3. Exceeding TD5/5 means that there is 5 percent probability of having complication such as severe proctitis, necrosis or fistula. For TD50/5, Emami et al. gave 81.38 Gy for partial volume of 1/3, 80.50 Gy for 2/3 volume and 80 Gy for 3/3 volume. The highest rectal dose recorded is 63.78 Gy which is far below threshold by Emami et al. (1991). (au)

  7. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  8. Risk of Hypogonadism From Scatter Radiation During Pelvic Radiation in Male Patients With Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, Ivan; Vuong, Te; Garant, Aurelie; Ducruet, Thierry; Doran, Patrick; Faria, Sergio; Liberman, Sender; Richard, Carole; Letellier, Francois; Charlebois, Patrick; Loungnarath, Rasmy; Stein, Barry; Devic, Slobodan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have reported fluctuations in sex hormones during pelvic irradiation. The objective of this study was to observe the effects of radiation on hormonal profiles for two treatment modalities: conventional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) given neoadjuvantly for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Routine serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels were collected from 119 consecutive male patients receiving either EBRT, using 45.0-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy or HDRBT using 26 Gy in 4 fractions. Results: Thirty patients with initially abnormal profiles were excluded. Profiles included in this study were collected from 51 patients treated with EBRT and 38 patients treated with HDRBT, all of whom had normal hormonal profiles before treatment. Mean follow-up times were 17 months for the entire patient cohort-14 and 20 months, respectively-for the EBRT and HDRBT arms. Dosimetry results revealed a mean cumulative testicular dose of 1.24 Gy received in EBRT patients compared with 0.27 Gy in the HDRBT group. After treatment, FSH and LH were elevated in all patients but were more pronounced in the EBRT group. The testosterone-to-LH ratio was significantly lower (p = 0.0036) in EBRT patients for tumors in the lower third of the rectum. The 2-year hypogonadism rate observed was 2.6% for HDRBT compared with 17.6% for EBRT (p = 0.09) for tumors in the lower two thirds of the rectum. Conclusion: HDRBT allows better hormonal sparing than EBRT during neoadjuvant treatment of patients with rectal cancer.

  9. Sphincter-saving extrasphincteric rectal dissection and proximal segmental sphincteric excision techniques by using combined abdominal and transvaginal anterior perineal access in female patients who have lower rectal cancer (Transvaginal low anterior rectal resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Naki Yücesoy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Combined abdominal and transvaginal anterior perineal approaches have been used as an alternative surgical method for the surgical treatment of the lower rectal cancer. The main aim of this paper is to describe the surgical stages of the combined abdominal and transvaginal approaches performed for lower rectal cancer, especially in transvaginal anterior perineal stage. Method: We have performed sphincter-saving surgical operations by using transvaginal anterior perineal access by combining with the abdominal access in four female patients who had lower rectal cancer. Results: Sphincter-saving extrasphincteric dissection and proximal segmental sphincteric excision techniques were performed in four female patients operated with combined abdominal and transvaginal anterior perineal approach. All patients were found to have continence. Postoperatively, one patient was converted to abdominoperineal rectal amputation due to the detected distal resection margin positivity. Conclusion: Transvaginal anterior perineal access provides the extrasphincteric rectal dissection possibility in the ischioanal fossa. Therefore, the combined abdominal and transvaginal anterior perineal approaches have been based on the different anatomical and surgical features when compared to intersphincteric dissection technique which is the most common used surgical procedure in lower rectal cancer surgery. Resumo: Introdução: Uma combinação de abordagens abdominal e perineal anterior transvaginal tem sido empregada como método cirúrgico alternativo para o tratamento cirúrgico do câncer de reto baixo. O principal objetivo do presente artigo é a descrição dos estágios cirúrgicos das abordagens abdominal e transvaginal combinadas realizadas para câncer de reto baixo, especialmente no estágio perineal anterior transvaginal. Método: Realizamos operações cirúrgicas com preservação de esfíncter com o uso do acesso perineal anterior transvaginal, em

  10. Diagnosis by computer-aided tomography in patients with carcinomas in the rectum-sigma area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnann, H.; Huebener, K.H.; Ahlemann, L.M.; Harms, S.

    1984-01-01

    In a retrospective study on the patients at Tuebingen between 1977 and 1980, the diagnostic value of computer-aided tomography was investigated in 232 cases of carcinomas in the rectum-sigma area. 192 examinations were post-operative. Whether computer-aided tomography will catch on as a staging measure in the pre-operative phase must for now remain unanswered until prospective studies on a large number of patients have been carried through. However, it is useful as a decision-taking aid as regards the choice of the operation method and to clarify whether the carcinoma is operable. Far more important in view of the known high rate of recurvency and metastatic spread seems to be the role of computer-aided tomography in the aftercare especially of those patients who had their rectum removed: the diagnosis of the recidivation permits direct therapeutic action (a second operation, radiation therapy) at an early date. The search for clinically not previously known recidivations revealed that computer-aided tomography had in 124 patients with operated rectal carcinoma a high sensitivity of 98 per cent, a specificity of 87 per cent and an accuracy of 91.9 percent. How long after the operation CAT checks should be carried through is quite as uncertain at present as the role of CAT in the staging of those tumors. The authors recommend intervals of 2-3 months within the first two post-operative years. (orig.) [de

  11. Clinical evaluation of per-rectal portal scintigraphy in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneyama, Keiichiro; Kamata, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Osamu; Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Haruo; Onuki, Makoto; Taguchi, Susumu; Hatta, Yoshio

    1986-09-01

    Hepatic blood flow and portal shunts were clinically studied with Tc-99m per-rectal portal scintigraphy in 51 patients with liver cirrhosis. RI time-activity curves of the liver and heart were used to define 3 patterns: type I = RI activity was more intense in the liver than in the heart, type II = more intense in the liver at one min and that in the heart at 15 min, or type III = less intense in the liver than in the heart. Four (8 %) of the patients had type 1, 22 (43 %) type II, and 25 (49 %) type III. Esophageal varices and splenomegaly were significantly associated with type III (p < 0.01). Regarding laboratory findings indicative of the impairment of liver function, there was no significant difference among the three types of RI activity. Indocyamine green tolerance test showed significantly higher R15 in the group with type III than in the other two groups (p < 0.05). Three other patients with idiopathic portal hypertension without liver function disturbance had type III. Per-rectal portal scintigraphy will be of help as a noninvasive tool for reflecting not only portal shunts but also hepatic blood flow and for predicting the severity of liver cirrhosis. (Namekawa, K.).

  12. Quality of life in patients with a permanent stoma after rectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näsvall, Pia; Dahlstrand, Ursula; Löwenmark, Thyra; Rutegård, Jörgen; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Strigård, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) assessment is important in understanding the patient's perspective and for decision-making in health care. HRQoL is often impaired in patients with stoma. The aim was to evaluate HRQoL in rectal cancer patients with permanent stoma compared to patients without stoma. 711 patients operated for rectal cancer with abdomino-perineal resection or Hartman's procedure and a control group (n = 275) operated with anterior resection were eligible. Four QoL questionnaires were sent by mail. Comparisons of mean values between groups were made by Student´s independent t test. Comparison was made to a Swedish background population. 336 patients with a stoma and 117 without stoma replied (453/986; 46 %). A bulging or a hernia around the stoma was present in 31.5 %. Operation due to parastomal hernia had been performed in 11.7 % in the stoma group. Mental health (p = 0.007), body image (p stoma. Fatigue (p = 0.019) and loss of appetite (p = 0.027) were also more prominent in the stoma group. Sexual function was impaired in the non-stoma group (p = 0.034). However in the stoma group, patients with a bulge/hernia had more sexual problems (p = 0.004). Pain was associated with bulge/hernia (p stoma was inferior compared to patients without stoma. In the stoma group, a bulge or a hernia around the stoma further impaired HRQoL.

  13. Radiochemotherapy in combination with regional hyperthermia in preirradiated patients with recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milani, V.; Issels, R.D.; Buecklein, V.; Institute of Molecular Immunology, Muenchen; Pazos, M.; Schaffer, P.; Wilkowski, R.; Duehmke, E.; Rahman, S.; Tschoep, K.; Schaffer, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Encouraging results of phase II studies combining chemotherapy with radiotherapy have been published. In this study, the results of a multimodal salvage therapy including radiochemotherapy (RCT) and regional hyperthermia (RHT) in preirradiated patients with recurrent rectal cancer are reported. Patients and Methods: All patients enrolled had received previous pelvic irradiation (median dose 50.4 Gy). The median time interval between prior radiotherapy and the onset of local recurrence was 34 months. The combined treatment consisted of reirradiation with a median dose of 39.6 Gy (30.0-45.0 Gy), delivered in fractions of 1.8 Gy/day. 5-fluorouracil was given as continuous infusion 350 mg/m2/day five times weekly, and RHT (BSD-2000 system) was applied twice a week within 1 h after radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was local progression-free survival (LPFS); secondary endpoints were overall survival, symptom control, and toxicity. Results: 24 patients (median age 59 years) with a previously irradiated locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum were enrolled. The median LPFS was 15 months (95% confidence interval 12-18 months) with a median follow-up of 27 months (16-37 months). The overall 1-year and 3-year survival rates were 87% and 30%, respectively. Pain was the main symptom in 17 patients. Release of pain was achieved in 12/17 patients (70%). No grade 3 or 4 hematologic or skin toxicity occurred. Grade 3 gastrointestinal acute toxicity was observed in 12.5% of the patients. Paratumoral thermometry revealed a homogeneous distribution of temperatures. Conclusion: RCT combined with RHT is an efficient salvage therapy showing high efficacy with acceptable toxicity and can be recommended as treatment option for this unfavorable group of preirradiated patients with local recurrence of rectal cancer. (orig.)

  14. Radiochemotherapy in combination with regional hyperthermia in preirradiated patients with recurrent rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milani, V.; Issels, R.D.; Buecklein, V. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Muenchen (Germany). Univ. Hospital Grosshadern, Dept. of Internal Medicine III; Institute of Molecular Immunology, Muenchen (Germany). KKG Hyperthermie GSF-Haematologikum; Pazos, M.; Schaffer, P.; Wilkowski, R.; Duehmke, E. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Muenchen (Germany). Univ. Hospital Grosshadern, Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Rahman, S.; Tschoep, K.; Schaffer, M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Muenchen (Germany). Univ. Hospital Grosshadern, Dept. of Internal Medicine III

    2008-03-15

    Background and Purpose: Encouraging results of phase II studies combining chemotherapy with radiotherapy have been published. In this study, the results of a multimodal salvage therapy including radiochemotherapy (RCT) and regional hyperthermia (RHT) in preirradiated patients with recurrent rectal cancer are reported. Patients and Methods: All patients enrolled had received previous pelvic irradiation (median dose 50.4 Gy). The median time interval between prior radiotherapy and the onset of local recurrence was 34 months. The combined treatment consisted of reirradiation with a median dose of 39.6 Gy (30.0-45.0 Gy), delivered in fractions of 1.8 Gy/day. 5-fluorouracil was given as continuous infusion 350 mg/m2/day five times weekly, and RHT (BSD-2000 system) was applied twice a week within 1 h after radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was local progression-free survival (LPFS); secondary endpoints were overall survival, symptom control, and toxicity. Results: 24 patients (median age 59 years) with a previously irradiated locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum were enrolled. The median LPFS was 15 months (95% confidence interval 12-18 months) with a median follow-up of 27 months (16-37 months). The overall 1-year and 3-year survival rates were 87% and 30%, respectively. Pain was the main symptom in 17 patients. Release of pain was achieved in 12/17 patients (70%). No grade 3 or 4 hematologic or skin toxicity occurred. Grade 3 gastrointestinal acute toxicity was observed in 12.5% of the patients. Paratumoral thermometry revealed a homogeneous distribution of temperatures. Conclusion: RCT combined with RHT is an efficient salvage therapy showing high efficacy with acceptable toxicity and can be recommended as treatment option for this unfavorable group of preirradiated patients with local recurrence of rectal cancer. (orig.)

  15. Importance of CT and MRI in the follow-up of patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balzer, J.O.; Luboldt, W.; Vogl, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    Indication Presentation and evaluation of diagnostic procedures for the follow-up in patients with suspected local recurrence of rectal cancer. Follow-up usually is performed using endoscopy and endosonography. Imaging techniques applied are also contrast enema as well as helical CT,MR imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). The results demonstrate the difficulty of all available modalities to differentiate between early tumor recurrences from posttherapeutic alterations.Especially the differentiation of scar tissue and local tumor recurrence, the detection of lymph node as well as pulmonary or hepatic metastasis requires a large diagnostic effort with employment of various imaging modalities. Values determined for sensitivity and specificity for CT are 84% and 91% with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 78%.For MRI and PET the sensitivity are 94% and 98%,and the specificity 92% and 90% with a PPV of 93% for the PET. The results demonstrate the increasing importance of CT and MRI in the follow-up of patients with rectal cancer and enable an accurate and early diagnosis through employment of new examination strategies and sequence protocols.PET remains an add-on examination in uncertain local lesions. (orig.) [de

  16. Tolerability and outcomes of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer in elderly patients aged 70 years and older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Xin; Wu, Hongbin; Peng, Junjie; Zhu, Ji; Cai, Sanjun; Cai, Gang; Zhang, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    To assess the safety and outcomes of radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in elderly patients (≥70) with rectal cancer. Elderly patients aged 70 and older with rectal cancer, who were treated with RT or CRT at a single institution, were retrospectively analyzed. Performance status (KPS and ECOG score) and comorbidity (Charlson comorbidity index) were calculated, and their correlation with treatment toxicity and overall survival were studied. Risk factors for overall survival were investigated using univariate and multivariate survival analysis. A total of 126 patients with locally advanced disease, local recurrence or synchronous metastasis were included, with a 3-year OS rate of 48.1%. Scheduled dosage of radiation was delivered to 69% of patients. Grade 3 toxicities occurred more often in patients treated with CRT versus RT. The occurrence of grade 3 toxicities was not related to KPS score, ECOG score, number of comorbidities, and Charlson score. Multivariate analysis found that only age and Charlson score were independent prognostic factors for predicting patients’ 3-year OS. The 3-year OS rate was significantly higher in patients with Charlson score <4 vs Charlson score ≥4 (71.1% vs. 26.4%, P=0.0003). Although toxicities may be significant, elderly patients with rectal cancer of varied stages can be safely treated with RT or CRT with careful monitoring and frequent modification of treatment. Except for patients’ age, Charlson comorbidity index may be helpful in assessing patients’ outcomes in elderly patients with rectal cancer

  17. Use of fractional dose–volume histograms to model risk of acute rectal toxicity among patients treated on RTOG 94-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Susan L.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Bosch, Walter R.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong, Lei; Winter, Kathryn; Purdy, James A.; Cox, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: For toxicities occurring during the course of radiotherapy, it is conceptually inaccurate to perform normal-tissue complication probability analyses using the complete dose–volume histogram. The goal of this study was to analyze acute rectal toxicity using a novel approach in which the fit of the Lyman–Kutcher–Burman (LKB) model is based on the fractional rectal dose–volume histogram (DVH). Materials and methods: Grade ⩾2 acute rectal toxicity was analyzed in 509 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 94-06. These patients had no field reductions or treatment-plan revisions during therapy, allowing the fractional rectal DVH to be estimated from the complete rectal DVH based on the total number of dose fractions delivered. Results: The majority of patients experiencing Grade ⩾2 acute rectal toxicity did so before completion of radiotherapy (70/80 = 88%). Acute rectal toxicity depends on fractional mean rectal dose, with no significant improvement in the LKB model fit when the volume parameter differs from n = 1. The incidence of toxicity was significantly lower for patients who received hormone therapy (P = 0.024). Conclusions: Variations in fractional mean dose explain the differences in incidence of acute rectal toxicity, with no detectable effect seen here for differences in numbers of dose fractions delivered.

  18. Clinical and dosimetric predictors of acute hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya; Son, Christina H.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To identify clinical and dosimetric factors associated with hematologic toxicity (HT) during chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Materials and methods: We analyzed 120 rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant pelvic radiotherapy (PRT) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The coxal (ilium, ischium, and pubis) bone marrow (BM), sacral BM, and femoral BM were contoured and dose-volume parameters were extracted. Associations between cell count trend and clinical predictors were tested using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Associations between clinical variables, Vx (percentage volume receiving x Gy), and cell count ratio at nadir were tested using linear regression models. Results: Nadirs for white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), and platelets (PLT) occurred in the second week of PRT and the fifth week for hemoglobin and absolute lymphocyte count (ALC). Using cell count ratio, patients treated with 3DCRT had a lower WBC ratio trend during PRT compared to patients treated with IMRT (p = 0.04), and patients ⩾59 years of age had a lower hemoglobin ratio trend during PRT (p = 0.02). Using absolute cell count, patients treated with 3DCRT had lower ANC cell count trend (p = 0.03), and women had lower hemoglobin cell count trend compared to men (p = 0.03). On univariate analysis, use of 3DCRT was associated with a lower WBC ratio at nadir (p = 0.02). On multiple regression analysis using dosimetric variables, coxal BM V45 (p = 0.03) and sacral BM V45 (p = 0.03) were associated with a lower WBC and ANC ratio at nadir, respectively. Conclusions: HT trends during PRT revealed distinct patterns: WBC, ANC, and PLT cell counts reach nadirs early and recover, while hemoglobin and ALC decline steadily. Patients who were treated with 3DCRT and older patients experienced lower cell count ratio trend during PRT. Dosimetric constraints using coxal BM V45 and sacral BM V45 can be considered

  19. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery versus conventional transanal excision for patients with early rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, Dimitrios; Cho, Hyeon-Min; Dixon, Matthew R; Mellgren, Anders F; Madoff, Robert D; Finne, Charles O

    2009-05-01

    To compare transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS) with conventional transanal excision (TAE) in terms of the quality of resection, local recurrence, and survival rates in patients with stage I rectal cancer. Although TEMS is often considered a superior surgical technique to TAE, it is poorly suited for excising tumors in the lower third of the rectum. Such tumors may confer a worse prognosis. We retrospectively reviewed information on all patients with stage pT1 and pT2 rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent local excision from 1997 through mid-2006. We excluded patients with node-positive, metastatic, recurrent, previously irradiated, or snare-excised tumors. Our study included 42 TEMS and 129 TAE patients. We found no significant differences in patient characteristics, adjuvant therapy, tumor stage, or adverse histopathologic features. In the TAE group, 52 (40%) of tumors were TEMS group, only 1 (2%) (P = 0.0001). Surgical margins were less often positive in the TEMS group (2%) than in the TAE group (16%) (P = 0.017). For patients with tumors > or =5 cm from the AV, the estimated 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was similar between the TEMS group (84.1%) and the TAE group (76.1%) (P = 0.651). But within the TAE group, the estimated 5-year DFS rate was better for patients with tumors > or =5 cm from the AV (76.1%) vs. TEMS or TAE) itself--were independent predictors of local recurrence and DFS. The quality of resection is better with TEMS than with TAE. However, the apparently better oncologic outcomes with TEMS can be partly explained by case selection of lower-risk tumors of the upper rectum.

  20. A pathway-centric survey of somatic mutations in Chinese patients with colorectal carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ling

    Full Text Available Previous genetic studies on colorectal carcinomas (CRC have identified multiple somatic mutations in four candidate pathways (TGF-β, Wnt, P53 and RTK-RAS pathways on populations of European ancestry. However, it is under-studied whether other populations harbor different sets of hot-spot somatic mutations in these pathways and other oncogenes. In this study, to evaluate the mutational spectrum of novel somatic mutations, we assessed 41 pairs of tumor-stroma tissues from Chinese patients with CRC, including 29 colon carcinomas and 12 rectal carcinomas. We designed Illumina Custom Amplicon panel to target 43 genes, including genes in the four candidate pathways, as well as several known oncogenes for other cancers. Candidate mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing, and we further used SIFT and PolyPhen-2 to assess potentially functional mutations. We discovered 3 new somatic mutations in gene APC, TCF7L2, and PIK3CA that had never been reported in the COSMIC or NCI-60 databases. Additionally, we confirmed 6 known somatic mutations in gene SMAD4, APC, FBXW7, BRAF and PTEN in Chinese CRC patients. While most were previously reported in CRC, one mutation in PTEN was reported only in malignant endometrium cancer. Our study confirmed the existence of known somatic mutations in the four candidate pathways for CRC in Chinese patients. We also discovered a number of novel somatic mutations in these pathways, which may have implications for the pathogenesis of CRC.

  1. Impact of age on efficacy of postoperative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuan-Zhang; Gao, Peng; Song, Yong-Xi; Sun, Jing-Xu; Chen, Xiao-Wan; Zhao, Jun-Hua; Ma, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhen-Ning

    2016-04-12

    Clinical practice guidelines focusing on age-related adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer are currently limited. The present study aimed to explore the impact of age on the efficacy of adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare-linked database from 1992-2009. We enrolled patients with yp stages I-III rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and underwent curative resection. The age-related survival benefit of adding oxaliplatin to adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with propensity score-matching and Cox proportional hazards models. Comparing the oxaliplatin group with the 5-FU group, there were significant interactions between age and chemotherapy efficacy in terms of overall survival (OS) (p for interaction = 0.017) among patients with positive lymph nodes (ypN+). Adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong survival in patients aged rectal cancer who have already received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and undergone curative resection, adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong OS in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category. However, adding oxaliplatin did not translate into survival benefits in patients age ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category, or in ypN- patients.

  2. Pathologic complete response in patients with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinola M, Daniela; Espinola M, Daniela; Bellolio R, Felipe; Gellona V, Jose; Bustos C, Mariza; Zuniga D, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Background: The standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (RC) of the middle and lower third of the rectum is neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (XRQT) follow by oncologic resection. After this treatment in 15-25% of the cases, the pathologist reports complete pathological response (pCR). Aim: To describe demographic, clinical and survival data of patients with pCR undergoing chemoradiotherapy and radical resection for RC. Material and Methods: Historic cohort study. In a prospectively maintained database between 2000 and 2010, we identified patients with RC, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy according to protocol, followed by radical resection. The preoperative staging was obtained by clinical examination, endoscopy, rectal ultrasound, CT scan of chest, abdomen and pelvis and pelvic MRI. Demographic data, tumor location, time between the end of XRTQ and surgery, postoperative staging (according AJCC) and survival, were collected. Results: 119 patients received preoperative XRTQ, 65% male, with a mean age of 58 years. The most frequent tumor site was the lower third (63%). Surgery was performed 8 weeks after the end of XRTQ. Of 119 patients with XRTQ, 15.1% had a pCR. Overall survival was 75%, and cancer-specific survival was 80.4% at 5 years in patients without pCR. For patients with pCR, the 5 year survival estimates for overall and cancer specific survival was 100%. We did not identify factors associated with pCR. Conclusions: In this study, pCR was comparable to other larger series reported elsewhere. No factors associated with pCR were identified

  3. Evidence based medicine (EBM) and evidence based radiology (EBR) in the follow-up of the patients after surgery for lung and colon-rectal carcinoma; Medicina basata sulle evidenze (EMB) e radiologia basata sulle evidenze (EBR) nel follow-up dei pazienti operati per tumore del polmone e del colon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovagnoni, Andrea; Ottaviani, Letizia; Mensa' , Anna; Durastanti, Martina; Floriani, Irene; Cascinu, Stefano [Marche Univ., Ancona (Italy). Azienda ospedaliera Umberto I, Istituto di radiologia, oncologia clinica

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: a) To define the role of diagnostic imaging modalities in the follow-up of patients after surgery for solid cancer, using an Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) approach; b) to asses the possible discrepancies between the theoretical model and the clinical protocols currently used for the follow-up of treated patients; c) to compare the real costs of the radiological examinations performed in a group of cancer patients followed up after surgery and the theoretical costs that would have been incurred had the patients been followed up according to the theoretical (evidence-based) follow-up programme. Materials and methods: We searched traditional and secondary databases for research papers and guidelines by international scientific societies published in the last 10 years and concerning the clinical impact of follow-up programs in patients operated on for colorectal and lung carcinoma. The papers were selected based on level of evidence using the systematic review approach of EBM. In each paper selected, we considered the overall survival and disease-free survival, quality of life, side and toxic effects of therapy, cost and psychological aspects to formulate a judgement on the usefulness the radiological tests. Subsequently, the clinical and imaging follow-up of 40 patients who had undergone surgical resection for colorectal cancer (20 patients) and lung cancer (20 patients) between 1998 and 2004 were retrospectively reviewed, and the costs of the follow-up programs for the two groups, were analysed and compared with those of the theoretical evidence-based programmes. Results: Of the 41 papers selected after systematic review only nine datasets were considered for our final analysis. The majority of papers (7 out of 9) and all the guidelines published by International Scientific Societies agreed on the poor value of closed imaging in the follow-up of patients who have undergone surgery for colorectal and lung cancer. A significant difference was found between the

  4. Postoperative radiotherapy for rectal and rectosigmoid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, B.M.P.; Lebesque, J.V.; Hart, A.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1988, 206 patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy after macroscopically complete surgery for rectal or (recto)sigmoid cancer. Depending on an estimation of the amount of small bowel in the intended treatment volume a total dose was, in general, 45 or 50 Gy. An additional boost of 10 Gy was given to 6 patients because of microscopically involved surgical margins. For tumor stage B a statistically significant trend (p=0.017) for higher local control with higher total dose was observed comparing patients treated with a total dose of 45 Gy or less, with more than 45 Gy but less than 50 Gy or with a total dose of 50 Gy or more. This finding illustrates the impact of total dose on local control for postoperative radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma. (author). 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. MicroRNA expression profile associated with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, Marek; Sana, Jiri; Fabian, Pavel; Kocakova, Ilona; Gombosova, Jana; Nekvindova, Jana; Radova, Lenka; Vyzula, Rostislav; Slaby, Ondrej

    2012-01-01

    Rectal cancer accounts for approximately one third of all colorectal cancers (CRC), which belong among leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/4 and/or cN+) includes neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil) followed by radical surgical resection. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of tumors do not respond enough to the neoadjuvant treatment and these patients are at risk of relapse. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs playing significant roles in the pathogenesis of many cancers including rectal cancer. MiRNAs could present the new predictive biomarkers for rectal cancer patients. We selected 20 patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer and whose tumors were classified as most sensitive or resistant to the treatment. These two groups were compared using large-scale miRNA expression profiling. Expression levels of 8 miRNAs significantly differed between two groups. MiR-215, miR-190b and miR-29b-2* have been overexpressed in non-responders, and let-7e, miR-196b, miR-450a, miR-450b-5p and miR-99a* have shown higher expression levels in responders. Using these miRNAs 9 of 10 responders and 9 of 10 non-responders (p < 0.05) have been correctly classified. Our pilot study suggests that miRNAs are part of the mechanisms that are involved in response of rectal cancer to the chemoradiotherapy and that miRNAs may be promising predictive biomarkers for such patients. In most miRNAs we identified (miR-215, miR-99a*, miR-196b, miR-450b-5p and let-7e), the connection between their expression and radioresistance or chemoresistance to inhibitors of thymidylate synthetase was already established

  6. The role of faecal diversion in low rectal cancer: a review of 1791 patients having rectal resection with anastomosis for cancer, with and without a proximal stoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurkin, S; Kakarla, V R; Ruiz, D E; Cance, W G; Tiszenkel, H I

    2013-06-01

    The morbidity of anastomotic dehiscence may be mitigated by a defunctioning stoma, but it is unclear if it is required for most low rectal anastomoses. Preoperative risk factors leading to anastomotic complications and the indications for faecal diversion have yet to be clearly defined. Using the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (ACS-NSQIP) participant-use file, patients were identified who underwent low anterior resection with anastomosis for cancer at the 211 participating hospitals in 2005-08. A total of 1791 patients underwent low anterior resection. Patients were subdivided into two groups based on the level of the anastomosis. Of these 1266 patients had a low pelvic anastomosis (LPA) and 525 a coloanal anastomosis (CAA). In the LPA group, 606 patients had a stoma and 660 had no stoma. There were no differences in wound complications, sepsis or septic shock. Patients who had a stoma were more likely to have postoperative acute renal failure (1.7 vs 0.5%, P = 0.0485, OR 3.674). In the CAA group, 352 had a stoma and 173 had no stoma. In patients without faecal diversion, there was a significantly greater incidence of sepsis (8.7 vs 3.7%, P = 0.022, OR 2.47), septic shock (3.5 vs 0.57%, P = 0.018, OR 6.29) and need for reoperation (11 vs 1.7%, P = 0.0001, OR 7.11). Hospital length of stay was significantly longer with CAA and no stoma. On multivariate analysis, not having a stoma with a CAA was a risk factor for serious postoperative morbidity. While a defunctioning stoma with a coloanal anastomosis seems to protect from postoperative sepsis, septic shock and need for reoperation, it is likely that it is overused in rectal cancer surgery. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Adjuvant irradiation improves the outcome of patients with rectal cancer following local excision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, Arnab; Willett, Christopher G.; Shellito, Paul; Kaufman, Donald; Daley, William J.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: the long-term outcomes of patients undergoing local excision with or without pelvic irradiation were examined to define the role of adjuvant irradiation following local excision of T1 and T2 rectal cancers. METHODS: From January 1966 to January 1997, 114 patients underwent local excision for rectal cancer. Fifty-nine patients underwent local excision alone, and 55 patients received adjuvant pelvic irradiation (45 Gy to 65.8 Gy)+/-concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Outcome was assessed by treatment, stage, and pathologic features of tumor grade and lymphatic/venous vessel involvement. RESULTS: Of the 114 patients treated by local excision, 90 had T1/T2 tumors. The 5-year actuarial local control (LC) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) of these 90 patients are shown (with numbers of patients at risk at 5 years) in the table below. The 5-year actuarial local control and recurrence-free survival (RFS) for T1/T2 patients treated by local excision alone was 85% and 77%, respectively. The corresponding values for patients undergoing local excision and adjuvant irradiation alone were 88% and 78%, respectively. All 20 patients treated by adjuvant chemoradiation achieved 5-year actuarial local control and had a recurrence-free survival of 88%. The improved outcomes in the adjuvant radiation group become more impressive when the higher T stage distribution of this group is considered. Fifty-five percent of the group receiving adjuvant radiation were stage T2 compared to only 14% of patients treated by local excision alone. Subgroup analysis was performed on those features recognized as poor prognostic factors including poorly differentiated histology and lymphatic vascular invasion. Patients in the local excision alone group with one or more adverse pathologic features had reduced rates of local control compared to those with the absence of such features (38% vs. 91%, respectively, p=0.02). In comparison, the 5 patients with poor prognostic features treated by

  8. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-05-01

    Anastomotic leak has a negative impact on the prognosis of patients who undergo colorectal cancer resection. However, data on anastomotic leak are limited for stage IV colorectal cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of anastomotic leak on survival and the decision to administer chemotherapy and/or metastasectomy after elective surgery for stage IV colorectal cancer. This was a nationwide, retrospective cohort study. Data were obtained from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group, the Danish Pathology Registry, and the National Patient Registry. Patients who were diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer between 2009 and 2013 and underwent elective resection of their primary tumors were included. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality depending on the occurrence of anastomotic leak. Secondary outcomes were the administration of and time to adjuvant chemotherapy, metastasectomy rate, and risk factors for leak. Of the 774 patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who were included, 71 (9.2%) developed anastomotic leaks. Anastomotic leak had a significant impact on the long-term survival of patients with colon cancer (p = 0.04) but not on those with rectal cancer (p = 0.91). Anastomotic leak was followed by the decreased administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with colon cancer (p = 0.007) but not in patients with rectal cancer (p = 0.47). Finally, anastomotic leak had a detrimental impact on metastasectomy rates after colon cancer but not on resection rates of rectal cancer. Retrospective data on the selection criteria for primary tumor resection and metastatic tumor load were unavailable. The impact of anastomotic leak on patients differed between stage IV colon and rectal cancers. Survival and eligibility to receive chemotherapy and metastasectomy differed between patients with colon and rectal cancers. When planning for primary tumor resection, these factors should be considered.

  9. [Two Cases of Fournier's Gangrene That Occurred during Chemotherapy for Rectal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Makoto; Kitazawa, Masato; Ehara, Takehito; Yamamoto, Yuta; Suzuki, Akira; Miyagawa, Yusuke; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2017-02-01

    Two cases of Fournier's gangrene occurred during chemotherapy for advanced rectal cancer. Patients were treated using surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. Case 1: A 66-year-old man had advanced rectal cancer with para-aortic and inguinal lymph node metastases. He received a sigmoid colostomy and chemotherapy(capecitabine, oxaliplatin, bevacizumab). Due to progression of the rectal mass, we performed radiotherapy(30 Gy)and chemotherapy(irinotecan, S-1, bevacizumab). After 14 days, he was hospitalized with a diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene with anal pain and fever. Case 2: A 63-year-old man had mucinous rectal carcinoma with sacrum invasion. He received a sigmoid colostomy and chemotherapy. Sixteen days after regorafenib therapy, as a fifth-line of chemotherapy, he was hospitalized with a diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene with hip pain, swollen perineum, and fever. There have been no reports of Fournier's gangrene occurring during chemotherapy for rectal cancer. We report 2 cases with a review of literature.

  10. Multinational Prospective Study of Patient-Reported Outcomes After Prostate Radiation Therapy: Detailed Assessment of Rectal Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Y.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Heath, Gerard; Scarlett, Sarah; Sanda, Martin G.; Chang, Peter; Regan, Meredith M.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Sandler, Howard M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Kaplan, Irving D.; Crociani, Catrina; McLaughlin, William P.; Mantz, Constantine A.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The new short Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) patient-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) tool has removed the rectal bleeding question from the previous much longer version, EPIC-26. Herein, we assess the impact of losing the dedicated rectal bleeding question in 2 independent prospective multicenter cohorts. Methods and Materials: In a prospective multicenter test cohort (n=865), EPIC-26 patient-reported HRQOL data were collected for 2 years after treatment from patients treated with prostate radiation therapy from 2003 to 2011. A second prospective multicenter cohort (n=442) was used for independent validation. A repeated-effects model was used to predict the change from baseline in bowel summary scores from longer EPIC instruments using the change in EPIC-CP bowel summary scores with and without rectal bleeding scores. Results: Two years after radiation therapy, 91% of patients were free of bleeding, and only 2.6% reported bothersome bleeding problems. Correlations between EPIC-26 and EPIC-CP bowel scores were very high (r"2=0.90-0.96) and were statistically improved with the addition of rectal bleeding information (r"2=0.94-0.98). Considering all patients, only 0.2% of patients in the test cohort and 0.7% in the validation cohort reported bothersome bleeding and had clinically relevant HRQOL changes missed with EPIC-CP. However, of the 2.6% (n=17) of men with bothersome rectal bleeding in the test cohort, EPIC-CP failed to capture 1 patient (6%) as experiencing meaningful declines in bowel HRQOL. Conclusions: Modern prostate radiation therapy results in exceptionally low rates of bothersome rectal bleeding, and <1% of patients experience bothersome bleeding and are not captured by EPIC-CP as having meaningful HRQOL declines after radiation therapy. However, in the small subset of patients with bothersome rectal bleeding, the longer EPIC-26 should strongly be considered, given its superior

  11. Multinational Prospective Study of Patient-Reported Outcomes After Prostate Radiation Therapy: Detailed Assessment of Rectal Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Y.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Heath, Gerard; Scarlett, Sarah [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sanda, Martin G. [Emory University Department of Urology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chang, Peter [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Regan, Meredith M. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kuban, Deborah A. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Kaplan, Irving D.; Crociani, Catrina [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McLaughlin, William P. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Mantz, Constantine A. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E. [21st Century Oncology, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P. [Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); and others

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: The new short Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) patient-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) tool has removed the rectal bleeding question from the previous much longer version, EPIC-26. Herein, we assess the impact of losing the dedicated rectal bleeding question in 2 independent prospective multicenter cohorts. Methods and Materials: In a prospective multicenter test cohort (n=865), EPIC-26 patient-reported HRQOL data were collected for 2 years after treatment from patients treated with prostate radiation therapy from 2003 to 2011. A second prospective multicenter cohort (n=442) was used for independent validation. A repeated-effects model was used to predict the change from baseline in bowel summary scores from longer EPIC instruments using the change in EPIC-CP bowel summary scores with and without rectal bleeding scores. Results: Two years after radiation therapy, 91% of patients were free of bleeding, and only 2.6% reported bothersome bleeding problems. Correlations between EPIC-26 and EPIC-CP bowel scores were very high (r{sup 2}=0.90-0.96) and were statistically improved with the addition of rectal bleeding information (r{sup 2}=0.94-0.98). Considering all patients, only 0.2% of patients in the test cohort and 0.7% in the validation cohort reported bothersome bleeding and had clinically relevant HRQOL changes missed with EPIC-CP. However, of the 2.6% (n=17) of men with bothersome rectal bleeding in the test cohort, EPIC-CP failed to capture 1 patient (6%) as experiencing meaningful declines in bowel HRQOL. Conclusions: Modern prostate radiation therapy results in exceptionally low rates of bothersome rectal bleeding, and <1% of patients experience bothersome bleeding and are not captured by EPIC-CP as having meaningful HRQOL declines after radiation therapy. However, in the small subset of patients with bothersome rectal bleeding, the longer EPIC-26 should strongly be considered, given its superior

  12. Influence of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy on the Surgical Strategy According to the Clinical T Stage of Patients With Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Seong Ho; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathologic responses and changes to surgical strategies following preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) in rectal cancer patients according to their clinical T stage (cT). The use of PCRT has recently been extended to less advanced disease. The authors enrolled 650 patients with cT2 to 4 mid and low rectal cancer who received both PCRT and surgical resection. The rate of total regression and the proportion of local excision were compared according to the cT category. The 3-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) rate was compared using the log-rank test according to patient cT category, pathologic stage, and type of surgical treatment. Patients with cT2 were older (P = 0.001), predominately female (P = 0.028), and had low-lying rectal cancer (P = 0.008). Pathologic total regression was achieved most frequently in cT2 patients (54% of cT2 versus 17.6% of cT3 versus 8.2% of cT4; P rectal cancer, optimal surgical treatment may be achieved with the tailored use of PCRT. PMID:26717384

  13. Metastatic papillary carcinoma of the thyroid in a patient previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incidental papillary carcinoma of the thyroid in patients treated surgically for benign thyroid diseases including Graves' disease is a known phenomenon. However, the management of these patients remains an issue of concern and controversy for those who care for them. We report a case of metastatic paillary carcinoma of ...

  14. Rectal Prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ball”. Rectal prolapse may be confused with significant hemorrhoid disease and can even be confusing at times ... and treating this problem. A = Rectal Prolapse B = Hemorrhoids Once a prolapse is apparent, fecal incontinence (inability ...

  15. Hydrocortisone Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also used to relieve itching and swelling from hemorrhoids and other rectal problems. Hydrocortisone is in a ... may improve within 5 to 7 days.For hemorrhoids, hydrocortisone rectal cream usually is used in adults ...

  16. Bisacodyl Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisac-Evac® Suppositories ... Dulcolax® Suppositories ... Rectal bisacodyl comes as a suppository and enema to use rectally. It is usually used at the time that a bowel movement is desired. The suppositories usually ...

  17. EURECCA colorectal: multidisciplinary mission statement on better care for patients with colon and rectal cancer in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, C.J. van de; Aristei, C.; Boelens, P.G.; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Blomqvist, L.; Borras, J.M.; Broek, C.B. van den; Brown, G.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Cutsem, E.V.; Espin, E.; Gore-Booth, J.; Glimelius, B.; Haustermans, K.; Henning, G.; Iversen, L.H.; Krieken, J.H. van; Marijnen, C.A.; Mroczkowski, P.; Nagtegaal, I.; Naredi, P.; Ortiz, H.; Pahlman, L.; Quirke, P.; Rodel, C.; Roth, A.; Rutten, H.J.; Schmoll, H.J.; Smith, J.; Tanis, P.J.; Taylor, C.; Wibe, A.; Gambacorta, M.A.; Meldolesi, E.; Wiggers, T.; Cervantes, A.; Valentini, V.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last twenty years however still considerable variation exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Therefore, EURECCA, which is the acronym of European Registration of cancer care, is aiming at

  18. EURECCA colorectal: Multidisciplinary Mission statement on better care for patients with colon and rectal cancer in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Aristei, Cynthia; Boelens, Petra G.; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Borras, Josep M.; van den Broek, Colette B. M.; Brown, Gina; Coebergh, Jan-Willem; van Cutsem, Eric; Espin, Eloy; Gore-Booth, Jola; Glimelius, Bengt; Haustermans, Karin; Henning, Geoffrey; Iversen, Lene H.; van Krieken, J. Han; Marijnen, Corrie A. M.; Mroczkowski, Pawel; Nagtegaal, Iris; Naredi, Peter; Ortiz, Hector; Påhlman, Lars; Quirke, Philip; Rödel, Claus; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm J. T.; Schmoll, Hans J.; Smith, Jason; Tanis, Pieter J.; Taylor, Claire; Wibe, Arne; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Meldolesi, Elisa; Wiggers, Theo; Cervantes, Andres; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last twenty years however still considerable variation exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Therefore, EURECCA, which is the acronym of European Registration of cancer care, is aiming at defining core

  19. A Unique Case of a Patient with Rectal Cancer Who Developed Benign Esophageal Stenosis after Localized Rectal Radiation and Systemic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Chahla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute esophagitis and esophageal strictures typically occur after local radiation therapy to the thoracic field. Toxicity is usually limited to the field of radiation and potentially augmented by concomitant use of chemotherapy, however esophageal stricturing due to chemotherapy alone is exceedingly rare. Gastrointestinal toxicity has been previously reported in the setting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-based chemotherapy with abnormal thymidylate synthase or dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activities. We present a unique case of isolated chemotherapy-induced esophageal stricture in the setting of stage IIIa rectal adenocarcinoma which presented shortly after initiation of treatment with 5-FU-based chemotherapy in a patient with normal thymidylate synthase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase assays. These findings prompt further investigation of pathways and potential risk factors leading to esophageal toxicity in patients treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

  20. Clinical significance of determination of serum SA, CEA and CRP levels in patients with colo-rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jie; Hu Junyan; Sun Shuming; Cheng Benkun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical usefulness of determination of serum SA, CEA and CRP levels in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: Serum SA (with colorimetry), CEA (with CLIA) and CRP (with ILIA) levels were measured in 120 patients with colo-rectal cancer. Results: (1) Serum SA, CEA and CRP levels increased significantly as the disease stage advanced from Duke A through Duke D. (2) As the malignancy of the growth advanced from well-differentiated to anaplastic, the serum SA and CRP levels increased significantly while the reverse was true for serum CEA levels. (3) In 68 post-operative patients followed 1-5 years, the serum levels of SA, CEA and CRP were significantly higher in the patients with recurrence (n=29) than those in patients without recurrence (n=39) (P<0.01). Conclusion: Serum SA CEA and CRP levels were closely related to the disease process in patients with colo-rectal cancer. (authors)

  1. Early results of quality of life for curatively treated rectal cancers in Chinese patients with EORTC QLQ-CR29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Junjie; Shi, Debing; Goodman, Karyn A; Goldstein, David; Xiao, Changchun; Guan, Zuqing; Cai, Sanjun

    2011-01-01

    To assess the quality of life in curatively treated patients with rectal cancer in a prospectively collected cohort. Patients with stage I-III rectal cancer who were treated curatively in a single institution were accrued prospectively. Quality of life was assessed by use of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaire module for all cancer patients (QLQ-C30) and for colorectal cancer patients (QLQ-CR29). Quality of life among different treatment modalities and between stoma and nonstoma patients was evaluated in all patients. A total of 154 patients were assessed. The median time of completion for the questionnaires was 10 months after all the treatments. For patients with different treatment modalities, faecal incontinence and diarrhea were significantly higher in radiation group (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively), and no difference in male or female sexual function was found between radiation group and non-radiation group. For stoma and nonstoma patients, the QLQ-CR29 module found the symptoms of Defaecation and Embarrassment with Bowel Movement were more prominent in stoma patients, while no difference was detected in scales QLQ-C30 module. Our study provided additional information in evaluating QoL of Chinese rectal cancer patients with currently widely used QoL questionnaires. As a supplement to the QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-CR29 is a useful questionnaire in evaluating curatively treated patients with rectal cancer. Bowel dysfunction (diarrhea and faecal incontinence) was still the major problem compromising QoL in patients with either pre- or postoperative chemoradiotherapy

  2. The utility of presacral drainage in penetrating rectal injuries in adult and pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoie, Kate B; Beazley, Thomas M; Cleveland, Brent; Khaneki, Sina; Markel, Troy A; Hammer, Peter M; Savage, Stephanie; Williams, Regan F

    2017-11-01

    With changing weaponry associated with injuries in civilian trauma, there is no clinical census on the utility of presacral drainage (PSD) in penetrating rectal injuries (PRIs), particularly in pediatric patients. Patients with PRI from July 2004-June 2014 treated at two free-standing children's hospitals and two adult level 1 trauma centers were compared by age (pediatric patients ≤16 years) and PSD. A stratified analysis was performed based on age. The primary outcome was pelvic/presacral abscess. We identified 81 patients with PRI; 19 pediatric, 62 adult. Forty patients had PSD; only three pediatric patients had a drain. Adult patients were more likely to have sustained gunshot wounds (84%), whereas pediatric patients were more likely to sustain impalement injuries (59%). Pediatric patients were more likely to have distal extraperitoneal injuries (56% versus 27% in adults, P = 0.03). PSD was more common in adult patients (59% versus 14%, P = 0.0004), African-Americans (71% versus 11% Caucasian, P adult and pediatric patients. There were three cases of pelvic/presacral abscess, all in the adult patients (P = 0.31); one patient with PSD and two without PSD (P = 0.58). In stratified analysis, there were no differences in any infectious complication between those with and without PSD. Pelvic/presacral abscess is a rare complication of PRI, especially in pediatric patients. PSD is not associated with decreased rates of infectious complications and may not be necessary in the treatment of PRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical significance of CT in the preoperative diagnosis of the staging of rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itano, Satoshi; Fuchimoto, Sadanori; Hamada, Fumihiro; Kimura, Takanobu; Iwagaki, Hiromi; Maeda, Tetsuya; Orita, Kunzo

    1987-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative clinical staging of rectal cancer was prospectively studied in 28 patients with macroscopically proven cancer. The CT studies were based on the previously established CT diagnostic criteria for wall invasion (S factor), lymph node metastases (N factor), and liver metastases (H factor). When macroscopic findings were used as the standard, the accuracy of CT was 61 % for S factor, 32 % for N factor, and 86 % for H factor. Using histological findings as the standard, the accuracy was 48 % for S factor and 16 % for N factor. Overall, CT had a high accuracy for H factor in all sites of cancer (75 % in the rectosigmoid, 86 % in the area above the peritoneal reflection, and 90 % in the area below the peritoneal reflection). For the other S and N factors, CT seemed to be of limited value in the preoperative diagnosis. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Rectal Cancer in a Patient with Bartter Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Mukai, Mikio; Kukita, Yoji; Hata, Taishi; Matsuda, Chu; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2017-05-12

    A woman with rectal cancer was scheduled for surgery. However, she also had hypokalemia, hyperreninemia, and hyperaldosteronism in the absence of any known predisposing factors or endocrine tumors. She was given intravenous potassium, and her blood abnormalities stabilized after tumor resection. Genetic analysis revealed mutations in several genes associated with Bartter syndrome (BS) and Gitelman syndrome, including SLC12A1 , CLCNKB , CASR , SLC26A3 , and SLC12A3 . Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) plays an important role in BS and worsens electrolyte abnormalities. The PGE2 level is reportedly increased in colorectal cancer, and in the present case, immunohistochemical examination revealed an increased PGE2 level in the tumor. We concluded that the tumor-related PGE2 elevation had worsened the patient's BS, which became more manageable after tumor resection.

  5. The Results of Curative Radiation Therapy for 49 Patients of the Uterine Cervical Carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Mi Ryeong; Kim, Yeon Sil; Choi, Byung Ock; Yoon, Sei Chul; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Namkoong, Sung Eun; Kim, Seung Jo

    1992-01-01

    Fifty patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix received curative radiotherapy by external irradiation of the whole pelvis and intracavitary radiation at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary Hospital from September,1983 to October, 1986. External beam whole pelvic irradiation was done first up to 4500-5940 cGy in 5 weeks to 6.5 weeks, followed by an intracavitary radiation. Total dose of radiation to point A varied from 6500 cGy to l1344 cGy (average 6764 cGy). Of the 50 patients, one patient was lost to follow up and follow up period of the remaining 49 patients ranged from 3 months to 93 months (median 32 months). According to FIGO classification, 6 (12.2%) were in stage I b, 6(12.2%) in stage I a, 25(51%) in stage II b, 7(14%) in stage III, and 5(10.2%) in stage IV. Age of the patients ranged from 33 to 76 years (Median 60 years). Pathologically, forty six(94%) patients had squamous cell carcinoma, 2 (4% had adenocarcinoma, and 1 (2%) had adenosquamous cell carcinoma. Overall response rate was 84%. 5-year survival rate was 49% for entire group (75% for stage I b, 83% for stage II a, 42.5% for stage II b, 25% for stage III, 40% for stage IV). Complications were observed in 11(22.4%) patients, who revealed rectal complications with most common frequency. Others were self limiting trifle ones such as wet desquamation, fatigue, mild leukopenia, etc. The correlation of the survival rate with various factors (age, dose, Hb level, pelvic lymph node status, performance status, local recurrence) was evaluated but showed no statistical significance except the age and local recurrence in this series; survival of patients less than 50 years of age was worse than that of the older, and the presence of local recurrence had worse prognosis(p< 0.05)

  6. Effect of Surgery on Health-Related Quality of Life of Patients With Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellino, Gianluca; Sciaudone, Guido; Candilio, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    Local recurrences of rectal cancer are best treated with surgical resection. Health-related quality of life is an important outcome measure in rectal cancer, but it has been poorly investigated in local recurrences. The purpose of this study was to assess quality of life in patients receiving or not receiving surgery for locally recurrent rectal cancer. This was a prospective cohort study. The study was conducted at a single tertiary care institution. Patients presenting with local recurrent rectal cancer between December 2002 and December 2011 were included. A control group of patients with nonrecurrent rectal cancer was prospectively enrolled (planned ratio, 1:2). All of the patients received the core Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer preoperatively or at diagnosis and then 1 and 3 years later. We compared results according to oncologic clearance (R0 vs R1 vs R2 vs no surgery). Confounding variables were tested with a multivariate logistic regression. Forty-five patients (27 men), median age 62 years (range, 34-80 years), with recurrence were observed. Twelve (26.7%) were not fit for surgery. Twenty one (63.6%), 7 (21.2%), and 5 (15.2%) received R0, R1, and R2 resections. Data for 30 (90.9%) and 25 operated patients (75.75%) were available at 1- and 3-year follow-ups. Irrespective of type of surgery and multimodal treatments, patients receiving R0/R1 resections had improvement in quality of life in all of the domains compared with the R2 and no-surgery groups. Outcomes were inferior compared with nonrecurrent control subjects (N = 71). At 3 years, R0 patients reported scores equal to those of control subjects, with superior emotional functioning. R1 patients had worse symptoms and quality of life at 3-year follow-up. Surgery impaired survival and quality of life of R2 patients compared with those who were not operated on. The study was limited because it involved a single center with a single

  7. Barium enema and CT volumetry for predicting pathologic response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murono, Koji; Kawai, Kazushige; Tsuno, Nelson H; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2014-06-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy has been widely used for the prevention of local recurrence of locally advanced rectal cancer, and the effect of chemoradiotherapy is known to be associated with overall survival. We aimed to evaluate the association of the pathologic response grade with tumor recurrence rate after chemoradiotherapy, using radiographic analysis and the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors as the parameters. This study was conducted at a single tertiary care institution in Japan. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy. A total of 101 low rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy from July 2004 to August 2012 were enrolled. The tumor reduction rate was measured with the use of traditional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, barium enema, and CT volumetry, and the correlation between the reduction rate and the pathologic response grade was examined. The tumor reduction rate assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors showed no association with the pathologic response grade (p =0.61). In contrast, the radiographic response rate by both barium enema and CT volumetry strongly correlated with the pathologic response grade (p volumetry had a lower recurrence rate (p =0.03, p =0.03, p =0.0002, and p =0.001). The difference between high responders and low responders was especially prominent by barium enema and CT volumetry. The study is limited by its retrospective nature. Double-contrast barium enema and CT volumetry were superior to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors in evaluating the effect of chemoradiotherapy and predicting the likelihood of tumor recurrence.

  8. Diagnostic role of barium enema in carcinoma rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this barium enema study was to evaluate its role in patients suspected to have rectal pathologies with complaints of change in bowel habit, anorexia/weight loss, bleeding per rectum and acute/sub-acute colonic obstruction. Results: barium enema study as screening test for colo-rectal carcinoma was undertaken. Contrast outlined the colonic growth in 35 cases, out of which the cases of carcinoma colon were 24 including 13 patients suffering from carcinoma rectum. The percentage of carcinoma colon to total colonic growth was 68% while, carcinoma rectum to total carcinoma colon was 54%. Conclusion: On the basis of these investigations, it is concluded that patient's compliance is important factor in the early detection of colonic neoplasia. Though results of colonoscopy are more reliable but in practice, barium enema (double contrast) is performed initially to outline the lesion and then colonoscopy for biopsy purpose. (author)

  9. SU-D-207B-01: Radiomics Feature Reproducibility From Repeat CT Scans of Patients with Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, P; Wang, J; Zhong, H; Zhou, Z; Shen, L; Hu, W; Zhang, Z [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of radiomics features by repeating computed tomographic (CT) scans in rectal cancer. To choose stable radiomics features for rectal cancer. Methods: 40 rectal cancer patients were enrolled in this study, each of whom underwent two CT scans within average 8.7 days (5 days to 17 days), before any treatment was delivered. The rectal gross tumor volume (GTV) was distinguished and segmented by an experienced oncologist in both CTs. Totally, more than 2000 radiomics features were defined in this study, which were divided into four groups (I: GLCM, II: GLRLM III: Wavelet GLCM and IV: Wavelet GLRLM). For each group, five types of features were extracted (Max slice: features from the largest slice of target images, Max value: features from all slices of target images and choose the maximum value, Min value: minimum value of features for all slices, Average value: average value of features for all slices, Matrix sum: all slices of target images translate into GLCM and GLRLM matrices and superpose all matrices, then extract features from the superposed matrix). Meanwhile a LOG (Laplace of Gauss) filter with different parameters was applied to these images. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and inter-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to assess the reproducibility. Results: 403 radiomics features were extracted from each type of patients’ medical images. Features of average type are the most reproducible. Different filters have little effect for radiomics features. For the average type features, 253 out of 403 features (62.8%) showed high reproducibility (ICC≥0.8), 133 out of 403 features (33.0%) showed medium reproducibility (0.8≥ICC≥0.5) and 17 out of 403 features (4.2%) showed low reproducibility (ICC≥0.5). Conclusion: The average type radiomics features are the most stable features in rectal cancer. Further analysis of these features of rectal cancer can be warranted for treatment monitoring and

  10. Imaging in Patients with Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzenhofer, E.; Ubl, P.; Czerny, C.; Erovic, B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the skin with a mortality rate of approximately 25% (Peloschek et al., 2010). Accurate assessment of nodal involvement in patients with MCC predicts significantly overall outcome (Smith et al., 2012 and Ortin-Perez et al., 2007). Due to the rarity of this highly aggressive disease, only a few imaging reports on MCC were published, and subsequently still to date no accepted imaging algorithm for MCC is available. For primary staging of MCC, general recommendations have included ultrasonography, chest X-ray CT, and MRI, but recent articles show that the use of sentinel node and FDG-PET/PET-CT is gaining more and more importance

  11. Prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant rectal flora in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy: A prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ho Seok; Hwang, Eu Chang; Yu, Ho Song; Jung, Seung Il; Lee, Sun Ju; Lim, Dong Hoon; Cho, Won Jin; Choe, Hyun Sop; Lee, Seung-Ju; Park, Sung Woon

    2018-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant rectal flora in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy and to identify the high-risk groups. From January 2015 to March 2016, rectal swabs of 557 men who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy were obtained from five institutions. Clinical variables, including demographics, rectal swab culture results and infectious complications, were evaluated. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to identify the risk factors for fluoroquinolone resistance of rectal flora and infectious complications. The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production was 48.1 and 11.8%, respectively. The most common fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria was Escherichia coli (81% of total fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria, 39% of total rectal flora), and 16 (2.9%) patients had infectious complications. Univariable and multivariable analysis of clinical parameters affecting fluoroquinolone resistance showed no factor associated with fluoroquinolone resistance of rectal flora. The clinical parameter related to infectious complications after prostate biopsy was a history of operation within 6 months (relative risk 6.60; 95% confidence interval 1.99-21.8, P = 0.002). These findings suggest that a risk-based approach by history taking cannot predict antibiotic resistance of rectal flora, and physicians should consider targeted antibiotic prophylaxis or extended antibiotic prophylaxis for Korean patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy because of high antibiotic resistance of rectal flora. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Changing practice of rectal cancer surgery in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, A.R.; Muneer, A.; Laghari, Z.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the presentation and pathology of rectal cancer, and to evaluate the local experience after total meso rectal excision at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan. Methodology: A retrospective study of two hundred cases of carcinoma rectum that had undergone total meso rectal excision at Liaquat University Hospital Jamshoro Pakistan was carried out from January 1998 to December 2007.The cases were admitted through outpatient and emergency departments. The demographic details of each patient and variables such as clinical presentation, tumor location, Dukes staging, TNM staging, operations and complications were recorded on proformas. Each patient was followed up at two months for one year, every four months for three years and annually thereafter. Results: Male to female ratio being almost equal 1.6:1, Age ranged from 14-70 years. Site of tumor at upper one third 25%, middle one third 30% and lower one third 45%. Majority of patients (more than 62%) were in Dukes B Group.There were no postoperative deaths, complications occurred in a total of 59 (29.5%) patients, which were mostly colostomy related (13.0%). The abdominal wound infection 5%, anastomotic dehiscence 1.0%, urinary tract infection 5%, and impotence occurred in 1.5%. In 20% patients local recurrence was detected. Conclusion: Total meso rectal excision is a safe and feasible technique for rectal cancer surgery with acceptable perioperative morbidity and adequate local disease control. (author)

  13. Pretreatment quality of life in patients with rectal cancer is associated with intrusive thoughts and sense of coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asplund, Dan; Bisgaard, Thue; Bock, David

    2017-01-01

    of coherence with pretreatment quality of life in patients with newly diagnosed rectal cancer. METHODS: Patients were prospectively included in 16 hospitals in Sweden and Denmark. They answered an extensive questionnaire after receiving their treatment plan. Clinical data were retrieved from national quality...... registries for rectal cancer. RESULTS: Of 1248 included patients, a total of 1085 were evaluable. Pretreatment global health-related and overall quality of life was lower in patients planned for palliative compared with curative treatment (median 53 vs. 80 on the EuroQoL visual analogue scale, p ...PURPOSE: Quality of life may predict survival. In addition to clinical variables, it may be influenced by psychological factors, some of which may be accessible for intervention. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the association of intrusive thoughts and the patients' sense...

  14. Complete pathological response after neoadjuvant therapy in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Sánchez-Pérez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. Preoperative neoadjuvant therapy (chemotherapy and radiotherapy is the gold standard in the management of rectal cancer before surgical resection. The literature includes reports of absence of neoplastic cells after neoadjuvant therapy. There are no reports on complete pathological response to this type of therapy in Mexico. Objectives: Determine the percentage of patients with rectal adenocarcinoma with complete pathological response after neoadjuvant therapy. All patients were treated in a colorectal surgery department of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and methods: A total of 64 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed by biopsy were treated from January 2010 to December 2015. Demographic data, tumour localisation, pathological report, TNM stage, neoadjuvant therapy, surgical procedure and postoperative pathological report were collected from patient records. Results: Mean patient age was 52.8 years (range of 26–73; 31 were women and 33 men. Twenty-seven patients (27 were stage II and 27 stage III. The preoperative biopsy results were classified as: well differentiated (10; moderately differentiated (48; and poorly differentiated/undifferentiated adenocarcinoma (6. Twenty patients received neoadjuvant therapy (31.2%. In these, 2 tumours were localised in the upper third of the rectum, 6 in the middle third, and 12 in the lower third. Six patients underwent abdominoperineal resection, 10 total mesorectal excision, and four posterior pelvic exenteration. Six patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy had a complete pathological response. Conclusions: The percentage of patients with a complete pathological response is similar to that in other literature reports. More evidence is needed to define good prognosis factors in patients who might not require surgery after neoadjuvant therapy. Resumen

  15. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of uterine cervix in a young patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Ankit

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Adenoid cystic carcinoma of uterine cervix is a rare tumor. Its origin is debatable. It has a high incidence in postmenopausal women but rarely can develop in patients under 40. An association with squamous cell carcinoma has been described. We report a case of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the endocervical canal with foci of squamous cell carcinoma in a 34-year-old suffering from menorrhagia associated with blood-stained vaginal discharge. Per vaginum and per speculum examination revealed a growth. Cervical biopsy showed bits of tissue, suggesting adenoid cystic carcinoma. Patient was operated upon and uterus with cervix sent for histopathological examination. We report this case because of its rarity, particularly in young patients, with description of illustrative pathology and discussion on the histological diagnosis.

  16. Role of endoscopic ultrasonography in the loco-regional staging of patients with rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Pietro; de Bellis, Mario; D’Angelo, Valentina; Delrio, Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; Di Girolamo, Elena; Rossi, Giovanni Battista; Rega, Daniela; Tracey, Maura Claire; Tempesta, Alfonso Mario

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of rectal cancer (RC) is strictly related to both T and N stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis. RC staging is crucial for choosing the best multimodal therapy: patients with high risk locally advanced RC (LARC) undergo surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (NAT); those with low risk LARC are operated on after a preoperative short-course radiation therapy; finally, surgery alone is recommended only for early RC. Several imaging methods are used for staging patients with RC: computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). EUS is highly accurate for the loco-regional staging of RC, since it is capable to evaluate precisely the mural infiltration of the tumor (T), especially in early RC. On the other hand, EUS is less accurate in restaging RC after NAT and before surgery. Finally, EUS is indicated for follow-up of patients operated on for RC, where there is a need for the surveillance of the anastomosis. The aim of this review is to highlight the impact of EUS on the management of patients with RC, evaluating its role in both preoperative staging and follow-up of patients after surgery. PMID:26140096

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin following intra-rectal dosing of artesunate in malaria patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, Julie A.; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Barnes, Karen I.; Di Perri, Gianni; Folb, Peter; Gomes, Melba; Krishna, Sanjeev; Krudsood, Srivicha; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Mansor, Sharif; McIlleron, Helen; Miller, Raymond; Molyneux, Malcolm; Mwenechanya, James; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Nosten, Francois; Olliaro, Piero; Pang, Lorrin; Ribeiro, Isabela; Tembo, Madalitso; van Vugt, Michele; Ward, Steve; Weerasuriya, Kris; Win, Kyaw; White, Nicholas J.

    2006-01-01

    Intra-rectal artesunate has been developed as a potentially life-saving treatment of severe malaria in rural village settings where administration of parenteral antimalarial drugs is not possible. We studied the population pharmacokinetics of intra-rectal artesunate and the relationship with

  18. Significance and prognostic value of increased serum direct bilirubin level for lymph node metastasis in Chinese rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chun; Fang, Long; Li, Jing-Tao; Zhao, Hong-Chuan

    2016-02-28

    To determine the significance of increased serum direct bilirubin level for lymph node metastasis (LNM) in Chinese rectal cancer patients, after those with known hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases were excluded. A cohort of 469 patients, who were treated at the China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Ministry of Health (Beijing, China), in the period from January 2003 to June 2011, and with a pathological diagnosis of rectal adenocarcinoma, were recruited. They included 231 patients with LNM (49.3%) and 238 patients without LNM. Follow-up for these patients was taken through to December 31, 2012. The baseline serum direct bilirubin concentration was (median/inter-quartile range) 2.30/1.60-3.42 μmol/L. Univariate analysis showed that compared with patients without LNM, the patients with LNM had an increased level of direct bilirubin (2.50/1.70-3.42 vs 2.10/1.40-3.42, P = 0.025). Multivariate analysis showed that direct bilirubin was independently associated with LNM (OR = 1.602; 95%CI: 1.098-2.338, P = 0.015). Moreover, we found that: (1) serum direct bilirubin differs between male and female patients; a higher concentration was associated with poor tumor classification; (2) as the baseline serum direct bilirubin concentration increased, the percentage of patients with LNM increased; and (3) serum direct bilirubin was associated with the prognosis of rectal cancer patients and higher values indicated poor prognosis. Higher serum direct bilirubin concentration was associated with the increased risk of LNM and poor prognosis in our rectal cancers.

  19. Rectal fistulas after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Audrey; Wallner, Kent; Merrick, Gregory; Seeberger, Jergen M.S.; Armstrong, Julius R.T.T.; Mueller, Amy; Cavanagh, William M.S.; Lin, Daniel; Butler, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the rectal and prostatic radiation doses for a prospective series of 503 patients, 44 of whom developed persistent rectal bleeding, and 2 of whom developed rectal-prostatic fistulas. Methods and Materials: The 503 patients were randomized and treated by implantation with 125 I vs. 103 Pd alone (n = 290) or to 103 Pd with 20 Gy vs. 44 Gy supplemental external beam radiotherapy (n = 213) and treated at the Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Medical Center (n = 227), Schiffler Cancer Center (n 242) or University of Washington (n = 34). Patients were treated between September 1998 and October 2001 and had a minimum of 24 months of follow-up. The patient groups were treated concurrently. Treatment-related morbidity was monitored by mailed questionnaires, using standard American Urological Association and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria, at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Patients who reported Grade 1 or greater Radiation Therapy Oncology Group rectal morbidity were interviewed by telephone to clarify details regarding their rectal bleeding. Those who reported persistent bleeding, lasting for >1 month were included as having Grade 2 toxicity. Three of the patients with rectal bleeding required a colostomy, two of whom developed a fistula. No patient was lost to follow-up. The rectal doses were defined as the rectal volume in cubic centimeters that received >50%, 100%, 200%, or 300% of the prescription dose. The rectum was considered as a solid structure defined by the outer wall, without attempting to differentiate the inner wall or contents. Results: Persistent rectal bleeding occurred in 44 of the 502 patients, 32 of whom (73%) underwent confirmatory endoscopy. In univariate analysis, multiple parameters were associated with late rectal bleeding, including all rectal brachytherapy indexes. In multivariate analysis, however, only the rectal volume that received >100% of the dose was significantly predictive of bleeding. Rectal fistulas occurred

  20. Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Immunosuppressed Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Janice E. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Brewer, Jerry D., E-mail: brewer.jerry@mayo.edu [Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive cutaneous malignancy. The infectivity of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), an apparent agent in MCC development, may be exacerbated with impaired immune responses. This paper reviews relevant data regarding the role of immunosuppression in the development of MCC and describes modes of immunodeficient states. Because of the inherently low incidence rate of MCC, several case studies and series are also briefly mentioned to provide a more comprehensive summary of MCC in the setting of immunosuppression. We describe immunosuppressed patients who have experienced excessive UV radiation, organ transplantation, human immunodeficiency virus infection/AIDS, autoimmune diseases, and lymphoproliferative disorders. Iatrogenic forms of immunosuppression are also highlighted. Studies that quantify risks consistently report that individuals with a history of solid organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases, AIDS, and/or lymphoproliferative diseases have a significantly elevated risk of developing MCC. Overall, immunocompromised patients also appear to have an early onset and more aggressive course of MCC, with poorer outcomes. Recommendations for multidisciplinary approaches are proposed to effectively prevent and manage MCC in these patients.

  1. Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Immunosuppressed Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Janice E.; Brewer, Jerry D.

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive cutaneous malignancy. The infectivity of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), an apparent agent in MCC development, may be exacerbated with impaired immune responses. This paper reviews relevant data regarding the role of immunosuppression in the development of MCC and describes modes of immunodeficient states. Because of the inherently low incidence rate of MCC, several case studies and series are also briefly mentioned to provide a more comprehensive summary of MCC in the setting of immunosuppression. We describe immunosuppressed patients who have experienced excessive UV radiation, organ transplantation, human immunodeficiency virus infection/AIDS, autoimmune diseases, and lymphoproliferative disorders. Iatrogenic forms of immunosuppression are also highlighted. Studies that quantify risks consistently report that individuals with a history of solid organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases, AIDS, and/or lymphoproliferative diseases have a significantly elevated risk of developing MCC. Overall, immunocompromised patients also appear to have an early onset and more aggressive course of MCC, with poorer outcomes. Recommendations for multidisciplinary approaches are proposed to effectively prevent and manage MCC in these patients

  2. Self-reported quality of life and functional outcome in patients with rectal cancer--QoLiRECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asplund, Dan; Heath, Jane; González, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    international multicentre study based on a comprehensive, validated questionnaire on functional impairments and QoL administered to an unselected population of 1,500 patients with rectal cancer at diagnosis and after one, two and five years. The clinical characteristics are retrieved from the national quality......INTRODUCTION: The treatment of rectal cancer has improved, and survival rates today exceed those of colon cancer, but functional impairments and other adverse effects of treatment are common among patients. The impact of treatment on patients' quality of life (QoL) remains unclear. Many...... registers. A total of 14 hospitals in Sweden and Denmark are currently involved in the study. Inclusion is ongoing, and new including hospitals are welcome to join. Full accrual is expected within two years. CONCLUSION: This study will provide detailed knowledge about the challenges that patients face...

  3. Self-reported quality of life and functional outcome in patients with rectal cancer – QoLiREC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asplund, Dan; Heath, Jane; González, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    international multicentre study based on a comprehensive, validated questionnaire on functional impairments and QoL administered to an unselected population of 1,500 patients with rectal cancer at diagnosis and after one, two and five years. The clinical characteristics are retrieved from the national quality......INTRODUCTION: The treatment of rectal cancer has improved, and survival rates today exceed those of colon cancer, but functional impairments and other adverse effects of treatment are common among patients. The impact of treatment on patients' quality of life (QoL) remains unclear. Many...... registers. A total of 14 hospitals in Sweden and Denmark are currently involved in the study. Inclusion is ongoing, and new including hospitals are welcome to join. Full accrual is expected within two years. CONCLUSION: This study will provide detailed knowledge about the challenges that patients face...

  4. [Analysis in pulmonary ventilatory function from 100 patients with ano-rectal diseases caused by deficiency of qi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W

    1999-03-01

    To explore the pathogenesis of ano-rectal diseases caused by deficiency of Qi, which is correlated with obstruction of pulmonary ventilation. The pulmonary ventilatory function was measured in 100 patients with the internal piles, the interno-external hemorrhoid and prolapse of rectum, the prolapse of anus was the principal symptom of them. Data from the 100 patients showed that 67% of them were diagnosed with the obstruction of pulmonary ventilation, the ratio was far less in the health control group. FEV 1.0 (mean +/- s) (2011.65 +/- 875) ml, MMF (1.84 +/- 1.24) L/s and PEF (2.34 +/- 1.51) L/s in male patients, (1551.54 +/- 514) ml, (1.57 +/- 0.62) L/s and (1.85 +/- 0.92) L/s in female patients, but those values were higher in the control than in the patients. The statistical analysis was performed and the difference was significant between patients and the control group (P < 0.01). The patients with ano-rectal diseases caused by deficiency of Qi accompanied with obstruction of pulmonary ventilation in different degree and varied sorts, it confirmed that the pathogenesis of ano-rectal diseases caused by deficiency of Qi is related with "sinking of pectoral Qi".

  5. Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Receiving Radio-Chemotherapy: A Novel Clinical-Pathologic Score Correlates With Global Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berardi, Rossana; Mantello, Giovanna; Scartozzi, Mario; Del Prete, Stefano; Luppi, Gabriele; Martinelli, Roberto; Fumagalli, Marco; Grillo-Ruggieri, Filippo; Bearzi, Italo; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Marmorale, Cristina; Cascinu, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the importance of downstaging of locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant treatment. Methods and Materials: The study included all consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy) in different Italian centers from June 1996 to December 2003. A novel score was used, calculated as the sum of numbers obtained by giving a negative or positive point, respectively, to each degree of increase or decrease in clinical to pathologic T and N status. Results: A total of 317 patients were eligible for analysis. Neoadjuvant treatments performed were as follows: radiotherapy alone in 75 of 317 patients (23.7%), radiotherapy plus chemotherapy in 242 of 317 patients (76.3%). Worse disease-free survival was observed in patients with a lower score (Score 1 = -3 to +3 vs. Score 2 = +4 to +7; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results suggest that a novel score, calculated from preoperative and pathologic tumor and lymph node status, could represent an important parameter to predict outcome in patients receiving neoadjuvant treatment for rectal cancer. The score could be useful to select patients for adjuvant chemotherapy after neoadjuvant treatment and surgery.

  6. Effects of pelvic floor muscle exercise on faecal incontinence in rectal cancer patients after stoma closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y-H; Yang, H-Y; Hung, S-L; Chen, H-P; Liu, K-W; Chen, T-B; Chi, S-C

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) on the faecal incontinence (FI) of rectal cancer patients following stoma closure. Participants were randomly distributed into an exercise group (n = 27) and non-exercise group (n = 26). An experimental design and longitudinal approach were implemented for data collection. Baseline data were collected at 1 day before discharge, and then PFME was taught before the patients were discharged from the hospital. We collected data and followed up with the patients at their pre-discharge visit and at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9 months after discharge. The Cleveland Clinic Faecal Incontinence (CCI) score was used to measure patient outcome. PFME proved to effectively decrease the degree of FI in stoma closure recipients. The FI score of the exercise group significantly decreased from 8.37 to 2.27 after PFME compared with that of the non-exercise group (from 8.54 to 2.58). The generalised estimation equation tests showed that both group and time were significantly different. The tests also indicated that although PFME appeared to hasten the decline of incontinence, this effect was no longer detectable at 9 months; thus, it may be an effective intervention for FI when implemented up to half a year after discharge. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Clinical outcome in 520 consecutive Danish rectal cancer patients treated with short course preoperative radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L H; Altaf, R; Harling, H

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to analyse the results of preoperative short course radiotherapy in a consecutive, national cohort of patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: Through a validated, prospective national database we identified 520 Danish patients who presented with high-risk mobile...... tumours in the lower two thirds of the rectum and were referred for preoperative radiotherapy with 5 x 5 Gy. The inclusion period was 56 months. Radiotherapy data was retrospectively collected. RESULTS: Of the 520 patients, 514 completed radiotherapy and 506 had surgery. Surgery was considered curative...... in 439 patients. The 3-year local recurrence rate was 4.0% (95% CI 2.5-6.5%) and the distant recurrence rate at 3 years was 18.7% (95% CI 15.4-22.5%). The 5-year disease free survival rate was 40.2% (95% CI 27.0-53.1%) and overall survival 50.4% (95% CI 36.1-63.1%). Most tumours (61%) were classified...

  8. Investigation of rectal complication after RALS-therapy for uterine cervix cancer using multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Takaichiro

    1983-01-01

    Rectal injury is one of the major side effects after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. According to our previous reports, the cases of rectal complication were mainly related to the measured rectal dose in half of patients, and the other causes were related to the following factors; such as diabetes mellitus, hemorrhagic tendency, syphilis and so on. Concerning to rectal complication, these factors were investigated by means of the discriminant analysis, one of the multivariate analyses, in this paper. Twenty-eight factors as to radiation dose, laboratory tests and physical condition of patients were analyzed. From August 1978 through January 1980, 52 cases of previously untreated carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated using RALS, remotely controlled high dose rate intracavitary radiotherapy, at our department. The data from 49 out of 52 cases were available for the discriminant analysis. By m eans of this analysis, it was found that these factors, such as the dose of whole pelvic irradiation, Point A dose of RALS, measured rectal dose by RALS, WGC-Z and TPHA were important factors for occurence of rectal complication. According to the discriminant score, 46 out of 49 cases (94 %) could be correctly discriminated. There were two cases of false positive and one false negative. Form February 1980 through July 1980, 27 cases of previously untreated carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated at our department. The obtained discriminant function was applied to these 27 cases, and 24 out of 27 cases (89 %) were correctly predicted. There were two cases of false positive, and one of false negative. Discriminant analysis is useful for the prediction of rectal complication after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. (J.P.N.)

  9. Importance of Preoperative Rectal Ultrasound and CT in Rectal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnellyova, T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The reason of high mortality of colorectal carcinoma is above all the fact, that majority of diseases are detected in progressive stage. Radical change in this unfavorable mortality rate can be achieved only by targeted search for early stages of the disease. Early diagnostics consists in rectoscopy and colonoscopy. Regarding X-ray methods it is X-ray irigography. Regarding CT examinations it is CT irigography, virtual colonoscopy. Another examination can be USG examination of abdomen and endo sonographic examination of rectum. Materials and methods: In the period from June 2006 to December 2010, in 60 patients out of the total number 106 examined patients, tumorous affection of rectum CT examination of pelvis and abdomen separately or pelvisand abdomen at one session was made in 3186 patients. In 115 patients we discovered malign tumorous illness of colon. Metastatic affection in the form of distant metastases was proven n 63 patients. 403 patients had CT irigography examination. In 77 out of them we diagnosed colon carcinoma. CT colonoscopy did not discover in our group of 30 patients examined the presence of colon carcinoma. Results: In the group of 60 patients who were diagnosed rectal carcinoma, in 29 patients expansive infiltrative affection was evaluated in endorectal sonography, histologically confirmed in 28 patients - 96,5 %, expansive affection in 41 patients with histological verification in 100 %. With CT we diagnosed 52 expansive tumorous processes, histologically confirmed in 47 patients - 90,38 %. In 63 patients expansive infiltrative process was evaluated, histologically confirmed in 52 patients 82,53 %. In total of 115 examinations there was conformance with histological examination in 99 patients - 86,08 %. In CT irigography we diagnosed colon tumour in 77 patients. Expansive growth was evaluated in 40 patients, histologically confirmed in 37 patients - 92,5 %. Expansive infiltrative expansion was evaluated in 37 patients, with

  10. Effect of smoking on survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolly, Philippe; Knöpfli, Marina; Dufour, Jean-François

    2017-11-01

    Lifestyle factors such as smoking, obesity and physical activity have gained interest in the field of hepatocellular carcinoma. These factors play a significant role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Several studies revealed the impact of tobacco consumption on the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and its synergistic effects with viral etiologies (hepatitis B and C). The effects of smoking on survival in patients with a diagnosed hepatocellular carcinoma have not yet been investigated in a Western cohort where hepatitis C infection is a major risk factor. Using data from a prospective cohort of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were followed at the University Hospital of Bern, Switzerland, survival was compared by Kaplan-Meier analysis in smokers and nonsmokers, and multivariate Cox regression was applied to control for confounding variables. Of 238 eligible hepatocellular carcinoma patients, 64 were smokers at the time of inclusion and 174 were nonsmokers. Smokers had a significant worse overall survival than nonsmokers (hazard ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval: 1.22-2.58, P=.003). Analysis of patients according to their underlying liver disease, revealed that smoking, and not nonsmoking, affected survival of hepatitis B virus and C virus-infected patients only. In this subgroup, smoking was an independent predictor for survival (hazard ratio 2.99, 95% confidence interval: 1.7-5.23, Phepatocellular carcinoma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cost effectiveness of mesh prophylaxis to prevent parastomal hernia in patients undergoing permanent colostomy for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lawrence; Saleem, Abdulaziz; Landry, Tara; Latimer, Eric; Chaudhury, Prosanto; Feldman, Liane S

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia (PSH) is common after stoma formation. Studies have reported that mesh prophylaxis reduces PSH, but there are no cost-effectiveness data. Our objective was to determine the cost effectiveness of mesh prophylaxis vs no prophylaxis to prevent PSH in patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection with permanent colostomy for rectal cancer. Using a cohort Markov model, we modeled the costs and effectiveness of mesh prophylaxis vs no prophylaxis at the index operation in a cohort of 60-year-old patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer during a time horizon of 5 years. Costs were expressed in 2012 Canadian dollars (CAD$) and effectiveness in quality-adjusted life years. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. In patients with stage I to III rectal cancer, prophylactic mesh was dominant (less costly and more effective) compared with no mesh. In patients with stage IV disease, mesh prophylaxis was associated with higher cost (CAD$495 more) and minimally increased effectiveness (0.05 additional quality-adjusted life years), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of CAD$10,818 per quality-adjusted life year. On sensitivity analyses, the decision was sensitive to the probability of mesh infection and the cost of the mesh, and method of diagnosing PSH. In patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection with permanent colostomy for rectal cancer, mesh prophylaxis might be the less costly and more effective strategy compared with no mesh to prevent PSH in patients with stage I to III disease, and might be cost effective in patients with stage IV disease. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Trephine Transverse Colostomy Is Effective for Patients Who Have Previously Undergone Rectal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Seung-Seop; Jung, Sung Woo; Oh, Se Heon; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, In Ja; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Colostomy creation is an essential procedure for colorectal surgeons, but the preferred method of colostomy varies by surgeon. We compared the outcomes of trephine colostomy creation with open those for the (laparotomy) and laparoscopic methods and evaluated appropriate indications for a trephine colostomy and the advantages of the technique. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 263 patients who had undergone colostomy creation by trephine, open and laparoscopic approaches between April 2006 and March 2016. We compared the clinical features and the operative and postoperative outcomes according to the approach used for stoma creation. Results One hundred sixty-three patients (62%) underwent colostomy surgery for obstructive causes and 100 (38%) for fistulous problems. The mean operative time was significantly shorter with the trephine approach (trephine, 46.0 ± 1.9 minutes; open, 78.7 ± 3.9 minutes; laparoscopic, 63.5 ± 5.0 minutes; P colostomy was feasible for a diversion colostomy (P colostomy is safe and can be implemented quickly in various situations, and compared to other colostomy procedures, the patient’s recovery is faster. Previous laparotomy history was not a contraindication for a trephine colostomy, and a trephine transverse colostomy is feasible for patients who have undergone previous rectal surgery. PMID:29742862

  13. A Complete Response Case in a Patient with Multiple Lung Metastases of Rectal Cancer Treated with Bevacizumab plus XELIRI Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Hashida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that many patients with lung metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC underwent chemotherapy with fluorouracil, folinic acid, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, or capecitabine. There is a small number of reports about the capecitabine and irinotecan (XELIRI plus bevacizumab (BV therapy for patients with metastatic CRC in Japan. We report a case of successful BV+XELIRI therapy for rectal cancer with multiple lung metastases as first-line chemotherapy. A 53-year-old female presented with advanced rectal cancer and metastatic lung tumors. Following surgery, the patient was treated with XELIRI+BV. After 6 courses, a computed tomography scan showed complete response of the lung metastases. No recurrence has occurred for 3 years after chemotherapy was stopped.

  14. Rectal ulcer in a patient with VZV sacral meningoradiculitis (Elsberg syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Shimizu, Takahiro; Tokushige, Shin-ichi; Mizuno, Hideo; Igeta, Yukifusa; Hashida, Hideji

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 55-year-old woman with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) sacral meningoradiculitis (Elsberg syndrome) who presented with herpes zoster in the left S2 dermatome area, urinary retention, and constipation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed the left sacral nerve root swelling with enhancement. Thereafter, she suddenly showed massive hematochezia and hemorrhagic shock because of a rectal ulcer. To elucidate the relation between Elsberg syndrome and rectal ulcer, accumulation of similar cases is necessary. To avoid severe complications, attention must be devoted to the possibility of rectal bleeding in the early stage of Elsberg syndrome.

  15. EURECCA colorectal: multidisciplinary mission statement on better care for patients with colon and rectal cancer in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Aristei, Cynthia; Boelens, Petra G; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Blomqvist, Lennart; Borras, Josep M; van den Broek, Colette B M; Brown, Gina; Coebergh, Jan-Willem; Cutsem, Eric Van; Espin, Eloy; Gore-Booth, Jola; Glimelius, Bengt; Haustermans, Karin; Henning, Geoffrey; Iversen, Lene H; Han van Krieken, J; Marijnen, Corrie A M; Mroczkowski, Pawel; Nagtegaal, Iris; Naredi, Peter; Ortiz, Hector; Påhlman, Lars; Quirke, Philip; Rödel, Claus; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm J T; Schmoll, Hans J; Smith, Jason; Tanis, Pieter J; Taylor, Claire; Wibe, Arne; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Meldolesi, Elisa; Wiggers, Theo; Cervantes, Andres; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2013-09-01

    Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last twenty years however still considerable variation exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Therefore, EURECCA, which is the acronym of European Registration of cancer care, is aiming at defining core treatment strategies and developing a European audit structure in order to improve the quality of care for all patients with colon and rectal cancer. In December 2012 the first multidisciplinary consensus conference about colon and rectum was held looking for multidisciplinary consensus. The expert panel consisted of representatives of European scientific organisations involved in cancer care of patients with colon and rectal cancer and representatives of national colorectal registries. The expert panel had delegates of the European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), European Society of Pathology (ESP), European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Radiology (ESR), European Society of Coloproctology (ESCP), European CanCer Organisation (ECCO), European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) and the European Colorectal Cancer Patient Organisation (EuropaColon), as well as delegates from national registries or audits. Experts commented and voted on the two web-based online voting rounds before the meeting (between 4th and 25th October and between the 20th November and 3rd December 2012) as well as one online round after the meeting (4th-20th March 2013) and were invited to lecture on the subjects during the meeting (13th-15th December 2012). The sentences in the consensus document were available during the meeting and a televoting round during the conference by all participants was performed. All sentences that were voted on are available on the EURECCA website www.canceraudit.eu. The consensus document was divided in sections describing evidence based algorithms of diagnostics, pathology, surgery, medical

  16. Organ Preservation Using Contact Radiotherapy for Early Rectal Cancer: Outcomes of Patients Treated at a Single Centre in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadda, A S; Martin, A; Killeen, S; Hunter, I A

    2017-03-01

    Contact radiotherapy for early rectal cancer uses 50 kV X-rays to treat rectal cancers under direct vision. We present data of a series of patients treated at a single centre with prospective follow-up and functional assessment. All patients were treated at the Queen's Centre for Oncology, Hull, UK between September 2011 and October 2015. Patients received a biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver/pelvis, computed tomography of the chest and endorectal ultrasound. Patients were deemed to be either unfit for radical surgery or refused it due to the need for a permanent stoma. Follow-up consisted of 3 monthly flexible sigmoidoscopy and MRI of the liver/pelvis and 12 monthly computed tomography of the chest. In total, 42 patients were treated with contact radiotherapy ± external beam chemo/radiotherapy without any primary surgical excision. The median age was 78 years (range 50-94 years). Local recurrence-free survival was 88%, disease-free survival was 86% and overall survival was 88% with a median follow-up of 24 months (range 5-54 months). The median time to recurrence was 12 months (range 4-14 months). The estimated 30 day surgical mortality for this cohort with radical surgery was 12%. Mortality from the contact radiotherapy procedure was 0%. Functional outcomes as investigated by the Low Anterior Resection Syndrome (LARS) score were good, with 65% having no LARS. Contact radiotherapy for early rectal cancer is a safe, well-tolerated outpatient procedure, allowing organ preservation, with excellent oncological and functional outcomes. For elderly co-morbid patients with suitable rectal cancers this should be considered as a standard of care. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sparing Sphincters and Laparoscopic Resection Improve Survival by Optimizing the Circumferential Resection Margin in Rectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Metin; Bayraktar, Adem; Sivirikoz, Emre; Yegen, Gülcin; Karip, Bora; Saglam, Esra; Bulut, Mehmet Türker; Balik, Emre

    2016-02-01

    The goal of rectal cancer treatment is to minimize the local recurrence rate and extend the disease-free survival period and survival. For this aim, obtainment of negative circumferential radial margin (CRM) plays an important role. This study evaluated predictive factors for positive CRM status and its effect on patient survival in mid- and distal rectal tumors.Patients who underwent curative resection for rectal cancer were included. The main factors were demographic data, tumor location, surgical technique, neoadjuvant therapy, tumor diameter, tumor depth, lymph node metastasis, mesorectal integrity, CRM, the rate of local recurrence, distant metastasis, and overall and disease-free survival. Statistical analyses were performed by using the Chi-squared test, Fisher exact test, Student t test, Mann-Whitney U test and the Mantel-Cox log-rank sum test.A total of 420 patients were included, 232 (55%) of whom were male. We observed no significant differences in patient characteristics or surgical treatment between the patients who had positive CRM and who had negative CRM, but a higher positive CRM rate was observed in patients undergone abdominoperineal resection (APR) (P CRM status. Logistic regression analysis revealed that APR (P CRM status. Moreover, positive CRM was associated with decreased 5-year overall and disease-free survival (P = 0.002 and P = 0.004, respectively).This large single-institution series demonstrated that APR and open resection were independent predictive factors for positive CRM status in rectal cancer. Positive CRM independently decreased the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates.

  18. A systematic review of online resources to support patient decision-making for full-thickness rectal prolapse surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, G E; Baker, D M; Lee, M J; Brown, S R

    2017-11-01

    The internet is becoming an increasingly popular resource to support patient decision-making outside of the clinical encounter. The quality of online health information is variable and largely unregulated. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of online resources to support patient decision-making for full-thickness rectal prolapse surgery. This systematic review was registered on the PROSPERO database (CRD42017058319). Searches were performed on Google and specialist decision aid repositories using a pre-defined search strategy. Sources were analysed according to three measures: (1) their readability using the Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease score, (2) DISCERN score and (3) International Patient Decision Aids Standards (IPDAS) minimum standards criteria score (IPDASi, v4.0). Overall, 95 sources were from Google and the specialist decision aid repositories. There were 53 duplicates removed, and 18 sources did not meet the pre-defined eligibility criteria, leaving 24 sources included in the full-text analysis. The mean Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease score was higher than recommended for patient education materials (48.8 ± 15.6, range 25.2-85.3). Overall quality of sources supporting patient decision-making for full-thickness rectal prolapse surgery was poor (median DISCERN score 1/5 ± 1.18, range 1-5). No sources met minimum decision-making standards (median IPDASi score 5/12 ± 2.01, range 1-8). Currently, easily accessible online health information to support patient decision-making for rectal surgery is of poor quality, difficult to read and does not support shared decision-making. It is recommended that professional bodies and medical professionals seek to develop decision aids to support decision-making for full-thickness rectal prolapse surgery.

  19. C-reactive protein as predictor of recurrence in patients with rectal cancer undergoing chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2013-11-01

    The clinical significance of the systemic inflammatory response (SIR) in patients with rectal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), to the best of our knowledge, has not been thus far investigated. The neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and C-Reactive protein (CRP) levels for 84 patients with rectal cancer undergoing CRT were available as indicators of SIR status. The impact of SIR status on the prognosis of these patients was assessed. Elevated NLR, CRP, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and pathological TNM stage III [ypN(+)] were identified as significant prognostic factors for poor overall survival (OS), with CRP and ypN(+) being validated as independent predictors of OS. Elevated CRP and CEA levels were significant predictive factors for poor disease-free survival (DFS), and an elevated CRP level was identified as the only independent predictive factor for DFS. In addition, an elevated CRP level predicted for poorer OS and DFS in patients with pathological TNM stage I-II [ypN(-)]. CRP is a promising predictor of recurrence and prognosis in patients with rectal cancer treated by CRT.

  20. Facial skin follllicular hyperkeratosis of patients with basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zhuchkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a clinical observation of paraneoplastic syndrome of a patient with basal cell carcinoma of skin. Authors present clinical features of the described for the first time, paraneoplastic retentional follicular hyperkeratosis of facial area.

  1. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  2. Comparison of oral versus rectal administration of acetaminophen with codeine in postoperative pediatric adenotonsillectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarzak, Vicki; Haddad, Joseph

    2006-08-01

    To examine whether acetaminophen with codeine administered per rectum is an effective alternative for pain control compared with oral administration after an adenotonsillectomy. A prospective, randomized control study. Seventy-five children aged 1 to 5 were recruited for this study. Each child was assigned randomly to receive either rectal or oral postoperative pain medication. A journal with eight questions was kept for 10 days after the operation, and an overall survey of five questions was filled out at the first postoperative visit. Postoperative pain was adequately controlled in those patients receiving suppositories when compared with those patients receiving oral pain medication. Adverse effects and total number of doses given per day were similar. Parents found the suppositories easy to administer, and more parents would switch or consider switching from oral pain medication to suppositories if given the choice. The suppositories achieved equivalent pain control as oral medication with few side effects and good tolerance. Furthermore, many parents preferred the suppositories to oral medication in maintaining postoperative pain control because of ease of administration. If given the choice for future surgeries, many parents would switch or consider switching from oral pain medication to suppositories.

  3. Use of Molecular Imaging to Predict Clinical Outcome in Patients With Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konski, Andre; Li Tianyu; Sigurdson, Elin; Cohen, Steven J.; Small, William; Spies, Stewart; Yu, Jian Q.; Wahl, Andrew; Stryker, Steven; Meropol, Neal J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate changes in 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) (18-FDG-PET) uptake with response and disease-free survival with combined modality neoadjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Charts were reviewed for consecutive patients with ultrasound-staged T3x to T4Nx or TxN1 rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent preoperative chemoradiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) or Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University with 18-FDG-PET scanning before and after combined-modality neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy . The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured from the tumor before and 3 to 4 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy preoperatively. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association of pretreatment SUV, posttreatment SUV, and % SUV decrease on pathologic complete response (pCR), and a Cox model was fitted to analyze disease-free survival. Results: A total of 53 patients (FCCC, n = 41, RLCCC, n = 12) underwent pre- and postchemoradiation PET scanning between September 2000 and June 2006. The pCR rate was 31%. Univariate analysis revealed that % SUV decrease showed a marginally trend in predicting pCR (p = 0.08). In the multivariable analysis, posttreatment SUV was shown a predictor of pCR (p = 0.07), but the test results did not reach statistical significance. None of the investigated variables were predictive of disease-free survival. Conclusions: A trend was observed for % SUV decrease and posttreatment SUV predicting pCR in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation therapy. Further prospective study with a larger sample size is warranted to better characterize the role of 18-FDG-PET for response prediction in patients with rectal cancer.

  4. Effect of preoperative injection of carbon nanoparticle suspension on the outcomes of selected patients with mid-low rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing-Mao; Liang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Zheng; Kou, Jian-tao; Zhou, Zhi-Xiang

    2016-04-04

    Carbon nanoparticles show significant lymphatic tropism and can be used to identify lymph nodes surrounding mid-low rectal tumors. In this study, we analyzed the effect of trans anal injection of a carbon nanoparticle suspension on the outcomes of patients with mid-low rectal cancer who underwent laparoscopic resection. We collected the data of 87 patients with mid-low rectal cancer who underwent laparoscopic resection between November 2014 and March 2015 at Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College. For 35 patients in the experimental group, the carbon nanoparticle suspension was injected transanally into the submucosa of the rectum around the tumor 30 min before the operation; 52 patients in the control group underwent the operation directly without the injection of carbon nanoparticle suspension. We then compared the operation outcomes between the two groups. In the experimental group, the rate of incomplete mesorectal excision was lower than that in the control group, but no significant difference was found (2.9% vs. 7.7%, P = 0.342). The distance between the tumor and the circumferential resection margin was 5.8 ± 1.4 mm in the experimental group and 4.8 ± 1.1 mm in the control group (P = 0.001). The mean number of lymph nodes removed was 28.2 ± 9.4 in the experimental group and 22.7 ± 7.3 in the control group (P = 0.003); the mean number of lymph nodes smaller than 5 mm in diameter was 10.1 ± 7.5 and 4.5 ± 3.7, respectively (P rectal cancer; it also improved the accuracy of pathologic staging. Moreover, for selected patients, this technique narrowed the scope of lateral lymph node dissection.

  5. Per-rectal portal scintigraphy for the evaluation of portal circulation in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiomi, Susumu; Seki, Shuichi; Harihara, Shigeyoshi; Kuroki, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Kenzo; Kurai, Osamu; Ikeoka, Naoko; Monna, Takeyuki; Yamamoto, Sukeo

    1988-10-01

    Portal circulation in patients with chronic liver diseases was evaluated by a new method named per-rectal portal scintigraphy. Following instillation of a solution containing 10 mCi of /sup 99m/TcO/sub 4//sup -/ into the upper part of the rectum, serial scintigrams were taken sequentially. At the same time, the radioactivity curves over the liver and the heart were recorded sequentially. Per-rectal portal shunt indices were calculated from serial radioactivities on the liver and the heart. 1) Per-rectal portal shunt indices (SI) were ranged from 1.9 % to 5.2 % (mean 4.1 %) in the healthy subjects. In patients with hepatitis the mean SI was 6.9 %, in patients with cirrhosis it was 52.9 %, in patients with PBC it was 46.8 % and in patients with IPH it was 54.4 %. 2) The SI was higher in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices than in those without (p < 0.001). The SI was higher in cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without (p < 0.01). 3) A good correlation (r = 0.774) was obtained between SI and ICGR-15. But in the patients with PBC and IPH, ICGR-15 was lower than that of the patients with chronic liver diseases who show same SI as the patients with PBC and IPH. A good correlation (r = -0.716) was obtained between SI and cholinesterase. But in the patients with PBC and IPH, cholinesterase was lower than that of the patients with chronic liver diseases who show same SI as the patients with PBC and IPH.

  6. BIOCHEMICAL NUTRITIONAL PROFILE OF LIVER CIRRHOSIS PATIENTS WITH HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Zanatta PORT

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Liver cirrhosis patients with hepatocellular carcinoma present nutritional alterations and metabolic disorders that negatively impact the prognosis. Objective The objective is to identify alterations in the metabolism of macro and micronutrients among liver cirrhosis patients with and without hepatocellular carcinoma and their relation to the Child-Turcote-Pugh score and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging. Methods Analytical transversal study, with 31 hepatocellular carcinoma patients and 48 liver cirrhosis patients. Laboratorial exams were carried out. The existence of an association between the biochemical parameters and the disease severity as well as the presence of hepatocellular carcinoma was assessed. Results The metabolic-nutritional profile of liver cirrhosis patients caused by the hepatitis C virus and hepatocellular carcinoma showed alterations, specifically the lipid (total cholesterol, HDL and triglycerides, protein (albumin, creatinine and uric acid, iron (transferrin, iron and ferritin saturation, hematocrit and hemoglobin, zinc and B12 vitamin profiles. There is a relation between nutritional biochemical markers and the Child-Turcote-Pugh, as well as Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging. Conclusions Considering the existence of alterations in the metabolism of nutrients in liver cirrhosis patients with and without hepatocellular carcinoma, and also that conventional nutritional assessment methods present limitations for this population, the biochemical laboratorial exams are valid to complement the diagnosis of the nutritional state in a quick and practical manner.

  7. [The role of magnetic resonance imaging to select patients for preoperative treatment in rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Claus; Sauer, Rolf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2009-08-01

    Traditionally, the decision to apply preoperative treatment for rectal cancer patients has been based on the T- and N-category. Recently, the radial distance of the tumor to the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been identified as an important risk factor for local failure. By magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) this distance can be measured preoperatively with high reliability. Thus, selected groups have started to limit the indication for preoperative therapy to tumors extending to - or growing within 1 mm from - the mesorectal fascia (CRM+). Pros and cons of this selected approach for preoperative treatment and first clinical results are presented. Prerequisites are the availability of modern high-resolution thin-section MRI technology as well as strict quality control of MRI and surgical quality of total mesorectal excision (TME). By selecting patients with CRM-positive tumors on MRI for preoperative therapy, only approximately 35% patients will require preoperative radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). However, with histopathologic work-up of the resected specimen after primary surgery, the indication for postoperative RCT is given for a rather large percentage of patients, i.e., for pCRM+ (5-10%), intramesorectal or intramural excision (30-40%), pN+ (30-40%). Postoperative RCT, however, is significantly less effective and more toxic than preoperative RCT. A further point of concern is the assertion that patients, in whom a CRM-negative status is achieved by surgery alone, do not benefit from additional RT. Data of the Dutch TME trial and the British MRC (Medical Research Council) CR07 trial, however, suggest the reverse. To omit preoperative RT/RCT for CRM-negative tumors on MRI needs to be further investigated in prospective clinical trials. The German guidelines for the treatment of colorectal cancer 2008 continue to indicate preoperative RT/RCT based on the T- and N-category.

  8. The role of magnetic resonance imaging to select patients for preoperative treatment in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, Claus; Sauer, Rolf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, the decision to apply preoperative treatment for rectal cancer patients has been based on the T- and N-category. Recently, the radial distance of the tumor to the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been identified as an important risk factor for local failure. By magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) this distance can be measured preoperatively with high reliability. Thus, selected groups have started to limit the indication for preoperative therapy to tumors extending to - or growing within 1 mm from - the mesorectal fascia (CRM+). Methods: Pros and cons of this selected approach for preoperative treatment and first clinical results are presented. Prerequisites are the availability of modern high-resolution thin-section MRI technology as well as strict quality control of MRI and surgical quality of total mesorectal excision (TME). Results: By selecting patients with CRM-positive tumors on MRI for preoperative therapy, only approximately 35% patients will require preoperative radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). However, with histopathologic work-up of the resected specimen after primary surgery, the indication for postoperative RCT is given for a rather large percentage of patients, i.e., for pCRM+ (5-10%), intramesorectal or intramural excision (30-40%), pN+ (30-40%). Postoperative RCT, however, is significantly less effective and more toxic than preoperative RCT. A further point of concern is the assertion that patients, in whom a CRM-negative status is achieved by surgery alone, do not benefit from additional RT. Data of the Dutch TME trial and the British MRC (Medical Research Council) CR07 trial, however, suggest the reverse. Conclusion: To omit preoperative RT/RCT for CRM-negative tumors on MRI needs to be further investigated in prospective clinical trials. The German guidelines for the treatment of colorectal cancer 2008 continue to indicate preoperative RT/RCT based on the T- and N-category. (orig.)

  9. Quality of life of patients with an intestinal stoma constructed in the course of treatment of rectal and sigmoid colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Pierzak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increased human life span is accompanied by a growing number of carcinomas, including colorectal cancer. This is due not only to genetic conditioning but also exposure to hazardous factors present in the environment. A stoma is the consequence of surgical treatment of colorectal cancer. Aim of the research : The objective of the study is to determine the level of quality of life of patients with an intestinal stoma, which would allow an evaluation of the effect of a stoma on the bio-psychosocial functioning of patients, as well as precise specification of discomfort of living with a stoma. Material and methods: The study was conducted during the period from January to April 2015, in the Surgical Clinic of the Regional Cancer Centre in Kielce, and included 102 patients with a stoma, aged 35–75. The study group included 65 males and 37 females, with a stoma constructed mainly from the sigmoid colon or rectum within various periods after surgical treatment. The method of a diagnostic survey was applied, and a questionnaire was selected as the research instrument. The patients were both rural and urban inhabitants. Statistical calculations were performed using the 2 test. Results: Based on the analysis of the results of the study, the quality of life of patients with an intestinal stoma formed in the course of surgical treatment of sigmoid colon and rectal cancer was investigated. The quality of life of patients is at a medium level (neither good nor poor. Conclusions: The quality of life of patients with an intestinal stoma depends on the degree of acceptance of the stoma and the present body image. The quality of life of patients with an intestinal stoma depends on the duration of the disease and of the stoma. There is no relationship between the degree of acceptance of the stoma by the patient and support received from family and friends. The stoma affects the quality of the sex life of patients.

  10. A retrospective comparison of outcome and toxicity of preoperative image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus conventional pelvic radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun-Ming; Huang, Ming-Yii; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Huang, Ching-Wen; Ma, Cheng-Jen; Lin, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chih-Jen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare clinical outcomes and toxicity between 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) administered through helical tomotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy. We reviewed 144 patients with Stage II–III rectal cancer receiving preoperative fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy followed by radical resection. Tumor responses following chemoradiotherapy were evaluated using the Dworak tumor regression grade (TRG). Of the 144 patients, 45 received IG-IMRT and 99 received 3DCRT. A significant reduction in Grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (IG-IMRT, 6.7%; 3DCRT, 15.1%; P = 0.039) was observed by IG-IMRT. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate did not differ between the IG-IMRT and the 3DCRT group (17.8% vs 15.1%, P = 0.52). Patients in the IG-IMRT group had the trend of favorable tumor regressions (TRG 3 or 4) compared with those in the 3DCRT group (66.7% vs 43.5%, P = 0.071). The median follow-up was 53 months (range, 18–95 months) in the 3DCRT group and 43 months (range, 17–69 months) in the IG-IMRT group. Four-year overall, disease-free, and local failure–free survival rates of the IG-IMRT and 3DCRT groups were 81.6% and 67.9% (P = 0.12), 53.8% and 51.8% (P = 0.51), and 88% and 75.1% (P = 0.031), respectively. LARC patients treated with preoperative IG-IMRT achieved lower acute gastrointestinal adverse effects and a higher local control rate than those treated with 3DCRT, but there was no prominent difference in distant metastasis rate and overall survival between two treatment modalities.

  11. Posttreatment TNM staging is a prognostic indicator of survival and recurrence in tethered or fixed rectal carcinoma after preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Alexander K.P.; Wong, Alfred; Jenken, Daryl; Heine, John; Buie, Donald; Johnson, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of the posttreatment TNM stage as a predictor of outcome in locally advanced rectal cancers treated with preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Between 1993 and 2000, 128 patients with tethered (103) or fixed (25) rectal cancers were treated with 50 Gy preoperative pelvic radiotherapy and two cycles of concurrent 5-fluorouracil infusion (20 mg/kg/d) and leucovorin (200 mg/m 2 /d) chemotherapy on Days 1-4 and 22-25 and a single bolus mitomycin C injection (8 mg/m 2 ) on Day 1. Of the 128 patients, 111 had Stage T3 and 17 Stage T4 according to the rectal ultrasound or CT findings and clinical evaluation. All 128 patients underwent surgery 8 weeks after chemoradiotherapy. Postoperatively, the disease stage was determined according to the surgical and pathologic findings using the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system. Results: Of the 128 patients, 32 had postchemoradiotherapy (pCR) Stage 0 (T0N0M0), 37 pCR Stage I, 26 pCR Stage II, 28 pCR Stage III, and 5 pCR Stage IV disease. Of the 128 patients, 79 had pCR Stage T0-T2, 35 pCR Stage T3, and 14 pCR Stage T4. The rate of T stage downstaging was 66% (84 of 128). Of the 128 patients, 25% achieved a pathologic complete response, and 31 (24%) had positive nodal disease. Lymphovascular or perineural invasion was found in 13 patients (10%). The 5-year disease-specific survival rate was 97% for pCR Stage 0, 88% for pCR Stage I, 74% for pCR Stage II, 44% for pCR Stage III, and 0% for pCR Stage IV (p = 0.0000059). The 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 97% for pCR Stage 0, 80% for pCR Stage I, 72% for pCR Stage II, 42% for pCR Stage III, and 0% for pCR Stage IV (p < 0.000001). In univariate analysis, the pretreatment tumor status (fixed vs. tethered tumors), the pCR TNM stage, T stage downstaging, pathologic T4 tumors, node-positive disease after chemoradiotherapy, and lymphovascular or perineural invasion were statistically significant

  12. Intrarectal ultrasound accuracy in preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallone, G.; Della Vecchia, A.; Di Capua, V.; Rengo, C.; Spirito, M.; Romano, G.

    1988-01-01

    The capabilities were evaluated of endorectal ultrasound in assessing the local extension of rectal carcinomas. The study population consisted of 50 patients with histologically proven rectal cancer. A CT scan was also performed on 45 patients, and the results were then compared to post-operative histologic findings. Endorectal US allowed the correct staging of 39/45 tumors (86.6%), with 1 false positive (overstaging T1 as T2), and 5 false negatives (understaging 3xT3 as T2; 2xT4 as T3). CT allowed the correct staging of 37/45 tumors (82.2%), with 5 false positives (overstaging T1 as T2) and 3 false negatives (understaging T3 as T2). Our results prove endorectal US to be a reliable method for the local staging of rectal cancers, limited to mucosa, submucosa and muscular layers of the rectal wall (T1 and T2 tumors). CT does not allow proper evaluation of T1 and T2 tumors, but provides with a better assessment of tumors (T3 and T4). Both C and endorectal US should, therefore, be used as complementary diagnostic techniques for an accurate evaluation of the local extension of lower rectal cancers

  13. Mesalamine Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rectal mesalamine comes as a suppository and an enema to use in the rectum. The suppository and the enema are usually used once a day at bedtime. ... rectal mesalamine without talking to your doctor.Mesalamine suppositories and enemas may stain clothing and other fabrics, ...

  14. Rectal cancer: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  15. Management of rectal cancers in relation to treatment guidelines: a population-based study comparing Italian and French patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minicozzi, Pamela; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Faivre, Jean; Sant, Milena

    2014-07-01

    Few studies have investigated rectal cancer management at the population level. We compared how rectal cancers diagnosed in Italy (2003-2005) and France (2005) were managed, and evaluated the extent to which management adhered to European guidelines. Samples of 3938 Italian and 2287 French colorectal cancer patients were randomly extracted from 8 and 12 cancer registries respectively. Rectal cancer patients (860 Italian, 559 French) were analysed. Logistic regression models estimated odds ratios (ORs) of being treated with curative intent, receiving sphincter-saving surgery, and receiving preoperative radiotherapy. Similar proportions of Italian and French patients were treated with curative intent (70% vs. 67%; OR=0.92 [0.73-1.16]); the respective proportions receiving sphincter-saving surgery were 21% and 33% (OR=1.15 [0.86-1.53]). In about 50% of those treated with curative intent, ≥ 12 lymph nodes were harvested in both countries. The proportion receiving postoperative radiotherapy was higher in Italy than in France (25% vs. 11%, pguidelines. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Occurrence and prognostic value of circumferential resection margin involvement for patients with rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cun; Zhou, Zong-guang; Yu, Yong-yang; Shu, Ye; Li, Yuan; Yang, Lie; Li, Li

    2009-04-01

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) was advocated owning to the reduction in local failure, while deficiency in pathologic details limited monitoring of surgical quality assurance. Here, we aimed to examine circumferential resection margin (CRM) by large tissue slice, discussing its rule in occurrence and relationship with prognosis, thus providing proof for the adoption of TME principles and the application of adjuvant therapy. Specimens of 106 patients with rectal cancer, who underwent potentially curative resection from December 2001 to September 2002, were examined. Follow-up data were collected. Altogether, 2,068 mesorectal nodes were examined with 272 involved by tumor. CRM involvement (CRMI) was examined in 20 specimens. In these 20 cases, seven, nine, and four were caused by tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis, and both, respectively. Occurrence of CRMI was more common for lower-located cancers while also statistically related to tumor differentiation, infiltration, and lymph node metastasis. The difference in local recurrence rate, general recurrence rate, disease-free survival rate, and overall survival rate between the group with CRMI and the group without were all proven to be significant. Detailed pathologic examination, including status of CRM, is advocated since it provides accurate prognostic information. Surgeons could maximize the probability of cure by following the principle of TME. Preoperative adjuvant therapy was essential for advanced staged and lower-located lesions, which implied likelihood of CRMI.

  17. Relationships Between Rectal Wall Dose-Volume Constraints and Radiobiologic Indices of Toxicity for Patients With Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzi, Simona; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Saracino, Bianca; Petrongari, Maria G.; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Landoni, Valeria; Soriani, Antonella; Benassi, Marcello

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to investigate how exceeding specified rectal wall dose-volume constraints impacts on the risk of late rectal bleeding by using radiobiologic calculations. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the rectal wall of 250 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. All patients were treated by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, receiving mean target doses of 80 Gy. To study the main features of the patient population, the average and the standard deviation of the distribution of DVHs were generated. The mean dose , generalized equivalent uniform dose formulation (gEUD), modified equivalent uniform dose formulation (mEUD) 0 , and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) distributions were also produced. The DVHs set was then binned into eight classes on the basis of the exceeding or the fulfilling of three dose-volume constraints: V 40 = 60%, V 50 = 50%, and V 70 = 25%. Comparisons were made between them by , gEUD, mEUD 0 , and NTCP. Results: The radiobiologic calculations suggest that late rectal toxicity is mostly influenced by V 70 . The gEUD and mEUD 0 are risk factors of toxicity always concordant with NTCP, inside each DVH class. The mean dose, although a reliable index, may be misleading in critical situations. Conclusions: Both in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and particularly in intensity-modulated radiation therapy, it should be known what the relative importance of each specified dose-volume constraint is for each organ at risk. This requires a greater awareness of radiobiologic properties of tissues and radiobiologic indices may help to gradually become aware of this issue

  18. Preoperative CT versus diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in patients with rectal cancer; a prospective randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Achiam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world and liver metastases are seen in up to 19% of patients with colorectal cancers. Detection of liver metastases is not only vital for sufficient treatment and survival, but also for a better estimation of prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion weighted MRI of the liver as part of a combined MR evaluation of patients with rectal cancers and compare it with the standard preoperative evaluation of the liver with CT.Methods. Consecutive patients diagnosed with rectal cancers were asked to participate in the study. Preoperative CT and diffusion weighted MR (DWMR were compared to contrast enhanced laparoscopic ultrasound (CELUS.Results. A total of 35 patients were included, 15 patients in Group-1 having the standard CT evaluation of the liver and 20 patients in Group-2 having the standard CT evaluation of the liver and DWMR of the liver. Compared with CELUS, the per-patient sensitivity/specificity was 50/100% for CT, and for DWMR: 100/94% and 100/100% for Reader 1 and 2, respectively. The per-lesion sensitivity of CT and DWMR were 17% and 89%, respectively compared with CELUS. Furthermore, one patient had non-resectable metastases after DWMR despite being diagnosed with resectable metastases after CT. Another patient was diagnosed with multiple liver metastases during CELUS, despite a negative CT-scan.Discussion. DWMR is feasible for preoperative evaluation of liver metastases. The current standard preoperative evaluation with CT-scan results in disadvantages like missed metastases and futile operations. We recommend that patients with rectal cancer, who are scheduled for MR of the rectum, should have a DWMR of the liver performed at the same time.

  19. Can dosimetric parameters predict acute hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Juefeng; Liu, Kaitai; Li, Kaixuan; Li, Guichao; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    To identify dosimetric parameters associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy. Ninety-three rectal cancer patients receiving concurrent capecitabine and pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were analyzed. Pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was contoured for each patient and divided into three subsites: lumbosacral spine (LSS), ilium, and lower pelvis (LP). The volume of each site receiving 5–40 Gy (V 5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and V40, respectively) as well as patient baseline clinical characteristics was calculated. The endpoint for hematologic toxicity was grade ≥ 2 (HT2+) leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia or thrombocytopenia. Logistic regression was used to analyze correlation between dosimetric parameters and grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Twenty-four in ninety-three patients experienced grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Only the dosimetric parameter V40 of lumbosacral spine was correlated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Increased pelvic lumbosacral spine V40 (LSS-V40) was associated with an increased grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity (p = 0.041). Patients with LSS-V40 ≥ 60 % had higher rates of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than did patients with lumbosacral spine V40 < 60 % (38.3 %, 18/47 vs.13 %, 6/46, p =0.005). On univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis, lumbosacral spine V40 and gender was also the variable associated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Female patients were observed more likely to have grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than male ones (46.9 %, 15/32 vs 14.8 %, 9/61, p =0.001). Lumbosacral spine -V40 was associated with clinically significant grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Keeping the lumbosacral spine -V40 < 60 % was associated with a 13 % risk of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  20. Combined curative radiation therapy alone in (T1) T2-3 rectal adenocarcinoma: a pilot study of 29 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, J.P.; Roy, P.; Coquard, R.; Barbet, N.; Romestaing, P.; Ayzac, L.; Ardiet, J.M.; Thalabard, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Aim: Analysis of a pilot study including 29 consecutive patients with high surgical risk or refusal of colostomy treated with radiation therapy alone with curative intent. Patients: Between 1986 and 1992, 29 patients were treated for infiltrating adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Median age was 72 years. Transrectal ultrasound staging was used in 24 patients (T1, 2; T2, 14; T3, 13; N0, 23; N1, 6). In 20 patients the lower border of the tumor was at 5 cm or less from the anal verge and in 19 patients the diameter exceeded 3 cm. CEA was elevated in seven cases. Treatment: Contact X-ray (50 kV) was given first (70 Gy/3 fractions). External beam radiation therapy used a three-field technique in the prone position. Accelerated schedule (39 Gy/13 fractions/17 days) with a concomitant boost 'field within the field' (4 Gy/4 fractions). Six weeks later an iridium-192 implant was performed in 21 (20 Gy/22 h). Results: Median follow-up time was 46 months. Overall and specific survival at 5 years was 68% (SE = 0.09) and 76% (SE = 0.08). Local control was obtained in (21(29)) patients (72%). There was one grade 2 rectal bleeding and five grade 2 rectal necroses. The overall tolerance was good in these frail patients. Discussion: For T2. T3 or T1 > 3 cm diameter rectal adenocarcinoma, where contact X-ray alone is not recommended, a combined treatment with radiation therapy alone is able to give good local control with acceptable toxicity. This treatment should be restricted to inoperable patients

  1. Is the Distance Worth It? Patients With Rectal Cancer Traveling to High-Volume Centers Experience Improved Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaomin; Becerra, Adan Z; Justiniano, Carla F; Boodry, Courtney I; Aquina, Christopher T; Swanger, Alex A; Temple, Larissa K; Fleming, Fergal J

    2017-12-01

    It is unclear whether traveling long distances to high-volume centers would compensate for travel burden among patients undergoing rectal cancer resection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether operative volume outweighs the advantages of being treated locally by comparing the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer treated at local, low-volume centers versus far, high-volume centers. This was a population-based study. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with rectal cancer. Patients with stage II or III rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection between 2006 and 2012 were included. The outcomes of interest were margins, lymph node yield, receipt of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, adjuvant chemotherapy, readmission within 30 days, 30-day and 90-day mortality, and 5-year overall survival. A total of 18,605 patients met inclusion criteria; 2067 patients were in the long-distance/high-volume group and 1362 in the short-distance/low-volume group. The median travel distance was 62.6 miles for the long-distance/high-volume group and 2.3 miles for the short-distance/low-volume group. Patients who were younger, white, privately insured, and stage III were more likely to have traveled to a high-volume center. When controlled for patient factors, stage, and hospital factors, patients in the short-distance/low-volume group had lower odds of a lymph node yield ≥12 (OR = 0.51) and neoadjuvant chemoradiation (OR = 0.67) and higher 30-day (OR = 3.38) and 90-day mortality (OR = 2.07) compared with those in the long-distance/high-volume group. The short-distance/low-volume group had a 34% high risk of overall mortality at 5 years compared with the long-distance/high-volume group. We lacked data regarding patient and physician decision making and surgeon-specific factors. Our results indicate that when controlled for patient, tumor, and hospital factors, patients who traveled a long distance to a high-volume center had improved lymph node yield

  2. Perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with rectal cancer: Correlation with microvascular density and vascular endothelial growth factor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeo Eun; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Ki Whang; Choi, Jun Jeong; Kim, Dae Hong; Myoung, Sung Min

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether quantitative perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) correlate with immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in rectal cancer. Preoperative DCE-MRI was performed in 63 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. Transendothelial volume transfer (K trans ) and fractional volume of the extravascular-extracellular space (Ve) were measured by Interactive Data Language software in rectal cancer. After surgery, microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression scores were determined using immunohistochemical staining of rectal cancer specimens. Perfusion parameters (K trans , Ve) of DCE-MRI in rectal cancer were found to be correlated with MVD and VEGF expression scores by Spearman's rank coefficient analysis. T stage and N stage (negative or positive) were correlated with perfusion parameters and MVD. Significant correlation was not found between any DCE-MRI perfusion parameters and MVD (rs = -0.056 and p 0.662 for K trans ; rs = -0.103 and p = 0.416 for Ve), or between any DCE-MRI perfusion parameters and the VEGF expression score (rs = -0.042, p 0.741 for K trans ; r = 0.086, p = 0.497 for Ve) in rectal cancer. TN stage showed no significant correlation with perfusion parameters or MVD (p > 0.05 for all). DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, K trans and Ve, correlated poorly with MVD and VEGF expression scores in rectal cancer, suggesting that these parameters do not simply denote static histological vascular properties.

  3. Long-Term Bone Marrow Suppression During Postoperative Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Neil B.; Sidhu, Manpreet K.; Baby, Rekha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Moss, Rebecca A.; Nissenblatt, Michael J. [Division of Medical Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Chen, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Lu, Shou-En [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey (United States); Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To quantify ensuing bone marrow (BM) suppression during postoperative chemotherapy resulting from preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by postoperative 5-Fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (OxF) chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. The pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was divided into ilium (IBM), lower pelvis (LPBM), and lumbosacrum (LSBM). Dose volume histograms (DVH) measured the mean doses and percentage of BM volume receiving between 5-40 Gy (i.e.: PBM-V5, LPBM-V5). The Wilcoxon signed rank tests evaluated the differences in absolute hematologic nadirs during neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment. Logistic regressions evaluated the association between dosimetric parameters and ≥ grade 3 hematologic toxicity (HT3) and hematologic event (HE) defined as ≥ grade 2 HT and a dose reduction in OxF. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to determine optimal threshold values leading to HT3. Results: During OxF chemotherapy, 40.0% (n=14) and 48% (n=17) of rectal cancer patients experienced HT3 and HE, respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increasing pelvic mean dose (PMD) and lower pelvis mean dose (LPMD) along with increasing PBM-V (25-40), LPBM-V25, and LPBM-V40 were significantly associated with HT3 and/or HE during postoperative chemotherapy. Exceeding ≥36.6 Gy to the PMD and ≥32.6 Gy to the LPMD strongly correlated with causing HT3 during postoperative chemotherapy. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT for rectal cancer has lasting effects on the pelvic BM, which are demonstrable during adjuvant OxF. Sparing of the BM during preoperative CRT can aid in reducing significant hematologic adverse events and aid in tolerance of postoperative chemotherapy.

  4. Long-Term Bone Marrow Suppression During Postoperative Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Neil B; Sidhu, Manpreet K; Baby, Rekha; Moss, Rebecca A; Nissenblatt, Michael J; Chen, Ting; Lu, Shou-En; Jabbour, Salma K

    2016-04-01

    To quantify ensuing bone marrow (BM) suppression during postoperative chemotherapy resulting from preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) therapy for rectal cancer. We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by postoperative 5-Fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (OxF) chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. The pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was divided into ilium (IBM), lower pelvis (LPBM), and lumbosacrum (LSBM). Dose volume histograms (DVH) measured the mean doses and percentage of BM volume receiving between 5-40 Gy (i.e.: PBM-V5, LPBM-V5). The Wilcoxon signed rank tests evaluated the differences in absolute hematologic nadirs during neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment. Logistic regressions evaluated the association between dosimetric parameters and ≥ grade 3 hematologic toxicity (HT3) and hematologic event (HE) defined as ≥ grade 2 HT and a dose reduction in OxF. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to determine optimal threshold values leading to HT3. During OxF chemotherapy, 40.0% (n=14) and 48% (n=17) of rectal cancer patients experienced HT3 and HE, respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increasing pelvic mean dose (PMD) and lower pelvis mean dose (LPMD) along with increasing PBM-V (25-40), LPBM-V25, and LPBM-V40 were significantly associated with HT3 and/or HE during postoperative chemotherapy. Exceeding ≥36.6 Gy to the PMD and ≥32.6 Gy to the LPMD strongly correlated with causing HT3 during postoperative chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant RT for rectal cancer has lasting effects on the pelvic BM, which are demonstrable during adjuvant OxF. Sparing of the BM during preoperative CRT can aid in reducing significant hematologic adverse events and aid in tolerance of postoperative chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Value of the magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of the circumferential resection margin (CRM) in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seehaus, A.; Fatal Jaef, V.; Pietrani, M.; Ocantos, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can predict tumor involvement of the circumferential resection margin (CRM) in patients with rectal cancer. Materials and methods: Between april 2005 and march 2008, 70 consecutive patients (mean age 64, range 34-78 years), 40 F and 30 M, with endoscopy and biopsy- proven middle and lower rectal cancer. Non contrast enhanced MRI was performed on a Siemens Avanto 1.5 T. A phased array coil was used and T2 weighted thin section sequences (TR/TE 4200/88, slice thickness 3mm, gap 0, matrix 256 x 256, field of view 150 x 150 mm) were performed in axial, sagittal and coronal orientations. Patients received a 150 ml glycerin enema before examination. No air insufflations or intramuscular antispasmodic was used. The shortest distance from the tumor edge to the circumferential margin was measured. A distance ≤ ?2 mm, analyzed in axial slices, was considered as definition of circumferential margin involvement. Results: The CRM was 2 mm in both MRI and histopathological findings in 26 patients. In 8 cases the CRM was shorter on MRI than in histopathological sections. In 32 patients the CRM was respected in both exams and 4 patients were considered positive on histopathological findings but negative in MRI. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for prediction of tumor involvement of CRM were 86%, 80%, 76% and 88%, respectively. Conclusions: MRI gives reliable information on tumor involvement of the CRM in patients with rectal cancer. This may provide accurate identification of an important prognostic risk factor in patients prior to surgical treatment. (authors) [es

  6. Efficacy and short-term outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with intermittent oral tegafur-uracil plus leucovorin in Japanese rectal cancer patients: a single center experience retrospective analysis.

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    Nakagawa, Ryosuke; Inoue, Yuji; Ohki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuka; Maeda, Fumi; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2017-05-31

    Various types of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) have been established for rectal cancer; thus, Physicians will need to refine the selection of appropriate preoperative CRT for different patients since there are various treatment regimens. Oral tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus leucovorin (LV) is commonly used to treat rectal cancer in Japan. Oral chemotherapy offers patients many potential advantages. Since 2008, we have been performing preoperative CRT with intermittent oral UFT plus LV in locally advanced rectal cancer patients to prevent postoperative local recurrence. Here, in a retrospective analysis, we evaluated the efficacy and short-term outcomes of preoperative CRT with intermittent oral UFT plus LV. We analyzed data from 62 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, including 31 patients who underwent preoperative CRT between 2009 and 2013 (the CRT group) and 31 patients who were treated with surgery alone between 2001 and 2008 (the non-CRT group). Clinicopathologically, both groups included patients with rectal cancer at clinical tumor stages III-IV or clinical node stages 0-III. In the CRT group, curative operations were performed ≥8 weeks after CRT. Patients were concomitantly treated with 2 cycles of oral UFT (300 mg/m 2 /day, days 1-14 and 29-42) plus LV (75 mg/day, days 1-14 and 29-42) and 45 Gy of radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was repeated every 28 days, followed by a 2-week break. The completion rate of CRT was high at 94% (n = 29/31). The downstaging rate of CRT was 61% (n = 19/31). The pathological complete response rate was 6.5% (n = 2/31). Significant differences were observed in the 3-year local recurrence rate between the two groups (P rectal cancer. A further investigation of a diversification of preoperative CRT for Japanese rectal cancer patients is required.

  7. HLA class I expression and its alteration by preoperative hyperthermo-chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

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    Hiro Sato

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Enhancing immunologic responses, including human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I expression on tumor cells and recognition and elimination of tumor cells by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL, is considered a novel concept of radiotherapy. The present study examined patients who underwent preoperative hyperthermo-chemoradiotherapy (HCRT for locally advanced rectal cancer to assess the correlation between HLA class I expression and clinical outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma who received preoperative HCRT were enrolled. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range, 33-85 years and 4, 18, and 56 patients had clinical stage I, II and III disease, respectively. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues excised before and after HCRT were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis with an anti-HLA class I-A, B, C antibody. HLA class I expression was graded according to tumor cell positivity. RESULTS: In pre-HCRT, the number of specimens categorized as Grade 0 and 1 were 19 (24% and 58 (74%, respectively. Only 1 patient (1% showed Grade 2 expression. However, 6 (8%, 27 (35%, 7 (9%, and 12 (15% post-HCRT specimens were graded as Grade 0, 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was a significant increase in HLA class I expression in post-HCRT specimens (p<0.01. However, neither pre- nor post-HCRT HLA class I expression affected overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival in clinical stage III patients. Univariate analysis revealed that Post-HCRT HLA class I expression showed a significant negative relationship with LC (p<0.05. Nevertheless, multivariate analysis showed that there was no correlation between HLA class I expression and clinical outcome. CONCLUSION: HCRT increased HLA class I expression in rectal cancer patients. However, multivariate analysis failed to show any correlation between the level of HLA class I expression and prognosis.

  8. Using Optical Markers of Non-dysplastic Rectal Epithelial Cells to Identify Patients With Ulcerative Colitis (UC) - Associated Neoplasia

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    Bista, Rajan K.; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Bronner, Mary P.; Langmead, Christopher J.; Brand, Randall E.; Liu, Yang

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Current surveillance guidelines for patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis (UC) recommend repeated colonoscopy with random biopsies, which is time-consuming, discomforting and expensive. A less invasive strategy is to identify neoplasia by analyzing biomarkers from the more accessible rectum to predict the need for a full colonoscopy. The goal of this pilot study is to evaluate whether optical markers of rectal mucosa derived from a novel optical technique – partial-wave spectroscopic microscopy (PWS) could identify UC patients with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or cancer (CA) present anywhere in their colon. METHODS Banked frozen non-dysplastic mucosal rectal biopsies were used from 28 UC patients (15 without dysplasia and 13 with concurrent HGD or CA). The specimen slides were made using a touch prep method and underwent PWS analysis. We divided the patients into two groups: 13 as a training set and an independent 15 as a validation set. RESULTS We identified six optical markers, ranked by measuring the information gain with respect to the outcome of cancer. The most effective markers were selected by maximizing the cross validated training accuracy of a Naive Bayes classifier. The optimal classifier was applied to the validation data yielding 100% sensitivity and 75% specificity. CONCLUSIONS Our results indicate that the PWS-derived optical markers can accurately predict UC patients with HGD/CA through assessment of rectal epithelial cells. By aiming for a high sensitivity, our approach could potentially simplify the surveillance of UC patients and improve overall resource utilization by identifying patients with HGD/CA who should proceed with colonoscopy. PMID:21351200

  9. Using optical markers of nondysplastic rectal epithelial cells to identify patients with ulcerative colitis-associated neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Rajan K; Brentnall, Teresa A; Bronner, Mary P; Langmead, Christopher J; Brand, Randall E; Liu, Yang

    2011-12-01

    Current surveillance guidelines for patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis (UC) recommend repeated colonoscopy with random biopsies, which is time-consuming, discomforting, and expensive. A less invasive strategy is to identify neoplasia by analyzing biomarkers from the more accessible rectum to predict the need for a full colonoscopy. The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate whether optical markers of rectal mucosa derived from a novel optical technique, partial-wave spectroscopic microscopy (PWS), could identify UC patients with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or cancer (CA) present anywhere in their colon. Banked frozen nondysplastic mucosal rectal biopsies were used from 28 UC patients (15 without dysplasia and 13 with concurrent HGD or CA). The specimen slides were made using a touch prep method and underwent PWS analysis. We divided the patients into two groups: 13 as a training set and an independent 15 as a validation set. We identified six optical markers, ranked by measuring the information gain with respect to the outcome of cancer. The most effective markers were selected by maximizing the cross-validated training accuracy of a Naive Bayes classifier. The optimal classifier was applied to the validation data yielding 100% sensitivity and 75% specificity. Our results indicate that the PWS-derived optical markers can accurately predict UC patients with HGD/CA through assessment of rectal epithelial cells. By aiming for high sensitivity, our approach could potentially simplify the surveillance of UC patients and improve overall resource utilization by identifying patients with HGD/CA who should proceed with colonoscopy. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  10. Clinical results and toxicity for short-course preoperative radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra; Debus, Jürgen; Hoehle, Frieder; Ulrich, Alexis; Muenter, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (SCPRT) is an alternative method to chemoirradiation for patients with Stage II and III rectal cancer when no downsizing is needed, but there is still widespread reluctance to use this method because of fear of side effects from high-fraction doses. This paper reports on a single institution patient cohort of operated rectal cancer patients after SCPRT, evaluated for chronic adverse effects, local control, progression-free survival and overall survival. Altogether, 257 patients were treated with SCPRT and surgery including total mesorectal excision (92% total mesorectal excision = TME) between 2002 and 2009. Local control and survival were analyzed. Chronic adverse effects for 154 patients without local relapse were evaluated according to the NCI–CTCAE version 4.0 classification, with a median follow-up of 48 months. We found a 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) of 71%. The 5-year estimated local control (LC) rate was 94%. A positive resection margin was found in 4% of the patients and was significantly correlated with decreased DFS, OS and LC. Chronic adverse effects were reported by 58% of the patients, of which 10% were Grade 3 toxicities. The most frequent Grade 2 toxicity was stool incontinence (13%). Sexual dysfunction was found in 36% of the patients (31% Grade 1 or 2, and only 5% Grade 3). SCPRT combined with TME produced excellent LC rates together with a low rate of high-grade chronic adverse effects. (author)

  11. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

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    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  12. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary

  13. Regional lymphadonectomy in uterine cervix carcinoma patients after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhman, Ya.V.; Kuznetsov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    A group of patients with uterine cervix carcinoma with metastatic indices in regional lymphatic vessels detected on lymphograms is studied. It is established that after radiation treatment the relative resistance of lymphogenic metastases to the ionizing radiation is found in 14.9% patients. Extraperitoneal removal of regional lymphatic collectors after a complete course of combined radiation therapy in patients with uterine cervix carcinoma with histologically proved metastases improves 3-year results of survival up to 40%. In the case of multiple and bilateral metastatic injury of regional lymph nodes the therapeutic value of extraperitoneal lymphadenectomy reduces sharply. The diagnostic value of X-ray contrast lymphography not only for defining regional metastases, but for planning and carrying out the treatment of patients with uterine cervix carcinoma is pointed out [ru

  14. Testicular dose and hormonal changes after radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, Robert M.; Henkel, Karsten; Christiansen, Hans; Vorwerk, Hilke; Hille, Andrea; Hess, Clemens F.; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To measure the dose received by the testicles during radiotherapy for rectal cancer and to determine the contribution of each field of the pelvic box and the relevance for hormonal status. Materials and methods: In 11 patients (mean age 55.2 years) testicular doses were measured with an ionisation chamber between 7 and 10 times during the course of pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy) for rectal carcinoma. Before and several months after radiotherapy luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and total testosterone serum levels were determined. Results: The mean cumulative radiation exposure to the testicles was 3.56 Gy (0.7-8.4 Gy; 7.1% of the prescribed dose). Seventy-three percent received more than 2 Gy to the testicles. Fifty-eight percent of the measured dose was contributed by the p.a. field, 30% by the a.p. field and 12% by the lateral fields. Mean LH and FSH levels were significantly increased after therapy (350%/185% of the pre-treatment values), testosterone levels decreased to 78%. No correlation could be found between changes of hormones and doses to the testis, probably due to the low number of evaluated patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy of rectal carcinoma causes significant damage to the testis, as shown by increased levels of gonadotropins after radiotherapy. Most of the gonadal dose is delivered by the p.a. field, due to the divergence of the p.a. beam towards the testicles. The reduction in testosterone level may be of clinical concern. Patients who will receive radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma must be instructed about a high risk of permanent infertility, and the risk of endocrine failure (hypogonadism). Larger studies are needed to establish the correlation between testicular radiation dose and hormonal changes in this group of patients

  15. Pretreatment Evaluation of Microcirculation by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Survival in Primary Rectal Cancer Patients

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    DeVries, Alexander Friedrich [Department of Radio-Oncology, Academic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch, Feldkirch (Austria); Piringer, Gudrun, E-mail: gudrun.piringer@hotmail.com [Department of Oncology, Wels-Grieskirchen Medical Hospital, Wels (Austria); Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Saely, Christoph Hubert [Department of Medicine and Cardiology, Academic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch, Feldkirch (Austria); Lukas, Peter [Department of Radio-Oncology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Öfner, Dietmar [Department of Surgery, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the perfusion index (PI), a microcirculatory parameter estimated from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability, to predict overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with primary rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients with stage cT3 rectal cancer requiring neoadjuvant chemoradiation were investigated with DCE-MRI before start of therapy. Contrast-enhanced dynamic T{sub 1} mapping was obtained, and a simple data analysis strategy based on the calculation of the maximum slope of the tissue concentration–time curve divided by the maximum of the arterial input function was used as a measure of tumor microcirculation (PI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability. Results: In 39 patients (47.0%), T downstaging (ypT0-2) was observed. During a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 71 ± 29 months, 58 patients (69.9%) survived, and disease-free survival was achieved in 45 patients (54.2%). The mean PI (PImean) averaged over the group of nonresponders was significantly higher than for responders. Additionally, higher PImean in age- and gender-adjusted analyses was strongly predictive of therapy nonresponse. Most importantly, PImean strongly and significantly predicted disease-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.85 [ 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.54; P<.001)]; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.81 [1.30-2.51]; P<.001) as well as overall survival (unadjusted HR 1.42 [1.02-1.99], P=.040; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.43 [1.03-1.98]; P=.034). Conclusions: This analysis identifies PImean as a novel biomarker that is predictive for therapy response, disease-free survival, and overall survival in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer.

  16. Medium dose rate brachytherapy for patients with cervical carcinoma; early result of a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amouzegar Hashemi F

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Treatment of cervical carcinoma is routinely performed with Low Dose Rate (LDR brachytherapy, but Brachytherapy in our department is done with Medium Dose Rate (MDR due to the technical characteristics of the machine available here. Thus we decided to evaluate the results of this treatment in our department in a prospective study. "nMethods: Between March 2006 and July 2008, 140 patients with histologic diagnosis of cervical carcinoma referred to Tehran Cancer Institute; were treated with external beam radiotherapy (44-64 Gy to whole pelvis and MDR brachytherapy (8-30 Gy to Point A with a dose rate of 2.2±0.3 Gy/h. "nResults: 121 patients were followed up for a median time of 18 months (range: 9-39 m. There were 11%(6/54 local recurrence for surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy group; 25%(16/65 for radical radiotherapy group, and 19%(23/121 for all patients. Rectal and bladder complications incidence for all patients were 10%(12/121 and 13%(16/121 respectively. High grade complication was shown only in one patient in radical radiotherapy group. In this study 3-years disease free survival and overall survival were 73% and 92% respectively, and disease stage (p=0.007 and overall treatment time (p=0.05 were the significant factors affecting disease free survival. "nConclusions: Results of this series suggest that the use of external beam radiotherapy and MDR brachytherapy with about 20% dose reduction in comparison with LDR can be an acceptable technique with regard to local control and complications.

  17. [Transanal total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer - just a fashion trend?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Z; Skrovina, M; Procházka, V; Grolich, T; Klos, K

    2014-12-01

    Transanal total mesorectal excision performed using equipment for transanal minimally invasive surgery is an innovative surgical technique introduced to facilitate this procedure and to reach better oncosurgical outcomes in patients with low rectal cancer. This article presents a brief summary of guidelines for treatment of patients with low rectal carcinoma. Up-to-date information about the principles of this new method, its modifications and contemporary indications is presented. Based on their own experience and literature resources, the authors inform about the advantages, limitations and unresolved issues of minimally invasive transanal mesorectal excision.

  18. Real-time in vivo rectal wall dosimetry using plastic scintillation detectors for patients with prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Landon; Kudchadker, Rajat; Lee, Andrew; Beddar, Sam

    2014-02-01

    We designed and constructed an in vivo dosimetry system using plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) to monitor dose to the rectal wall in patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Five patients were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board-approved protocol for twice weekly in vivo dose monitoring with our system, resulting in a total of 142 in vivo dose measurements. PSDs were attached to the surface of endorectal balloons used for prostate immobilization to place the PSDs in contact with the rectal wall. Absorbed dose was measured in real time and the total measured dose was compared with the dose calculated by the treatment planning system on the daily computed tomographic image dataset. The mean difference between measured and calculated doses for the entire patient population was -0.4% (standard deviation 2.8%). The mean difference between daily measured and calculated doses for each patient ranged from -3.3% to 3.3% (standard deviation ranged from 5.6% to 7.1% for four patients and was 14.0% for the last, for whom optimal positioning of the detector was difficult owing to the patient's large size). Patients tolerated the detectors well and the treatment workflow was not compromised. Overall, PSDs performed well as in vivo dosimeters, providing excellent accuracy, real-time measurement and reusability.

  19. Unique mutational profile associated with a loss of TDG expression in the rectal cancer of a patient with a constitutional PMS2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasovcak, P; Krepelova, A; Menigatti, M; Puchmajerova, A; Skapa, P; Augustinakova, A; Amann, G; Wernstedt, A; Jiricny, J; Marra, G; Wimmer, K

    2012-07-01

    Cells with DNA repair defects have increased genomic instability and are more likely to acquire secondary mutations that bring about cellular transformation. We describe the frequency and spectrum of somatic mutations involving several tumor suppressor genes in the rectal carcinoma of a 13-year-old girl harboring biallelic, germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair gene PMS2. Apart from microsatellite instability, the tumor DNA contained a number of C:G→T:A or G:C→A:T transitions in CpG dinucleotides, which often result through spontaneous deamination of cytosine or 5-methylcytosine. Four DNA glycosylases, UNG2, SMUG1, MBD4 and TDG, are involved in the repair of these deamination events. We identified a heterozygous missense mutation in TDG, which was associated with TDG protein loss in the tumor. The CpGs mutated in this patient's tumor are generally methylated in normal colonic mucosa. Thus, it is highly likely that loss of TDG contributed to the supermutator phenotype and that most of the point mutations were caused by deamination of 5-methylcytosine to thymine, which remained uncorrected owing to the TDG deficiency. This case provides the first in vivo evidence of the key role of TDG in protecting the human genome against the deleterious effects of 5-methylcytosine deamination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative analysis of the effects of belly board and bladder distension in postoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.H.; Kim, D.Y.; Cho, K.H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effect of reducing the irradiated small-bowel volume with the use of belly board, bladder distension or both methods combined, in patients with rectal cancer undergoing postoperative pelvic radiotherapy. Patients and methods: This study enrolled 20 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who were scheduled to receive postoperative pelvic radiotherapy. All patients underwent four sets of CT scans under four different methods as follows: group I: empty bladder without the use of a belly board; group II: empty bladder with the use of a belly board; group III: bladder distension without the use of a belly board; group IV: bladder distension with the use of a belly board. The conventional three-field treatment plan was made using a three-dimensional treatment planning system. The irradiated small-bowel volume was calculated at 10% intervals from 10% to 100% of the prescribed dose. Results: The volume of the irradiated small bowel decreased in the order of group I, group II, group III, and group IV at all dose levels (p 3 (33.9±12.9%) in group II, 76.6±30.5 cm 3 (55.1±17.8%) in group III, and 98.5±36.7 cm 3 (70.7±14.5%) in group IV. Conclusion: Bladder distension was a more effective method than the belly board for reducing the irradiated small-bowel volume in postoperative pelvic radiotherapy of rectal cancer patients. The combination of the belly board and bladder distension showed an additive effect and was the most effective method for reducing the irradiated small-bowel volume. (orig.)

  1. Dose–Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ronald C.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Killoran, Joseph H.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose–volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)–based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman’s correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU–based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

  2. Anorectal Function and Quality of Life in Patients With Early Stage Rectal Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation and Local Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Patricio B; Renfro, Lindsay A; Carrero, Xiomara W; Shi, Qian; Strombom, Paul L; Chow, Oliver; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about anorectal function and quality of life after chemoradiation followed by local excision, which is an alternative to total mesorectal excision for selected patients with early rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess anorectal function and health-related quality of life of patients with T2N0 rectal cancer who were treated with an alternative approach. This was a prospective, phase II trial. The study was multicentric (American College of Surgeons Oncology Group trial Z6041). Patients with stage cT2N0 rectal adenocarcinomas were treated with an oxaliplatin/capecitabine-based chemoradiation regimen followed by local excision. Anorectal function and quality of life were assessed at enrollment and 1 year postoperatively with the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index, Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life scale, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colorectal Questionnaire. Results were compared, and multivariable analysis was performed to identify predictors of outcome. Seventy-one patients (98%) were evaluated at enrollment and 66 (92%) at 1 year. Compared with baseline, no significant differences were found on Fecal Incontinence Severity Index scores at 1 year. Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life results were significantly worse in the lifestyle (p Cancer Therapy overall score, but the physical well-being subscale was significantly worse and emotional well-being was improved after surgery. Treatment with the original chemoradiation regimen predicted worse depression/self-perception and embarrassment scores in the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life, and male sex was predictive of worse scores in the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy overall score and trial outcome index. Small sample size, relatively short follow-up, and absence of information before cancer diagnosis were study limitations. Chemoradiation followed by local excision had minimal impact on anorectal function 1 year after surgery. Overall quality of

  3. Results and DVH analysis of late rectal bleeding in patients treated with 3D-CRT or IMRT for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Someya, Masanori; Hori, Masakazu; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Nakata, Kensei; Saito, Masato; Hirokawa, Naoki; Sakata, Koh-ichi; Takagi, Masaru; Hareyama, Masato

    2015-01-01

    In patients undergoing radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, dose-volume histograms and clinical variables were examined to search for correlations between radiation treatment planning parameters and late rectal bleeding. We analyzed 129 patients with localized prostate cancer who were managed from 2002 to 2010 at our institution. They were treated with 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT, 70 Gy/35 fractions, 55 patients) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 76 Gy/38 fractions, 74 patients). All radiation treatment plans were retrospectively reconstructed, dose-volume histograms of the rectum were generated, and the doses delivered to the rectum were calculated. Time to rectal bleeding ranged from 9 - 53 months, with a median of 18.7 months. Of the 129 patients, 33 patients had Grade 1 bleeding and were treated with steroid suppositories, while 25 patients with Grade 2 bleeding received argon plasma laser coagulation therapy (APC). Three patients with Grade 3 bleeding required both APC and blood transfusion. The 5-year incidence rate of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding was 21.8% for the 3D-CRT group and 21.6% for the IMRT group. Univariate analysis showed significant differences in the average values from V65 to V10 between Grades 0 - 1 and Grades 2 - 3. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that patients with V65 ≥ 17% had a significantly increased risk (P = 0.032) of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding. Of the 28 patients of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding, 17 patients (60.7%) were cured by a single session of APC, while the other 11 patients required two sessions. Thus, none of the patients had any further rectal bleeding after the second APC session. (author)

  4. Perforated gastric carcinoma in a young-age patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Hsu Wu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Perforation is a rare complication of gastric carcinoma, and it occurs in less than 5% of all gastric carcinoma cases and in less than 1% within all acute abdomen cases. The diagnosis of malignancy is usually not validated preoperatively. In previous reported English literature, all patients with perforated gastric cancer have the feature of old age. This feature might be able to guide the surgeon to impress the differential diagnosis of malignancy before or during the emergent operation of gastric perforation.This 32-year-old male patient suffered from sudden onset of epigastric pain. We performed emergent operation under the impression of hollow organ perforation. The postoperative pathologic report of gastric ulcer revealed gastric carcinoma. We performed second-stage operation of total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy smoothly 7 days later. As we know, this is the youngest patient having the condition of perforated gastric carcinoma reported in the literature. This case reminds us that it is possible for perforated gastric carcinoma to occur in young-age patients. Keywords: Gastric cancer, Acute abdomen, Gastric perforation

  5. Outcomes of patients with abdominoperineal resection (APR) and low anterior resection (LAR) who had very low rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Seung-Seop; Park, In Ja; Jung, Sung Woo; Oh, Se Heon; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Nayoung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2017-10-01

    We compared the oncological outcomes of sphincter-saving resection (SSR) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in 409 consecutive patients with very low rectal cancer (i.e., tumors within 3 cm from the anal verge); 335 (81.9%) patients underwent APR and 74 (18.1%) underwent SSR. The APR group comprised higher proportions of men (67.5% vs 55.4%, P = .049) and advanced-stage patients (P cancer stages. RFS was associated with ypT and ypN stages in patients who received PCRT, while pN stage, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement were risk factors for RFS in those who did not receive PCRT. Notably, SSR was not found to be a risk factor for RFS in either subgroup. Patients who were stratified according to cancer stage and PCRT also showed no differences in RFS according to the mode of surgery. Our results demonstrate that, regardless of PCRT administration, SSR is an effective treatment for very low rectal cancer, while CRM is an important prognostic factor for patients who did not receive PCRT.

  6. Oblimersen in Treating Patients With Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage I Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage II Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin

  7. Peculiarities of immune status in uterine cervix carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekster, L.I.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of investigating the peripheral blood lymphocytes the immunologic state in 81 patients with uterine cervix carcinoma is estimated. It is established that there is a considerable decrease of indices in the T-immune system in patients with uterine cervix carcinoma. The detection of reductions in the immunogram indices in the initial stage plays a definte diagnostic role in the detection of metastases, permits to forecast the process generalization, and consequently, to determine the treatment tactics. It is established that under the effect of combined radiation treatment the T-system is mostly injured. Consequently, pronounced postradiation depression is prognostically unfavourable. The examination of another group of patients has shown that the probability of development of lymphogenic metastases in uterine cervix carcinoma is mainly determined by immuno-morphological peculiarities of regional lymph nodes [ru

  8. The value of "1"8F-FDG PET/CT imaging in diagnosis of postoperative recurrence of rectal carcinoma and metastasis of colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo Xiaoli; Li Shiyun; Dai Ruqi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value "1"8F-FDG PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of rectal cancer recurrence and metastasis after operation. Methods: 42 cases of colorectal cancer patients after surgery were involved, all patients were given general "1"8F-FDG PET/CT examination and strengthen CT examination. According to the PET/CT results, the postoperative anastomotic recurrence and metastasis were determined and patients were taken for reoperation or biopsy pathology diagnosis. Results: Among 42 colorectal cancer patients after resection, there were 2 cases recurrence without metastasis, 19 cases metastasis without recurrence, 11 cases with metastasis and recurrence, and 10 cases without recurrence and metastasis. The accuracy, specificity and positive predictive value of PET/CT examination were higher than that of strengthen CT(P < 0.05). Conclusion: The clinical application value of "1"8FFDG PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer recurrence and metastasis is higher than that of the traditional strengthening CT, and it can be wildly applied in clinical applications. (authors)

  9. [Liver metastases from colon and rectal cancer in terms of differences in their clinical parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liška, V; Emingr, M; Skála, M; Pálek, R; Troup, O; Novák, P; Vyčítal, O; Skalický, T; Třeška, V

    2016-02-01

    From the clinical point of view, rectal cancer and colon cancer are clearly different nosological units in their progress and treatment. The aim of this study was to analyse and clarify the differences between the behaviour of liver metastases from colon and rectal cancer. The study of these factors is important for determining an accurate prognosis and indication of the most effective surgical therapy and oncologic treatment of colon and rectal cancer as a systemic disease. 223 patients with metastatic disease of colorectal carcinoma operated at the Department of Surgery, University Hospital in Pilsen between January 1, 2006 and January 31, 2012 were included in our study. The group of patients comprised 145 men (65%) and 117 women (35%). 275 operations were performed. Resection was done in 177 patients and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the total of 98 cases. Our sample was divided into 3 categories according to the location of the primary tumor to C (colon), comprising 58 patients, S (c. sigmoideum) in 61 patients, and R (rectum), comprising 101 patients. Significance analysis of the studied factors (age, gender, staging [TNM classification], grading, presence of mucinous carcinoma, type of operation) was performed using ANOVA test. Overall survival (OS), disease-free interval (DFI) or no evidence of disease (NED) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves, which were compared with the log-rank and Wilcoxon tests. As regards the comparison of primary origin of colorectal metastases in liver regardless of their treatment (resection and RFA), our study indicated that rectal liver metastases showed a significantly earlier recurrence than colon liver metastases (shorter NED/DFI). Among other factors, a locally advanced finding, further R2 resection of liver metastases and positivity of lymph node metastases were statistically significant for the prognosis of an early recurrence of the primary colon and sigmoid tumor. Furthermore, we proved that in patients with

  10. Temporal Patterns of Fatigue Predict Pathologic Response in Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Janjan, Nora A.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Lin, Edward H.; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hundal, Mandeep; Zhang Yiqun; Delclos, Marc E.; Crane, Christopher H.; Das, Prajnan; Wang, Xin Shelley; Cleeland, Charles S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether symptom burden before and during preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer predicts for pathologic tumor response. Methods and Materials: Fifty-four patients with T3/T4/N+ rectal cancers were treated on a Phase II trial using preoperative capecitabine and concomitant boost radiotherapy. Symptom burden was prospectively assessed before (baseline) and weekly during CRT by patient self-reported questionnaires, the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI), and Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI). Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Symptom scores according to tumor downstaging (TDS) were compared using Student's t tests. Logistic regression was used to determine whether symptom burden levels predicted for TDS. Lowess curves were plotted for symptom burden across time. Results: Among 51 patients evaluated for pathologic response, 26 patients (51%) had TDS. Fatigue, pain, and drowsiness were the most common symptoms. All symptoms increased progressively during treatment. Patients with TDS had lower MDASI fatigue scores at baseline and at completion (Week 5) of CRT (p = 0.03 for both) and lower levels of BFI 'usual fatigue' at baseline. Conclusion: Lower levels of fatigue at baseline and completion of CRT were significant predictors of pathologic tumor response gauged by TDS, suggesting that symptom burden may be a surrogate for tumor burden. The relationship between symptom burden and circulating cytokines merits evaluation to characterize the molecular basis of this phenomenon.

  11. Chemoradiation-induced changes in serum CEA and plasma TIMP-1 in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib J; Sölétormos, György

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative biomarkers serum CEA and plasma TIMP-1 have been shown to have prognostic and predictive value in patients with colorectal cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible impact of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on preoperative biomarker levels in patients...... with rectal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients with rectal cancer were prospectively included. The patients received CRT for 6-8 weeks. Blood samples were collected before CRT (pre-CRT) and preoperatively (post-CRT). RESULTS: Median CEA was 3.5 (range 0.6-36.1) µg/l and 2.4 (range 0.......0-10.2) µg/l (p=0.002) and median plasma TIMP-1 was 132.1 (range 77.8-342.7) µg/l and 140.0 (range 82.6-440.9) µg/l (p=0.04) in the pre- and post-CRT measurements, respectively. CONCLUSION: CRT induced a significant decrease in serum CEA and increase in plasma TIMP-1 levels. Therefore, the preoperative...

  12. Renal cell carcinoma in patient with crossed fused renal ectopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Cakmak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary renal cell carcinomas have rarely been reported in patients with crossed fused renal ectopia. We presented a patient with right to left crossed fused kidney harbouring renal tumor. The most frequent tumor encountered in crossed fused renal ectopia is renal cell carcinoma. In this case, partial nephrectomy was performed which pave way to preservation of the uninvolved both renal units. Due to unpredictable anatomy, careful preoperative planning and meticulous delineation of renal vasculature is essential for preservation of the uninvolved renal units.

  13. Marital status and survival in patients with rectal cancer: An analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyang; Cao, Weilan; Zheng, Chenguo; Hu, Wanle; Liu, Changbao

    2018-06-01

    Marital status has been validated as an independent prognostic factor for survival in several cancer types, but is controversial in rectal cancer (RC). The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of marital status on the survival outcomes of patients with RC. We extracted data of 27,498 eligible patients diagnosed with RC between 2004 and 2009 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. Patients were categorized into married, never married, divorced/separated and widowed groups.We used Chi-square tests to compare characteristics of patients with different marital status.Rectal cancer specific survival was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method,and multivariate Cox regression analyses was used to analyze the survival outcome risk factors in different marital status. The widowed group had the highest percentage of elderly patients and women,higher proportion of adenocarcinomas, and more stage I/II in tumor stage (P married group (76.7% VS 85.4%). Compared with the married patients, the never married (HR 1.40), widowed (HR 1.61,) and divorced/separated patients (HR 1.16) had an increased overall 5-year mortality. A further analysis showed that widowed patients had an increased overall 5-year cause-specific survival(CSS) compared with married patients at stage I(HR 1.92),stage II (HR 1.65),stage III (HR 1.73),and stage IV (HR 1.38). Our study showed marriage was associated with better outcomes of RC patients, but unmarried RC patients, especially widowed patients,are at greater risk of cancer specific mortality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Significant correlation between rectal DVH and late bleeding in patients treated after radical prostatectomy with conformal or conventional radiotherapy (66.6-70.2 Gy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Fiorino, Claudio; Ceresoli, Giovanni Luca; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Bolognesi, Angelo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Villa, Eugenio

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Investigating the correlation between dosimetric/clinical parameters and late rectal bleeding in patients treated with adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Data of 154 consecutive patients, including three-dimensional treatment planning and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum (including filling), were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-six of 154 patients presenting a (full) rectal volume >100 cc were excluded from the analysis. All patients considered for the analysis (n=128) were treated at a nominal dose equal to 66.6-70.2 Gy (ICRU dose 68-72.5 Gy; median 70 Gy) with conformal (n=76) or conventional (n=52) four-field technique (1.8 Gy/fr). Clinical parameters such as diabetes mellitus, acute rectal bleeding, hypertension, age, and hormonal therapy were considered. Late rectal bleeding was scored using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, and patients experiencing ≥Grade 2 were considered bleeders. Median follow-up was 36 months (range 12-72). Mean and median rectal dose were considered, together with rectal volume and the % fraction of rectum receiving more than 50, 55, 60, and 65 Gy (V50, V55, V60, V65, respectively). Median and quartile values of all parameters were taken as cutoff for statistical analysis. Univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox hazard model) analyses were performed. Results: Fourteen of 128 patients experienced ≥Grade 2 late bleeding (3-year actuarial incidence 10.5%). A significant correlation between a number of cutoff values and late rectal bleeding was found. In particular, a mean dose ≥54 Gy, V50 ≥63%, V55 ≥57%, and V60 ≥50% was highly predictive of late bleeding (p≤0.01). A rectal volume <60 cc and type of treatment (conventional vs. conformal) were also significantly predictive of late bleeding (p=0.05). Concerning clinical variables, acute bleeding (p < 0.001) was significantly related to late bleeding, and a trend was found for

  15. Is It Time to Tailor the Prediction of Radio-Induced Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients? Building the First Set of Nomograms for Late Rectal Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Radiotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS - Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Kattan, Michael W. [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rancati, Tiziana, E-mail: tiziana.rancati@istitutotumori.mi.it [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Yu Changhong [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Vavassori, Vittorio [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, Humanitas - Gavazzeni, Bergamo (Italy); Fellin, Giovanni [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Cagna, Elena [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Gabriele, Pietro [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo (Italy); Mauro, Flora Anna; Baccolini, Micaela [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Villa Maria Cecilia, Lugo (Italy); Bianchi, Carla [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy); Menegotti, Loris [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Monti, Angelo F. [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Stasi, Michele [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo (Italy); Giganti, Maria Olga [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Dept. of Oncology, Ospedale Niguarda, Milan (Italy); and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Development of user-friendly tools for the prediction of single-patient probability of late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity through self-assessed questionnaires (minimum follow-up, 36 months) by 718 adult men in the AIROPROS 0102 trial. Doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Nomograms were created based on multivariable logistic regression analysis. Three endpoints were considered: G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding (52/718 events), G3 late rectal bleeding (24/718 events), and G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence (LINC, 19/718 events). Results: Inputs for the nomogram for G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding estimation were as follows: presence of abdominal surgery before RT, percentage volume of rectum receiving >75 Gy (V75Gy), and nomogram-based estimation of the probability of G2 to G3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (continuous variable, which was estimated using a previously published nomogram). G3 late rectal bleeding estimation was based on abdominal surgery before RT, V75Gy, and NOMACU. Prediction of G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence was based on abdominal surgery before RT, presence of hemorrhoids, use of antihypertensive medications (protective factor), and percentage volume of rectum receiving >40 Gy. Conclusions: We developed and internally validated the first set of nomograms available in the literature for the prediction of radio-induced toxicity in prostate cancer patients. Calculations included dosimetric as well as clinical variables to help radiation oncologists predict late rectal morbidity, thus introducing the possibility of RT plan corrections to better tailor treatment to the patient's characteristics, to avoid unnecessary worsening of quality of life, and to provide support to the patient in selecting the best therapeutic approach.

  16. Usefulness of magnetic resonance volumetric evaluation in predicting response to preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with resectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung-yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Dae Hyun; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We performed magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry before and after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for evaluating response to therapy in T3 and T4 rectal cancer. To investigate the utility of MR volumetry for predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation, we compared results from MR volumetry before chemoradiation with those after chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: A total 112 patients with T3 or T4 rectal cancer who successfully underwent MR volumetry and completed neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical resection for cure were identified. MR volumetries were performed before and after chemoradiation. We compared pre- and postchemoradiation tumor volume and % volume reduction rates of patients whose tumors were down-staged with those of patients that were not down-staged. The same analyses were also performed between those patients having a complete histologic regression and those with residual disease in the operative specimen. We assessed the difference of % volume reduction rate according to Dworak's rectal cancer regression grades. Results: Fifty-seven patients (50.9%) demonstrated a tumor down-staging after chemoradiation therapy. Both pre- and posttreatment MR tumor volumes were significantly less in patients whose tumors were down-staged than in patients that were not down-staged (p = 0.04, 0.031), and % volume reduction rates were significantly higher in patients whose tumors were down-staged (p = 0.024). Sixteen patients (14.3%) showed pathologically complete tumor regression. The differences of MR tumor volumes before and after chemoradiation and % volume reduction rates were not significantly different between patients having a complete histologic regression and those with residual disease (p = 0.688, 0.451, and 0.480). The differences of % volume reduction rates according to Dworak's grades were statistically significant (p = 0.03). Conclusion: The MR volumetric examinations before and after chemoradiation demonstrated the

  17. Evolution of the three surgical patients with rectal neoplasm using the York Mason

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praderi, R.; Harretche, M.

    1998-01-01

    Before the development of mechanical suture machines, we often used the York Mason transrectal approach technique for resection of villous tumors of the rectum and small carcinomas.Three female patients who underwent this procedure in 1979, 1983 and 1986 were followed up to the present. In two of the cases (An, 28 years, and Eg, 68 years), small epitheliomas were resected (4 and 3 cm). Eg underwent radiotherapy, as she had a Malpighian tumor, and a year later plastia of the anus.Evolution was good and 14 year later a small perineal tumor appeared which was resected on may 23 1997 and turned out to be a fibrosarcoma with little cellular activity (the patient is now 81 years old).The third patient(MZ; 70 years old) had a great villous tumor which was resected in late 1986,received and was re operated with York Mason approach four years later (october 1990)At the beginning of 1994 a new received was resected by means of endoscopy, but bled profusely and has to undergo urgent surgery carrying out a perineal amputation of the rectum which was left open (Lisfranc).Histological study showed it was a tubular and villous adenocarcinoma with high mucosecretant activity.In March of the same year the perineum was closed and the sigmoidal stump was resected below the colostomy. In late 1996 an encapsulated tumor appeared with subcutaneous situation in the posterior perineum; this was resected in november 19, 1996 with local anesthesia.Microscopical findings also showed an adenocarcinoma with great production of mucine.The patient is now 80 years old and she has not relapsed.The three patients are alive; two of them have continent anus.They have been operated on for 20, 14 and 11 years

  18. A misleading false-negative result using Neisseria gonorrhoeae opa MGB multiplex PCR assay in patient's rectal sample due to partial mutations of the opa gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidnia, Ali; van Empel, Pieter Jan; Costa, Sandra; Oud, Rob T N; van der Straaten, Tahar; Bliekendaal, Harry; Spaargaren, Joke

    2015-07-01

    A 53-year-old homosexual man presented at his general practitioner (GP) practice with a suspicion of sexually transmitted infection. Initial NAAT screening was performed for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The patient was positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae both for his urine and rectal sample. The subsequent confirmation test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae by a second laboratory was only confirmed for the urine sample and the rectal sample was negative. We report a case of a potential false-negative diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae due to mutations of DNA sequence in the probe region of opa-MGB assay of the rectal sample. The patient did not suffer any discomfort as diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in his urine sample had already led to treatment by prescribing the patient with Ceftriaxone 500 mg IV dissolved in 1 ml lidocaine 2% and 4 mL saline. The patient also received a prescription for Azithromycin (2x500 mg).

  19. Clinical significance of changes of serum of P-selectin, CEA and TSGF levels after operation in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhizhong; Huang Jin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of postoperative changes of serum P-selectin, CEA and TSGF levels in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Serum CEA (with RIA), P-selectin (with ELISA), and TSGF (with biochemistry levels were determined) in 32 patients with rectal cancer both before and after operation as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before operation, the serum P-selectin, CEA and TSGF levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P < 0.01), Twenty -two of the 30 patients underwent operative therapy showed no sign of recurrence at one year and their serum P-selectin, CEA and TSGF levels dropped to within normal range. Hower in the 8 patients with recurrence, the serum levels of P-selectin, CEA and TSGF remained abnormally high. Conclusion: Serum P-selectin, CEA and TSGF levels were closely related to the diseases process of rectal cancer and were of prognostic values. (authors)

  20. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Shinya; Kataoka, Hiromi; Mimura, Mikio; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ayakawa, Shiho; Nagai, Aiko; Hayashi, Akihiro; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Baba, Fumiya; Yanagi, Takeshi; Sugie, Chikao

    2012-01-01

    Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC) was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS), which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding) and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding). Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months). Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42%) observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%), although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62%) treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003) and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%). One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p < 0.001) and bleeding stopped in 5 (42%). After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories/enemas are expected to be effective. However, short

  1. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemoto Shinya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS, which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding. Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. Results The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months. Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42% observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%, although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62% treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003 and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%. One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p  Conclusions After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories

  2. Conversations for providers caring for patients with rectal cancer: Comparison of long-term patient-centered outcomes for patients with low rectal cancer facing ostomy or sphincter-sparing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrinton, Lisa J; Altschuler, Andrea; McMullen, Carmit K; Bulkley, Joanna E; Hornbrook, Mark C; Sun, Virginia; Wendel, Christopher S; Grant, Marcia; Baldwin, Carol M; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Temple, Larissa K F; Krouse, Robert S

    2016-09-01

    For some patients with low rectal cancer, ostomy (with elimination into a pouch) may be the only realistic surgical option. However, some patients have a choice between ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery. Sphincter-sparing surgery has been preferred over ostomy because it offers preservation of normal bowel function. However, this surgery can cause incontinence and bowel dysfunction. Increasingly, it has become evident that certain patients who are eligible for sphincter-sparing surgery may not be well served by the surgery, and construction of an ostomy may be better. No validated assessment tool or decision aid has been published to help newly diagnosed patients decide between the two surgeries or to help physicians elicit long-term surgical outcomes. Furthermore, comparison of long-term outcomes and late effects after the two surgeries has not been synthesized. Therefore, this systematic review summarizes controlled studies that compared long-term survivorship outcomes between these two surgical groups. The goals are: 1) to improve understanding and shared decision-making among surgeons, oncologists, primary care providers, patients, and caregivers; 2) to increase the patient's participation in the decision; 3) to alert the primary care provider to patient challenges that could be addressed by provider attention and intervention; and 4) ultimately, to improve patients' long-term quality of life. This report includes discussion points for health care providers to use with their patients during initial discussions of ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery as well as questions to ask during follow-up examinations to ascertain any long-term challenges facing the patient. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:387-397. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. Is It Time to Tailor the Prediction of Radio-Induced Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients? Building the First Set of Nomograms for Late Rectal Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Kattan, Michael W.; Rancati, Tiziana; Yu Changhong; Vavassori, Vittorio; Fellin, Giovanni; Cagna, Elena; Gabriele, Pietro; Mauro, Flora Anna; Baccolini, Micaela; Bianchi, Carla; Menegotti, Loris; Monti, Angelo F.; Stasi, Michele; Giganti, Maria Olga

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Development of user-friendly tools for the prediction of single-patient probability of late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity through self-assessed questionnaires (minimum follow-up, 36 months) by 718 adult men in the AIROPROS 0102 trial. Doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Nomograms were created based on multivariable logistic regression analysis. Three endpoints were considered: G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding (52/718 events), G3 late rectal bleeding (24/718 events), and G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence (LINC, 19/718 events). Results: Inputs for the nomogram for G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding estimation were as follows: presence of abdominal surgery before RT, percentage volume of rectum receiving >75 Gy (V75Gy), and nomogram-based estimation of the probability of G2 to G3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (continuous variable, which was estimated using a previously published nomogram). G3 late rectal bleeding estimation was based on abdominal surgery before RT, V75Gy, and NOMACU. Prediction of G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence was based on abdominal surgery before RT, presence of hemorrhoids, use of antihypertensive medications (protective factor), and percentage volume of rectum receiving >40 Gy. Conclusions: We developed and internally validated the first set of nomograms available in the literature for the prediction of radio-induced toxicity in prostate cancer patients. Calculations included dosimetric as well as clinical variables to help radiation oncologists predict late rectal morbidity, thus introducing the possibility of RT plan corrections to better tailor treatment to the patient’s characteristics, to avoid unnecessary worsening of quality of life, and to provide support to the patient in selecting the best therapeutic approach.

  4. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism TGFβ1 R25P Correlates with Acute Toxicity during Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J. Joshua; Wasserman, Isaac; Milgrom, Sarah A.; Chow, Oliver S.; Chen, Chin-Tung; Patil, Sujata; Goodman, Karyn A.; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the finding of an association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and toxicity during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer patients, in an independent population. Methods and Materials: The cohort consisted of 165 patients who received CRT for rectal cancer from 2006 to 2012. Prospectively recorded toxicity information, graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, was retrieved from the medical record. Additionally, a subset of 52 patients recorded their gastrointestinal symptoms weekly during CRT, using the 7-item Bowel Problems Scale. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from normal tissue in the proctectomy specimens and screened for 3 SNPs: XRCC1 R399Q, XPD K751Q, and TGFβ1 R25P. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed. Results: The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy, and all patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Toxicities measured by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were closely associated with patient-reported outcomes for the patients who completed the 7-item Bowel Problems Scale. Grade ≥3 toxicity occurred during CRT in 14 patients (8%). All 14 patients had either XRCC1 R399Q or TGFβ1 R25P polymorphisms. The TGFβ1 R25P polymorphism was significantly associated with grade ≥3 toxicity (odds ratio [OR] 3.47, P=.04) and, in patients who completed the Bowel Problems Scale, with grade ≥4 toxicity (OR 5.61, P=.02). The latter finding persisted in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for ethnicity, age, and sex (adjusted OR 1.83, P=.02). Conclusions: We have validated the correlation between the TGFβ1 R25P SNP and acute toxicity during CRT in an independent cohort using both clinician- and patient-reported toxicity. The information from our study could be used as a basis to formulate a prospective trial testing the utility of this SNP as a biomarker of acute toxicity during neoadjuvant treatment in locally

  5. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism TGFβ1 R25P Correlates with Acute Toxicity during Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J. Joshua [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wasserman, Isaac [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Milgrom, Sarah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Chow, Oliver S.; Chen, Chin-Tung [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Patil, Sujata [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Garcia-Aguilar, Julio, E-mail: garciaaj@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To validate the finding of an association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and toxicity during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer patients, in an independent population. Methods and Materials: The cohort consisted of 165 patients who received CRT for rectal cancer from 2006 to 2012. Prospectively recorded toxicity information, graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, was retrieved from the medical record. Additionally, a subset of 52 patients recorded their gastrointestinal symptoms weekly during CRT, using the 7-item Bowel Problems Scale. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from normal tissue in the proctectomy specimens and screened for 3 SNPs: XRCC1 R399Q, XPD K751Q, and TGFβ1 R25P. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed. Results: The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy, and all patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Toxicities measured by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were closely associated with patient-reported outcomes for the patients who completed the 7-item Bowel Problems Scale. Grade ≥3 toxicity occurred during CRT in 14 patients (8%). All 14 patients had either XRCC1 R399Q or TGFβ1 R25P polymorphisms. The TGFβ1 R25P polymorphism was significantly associated with grade ≥3 toxicity (odds ratio [OR] 3.47, P=.04) and, in patients who completed the Bowel Problems Scale, with grade ≥4 toxicity (OR 5.61, P=.02). The latter finding persisted in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for ethnicity, age, and sex (adjusted OR 1.83, P=.02). Conclusions: We have validated the correlation between the TGFβ1 R25P SNP and acute toxicity during CRT in an independent cohort using both clinician- and patient-reported toxicity. The information from our study could be used as a basis to formulate a prospective trial testing the utility of this SNP as a biomarker of acute toxicity during neoadjuvant treatment in locally

  6. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  7. Intraoperative radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tetsuo; Itoh, Kei; Agawa, Senichiro; Ishihara, Yukio; Konishi, Toshiro

    2001-01-01

    We studied the efficacy and complications of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in 40 subjects with unresected pancreatic carcinoma (Group A) and 8 with resected pancreatic carcinoma (Group B). These 2 groups were compared to groups not treated by IORT; 59 subjects with unresected pancreatic carcinoma (Group C) and 55 with resected pancreatic carcinoma (Group D). The 6-month survival in Group A was 55%, and 1-year survival 26% compared to 20% 6-month survival and 9% 1-year survival in Group C with a median survival of 7 months in Group A and 4 months in group C; all statistically significant. Pain control was 81.8% in Group A, reduction in tumor size was 50% and reduction of tumor marker, CA19-9 was 56.3% in Group A. Survival in Groups B and D did not differ significantly. The histological efficacy of IORT in Group A was confirmed in autopsy of fibrosis and scar formation in radiation fields of the pancreas. Two patients in Group B had major morbidity leading to death; 1 from leakage in the pancreatojejunal anastomosis accompanied by pancreatic necrosis and the other from duodenal perforation with rupture of the portal vein and hepatic artery. This study demonstrates the efficacy of IORT in patients with unresected pancreatic carcinoma. Prophylactic bypass and shielding of the residual pancreas with lead or reducing the IORT or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) dose should be considered in patients with unresected or resected pancreatic carcinoma, however, to prevent serious complications due to radiation injury of the duodenum and pancreas. (author)

  8. Contribution of co-registered PET/CT for patients with suspected recurrence of colo-rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, E.; Devillers, A.; Prigent, F.; Girault, S.; Herry, J.Y.; Bourguet, P.; Bouriel, C.; Boudjema, K.; Campion, J.P.; Meunier, B.; Boucher, E.; Raoul, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using 18 F fluorodeoxyglucose (PET) has proved to offer advantages for patients presenting with suspected recurrence of colo-rectal cancer. However; this examination is confronted with two disadvantages: the lack of anatomical reference marks and the presence of physiological uptake that can be difficult to locate. We carried out a retrospective study on 30 patients with suspected recurrence of Colo-rectal cancer in order to evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of PET/CT fusion images compared with PET alone. PET/CT acquisitions were performed on a prototype Positrace or on a double-detection head gamma camera in coincidence Hawkeye. PET/CT fusion images had a formal diagnostic impact for 6 patients out of 30 (20%), including 5 patients out of 12 (41%) having a suspected pelvic recurrence. In five cases, it allowed us to resolve ambiguities about whether the site of recurrence was located in the bone or the soft tissues. Furthermore, in one case we were able to locate an intra-abdominal uptake focus at the level of the liver. The PET/CT fusion images had a probable diagnostic impact for three additional patients. For two patients, the PET/CT fusion images allowed us to identify an ambiguous uptake focus as being related to physiological renal uptake. For 4 patients out of 30 (13%), the PET/CT fusion images had a clear additional therapeutic impact, including 4/12 (33%) for whom a pelvic recurrence could be suspected. The present study shows that PET/CT fusion images have an important diagnostic and therapeutic impact for patients with suspected recurrence of colorectal cancer; the impact becoming major for the subgroup of patients having a suspected pelvic recurrence. (author)

  9. Liver cirrhosis is a risk factor of repeat acute hemorrhagic rectal ulcer in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi-Kai Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute hemorrhagic rectal ulcer (AHRU can be found in patients with severe comorbid illness, who are bedridden for a long time. Per anal suturing is a quick and feasible treatment. However, recurrent bleeding occurs frequently after suture ligation of a bleeder and can be life-threatening. However, the risk factor for recurrent bleeding is not well known. Our study tries to clarify the risk factor of repeat AHRU in Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients. Materials and Methods: From January 2004 to December 2009, the medical records of 32 patients, who were admitted to the ICU of the Tri-Service General Hospital, a tertiary referral center in Taiwan, and who underwent per anal suturing of acute hemorrhagic rectal ulcer were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of the 96 patients who received emergency treatment for acute massive hematochezia, 32 patients were diagnosed with AHRU. Eight (25% patients had recurrent bleeding following suture ligation of AHRU and underwent a reoperation; no patient had recurrent bleeding after the second operation. The duration from the first hematochezia attack to surgery (P = 0.04, liver cirrhosis (P = 0.002, and coagulopathy (P = 0.01 were the risk factors of recurrent bleeding after suture ligation of a bleeder. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that liver cirrhosis (OR = 37.77, P = 0.014 was an independent risk factor for recurrent bleeding. Conclusion: AHRU could be a major cause of acute massive hematochezia in patients with severe illness. Our data showed that per anal suturing could quickly and effectively control bleeding. We found that liver cirrhosis was an independent risk factor for recurrent bleeding. Therefore, treatment of a liver cirrhosis patient with AHUR should be more aggressive, such as, early detection and proper suture ligation.

  10. Immunological status of patients with uterine ceroix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'in, I.V.; Dekster, L.I.; Letskij, V.B.

    1979-01-01

    Comparative data on the immunological status of 60 patients with uterine cervix carcinoma 27 of whom were exposed to combined radiotherapy are given. The evaluation of the immunological parameters makes it possible to note a marked affection of the T system by radiant energy. Taking into consideration a significant immunodepressive effect of irradiation it is advisable that immunotherapy by included into the therapeutic regimen

  11. Antinuclear antibodies in the sera of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takimoto, T.; Ishikawa, S.; Masuda, K.; Tanaka, S.; Yoshizaki, T.; Umeda, R. (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    We studied the production of heterophile antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in the sera of 50 patients, 20 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and 30 with other head and neck cancers (laryngeal cancer and maxillary cancer), before and after radiation therapy. A higher incidence of ANAs was found in the sera of patients with NPC and ANA production in these patients was higher after radiation therapy. We therefore performed in vitro experiments to explore the mechanisms of ANA production in the serum of postirradiated NPC patients. X-ray-irradiated NPC-derived cells (NPC-KT) produced a large amount of Epstein-Barr virus (NPC EBV) compared with non-irradiated NPC-KT cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma EBV-infected lymphocytes produced high levels of ANAs. These data suggest that lymphocytes infected by EBV from NPC cells may produce ANAs in the sera of NPC patients.

  12. Clinical outcome of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Yasukazu; Tsukuda, Mamoru; Mochimatsu, Izumi; Arai, Yasuhiro; Kawai, Satoshi; Enomoto, Hiroyuki

    2001-01-01

    Sixty patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx treated at our hospital from 1991 through 1999 were analyzed. In terms of curative treatments, definitive radiotherapy or curative surgery after neoajuvant chemotherapy had been mainly applied for advanced cases until 1997. Since 1998, advanced cases have been treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy. The cause-specific survival rate at 5 years for the 60 patients was 50% (stage I, II, 100%; III, 45%; IV A, 36%; IV B, 0%). In the 35 patients with operable advanced-stage disease, the 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 35% in cases treated with definitive radiotherapy, and 66% in those treated with curative surgery, respectively. All 12 operable patients treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy showed complete response, and 10 patients in this group are disease-free now. However, many problems in definitive treatment modalities, including concomitant chemoradiotherapy for advanced cases with oropharyngeal carcinoma, have not been clarified yet. (author)

  13. Implant R100 Predicts Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with IG-IMRT to 45 Gy and Pd-103 Implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packard, M.; Fuhrer, R.; Valakh, V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To define factors associated with rectal bleeding in patients treated with IG-IMRT followed by Pd-103 seed implant. Methods and Materials. We retrospectively reviewed 61 prostate adenocarcinoma patients from 2002 to 2008. The majority (85.2%) were of NCCN intermediate risk category. All received IG-IMRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles followed by Pd-103 implant delivering a mean D90 of 100.7 Gy. Six patients received 45 Gy to the pelvic nodes and 10 received androgen deprivation. Results. Ten patients (16.4%) developed rectal bleeding: 4 were CTCAE v.3 grade 1, 5 were grade 2, and 1 was grade 3. By univariate analysis, age, stage, Gleason sum, PSA, hormonal therapy, pelvic radiation, postoperative prostate volume, D9, V100, individual source activity, total implanted activity per cm 3 , and duration of interval before implant did not impact rectal bleeding. Implant R100 was higher in patients with rectal bleeding: on average, 0.885 versus 0.396 cm 3 ,(Ρ =0.02) , odds ratio of 2.26 per .5 cm 3 (95% CI, 1.16–4.82). A trend for significance was seen for prostate V200 and total implanted activity. Conclusion. Higher implant R100 was associated with development of rectal bleeding in patients receiving IG-IMRT to 45 Gy followed by Pd-103 implant. Minimizing implant R100 may reduce the rate of rectal bleeding in similar patients.

  14. Time to surgery and pathologic complete response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer: A population study on 2094 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Macchia

    2017-06-01

    Results: Data on 2094 LARC patients treated between 1997 and 2016 were considered suitable for analysis. Overall, 578 patients had stage II while 1516 had stage III histological proven invasive rectal adenocarcinoma. A CRT schedule of one agent (N = 1585 or 2-drugs (N = 509 was administered. Overall, pCR was 22.3% (N = 468 patients. The proportion of patients achieving pCR with respect to time interval was, as follows: 12.6% (1st group, 23% (2nd group and 31.1% (3rd group (p 5040 cGy (p = 0.002 and longer interval (p 13 weeks from CRT to surgery improves the pathological response (pCR and pathologic partial response; pPR in comparison to historic data. Furthermore, radiotherapy dose >5040 cGy and two drugs chemotherapy correlated with pPR rate.

  15. Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) for rectal cancer: effects on patient-reported quality of life and functional outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedam, T W A; van Ramshorst, G H; Deijen, C L; Elfrink, A K E; Meijerink, W J H J; Bonjer, H J; Sietses, C; Tuynman, J B

    2017-01-01

    Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) has rapidly become an important component of the treatment of rectal cancer surgery. Cohort studies have shown feasibility concerning procedure, specimen quality and morbidity. However, concerns exist about quality of life and ano(neo)rectal function. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate quality of life in patients following TaTME for rectal cancer with anastomosis. Consecutive patients who underwent restorative TaTME surgery for rectal adenocarcinoma in an academic teaching center with tertiary referral function were evaluated. Validated questionnaires were prospectively collected. Quality of life was assessed by the EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer's QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 and low anterior resection syndrome (LARS) scale. Outcomes of the questionnaires at 1 and 6 months were compared with preoperative (baseline) values. Thirty patients after restorative TaTME for rectal cancer were included. Deterioration for all domains was mainly observed at 1 month after surgery compared to baseline, but most outcomes had returned to baseline at 6 months. Social function and anal pain remained significantly worse at 6 months. Major LARS (score >30) was 33% at 6 months after ileostomy closure. No end colostomies were required. TaTME is associated with acceptable quality of life and functional outcome at 6 months after surgery comparable to published results after conventional laparoscopic low anterior resection.

  16. Study of positional dependence of dose to bladder, pelvic wall and rectal points in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in cervical cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talluri, Anil Kumar; Alluri, Krishnam Raju; Gudipudi, Deleep Kumar; Ahamed, Shabbir; Sresty, Madhusudhana M.; Reddy, Aparna Yarrama

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study is to examine the variation in doses to, Bladder, pelvic wall and Rectal Points when a patient is simulated in Supine (S Position) and Lithotomy M shaped positions (LM Position), respectively as part of Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer patients. Patients (n = 19) were simulated and orthogonal images were taken in S Position and LM Positions on a physical simulator. Digital orthogonal X-ray images were transferred to Brachyvision Treatment Planning System via Dicom to generate treatment plans. Radio opaque dye of 7 ml was injected into the Foley bulb for identification and digitization of International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) Bladder point. Pelvic side wall points were marked in accordance with ICRU 38 recommendations. A Rectal tube containing dummy source marker wire was used to identify Rectal Point. Students' t-test was used to analyze the results. Doses in LM Position were lower and statistically significant when compared to S Position for ICRU Bladder Point, pelvic walls and Rectal Point. It was observed that movement of applicator could be the reason for the variations in doses between the two positions. Bladder, pelvic wall and rectal points systematically registered lower doses in LM Position as compared to S Position. (author)

  17. Rectal duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni B

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Duplications of the alimentary tract are of a great rarity, particularly so in the rectum. Because of its rarity, the difficulty of making a correct diagnosis and of selection of proper approach for treatment, this entity bears a special significance. The present case report deals with a female newborn who presented with imperforate anus and a rectovestibular fistula and a mass prolapsing at the introitus. Complete excision of the mass was carried out through the perineal approach and the child then underwent, a PSARP for the correction of the rectal anomaly. Histology confirmed the mass to be a rectal duplication.

  18. Conversations for Providers Caring for Rectal Cancer Patients: Comparison of Long-Term Patient-Centered Outcomes for Low Rectal Cancer Patients Facing Ostomy or Sphincter-Sparing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrinton, Lisa J.; Altschuler, Andrea; McMullen, Carmit K.; Bulkley, Joanna E.; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Sun, Virginia; Wendel, Christopher S.; Grant, Marcia; Baldwin, Carol M.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Temple, Larissa K.F.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    For some low rectal cancer patients, ostomy (with elimination into a pouch) may be the only realistic surgical option. However, some patients have a choice between ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery. Sphincter-sparing surgery has been preferred over ostomy because it offers preservation of normal bowel function. However, this surgery can cause incontinence and bowel dysfunction. Increasingly, it has become evident that certain patients eligible for sphincter-sparing surgery may not be well served by the surgery and construction of an ostomy may be better. No validated assessment tool or decision aid has been published to help newly diagnosed patients decide between the two surgeries, or to help physicians elicit long-term surgical outcomes. Furthermore, comparison of long-term outcomes and late effects following the two surgeries has not been synthesized. We therefore conducted a systematic review to examine this ? This systematic review summarizes controlled studies that compared long-term survivorship outcomes between these two surgical groups. Our goals are: 1) improve understanding and shared decision-making among surgeons, oncologists, primary care providers, patients, and caregivers; 2) increase the patient’s participation in the decision; (3) alert the primary care provider to patient challenges that could be addressed by provider attention and intervention; and 4) ultimately, improve patients’ long-term quality of life. This report includes discussion points for health care providers to use with their patients during initial discussions of ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery, as well as questions to ask during follow-up examinations to ascertain any long-term challenges facing the patient. PMID:26999757

  19. Computed tomography and sonography in the diagnosis of recurrent colo-rectal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, J.P.; Goebel, N.; Zurich Univ.

    1985-01-01

    CT and ultrasound of the abdomen were retrospectively evaluated in 44 patients operated on colorectal cancers (18 colon, 26 rectal carcinomas) in detecting a recurrence suspected on biochemical, endoscopic or clinical grounds. CT is superior to ultrasound in detecting a recurrence (metastases of liver and lymph nodes, local recurrence, intraabdominal recurrences of another localisation). CT is recommended as a routine examination in the follow-up of patients operated on colorectal cancers. (orig.) [de

  20. Risk factors for adverse outcome in patients with rectal cancer treated with an abdominoperineal resection in the total mesorectal excision trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dulk, Marcel; Marijnen, Corrie A. M.; Putter, Hein; Rutten, Harm J. T.; Beets, Geerard L.; Wiggers, Theo; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    Objective: This study was performed to identify tumor- and patient-related risk factors for distal rectal cancer in patients treated with an abdominoperineal resection (APR) associated with positive circumferential resection margin (CRM), local recurrence (LR), and overall survival (OS). Background:

  1. Predictors of fecal incontinence and related quality of life after a total mesorectal excision with primary anastomosis for patients with rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walma, Marieke S; Kornmann, Verena N N; Boerma, Djamila; de Roos, Marnix A J; van Westreenen, Henderik L

    PURPOSE: After total mesorectal excision (TME) with primary anastomosis for patients with rectal cancer, the quality of life (QoL) may be decreased due to fecal incontinence. This study aimed to identify predictors of fecal incontinence and related QoL. METHODS: Patients who underwent TME with

  2. High-dose radiotherapy (60 Gy) with oral UFT/folinic acid and escalating doses of oxaliplatin in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber Vestermark, Lene; Jensen, Helle A; Pfeiffer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Consensus is that patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) should receive long-term chemoradiotherapy (CRT) before surgery. With the intent to offer the patients intensified concomitant chemotherapy (CT) to improve outcome and to assess tolerability and toxicity of oxaliplatin (Ox...

  3. Evaluation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 expressions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat; Asnir, R. A.; Yudhistira, A.; Daulay, E. R.; Puspitasari, D.; Yulius, S.

    2018-03-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of head and neck cancer with a poor prognosis because of the position of the tumor adjacent to the skull base and vital structures. Degradation of extracellular matrix that will cause tumor cells to invade surrounding tissues, vascular or lymphatic vessels. One that plays a role in the extracellular matrix degradation process is matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). MMP-9 plays a role in tumor invasion process, metastasis and induction of tumor tissue vascularization. To determine the expression of MMP-9 in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a descriptive study was conducted by examining immunohistochemistry MMP-9 in 30 NPC tissues that had never received radiotherapy, chemotherapy or combination. Frequency distribution of NPC patient mostly in the age group 41-50 years old and 51-60 years were nine people (30.0%); men (73.3%) and non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma (53.3%) histopathology type. The overexpression of MMP-9 in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were mostly found in advance stage.

  4. Depression and anxiety in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate symptoms of depression and anxiety in the patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). METHODS: 76 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma participated in this program. All patients were rated with the self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and the self-rating depression scale (SDS). The mean scores of SAS and SDS were compared to those scores of the Norm of Chinese people. In addition, the different treatment results of the patients with different levels of anxiety and depression were studied. Further, the number of patients of SAS, SDS with more than 50 score were compared between primary cancer patients and recurrent cancer patients. RESULTS: The scores of SAS, SDS and the number of patients with more than 50 score in the patients group were obviously higher than those in Chinese Norm (P<0.01).The levels of anxiety and depression in 32 patients with recurrent cancer were more severe than those of 44 patients with primary cancer. The patients with anxiety and/or depression showed poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: Anxiety and depression are common symptoms in patients with OSCC and have negative effects on the prognosis, thus the psychological intervention for the patients must be carried out.

  5. Does age affect prognosis in salivary gland carcinoma patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørndal, Kristine; Larsen, Stine R; Therkildsen, Marianne H

    2016-01-01

    in the young group were WHO performance status 0 and in disease stage I + II, and they presented with significantly more histological low grade tumors. In multivariate analysis, chronological age seemed to be of no prognostic significance to salivary gland carcinoma patients as opposed to performance status......, disease stage and histological grade. CONCLUSIONS: Salivary gland carcinoma patients over the age of 70 years have a poor prognosis compared to younger patients, which can be explained by higher disease stages, more histological high grade subtypes and a poorer performance status at the time of diagnosis.......AIM: To compare incidence, histology, treatment modalities, disease stages, and outcome in elderly patients (≥70 years) compared to younger (

  6. High risk factors in patient with carcinoma esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afridi, S.P.; Khan, A.; Waheed, I.

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the presence of high risk factors in carcinoma esophagus from February, 1992 to August, 1995 at Surgical unit 1, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC), Karachi. In all 37 patients, 22 males and 15 females, were included in the study through outpatient department, surgical emergency and those referred from other cities of the country. All patients were cachectic. Diagnosis was made by detailed history, examination and laboratory investigations. Diagnosis was confirmed on barium swallow and endoscopic biopsy. Highest number of patients were in their 6th decade of life. History of snuff inhalation and opium was present in 2.7% cases each. Lower 3rd of the esophagus was affected in 62.16% middle third in 21.62% and upper third in 16.21% cases. Smoking, pan chewing, naswar eating and snuff inhalation were identified as high risk factors among patients of carcinoma esophagus. (author)

  7. Locoregional recurrence of rectal carcinoma. A CT-analysis and a target volume concept in adjuvant radiotherapy; Das lokoregionaere Rezidiv des Rektumkarzinoms. Eine computertomographische Analyse und ein Zielvolumenkonzept fuer die adjuvante Radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagatzounis, A. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Koelbl, O. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Mueller, G. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Oppitz, U. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Willner, J. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Flentje, M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie

    1997-02-01

    Patients and method: 155 patients with the diagnosis of rectal carcinoma recurrences were treated in our institution between 1980 and 1995. To determine the extension of the recurrent tumor within the pelvic levels (praesacral levels S1-S5, precoccygeal-, pelvic floor level and perineal level) and the tumor infiltration of pelvic organs and muscles we analysed the pretherapeutic CT-images. The lymphnode recurrences were classified as: Pararectal-, presacral-, iliac internal-, iliac external-, iliac communis- and paraaortal recurrences. Results: Sixty-one percent of the patients with rectum exstirpation and 66% with anterior resection showed a combined local and nodal recurrence. Isolated lymph node recurrences were rare (4% and 5%). The local recurrence was mostly situated in the presacral pelvis, predominantly there was an infiltration of the presacral space at the level of S4, S5 and os coccygis regardless of the operating method and the primary tumor location. The anastomosis was involved in the tumor recurrence in 93% of the anteriorly resected patients. In 9 out of 96 patients after rectum exstirpation the pelvic region caudal of the tip of the coccyx was the origin of the recurrent tumor. Primarily all 9 patients had a deep-seated carcinoma (<6 cm ab ano). Only 2 patients showed an isolated perineal recurrence after rectum exstirpation. Two thirds of the deepseated tumors showed a vaginal involvement. The incidence of iliac internal- and presacral nodal recurrence was 47 to 59%. The incidence of iliac external lymph node recurrences was 7% after rectum exstirpation and 2% after anterior resection/Hartmann procedure. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Patienten und Methode: 155 Patienten wurden in unserer Klinik im Zeitraum 1980 bis 1995 wegen eines Rektumkarzinomrezidivs behandelt. Die Rezidivausdehnung innerhalb der Beckenetagen (Sakralsegmente S1 bis S5, praekokzygeal, Beckenbodenetage und perineales Weichgewebe) und die Infiltration von Beckenorganen und Muskelgruppen

  8. Two patients with rare mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas of the rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül-Klein, Safak; Sinn, Marianne; Jurmeister, Philipp Sebastian; Biebl, Matthias; Weiß, Sascha; Rau, Beate; Bläker, Hendrik; Pratschke, Johann; Aigner, Felix

    2018-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract are until today poorly understood and thus very challenging for interdisciplinary therapy. We herewith report the first case series of patients with a primary mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma of the rectum. Both cases were initially diagnosed as adenocarcinoma and only secondarily with mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma and had a poor outcome due to a rapid tumor progression and resistance to chemotherapy. A 65-year-old female presented with local tumor recurrence and hepatopulmonary metastasis 1 year after primary surgery for adenocarcinoma of the rectum and consecutive radiochemotherapy regimen. Fluorouracil (5-FU) was followed by bevacizumab- and capecitabine-based chemotherapy but had to be discontinued due to side effects and progressive disease. Progressive local pain syndrome accompanied by recurrent bleeding episodes led to a local tumor-debulking operation. Afterward, mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma as the underlying diagnosis in the final histopathological examination was detected. The patient died 3 months after the operation in the context of a fulminant tumor progress. A 63-year-old male patient underwent neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and laparoscopic rectum resection. After 5 months, postoperative oxaliplatin/capecitabine-based adjuvant chemotherapy was switched to carboplatin/etopsid due to a progressive polyneuropathy and biopsy-proven pulmonary metastasis. The patient then had to be switched to local radiation of cerebral metastases and Topotecan due to cerebral bleeding episodes but died 18 months after the initial diagnosis. In conclusion of our case series, mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas of the rectum should be considered as a rare but aggressive tumor entity. An early and detailed histopathological diagnosis is required in order to establish an individual interdisciplinary treatment concept.

  9. Colorectal carcinomas with microsatellite instability display a different pattern of target gene mutations according to large bowel site of origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, Manuela; Fragoso, Maria; Santos, Lúcio; Henrique, Rui; Lopes, Paula; Lopes, Carlos; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Teixeira, Manuel R; Ahlquist, Terje; Danielsen, Stine A; Lind, Guro E; Veiga, Isabel; Pinto, Carla; Costa, Vera; Afonso, Luís; Sousa, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Only a few studies have addressed the molecular pathways specifically involved in carcinogenesis of the distal colon and rectum. We aimed to identify potential differences among genetic alterations in distal colon and rectal carcinomas as compared to cancers arising elsewhere in the large bowel. Constitutional and tumor DNA from a test series of 37 patients with rectal and 25 patients with sigmoid carcinomas, previously analyzed for microsatellite instability (MSI), was studied for BAX, IGF2R, TGFBR2, MSH3, and MSH6 microsatellite sequence alterations, BRAF and KRAS mutations, and MLH1 promoter methylation. The findings were then compared with those of an independent validation series consisting of 36 MSI-H carcinomas with origin from each of the large bowel regions. Immunohistochemical and germline mutation analyses of the mismatch repair system were performed when appropriate. In the test series, IGFR2 and BAX mutations were present in one and two out of the six distal MSI-H carcinomas, respectively, and no mutations were detected in TGFBR2, MSH3, and MSH6. We confirmed these findings in the validation series, with TGFBR2 and MSH3 microsatellite mutations occurring less frequently in MSI-H rectal and sigmoid carcinomas than in MSI-H colon carcinomas elsewhere (P = 0.00005 and P = 0.0000005, respectively, when considering all MSI-carcinomas of both series). No MLH1 promoter methylation was observed in the MSI-H rectal and sigmoid carcinomas of both series, as compared to 53% found in MSI-H carcinomas from other locations (P = 0.004). KRAS and BRAF mutational frequencies were 19% and 43% in proximal carcinomas and 25% and 17% in rectal/sigmoid carcinomas, respectively. The mechanism and the pattern of genetic changes driving MSI-H carcinogenesis in distal colon and rectum appears to differ from that occurring elsewhere in the colon and further investigation is warranted both in patients with sporadic or hereditary disease

  10. The response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil in locally advanced rectal cancer patients: a predictive proteomic signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Anaïs; Wang, Chang-Shu; Geha, Sameh; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Mathieu, Alex-Ane; Lacasse, Vincent; Boisvert, François-Michel

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common and the fourth most lethal cancer in the world. In the majority of cases, patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage or even metastatic, thus explaining the high mortality. The standard treatment for patients with locally advanced non-metastatic rectal cancer is neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy (NRCT) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) followed by surgery, but the resistance rate to this treatment remains high with approximately 30% of non-responders. The lack of evidence available in clinical practice to predict NRCT resistance to 5-FU and to guide clinical practice therefore encourages the search for biomarkers of this resistance. From twenty-three formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies performed before NRCT with 5-FU of locally advanced non-metastatic rectal cancer patients, we extracted and analysed the tumor proteome of these patients. From clinical data, we were able to classify the twenty-three patients in our cohort into three treatment response groups: non-responders (NR), partial responders (PR) and total responders (TR), and to compare the proteomes of these different groups. We have highlighted 384 differentially abundant proteins between NR and PR, 248 between NR and TR and 417 between PR and TR. Among these proteins, we have identified many differentially abundant proteins identified as having a role in cancer (IFIT1, FASTKD2, PIP4K2B, ARID1B, SLC25A33: overexpressed in TR; CALD1, CPA3, B3GALT5, CD177, RIPK1: overexpressed in NR). We have also identified that DPYD, the main degradation enzyme of 5-FU, was overexpressed in NR, as well as several ribosomal and mitochondrial proteins also overexpressed in NR. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD008440. From these retrospective study, we implemented a protein extraction protocol from FFPE biopsy to highlight protein differences between different response groups to RCTN with 5-FU in patients with locally advanced non-metastatic rectal cancer

  11. Recurrence pattern of rectal cancer after surgical treatment. Analysis of 122 patients in a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Sevá-Pereira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Survival in rectal cancer has been related mainly to clinical and pathological staging. Recurrence is by far the most challenging issue when surgical treatment of rectal cancer is concerned. This study aims to establish a recurrence pattern for rectal adenocarcinoma submitted to surgical treatment between March 2003 and July 2016. After exclusion criteria were applied, one hundred twenty two patients were analyzed. Global recurrence was found in 22% of them, while 13.1% have had local recurrence. Disease-free survival was 23.9 months, in average, and medium follow-up was 34.13 months, varying from 6 to 115 months. Recurrence, in literature, is usually between 3 and 35% in 5 years, and shows a 5-years survival rate of only 5%. Around 50% of cases, recurrence is local, confined to pelvis. This data followed literature in most aspects evaluated, although finding a high rate of local recurrence remains a challenge in the seek for better surgical outcomes. Resumo: A sobrevida de pacientes com câncer retal tem sido relacionada, sobretudo, aos estadiamentos clínico e patológico. De longe a recorrência é o problema mais desafiador, no que concerne ao tratamento cirúrgico do câncer retal. Esse estudo pretende estabelecer um padrão de recorrência para pacientes com adenocarcinoma retal submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico entre março de 2003 e julho de 2016. Após a aplicação dos critérios de exclusão, foram analisados 122 pacientes. Recorrência global foi constatada em 22% dos pacientes, enquanto que 13,1% tiveram recorrência localizada. A média para sobrevida livre de doença foi de 23,9 meses, e o acompanhamento médio foi de 34,13 meses, com variação entre 6-115 meses. Na literatura, em geral a recorrência se situa entre 3-35% após 5 anos, com um percentual de sobrevida após 5 anos de apenas 5%. Em cerca de 50% dos casos a recorrência é localizada, ficando confinada à pelve. Os presentes dados acompanharam os achados da

  12. Impact of a rectal and bladder preparation protocol on prostate cancer outcome in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggio, A.; Bresciani, S.; Di Dia, A.; Miranti, A.; Poli, M.; Stasi, M. [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Medical Physic Department, Candiolo (Italy); Gabriele, D. [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Radiotherapy Department, Candiolo (Italy); University of Sassari, Division of Radiation Oncology, Sassari (Italy); Garibaldi, E.; Delmastro, E.; Gabriele, P. [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Radiotherapy Department, Candiolo (Italy); Varetto, T. [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine Department, Candiolo (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    To test the hypothesis that a rectal and bladder preparation protocol is associated with an increase in prostate cancer specific survival (PCSS), clinical disease free survival (CDFS) and biochemical disease free survival (BDFS). From 1999 to 2012, 1080 prostate cancer (PCa) patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Of these patients, 761 were treated with an empty rectum and comfortably full bladder (RBP) preparation protocol, while for 319 patients no rectal/bladder preparation (NRBP) protocol was adopted. Compared with NRBP patients, patients with RBP had significantly higher BDFS (64% vs 48% at 10 years, respectively), CDFS (81% vs 70.5% at 10 years, respectively) and PCSS (95% vs 88% at 10 years, respectively) (log-rank test p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis (MVA) indicated for all treated patients and intermediate high-risk patients that the Gleason score (GS) and the rectal and bladder preparation were the most important prognostic factors for PCSS, CDFS and BDFS. With regard to high- and very high-risk patients, GS, RBP, prostate cancer staging and RT dose were predictors of PCSS, CDFS and BDFS in univariate analysis (UVA). We found strong evidence that rectal and bladder preparation significantly decreases biochemical and clinical failures and the probability of death from PCa in patients treated without daily image-guided prostate localization, presumably since patients with RBP are able to maintain a reproducibly empty rectum and comfortably full bladder across the whole treatment compared with NRPB patients. (orig.) [German] Pruefung der Hypothese, dass ein Rektum-Blasen-Vorbereitungsprotokoll mit einer Zunahme des prostatakarzinomspezifischen Ueberlebens (PCSS), des klinisch krankheitsfreien Ueberlebens (CDFS) und des biochemisch krankheitsfreien Ueberlebens (BDFS) verbunden ist. Von 1999 bis 2012 erhielten 1080 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom eine 3-dimensional geplante Strahlentherapie. Bei 761 Patienten wurde ein

  13. Comparison of non-Gaussian and Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion weighted imaging of rectal cancer at 3.0 T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangwen; Wang, Shuangshuang; Wen, Didi; Zhang, Jing; Wei, Xiaocheng; Ma, Wanling; Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Mian; Wu, Guosheng; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-12-09

    Water molecular diffusion in vivo tissue is much more complicated. We aimed to compare non-Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) including intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM), stretched-exponential model (SEM) and Gaussian diffusion model at 3.0 T MRI in patients with rectal cancer, and to determine the optimal model for investigating the water diffusion properties and characterization of rectal carcinoma. Fifty-nine consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma underwent DWI with 16 b-values at a 3.0 T MRI system. DWI signals were fitted to the mono-exponential and non-Gaussian diffusion models (IVIM-mono, IVIM-bi and SEM) on primary tumor and adjacent normal rectal tissue. Parameters of standard apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), slow- and fast-ADC, fraction of fast ADC (f), α value and distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC) were generated and compared between the tumor and normal tissues. The SEM exhibited the best fitting results of actual DWI signal in rectal cancer and the normal rectal wall (R 2  = 0.998, 0.999 respectively). The DDC achieved relatively high area under the curve (AUC = 0.980) in differentiating tumor from normal rectal wall. Non-Gaussian diffusion models could assess tissue properties more accurately than the ADC derived Gaussian diffusion model. SEM may be used as a potential optimal model for characterization of rectal cancer.

  14. Continuous Effect of Radial Resection Margin on Recurrence and Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients Who Receive Preoperative Chemoradiation and Curative Surgery: A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, SooYoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Joo Hwan; Nam, Taek Keun; Jeong, Songmi; Jang, Hong Seok; Song, Jin Ho; Lee, Jeong Won; Bae, Jung Min; Lee, Jong Hoon

    2017-07-01

    To elucidate the proper length and prognostic value of resection margins in rectal cancer patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by curative total mesorectal excision (TME). A total of 1476 rectal cancer patients staging cT3-4N0-2M0 were analyzed. All patients received radiation dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. Total mesorectal excision was performed 4 to 8 weeks after radiation therapy. The recurrence-free survival (RFS) at 5 years showed a significant difference between 3 groups: patients with circumferential resection margin (CRM) ≤1 mm, CRM 1.1 to 5 mm, and CRM >5 mm (46.2% vs 68.6% vs 77.5%, P5 mm. Distal resection margin (≤5 vs >5 mm) did not show any significant difference in cumulative incidence of locoregional recurrence (P=.310) and distant metastasis (P=.926). Rectal cancer patients with CRM ≤1 mm are a high-risk group, with the lowest RFS. Patients with CRM 1.1 to 5 mm may be at intermediate risk, with moderately increased distant recurrence. Distal resection margin was not significantly associated with RFS in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant CRT and total mesorectal excision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Type D personality is associated with delaying patients to medical assessment and poor quality of life among rectal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-kui; Fang, Li-li; Zhang, De-wei; Jin, Qiu; Wu, Xiao-mei; Liu, Ji-chao; Zhang, Chun-dong; Dai, Dong-qiu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore quality of life (QoL), mental health status, type D personality, symptom duration, and emergency admissions of Chinese rectal cancer patients as well as the relationship between these factors. Type D personality was measured with the 14-item Type D Personality Scale (DS14). Mental health status was measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The QoL outcomes were assessed longitudinally using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38 questionnaires at the baseline and 6 months after diagnosis. Of the 852 survivors who responded (94 %), 187 (22 %) had a type D personality. The proportion of patients with duration of symptoms >1 month and being diagnosed after emergency admissions in type D group is significantly higher than that in non-type D group. At both of the time points, type D patients reported statistically significant lower scores on most of the functional scales, global health status/QoL scales, and worse symptom scores compared to patients without a type D personality. At the 6-month time point, a higher percentage of patients in the type D group demonstrated QoL deterioration. Clinically elevated levels of anxiety and depression were more prevalent in type D than in non-type D survivors. Type D personality was associated with poor QoL and mental health status among survivors of rectal cancer, even after adjustment for confounding background variables. Type D personality might be a general vulnerability factor to screen for subgroups at risk for longer symptom duration and emergency admissions in clinical practice.

  16. Whole-body MR imaging versus sequential multimodal diagnostic algorithm for staging patients with rectal cancer. Cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppertz, A.; Charite Universitaetsklinikum Berlin; Schmidt, M.; Schoeffski, O.; Wagner, M.; Asbach, P.; Maurer, M.H.; Puettcher, O.; Strassburg, J.; Stoeckmann, F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the direct costs of two diagnostic algorithms for pretherapeutic TNM staging of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: In a study including 33 patients (mean age: 62.5 years), the direct fixed and variable costs of a sequential multimodal algorithm (rectoscopy, endoscopic and abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray, thoracic/abdominal CT in the case of positive findings in abdominal ultrasound or chest X-ray) were compared to those of a novel algorithm of rectoscopy followed by MRI using a whole-body scanner. MRI included T 2w sequences of the rectum, 3D T 1w sequences of the liver and chest after bolus injection of gadoxetic acid, and delayed phases of the liver. The personnel work times, material items, and work processes were tracked to the nearest minute by interviewing those responsible for the process (surgeon, gastroenterologist, two radiologists). The costs of labor and materials were determined from personnel reimbursement data and hospital accounting records. Fixed costs were determined from vendor pricing. Results: The mean MRI time was 55 min. CT was performed in 19 / 33 patients (57 %) causing an additional day of hospitalization (costs 374 Euro). The costs for equipment and material were higher for MRI compared to sequential algorithm (equipment 116 vs. 30 Euro; material 159 vs. 60 Euro per patient). The personnel costs were markedly lower for MRI (436 vs. 732 Euro per patient). Altogether, the absolute cost advantage of MRI was 31.3 % (711 vs. 1035 Euro for sequential algorithm). Conclusion: Substantial savings are achievable with the use of whole-body MRI for the preoperative TNM staging of patients with rectal cancer. (orig.)

  17. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m 2 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m 2 /week, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 /week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m 2 /day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  18. Limitations of combined flexible sigmoidoscopy and double contrast barium enema in patients with rectal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hixson, L.J.; Sampliner, R.E.; Chernin, M.; Amberg, J.; Kogan, F.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, Tucson, AZ

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-seven outpatients with non-massive rectal bleeding or asymptomatic positive fecal occult blood were evaluated with 35 cm flexible sigmoidoscopy, double contrast barium enema (DBCE) and colonoscopy. 82% had hemorrhoids and 35% harbored colorectal neoplasia. The combination of flexible sigmoidoscopy and DCBE missed none of 7 malignant lesions. However, 35% of benign polyps ≥ 1 cm and 60.5% of those < 1 cm were not detected by this combination. The presence of hemorrhoids should not prevent a search for colon neoplasia and colonoscopy is the preferred method. (orig.)

  19. Aneuploidy-Dependent Massive Deregulation of the Cellular Transcriptome and Apparent Divergence of the Wnt/β-catenin Signaling Pathway in Human Rectal Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grade, Marian; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Varma, Sudhir; Simon, Richard; Wangsa, Danny; Barenboim-Stapleton, Linda; Liersch, Torsten; Becker, Heinz; Ried, Thomas; Difilippantonio, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    To identify genetic alterations underlying rectal carcinogenesis, we used global gene expression profiling of a series of 17 locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas and 20 normal rectal mucosa biopsies on oligonucleotide arrays. A total of 351 genes were differentially expressed (P 5-fold difference, and 85 genes always had at least a 2-fold change in all of the matched samples. Twelve genes satisfied all three of these criteria. Altered expression of genes such as PTGS2 (COX-2), WNT1, TGFB1, VEGF, and MYC was confirmed, whereas our data for other genes, like PPARD and LEF1, were inconsistent with previous reports. In addition, we found deregulated expression of many genes whose involvement in rectal carcinogenesis has not been reported. By mapping the genomic imbalances in the tumors using comparative genomic hybridization, we could show that DNA copy number gains of recurrently aneuploid chromosome arms 7p, 8q, 13q, 18q, 20p, and 20q correlated significantly with their average chromosome arm expression profile. Taken together, our results show that both the high-level, significant transcriptional deregulation of specific genes and general modification of the average transcriptional activity of genes residing on aneuploid chromosomes coexist in rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:16397240

  20. Burden, quality of life and distress of the main caregiver in head and neck, cervix and rectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel I

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Based on Portuguese experience, current practice does not focus sufficiently on the caregiver needs through caring of the cancer patient. Understanding the impact of different tumor types on caregiver burden, quality of life, and distress may help with organizing resources more efficiently to provide enhanced support for patients and caregivers. Methods: Ninety main caregivers of patients with cervix, rectal and head and neck cancer were interviewed at Instituto Português de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil. The Portuguese versions of Zarit Burden Interview, Caregiver Quality of Life Index - Cancer (CQOLC Scale and the distress thermometer were used. Results: The majority of caregivers were female (76.7%, median age was 45.5years (20-79, 40% were spouses and 38.7% sons/daughters. Zarit Burden Interview average score was 25.2 ± 11.6, higher on head and neck cancer group. 59.5% of caregivers had moderate burden and no cases of severe burden. Mean quality of life score was 64.8 ± 15.8 which was lower in the head and neck group. Average distress score across the three groups was seven and rectal group presented a lower score than the other two groups. A subgroup analysis (gender, kinship relation, employment status and cohabitation before starting care of caregivers characteristics showed no statistical differences. Conclusion: There were little differences in the experience of caring within caregivers based on the three different cancer groups, although caregivers of patients with head and neck cancer scored consistently worse in the three scales studied. More efforts should be taken to optimize coping strategies for these caregivers, as well as non-cohabitant and active caregivers, who had a worse caring experience.

  1. Transcatheter arterial embolization with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere®) leads to life-threatening tumor lysis syndrome in a rectal carcinoid patient with hepatic metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Yuan-Hao; Tsai, Ming-Tsun; Kuo, Chen-Yu; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Li, Chung-Pin; Chen, Jinn-Yang; Chao, Yee

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal carcinoids appears to be increasing, and the rectum is the third most common location. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere ® ) has been reported as an effective method for hepatic metastases of rectal carcinoids. Complications are uncommon and usually of minor consequence. We report an unusual case of a 34-year-old man with tumor lysis syndrome following TAE with Embosphere ® in a patient with multiple hepatic metastases of a rectal carcinoid. Early detection and effective treatment are essential for this rare but potentially catastrophic complication

  2. Early rectal stenosis following stapled rectal mucosectomy for hemorrhoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuster Anja

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the last years, stapled rectal mucosectomy (SRM has become a widely accepted procedure for second and third degree hemorrhoids. One of the delayed complications is a stenosis of the lower rectum. In order to evaluate the specific problem of rectal stenosis following SRM we reviewed our data with special respect to potential predictive factors or stenotic events. Methods A retrospective analysis of 419 consecutive patients, which underwent SRM from December 1998 to August 2003 was performed. Only patients with at least one follow-up check were evaluated, thus the analysis includes 289 patients with a mean follow-up of 281 days (±18 days. For statistic analysis the groups with and without stenosis were evaluated using the Chi-Square Test, using the Kaplan-Meier statistic the actuarial incidence for rectal stenosis was plotted. Results Rectal stenosis was observed in 9 patients (3.1%, eight of these stenoses were detected within the first 100 days after surgery; the median time to stenosis was 95 days. Only one patient had a rectal stenosis after more than one year. 8 of the 9 patients had no obstructive symptoms, however the remaining patients complained of obstructive defecation and underwent surgery for transanal strictureplasty with electrocautery. A statistical analysis revealed that patients with stenosis had significantly more often prior treatment for hemorrhoids (p Conclusion Rectal stenosis is an uncommon event after SRM. Early stenosis will occur within the first three months after surgery. The majority of the stenoses are without clinical relevance. Only one of nine patients had to undergo surgery for a relevant stenosis. The predictive factor for stenosis in the patient-characteristics is previous interventions for hemorrhoids, severe postoperative pain might also predict rectal stenosis.

  3. The colostomy impact score: development and validation of a patient reported outcome measure for rectal cancer patients with a permanent colostomy. A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyø, A; Emmertsen, K J; Pinkney, T D; Christensen, P; Laurberg, S

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to develop and validate a simple scoring system evaluating the impact of colostomy dysfunction on quality of life (QOL) in patients with a permanent stoma after rectal cancer treatment. In this population-based study, 610 patients with a permanent colostomy after previous rectal cancer treatment during the period 2001-2007 completed two questionnaires: (i) the basic stoma questionnaire consisting of 22 items about stoma function with one anchor question addressing the overall stoma impact on QOL and (ii) the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ) C30. Answers from half of the cohort were used to develop the score and subsequently validated on the remaining half. Logistic regression analyses identified and selected items for the score and multivariate analysis established the score value allocated to each item. The colostomy impact score includes seven items with a total range from 0 to 38 points. A score of ≥ 10 indicates major colostomy impact (Major CI). The score has a sensitivity of 85.7% for detecting patients with significant stoma impact on QOL. Using the EORTC QLQ scales, patients with Major CI experienced significant impairment in their QOL compared to the Minor CI group. This new scoring system appears valid for the assessment of the impact on QOL from having a permanent colostomy in a Danish rectal cancer population. It requires validation in non-Danish populations prior to its acceptance as a valuable patient-reported outcome measure for patients internationally. Colorectal Disease © 2016 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Validation of the 12-gene colon cancer recurrence score as a predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Marlies S; Kuppen, Peter J K; Lee, Mark; Lopatin, Margarita; Tezcan, Haluk; Putter, Hein; Clark-Langone, Kim; Liefers, Gerrit Jan; Shak, Steve; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2014-11-01

    The 12-gene Recurrence Score assay is a validated predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III colon cancer patients. We conducted a prospectively designed study to validate this assay for prediction of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients from the Dutch Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) trial. RNA was extracted from fixed paraffin-embedded primary rectal tumor tissue from stage II and III patients randomized to TME surgery alone, without (neo)adjuvant treatment. Recurrence Score was assessed by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction using previously validated colon cancer genes and algorithm. Data were analysed by Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for stage and resection margin status. All statistical tests were two-sided. Recurrence Score predicted risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11 to 2.21, P = .01), risk of distant recurrence (HR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.17, P = .03), and rectal cancer-specific survival (HR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.15 to 2.34, P = .007). The effect of Recurrence Score was most prominent in stage II patients and attenuated with more advanced stage (P(interaction) ≤ .007 for each endpoint). In stage II, five-year cumulative incidence of recurrence ranged from 11.1% in the predefined low Recurrence Score group (48.5% of patients) to 43.3% in the high Recurrence Score group (23.1% of patients). The 12-gene Recurrence Score is a predictor of recurrence risk and cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer patients treated with surgery alone, suggesting a similar underlying biology in colon and rectal cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Evaluating the effect of rectal distension and rectal movement on prostate gland position using cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhani, Anwar R.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Suckling, John; Husband, Janet E.; Leach, Martin O.; Dearnaley, David P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dynamic interrelationship between rectal distension and rectal movements, and to determine the effect of rectal movement on the position of the prostatic gland using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with biopsy-proven or suspected prostate cancer were examined in the axial plane using repeated spoiled gradient-echo sequences every 10 seconds for 7 minutes. Twenty-four patients received bowel relaxants before imaging. Images were analyzed for the degree of rectal distension, for the incidence, magnitude, and number of rectal and prostate movements. Results: Rectal movements were seen in 28 (51%) patients overall, in 10 (42%) of those receiving bowel relaxants and in 18 (58%) not receiving bowel relaxants. The incidence of rectal movements correlated with the degree of rectal distension (p = 0.0005), but the magnitude of rectal movements did not correlate with the degree of rectal distension. Eighty-six rectal movements resulting in 33 anterior-posterior (AP) prostate movements were seen. The magnitude of rectal movements correlated well with degree of prostate movements (p < 0.001). Prostate movements in the AP direction were seen in 16 (29%) patients, and in 9 (16%) patients the movement was greater than 5 mm. The median prostate AP displacement was anterior by 4.2 (-5 to +14 mm). Conclusions: Cine MRI is able to demonstrate near real time rectal and associated prostate movements. Rectal movements are related to rectal distension and result in significant displacements of the prostate gland over a time period similar to that used for daily fractionated radiotherapy treatments. Delivery of radiotherapy needs to take into account these organ movements

  6. Infective complications in patients after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy and the role of ciprofloxacin resistant Escherichia coli colonization in rectal flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamarat, Mustafa Bilal; Tarhan, Fatih; Horuz, Rahim; Öcal, Gülfem Akengin; Demirkol, Mehmet Kutlu; Kafkaslı, Alper; Yazıcı, Özgür

    2017-06-01

    In the present study, we aimed to invastigate the ciprofloxacin resistance in rectal flora of the patients undergoing prostate biopsy in our department. Additionally, the possible effects of the presence of ciprofloxacin resistant bacteria in faecal flora on the risk of infective complications after the procedure as well as the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on such infectious complications have been evaluated. A total of 142 patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy were included into the study program. Rectal swab samples were taken from all patients prior to biopsy. The presence of complications have been evaluated after a week following the biopsy procedure. Patients with fever were also evaluated. The possible correlation between the presence of ciprofloxacin-resistant bacteria in faecal flora and the risk of urinary tract infection development and the other complications were evaluated. E. coli bacteria were present in all cultures of rectal swab samples obtained from 142 patients prior to prostate biopsy. Of all these patients, while ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli (CR E. coli ) grew in 76 (53.5%) patients; ciprofloxacin susceptible E. coli (CS E. coli ) was obtained in 66 (46.5%) patients. In 16 patients (11.3%), infectious complications were observed. While the infective complications were present in the 14.5% of patients with CR E. coli ; they were present in the 7.6% of patients with CS E. coli (p=0.295). High fever was observed in nine patients (6.3%). Of these nine patients, although six had CR E. coli growth as detected during culture sensitivity tests; three had CS E. coli growth in their rectal swab culture tests. Sepsis was observed in three (2.1%) of these patients with high fever. Ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli grew in all of the rectal swab cultures obtained from these patients with sepsis. In the light of our findings we may say that, it will be appropriate to reconsider the ciprofloxacin prophylaxis and prefer to use

  7. A multivariate analysis of limiting factors for stoma reversal in patients with rectal cancer entered into the total mesorectal excision (TME) trial : a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dulk, Marcel; Smit, Marije; Peeters, Koen C. M. J.; Kranenbarg, Elma Meershoek-Klein; Rutten, Harm J. T.; Wiggers, Theo; Putter, Hein; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    Background In many patients with rectal cancer, defunctioning stomas are created to limit the consequences of anastomotic leakage. Although intended to be temporary, a substantial proportion of these stomas might never be reversed for various reasons. We aimed to describe stoma policy by use of data

  8. Cell-mediated immunity in patients with carcinoma under immunotheraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    'In vivo' and 'in vitro' cellular immunity is evaluated in 32 patients with carcinoma under immunotheraphy with subcutaneous or endovenous glucan, transfer factor and levamisole. The immunotheraphy is done relatively by intradermal tests with common antigens, by sensitization with dinitrochlorinebenzene and lymphocytes culture from whole blood. The levels of blood serum of human T lymphotocyte soluble receptor for sheep erythrocytes are detected. (M.A.C.) [pt

  9. Systemic Chemotherapy as Salvage Treatment for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Who Fail to Respond to Standard Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Francesco; Brown, Gina; Cunningham, David; Rao, Sheela; Tekkis, Paris; Tait, Diana; Morano, Federica; Baratelli, Chiara; Kalaitzaki, Eleftheria; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Watkins, David; Starling, Naureen; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Chau, Ian

    2017-06-01

    The potential of chemotherapy as salvage treatment after failure of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) has never been explored. We conducted a single-center, retrospective analysis to address this question. Patients with newly diagnosed LARC who were inoperable or candidates for extensive (i.e., beyond total mesorectal excision [TME]) surgery after long-course chemoradiotherapy and who received salvage chemotherapy were included. The primary objective was to estimate the proportion of patients who became suitable for TME after chemotherapy. Forty-five patients were eligible (39 candidates for extensive surgery and 6 unresectable). Previous radiotherapy was given concurrently with chemotherapy in 43 cases (median dose: 54.0 Gy). Oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-based salvage chemotherapy was administered in 40 (88.9%) and 5 (11.1%) cases, respectively. Eight patients (17.8%) became suitable for TME after chemotherapy, 10 (22.2%) ultimately underwent TME with clear margins, and 2 (4.4%) were managed with a watch and wait approach. Additionally, 13 patients had extensive surgery with curative intent. Three-year progression-free survival and 5-year overall survival in the entire population were 30.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15.0-46.0) and 44.0% (95% CI: 26.0-61.0), respectively. For the curatively resected and "watch and wait" patients, these figures were 52.0% (95% CI: 27.0-73.0) and 67.0% (95% CI: 40.0-84.0), respectively. Systemic chemotherapy may be an effective salvage strategy for LARC patients who fail to respond to chemoradiotherapy and are inoperable or candidates for beyond TME surgery. According to our study, one out of five patients may become resectable or be spared from an extensive surgery after systemic chemotherapy. High-quality evidence to inform the optimal management of rectal cancer patients who are inoperable or candidates for beyond total mesorectal excision surgery following standard chemoradiotherapy is

  10. Target volume shape variation during irradiation of rectal cancer patients in supine position: Comparison with prone position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Jong, Rianne de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Vliet, Corine van; Marijnen, Corrie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the inter-fraction shape variation of the mesorectum for rectal cancer patients treated with 5 x 5 Gy in supine position and compare it to variation in prone position. Methods and materials: For 28 patients a planning CT (pCT) and five daily cone-beam-CT (CBCT) scans were acquired in supine position. The mesorectal part of the CTV (MesoRect) was delineated on all scans. The shape variation was quantified by the distance between the pCT- and the CBCT delineations and stored in surface maps after online setup correction. Data were analyzed for male and female patients separately and compared to prone data. Results: A large range of systematic, 1-8 mm (1SD), and random, 1-5 mm, shape variation was found, comparable to prone patients. Random-shape variation was comparable for male and female patients, while systematic variation was 3 mm larger for female patients. Conclusions: Shape variation of the MesoRect is substantial, heterogeneous and different between male and female patients. Differences between supine and prone orientation, however, are small. Clinical margins should be differentiated in position along the cranio-caudal axis, in anterior-posterior direction and for gender. Margins should also be increased, even when online setup correction is used. Due to the small margin differences between prone and supine treatments, the setup choice should be determined on dose to the organs at risk.

  11. Conservative management of anal and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, J.P.; Romestaing, P.; Montbarbon, X.

    1989-01-01

    The role of irradiation in the management of anal and rectal cancer has changed during the past ten years. In small epidermoid carcinomas of the anal canal (T1 T2) irradiation is in most departments considered the primary treatment, giving a 5-year survival rate of between 60 and 80% with good sphincter preservation. Even in larger tumors, irradiation can still offer some chance of cure without colostomy. Surgery remains the basic treatment of rectal cancer but irradiation is used in association with surgery in many cases. Radiotherapy is of value in the conservative management of cancer of the rectum in three situations: In small polypoid cancers contact X-ray therapy can give local control in about 90%. In cancers of the middle rectum, preoperative external irradiation may increase the chances of restorative surgery and reduce the risk of local relapse. In inoperable patients, external radiotherapy and/or intracavitary irradiation may cure some patients with infiltrating tumors (T2 T3) without colostomy. (orig.)

  12. Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Konstantinov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the clinical and epidemiological data in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC before they sought specialized medical care. The study included 92 patients with CHC. All patients were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 consisted of CHC patients with HCC (n=45, and Group 2 (n=47 consisted of CHC patients without HCC. With the development of HCC in CHC patients, clinical manifestations were absent only in 2.2% of patients. Determining factors in HCC development are male sex, mature age, the maintained HCV replication, moderate and severe fibrosis, disease duration of more than 10 years, and the lack of effect of antiviral treatment.

  13. Radiotherapy for carcinoma of the esophagus in aged patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, Satoshi; Imada, Hajime; Yamashita, Shigeru; Terashima, Hiromi; Nakata, Hajime; Itoh, Hideaki; Ohsato, Keiichi; Okamura, Takeshi

    1995-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-four patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with either irradiation alone or irradiation combined with surgery at the University of Occupational and Environmental Health Hospital between January 1980 and February 1992. The number of patients 75 years old and older was 25. In patients 74 years old and younger, the overall five-year survival rate by Kaplan-Meier method was 24.5%. The survival rate was best in the patients who were treated by a combination of irradiation and surgery. In patients 75 years old and older, the one-year survival rate was 59%, and the three-year rate was 20%. Aged patients had a tendency to be worse in performance status, and there was no correlation between treatment modality and survival time. We conclude that radiotherapy is useful for treating esophageal cancer in aged patients particularly when maintenance of the quality of life is considered. (author)

  14. Continuous intraoperative monitoring of pelvic autonomic nerves during TME to prevent urogenital and anorectal dysfunction in rectal cancer patients (NEUROS): a randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauff, D. W.; Kronfeld, K; Gorbulev, S; Wachtlin, D; Lang, H; Kneist, W

    2016-01-01

    Urinary, sexual and anorectal sequelae are frequent after rectal cancer surgery and were found to be related to intraoperative neurogenic impairment. Neuromonitoring methods have been developed to identify and preserve the complex pelvic autonomic nervous system in order to maintain patients’ quality of life. So far no randomized study has been published dealing with the role of neuromonitoring in rectal cancer surgery. NEUROS is a prospective two-arm randomized controlled multicenter clinical trial comparing the functional outcome in rectal cancer patients undergoing total mesorectal excision (TME) with and without pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring (pIONM). A total of 188 patients will be included. Primary endpoint is the urinary function measured by the International Prostate Symptom Score. Secondary endpoints consist of sexual, anorectal functional outcome and safety, especially oncologic safety and quality of TME. Sexual function is assessed in females with the Female Sexual Function Index and in males with the International Index of Erectile Function. For evaluation of anorectal function the Wexner-Vaizey score is used. Functional evaluation is scheduled before radiochemotherapy (if applicable), preoperatively (baseline), before hospital discharge, 3 and 6 months after stoma closure and 12 months after surgery. For assessment of safety adverse events, the rates of positive resection margins and quality of mesorectum are documented. This study will provide high quality evidence on the efficacy of pIONM aiming for improvement of functional outcome in rectal cancer patients undergoing TME. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01585727. Registration date is 04/25/2012

  15. Phase II study of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ) and concomitant boost radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Chang, George J.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Eng, Cathy; Brown, Thomas D.; Crane, Christopher H.; Feig, Barry W.; Morris, Jeffrey; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Lin, Edward H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ), an oral fluoropyrimidine, as a radiosensitizer in the neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: We conducted a phase II study of capecitabine (825 mg/m 2 orally, twice daily continuous) with radiotherapy (52.5 Gy/30 fractions to the primary tumor and perirectal nodes) in 54 patients with LARC (node-negative ≥T3 or any node-positive tumor) staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The primary endpoint was pathologic response rate; secondary endpoints included toxicity profiles and survival parameters. Results: Of the 54 patients (median age, 56.7 years; range, 21.3-78.7 years; male:female ratio, 1.7; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1: 100%), 51 patients (94%) had T3N0 or T3N1 disease by EUS. Surgery was not performed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients had metastatic disease, and the third patient refused after a complete clinical response. Of the 51 patients evaluable for pathologic response, 9 patients (18%) achieved complete response, and 12 patients (24%) had microscopic residual disease (<10% viable cells). In addition, 26 patients of all 54 patients (51%) achieved T-downstaging, and 15 patients of 29 patients (52%) achieved N-downstaging. Grade 3/4 toxicities were radiation dermatitis (9%) and diarrhea (2%). Sphincter preservation rate for tumor ≤5 cm from the anal verge was 67% (18/27). Conclusion: This regimen of radiotherapy plus capecitabine is well tolerated and is more convenient than protracted venous infusion of 5-FU. The pathologic response rate is comparable to our previous experience using protracted venous infusion 5-FU for LARC

  16. Studies on recurrence of colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masayuki; Nosaki, Tadaharu; Murai, Tomoya; Ooshita, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Suzuo

    1989-01-01

    Recurrence patterns of colorectal carcinoma were studied in 402 patients followed up for 5 years or more after surgery. Recurrence was observed in 23% for colon cancer and 38% for rectal canccer. The most frequent site of recurrence or relapse in cases of colon cancer was the liver, followed by multiple organs and a local region; and in the case of rectal cancer, it was multiple organs, followed by a local region, the liver, lung, and bone. The rate of recurrence or relapse tended to be higher in patients with lymph node metastases or more advanced clinical stage. Liver relapse was seen in 13% for colon cancer and 12% for rectal cancer, occurring within 48 months after surgery. Since CT can detect liver relapse within 24 months, abdominal CT and chest plain roentgenography should be performed in the first 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after surgery. (Namekawa, K)

  17. Docetaxel as neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Carlos T; Machiavelli, Mario R; Pérez, Juan E; Romero, Alberto O; Bologna, Fabrina; Vicente, Hernán; Lacava, Juan A; Ortiz, Eduardo H; Cubero, Alberto; Focaccia, Guillermo; Suttora, Guillermo; Scenna, Mirna; Boughen, José M; Leone, Bernardo A

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel as single-agent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locoregionally advanced cervical carcinoma. Between April 1998 and August 2000, 38 untreated patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IIB to IVA were entered onto this study. The median age was 44 years (range: 25-66 years). Stages: IIB 22 patients, IIIB 15 patients, and IVA 1 pt. Treatment consisted of docetaxel 100 mg/m2 IV infusion during 1 hour. Standard premedication with dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, and ranitidine was used. Cycles were repeated every 3 weeks for three courses, followed by radical surgery when it was judged appropriate, or definitive radiotherapy. Both staging and response assessment were performed by a multidisciplinary team. 106 cycles of therapy were administered; all patients were evaluable for TX, whereas 35 were evaluable for response (3 patients refused further treatment after the first cycle of therapy). Complete response (CR): 1 patient (3%); partial response: 11 patients (31%), for an overall objective response rate of 34% (95% CI: 15-53%); no change (NC): 16 patients (46%); and progressive disease: 7 patients (20%). Six patients (17%) underwent surgery and a pathologic CR was confirmed in 1 of them. The median time to treatment failure and the median survival have not been reached yet. The limiting toxicity was leukopenia in 25 patients (69%) (G1-G2: 14 patients, G3: 10 patients, and G4: 1 patient). Neutropenia: 28 patients (78%) (G1-G2: 10 patients, G3: 8 and G4: 10). Myalgias: 17 patients (47%) (G1-G2: 15 patients and G3: 2 patients). Emesis: 21 patients (55%) (G1-G2: 19 patients and G3: 2 patients). Alopecia G3: 13 patients (36%); rash cutaneous 26 patients (68%) (G1-G2: 22 patients and G3: 4 patients). There were no hypersensitivity reactions or fluid-retention syndrome. The received dose intensity was 91% of that projected. Docetaxel is an active drug against advanced

  18. Impact of 18F-FDG-PET/CT on staging and irradiation of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paskeviciute, Brigita; Boelling, Tobias; Brinkmann, Markus; Rudykina, Ganna; Ernst, Iris; Willich, Normann; Koenemann, Stefan; Stegger, Lars; Schober, Otmar; Weckesser, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the impact of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on planning of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients. From January 2003 to December 2007, a total of 36 patients with LARC underwent a retroprospective PET/CT study for radiotherapy-planning purposes. Gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were defined in a retrospective analysis by a blinded reader. The hypothetical boost volume was defined primarily on CT alone, and afterwards on the fused PET/CT dataset. The CT- and PET/CT-based GTVs were quantitatively compared and percentage of overlap (OV%) was calculated and analyzed. The impact of PET/CT on radiation treatment planning and overall patient management was evaluated. PET/CT-GTVs were smaller than CT-GTVs (p < 0.05). PET/CT imaging resulted in a change of overall management for three patients (8 %). In 16 of 35 patients (46 %), PET/CT resulted in a need for modification of the usual target volumes (CT-PTV) because of detection of a geographic miss. FDG-PET/CT had significant impact on radiotherapy planning and overall treatment of patients with LARC. (orig.)

  19. Organ Preservation in Rectal Adenocarcinoma: a phase II randomized controlled trial evaluating 3-year disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation plus induction or consolidation chemotherapy, and total mesorectal excision or nonoperative management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J. Joshua; Chow, Oliver S.; Gollub, Marc J.; Nash, Garrett M.; Temple, Larissa K.; Weiser, Martin R.; Guillem, José G.; Paty, Philip B.; Avila, Karin; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with non-metastatic, locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) includes pre-operative chemoradiation, total mesorectal excision (TME) and post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy. This trimodality treatment provides local tumor control in most patients; but almost one-third ultimately die from distant metastasis. Most survivors experience significant impairment in quality of life (QoL), due primarily to removal of the rectum. A current challenge lies in identifying patients who could safely undergo rectal preservation without sacrificing survival benefit and QoL. This multi-institutional, phase II study investigates the efficacy of total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) and selective non-operative management (NOM) in LARC. Patients with MRI-staged Stage II or III rectal cancer amenable to TME will be randomized to receive FOLFOX/CAPEOX: a) before induction neoadjuvant chemotherapy (INCT); or b) after consolidation neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CNCT), with 5-FU or capecitabine-based chemoradiation. Patients in both arms will be re-staged after completing all neoadjuvant therapy. Those with residual tumor at the primary site will undergo TME. Patients with clinical complete response (cCR) will receive non-operative management (NOM). NOM patients will be followed every 3 months for 2 years, and every 6 months thereafter. TME patients will be followed according to NCCN guidelines. All will be followed for at least 5 years from the date of surgery or—in patients treated with NOM—the last day of treatment. The studies published thus far on the safety of NOM in LARC have compared survival between select groups of patients with a cCR after NOM, to patients with a pathologic complete response (pCR) after TME. The current study compares 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) in an entire population of patients with LARC, including those with cCR and those with pCR. We will compare the two arms of the study with respect to organ preservation at 3 years, treatment

  20. Organ Preservation in Rectal Adenocarcinoma: a phase II randomized controlled trial evaluating 3-year disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation plus induction or consolidation chemotherapy, and total mesorectal excision or nonoperative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J Joshua; Chow, Oliver S; Gollub, Marc J; Nash, Garrett M; Temple, Larissa K; Weiser, Martin R; Guillem, José G; Paty, Philip B; Avila, Karin; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-10-23

    Treatment of patients with non-metastatic, locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) includes pre-operative chemoradiation, total mesorectal excision (TME) and post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy. This trimodality treatment provides local tumor control in most patients; but almost one-third ultimately die from distant metastasis. Most survivors experience significant impairment in quality of life (QoL), due primarily to removal of the rectum. A current challenge lies in identifying patients who could safely undergo rectal preservation without sacrificing survival benefit and QoL. This multi-institutional, phase II study investigates the efficacy of total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) and selective non-operative management (NOM) in LARC. Patients with MRI-staged Stage II or III rectal cancer amenable to TME will be randomized to receive FOLFOX/CAPEOX: a) before induction neoadjuvant chemotherapy (INCT); or b) after consolidation neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CNCT), with 5-FU or capecitabine-based chemoradiation. Patients in both arms will be re-staged after completing all neoadjuvant therapy. Those with residual tumor at the primary site will undergo TME. Patients with clinical complete response (cCR) will receive non-operative management (NOM). NOM patients will be followed every 3 months for 2 years, and every 6 months thereafter. TME patients will be followed according to NCCN guidelines. All will be followed for at least 5 years from the date of surgery or--in patients treated with NOM--the last day of treatment. The studies published thus far on the safety of NOM in LARC have compared survival between select groups of patients with a cCR after NOM, to patients with a pathologic complete response (pCR) after TME. The current study compares 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) in an entire population of patients with LARC, including those with cCR and those with pCR. We will compare the two arms of the study with respect to organ preservation at 3 years, treatment compliance

  1. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: 91 patients treated by surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junor, E.J.; Paul, J.; Reed, N.S.

    1992-01-01

    Ninety-one patients with histologically proven anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid were referred to the Beatson Oncology Centre between 1961 and 1986. The female:male ratio was 2.4:1 and the median age at presentation was 70 (range 38-92) years. All patients had a thyroid mass at presentation and the most common symptoms were dyspnoea, dyspnagia and dysphonia. Five patients had a total thyroidectomy and 28 partial thyroidectomy. Ninety five per cent of patients received external beam radiotherapy. Results show dyspnoea to be the only symptom strongly influencing survival. Total or partial thyroidectomy is associated with increased survival. This association is most marked for patients presenting without dyspnoea. Eighty per cent of patients responded to radiotherapy. (Author)

  2. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: 91 patients treated by surgery and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junor, E.J.; Paul, J.; Reed, N.S. (Beatson Oncology Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom))

    1992-04-01

    Ninety-one patients with histologically proven anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid were referred to the Beatson Oncology Centre between 1961 and 1986. The female:male ratio was 2.4:1 and the median age at presentation was 70 (range 38-92) years. All patients had a thyroid mass at presentation and the most common symptoms were dyspnoea, dyspnagia and dysphonia. Five patients had a total thyroidectomy and 28 partial thyroidectomy. Ninety five per cent of patients received external beam radiotherapy. Results show dyspnoea to be the only symptom strongly influencing survival. Total or partial thyroidectomy is associated with increased survival. This association is most marked for patients presenting without dyspnoea. Eighty per cent of patients responded to radiotherapy. (Author).

  3. Fluid hydration to prevent post-ERCP pancreatitis in average- to high-risk patients receiving prophylactic rectal NSAIDs (FLUYT trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Xavier J N M; da Costa, David W; Fockens, Paul; Mulder, Chris J J; Timmer, Robin; Kievit, Wietske; Zegers, Marieke; Bruno, Marco J; Besselink, Marc G H; Vleggaar, Frank P; van der Hulst, Rene W M; Poen, Alexander C; Heine, Gerbrand D N; Venneman, Niels G; Kolkman, Jeroen J; Baak, Lubbertus C; Römkens, Tessa E H; van Dijk, Sven M; Hallensleben, Nora D L; van de Vrie, Wim; Seerden, Tom C J; Tan, Adriaan C I T L; Voorburg, Annet M C J; Poley, Jan-Werner; Witteman, Ben J; Bhalla, Abha; Hadithi, Muhammed; Thijs, Willem J; Schwartz, Matthijs P; Vrolijk, Jan Maarten; Verdonk, Robert C; van Delft, Foke; Keulemans, Yolande; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, Joost P H; van Geenen, Erwin J M

    2018-04-02

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) is the most common complication of ERCP and may run a severe course. Evidence suggests that vigorous periprocedural hydration can prevent PEP, but studies to date have significant methodological drawbacks. Importantly, evidence for its added value in patients already receiving prophylactic rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is lacking and the cost-effectiveness of the approach has not been investigated. We hypothesize that combination therapy of rectal NSAIDs and periprocedural hydration would significantly lower the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis compared to rectal NSAIDs alone in moderate- to high-risk patients undergoing ERCP. The FLUYT trial is a multicenter, parallel group, open label, superiority randomized controlled trial. A total of 826 moderate- to high-risk patients undergoing ERCP that receive prophylactic rectal NSAIDs will be randomized to a control group (no fluids or normal saline with a maximum of 1.5 mL/kg/h and 3 L/24 h) or intervention group (lactated Ringer's solution with 20 mL/kg over 60 min at start of ERCP, followed by 3 mL/kg/h for 8 h thereafter). The primary endpoint is the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis. Secondary endpoints include PEP severity, hydration-related complications, and cost-effectiveness. The FLUYT trial design, including hydration schedule, fluid type, and sample size, maximize its power of identifying a potential difference in post-ERCP pancreatitis incidence in patients receiving prophylactic rectal NSAIDs. EudraCT: 2015-000829-37 . Registered on 18 February 2015. 13659155 . Registered on 18 May 2015.

  4. Gingival squamous cell carcinoma: imaging analysis of seven patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Moreira, Paulo de Tarso Barbosa; Paes Junior, Ademar Jose de Oliveira; Pacheco Netto, Mario C.; Rapoport, Abrao; Soares, Aldemir Humberto

    2003-01-01

    The authors st