WorldWideScience

Sample records for recreation planning committee

  1. 77 FR 36250 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... Forest Service Recreation Resource Advisory Committees AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Call for nominations for the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Agriculture has established the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee (Recreation RACs...

  2. 76 FR 4281 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees Charter Reestablishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... Forest Service Recreation Resource Advisory Committees Charter Reestablishment AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to reestablish the Recreation Resource Advisory Committees. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Agriculture intends to reestablish the charter for 5 Forest Service Recreation Resource...

  3. Missouri Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri State Inter-Agency for Outdoor Recreation, Jefferson.

    The document is a summary of the Missouri State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan, which was designed to provide guidelines for allocation of resources for needed recreation facilities. The plan identifies the present and future needs for outdoor recreation and recommends ways of meeting these needs. This 1967 document provides a brief history…

  4. Report of the Technical Committee for Hospitality, Tourism, Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This color-coded committee report identifies the skills and knowledge required by employees in the hospitality/tourism/recreation occupational area. The reports of four subcommittees focused on food/beverage, hotel/motel, recreation/leisure, and travel/tourism skills are also included. Introductory materials include a general statement of the…

  5. 76 FR 63600 - Notice of Meeting of the Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee; Federal Lands...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... who wish to bring recreation fee matters to the attention of the Committee may file written statements... Recreation Resource Advisory Committee; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act AGENCY: Rocky Mountain Region, Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Meeting of the Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee...

  6. 75 FR 19608 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... recommendations regarding recreation fees to both the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) as... contact. Additional information about recreation fees and REA is available at http://www.fs.fed.us... / Thursday, April 15, 2010 / Notices#0;#0; [[Page 19608

  7. The role of futures forecasts in recreation: some applications in the third nationwide outdoor recreation plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meg Maguire; Dana R. Younger

    1980-01-01

    This paper provides a quick glimpse into the theoretical applicability and importance of futures forecasting techniques in recreation policy planning. The paper also details contemporary socioeconomic trends affecting recreation, current recreation participation patterns and anticipated social changes which will alter public recreation experiences as developed in the...

  8. Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge River Recreation Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge River Recreation Management Plan is to provide guidance and direction for management of recreational...

  9. Planning Facilities for Athletics, Physical Education, and Recreation. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This guide for the planning and construction of recreational facilities is divided into the following five parts: (a) fundamental procedures, (b) indoor facilities, (c) sport and athletic facilities, (d) recreational and park areas and facilities, and (e) indoor and outdoor swimming pools. Part one concerns planning the facility and dealing with…

  10. Planning Facilities for Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD).

    This revised edition includes new material recommended by a panel of experts in the field of recreational planning. The following topics are covered: (1) the planning process; (2) indoor facilities; (3) outdoor facilities; (4) indoor and outdoor swimming pools; (5) encapsulated spaces and stadiums; (6) service areas; (7) recreation and park…

  11. Recreational Fishing Plan : Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Recreational Fishing Plan for Cypress Creek NWR. The Plan provides an introduction to the Refuge, information about conformance with statutory...

  12. Planning and Marketing: Two Keys to a Recreation Center's Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Joseph P.

    1983-01-01

    Indoor recreational facilities in Fairfax County, Virginia, owe their success to (1) development of comprehensive plans, which take into account site location, community needs, area trends, and financing possibilities, and (2) use of continuous marketing strategies. The centers are self-supporting. Each offers a variety of recreation/sports…

  13. Research for planning of outdoor recreation facilities in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, van H.N.

    1975-01-01

    In the Netherlands the planning and management of outdoor recreation projects is becoming more and more important. This is caused on the one hand by a rapidly growing demand for such projects and on the other hand by the relationship that exists between outdoor recreation activities and

  14. Recreational Management Plan for Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan outlines the reasoning behind the recommendation to minimize the public recreational activities at Montezuma National Wildlife refuge in 1958.

  15. Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The LEPC data set contains over 3000 listings, as of 2008, for name and location data identifying Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs). LEPCs are people...

  16. Tourism and recreation system planning in Alberta provincial parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul F.J. Eagles; Angela M. Gilmore; Luis X. Huang; Denise A. Keltie; Kimberley Rae; Hong Sun; Amy K. Thede; Meagan L. Wilson; Jennifer A. Woronuk; Ge Yujin

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, system planning in parks and protected areas concentrated on biogeographical concepts, while neglecting tourism and recreation. The existing system plan for parks and protected areas in Alberta, Canada, divides the province into six natural regions based on a geographic classifi cation system (Grassland, Parkland, Foothills, Rocky Mountains, Boreal...

  17. Mississippi National River and Recreation Area Water Trail Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    The Water Trail Plan describes the current conditions of and future plans for the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area (NRRA), a 72-mile stretch of the Mississippi River running through the Twin Cities region of Minnesota. In 2012, the NRRA...

  18. 77 FR 20046 - Establishment of the Gateway National Recreation Area Fort Hancock 21st Century Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... Establishment of the Gateway National Recreation Area Fort Hancock 21st Century Advisory Committee AGENCY... Interior (Secretary) is announcing the establishment of the Gateway National Recreation Area Fort Hancock... relating to future uses of the Fort Hancock Historic Landmark District of Gateway National Recreation area...

  19. 78 FR 29321 - Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... East Maroon Wilderness Portal, West Maroon Wilderness Portal and Maroon Lake on the White River... Advisory Committee Web site at: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/r2/rac-colorado . DATES: The meeting will be...

  20. Cat Island NWR Recreational Hunting Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A natural resource management plan describing the regulations and decision processes for sport hunting at Cat Island NWR. This plan has been replaced by a more...

  1. Use of the recreation opportunity spectrum in natural protected area planning and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavo Perez-Verdin; Martha E. Lee; Deborah J. Chavez

    2008-01-01

    The use of the Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) framework, widely used in planning and managing wildland recreation in the United States, was tested for managing recreation opportunities in southern Durango, Mexico. Two natural protected areas were used as case studies to evaluate the ROS criteria and standards for land classification of outdoor recreation...

  2. 76 FR 3652 - Dog Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... National Park Service Dog Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation... Impact Statement for the Dog Management Plan, Golden Gate National Recreation Area. SUMMARY: Pursuant to...) is releasing a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Dog Management Plan (Draft Plan/EIS...

  3. Trends in state outdoor recreation from periodic to process planning: the Minnesota example

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. Becker; George Orning

    1980-01-01

    After a decade of trial, a change in federal planning philosophy is forcing many state recreation planning programs to change. Ten years of experience showed that plans produced periodically - every five years - grew stale and failed to provide the flexibility necessary to meet changing recreation markets and environmental problems. Recognizing these problems, the...

  4. 77 FR 40565 - Northwest Forest Plan Provincial Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ...: Notice of Administrative Meetings for the Northwest Forest Plan Provincial Advisory Committees. SUMMARY... up under the Northwest Forest Plan. The PIECs facilitate the successful implementation of the Record... administrative meetings will be to inform the current Provincial Advisory Committee membership of the following...

  5. Trend indicators needed for effective recreation planning - a statistical blueprint for the 80's

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Fred Kaiser; George H. Moeller

    1980-01-01

    Here we outline important elements in recreation planning and describe how the process is changing, using Federal land management agencies as our example. We outline some factors that will impact on planning in the 80's, encourage establishment of a system to monitor trends in key factors that influence recreation behavior.

  6. Work Plans 2011 – Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety

    2011-01-01

    The annual work plan for 2011 summaries activities for the Scientific Steering Committee and the 9 panels of the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety (VKM). VKM carries out independent risk assessments for the Norwegian Food Safety Authority across the Authority’s field of responsibility as well as environmental risk assessments of genetically modified organisms for the Directorate for Nature Management.

  7. Listening to your audience: developing an educational tool to assist with recreation planning on private lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Daniel van Dijk; Gary T. Green; Craig A. Miller

    2009-01-01

    The Georgia Forestry Commission in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service instituted the Forest Stewardship Program (FSP) in 1991. A growing component of the FSP is recreation, which is the component least understood by stewardship planners. A survey was developed to better understand the needs of planners with regard to developing forest recreation plans, and the...

  8. Social-psychological implications for recreation resource planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeep S. Bhullar; Alan R. Everson; Scout L. Gunn

    1980-01-01

    Many claims have been made concerning the cause/effect relationship between recreation and leisure activity, and the acquisition of quality living. Studies have investigated the utility, quality, and quantity of recreation facilities. Studies of programs, leadership, members, and general classifications of users have also been conducted.

  9. National forest trail users: planning for recreation opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    John J. Daigle; Alan E. Watson; Glenn E. Haas

    1994-01-01

    National forest trail users in four geographical regions of the United States are described based on participation in clusters of recreation activities. Visitors are classified into day hiking, undeveloped recreation, and two developed camping and hiking activity clusters for the Appalachian, Pacific, Rocky Mountain, and Southwestern regions. Distance and time traveled...

  10. The use of recreation planning tools in U.S. Forest Service NEPA assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveny, Lee K; Blahna, Dale J; Stern, Marc J; Mortimer, Michael J; Predmore, S Andrew; Freeman, James

    2011-09-01

    U.S. Forest Service managers are required to incorporate social and biophysical science information in planning and environmental analysis. The use of science is mandated by the National Environmental Policy Act, the National Forest Management Act, and U.S. Forest Service planning rules. Despite the agency's emphasis on 'science-based' decision-making, little is known about how science is actually used in recreation planning and management. This study investigated the perceptions of Forest Service interdisciplinary (ID) team leaders for 106 NEPA projects dealing with recreation and travel management between 2005 and 2008. Our survey data show how managers rate the importance of social and biophysical science compared to other potential 'success factors' in NEPA assessments. We also explore how team leaders value and use multi-disciplinary tools for recreation-related assessments. Results suggest that managers employ a variety of recreation planning tools in NEPA projects, but there appears to be no common understanding or approach for how or when these tools are incorporated. The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) was the most frequently used planning tool, but the Visitor Experience and Resource Protection (VERP) framework was the most consistently valued tool by those who used it. We recommend further evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of each planning tool and future development of procedures to select appropriate planning tools for use in recreation-related NEPA assessments.

  11. Remote sensing as a source of data for outdoor recreation planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W. E.; Goodell, H. G.; Emmitt, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Specific data needs for outdoor recreation planning and the ability of tested remote sensors to provide sources for these data are examined. Data needs, remote sensor capabilities, availability of imagery, and advantages and problems of incorporating remote sensing data sources into ongoing planning data collection programs are discussed in detail. Examples of the use of imagery to derive data for a range of common planning analyses are provided. A selected bibliography indicates specific uses of data in planning, basic background materials on remote sensing technology, and sources of information on environmental information systems expected to use remote sensing to provide new environmental data of use in outdoor recreation planning.

  12. 78 FR 55093 - Dog Management Plan, Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... National Park Service Dog Management Plan, Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate... Statement for the Dog Management Plan (Plan/SEIS), Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), California. Current dog management in the park is based on a number of factors. Areas included in the GGNRA Citizens...

  13. 76 FR 22917 - Dog Management Plan/Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National Recreation Area...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... National Park Service Dog Management Plan/Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Golden Gate National... comment period for Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Dog Management Plan, Golden Gate National Recreation Area. SUMMARY: The National Park Service has prepared a Draft Dog Management Plan and...

  14. Good Practice in European Recreation Planning and Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaae, B.C.; Pröbstl, U.; Wirth, V.; Bell, S.; McCormack, A.; Elands, B.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes a number of good practice examples in outdoor recreation and nature-based tourism collected from different European countries. The examples provide trans-national inspiration on how to solve some of the problems and challenges identified in the previous chapters. Furthermore,

  15. 78 FR 47410 - General Management Plan, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Gateway National Recreation Area...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... National Park Service General Management Plan, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Gateway National... Management Plan (GMP), Gateway National Recreation Area (Gateway), New York. The draft describes and analyzes... Gateway's resources. DATES: We will accept comments for a period of 60 days following publication of the...

  16. Riparian area protection and outdoor recreation: lessons from the Northwest Forest Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick Impero Wilson; Troy E. Hall; Linda E. Kruger

    2012-01-01

    The Northwest Forest Plan required the US Forest Service (USFS) to shift its management focus to ecological values rather than the utilitarian ones that had dominated forest policy in the region. This article examines the effects of this shift on the USFS's historic mission to provide recreational access to the region's forests. Focusing on six national...

  17. Determination of planning capacity and layout criteria of outdoor recreation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, van H.N.

    1973-01-01


    When meeting the increasing demand for outdoor recreation projects, problems arise concerning location, planning capacity and layout. A system has been developed to solve the two last mentioned problems. Special attention is paid to inland beaches in the Netherlands. To apply the system two

  18. The use of GIS-based support of recreational trail planning by local governments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olafsson, Anton Stahl; Skov-Petersen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, multiple GIS-based planning support systems have been developed in order to improve the basis for spatial planning. Recent research has focused on problems regarding a lack of utilisation or barriers to the use of advanced GIS and GIS-based planning support systems in planning...... applications. This paper discusses these research findings in the context of outdoor recreational planning by local governments in Denmark. According to a national survey of municipal planners, GIS-based planning support is widely used in Denmark, but more GIS is needed and is being requested for local outdoor......-based collaborative planning associated with extensive GIS use; 2) experienced and older planners who are laggards regarding the use of advanced GIS-based planning support; and finally, 3) an envisioned need and demand for more GIS which are mainly realised through a GIS department in the municipality. These findings...

  19. 75 FR 23224 - Notice of Request for Nominations for the Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... outfitter guides, (5) Local environmental groups, (6) State tourism official, and (7) Indian tribes. The... Dakotas, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. In 2006, the Forest Service chartered new Recreation RACs... environmental groups. (3) Three persons, as follows: (a) State tourism official to represent the state; (b) A...

  20. Selected Outdoor Recreation Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    In this recreational information report, 96 tables are compiled from Bureau of Outdoor Recreation programs and surveys, other governmental agencies, and private sources. Eight sections comprise the document: (1) The Bureau of Outdoor Recreation, (2) Federal Assistance to Recreation, (3) Recreation Surveys for Planning, (4) Selected Statistics of…

  1. Integrating landscape analysis and planning: a multi-scale approach for oriented management of tourist recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aranzabal, Itziar; Schmitz, María F; Pineda, Francisco D

    2009-11-01

    Tourism and landscape are interdependent concepts. Nature- and culture-based tourism are now quite well developed activities and can constitute an excellent way of exploiting the natural resources of certain areas, and should therefore be considered as key objectives in landscape planning and management in a growing number of countries. All of this calls for careful evaluation of the effects of tourism on the territory. This article focuses on an integrated spatial method for landscape analysis aimed at quantifying the relationship between preferences of visitors and landscape features. The spatial expression of the model relating types of leisure and recreational preferences to the potential capacity of the landscape to meet them involves a set of maps showing degrees of potential visitor satisfaction. The method constitutes a useful tool for the design of tourism planning and management strategies, with landscape conservation as a reference.

  2. 77 FR 50979 - Northwest Forest Plan Provincial Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ...; 13. Up to a maximum of two representatives of the recreation and tourism sectors; 14. Three to five..., or forestry conservation organizations; special forest products interests, mining interests, grazing...

  3. Veterinary Immunology Committee Toolkit Workshop 2010: progress and plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entrican, Gary; Lunney, Joan K

    2012-07-15

    The 3rd Veterinary Immunology Committee (VIC) Toolkit Workshop took place at the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (IVIS) in Tokyo, Japan on 18th August 2010. The Workshop built on previous Toolkit Workshops and covered various aspects of reagent development, commercialization and provision to the veterinary immunology research community. The emphasis was on open communication about current progress and future plans to avoid duplication of effort and to update priorities for reagent development. There were presentations on the major reagent development and networking projects such as the BBSRC/RERAD Immunological Toolbox (2004-2009), US Veterinary Immune Reagent Network (VIRN 2006-2010) that has just received renewal funding for 2010-2014, and EU Network for Animal Diseases Infectiology Research Facilities project (NADIR 2009-2013). There were also presentations and discussions on the use of reagents for assay development, particularly multiplexing, and how these new technologies will underpin basic research developments. Mechanisms for improved information exchange, especially though websites with VIC playing a central role, were identified. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The recreation-resource inventory process for state and regional plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugh C. Davis

    1971-01-01

    The establishment of guidelines for identifying recreation resources in the inventorying process should be limited to conditions and characteristics of the natural resources themselves. This requires not only that we define recreation, but also that we prescribe the combination of resources necessary to carry on a variety of recreational activities.

  5. Collaborative recreation and tourism planning within a national park context: the process, stakeholder identification, and expected outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard O. B. Makopondo

    2003-01-01

    Recent economic, political, and social forces have resulted in collaboration and public-private partnerships being endorsed as sound mechanisms for planning, developing, managing, and marketing recreation and tourism on public lands (Selin and Chavez 1995; WTO 1996; Selin and Myers 1998; Crompton 1998; Bramwell and Lane 2000). Generally, many commentators contend that...

  6. 76 FR 15307 - Notice of Staff Attendance at Southwest Power Pool Strategic Planning Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Staff Attendance at Southwest Power Pool Strategic Planning... attend the meeting of the Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP) Strategic Planning Committee (SPC), as noted...

  7. Veterinary Immunology Committee Toolkit Workshop 2010: Progress and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Third Veterinary Immunology Committee (VIC) Toolkit Workshop took place at the Ninth International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (IVIS) in Tokyo, Japan on August 18, 2020. The Workshop built on previous Toolkit Workshops and covered various aspects of reagent development, commercialisation an...

  8. Methods for mapping recreational and social values in urban green spaces in the nordic countries and their comparative merits for urban planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Caspersen, Ole H.; Konijnendijk, Cecil Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges faced by urban planning is to identify and evaluate recreational and social values of urban and peri-urban green spaces. Over the past 30 years a number of methods for mapping recreational and social values have been developed and implemented in the Nordic countries......, in dialogue between research and urban planning practice. This paper provides a framework for assessment of planning methods and an analysis of the comparative merits of seven Nordic mapping methods and how they address the challenges of identification and evaluation of recreational and social values...

  9. The recreation opportunity spectrum: a framework for planning, management, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger N. Clark; George H. Stankey

    1979-01-01

    The end product of recreation management is a diverse range of opportunities from which people can derive various experiences. This paper offers a framework for managing recreation opportunities based on six physical, biological, social, and managerial factors that, when combined, can be utilized by recreationists to obtain diverse experiences.

  10. Simulation of recreational use in backcountry settings: an aid to management planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    2002-01-01

    Simulation models of recreation use patterns can be a valuable tool to managers of backcountry areas, such as wilderness areas and national parks. They can help fine-tune existing management programs, particularly in places that ration recreation use or that require the use of designated campsites. They can assist managers in evaluating the likely effects of increasing...

  11. Community involvement, planning and coping skills: pilot outcomes of a recreational-therapy intervention for adults with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snethen, Gretchen; McCormick, Bryan P; Van Puymbroeck, Marieke

    2012-01-01

    The Independence through Community Access and Navigation (I-CAN) intervention was developed to increase community participation in adults with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) through identification of interest-based recreation activities and supported participation. Ten individuals consented to participate in a 10-week pilot intervention. Eight individuals participated in the intervention, during which time they worked with a recreational therapist to identify interest-based recreation activities, develop participation goals and coparticipate with the recreational therapist. At the end of the intervention, seven participants were involved in a semistructured interview to understand their perceptions of the intervention, including its outcomes and effectiveness. Therapists' notes and transcripts from the semistructured interviews were used to understand clients' perception of the intervention. Thematic analyses of seven exit interviews suggested the primary perceived outcomes of the intervention included: increased community involvement; development of planning skills; and the development of coping skills. These were facilitated by the therapeutic relationship between the client and therapist. This project provides preliminary support for the I-CAN as a participant-centered method for individuals with SSD to develop skills in the community. Implications for practice and future research are presented.

  12. National Committee on Quality Assurance health-plan accreditation: predictors, correlates of performance, and market impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean Beaulieu, Nancy; Epstein, Arnold M

    2002-04-01

    Accreditation of health care organizations has traditionally been considered a building block of quality assurance. However, the differences between accredited and nonaccredited health plans and the impact of accreditation on plan enrollment are not well understood. To determine the characteristics of plans that have submitted to accreditation review, the performance of accredited plans on quality indicators and the impact of accreditation on enrollment. The databases containing 1996 data on health plans' National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) accreditation status, organizational characteristics, Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) scores, and patient-reported quality and satisfaction scores were linked to compare accredited health plans to nonaccredited plans. We also combined longitudinal data sets (1993-1998) on accreditation and health plan enrollment. Mean performance of accredited and nonaccredited plans on HEDIS measures and patient-reported measures of quality; health plan enrollment changes. Accredited plans have higher HEDIS scores but similar or lower performance on patient-reported measures of health plan quality and satisfaction. Furthermore, a substantial number of the plans in the bottom decile of quality performance were accredited suggesting that accreditation does not ensure high quality care. Receipt of accreditation has been associated with increased enrollment in the early years of the accreditation program; however, plans denied NCQA accreditation do not appear to suffer enrollment losses. NCQA accreditation is positively associated with some measures of quality but does not assure a minimal level of performance. Efforts now underway to incorporate plan performance on HEDIS into criteria for accreditation seem warranted.

  13. 75 FR 57058 - Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Habitat Conservation Plan Along the Pacific Coast in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... patterns, including breeding, feeding, and sheltering (50 CFR 17.3(c)). However, under limited... include: 1. Public Use a. Dog Exercising b. Driving c. Recreational Activities d. Non-Motorized Vehicle...

  14. Master Plan, Tucson Diversion Channel, Recreation Development Program. Gila River and Tributaries, Arizona and New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    shrubs and a few cholla cactus (Sorghum, Phalaris, Baccharis, Psilostrophe, Opuntia , and Larrea) . (See photo 5.) On the inner slope of the...fruition. If you need any further clarifications or assistance, please do not hesitate to contact myself, or Gene Laos, Parks and Recreation Director...CAMc:mp cc: Dennis Majors Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Gene Laos Director Pima County Parks ( Recreation A-4 ; PIMA COUNTY

  15. Planning countryside space for recreational purposes: The case of the upper water basin of the River Soča

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Golja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the upper Soča River basin, the article deals with the problem of exploitation of valuable natural features for tourist and recreational purposes. The goal was to propose a model of recreational use of a selected section of the Soča River, to put forward a proposal of legal framework for managing the selected area and work out a management plan for recreational purposes; thus the most burdened area of the Soča River during summer months was chosen, i.e. a 9 km reach of the Soča (between Log Čezsoški and Trnovo ob Soči, and accordingly a feasible marketing proposal, control proposal and spatial planning proposal were given in order to reduce the negative effects on the environment. The chosen methodology combines knowledge and practice from different fields, having in mind that this kind of problem solving should be carried out in an interdisciplinary connection of expert knowledge. Our basic theoretical premise has been environmental protection with an objective to preserve space as a value everywhere and in all its forms. The purpose of environmental protection is to encourage and direct such spatial development that provides a long-term basis for human health, well-being and quality of life as well as maintaining biotic diversity. This enables us to connect space with all its parts and features, sport recreation and tourism, thus achieving quality of life of local inhabitants, well-being of guests, protection of the natural environment, economic development, creation of new work places and income.

  16. Addendum to Air Quality: Decision Support Tools, Partner Plans, Working Groups, Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holekamp, Kara; Frisbie, Troy; Estep, Lee

    2005-01-01

    In the original report dated February 11, 2005, the utility of the NASA Earth science data in the air quality activities of other agencies and organizations was assessed by reviewing strategic and mission plans and by conducting personal interviews with agency experts to identify and investigate agencies with the potential for partnership with NASA. The overarching agency strategic plans were reviewed and commonalities such as the desire for partnerships and technology development were noted. The addendum to the original report contains such information about the Tennessee Valley Authority and will be inserted in Section 2.6 of "Air Quality Decision Support Tools, Partner Plans, Working Groups, Committees".

  17. A Plan to Close the Achievement Gap for African American Students. Final Report. Submitted by the HB2722 Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, the Washington State Legislature passed HB 2722, which called for the appointment of an Advisory Committee charged with creating a plan--which, when fully implemented, will close the education gap for African American students. Beginning in May 2008, the newly appointed HB 2722 Advisory Committee took on this challenging charge. Early in…

  18. Community involvement in planning and management for outdoor recreation in New Zealand protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Sutton; Gordon Cessford

    2007-01-01

    Managing New Zealand’s protected natural and historic heritage falls largely on the Department of Conservation (DOC), which manages close to a third of the country’s land area and increasing proportions of the coastal/marine setting. Providing public access to this shared heritage through a range of recreation opportunities is a key management outcome for DOC. This...

  19. Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Leadership Team of the IAHR Committee for Hydraulic Machinery and Systems Eduard EGUSQUIZA, UPC Barcelona, Spain, Chair François AVELLAN, EPFL-LMH, Switzerland, Past Chair Richard K FISHER, Voith Hydro Inc., USA, Past Chair Fidel ARZOLA, Edelca, Venezuela Michel COUSTON, Alstom Hydro, France Niklas DAHLBÄCKCK, Vatenfall, Sweden Normand DESY, Andritz VA TECH Hydro Ltd., Canada Chisachi KATO, University of Tokyo, Japan Andrei LIPEJ, Turboinstitut, Slovenija Torbjørn NIELSEN, NTNU, Norway Romeo SUSAN-RESIGA, 'Politehnica' University Timisoara, Romania Stefan RIEDELBAUCH, Stuggart University, Germany Albert RUPRECHT, Stuttgart University, Germany Qing-Hua SHI, Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co., China Geraldo TIAGO, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Brazil International Advisory Committee Shouqi YUAN (principal) Jiangsu University China QingHua SHI (principal) Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co. China Fidel ARZOLA EDELCA Venezuela Thomas ASCHENBRENNER Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Anton BERGANT Litostroj Power doo Slovenia B C BHAOYAL Research & Technology Centre India Hermod BREKKE NTNU Norway Stuart COULSON Voith Hydro Inc. USA Paul COOPER Fluid Machinery Research Inc USA V A DEMIANOV Power Machines OJSC Russia Bart van ESCH Technische Universiteit Eindhoven Netherland Arno GEHRER Andritz Hydro Graz Austria Akira GOTO Ebara Corporation Japan Adiel GUINZBURG The Boeing Company USA D-H HELLMANN KSB AG Germany Ashvin HOSANGADI Combustion Research and Flow Technology USA Byung-Sun HWANG Korea Institute of Material Science Korea Toshiaki KANEMOTO Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan Mann-Eung KIM Korean Register of Shipping Korea Jiri KOUTNIK Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Jinkook LEE Eaton Corporation USA Young-Ho LEE Korea Maritime University Korea Woo-Seop LIM Hyosung Goodsprings Inc Korea Jun MATSUI Yokohama National University Japan Kazuyoshi Mitsubishi H I Ltd, Japan MIYAGAWA Christophe NICOLET Power Vision Engineering Srl Switzerland Maryse PAGE Hydro

  20. 75 FR 67783 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and Procedures The ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and Procedures will hold a meeting on December 1, 2010, in Room... conduct of the meeting, persons planning to attend should check with these references if such rescheduling...

  1. 75 FR 51501 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and Procedures The ACRS Subcommittee on Planning and Procedures will hold a meeting on September 8, 2010, at... conduct of the meeting, persons planning to attend should check with these references if such rescheduling...

  2. Strategic planning by the palliative care steering committee of the Middle East Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Shannon Y; Pirrello, Rosene D; Christianson, Sonya K; Ferris, Frank D

    2011-04-01

    High quality comprehensive palliative care is a critical need for millions of patients and families, but remains only a dream in many parts of the world. The failure to do a strategic planning process is one obstacle to advancing education and pain prevention and relief. The Middle Eastern Cancer Consortium Steering Committee attendees completed an initial strategic planning process and identified "developmental steps" to advance palliative care. Underscoring the multi-disciplinary nature of comprehensive palliative care, discipline-specific planning was done (adult and pediatric cancer and medicine, pharmacy, nursing) in a separate process from country-specific planning. Delineating the layers of intersection and differences between disciplines and countries was very powerful. Finding the common strengths and weaknesses in the status quo creates the potential for a more powerful regional response to the palliative care needs. Implementing and refining these preliminary strategic plans will augment and align the efforts to advance palliative care education and pain management in the Middle East. The dream to prevent and relieve suffering for millions of patients with advanced disease will become reality with a powerful strategic planning process well implemented.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL AND TOURIST-RECREATIONAL PLANNING OF THE CITY IN THE CONTEXT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-MINING REGION (ON THE EXAMPLE OF DONETSK, DONETSK PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Lebezova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of environmental problems and natural potential of Donetsk city, the directions of sustainable socio-economic development of the city and the region are grounded on the example of the use of waste heaps and optimization of tourism and recreation planning in Donetsk.

  4. Greene County Community Park Stormwater Master Plan : A supplement to the park master plan

    OpenAIRE

    Gilboy, Elizabeth Truex; Steika, Kim; Marshall, Ashleigh

    2010-01-01

    The Community Design Assistance Center (CDAC) worked with Greene County in 1998 to develop a conceptual master plan for Greene County Community Park. In 2008, CDAC worked with the County Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee, and the County Parks and Recreation Director to update the conceptual master plan. Through a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to the Rivanna River Basin Commission (RRBC), CDAC was asked in 2010 to work with the Center for Watershed Protection to cr...

  5. Re-creating Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the importance of the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board guidelines for recreational and sports areas and their ancillary spaces. Examples of how the guidelines affect specific areas are highlighted, such as team seating areas, fitness centers, tennis courts, swimming pools, and locker rooms. (GR)

  6. National Institutes of Health Research Plan on Rehabilitation: NIH Medical Rehabilitation Coordinating Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Ann; Rowland, Julia H; Greenwell, Thomas N; Wiggs, Cheri L; Fleg, Jerome; Joseph, Lyndon; McGowan, Joan; Panagis, James S; Washabaugh, Charles; Peng, Grace C Y; Bray, Rosalina; Cernich, Alison N; Cruz, Theresa H; Marden, Sue; Michel, Mary Ellen; Nitkin, Ralph; Quatrano, Louis; Spong, Catherine Y; Shekim, Lana; Jones, Teresa L Z; Juliano-Bult, Denise; Panchinson, David M; Chen, Daofen; Jakeman, Lyn; Knebel, Ann; Tully, Lois A; Chan, Leighton; Damiano, Diane; Tian, Biao; McInnes, Pamela; Khalsa, Partap; Reider, Eve; Shurtleff, David; Elwood, William; Ballard, Rachel; Ershow, Abby G; Begg, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    One in five Americans experiences disability that affects their daily function because of impairments in mobility, cognitive function, sensory impairment, or communication impairment. The need for rehabilitation strategies to optimize function and reduce disability is a clear priority for research to address this public health challenge. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a Research Plan on Rehabilitation that provides a set of priorities to guide the field over the next 5 years. The plan was developed with input from multiple Institutes and Centers within the NIH, the National Advisory Board for Medical Rehabilitation Research, and the public. This article provides an overview of the need for this research plan, an outline of its development, and a listing of six priority areas for research. The NIH is committed to working with all stakeholder communities engaged in rehabilitation research to track progress made on these priorities and to work to advance the science of medical rehabilitation.This article is being published almost simultaneously in the following six journals: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Physical Therapy, and Rehabilitation Psychology. Citation information is as follows: NIH Medical Rehabilitation Coordinating Committee. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2017;97(4):404-407. Copyright © Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. 2017.

  7. Brain Malignancy Steering Committee clinical trials planning workshop: report from the Targeted Therapies Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Brian M; Galanis, Evanthia; Yung, W K Alfred; Ballman, Karla V; Boyett, James M; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Degroot, John F; Huse, Jason T; Mann, Bhupinder; Mason, Warren; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Mikkelsen, Tom; Mischel, Paul S; O'Neill, Brian P; Prados, Michael D; Sarkaria, Jann N; Tawab-Amiri, Abdul; Trippa, Lorenzo; Ye, Xiaobu; Ligon, Keith L; Berry, Donald A; Wen, Patrick Y

    2015-02-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain malignancy and is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive local and systemic therapy, which is related to a paucity of viable treatment options in both the newly diagnosed and recurrent settings. Even so, the rapidly increasing number of targeted therapies being evaluated in oncology clinical trials offers hope for the future. Given the broad range of possibilities for future trials, the Brain Malignancy Steering Committee convened a clinical trials planning meeting that was held at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, on September 19 and 20, 2013. This manuscript reports the deliberations leading up to the event from the Targeted Therapies Working Group and the results of the meeting. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recreation. 801.10... POLICIES § 801.10 Recreation. (a) The use of surface water resources of the basin for recreation purposes... private agencies in the planning and development of water-related recreation and fish and wildlife...

  9. 76 FR 41819 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan Amendment for the Glade Run Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... comments must be received prior to the close of the scoping period or 30 days after the last public meeting... Attention: Outdoor Recreation Planner. Mail: 1235 La Plata Highway, Farmington, New Mexico 87401, Attention: Outdoor Recreation Planner. Public comments, maps and other information related to the Glade RMP amendment...

  10. Recreational Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State & Area Data Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for recreational therapists. Similar Occupations Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of recreational therapists with ...

  11. IUSSP activities: Committee on Fertility and Family Planning. Implications of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) Programme of Action for the IUSSP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J

    1996-05-01

    This article provides an overview of some emerging research issues on population and development, appropriate program design, the impact of family planning programs, and a tentative agenda for forthcoming International Union for Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP) seminars. The 1994 Plan of Action from the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo challenges the population research community. This article addresses the implications of the 1994 Plan for the IUSSP Fertility and Family Planning Committee. The Cairo ICPD policy consensus confirmed the impact of family planning programs over the decades. The conference shifted the focus to research on how family planning programs manifest this impact and who benefits. The IUSSP committee will focus on the efficiency of the investment in programs, the relevance of programs to demand-constrained economies, sustainability of programs, the appropriate design and organization of programs, and social impacts of family planning. The committee plans to hold three seminars on the aforementioned topics. The IUSSP General Conference in Beijing plans to review the literature on theories of measurement and the social impact of family planning programs. Papers at the Beijing conference will stress the impact of family planning programs on social institutions and empowerment, unmet need for contraception, and male roles. The Fertility and Family Planning Committee will discuss fertility trends and determinants in South Asia, social institutions and family planning programs in sub-Saharan Africa, and methods for evaluating family planning programs at the first committee meeting. A textbook is planned for late 1996 on methods for evaluation of family planning programs. Sub-Saharan African family planning programs must be adapted to the rapidly spreading AIDS epidemic. The Committee on AIDS will be offering an exploratory workshop on policy issues and research needs on the implications of the AIDS crisis

  12. Trends in outdoor recreation activity conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    John J. Lindsay

    1980-01-01

    Conflict caused by outdoor recreation activity groups competing for the same physical and psychological space has given rise to recreation resource planning, allocation and management problems. Research has shown recreation managers can expect certain types of users to be involved in significant conflict about 25 percent of their occupancy time. Well planned and...

  13. Proceedings of the 2000 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard Kyle

    2001-01-01

    Contains articles presented at the 2000 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Contents cover management and planning, economics of outdoor recreation and tourism, tourism, characteristics of outdoor recreationists, ethnicity and culture, methodological issues, and marketing and management in outdoor recreation and tourism.

  14. Assessing Tourists’ Preferences for Recreational Trips in National and Natural Parks as a Premise for Long-Term Sustainable Management Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana E. Dumitras

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable tourism management plans rely on relevant and consistent information about factors that can influence the decision to visit a protected area. This paper uses the choice experiment method to investigate tourists’ preferences with regard to recreational trip characteristics in national and natural parks in Romania. An on-site survey questionnaire was administered to visitors. The multinomial logit model was employed to investigate the preference orderings of the identified groups of recreational users. Overall, results indicate that tourists gain benefits after visiting the parks. Main preference differences were found for information sources and location of campsites. Visitors who stated that the park was the main trip destination were willing to have access to more information sources, the marks on trails being insufficient. Camping is preferred only in organized places, expressing the concern for environmental protection. The results of this study have management implications, highlighting the importance of assessing tourists’ preferences as a foundation for developing sustainable tourism strategies.

  15. Proceedings of the 2003 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, comp., ed. Murdy; ed. comp.

    2004-01-01

    Contains articles presented at the 2003 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Contents cover planning issues, communications and information, management presentations, service quality and outdoor recreation, recreation behavior, founders? forum, featured posters, tourism and the community, specialized recreation, recreation and the community, management issues in...

  16. 75 FR 14623 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area Management Plan and Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... . Fax: (760) 337-4490. Mail: 1661 So. 4th St., El Centro, California 92243. Copies of the Draft Imperial Sand Dunes RAMP/EIS are available in the El ] Centro Field Office at the above address and at the BLM...: Recreation; transportation and public access; wildlife and botany; cultural resources and paleontology...

  17. Financing of Private Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A survey of financial institutions was undertaken by the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation to evaluate the demand and availability of private credit for enterprises that provide outdoor recreation. The survey provided basic information for (1) evaluating legislative proposals for loan guarantee programs, (2) nationwide planning, and (3) assessing the…

  18. The coming revolution in particle physics: Report of the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Appel et al.

    2004-06-22

    In early 2003, the Fermilab Director formed a committee (Appendix A) to examine options for the long-range future of Fermilab. Specifically, the committee was asked to respond to a charge (Appendix B), which laid out the assumptions, which were to underlie our discussions. The committee met a few times during the spring of 2003 and formulated a plan of action. It identified a number of issues that deserved attention, and a subcommittee was formed to focus on each. We agreed that in addressing these key issues, a broader participation was appropriate. The manner in which that was achieved varied from subcommittee to subcommittee to group. In some cases the expanded membership participated in all the discussions, in others, particular presentations were solicited and heard. Some subgroups met regularly over several months, others convened only for a small number of discussions. We have attempted to list participants in Appendix C. General presentations indicating the purpose of the work were given, for example at the Fermilab Users Annual Meeting. Towards the end of the summer some sense of direction developed and a series of open meetings was organized by the different subgroups. These meetings of two and more hour's duration gave the broader laboratory and user community a further chance to react to perceived directions and to make their opinions known. They were extremely well attended. In all, nearly 100 people have participated in the process including the development of initial drafts and proto-recommendations. A larger number attended the various open sessions. It is therefore likely, even expected, that the general thrusts of this report are no surprise. Nevertheless, the committee met in a number of plenary closed sessions including a two-day retreat in which all the issues were discussed and a common view was developed. The Director and Deputy Director heard and interacted with the discussions in most of these meetings. In attempting to converge, we

  19. Planning Committee for a National Resource for Computation in Chemistry. Final report, October 1, 1974--June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigeleisen, Jacob; Berne, Bruce J.; Coton, F. Albert; Scheraga, Harold A.; Simmons, Howard E.; Snyder, Lawrence C.; Wiberg, Kenneth B.; Wipke, W. Todd

    1978-11-01

    The Planning Committee for a National Resource for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC) was charged with the responsibility of formulating recommendations regarding organizational structure for an NRCC including the composition, size, and responsibilities of its policy board, the relationship of such a board to the operating structure of the NRCC, to federal funding agencies, and to user groups; desirable priorities, growth rates, and levels of operations for the first several years; and facilities, access and site requirements for such a Resource. By means of site visits, questionnaires, and a workshop, the Committee sought advice from a wide range of potential users and organizations interested in chemical computation. Chemical kinetics, crystallography, macromolecular science, nonnumerical methods, physical organic chemistry, quantum chemistry, and statistical mechanics are covered.

  20. Park, recreation, fitness, and sport sector recommendations for a more physically active america: a white paper for the United States national physical activity plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowen, Andrew J; Baker, Birgitta L

    2009-11-01

    The United States' first National Physical Activity Plan is now under development. This plan follows the release of new physical activity guidelines and seeks to address the nation's ongoing physical inactivity and obesity crisis. For this plan to be successful, all facets of American culture need to unify behind its recommendations and action steps. Guidance for this plan involves active participation from a variety of sectors, including the park, recreation, fitness, and sport (PRFS) sector. In this white paper, we discuss the potential of the PRFS sector in addressing America's physical inactivity. Specifically, we provide a brief description, history, and scope of the PRFS sector; present evidence concerning linkages between this sector and physical activity; and discuss existing challenges and emerging opportunities for promoting physical activity. We conclude by suggesting PRFS recommendations to promote physical activity based on anticipated effectiveness, reach, scope, and sustainability. Academic articles, professional reports, and physical activity plans were reviewed to summarize the evidence concerning PRFS sector strategies for increasing physical activity. Based on our review, we propose several sector-specific proximity, place, program, partnership, promotion, people, policy, and performance indicator recommendations for improving physical activity in the United States.

  1. Recreational Fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agencies shall, to the extent permitted by law and where practicable, improve the quantity, function, sustainable productivity, and distribution of U.S. aquatic resources for increased recreational fishing opportunities

  2. Tourism climatology: evaluating environmental information for decision making and business planning in the recreation and tourism sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, C R

    2003-09-01

    This work grew from initiatives of the International Society of Biometeorology's Commission on Climate, Tourism and Recreation (ISBCCTR). The ISBCCTR was formed during the 15th Congress of the ISB held in November 1999 in Sydney, Australia. The aim of ISBCCTR is to promote research in tourism climatology. The first formal meeting of the Commission took place at the Meliton Resort, Halkidiki, Greece, 5-10 October 2001. The aims were to (1) bring together a selection of scientists and tourism experts to review the current state of knowledge of tourism climatology and (2) explore areas and priorities for future work and the role of the Commission in this. The Workshop highlighted the fact that, although climate is widely recognised as vitally important to tourism, relatively little is known about its effects. Even less is known about the economic impact or significance of climate on commercial prospects for tourism. Important research themes that warrant attention were identified. Among these was the need for a tourism climate index (or indices) that integrates all facets of climate, uses standard data and is objectively tested and verified. Work is also required on developing a better understanding of what climate-related information is required by both tourists and the tourism industry, exploring the distinction between the impact of climate on tourists and the impact on the tourism industry, setting a standard approach to tourism climate assessment, assessing the role of weather forecasts and long-term expectations of climate on choices made by tourists, the risks to tourism caused by extreme atmospheric events, what climate-related criteria people use to make decisions about tourism and recreational choices, how products giving information about weather and climate are currently used by the recreation and tourism industry and what are the existing and future requirements for this climate information.

  3. Analysis and Prospects of European Co-Operation in the Field of Regional Planning. Activity Report of the Committee of Senior Officials 1976-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    To guide future work, to provide an overall view of the program of technical cooperation in regional planning, and to form a basis for a Conference Ministerial Resolution, the report outlines the activities of the Committee of Senior Officials (CSO) of the Council of Europe's Conference of Ministers Responsible for Regional Planning during…

  4. Finding Inspiration in the Common Core: An Uncommon Opportunity to Refine the Role of the School Library and Technology Planning Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravey, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts affords school librarians and their planning committees an opportunity to reinvigorate their roles in the school as curators of the school library collection, innovators in the use of instructional technology, and leaders in instructional planning. By focusing on these…

  5. 78 FR 33799 - National Poultry Improvement Plan; General Conference Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ...: The meeting will be held at the Hotel Indigo Athens, 500 College Avenue, Athens, GA. FOR FURTHER... cooperating State agencies and poultry industry members, serves an essential function by acting as a liaison between the poultry industry and the Department in matters pertaining to poultry health. The Committee...

  6. Outdoor Recreation Benchmark 1988: Proceedings of the National Outdoor Recreation Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan H. Watson

    1989-01-01

    BENCHMARK 1988: A National Outdoor Recreation and Wilderness Forum was the first national recreation assessment meeting. The need for this meeting grew out of the desire to incorporate scientific, planning, and administrative peer review into the 1989 RPA Assessment of Outdoor Recreation and Wilderness. This meeting brought together many university and government...

  7. Outdoor Recreation in Florida: A Comprehensive Program for Meeting Florida's Outdoor Recreation Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Natural Resources, Tallahassee.

    A comprehensive program for meeting outdoor recreational needs in Florida is described in this planning and reference document in terms of objectives for the program through the year 1975 (with projections to the year 2000). The scope and nature of outdoor recreation are defined, and a justification for an outdoor recreation program is presented.…

  8. Brain Malignancy Steering Committee clinical trials planning workshop: Report from the Targeted Therapies Working Group

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Brian M; Galanis, Evanthia; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Ballman, Karla V.; Boyett, James M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Degroot, John F.; Huse, Jason T.; Mann, Bhupinder; Mason, Warren; Ingo K Mellinghoff; Mikkelsen, Tom; Mischel, Paul S.; O'Neill, Brian P.; Prados, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain malignancy and is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive local and systemic therapy, which is related to a paucity of viable treatment options in both the newly diagnosed and recurrent settings. Even so, the rapidly increasing number of targeted therapies being evaluated in oncology clinical trials offers hope for the future. Given the broad range of possibilities for future trials, the Brain Malignancy Steering Committee convened a cli...

  9. Outdoor recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. M. Bowker; Ashley Askew; H. Ken Cordell; John C. Bergstrom

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsBy 2060, the number of southern adults participating in each of 10 different popular outdoor recreation activities is projected to increase. Depending on future demographic, economic, land use, and population changes, the activity demonstrating the least growth in participants is hunting (8–25 percent). The activity projected to...

  10. An Ecosystem Approach to Recreation Location Quotients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Vogel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread agreement on the importance of preserving ecological integrity in conservation and outdoor recreation decision-making processes, traditional metrics analyzing the supply of and demand for conservation and recreation resources have focused on geographical and population-centric units of measurement rather than ecological ones. One tool past researchers have used to inform recreation resource planning is the recreation location quotient (RLQ. While simple park-to-population ratios or acres-per-capita metrics provide a base measure of carrying capacity and are often useful to set broad recreation supply standards, the RLQ offers a more nuanced snapshot of supply and demand by comparing regional ratios to a standardized reference region. The RLQ is thus able to provide a statistic or quotient that highlights regions where recreation resources are particularly abundant and/or scarce relative to a reference area. This project expands the past RLQ analyses by investigating the distribution of recreation resources across the 10 ecological sections found within the US state of Minnesota. RLQs were calculated using recreation trail mileage, natural resource and recreation area acreage data, and recreation facility data from federal, state, and local agencies. Results found notable differences in supply of recreation resources across ecological sections. Some sections were considerably underrepresented in recreation resources-per area (e.g., Red River Valley and North Central Glaciated Plains while others were underrepresented in recreation resources-per capita (e.g., Minnesota and Northeast Iowa Morainal. The RLQ statistics and resulting maps illustrating relative surplus or deficiencies can inform future land acquisition decisions and highlight the need for cross-jurisdictional planning in order to ensure outdoor recreation systems are ecologically representative. Possible implications and recommendations for future planning

  11. Projections of Future Participation and Needs in Outdoor Recreation for North Dakota

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Randall S.; Leitch, Jay A.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents projected participation levels in selected outdoor recreation activities for North Dakota residents. It is the fifth study to collect data on recreation participation rates for North Dakota's State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan.

  12. 77 FR 29316 - Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee; Public... Committee meeting will include a panel presentation on MPAs and recreation and tourism. The Committee will... Administration. BILLING CODE 3510-08-P ...

  13. Proceedings of the 1991 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gail A. Vander Stoep

    1992-01-01

    Contains 48 research and management papers on the following subjects: social science in resource management; outdoor recreation planning and management; fisheries and wjldlife management; specialization theory; travel, tourism and community development; urban recreation; and geographic information systems.

  14. Mapping recreation and aesthetic values of ecosystem services in the Bilbao Metropolitan Greenbelt (northern Spain) to support landscape planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casado-Arzuaga, I.; Onaindia, M.; Madriaga, I.; Verburg, P.H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method to quantify cultural ecosystem services (ES) and their spatial distribution in the landscape based on ecological structure and social evaluation approaches. The method aims to provide quantified assessments of ES to support land use planning decisions. A GIS-based

  15. [Plans for the establishment of central vaccination committees in the institutionalization of Medicine in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias Nuñez, M

    1993-01-01

    The fight against smallpox epidemics in the Granada at the end of the 18th and beginning of the 19th centuries involved a whole series of actions which demonstrated the new ways of treating the disease. First the application of the innoculation and then the vaccination coincided with a greater general concern for the health of the population. At this time and especially with the arrival of José Celestino Mutis on Latin-American soil science in Colombia embarked upon an institutionalization process which also involved Medicine. José Salvany's proposals of stablishing Central Vaccination Committees were made in this context. The analysis of these proposals and their contribution towards "establishing institutional spaces" are the axes upon which this study is based.

  16. 18 CFR 8.1 - Publication of license conditions relating to recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... conditions relating to recreation. 8.1 Section 8.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... recreation. Following the issuance or amendment of a license, the licensee shall make reasonable efforts to... recreational purposes, recreational plans, installation of recreation and fish and wildlife facilities...

  17. 75 FR 7290 - Notice of Public Meeting, Coeur d'Alene District Resource Advisory Council Meeting and Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... fees (Recreation RAC Subcommittee) and field trip of BLM recreation site--Blue Creek Bay and Mineral... Meeting and Recreation Subcommittee Meeting; Idaho AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION...), the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (FACA), and the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act of...

  18. Conference Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Organising Committee Chair Dr. Georgios Priniotakis Scientific Committee Chair Prof. Dr. Savvas Vassiliadis List of International Organizing Committee, Honorary Scientific Committee, International Scientific Committee are available in this PDF

  19. Projections of outdoor recreation participation to 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Michael Bowker; Donald B.K. English; H. Ken Cordell

    1999-01-01

    The authors project future outdoor recreation participation and consumption, in days and trips, well into the next century, as mandated by the Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA). The chapter begins with a brief description of the data and methods used. They report indexed projections of future recreation participation (by millions of participants aged 16 and over)...

  20. FAQ about Recreational Therapy/Therapeutic Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biological, and behavioral sciences and recreation and leisure theory. How can I get RT/TR services? Many ... facilities, as was daycare programs for individuals with disabilities." About the American Therapeutic Recreation Association: The American ...

  1. A Work in Progress: Accessible Trails, Campsites, and Other Outdoor Recreation Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, John N.

    2001-01-01

    Appointed by the U.S. Access Board, the Recreation Access Advisory Committee developed guidelines for making outdoor recreation facilities and areas accessible to persons with disabilities. Following negative public comment, a regulatory negotiation committee conducted public meetings and devised accessibility guidelines for trails that allowed…

  2. The Strategic Planning Committee Report: The First Step in a Journey to Recognize Pediatric Hospital Medicine as a Distinct Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Christopher G.; Swanson Mendez, Suzanne; Quinonez, Ricardo A.; Bode, Ryan S.; Brands, Chad K.; Eagle, Steven; Nena Osorio, Snezana; Rauch, Daniel; Simon, Tamara D.

    2013-01-01

    The field of pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) has experienced phenomenal growth over the past decade. Academic contributions by pediatric hospitalists include the creation of PHM core competencies,1 national collaborative PHM networks for both research (the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings network2) and quality improvement (the Value in Inpatient Pediatrics network3), a robust and well-attended annual scientific meeting,4 and an increasing number of divisions or sections of PHM in pediatric departments across the country. Many pediatricians are choosing to pursue careers in PHM,5,6 and several postgraduate training programs for PHM have emerged.7 Similar to other generalist pediatric fields,8-11 the question as to how best for PHM to evolve as a distinct discipline has arisen. Several training and/or certification options are feasible and have been examined by the pediatric hospitalists who constitute the Strategic Planning (STP) Committee. The objectives of this commentary are to (1) describe the work done to investigate these options to date, (2) provide a framework for evaluating them, and (3) describe next steps. This commentary will neither justify subspecialty status for PHM, which is currently still debated within the field, nor will it compare the development of PHM as a subspecialty with other generalist fields because such a comparison is premature. PMID:24313023

  3. 77 FR 60375 - Notice of Proposed New Fee Sites; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Forest Service Notice of Proposed New Fee Sites; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act AGENCY: Caribou... a Recreation Resource Advisory Committee. New fees would begin after April 2013. ADDRESSES: Brent... new recreation fee areas are established. Once public involvement is complete, these new fees will be...

  4. RPA Assessment of Outdoor Recreation: Past, Current, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Bergstrom; H. Ken Cordell; Linda Langner

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the outdoor recreation sections of the Renewable Resource Planning Act (RPA) Assessments conducted to date are reviewed. Current policy and mangement applications of the outsdoor recreation results published in 1989 Assessment are discussed also. The paper concludes with suggestions for the assemssment of outdoor recreation in future RPA Assessements...

  5. Outdoor Recreation Participation: Blacks, Whites, Hispanics, and Asians in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer

    1992-01-01

    Blacks, Whites, Hispanics, and Asians in Illinois attach a high level of significance to outdoor recreation. However, there are important differences in the outdoor recreation participation patterns of these four groups, including the activities participated in and where they participate, that have important implications for recreation resource planning and research....

  6. 78 FR 4120 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... use existing BLM RACs in the states of Arizona, Idaho, the Dakotas, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, and... persons who are-- (a) State tourism official representing the State; (b) A representative of affected...

  7. Department of the Interior U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service : Final Environmental Assessment for Recreational Fishing Plan : Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary purpose of the proposed action is to consider recreational fishing opportunities on Cypress Creek NWR. This EA analyzes four different fishing...

  8. Prof. Manuel Trajtenberg, Chair of the Planning and Budget Committee, Council for Higher Education in Israel with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and in front of the ATLAS detector on Thursday 14th January.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice; Point 1

    2010-01-01

    Prof. Manuel Trajtenberg, Chair of the Planning and Budget Committee, Council for Higher Education in Israel with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and in front of the ATLAS detector on Thursday 14th January.

  9. Assessment of Recreational Facilities in Federal Capital City, Abuja, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Kanayo Ezeamaka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abuja Master Plan provided development of adequate Green Areas and other Recreational Facilities within the Federal Capital City (FCC, as part of its sustainability principles and provided for these recreational facilities within each neighborhood (FCDA, 1979. However, there have been several recent foul cries about the negative development of recreational facilities and the abuse of the Master Plan in the FCC.  The motivation for carrying out this study arose from the observation that recreational facilities in Phase 1 of the Federal Capital City Abuja are not clearly developed as intended by the policy makers and thus, the need to identify the recreational facilities in the Phase 1 of FCC and observe their level of development as well as usage. The field survey revealed that the Central Business District and Gazupe have higher numbers of recreational facilities with 45 and 56. While Wuse II (A08 and Wuse II (A07 Districts have lesser recreational facilities with 10 and 17. The field survey further revealed that all the districts in Phase 1 have over 35% cases of land use changes from recreational facilities to other use. The survey shows that over 65% of these recreational facilities are fully developed. The study also shows that just about 11% of the recreational sporting facilities were developed in line with the Abuja Master Plan in Phase 1. The study revealed that recreational facilities in Phase 1 of the FCC, Abuja has not being developed in compliance with the Abuja Master Plan.

  10. Superconductivity committee planning report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    The recent discovery of superconductors that operate at relatively high temperatures has generated a large amount of research which promises to have applications in almost all branches of high technology, notably those in which high electric current densities are used. After a background description of the properties of superconductors, the market for superconductor technology is described from the Canadian perspective. Worldwide markets are growing rapidly and are estimated to total $920 million by 1990, considering only conventional low-temperature superconductors. Applications for superconductivity include the use of thin films and microelectronics, low loss signal transmission, tunnel injections, and sensitive magnetic detectors. Superconducting magnets find application in magnetic separation, magnetic levitation and propulsion, and for energy storage and transmission by power utilities. Research in superconductivity in British Columbia, reviewed in this report, has been under way at 3 universities and 4 or 5 compaines, where a small group of qualified researchers and some high-technology laboratories are focusing on thin-film and electonic applications. The potential market for superconductivity is felt to warrant more effort in British Columbia, and a number of recommendations are made for coordinating and promoting research, funding joint university-industry projects for innovative applications, and facilitating technology transfer.

  11. Are village health sanitation and nutrition committees fulfilling their roles for decentralised health planning and action? A mixed methods study from rural eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Aradhana; Gope, Rajkumar; Nair, Nirmala; Rath, Shibanand; Rath, Suchitra; Sinha, Rajesh; Sahoo, Prabas; Biswal, Pavitra Mohan; Singh, Vijay; Nath, Vikash; Sachdev, H P S; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene; Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey; Bhattacharyya, Sanghita

    2016-01-22

    In India, Village Health Sanitation and Nutrition Committees (VHSNCs) are participatory community health forums, but there is little information about their composition, functioning and effectiveness. Our study examined VHSNCs as enablers of participatory action for community health in two rural districts in two states of eastern India - West Singhbhum in Jharkhand and Kendujhar, in Odisha. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 169 VHSNCs and ten qualitative focus group discussions with purposively selected better and poorer performing committees, across the two states. We analysed the quantitative data using descriptive statistics and the qualitative data using a Framework approach. We found that VHSNCs comprised equitable representation from vulnerable groups when they were formed. More than 75 % members were women. Almost all members belonged to socially disadvantaged classes. Less than 1 % members had received any training. Supervision of committees by district or block officials was rare. Their work focused largely on strengthening village sanitation, conducting health awareness activities, and supporting medical treatment for ill or malnourished children and pregnant mothers. In reality, 62 % committees monitored community health workers, 6.5 % checked sub-centres and 2.4 % monitored drug availability with community health workers. Virtually none monitored data on malnutrition. Community health and nutrition workers acted as conveners and record keepers. Links with the community involved awareness generation and community monitoring of VHSNC activities. Key challenges included irregular meetings, members' limited understanding of their roles and responsibilities, restrictions on planning and fund utilisation, and weak linkages with the broader health system. Our study suggests that VHSNCs perform few of their specified functions for decentralized planning and action. If VHSNCs are to be instrumental in improving community health, sanitation and nutrition

  12. Geographic Information Systems and Image Processing, Tools for Recreational Land Use Planning and Conflict Mitigation: A Case Study within the Monument Open Space, Monument Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    came from the environmental classic Sand County Almanac written in 1949 by Aldo Leopold . In this text, Leopold looked at the earths resources as a...recreation and tourism at the local level: Applied research in the Manawatu region of New Zealand. Tourism Geographies 4, no. 1: 3-21. Leopold A

  13. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Recreation Study. A Plan Prepared for the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works). Volume 2. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    by the Federal Government for park and recreation, wildlife, and forest management purposes since the early 20th century when Theodore Roosevelt was...Parks Topeka, KS Tel: 913/296-2281 Gerry Newcombe , Chief of Operations County Regional Parks San Bernardino, CA Tel: 714/387-2594 Les Nichols

  14. The development of a recreational land classification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert W. Reinhardt; Diana Gould

    1995-01-01

    The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation has had a land classification system in place since 1972. This system was developed during the creation of the first Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan. This system has become the backbone of the Park Master Planning Process. During the past few years the New York State Park System...

  15. Education and Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A special study was conducted to determine the needs and demands of the public for outdoor recreation. Increasing amounts of leisure time of the American people are being used for outdoor recreation activities. Ways in which education can help people realize optimum benefit from recreational use of the outdoor environment are discussed.…

  16. Economics of Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Marion; Knetsch, Jack L.

    Written for the purposes of presenting an overview of outdoor recreation in the United States and defining the significant outdoor recreation policy issues of the next 10 to 20 years, this document also includes major sections on recreation resources and economic considerations. Projections to the year 2000 are made for a national time budget,…

  17. Outdoor recreation participation trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Barbara L. McDonald; R. Jeff Teasley; John C. Bergstrom; Jack Martin; Jim Bason; Vernon R. Leeworthy

    1999-01-01

    As part of the national assessment of outdoor recreation trends, the authors have taken a look at participation patterns and levels of participation across activities and across segments of our society. The primary source of data is the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE). The NSRE is the latest in the continuing series of National Recreation...

  18. Latinos and Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah J. Chavez

    2012-01-01

    The research reported here includes a number of studies conducted in southern California. It was aimed at better understanding the recreation needs and desires of Latino populations. Generally, the findings indicate that Latinos have many of the same recreation needs as other groups, such as places to recreate and reasonable accommodations. But it also indicates they...

  19. 77 FR 62215 - Notice of Proposed New Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jane Cropp, Recreation Fee Coordinator, 208-634-0757. Information... Federal Register whenever new recreation fee areas are established. Once public involvement is complete, these new fees will be reviewed by a Recreation Resource Advisory Committee prior to a final decision...

  20. 76 FR 36518 - Notice of Meeting; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    .... 2. An increase of fees for the Shelf Road Recreation Area in the Royal Gorge Field Office of the BLM..., Bureau of Land Management staff and Committee members. Persons who wish to bring recreation fee matters... Forest Service Notice of Meeting; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447...

  1. 78 FR 41783 - Notice of Proposed New Fee Sites; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-11

    ... Forest Service Notice of Proposed New Fee Sites; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII... comments can be compiled, analyzed and shared with a Recreation Resource Advisory Committee. New fees would... advance notice in the Federal Register whenever new recreation fee areas are established. Once public...

  2. 75 FR 80789 - Notice of New Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Forest Service Notice of New Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108... Agriculture to publish a six month advance notice in the Federal Register whenever new recreation fee areas are established. This new fee will be reviewed by the Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee...

  3. 78 FR 114 - Notice of January 23 and 24, 2013 Meeting for Fort Hancock 21st Century Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    .... Administrative briefings, including legal and ethics requirements 3. Discussion of the Committee's charter, goals... may be obtained from Robert Vohden, Office of Business Services, Gateway National Recreation Area, 210... National Recreation Area. BILLING CODE 4310-WV-P ...

  4. Estimating recreational harvest using interview-based recall survey: Implication of recalling in weight or numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparrevohn, Claus Reedtz

    2013-01-01

    For many overfished marine stocks, recreational fishing continues even though recovery plans are implemented and commercial landings regulated. In such cases, unbiased and precise estimates of recreational harvest are important for successful management. Harvest estimation often relies on intervi......For many overfished marine stocks, recreational fishing continues even though recovery plans are implemented and commercial landings regulated. In such cases, unbiased and precise estimates of recreational harvest are important for successful management. Harvest estimation often relies...

  5. Chesapeake Bay Tidal Flooding Study. Appendix A. Problem Identification. Appendix B. Plan Formulation, Assessment and Evaluation. Appendix C. Recreation and Natural Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    MEMORIA is ayA FIUR A-3 POTOT AREA PLYAL Y’AGS 93 URCN SA ~ ~ 110r T6RV made to eliminate the Scott’s Creek area and make a tie-out at Glasgow and Godwin...the affluence factor (reference Appendix F - Economics). B-37 S/ --. . . POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND DESCRIPTION OF PLANS Plan PC -I This plan would...references. Plan PC -2 This plan would provide the same areal protection as PC -I, but to the design elevation of 8 feet NGVD (standard project flood). The

  6. A Plan for the Development of Fusion Energy. Final Report to Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, Fusion Development Path Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-03-05

    This report presents a plan for the deployment of a fusion demonstration power plant within 35 years, leading to commercial application of fusion energy by mid-century. The plan is derived from the necessary features of a demonstration fusion power plant and from the time scale defined by President Bush. It identifies critical milestones, key decision points, needed major facilities and required budgets.

  7. 78 FR 9883 - Lake Tahoe Basin Federal Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... Committee members will serve staggered terms up to 3 years, and will meet a minimum of 4 times a year...) North Shore Economic/Recreation, f) South Shore Economic/Recreation, g) Resorts, h) Education, i... the extent practicable, individuals with demonstrated ability to represent minorities, women, and...

  8. 36 CFR 30.4 - Recreation District II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... permitted in Recreation District II, provided the Shasta County Planning Commission has issued a use permit..., and greenhouses. (ii) Stands for retail sales of products produced on the premises. (iii) Measures to... operations will cause a minimum of interference with public recreational use and enjoyment of the area. (viii...

  9. Collegiate Recreational Sports: Pivotal Players in Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kent J.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the rise of modern-day collegiate recreational sports and their relevance to student learning and quality of life. The author discusses planning considerations for collegiate recreational sports facilities and the importance of these facilities as a recruitment and retention tool. (Contains 4 figures.)

  10. Case studies of simulation models of recreation use

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    2005-01-01

    Computer simulation models can be usefully applied to many different outdoor recreation situations. Model outputs can also be used for a wide variety of planning and management purposes. The intent of this chapter is to use a collection of 12 case studies to illustrate how simulation models have been used in a wide range of recreation situations and for diverse...

  11. Predicting daily use of urban forest recreation sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer

    1988-01-01

    A multiple linear regression model explains 90% of the variance in daily use of an urban recreation site. Explanatory variables include season, day of the week, and weather. The results offer guides for recreation site planning and management as well as suggestions for improving the model.

  12. U.S. Outdoor Recreation Participation Projections to 2060

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. Bowker; Ashley Askew

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we develop and present national outdoor recreation participation projections for 17 recreation activities or activity composites through 2060. (The projections are for the population of Americans age 16 and older, referred to hereafter in this section as “adults.”) This charge is consistent with the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act...

  13. Locating opportunities for outdoor action and adventure recreation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper indicates how modern spatial computing technology can be used for developing spatial policy for, and planning of outdoor action and adventure recreation and tourism (OAART). An application was performed in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. The research overviews spatial recreation and tourism ...

  14. Introducing a method for mapping recreational experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Dempsey, Nicola; Burton, Mel

    2013-01-01

    The provision of recreational opportunities forms an important and long-standing urban planning and management objective. However, considering a range of experiences encountered when in such spaces currently does not form part of existing open space assessment tools in the UK. In this paper, ‘rec......-mapping’, an innovative method of analysing and mapping positive recreational experiences in urban green spaces is explored and piloted within the UK planning context. Originating in the Nordic countries, this on-site method can provide urban planners and designers with data about the extent to which specific green...... spaces provide and support a range of recreational experiences. The exploration reported here is based on a short review of the methods background and an application in two test sites in Sheffield, South Yorkshire in early summer 2010. This paper critically appraises the application of rec...

  15. Recreation for Me Too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Social Services and Community Health, Edmonton.

    This five-part manual is concerned with recreational activities for disabled persons. The first part defines four terms commonly used in reference to the disabled--impairment, disability, handicap, and inconvenience. Reasons for including the disabled in recreational activities and for developing activities for the disabled, discussed in the…

  16. Trends in Therapeutic Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the rapid, dramatic changes taking place in therapeutic recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The article notes the impact of changes in managed care, examines programming trends in therapeutic recreation (adventure/outdoor education, competitive sports, handcycling, health enhancement activities, and…

  17. Outdoor recreation resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter J. Betz; Donald B.K. English; H. Ken Cordell

    1999-01-01

    The authors examine recreation resources and opportunities by the four types of providers: Federal, State, local governments, and the private sector. They discuss the trend of partnerships in the provision of outdoor recreation opportunities, especially two types that emerged in the 1990’s: Scenic Byways and Watchable Wildlife opportunities. Where possible, the authors...

  18. Immunotherapy of head and neck cancer: Emerging clinical trials from a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Planning Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Julie E; Cohen, Ezra; Ferris, Robert L; Adelstein, David J; Brizel, David M; Ridge, John A; O'Sullivan, Brian; Burtness, Barbara A; Butterfield, Lisa H; Carson, William E; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Gajewski, Thomas F; Gillison, Maura L; Hodge, James W; Le, Quynh-Thu; Raben, David; Strome, Scott E; Lynn, Jean; Malik, Shakun

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances have permitted successful therapeutic targeting of the immune system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). These new immunotherapeutic targets and agents are being rapidly adopted by the oncologic community and hold considerable promise. The National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address the issue of how to further investigate the use of immunotherapy in patients with HNSCC. The goals of the meeting were to consider phase 2 or 3 trial designs primarily in 3 different patient populations: those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-initiated oropharyngeal cancers; those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-negative HNSCC; and those with recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. In addition, a separate committee was formed to develop integrative biomarkers for the clinical trials. The meeting started with an overview of key immune components and principles related to HNSCC, including immunosurveillance and immune escape. Four clinical trial concepts were developed at the meeting integrating different immunotherapies with existing standards of care. These designs were presented for implementation by the head and neck committees of the National Cancer Institute-funded National Clinical Trials Network. This article summarizes the proceedings of this Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, the purpose of which was to facilitate the rigorous development and design of randomized phase 2 and 3 immunotherapeutic trials in patients with HNSCC. Although reviews usually are published immediately after the meeting is held, this report is unique because there are now tangible clinical trial designs that have been funded and put into practice and the studies are being activated to accrual. Cancer 2017;123:1259-1271. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  19. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    similarities and differences in outdoor recreation patterns of adolescents with ethnic Danish and ethnic minority background. There are e.g. no differences in the number of days spent on outdoor recreation pr. year. Among both the ethnic Danish and ethnic minority group adolescents, the stated reasons...... for visiting natural areas were most often social, such as being with family and friends, and health and well-being reasons (exercise and relaxing from stress). However, the ethnic minority adolescents more often stated “to be with family” as an important reason for visiting green spaces compared...... to their ethnic Danish counterparts. The adolescents use different areas for outdoor recreation: the adolescents with ethnic Danish background use sports grounds for outdoor recreation, while adolescents with ethnic minority backgrounds use urban green spaces for outdoor recreation. For activities reported...

  20. 75 FR 33761 - Notice of a New Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Forest Service Notice of a New Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (Title VIII, Pub. L... Register whenever new recreation fee areas are established. Once public involvement is complete, these new fees will be reviewed by a Recreation Resource Advisory Committee prior to a final decision and...

  1. Forecasting trends in outdoor recreation activities on multi-state basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent A. Scardino; Josef Schwalbe; Marianne Beauregard

    1980-01-01

    Since a substantial amount of recreation planning takes place on a statewide basis, it is essential to have reliable information and forecasts of recreational needs on a state level. However, most of the recreation research over the last few years have used either national survey data, statewide data or site specific information.

  2. Toward a better understanding of the social benefits of outdoor recreation participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. L. Driver

    1976-01-01

    This paper proposes that recreation resource managers need to give more attention to the benefits that a person derives from participation in recreation activities. Behavioral information is described as one of several types of knowledge needed in recreation planning and management decisions. A model outlining the dynamics of a recreationist's behavior is...

  3. Private Assistance in Outdoor Recreation. A Directory of Organizations Providing Aid to Individuals and Public Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    In an effort to aid private recreation area developers and operators, and other individuals interested in outdoor recreation, this Bureau of Outdoor Recreation publication lists a number of professional societies and national organizations providing low-cost publications and other aids to planning, development, and operation of outdoor recreation…

  4. Outdoor recreation trends and futures: a technical document supporting the Forest Service 2010 RPA Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents a national study of outdoor recreation trends as part of the Renewable Resources Planning Act Assessment by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. The objectives are to review past trends in outdoor recreation participation by Americans, to describe in detail current outdoor recreation participation patterns, and to compare...

  5. Introduction to Recreation Services for People with Disabilities: A Person-Centered Approach. 3rd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Charles C.; Mahon, Michael J.; Killingsworth, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Ultimately, all successful recreation programs center around its participants wants and needs. Serving people with disabilities is no exception. "Introduction to Recreation Services for People with Disabilities" is intended to be an introductory book for anyone planning or working in the parks, recreation, and leisure service industry. Through…

  6. 78 FR 73820 - Publicly Managed Recreation Opportunities, Recreation Fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... Forest Service RIN 0596-AD09 Publicly Managed Recreation Opportunities, Recreation Fees AGENCY: Forest... final directive providing direction on recreation fees in chapter 30 of new Forest Service Handbook (FSH) 2309.13. This chapter enumerates the requirements for recreation fees charged by the Forest Service...

  7. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    to their ethnic Danish counterparts. The adolescents use different areas for outdoor recreation: the adolescents with ethnic Danish background use sports grounds for outdoor recreation, while adolescents with ethnic minority backgrounds use urban green spaces for outdoor recreation. For activities reported...... often reported using green areas to “drink beer with friends” and “do sunbathing”. The third paper reflects on the different national approaches towards ethnic minorities’ access to natural areas, in four example-countries Germany, Denmark, United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. This was done through...

  8. Expanding & strengthening outdoor recreation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter S. Hopkins

    1971-01-01

    Though the Forest Service has pioneered in outdoor recreation research, the funding for recreation research has been inadequate. Specific needs for research are outlined. There is a need to define recreation and recreation research in terms that busy legislators can understand.

  9. Outdoor Recreation Action. Report 25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This report from the Department of Interior presents information concerning individual state actions and projects related to the broad topic of outdoor recreation. Included are data on the following topics: rights-of-way for recreation; federal financing of outdoor recreation; state and local financing of outdoor recreation; federal acquisition…

  10. Trends in outdoor recreation legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    George H. Siehl

    1980-01-01

    The two decades which have passed since the era of the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission (ORRRC) have been active and fruitful in terms of Federal recreation legislation. The Commission and its final report "Outdoor Recreation for America" strongly influenced the burst of recreation legislation in the 1960's. Even today, the studies prepared...

  11. Attitudes towards recreational hunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Christian; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2017-01-01

    a negative attitude to recreational hunting. Older respondents and rural residents had more positive attitudes towards hunting than younger and urban residents. Some of the conditions under which hunting occurs affected attitudes negatively, especially the hunting of farm-reared and released game birds...... to the commercial aspect of hunting and this could result in tighter regulation with further effects on management practices. Management Implications The public opinions and public preferences concerning recreational hunting are complex. However, this study revealed some factors relevant for regulatory...... and managerial development in relation to outdoor recreation: age (younger respondents were least supportive of hunting), urbanisation (living in an urban environment enhanced negative attitudes), compatibility of recreational hunting with other outdoor leisure activities....

  12. American Therapeutic Recreation Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) Research Grant Opportunities Publications MDS 3.0 Tools International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - World Health Organization (ICF/WHO) Marketing Links RecreationalTherapynet New Publications & Items Promotional Items Publications ...

  13. Outdoor Recreation Sites Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The RECSITES data layer contains a wide range of recreational sites in Vermont. This point data layer includes parks, ski areas, boat access points, and many other...

  14. Recreational Boating Statistics 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Every year, the USCG compiles statistics on reported recreational boating accidents. These statistics are derived from accident reports that are filed by the owners...

  15. Recreational Angler Attitudes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Fisheries implemented a national survey of saltwater recreational anglers beginning in February 2013. The survey was implemented in six regions including the...

  16. Recreational Boating Statistics 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Every year, the USCG compiles statistics on reported recreational boating accidents. These statistics are derived from accident reports that are filed by the owners...

  17. Recreational Boating Statistics 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Every year, the USCG compiles statistics on reported recreational boating accidents. These statistics are derived from accident reports that are filed by the owners...

  18. Elbrus – chronology, recreation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergii Bershov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to conduct research of the historical and geographical factors of becoming and development of the Elbrus region as a center of tourism and mountaineering, to consider the use of mountain and natural complexes for active rest, to give a recreational assessment of the use of mountain natural complexes. Material & Methods: analysis of literature sources, analysis of documents, organizational analysis. Results: the historical and geographical analysis of the mountain-natural territory of the Elbrus region is carried out, the recreational assessment of the use of mountain natural complexes for active recreation is displed. Conclusions: analysis of the spatial assessment of the recreational and tourism-mountaineering potential of mountain natural territorial systems, allows choosing the safest and most attractive routes and classifying them according to complexity and safety.

  19. Recreational System Optimization to Reduce Conflict on Public Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilling, Fraser; Boggs, Jennifer; Reed, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    In response to federal administrative rule, the Tahoe National Forest (TNF), California, USA engaged in trail-route prioritization for motorized recreation (e.g., off-highway-vehicles) and other recreation types. The prioritization was intended to identify routes that were suitable and ill-suited for maintenance in a transportation system. A recreational user survey was conducted online ( n = 813) for user preferences for trail system characteristics, recreational use patterns, and demographics. Motorized trail users and non-motorized users displayed very clear and contrasting preferences for the same system. As has been found by previous investigators, non-motorized users expressed antagonism to motorized use on the same recreational travel system, whereas motorized users either supported multiple-use routes or dismissed non-motorized recreationists' concerns. To help the TNF plan for reduced conflict, a geographic information system (GIS) based modeling approach was used to identify recreational opportunities and potential environmental impacts of all travel routes. This GIS-based approach was based on an expert-derived rule set. The rules addressed particular environmental and recreation concerns in the TNF. Route segments were identified that could be incorporated into minimal-impact networks to support various types of recreation. The combination of potential impacts and user-benefits supported an optimization approach for an appropriate recreational travel network to minimize environmental impacts and user-conflicts in a multi-purpose system.

  20. Recreational system optimization to reduce conflict on public lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilling, Fraser; Boggs, Jennifer; Reed, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    In response to federal administrative rule, the Tahoe National Forest (TNF), California, USA engaged in trail-route prioritization for motorized recreation (e.g., off-highway-vehicles) and other recreation types. The prioritization was intended to identify routes that were suitable and ill-suited for maintenance in a transportation system. A recreational user survey was conducted online (n = 813) for user preferences for trail system characteristics, recreational use patterns, and demographics. Motorized trail users and non-motorized users displayed very clear and contrasting preferences for the same system. As has been found by previous investigators, non-motorized users expressed antagonism to motorized use on the same recreational travel system, whereas motorized users either supported multiple-use routes or dismissed non-motorized recreationists' concerns. To help the TNF plan for reduced conflict, a geographic information system (GIS) based modeling approach was used to identify recreational opportunities and potential environmental impacts of all travel routes. This GIS-based approach was based on an expert-derived rule set. The rules addressed particular environmental and recreation concerns in the TNF. Route segments were identified that could be incorporated into minimal-impact networks to support various types of recreation. The combination of potential impacts and user-benefits supported an optimization approach for an appropriate recreational travel network to minimize environmental impacts and user-conflicts in a multi-purpose system.

  1. Report to the Nuclear energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) Subcommittee on "Long-Term Isotope Research and Productions Plan" - Responses to Questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammoniums

    1999-07-01

    This report presents responses to two series of questions that were raised by a subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) that has been charged with producing a ''Long-Term Isotope Research and Production Plan.'' The NERAC subcommittee is chaired by Dr. Richard Reba, and the Hanford Site Visit team, which comprises a subset of the subcommittee members, is chaired by Dr. Thomas Ruth. The first set of questions raised by the subcommittee on isotope production at the Hanford Site was received from Dr. Ruth on May 10, 1999, and the second set was received from him on July 5, 1999. Responses to the first set of questions were prepared as part of a June 1999 report entitled ''Isotope Production at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington'' (PNNL 1999a). The responses to these questions are summarized in this document, with frequent references to the June 1999 report for additional details. Responses to the second set of questions from the NERAC subcommittee are presented in this document for the first time.

  2. Reproductive planning in times of Zika: getting pregnant or delaying plans? The opinion of the Brazilian Society of Assisted Reproduction Committee - a basis for a bioethical discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Bruno R de; Taitson, Paulo F; Brandão, Karina S A G; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Nakagawa, Hitomi M; Silva, Adelino A; Lopes, Joaquim R C

    2016-08-01

    Although the causality between Zika virus, microcephaly, and other central nervous system disorders has been taken for granted by the scientific community, many uncertainties remain. The gap of knowledge at the moment is large enough to remove part of the confidence physicians have on the advice given to patients - and infertile women in particular - on their reproductive plans. Pretreatment serologic screening is a possible strategy to offer more confidence for individuals choosing to bear children regardless of the Zika virus, but the tests currently available do not seem to be sufficiently adequate. Until now, there is no formal recommendation to avoid pregnancy solely because of the Zika virus outbreak, and the choice of becoming pregnant has been regarded as a personal decision to be made by each woman and her family.

  3. Dahomey Plantation Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Plan describing timber, wildlife and recreational assessments and assoicated development costs of the Dahomey Plantion timberlands. Plan details existinig forest...

  4. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    The thesis has three aims: The first aim is to review the existing knowledge about ethnic minorities’ outdoor recreation in Europe. The second aim is to investigate similarities and differences in outdoor recreation patterns between adolescents with ethnic Danish and ethnic minority background...... carried out during some part of the year, “going for a walk”, “barbequing”, “taking a trip with family” were frequently cited by both groups, but more common among adolescents with ethnic minority background. “Walking the dog” was much more common among adolescents with Danish background, who also more...

  5. Review of the Strategic Plan for International Collaboration on Fusion Science and Technology Research. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1998-01-23

    The United States Government has employed international collaborations in magnetic fusion energy research since the program was declassified in 1958. These collaborations have been successful not only in producing high quality scientific results that have contributed to the advancement of fusion science and technology, they have also allowed us to highly leverage our funding. Thus, in the 1980s, when the funding situation made it necessary to reduce the technical breadth of the U.S. domestic program, these highly leveraged collaborations became key strategic elements of the U.S. program, allowing us to maintain some degree of technical breadth. With the recent, nearly complete declassification of inertial confinement fusion, the use of some international collaboration is expected to be introduced in the related inertial fusion energy research activities as well. The United States has been a leader in establishing and fostering collaborations that have involved scientific and technological exchanges, joint planning, and joint work at fusion facilities in the U.S. and worldwide. These collaborative efforts have proven mutually beneficial to the United States and our partners. International collaborations are a tool that allows us to meet fusion program goals in the most effective way possible. Working with highly qualified people from other countries and other cultures provides the collaborators with an opportunity to see problems from new and different perspectives, allows solutions to arise from the diversity of the participants, and promotes both collaboration and friendly competition. In short, it provides an exciting and stimulating environment resulting in a synergistic effect that is good for science and good for the people of the world.

  6. 78 FR 18322 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Smart Grid Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: National... Smart Grid Advisory Committee (SGAC or Committee), will meet in open session on Friday, April 19, 2013... Smart Grid Program Plan. The agenda may change to accommodate Committee business. The final agenda will...

  7. 77 FR 71169 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Smart Grid Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: National... Smart Grid Advisory Committee (SGAC or Committee), will meet in open session on Tuesday, December 18... NIST Smart Grid Program Plan. The agenda may change to accommodate Committee business. The final agenda...

  8. Federal Outdoor Recreation Programs and Recreation-Related Environmental Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This is the first revision of "Federal Outdoor Recreation Programs," updating information first provided in May, 1968, by the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation in cooperation with other Federal agencies. Programs described in this publication broadly reflect the scope of Federal involvement in outdoor recreation and related environmental efforts. The…

  9. Design & layout of recreation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard R. Orr

    1971-01-01

    Design and layout of recreation facilities is a problem solving process that must be divorced from the emotionalism that has shrouded outdoor recreation and must deal deliberately with the growing information concerning people and natural resources.

  10. Private recreation enterprise economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm I. Bevins

    1971-01-01

    Cash returns to recreation enterprise labor and management are low. Low returns are associated with poor location, small size, and short season. Land-value appreciation may offset low returns for some operators and explain why they stay in business. Profit maximization is not always the prime entrepreneurial goal: personal and noneconomic considerations or long-run...

  11. Mental Recreation in Wonderland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendlebury, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The author argues that children's books are not, as commonly held, either didactic or entertaining and that successful juvenile literature teaches what Lewis Carroll, who wrote "Alice in Wonderland," termed "mental recreation." Pendlebury contends that learning and play, far from being opposites, can closely resemble one…

  12. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Main points examined at the meeting of 24 June 2009 Results of the 2009 MARS exercise The Committee took note of the results of the 2009 MARS exercise presented by the Head of the HR Department, expressing satisfaction for the early availability of the statistics and for the fact that the analysis of the results covered the last three years. Status report on the work on the five-yearly review The Committee took note of a presentation by P. Gildemyn on the data collection procedure for the 2010 five-yearly review (staff, fellows, associate members of the personnel, CHIS) and of the proposed work schedule. Implications for employment conditions of the discussions at the Finance Committee and Council on 17 and 18 June 2009 The Chairman briefly reported on the discussions at the meetings of the Finance Committee and Council in June 2009, on the 2010-2014 medium-term plan and the 2010 preliminary draft budget, as well as on the modified strategy and goals for 2009. The Committee ...

  13. Job satisfaction among recreation practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin Parks; Andrew Holdnak

    2002-01-01

    Job satisfaction among recreation professionals can be affected by many working conditions. This study has investigated the impact fourteen variables had on the job satisfaction of recreation practitioners. The sample consisted of 106 responses from members of the Resort and Commercial Recreation Association (RCRA). The results of the regression analysis for job...

  14. Final Report: Education, Public Access, and Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    supervision was provided by Mr. Roger Hamilton, Chief, RAB; Mr. Chegter 0. Martin , Acting Chief, SB; Mr. J. L. Decell, Acting Chief, NRD; and Dr. John...Alicia Ridell, Outdoor Recreation Planner National Park Service George H. Siehl , Specialist in Natural Resources Policy Congressional Research Service...Spectrum for Outdoor Recreation Planning on Army Installations," Technical Report N-124, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA. Siehl

  15. 75 FR 76483 - Notice of Final Supplementary Rules for Public Lands in Idaho: Blue Creek Bay Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... Recreation Management Area AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Final supplementary rules... supplementary rules to regulate conduct on public lands within the Blue Creek Bay Recreation Management Area... Recreation Project Plan Environmental Assessment (EA) (2009) and in the Coeur d'Alene Resource Management...

  16. Introductory materials for committee members: 1) instructions for the Los Alamos National Laboratory fiscal year 2010 capability reviews 2) NPAC strategic capability planning 3) Summary self-assessment for the nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics an

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors.

  17. Recreational potential of Kiev region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Poltavets

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It analyzes the recreational potential of the territory of the Kiev region, which focuses on all types of land on the main intended purpose. The most favorable conditions for recreation are formed on the lands of recreation, recreation, historical and cultural, natural reserve fund and other environmental protection, forestry purposes, and water resources. The area of land corresponding categories are significantly (3‐5 times inferior standards adopted in the European Union. The main directions of development of recreational land use for the future are determined.

  18. 76 FR 57100 - Natural Resource Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... electrical generating facilities. From its inception through 1998, TVA received federal appropriations for... biological, cultural, and water resources, recreation, reservoir lands planning, and public engagement... biological, cultural, and water resources would be greatly enhanced. Recreation management activities would...

  19. Culture of the Recreation, Democracy and Political Conscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alixon Reyes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recreation is a universal cultural and intangible patrimony. Besides, it has to do with all those experiences lived and felt by a human being while a transformation takes place towards it that he wishes, needs and gasps. But, the recreation has been confused with entertainment and amusement, elements that form a way of being and a way of thinking producing a cultural emptying of the recreation turning it into a banal and instrumental matter. And do not think that this is neutral and innocent. On the contrary, it is a trend that marks the fingerprint of a neocoloniality. This way, the recreation is done, is bought and sold, is programmed and is planned, offers to the measurement the one who can buy it and the one who can pay it, leaving of side the experience humanizes as vital point.

  20. Spatial analysis and facility characteristics of outdoor recreational areas in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Fatih; Demirci, Ali

    2010-05-01

    This article reports the results of a study that explored whether outdoor recreational areas are sufficient in Istanbul in terms of their surface area and facility characteristics. All the municipalities in 32 subprovinces of Istanbul were sent a survey in 2007 and asked to prepare a list of their outdoor recreational areas including their names, addresses, size, and facilities. All the data collected from the municipalities were used to create a GIS-based inventory by using GIS and remote sensing. As the study revealed, the outdoor recreational areas in Istanbul are far behind meeting the recreational needs of the residents in terms of area per person and facility characteristics. There are 2,470 areas which were dedicated to outdoor recreational activities in Istanbul. Total surface area of all these outdoor recreational areas is 19,2 sq kilometers; this means 1.52 m(2) recreational area per person in the city. This value is very low when compared to that of many cities in Europe and USA. As the study also revealed, the majority of outdoor recreational areas in Istanbul are poor in facility. Majority of the existing outdoor recreational areas are small and do not provide the public with many opportunities to engage in different outdoor activities. A more sustainable and efficient recreational plan is needed in Istanbul to meet the various recreational needs of its residents.

  1. Meeting the Challenges of Professional Committee Meetings

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Schroeder; Donald Frank

    2013-01-01

    Librarians join many professional associations and work on a great number of professional committees over the course of their careers. Working on a committee as a member can be a challenge, and the challenges can be even greater if you are chairing the committee. The authors summarize some of the key points for planning and executing effective and enjoyable meetings. Get tips as well on how to follow through to get results and how to improve future meetings.

  2. 36 CFR 1002.23 - Recreation fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation fees. 1002.23... RECREATION § 1002.23 Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be charged in the area administered by the Presidio Trust to the same extent that recreation fees have been established for the Golden Gate National...

  3. 36 CFR 2.23 - Recreation fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation fees. 2.23 Section... PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.23 Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be established as... sites, facilities, equipment or services, or participating in group activities, recreation events, or...

  4. Computer Security: Governmentwide Planning Process Had Limited Impact. Report to the Chairman, Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Information Management and Technology Div.

    As required by the Computer Security Act of 1987, federal agencies have to identify systems that contain sensitive information and develop plans to safeguard them. The planning process was assessed in 10 civilian agencies as well as the extent to which they had implemented planning controls described in 22 selected plans. The National Institute of…

  5. 78 FR 49253 - Pacific Southwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... inspect comments received at the Pacific Southwest Regional Office (Region 5), 1323 Club Drive, Vallejo..., Vallejo, CA 94592, or by email to [email protected] , or via facsimile to 707-562-9047. A summary of...

  6. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Ordinary Meeting on 11 May 2009 The meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee held on 11 May 2009 was entirely dedicated to the preparation of the TREF meeting on 19 & 20 May 2009. The Committee took note, discussed and agreed on some clarifications on a number of documents and presentations that the Management planned to submit and/or present to TREF on the following subjects: • Personnel statistics 2008: J. Purvis presented the Personnel Statistics for 2008 prepared by HR Department. In line with the previous year, key messages were firstly, a general reduction in staff (2544 to 2400, - 6%), secondly, a reduction in administrative services personnel (from 422 to 387, - 8%) and thirdly, a marked increase in the number of Users and Unpaid Associates (from 8369 to 9140, + 9%) • Five-Yearly Review 2010: A series of draft documents were submitted for discussion, comprising an introductory document explaining the statutory basis for the following four document...

  7. Planning Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Richard B., Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Nine articles give information to help make professionals in health, physical education, recreation, dance, and athletics more knowledgeable about planning facilities. Design of natatoriums, physical fitness laboratories, fitness trails, gymnasium lighting, homemade play equipment, indoor soccer arenas, and dance floors is considered. A…

  8. Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee. The report conveys the Committee's views on the matters specified by the Secretary in his charge and subsequent letters to the Committee, and also satisfies the provisions of Section 7 of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980, Public Law 96-386, which require a triennial review of the conduct of the national Magnetic Fusion Energy program. Three sub-Committee's were established to address the large number of topics associated with fusion research and development. One considered magnetic fusion energy, a second considered inertial fusion energy, and the third considered issues common to both. For many reasons, the promise of nuclear fusion as a safe, environmentally benign, and affordable source of energy is bright. At the present state of knowledge, however, it is uncertain that this promise will become reality. Only a vigorous, well planned and well executed program of research and development will yield the needed information. The Committee recommends that the US commit to a plan that will resolve this critically important issue. It also outlines the first steps in a development process that will lead to a fusion Demonstration Power Plant by 2025. The recommended program is aggressive, but we believe the goal is reasonable and attainable. International collaboration at a significant level is an important element in the plan.

  9. Long-term Outdoor Recreation Participation Projections for Public Land Management Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, John G.; Kaiser, H. Fred

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical structure for projecting long-term outdoor recreation demand is presented and demonstrated, using data from an outdoor recreation survey by the United States Department of Interior. Since the availability of opportunities seems to influence participation significantly, future planning should take into account supply-demand…

  10. Survey of recreational fishing in Canada, 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    The 2005 Survey of Recreational Fishing in Canada collected information about recreational fishing activities to assess the economic and social importance of recreational fisheries to Canada's provinces and territories...

  11. Recreational Limits in a World of Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustin, Daniel L.

    1984-01-01

    The responsibility of recreation professionals is to encourage others to recreate in more sensitive ways, rather than highly consumptive, power-based ways. The psychology of affluence and limits on resources and their influence on recreational activities are discussed. (DF)

  12. [Recreational attraction of urban park wetlands in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fen; Sun, Ran-Hao; Chen, Li-Ding

    2012-08-01

    Taking the 20 urban park wetlands in Beijing as test objects, a 3-layer evaluation index system including urban park wetland landscape quality, location condition, and accessibility for the recreational attraction of urban bark wetlands was established, and, by using analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and an integrating index evaluation method, the recreational attraction of the urban park wetlands in Beijing was quantitatively assessed, and validated with questionnaire data. In Beijing, the urban park wetlands with high recreational attraction were in the order of the Summer Palace, Olympic Park, Qinglong Lake Park, Beihai Park, Yuanmingyuan Park, Yuyuantan Park, Shidu, Golden Sea Lake scenic area, Taoranting Park, and Yeyahu wetland. The Rice Fragrance Lake wetland and Zhenzhuhu scenic area had the lowest recreational attraction, and the others were fair. The evaluation results were supported by the questionnaire data, which indicated that the index system and evaluation model were useful. According to the recreational services, the 20 park wetlands in Beijing could be clustered into four categories, which could be managed in different ways. Appropriately assessing the recreational services of urban park wetlands could help the decision-making on the urban parks optimal planning and designing, improve human living environment, and optimize the spatial distribution of urban landscape.

  13. 76 FR 57765 - Advisory Committee for Geosciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... Advisory Committee for Geosciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: Advisory Committee for Geosciences (1755). Dates: October 13, 2011 8:30 a.m.-5,p.m. October 14, 2011 8:30 a... concerning support for geosciences. Agenda October 13, 2011 Update on Directorate Activities and Plans...

  14. 76 FR 12136 - Advisory Committee for Geosciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... Advisory Committee for Geosciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: Advisory Committee for Geosciences (1755). Dates: April 13, 2011; 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m., April 14, 2011; 8:30 a... concerning support for geosciences. Agenda April 13, 2011 Directorate activities and plans including...

  15. 78 FR 10595 - Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... Forest Service Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION... management projects to be funded under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self- Determination Act, should... members in Categories A, B, and C. Category A represents organized labor, developed outdoor recreation...

  16. Proceedings of the 2004 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, comp., ed. Bricker; ed. comp.

    2005-01-01

    Contains articles presented at the 2004 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Contents cover place attachment, diverse populations, tourism economics, visitor management, tourism development, perceptions, preferences and attitudes, trends, visitor choice and resource attributes, norms and carrying capacity, specialization and participant development, planning and...

  17. Recreation and scenic resources in Alaska: an annotated bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert M. Muth; Sally Anne Fitchet

    1976-01-01

    This bibliography provides descriptions of material published on recreation and scenic resources in Alaska. Included are publications on research and supporting material in the form of studies and reports, proposals, plans, historical and cultural references, bibliographic documents, and popular books and articles describing the resources of Alaska and issues relating...

  18. Out, out, and Away! Collection Development: Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, John

    2009-01-01

    Summer is fast approaching, and it will soon be time to climb the mountains to get their good tidings, as naturalist John Muir put it. In other words, librarians must now prepare for the influx of patrons making weekend recreational and summer vacation plans by stocking up on books and other resources on the great outdoors. Outdoor recreational…

  19. The value of research in recreation fee project implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Absher; Daniel W. McCollum; J. Michael Bowker

    1999-01-01

    In a survey of Forest Service managers responsible for implementation of recreation fee programs, research skills were perceived to provide little benefit to business or communications planning. A majority of managers reported, however, that they used research data they collected or contracted for when developing and implementing their fee programs. They rated the...

  20. 47 CFR 90.527 - Regional plan requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.527 Regional plan requirements. Each regional planning committee must... regional planning chairperson that all planning committee meetings, including subcommittee or executive... modified by submitting a written request, signed by the regional planning committee, to the Chief, Wireless...

  1. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2007 included: Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): It was announced that a Management/Staff Association working group had been set up to discuss the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): Members : M. Büttner, E. Chiaveri (chair), Ph. Defert, D. Klem, M. Vitasse, J.-M. Saint-Viteux. It was noted that the Staff Association was launching a questionnaire on SLS and distributed to all members of the personnel. Merit Recognition Guidelines: In the context of the new Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS), the committee took note of the CERN-wide 2007 Merit Recognition Guidelines, including the Frequently Asked Questions on HR Department's dedicated website. Information on CERN's medium and long-term plans (MTP-LTP)/Contract renewals/ External mobility The Committee took note of the information provided on CERN's MTP-LTP and of documentation distributed at the meeting by the Staff ...

  2. 75 FR 33244 - Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ..., 2010, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Prospector Hotel, 375...; recreational fisheries engagement; and NOAA strategic planning. Updates will be presented on NOAA budgets...

  3. A Youth Perspective on Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Arizona Outdoor Recreation Coordinating Commission and Arizona State Parks Board conducted a survey of students in grades 4-12 to gather information on their recreation needs and desires. Results provided recreation planners and providers with a profile of the young outdoor recreation customer to help them develop the most appropriate…

  4. A Program for Outdoor Recreation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    The categorical sections of the proposed program for outdoor recreation research are (1) principal findings and recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences, (2) the social and behavioral dimensions of outdoor recreation, (3) the economics of outdoor recreation, and (4) the operation of recreation service systems. Among the specific topics…

  5. 43 CFR 17.270 - Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreation. 17.270 Section 17.270 Public... OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap § 17.270 Recreation... operation of programs or activities involving recreation. (a) Accessibility in existing recreation...

  6. Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tub/Spa Test Strips Inflatable & Plastic Kiddie Pools Water Play Areas & Interactive Fountains Swim Diapers & Swim Pants Breastfeeding in Pools & Hot Tubs/Spas Recreational Water Illnesses Diarrheal Illness Rashes Ear Infections Respiratory Infections ...

  7. Massachusetts Recreational Fishing Demand Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stated preference choice experiment data were collected in 2012 from Massachuestts saltwater recreational fishermen. Saltwater anglers fishing in Massachusetts (MA)...

  8. Recreation and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cure for glaucoma Give now Recreation & Quality of Life People who have glaucoma may find it difficult ... can continue to enjoy a full and productive life. From Dependence to Independence With glaucoma, the extent ...

  9. Executive committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guoqing; Cai, Xiaohong; Ding, Dajun; Ma, Xinwen; Zhao, Yongtao

    2014-04-01

    ChairVice Chair Toshiyuki AzumaRoberto Rivarola Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics LabUniversidad Nacional de Rosario and Advanced Science InstituteInstituto de Fisica Rosario RIKEN, JapanRosario, Argentina SecretaryMembers Dominique VernhetJoachim Burgdörfer, Austria Institut des NanoSciences de Paris Birgit Lohmann, Australia Université Pierre et Marie Curie Hossein Sadeghpour, USA Paris, FranceThomas Stöhlker, Germany Past ChairJim McCann, UK Barry DunningGuoqing Xiao, China Physics & AstronomyXiaohong Cai, China Rice University, HoustonXinwen Ma, China Texas, USAYongtao Zhao, China TreasurerFernando Martin, Spain Henrik CederquistLuis Mendez, Spain Alba Nova University CenterAnatoli Kheifets, Australia Stockholm University Stockholm, Sweden Details of the general committee are available in the PDF

  10. The Investment Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an AGB series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices included in this text support the objectives of board committees:…

  11. The psychological benefits of recreational running: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Attila; Abrahám, Júlia

    2013-01-01

    Running yields positive changes in affect, but the external validity of controlled studies has received little attention in the literature. In this inquiry, 50 recreational runners completed the Exercise-Induced Feeling Inventory (Gauvin & Rejeskí, 1993) before and after a bout of self-planned running on an urban running path. Positive changes were seen in all four measures of affect (p run, weekly running time, weekly running distance, and running experience) to the observed changes in affect. The results have revealed that exercise characteristics accounted for only 14-30% of the variance in the recreational runners' affect, in both directions. It is concluded that psychological benefits of recreational running may be linked to placebo (conditioning and/or expectancy) effects.

  12. CONSUMER PREFERENCES AND DRIVERS OF CHOICE REGARDING LOCAL RECREATION SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria SAVA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the rapidly growing industry of leisure has displayed some signs of overcrowding on account of the diminished capacities of turning employed resources into profit and the lowered personnel productivity in Romania. Economic agents striving to succeed in this rapidly evolving economic sector should reconsider their position and plan a strategy to grow or reinforce their business. The present paper provides a starting point in outlying the local recreation market specificity by investigating consumer preferences and drivers of choice. Results show that although there is an active demand for commercial recreational activities, its quantum is rather low. Moreover, the study shows that service-related factors (such as quality, personnel qualification, price and novelty appear to have the highest importance for consumers, that positive word of mouth is a rather strong influencer, while advertising and location-related factors rank lowest on the list of priorities when choosing a recreation provider.

  13. 42 CFR 431.12 - Medical care advisory committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical care advisory committee. 431.12 Section 431... § 431.12 Medical care advisory committee. (a) Basis and purpose. This section, based on section 1902(a... Medicaid agency about health and medical care services. (b) State plan requirement. A State plan must...

  14. 78 FR 30929 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General... and Risk Management Advisory Committee (DSaRM). On July 10, 2013, the Agency plans to discuss the risk...

  15. 77 FR 778 - Council Coordination Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ..., including FY 2012 budget allocations and budget planning for FY2013 and beyond, Marine Recreational... held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, 8777 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20910; telephone: (301) 563-3722....--Lunch. 1:30 p.m.--Afternoon Session Begins. 1:30 p.m.-2:15 p.m.--Budget. FY2012: Status, Council funding...

  16. The relationship between the audit committee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia VASILE

    2016-05-01

    Because of the importance of communication between the internal auditors and the audit committee, the paper addresses issues such as planning discussions with internal auditors, analysis and conclusions as a result of communication, questionnaire models for the addressed areas and planning the meetings with external auditors.

  17. Citizen Advisory Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Leann R.

    This guide, describing community involvement through citizen advisory committees, is a summary of the literature on such committees. Its main concern is district committees created by school boards. Citations in the bibliography contain all points of view on committees and present many alternatives on most of the topics covered in the guide.…

  18. Female Consumers Recreational Shopping Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbjot Singh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the core meaning of intrinsic shopping to understand their experimental aspects of recreational and leisure shopping. The study focus only on female shoppers of age group ranging from 25-30, and understand their mall experiences because this segment is newly transform into self dependent segment which have less social and familial liabilities and have enough enthusiasm to explore the world or their boundaries. The Grounded theory use for identification of recreational shopping themes which are (a seeking experiences and (b experimental shopping and each have respective sub themes. The themes are connected to the key idea that shoppers are motivated by their expectations and desires. The study uses social constructivism to find and understand the shopper meanings in real terms rather than imposing and judgment on them. The findings described the way people do recreational shopping and how shopping malls use as leisure space and become facilitators of recreational shopping activities. Females use malls to fulfill their recreational and leisure shopping experiences as this is the great way of enjoying shopping for females of small towns. In malls females not only enjoy product experiences but services experiences also which makes their shopping interesting. The way the female of this age category use malls help the marketers and retailers to understand this segment shopping patterns.

  19. The use and QA of biologically related models for treatment planning: short report of the TG-166 of the therapy physics committee of the AAPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen Li, X; Alber, Markus; Deasy, Joseph O; Jackson, Andrew; Ken Jee, Kyung-Wook; Marks, Lawrence B; Martel, Mary K; Mayo, Charles; Moiseenko, Vitali; Nahum, Alan E; Niemierko, Andrzej; Semenenko, Vladimir A; Yorke, Ellen D

    2012-03-01

    Treatment planning tools that use biologically related models for plan optimization and/or evaluation are being introduced for clinical use. A variety of dose-response models and quantities along with a series of organ-specific model parameters are included in these tools. However, due to various limitations, such as the limitations of models and available model parameters, the incomplete understanding of dose responses, and the inadequate clinical data, the use of biologically based treatment planning system (BBTPS) represents a paradigm shift and can be potentially dangerous. There will be a steep learning curve for most planners. The purpose of this task group is to address some of these relevant issues before the use of BBTPS becomes widely spread. In this report, the authors (1) discuss strategies, limitations, conditions, and cautions for using biologically based models and parameters in clinical treatment planning; (2) demonstrate the practical use of the three most commonly used commercially available BBTPS and potential dosimetric differences between biologically model based and dose-volume based treatment plan optimization and evaluation; (3) identify the desirable features and future directions in developing BBTPS; and (4) provide general guidelines and methodology for the acceptance testing, commissioning, and routine quality assurance (QA) of BBTPS.

  20. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMITTEE

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 29 SEPTEMBER 2003 Original: English This meeting was devoted to the main topics summarised below. 1 Follow-up from the meetings of TREF and the Finance Committee in September 2003 The last meeting of TREF had been devoted to presentations and clarifications on the 5-Yearly Review process. The content and planning of the 2005 Review are matters for the next Management, which will be presented to TREF next year. Underlining that due account has to be taken of the limited resources available to conduct such an exercise, the Staff Association stated that it looks forward to the concertation process at the SCC in preparing the next 5-Yearly Review to define an optimum set of topics in order to ensure that CERN can attract, retain and motivate the personnel that it needs to remain a centre of excellence. The Chairman of the SCC recalled that an information document on the Cost-Variation Index for 2004 had been transmitted to the Finance Committee last September and that complete information o...

  1. Improving the integration of recreation management with management of other natural resources by applying concepts of scale from ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayde c. Morse; Troy E. Hall; Linda E. Kruger

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we examine how issues of scale affect the integration of recreation management with the management of other natural resources on public lands. We present two theories used to address scale issues in ecology and explore how they can improve the two most widely applied recreation-planning frameworks. The theory of patch dynamics and hierarchy theory are...

  2. Problem solving through recreational mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Averbach, Bonnie

    1999-01-01

    Historically, many of the most important mathematical concepts arose from problems that were recreational in origin. This book takes advantage of that fact, using recreational mathematics - problems, puzzles and games - to teach students how to think critically. Encouraging active participation rather than just observation, the book focuses less on mathematical results than on how these results can be applied to thinking about problems and solving them. Each chapter contains a diverse array of problems in such areas as logic, number and graph theory, two-player games of strategy, solitaire ga

  3. Craniomaxillofacial fractures during recreational baseball and softball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Matthew J; Doerr, Timothy D

    2004-10-01

    Baseball and softball are leading causes of sports-related facial trauma in the United States. We review our institutional experience (Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, NY) with these injuries and discuss measures to reduce their incidence. We review our institutions experience with facial fractures sustained during the course of a softball or baseball game over a 12-year period. A total of 38 patients were identified and medical records analyzed for patient demographics, type of impact, and fracture location. The male-to-female ratio was 3.2:1; mean age was 24.2 years, with 17 (45%) of the injuries occurring in the pediatric population. The majority of the injuries were caused by direct impact with the ball (68%), while player-player collisions (18%) and impact from a swung bat (13%) were responsible for the remaining injuries. There were a total of 39 fractures; 18 fractures (46%) involved the midface (level 2), skull (level 1) fractures accounted for 12 (31%), while 9 (23%) were mandibular (level 3) fractures. With 68% of the injuries resulting from a ball impact, we endorse the recommendations of the Consumer Product Safety Commission for the use of low-impact National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment-approved baseballs and softballs for youth and recreational leagues.

  4. Training needs of recreation staff at recreation centres: Supervising ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results suggest that staff do not possess the basic recreation knowledge and that, in turn, may lead to unnecessary work pressure on the supervising area manager. In the local government, procedures are already in place that could help the staff if they needed funding for further training. Unfortunately, the available ...

  5. Activities of the research committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, A.; Shirai, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Osugi, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Ishida, T.; Shimazaki, J. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-01-01

    The department of Nuclear Energy System serves as a secretarial of the following four research committees organized by JAERI; Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, Atomic and Molecular Data Research Committee, Research Committee on Reactor Physics and Research Committee on Marine Reactors. The purpose and the expected task of each committee are summarized here. The detailed activities of each committee are presented in this paper. (author)

  6. 75 FR 49547 - Renewal of the Charter of the United States International Telecommunication Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... of the Charter of the United States International Telecommunication Advisory Committee SUMMARY: The Charter of the International Telecommunication Advisory Committee (ITAC) has been renewed for an... Department of State with respect to, and provide strategic planning recommendations on, telecommunication and...

  7. 76 FR 2883 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Wyoming Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... orientation and ethics training for new members and brief the committee on civil rights issues in the State. A... Justice, Denver. The committee will discuss recent Commission and regional activities, and plan future...

  8. Recreational Assets in the State of Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This dataset is meant to be a comprehensive database of recreational assets in public areas. Recreational assets are considered amenities provided to the public for...

  9. 36 CFR 71.10 - Special recreation permits and special recreation permit fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special recreation permits and special recreation permit fees. 71.10 Section 71.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.10 Special recreation permits and special...

  10. Recreation conflicts on Mt. Evans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry J. Vaske; Karin Wittmann; Susan Laidlaw; Maureen P. Donnelly

    1995-01-01

    This study examines recreation conflict at Mt. Evans, Colorado; a high visibility area that attracts both hunters and non-hunters. Two types of conflict were distinguished: goal interference and conflict of values. Data were obtained from a series of on-site and mailed surveys. For hunting related events (e.g. seeing an animal being shot, hearing...

  11. Writing of water and recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda E. Kruger

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a personal perspective on water and recreation including challenges for managers and researchers and approaches to contemporary issues. The article explores the relationship between group identify and connection to place, developed through trecreation activities, and engagement in stewardhsip and sustainability activities.

  12. Main Elements for Upscaling Recreation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Termansen, Mette

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information on the main elements used to scale up modelled local visitor flow data to regional level based on recreational de-mand models. These models are described in Report #1. This report also provides information on data sources such as spatial data (e.g. land cov...

  13. Water Demand at Recreation Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Simon; Hughes, Trevor C

    1980-01-01

    Design criteria for drinking water systems at recreation developments, particularly summer home type, cause frequent confrontations with regulatory agencies. Developers claim extremely low water use rates due to low occupancy rates, but regulatory agencies are concerned about changes over time from essentially weekend use to more permanent residency and also about occasional peak day water demands similar to those...

  14. Water Recreation and Illness Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Background: The health endpoint of prior studies of water recreation has been the occurrence gastrointestinal (GI) of illness. The use of this dichotomous health outcome fails to take into account the range of symptom severity among those with GI illness, as well as thos...

  15. Heel Pain in Recreational Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzoli, Allan S.; Pollina, Frank S.

    1989-01-01

    Provides physicians with the signs, symptoms, and management of heel/sole pain in recreational runners (usually due to plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and calcaneal stress fractures). Remedies involve palliative treatment of symptoms, correction of underlying biomechanical problems, and flexibility exercises. (SM)

  16. The science of trail surveys: Recreation ecology provides new tools for managing wilderness trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Jeffrey L.; Wimpey, Jeremy F.; Park, Logan O.

    2011-01-01

    Recreation ecology examines the effects of recreation on protected area ecosystems. One core focus of recreation ecology research is trail science, including the development of efficient protocols to assess and monitor the type and severity of resource impacts, analyses to improve knowledge of factors that influence trail conditions, and studies to assist land managers in improving trail design, maintenance, and visitor management. This article reviews alternative trail survey methodologies most useful for the management of wilderness and backcountry trail networks. Illustrations and implications from survey data for trail planning, design, and management are included.

  17. 36 CFR 12.11 - Recreational activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreational activities. 12.11 Section 12.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL CEMETERY REGULATIONS § 12.11 Recreational activities. Engaging in a recreational activity...

  18. 50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreational activities. 36.31 Section 36... Recreational activities. (a) Public recreational activities within the Alaska National Wildlife Refuges are authorized as long as such activities are conducted in a manner compatible with the purposes for which the...

  19. 46 CFR 67.23 - Recreational endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreational endorsement. 67.23 Section 67.23 Shipping... DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Forms of Documentation; Endorsements; Eligibility of Vessel § 67.23 Recreational endorsement. (a) A recreational endorsement entitles a vessel to pleasure use only. (b) Any vessel eligible...

  20. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE RECREATIONAL AND COMMERCIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of the recreational and commercial skiboat linefishery in the Transkei was conducted from March 1997 to April 1999. Effort by commercial skiboats was substantially higher than by recreational skiboats, and catch rates on commercial boats were much higher than rates on recreational boats. Catch rates in the ...

  1. Does zoning winter recreationists reduce recreation conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrey D. Miller; Jerry J. Vaske; John R. Squires; Lucretia E. Olson; Elizabeth K. Roberts

    2017-01-01

    Parks and protected area managers use zoning to decrease interpersonal conflict between recreationists. Zoning, or segregation, of recreation - often by nonmotorized and motorized activity - is designed to limit physical interaction while providing recreation opportunities to both groups. This article investigated the effectiveness of zoning to reduce recreation...

  2. Large Indoor Sports and Recreation Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Todd

    This paper presents an overview and analysis of field houses, stadiums, arenas, and campus recreation centers. All are large indoor sports or recreation facilities. In general, stadiums and arenas are spectator facilities while field houses and campus recreation centers are primarily designed for activity. A college field house is a structure that…

  3. Projected participation in marine recreation: 2005 & 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon R. Leeworthy; J. Michael Bowker; Justin H. Hospital; Edward A. Stone

    2005-01-01

    Background and Definitions. NSRE 2000 is the first National Survey to include a broad assessment of the Nation’s participation in marine recreation. Approximately every five years since 1955, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has conducted a National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife Associated Recreation. But the marine component of recreation was only broken...

  4. Sustainable Development of Lithuanian Seacoast Recreational Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Abromas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Recreational architecture is a branch of architectural activity whose main object is formation of recreational spaces (territories, buildings, complexes and equipment. The goal of recreational architecture is to create optimal (comfortable, lovely and realizable environment for all recreation types and forms. This goal is realized by projects which are based on scientific research and recommendations. This activity needs more than casual work and living environment. It needs special space and equipment: territory, water area, buildings, and rooms. Everything can be called recreational environment. Recreational environment can be of various dimensional scales: enormous seaside or lake areas intended for recreation, resorts, recreational institution complexes and many single buildings, beaches, forest parks, pools. Recreational environment is possible not only out of town but in town as well. Beginning of recreational architecture is observed in antique cultures, but as a separate specific architectural activity branch it rapidly began to spread in last century first half and in Lithuania – in the last four decades. In this work, analysis of evaluating recreational architecture is made seeking to reveal recreational architecture evaluating criteria and their use .Article in Lithuanian

  5. New Hampshire - an outdoor recreation trend leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    George T. Hamilton

    1980-01-01

    It seems appropriate (at least to me) that a national symposium focusing on trends in outdoor recreation be held in the Granite State; a state which has played historically a role in the evolution of a variety of recreation activities far out of proportion to its size and population. After all, outdoor recreation is more than 150 years old here in New Hampshire.

  6. Let's Take a Risk with Adventure Recreation!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Stewart; Meier, Joel F.

    1982-01-01

    Three main concepts relating to risk recreation are: (1) understanding how an individual evaluates a recreational activity; (2) understanding that the reasons individuals initially participate in risk recreation may be different from those which perpetuate participation; and (3) understanding that factors other than the individuals and the…

  7. A National Study of Recreation Impact Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Paul B.; Frank, James E.

    1984-01-01

    To determine the usage and character of recreation impact fees, a national survey (using a two-stage mail questionnaire) of parks and recreation agencies was conducted. The use of recreation impact fees was observed in 12 states. Details are given as to the various uses. (CJB)

  8. 28 CFR 551.115 - Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation. 551.115 Section 551.115... Pretrial Inmates § 551.115 Recreation. (a) When consistent with institution security and good order... opportunities: (1) One hour daily of outside recreation, weather permitting; or (2) Two hours daily of indoor...

  9. 36 CFR 261.17 - Recreation fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation fees. 261.17 Section 261.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.17 Recreation fees. Failure to pay any recreation fee is prohibited...

  10. Approaches to measuring cultural diversity in recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieh-Lu Li; James D. Absher; Yi-Chung Hsu; Alan R. Graefe

    2008-01-01

    Measuring cultural diversity in recreation has become an important topic because of the increasing coverage of and interest in ethnicity and cross-cultural aspects of recreation. Introducing theories and methods from established disciplines other than leisure studies/recreation and park studies is necessary to understand this important issue. In this article, we first...

  11. Urban Recreational Fisheries in the Australian Coastal Zone: The Sustainability Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl P. McPhee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recreational fishing is an important wildlife harvesting activity in urban coastal areas, and recreational harvest in these areas can frequently exceed the commercial harvest. Recreational fishing is a key way that many members of the public experience the environment. The activity enhances social capital, promotes respect for nature, provides health benefits and can provide economic benefits to coastal communities. It is also an important driver of the science on aquatic animals and habitats, and an important tangible reason for many members of the public to conserve and protect aquatic resources. Overall, there has been little specific consideration of urban recreational fisheries management in Australia, despite the paramount importance of urban areas as a focus of recreational fishing activity. This paper identifies that in order to maximize individual and societal benefits from recreational fishing, there needs to be a refocussing of management with the aim of being more holistic. Historically, fisheries management in Australia has focused on maximum sustainable yield (MSY or maximum economic yield (MEY which is relevant for the commercial fishing sector, but neither of these is directly relevant to recreational fisheries. This paper identifies that Urban Fisheries Management Plans are required that recognize the specific issues associated with urban recreational fisheries. These plans need to coordinate within and between levels of government and have clear management objectives relevant to urban recreational fisheries. Enhanced opportunities for meaningful citizen science can be incorporated at multiple levels within these plans and this can engender public support for environmental stewardship, as well as fill a very important gap in the knowledge base necessary for managing the activity. As urban recreational fisheries are often occurring in highly modified or degraded habitats, a central element of these plans needs to be habitat

  12. Transoral resection of pharyngeal cancer: summary of a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, November 6-7, 2011, Arlington, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, David J; Ridge, John A; Brizel, David M; Holsinger, F Christopher; Haughey, Bruce H; O'Sullivan, Brian; Genden, Eric M; Beitler, Jonathan J; Weinstein, Gregory S; Quon, Harry; Chepeha, Douglas B; Ferris, Robert L; Weber, Randal S; Movsas, Benjamin; Waldron, John; Lowe, Val; Ramsey, Scott; Manola, Judith; Yueh, Bevan; Carey, Thomas E; Bekelman, Justin E; Konski, Andre A; Moore, Eric; Forastiere, Arlene; Schuller, David E; Lynn, Jean; Ullmann, Claudio Dansky

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances now permit resection of many pharyngeal tumors through the open mouth, an approach that can greatly reduce the morbidity of surgical exposure. These transoral techniques are being rapidly adopted by the surgical community and hold considerable promise. On November 6-7, 2011, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address how to further investigate the use of transoral surgery, both in the good prognosis human papillomavirus (HPV)-initiated oropharyngeal cancers, and in those with HPV-unrelated disease. The proceedings of this meeting are summarized. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Review and Recommendations for the Interagency Ship Structure Committee’s Fiscal 1983 Research Program and Five-Year Research Program Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-31

    Institute, San Antonio , TX ACTIVATION DATE: November 26, 1979 CONTRACT FUNDING: $41,252 SSC LONG-RANGE GOAL: Advanced Concepts and Long-Range Planning...Urde .k4eA! We.Ldinq SeAvicu , Inc., StaughteA, LA Dr. S. Ibarra , (84)., 5%. MetttLgi/caL Engineea, Gul6 Sci~ence S Tecitnotogy Co., Pit~bwrVh, PA Mr. I...1276 PROJECT TITLE: LONG-TERM CORROSION FATIGUE OF WELDED MARINE STEELS INVESTIGATOR: Dr. O.H. Burnside CONTRACTOR: Southwest Research Institute, San

  14. The Executive Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legon, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  15. Annual Plan - Fiscal Year 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Includes Strategic Plan Update and Draft Plans for Oversight of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Based Upon the Enterprise Risk Management Integrated Framework Model Developed by the Committee of Sponsoring Orgs of the Treadway Commission

  16. Gateway National Recreational Area - Sandy Hook Unit : automated fee entrance plaza and intelligent transportation system technical requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center) is providing technical : support to Sandy Hook, a unit of the Gateway National Recreation Area, in the planning and : concept development for possible Intelligent Transportation Systems ...

  17. Shark recreational fisheries: Status, challenges, and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Austin J; Hammerschlag, Neil; Danylchuk, Andy J; Cooke, Steven J

    2017-05-01

    For centuries, the primary manner in which humans have interacted with sharks has been fishing. A combination of their slow-growing nature and high use-values have resulted in population declines for many species around the world, and to date the vast majority of fisheries-related work on sharks has focused on the commercial sector. Shark recreational fishing remains an overlooked area of research despite the fact that these practices are popular globally and could present challenges to their populations. Here we provide a topical overview of shark recreational fisheries, highlighting their history and current status. While recreational fishing can provide conservation benefits under certain circumstances, we focus our discourse on the relatively understudied, potentially detrimental impacts these activities may have on shark physiology, behavior, and fitness. We took this angle given the realized but potentially underestimated significance of recreational fishing for shark conservation management plans and stock assessments, in hopes of creating a dialogue around sustainability. We also present a series of broad and focused research questions and underpin areas of future research need to assist with the development of this emergent area of research.

  18. Recreational activities performed with neoplasia carrier Inpatients in a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline de Castro Moura

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at apprehending the contribution of recreational activities in the treatment of hospitalized cancer patients and identifying the most stimulating resources for them. This is a qualitative research of phenomenological nature, it was approved by the Ethics in Research Committee, Protocol 139/2010. It was conducted with patients with cancer in a general hospital, located in Alfenas, in March and April, 2011.The research began from these guiding questions: What are your thoughts on the recreational team work and the activities they do? What do you suggest for this group to be developed? It was perceived that ludic activities help patients to face the disease, that they eased the interaction between the recreational group and the multiprofessional team, besides providing a happy and welcoming environment. The most well accepted activities were music and games the clowns provided. We suggest implementing the humanization by using ludic resources.

  19. The Audit Committee Impact

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Study - Executive Summary In 2002, new corporate governance-related guidelines were introduced in Switzerland that included recommendations on the establishment, composition, structure and processes of audit committees. This study presents new evidence on audit committee patterns and trends at Swiss listed companies, as well as on audit committee effectiveness. The results of this study are important to individuals and organizations dealing with audit committees, incl...

  20. Points from the September Committee Meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    After a turbulent year, the Committee meetings during the week beginning 16th September took a calmer nature, even if the follow-up of the cost-to-completion review was still a central topic of discussion. The detailed Action Plan and timetable for implementing the recommendations of the External Review Committee were among the principle items. The Plan is based on actions that address specific recommendations, from the redeployment of staff to the LHC to improved financial controls and budgetary tools. It was well received by the Committees and will be presented to the full CERN Council in December. In the meantime, many actions are underway, such as the restructuring of the Accelerator Sector, and the establishment of an external committee to review costs and progress of the LHC on an annual basis. The Finance Committee examined the proposed budget for 2003, which will also be presented to Council for approval in December. In addition, the Committee approved the volume of Industrial Support contracts for 20...

  1. NASA science committee appointments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-10-01

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin has made three new appointments to the NASA Advisory Council's (NAC' Science Committee, NASA announced on 22 September. Edward David, president of EED, Inc., and science advisor to the President from 1970 to 1973, will serve as the committee-s chair. Also appointed to the committee were Owen Garriott, a retired scientist astronaut, and Alan Stern, executive director of the Space Science and Engineering Division of the Southwest Research Institute (San Antonio, Tex.). David, Garriott, and Stern-who are among nine new members of the full advisory committee that were announced on 22 September-will replace three members of the Science Committee who resigned in August: Science Committee Chair Charles Kennel (Scripps Institution of Oceanography), Wesley Huntress (Carnegie Institution of Washington), and Eugene Levy (Rice University). The NAC's next public meeting will be held on 12 October at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

  2. 75 FR 65641 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... ongoing communications programs, such as FDA's Strategic Plan for Risk Communication, FDA's Transparency... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice... announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the Risk Communication Advisory Committee. This meeting...

  3. 42 CFR 460.138 - Committees with community input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Committees with community input. 460.138 Section... community input. A PACE organization must establish one or more committees, with community input, to do the... implementation of, and results from, the quality assessment and performance improvement plan. (c) Provide input...

  4. Strengthening the Capacity of the Economic Committee of the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Economic Committee of the National Assembly (ECNA) of Viet Nam is mandated to review drafts of legislation related to economic management, business activity and monetary affairs (including banking), and to supervise the implementation of state plans for socioeconomic development. The Committee receives ...

  5. 77 FR 9219 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... the Creation of a Strategic Plan on Accelerator Science Report on National Ignition Facility Workshop... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC...

  6. 77 FR 36039 - Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... discussion of FICEMS strategic planning process A discussion of recently finalized recommendations from the... Security, to provide administrative support to the Interagency Committee, including scheduling meetings... Response to Recommendations from the National Transportation Safety Board Update on Helicopter Emergency...

  7. Effects of Changed Aircraft Noise Exposure on the Use of Outdoor Recreational Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norun Hjertager Krog

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines behavioural responses to changes in aircraft noise exposure in local outdoor recreational areas near airports. Results from a panel study conducted in conjunction with the relocation of Norway’s main airport in 1998 are presented. One recreational area was studied at each airport site. The samples (n = 1,264/1,370 were telephone interviewed about their use of the area before and after the change. Results indicate that changed aircraft noise exposure may influence individual choices to use local outdoor recreational areas, suggesting that careful considerations are needed in the planning of air routes over local outdoor recreational areas. However, considerable stability in use, and also fluctuations in use unrelated to the changes in noise conditions were found. Future studies of noise impacts should examine a broader set of coping mechanisms, like intra- and temporal displacement. Also, the role of place attachment, and the substitutability of local areas should be studied.

  8. Effects of Changed Aircraft Noise Exposure on the Use of Outdoor Recreational Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krog, Norun Hjertager; Engdahl, Bo; Tambs, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines behavioural responses to changes in aircraft noise exposure in local outdoor recreational areas near airports. Results from a panel study conducted in conjunction with the relocation of Norway’s main airport in 1998 are presented. One recreational area was studied at each airport site. The samples (n = 1,264/1,370) were telephone interviewed about their use of the area before and after the change. Results indicate that changed aircraft noise exposure may influence individual choices to use local outdoor recreational areas, suggesting that careful considerations are needed in the planning of air routes over local outdoor recreational areas. However, considerable stability in use, and also fluctuations in use unrelated to the changes in noise conditions were found. Future studies of noise impacts should examine a broader set of coping mechanisms, like intra- and temporal displacement. Also, the role of place attachment, and the substitutability of local areas should be studied. PMID:21139867

  9. Effects of changed aircraft noise exposure on the use of outdoor recreational areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krog, Norun Hjertager; Engdahl, Bo; Tambs, Kristian

    2010-11-01

    This paper examines behavioural responses to changes in aircraft noise exposure in local outdoor recreational areas near airports. Results from a panel study conducted in conjunction with the relocation of Norway's main airport in 1998 are presented. One recreational area was studied at each airport site. The samples (n = 1,264/1,370) were telephone interviewed about their use of the area before and after the change. Results indicate that changed aircraft noise exposure may influence individual choices to use local outdoor recreational areas, suggesting that careful considerations are needed in the planning of air routes over local outdoor recreational areas. However, considerable stability in use, and also fluctuations in use unrelated to the changes in noise conditions were found. Future studies of noise impacts should examine a broader set of coping mechanisms, like intra- and temporal displacement. Also, the role of place attachment, and the substitutability of local areas should be studied.

  10. Methodology for the Valuation of Forest Recreation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Termansen, Mette

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this report #1 is to provide an overview and description of the methodology and data sources used in order to evaluate forest recreation in terms of monetary values and visitor numbers on a spatially explicit basis using an indirect valuation methodology. Report #2 reports the main...... ele-ments used to predict and upscale visitor flows and site values to the region of North Zealand and the results. Background to the report is the development of the Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) model developed by JRC, which maps the recreation potential in Europe. The ROS is based...... on a recreation service supply approach where indices of recreation potentials are linked with zoning of areas in terms of proximity versus remoteness from where people live. The ROS maps opportunities rather than the actual recreation taking place. A validation of the ROS model has been made using revealed...

  11. 78 FR 54680 - NASA Federal Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... specific entity of interest, i.e., either the Council or one of its eight (8) Committees. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel--The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel provides advice and recommendations to the NASA.... space- based PNT policy, planning, program management, and funding profiles in relation to the current...

  12. Literacy Committee: Creating a Community of Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preddy, Leslie B.

    2009-01-01

    In many schools, the school librarian is solely responsible to ensure the implementation of the school's reading program, technology plan, and information skills training. It may be a worthy goal to be a superhero, but school librarians should understand that they don't have to do all this alone. A school Literacy Committee can be a tremendous…

  13. 77 FR 61380 - Census Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... outside-user perspective and advice on research and early design plans for the 2020 Census, the American... address issues related to the American Community Survey, Mixed-Mode Data Collection, and early 2020 Census... disseminated to diverse racial and ethnic populations and other users. The Committee is established in...

  14. 77 FR 38768 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Smart Grid Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: The Smart Grid... the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel transition plan, review the status of the research subcommittee...

  15. Design of ropeways of the mountain recreational centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseva Anna Victorovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ropeways are an eco-friendly and economically viable transport used for transportation of passengers and shipment. Ropeways are widely applied during construction in the conditions of a mountainous relief. The state programs aimed at the development of mountain recreational centers (MRCs stipulate ropeways construction in accordance with the MRC situational plan. Safety and comfort of a ropeway are defined not only by its technical characteristics, but also by its linking to the relief, MRC facilities and infrastructure. The article describes the main design stages of a ropeway starting from the concept, a choice of its axis, determination of capacity, type of a ropeway, requirements to the track before the design of drop-off/pick-up zones. For each design stage the explanations, which reflect real work specifics, are provided, together with the technical characteristics for calculations and solution samples. The concept defines the functional purpose of a ropeway: ski slopes/ tourist zones/ recreation areas; the season of ropeway operation, the scheme of communications with the MRC objects, the capacity of reception base, the minimum distance from the bottom stations to residential complexes. The critical decisions of axis and track design are carried out by a coalition of designer-planners, expert designers and ropeway technologists. The ropeway, which performs transport function, unites all the objects of the mountain recreational center into a single complex. The optimum placement of a ropeway deals with the questions of comfort, safety and profitability, therefore greatly contributing to the quality of the whole ropeway project. During the MRC development one should consider the questions of infrastructure expansion, year-round ropeway operation and increasing ski tracks capacity, which will demand ropeway modernization and/ or changes in the situational plan of the mountain recreational center.

  16. Does Zoning Winter Recreationists Reduce Recreation Conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aubrey D; Vaske, Jerry J; Squires, John R; Olson, Lucretia E; Roberts, Elizabeth K

    2017-01-01

    Parks and protected area managers use zoning to decrease interpersonal conflict between recreationists. Zoning, or segregation, of recreation-often by non-motorized and motorized activity-is designed to limit physical interaction while providing recreation opportunities to both groups. This article investigated the effectiveness of zoning to reduce recreation conflict in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area in Colorado, USA. Despite a zoning management system, established groomed travel routes were used by both non-motorized recreationists (backcountry skiers, snowboarders, snowshoers) and motorized recreationists (snowmobilers). We hypothesized that persistent recreation conflict reported by non-motorized recreationists was the result of recreation occurring in areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use, mostly along groomed routes. We performed a geospatial analysis of recreation [from Global Positioning System (GPS) points, n = 1,233,449] in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area to identify areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use. We then surveyed non-motorized recreationists (n = 199) to test whether reported conflict is higher for respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with respondents traveling outside areas of mixed-use. Results from the geospatial analysis showed that only 0.7 % of the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area contained recreation from both groups, however that area contained 14.8 % of all non-motorized recreation and 49.1 % of all motorized recreation. Survey analysis results showed higher interpersonal conflict for all five standard conflict variables among non-motorized respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with those traveling outside mixed-use areas. Management implications and recommendations for increasing the effectiveness of zoning are provided.

  17. Committee Effectiveness in Higher Education: The Strengths and Weaknesses of Group Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on five models of committee effectiveness for purposes of this assessment will lend insight into the strengths and weaknesses of utilizing a structured action plan as a guide to achieving and maintaining optimum committee effectiveness in higher education. In the compilation of the strengths and weaknesses of committee decision making,…

  18. 76 FR 23340 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the purposes of Sections 29 and 182b of the Atomic Energy Act (42 U.S.C. 2039, 2232b), the Advisory Committee on Reactor...:30 a.m.: Advanced Reactor Research Plan (Open/Closed)--The Committee will hear presentations by and...

  19. High Biodiversity of Green Infrastructure Does Not Contribute to Recreational Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Sikorska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Urban lakes, especially those of natural origin, provide ecosystem services, recreation being one of the most important and highly valued by city dwellers. Fulfilling the needs of city residents to relax and have contact with nature has become a priority in urbanized areas and has been proven to positively affect people’s health and well-being. The recreational potential of water bodies was identified to be the most important aspect of ecosystem services to the residents of the neighboring areas. An assessment of recreational ecosystem services (RES provisioning to society based on the real time spent by the citizens and housing values in the urban–rural gradient revealed that the economic benefits of lakes differ in urbanized, suburban and rural landscapes. The growth of cities has led to an increased population density in the surroundings of ecologically valuable areas, resulting in higher pressure from visitors seeking recreational areas. Along with urbanization, the impoverishment of ecosystem functions takes place, limiting their capability to provide ecosystem services. In this work, the provisioning of recreational ecosystem services of 28 floodplain lakes located along the urban–rural gradient of the Warsaw agglomeration was assessed. The relationship between the ecological value of the water bodies, measured using naturalness indices, and the recreational ecosystem services they can provide was assessed. The results showed that the floodplain lakes located along the urban–rural gradient are of great importance to the citizens due to their recreational potential. The provisioning of recreational ecosystem services is poorly connected with the ecological characteristics of the floodplain lakes. Only hemeroby was significantly correlated with provisioning, and there was no relationship with factors such as naturalness of vegetation or water quality, demonstrating that public preference was not generally influenced by high

  20. 75 FR 22621 - Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... Federal land managers as they select projects to be conducted on Federal lands or that will benefit... more than one Committee. Nominees will be evaluated based on their education, training, and experience... product harvester groups; 2. Represent developed outdoor recreation, off-highway vehicle users, or...

  1. Fuel used for off-highway recreation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, P.S.; Trumble, D.; Lu, A.

    1994-07-01

    The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA requires that tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation by transferred from the Highway Trust Fund to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund of individual states equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation at the state level by different vehicle types. This report documents this estimation procedure. For this estimation procedure, off-highway recreational fuel use was defined as Federally taxed gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, or special fuel used in recreational motorized vehicles on recreational trails or back country terrain. Fuel used in outdoor non-engine recreational equipment, such as camp stoves, heaters, and lanterns, was excluded from the analysis. Vehicle types included in this study were: pickup truck, light utility vehicle, motorcycle, all terrain vehicle (ATV), and snowmobile.

  2. Outdoor recreation in forest policy and legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Carsten; Pouta, Eija; Gentin, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The benefists of outdoor recreation and the need for recreation inventories and monitoring are described in various policy and legislation documents at the European level. The objective of this paper is to analyse how these recreational aspects are reflected at the national level in core forest...... indicates that a consistent forest recreation monitoring system, linked to sustainable forest management, as describes for example in the Helsinki process, should be better transferred into national policuy and legislation. Compareable data across Europe could then provide a sound base for making decisions...

  3. 36 CFR 72.13 - Action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Recreation Recovery Program and the local government's overall recreation system goals. The Action Plan... costs of implementation should accompany these priorities. (e) Evaluation and Updating of Action Program... involvement is essential in the evaluation and monitoring of the Action Program. Copies of approved Action...

  4. Community-based recreational football

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Ditte Marie; Bjerre, Eik; Krustrup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    is limited and the majority of prostate cancer survivors remain sedentary. Hence, novel approaches to evaluate and promote physical activity are warranted. This paper presents the rationale behind the delivery and evaluation of community-based recreational football offered in existing football clubs under...... the Danish Football Association to promote quality of life and physical activity adherence in prostate cancer survivors. The RE-AIM framework will be applied to evaluate the impact of the intervention including outcomes both at the individual and organizational level. By introducing community-based sport...

  5. 36 CFR 71.9 - Establishment of recreation use fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Establishment of recreation... THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.9 Establishment of recreation use fees. (a) Recreation use fees shall be established by all outdoor recreation administering agencies of the Department of the Interior...

  6. 36 CFR 30.3 - Recreation District I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation District I. 30.3... WHISKEYTOWN-SHASTA-TRINITY NATIONAL RECREATION AREA: ZONING STANDARDS FOR WHISKEYTOWN UNIT § 30.3 Recreation... Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity National Recreation Area delineated as “Recreation District I” on a map bearing the...

  7. 76 FR 10915 - Notice of Use Authorizations; Special Recreation Permits, Other Than on Developed Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Use Authorizations; Special Recreation Permits, Other Than on Developed Recreation Sites; Adjustment in Fees AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is adjusting certain special recreation permit fees for...

  8. Mapping landscape potential for outdoor recreation using different archetypical recreation user groups in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komossa, Franziska; van der Zanden, Emma H.; Schulp, Catharina J.E.; Verburg, Peter H.

    2018-01-01

    Engagement with the natural environment and public enjoyment of access to farmland and woodland often takes the form of outdoor recreation. Numerous studies on landscape preferences of outdoor recreation have focused on individual characteristics and attitudes of recreation users. Although the

  9. Recreation fees: attitudes and perceptions of Region 6 Forest Service employees in recreation positions and non-recreation positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen Robinson; Robert C. Burns; Alan Graefe

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the attitudes and perceptions of U.S. Forest Service employees concerning the Recreation Fee Demonstration Program (RFDP) in the Pacific Northwest Region (Region 6, Oregon and Washington), and their perceptions of how recreation fees should be used once the money is collected. Employees who reported that they were in a recreationrelated position...

  10. Does Zoning Winter Recreationists Reduce Recreation Conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aubrey D.; Vaske, Jerry J.; Squires, John R.; Olson, Lucretia E.; Roberts, Elizabeth K.

    2017-01-01

    Parks and protected area managers use zoning to decrease interpersonal conflict between recreationists. Zoning, or segregation, of recreation—often by non-motorized and motorized activity—is designed to limit physical interaction while providing recreation opportunities to both groups. This article investigated the effectiveness of zoning to reduce recreation conflict in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area in Colorado, USA. Despite a zoning management system, established groomed travel routes were used by both non-motorized recreationists (backcountry skiers, snowboarders, snowshoers) and motorized recreationists (snowmobilers). We hypothesized that persistent recreation conflict reported by non-motorized recreationists was the result of recreation occurring in areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use, mostly along groomed routes. We performed a geospatial analysis of recreation [from Global Positioning System (GPS) points, n = 1,233,449] in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area to identify areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use. We then surveyed non-motorized recreationists ( n = 199) to test whether reported conflict is higher for respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with respondents traveling outside areas of mixed-use. Results from the geospatial analysis showed that only 0.7 % of the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area contained recreation from both groups, however that area contained 14.8 % of all non-motorized recreation and 49.1 % of all motorized recreation. Survey analysis results showed higher interpersonal conflict for all five standard conflict variables among non-motorized respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with those traveling outside mixed-use areas. Management implications and recommendations for increasing the effectiveness of zoning are provided.

  11. A temporal importance-performance analysis of recreation attributes on national forests: a technical document supporting the Forest Service update of the 2010 RPA Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley E. Askew; J.M. Bowker; Donald B.K. English; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Gary T. Green

    2017-01-01

    The outdoor recreation component of the 2010 Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment provided projections and modeling of participation and intensity by activity. Results provided insight into the future of multiple outdoor recreation activities through projections of participation rates, numbers of participants, days per participant, and total activity days. These...

  12. Outlook for outdoor recreation in the northern United States. A technical document supporting the Northern Forest Futures Project with projections through 2060

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. Bowker; Ashley E. Askew

    2013-01-01

    We develop projections of participation and use for 17 nature-based outdoor recreation activities through 2060 for the Northern United States. Similar to the 2010 Resources Planning Act (RPA) assessment, this report develops recreation projections under futures wherein population growth, socioeconomic conditions, land use changes, and climate are allowed to change over...

  13. Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge, Nebraska : Master Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Master plan for the recreational and public use development of Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge, near Valentine, Nebraska. This plan outlines the development...

  14. Minimizing conflict between recreation and nature conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    1993-01-01

    Most greenways are created with multiple goals in mind. Two of the foremost are providing recreational opportunities and conserving nature. Although these two goals frequently enhance each other, sometimes pursuing both simultaneously can result in conflicts. In some cases, recreational use can so severely degrade an area that not only is the environment damaged but...

  15. Recreational scuba divers' knowledge regarding the audiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sport of scuba diving may be associated with possible injuries, especially those concerning the auditory system. Research available focuses on the implications of recreational scuba diving on the auditory system. However, there is a lack of information regarding the knowledge of recreational scuba divers ...

  16. Campus Recreation and Perceived Academic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragheb, Mounir G.; McKinney, Jennifer

    1993-01-01

    Examined interrelationships among campus recreation participation, leisure satisfaction, and academic stress. Findings from 343 university and community college students revealed that the more students participated in recreation activities, the less they perceived academic stress, and that the greater satisfaction with leisure that students…

  17. Carrying capacity: maintaining outdoor recreation quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Lime; George H. Stankey

    1971-01-01

    A discussion of (1) what is meant by the concept of recreational carrying capacity; (2) what is known about capacities in terms of both how resources and experience of visitors are affected by recreational use; and (3) what alternative procedures the administrator can use to manage both resources and visitors for capacity.

  18. Adapting Activities for Therapeutic Recreation Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Recreational activities can be adapted for disabled persons by using a functional device (such as a handle or extension), using an alternative stimulus (such as using tactile cues for blind persons), changing the participation technique (such as wheelchair basketball), or creating transitional recreation experiences (teaching prerequisite skills…

  19. Sustainability in outdoor recreation and tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Winter; Kelly Bricker; Jeremy. Schultz

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor recreation and tourism represents a major service by which the public identifies with and better understands natural resources, even to the extent that it can foster environmental stewardship (for example, see Winter and Chavez 2008). Yet, myriad threats to recreation and tourism exist which need to be addressed. Addressing these threats can be...

  20. Factors Influencing Recreational Use of Private Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald F. Dennis; Donald F. Dennis

    1990-01-01

    Probit analysis was used to estimate relationships between the probability that forest land was used for recreation and characteristics of the forest, owner, and surrounding community. Land held by owners with more formal education or those reared in large cities was more likely to be used for recreation while the opposite was true for land held by older owners....

  1. A Cross-Regional Comparison of Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieh-Lu Li; Harry C. Zinn; Susan C. Barro; Michael J. Manfredo

    2003-01-01

    We studied outdoor recreation patterns among older hunting license holders in Pennsylvania and Colorado to better understand aspects of five trends that promise to impact outdoor recreation preferences, behavior, and management priorities: Sunbelt population growth, declining residential stability, urbanization, aging, and increasing levels of formal education. Results...

  2. Stakeholders' perceptions about recreational events within Marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stakeholders' perceptions about recreational events within Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in the South Coast of KwaZulu- Natal, South Africa. ... The evidence shows that MPAs can support tourism and recreational activities andthey can be used as a tool to enhance tourism growth and local economic development.

  3. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation areas. 294.1 Section 294.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL AREAS Miscellaneous Provisions § 294.1 Recreation areas. Suitable areas of national forest land, other than wilderness...

  4. Solid Waste Management in Recreational Forest Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Charles S.

    The Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, requested the Bureau of Solid Waste Management to conduct a study of National Forest recreation areas to establish waste generation rates for major recreation activities and to determine the cost of solid waste handling for selected Forest Service Districts. This report describes the 1968 solid…

  5. A behavioral intervention tool for recreation managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.M. Burn; P.L. Winter

    2008-01-01

    Depreciative behaviors and other undesirable recreationist actions continue to be a topic of great interest for recreation management (fig. 1). Maintaining park ecosystems involves responding to and preventing damage from depreciative recreationist behavior, and recreation managers are charged with developing and selecting eff ective tools to address the costly and...

  6. Physical Education and Recreation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, M. L.; Van Vliet, M. L.

    Physical education and research programs, and recreational and athletic facilities, in Yugoslavia, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, England, and the U.S.S.R. are examined by two faculty members from the University of Alberta. This publication is an abridgement of their report on European approaches to physical education and recreation, giving their…

  7. United States of America: outdoor recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.Ken Cordell; G.Theodore Green; V.R. Leeworthy; R. Stephens; M.J. Fly; Carter J. Betz

    2005-01-01

    the first nationwide survey of outdoor recreation in the USA was conducted in 1960 for the outdoor recreation resources review commission (ORRC, 1962; Cordell et al., 1996). since that time, seven additional national surveys have been conducted, in 1965, 1970, 1972, 1977, 1983, 1995, and 2000/01 - summary details are presented in Table 16.1.

  8. Outdoor Recreation Action: Federal, State, Local, Private.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, George M., Ed.

    This booklet reports on outdoor recreation actions taken at the federal, state, local, and private levels. The Land and Water Conservation Fund and the financing of outdoor recreation on all levels are discussed. New agencies, personnel, reorganizations, resolutions, and recommendations for the organization and administration of outdoor recreation…

  9. UNBC: Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Pat

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC's) Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management (ORTM) Program, which focuses squarely on the management of outdoor recreation as it relates to conservation (i.e., in and around parks and protected areas), tourism that is both based in and concerned with the natural/cultural…

  10. Rugged Practices: Embodying Authenticity in Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda-Cook, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    When people recreate outdoors, they value the quality of the experience. This study examines rhetorical practices that sustain or undermine perceived authentic outdoor recreation experiences. I conducted a rhetorical analysis of my fieldnotes gathered through participant observation and interview transcripts of online and in-person interviews. I…

  11. Collegiate Recreation Student Employee as Student Leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Cara W; Carr, Julia Wallace

    2015-01-01

    Collegiate recreation student employment opportunities are found in such areas as facilities, intramurals, aquatics, fitness, and outdoor adventure. Recreation is one of the largest providers of student employment opportunities on campuses across the country with an important role in student employee leadership development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  12. Connecting Collegiate Recreation and Athletics to Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Cara W; Stenta, Donald A

    2015-01-01

    Collegiate recreation and intercollegiate athletics have an impact on individual, group, and community development of students who are participants, employees, and athletes and learn leadership within these environments. This chapter explores and applies leadership frameworks in recreation and athletics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  13. Intelligence and Past Use of Recreational Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmoth, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    One motivation for trying recreational drugs is the desire for novel experiences. More intelligent people tend to value novelty more highly and may therefore be more likely to have tried recreational drugs. Using data from a national survey, it is shown that intelligence tends to be positively related to the probabilities of having tried alcohol,…

  14. Recreation trends: indicators of environmental quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Feuchter

    1980-01-01

    As you probably know, tomorrow is Earth Day-80, the 10th anniversary of the original Earth Day, so it is certainly appropriate that we talk these next few days about environmental quality and the relationship of outdoor recreation to that quality. However, perhaps the title should be more of a question such as: Are recreation trends indicators of environmental quality...

  15. House Committee on Veterans' Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... following events are open to the press: WHO: House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs WHAT: Legislative Hearing on ... From Shielding Dangerous Doctors 13 Oct On Thursday, House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs Committee Chairman Phil Roe ( ...

  16. FREQUENCY OF PULSE AS MARKER BALLAST IN SPORTIVE RECREATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosta Goranović

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Every fisical activity requires immediatly adoption and respons cardio vascular sistem on applied ballast, then sanitary state of heart is most important for good shape, frequency of pulse (heart is the best indicator of state in wich is located heart's muscle,general state and of organism and his capability for brook fisical effort. Frequency of pulse in serenity ( Fc/mir, maximum frequency of pulse (Fc/max, as frequencu of pulse in revival ( Fc/opo represents parametar on basis wich observe doses ballast in sportive recreation, determines objective zone of ballast apropose ponderable grade of adoption CVS on applied effort. In practise very often uses formula for calculation pulse's zone of ballast. Monitoring freqvency of pulse recreative person or sportive tipe represents one of most racionality method attends effect sportive recreative activity or (sportive train on increasment adoption capabillity cardio-vascular sistem (CVS. Dynamic frequencu of pulse during fisical exercise in immutable and valuable phisiological parametar without which is impossible do planning, doses of ballast as operation program contens in current time we can't imagine.

  17. Ethics committees in Croatia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovecki, Ana

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis the work of ethics committees in Croatia is being investigated for the first time. The 1997 Law on Health Protection introduced legal standards for the establishment of the so-called 'mixed' type of ethics committees in healthcare institutions. Our study aims to examine whether this

  18. Death by Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemuel, John

    2007-01-01

    The author finds that as faculty members, professors are susceptible to an excess of university committee work. He explains that new hires know they need to busy themselves with scholarship, teaching, and service in order to build a strong case for tenure. Eager to make a good impression, they volunteer for committees, task forces, and other…

  19. Methodology of physical recreation: problems, experience, recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaytsev V.P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article contains methodical approaches in the process of conducting practical classes with the students on discipline «Physical recreation». The methodical reception is shown, also their definition, the importance of definitions during the life of the person, including the student. The essence of physical recreation in the understanding of students for passive and active recreation is uncover, as well as formulating the tasks in forming, recovering, strengthening and preserving the health of different age groups of the population. The methodological principles of physical recreation described in detail in the context of its performance by students. It uses traditional principal means for physical culture ((physical exercise, movement modes, natural factors, massage, occupational therapy, mechanotherapy. They are distinguished by various forms, methods, and activities, bearing recreational character.

  20. Fuel Used for Off-Highway Recreation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA requires that tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation be transferred from the Highway Trust Fund to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund to individual states equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation at the state level by different vehicle types. This report documents this estimation procedure. For this estimation procedure, off-highway recreational fuel use was defined as Federally taxed gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, or special fuel used in recreational motorized vehicles on recreational trails or back country terrain. Fuel used in outdoor non-engine recreational equipment, such as camp stoves, heaters, and lanterns, was excluded from the analysis. Vehicle types included in this study were: pickup truck, light utility vehicle, motorcycle, all terrain vehicle (ATV), and snowmobile. Two factors governed the development of this estimation procedure. First, individual state shares of the total Trust Funds need to be developed using a uniform approach. Second, data needed for the estimation procedure should be publicly available and easily obtainable so that estimates for all subsequent years can be generated easily. Estimates were developed based on existing data sources. Adjustment factors were developed to take into account different vehicular off-highway recreational usage among states.

  1. 76 FR 81911 - National Advisory Committee for Implementation of the National Forest System Land Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... Management Planning Rule AGENCY: USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of intent to establish an advisory... Advisory Committee for Implementation of the National Forest System Land Management Planning Rule.... Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, National Forest System, Ecosystem Management Coordination...

  2. Climate Change Adaptation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    www.ccawwg.us/ docs/Short-Term_Water_Management_Decisions_Final_3_ Jan_2013.pdf Short MD, Peirson WL, Peters GL, Cox RJ. Managing adaptation of urban water...Reduction ER: Ecosystem Restoration H: Hydrop wer G: gul t ry RC: Recreation EM: Emergency Management W: Water Supply + Changes in stormwater runoff N...USACE is taking to manage these risks and vulnerabilities. This Plan contains a description of programs, policies, and plans USACE has already put in

  3. Comparison of Standard and Newer Balance Tests in Recreational Alpine Skiers and Ski Novices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjekoslav Cigrovski

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alpine skiers should physically prepare for skiing due to the specific body movements it requires. As balance is essential for the success of competitive alpine skiers, we investigated its importance during preparation for alpine skiing in recreational skiers. We included 24 male participants; twelve recreational skiers just after 10 days of alpine skiing, and twelve alpine ski novices. All participants were tested with two balance tests (BAL40 and GYKO. Participants of the two groups did not differ significantly in the results of the BAL40 standard balance test. In contrast, we found significant differences in four out of six variables measured with the GYKO test performed on BOSU trainer during the two-feet stand. Participants specifically differed in the variables overall average body tilt (p=0.02, overall average deviation of body tilt (p=0.00, overall medio-lateral average body tilt (p=0.01, and overall medio-lateral average deviation of body tilt (0.00. Average results were lower for participants of the group of recreational skiers than for participants of the novice alpine ski group, suggesting that balance is important for recreational skiers, either as an acquired trait during skiing, or the result of conditioning training in the preparation period for skiing. According to the results, we would advise recreational skiers as well as people planning to be involved in alpine skiing as a new recreational activity to include balance exercises in the preparation period.

  4. Energy conservation: policy issues and end-use scenarios of savings potential. Part IV. Energy-efficient recreational travel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, P.; Codina, R.; Cornwall, B.

    1978-09-01

    The guidelines laid out for the five subjects investigated in this series are to take a holistic view of energy conservation policies by describing the overall system in which they are implemented; provide analytical tools and sufficiently disaggregated data bases that can be adapted to answer a variety of questions by the users; identify and discuss some of the important issues behind successful energy conservation policy; and develop an energy conservation policy in depth. This report contains the design of a specific policy that addresses energy conservation in recreational travel. The policy is denoted as an ''Information System for the National Park Service.'' This work is based on prior examination of the characteristics of the recreational trip and decision making for the recreational experience. The examination revealed which aspects of the recreational travel system needed to be addressed to encourage energy-efficient modal decisions for recreational travel. This policy is briefly described in Section 1, the ''Summary of Initiative.'' A more detailed discussion of the policy follows. The material which led to the policy's formation is developed in Section 2: Importance and Impact of the Recreational Trip; Weekend Travel; The Flowchart: Decision Making for the Recreational Experience; Policy Development for Phase 1 ''Planning the Trip;'' and Objectives and Strategies for ''Planning the Trip.'' (MCW)

  5. Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee, a permanent, broadly representative advisory committee, meets with EPA on a regular basis to discuss pesticide regulatory, policy, and program implementation issues.

  6. Recreating Daily life in Pompeii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose an integrated Mixed Reality methodology for recreating ancient daily life that features realistic simulations of animated virtual human actors (clothes, body, skin, face who augment real environments and re-enact staged storytelling dramas. We aim to go further from traditional concepts of static cultural artifacts or rigid geometrical and 2D textual augmentations and allow for 3D, interactive, augmented historical character-based event representations in a mobile and wearable setup. This is the main contribution of the described work as well as the proposed extensions to AR Enabling technologies: a VR/AR character simulation kernel framework with real-time, clothed virtual humans that are dynamically superimposed on live camera input, animated and acting based on a predefined, historically correct scenario. We demonstrate such a real-time case study on the actual site of ancient Pompeii.

  7. 78 FR 25760 - Proposed Information Collection; Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ...--renovate or redesign existing close-to- home recreation facilities. Innovation--specific activities that... Rehabilitation or Innovation grants. Rehabilitation and Innovation proposals must be based on priorities...), narrative statements with a description and scope of the planning product(s) to be developed, a project...

  8. 76 FR 82197 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Recreational...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... manner is critical to enabling charter/party operations to finalize business plans and advertising strategies as quickly as possible. These AMs conflict with the Recreational Advisory Panel's recommendation... each year. Charter/party operations advertise and try to book fishing trips prior to the start of the...

  9. Public purpose recreation marketing: a focus on the relationships between the public and public lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    William T. Borrie; Neal Christensen; Alan E. Watson; Theron A. Miller; Daniel W. McCollum

    2002-01-01

    Marketing has long had a place in the planning and management of public sector recreation. In particular, the use of market segmentation has allowed leisure providers to better understand their clientsgas needs and to tailor their services to the diversity of those needs. However, the use of marketing approaches is not without controversy and is sometimes perceived to...

  10. A Constructivist Case Study Examining the Leadership Development of Undergraduate Students in Campus Recreational Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey L.; Forrester, Scott; Borsz, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    This constructivist case study examined undergraduate student leadership development. Twenty-one student leaders, 13 females and 8 males, in a campus recreational sports department were interviewed using a semi-structured interview protocol. Seven broad themes: organizing, planning, and delegating; balancing academic, personal and professional…

  11. 76 FR 16457 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Paper on Emergency Planning for Small Modular Reactors (Open)--The Committee will hear presentations by... emergency planning for small modular reactors. 1:45 p.m.-4:15 p.m.: Draft Final Regulatory Guide 1.152... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the purposes of...

  12. Committee on Solar and Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    The Space Science Board (SSB) of the National Research Council was established in 1958 (just before the establishment of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)) to provide policy advice to the space agency on the conduct of space science. The board discharges this function through several committees composed of working scientists in each area of space science who work closely with NASA personnel to develop plans for future space research. One such committee is the Committee on Solar and Space Physics (CSSP), whose purview ranges from the sun through the interplanetary medium and the magnetospheres, ionospheres, and upper atmospheres of the earth, the planets, and comets. I have had the privilege of serving as chairman of the CSSP from 1983 through 1986, and along with my 18 colleagues, I did my best to represent Solar and Space Physics and the concerns of the community to our colleagues in other disciplines, to NASA, to other agencies of the federal government, and to Congress.

  13. 76 FR 41307 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee and Exploration Committee; Joint Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee and Exploration Committee; Joint... they are attending the NASA Advisory Council Space Operations Committee and Exploration Committee joint... they are attending the Space Operations Committee and Exploration Committee joint meeting in NASA...

  14. Formulating New Directions with Strategic Marketing Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, John L.

    1983-01-01

    This article describes both a short- and long-term strategic marketing planning approach for the parks and recreation manager. Both plans involve a needs assessment, objective development, marketing plans, and evaluations. Also discussed is a continuum of stragetic program options ranging from developing new programs to terminating existing…

  15. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2008 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2008 included: Short-term Saved Leave Scheme The Committee noted that, by the end of February 2008, some 600 staff had enrolled in the short-term saved leave scheme: approx. 58% had signed up for 1 slice, 14% for two slices, 5% for three slices and 23% for four slices. Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme. Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial Benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract. Progressive Retirement Programme The Progressive Retirement Programme (PR...

  16. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Main issues examined at the meeting of 2 October 2009 The October 2009 meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee was entirely devoted to preparation of TREF’s meeting on 21-22 October. The Committee took note of, discussed and agreed on clarifications needed to some of the documents and presentations that the Management intended to submit and/or present to TREF on the following subjects: Equal opportunities The Committee took note of a preliminary report on equal opportunities at CERN drawn up by D. Chromek-Burckhart, the Equal Opportunities Officer, and T. Smith, Chairman of the Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel, containing in particular a proposal for a new process for resolving harassment conflicts. Technical analysis of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme - Actuary’s Report The Committee took note of a presentation by P. Charpentier, Chairman of the CERN Health Insurance Supervisory Board (CHIS Board), on the 2009 actuarial report on the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS). Th...

  17. Valuation of damages to recreational trout fishing in the Upper Northeast due to acidic deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englin, J.E.; Cameron, T.A.; Mendelsohn, R.E.; Parsons, G.A.; Shankle, S.A.

    1991-04-01

    This report documents methods used to estimate economic models of changes in recreational fishing due to the acidic deposition. The analysis was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and its subcontractors for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) in support of the National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The primary data needed to estimate these models were collected in the 1989 Aquatic Based Recreation Survey (ABRS), which was jointly funded by the DOE and the EPA's Office of Policy Planning and Evaluation. 11 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs.

  18. Experience patterns: capturing the dynamic nature of a recreation experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.B., IV Hull; William P. Stewart; Young K. Yi

    1992-01-01

    A recreation experience is not static, it varies over the course of an engagement. Yet, most recreation research operationalizes recreation benefits andoutcomes as essentially static in nature (i.e., satisfaction). "Experience patterns" capture the dynamic nature of a recreation experience and thus might prove useful as units of analysis in the management and...

  19. Effects of pretesting with the Adventure Recreation Model instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson Young; Lynn Anderson; Dale Anderson

    2002-01-01

    The Adventure Recreation Model, first proposed and tested by Ewert and Hollenhorst (1989), attempts to describe participant characteristics and patterns of use in adventure recreation activities. The Adventure Recreation Model is based on the relationship of level of engagement in an outdoor recreation activity (ranging from beginner, to development, to commitment)...

  20. Proceedings of the 2006 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Burns; K., comps. Robinson

    2007-01-01

    Contains articles and posters presented at the 2006 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Contents cover tourism marketing, fish and wildlife, place meaning, leisure and gender, recreation resource allocation, nature-based tourism, methods, leisure motives, outdoor recreation management, tourism impacts, outdoor recreation among specific populations, leisure...

  1. Proceedings of the 2008 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. Klenosky; Cherie LeBlanc Fisher; eds.

    2009-01-01

    Contains articles and posters presented at the 2008 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Contents cover tourism marketing, fish and wildlife, place meaning, leisure and gender, recreation resource allocation, nature-based tourism, methods, leisure motives, outdoor recreation management, tourism impacts, outdoor recreation among specific populations, leisure...

  2. Proceedings of the 2007 northeastern recreation research symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherie LeBlanc; Christine, comps. Vogt

    2008-01-01

    Contains articles and posters presented at the 2007 northeastern recreation research symposium. Contents cover tourism marketing, fish and wildlife, place meaning, leisure and gender, recreation resource allocation, nature-based tourism, methods, leisure motives, outdoor recreation management, tourism impacts, outdoor recreation among specific populations, leisure...

  3. Motivations and sensation seeking characteristics of recreational storm chasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuangyu Xu; Sonja Wilhelm Stanis; Carla Barbieri; Jiawen. Chen

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about recreational storm chasing, a type of risk recreation that has increased in popularity since the 1990s. This study was conducted to understand factors associated with participation in recreational storm chasing in the United States. Particularly, this study assessed the motivations and sensation seeking attributes of recreational storm chasers, as...

  4. Predicting quantitative and qualitative values of recreation participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood L., Jr. Shafer; George Moeller

    1971-01-01

    If future recreation consumption and associated intangible values can be predicted, the problem of rapid decision making in recreation-resource management can be reduced, and the problems of implementing those decisions can be anticipated. Management and research responsibilities for meeting recreation demand are discussed, and proved methods for forecasting recreation...

  5. Federal outdoor recreation trends: effects on economic opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric White; J.M. Bowker; Ashley E. Askew; Linda L. Langner; J. Ross Arnold; Donald B.K. English

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor recreation is a central way that people interact with the natural environment. Federal land agencies are key providers of settings, facilities, and landscapes for recreation. Outdoor recreation is also an important driver of economic activity in rural communities near recreation destinations and across the United States. Future participation in outdoor...

  6. 76 FR 27002 - Information Collection; National Recreation Program Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ...-6814) authorizes the Forest Service to issue permits and charge fees for recreation uses of Federal... authorized to collect recreation fees and/or issue recreation permits. Name and contact information will be... Forest Service Information Collection; National Recreation Program Administration AGENCY: Forest Service...

  7. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water-related recreation. 230.52... Effects on Human Use Characteristics § 230.52 Water-related recreation. (a) Water-related recreation... or fill disposal is to impair or destroy the resources which support recreation activities. The...

  8. Impact of Place Attachment and Recreation Involvement on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Place attachment, recreation involvement and satisfaction are key indicators explaining future behaviour in nature-based recreation. This study examined a behavioural model using latent variables of place attachment, recreation involvement, recreation satisfaction and future behaviour of surfers. In total, 1140 usable ...

  9. 36 CFR 71.11 - Collection of Federal recreation fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recreation fees. 71.11 Section 71.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.11 Collection of Federal recreation fees. The bureaus of the Department of the Interior administering outdoor recreation programs shall provide for the collection of...

  10. 36 CFR 71.2 - Types of Federal recreation fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Types of Federal recreation... INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.2 Types of Federal recreation fees. There shall be three types of Federal recreation fees: (a) Entrance fees, charged either on an annual or single-visit basis, for admission to any...

  11. Region 9 RTOC Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Regional Tribal Operations Committee (RTOC) has developed this Strategic Plan to address the issues the RTOC has identified and the activities the RTOC intends to carry out between October 1, 2015 and September 30, 2017.

  12. Quadriceps Muscle Function during Recreational Alpine Skiing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kröll, Josef; Wakeling, James M; Seifert, John G; Müller, Erich

    2010-01-01

    .... The three-part aim of this recreational skiing study was to analyze functional differences within the quadriceps muscle, to analyze the topographical influence, and to apply a time-frequency analysis...

  13. Microbial (Pathogen)/Recreational Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertaining to Recreational Human Health Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Microbial Organisms (Pathogens). These documents include safe levels for cyanotoxins microcystin and cylindrospermopsin, and Coliphage to protect human health.

  14. National Marine Recreational Fishing Expenditure Survey 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine recreational fishing is a popular pastime across the United States that generates significant economic impacts to both local economies and to the nation. In...

  15. EAARL Topography - Gateway National Recreation Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model or DEM) of Gateway National Recreation Area was produced from remotely-sensed,...

  16. Greening the Golden Gate National Recreation Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Golden Gate National Recreation Area was recognized a 2016 Federal Green Challenge Award for making significant strides to reduce its carbon footprint with the goal of becoming a carbon neutral park.

  17. Using teams and committees effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, B

    1998-09-01

    In a corporate setting, the term "team" usually refers to members of a group with different responsibilities and/or skills working together to achieve a common goal or objective. The major reason why a company desires group as opposed to individual involvement is to derive sounder decisions. Two essential issues to resolve in establishing teams or committees are 1) who should be a member or representative; and 2) what is the charter or mandate for the group. Representatives join a team or group in numerous ways; four common methods are 1) appointment by the group member's supervisor; 2) recruitment by the team leader; 3) appointment by a senior manager; and 4) volunteering. There are various profiles of how groups can approach a decision, including "groupthink," the "ideal group process" and the "debating society" approach. Group meetings must be structured to ensure that decisions are reached and then implemented. Foresight and planning are essential prerequisites to have efficient teams and committees that work effectively and achieve their goals. (c) 1998 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  18. 75 FR 5759 - Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... Forest Service Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII... Recreation Fee Sites. SUMMARY: The Soda Springs Ranger District of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest is... appreciate and enjoy the availability of developed recreation campground and picnicking facilities. This...

  19. 75 FR 4340 - Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... Forest Service Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Recreation Lands Enhancement Act (Title VII, Pub. L. 108-447) directed... new recreation fee areas are established. The Caribou-Targhee National Forest currently has nine other...

  20. 75 FR 33763 - Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Sites; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (Title VIII...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Forest Service Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Sites; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act...: Notice of three proposed new recreation fee sites. SUMMARY: Moss Knob Shooting Range, Nantahala National..., Recreation Program Manager, 828-524-6441, Nantahala Ranger District, Nantahala National Forest, 90 Sloan Road...

  1. Data monitoring committees for pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberg, Susan S; Culbertson, Richard; Gillen, Daniel L; Goodman, Steven; Schrandt, Suzanne; Zirkle, Maryan

    2015-10-01

    In any clinical trial, it is essential to monitor the accumulating data to be sure that the trial continues to be safe for participants and that the trial is being conducted properly. Data monitoring committees, independent expert panels who undertake regular reviews of the data as the trial progresses, serve an important role in safeguarding the interests of research participants and ensuring trial integrity in many trials. Many pragmatic clinical trials, which aim to inform healthcare decisions by comparing alternate interventions in heterogeneous healthcare delivery settings, will warrant review by an independent data monitoring committee due to their potential impact on clinical practice. However, the very features that make a trial "pragmatic" may pose challenges in terms of which aspects of a trial to monitor and when it is appropriate for a data monitoring committee to intervene. Using the Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary tool that draws distinctions between pragmatic and explanatory clinical trials, we review characteristics of pragmatic clinical trials that may have implications for data monitoring committees and interim monitoring plans. These include broad eligibility criteria, a focus on subjective patient-centered outcomes, and in some cases a lack of standardized follow-up procedures across study sites. Additionally, protocol adherence is often purposefully not addressed in pragmatic trials in order to accurately represent the clinical practice setting and maintain practicability of implementation; there are differing viewpoints as to whether adherence should be assessed and acted upon by data monitoring committees in these trials. Some other issues not specifically related to the Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary criteria may also merit special consideration in pragmatic trials. Thresholds for early termination of a pragmatic clinical trial might be controversial. The distinguishing features of pragmatic clinical

  2. Poverty and Hunger in Hispanic America: The Inadequacy of Data for Policy Planning. Hearing before the Select Committee on Hunger. United States House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session (March 30, 1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Hunger.

    This hearing addresses issues of health, hunger, and malnutrition among Hispanic Americans. Health and poverty agency officials made statements before the committee and expressed difficulty in examining the health- and poverty-related problems among Hispanics because of a lack of data. Testimony indicated that previous data regarding the health of…

  3. Role of commercial harbours and recreational marinas in the spread of non-indigenous fouling species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Jasmine; Caronni, Sarah; Occhipinti-Ambrogi, Anna; Marchini, Agnese

    2017-09-01

    The role of commercial harbours as sink and source habitats for non-indigenous species (NIS) and the role of recreational boating for their secondary spread were investigated by analysing the fouling community of five Italian harbours and five marinas in the western Mediterranean Sea. It was first hypothesised that NIS assemblages in the recreational marinas were subsets of those occurring in commercial harbours. However, the data did not consistently support this hypothesis: the NIS pools of some marinas significantly diverged from harbours even belonging to the same coastal stretches, including NIS occurring only in marinas. This study confirms harbours as hotspots for marine NIS, but also reveals that numbers of NIS in some marinas is higher than expected, suggesting that recreational vessels effectively facilitate NIS spread. It is recommended that this vector of NIS introduction is taken into account in the future planning of sustainable development of maritime tourism in Europe.

  4. NASA Strategic Roadmap Committees Final Roadmaps. Volumes 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Volume 1 contains NASA strategic roadmaps for the following Advanced Planning and Integration Office (APIO) committees: Earth Science and Applications from Space; Sun - Solar System Connection. Volume 2 contains NASA strategic roadmaps for the following APIO committees: Robotic and Human Exploration of Mars; Solar System Exploration; Search for Earth-like Planets; Universe Exploration, as well as membership rosters and charters for all APIO committees, including those above and the following: Exploration Transportation System; Nuclear Systems; Robotic and Human Lunar Exploration; Aeronautical Technologies; Space Shuttle; International Space Station; Education.

  5. Managing for Recreational Experience Opportunities: The Case of Hikers in Protected Areas in Catalonia, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías Torbidoni, Estela Inés

    2011-03-01

    Planning and management for recreational activities in protected areas involves an understanding of many complex factors. Segmentation of recreation demand and of the main physical or sporting activities can contribute to the design of more efficient management strategies, which may help to maintain or significantly enhance satisfaction with the recreation experience, and this in turn could improve the interest in and appreciation of the natural environment. The current study examined the motivations of hikers in three small Natura 2000 protected areas. It establishes a typology or categorization as a contribution to better management based on a survey conducted through on-site personal interviews with a representative sample of 569 hikers. Through an analysis of the principal intervening components by means of cluster analysis, we identified three groups of hikers based on three motivational dimensions: (1) nature-minded hikers, (2) sporting hikers and (3) general-purpose hikers. The most striking results were the significant differences among group variables related to visit behaviour (frequency and duration of visits and number of people per group), previous knowledge (protection status of the areas) and recreational frequentation (trail categories and protected areas visited). A positive correlation between the degree of sympathy for nature and the degree of satisfaction with the recreational experience (including positive evaluation of the public facilities, signposting and services offered) was also observed. The results are discussed in terms of their applicability and implications in hiking management in protected natural areas such as those of Natura 2000.

  6. Urban Densification and Recreational Quality of Public Urban Green Spaces—A Viennese Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Arnberger

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Public urban green spaces play an important role in urban sustainability. These places should provide high-quality recreation experiences for the urban residents. However, they are often overused. The Wienerberg area in the south of Vienna, Austria, was transformed from a waste disposal site into a natural recreation area. During the past years, intensive settlement densification processes have taken place, resulting in a doubling of the local population living within a few minutes walking distance. An on-site survey among green space visitors (N = 231 revealed that the majority of them considered the area to be overcrowded on Sundays/holidays and reported a perceived increase in visitor numbers during the past years. Visitors with more past experience, as well as those who have perceived an increase in visitor numbers during recent years, reported higher crowding perceptions. A significant proportion of them try to avoid these crowds, relying on behavioral coping strategies, such as inter-area displacement. While urban regeneration has provided an attractive recreation area, urban densification around the green space appears to have reduced its recreational quality. Monitoring recreation quality indicators, such as crowding perceptions, seems to be useful for sustainable urban green space management and city planning.

  7. Recreational Interests of Visitors and Their Effects on Miankaleh Wildlife Refuge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Masoodi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, ecotourism is a major tourist activity around the world. Ecotourism is one of the strategies for supporting conservation and ensuring income in the protected areas. When implemented within the capabilities of natural systems evaluated based on natural and socio-economic factors, ecotourism can simultaneously lead to regional prosperity and environmental protection. The goal of research is determination of natural potential, recreational opportunity, and effective factors in their choice in natural areas. The area is located south of the Caspian Sea in Mazandaran and Golestan Provinces. We used questionnaires and field survey for collecting public opinions. Results indicated the high tendency of visitors for bird watching, swimming, nature photography and filming and boating among all the suggested recreational activities. Also, the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used for assessment of the relationships between age, sex and visitor groups and recreational activities. We found significant relationships between the groups in many of recreational activities such as research, resting and photography and filming of nature. The results of this study showed this area lacked sufficient facilities for visitors, therefore planning, preparation and implementation of comprehensive tourism infrastructure are essential to attract more ecotourists that can also reduce negative effects of recreational activities on the environment.

  8. Modeling large-scale winter recreation terrain selection with implications for recreation management and wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucretia E. Olson; John R. Squires; Elizabeth K. Roberts; Aubrey D. Miller; Jacob S. Ivan; Mark Hebblewhite

    2017-01-01

    Winter recreation is a rapidly growing activity, and advances in technology make it possible for increasing numbers of people to access remote backcountry terrain. Increased winter recreation may lead to more frequent conflict between recreationists, as well as greater potential disturbance to wildlife. To better understand the environmental characteristics favored by...

  9. Social-Psychological Factors Influencing Recreation Demand: Evidence from Two Recreational Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jordan W.; Moore, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of estimating demand for recreation areas involve making inferences about individuals' preferences. Frequently, the assumption is made that recreationists' cost of traveling to a site is a reliable measure of the value they place on that resource and the recreation opportunities it provides. This assumption may ignore other…

  10. Adventure Recreation: What's New for Resource Managers, Public Policy Analysts, and Recreation Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Alan; Galloway, Shayne

    2001-01-01

    Describes the phenomenon of risk taking in and through recreational activities, reviewing the use of adventure in recreation; summarizing salient research findings on adventure education within the past decade (perceived risk and individual involvement); and offering remarks related to what researchers know and do not know about the deliberate use…

  11. Recreation visitor preferences for and perceptions of outdoor recreation setting attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Tarrant; Erin Smith; H. Ken Cordell

    1999-01-01

    Between 1990 and 1994, a comprehensive national survey was conducted by the USDA Forest Service (FS), Southern Research Station, to measure visitor preferences for, and perceptions of, setting attributes at a variety of outdoor recreation sites. Over 11,000 visitors at 31 outdoor recreation sites across the country were interviewed in this study. The study was entitled...

  12. CHARACTERISTICS OF SPORTS RECREATIONAL TOURISM IN MONTENEGRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ognjen Jovović

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Basic for realization of tourist movements lays in meeting cultural and recreational needs of potential customers. If we know that largest number of tourists represents part of recreational ones, than is not hard to realize how large potential lays in that number of potential guests. On this fact should be built strategy of movement of tourist offer of Montenegro for it extreme potentials on which can be founded concrete project. In this work are given basic assumptions for development of sport recreational shapes of tourism with stress to natural potentials that directly determine shape of sport recreational activities that represent basis of tourist offer. Offer should be created in that way that it is adapted to wide segment of recreational guests and not professional sportsmen, although they also should not be underestimated but one should know that in order to create conditions for arrival of sports professionals offer has to be completely different and more specialized that requires creating of conditions of existence of highly developed sports infrastructure, while for amateurs a lot can be done in “system of improvising”, satisfying basic criteria – recreation in conditions of untouched and well preserved nature with securing maximal level of security and protection of guests, in order to prevent possible unwilling consequences that can lead to injury of guests and for development and realization of such project one need a much less funds than is building of facilities that should meet standards of professional sportsmen. The aim is to create good offer at good infrastructure, logistics and with good equipment with securing maximal security, adaptation to various wishes of guests, taking in consideration their structure is conditioned by age, health condition, physical fitness as personal wishes toward sports and recreational activities.

  13. Sustaining health promotion programs within sport and recreation organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Meghan M; Payne, Warren R; Eime, Rochelle M; Brown, Sue J

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of the sport and recreation sector as a setting for health promotion is a new strategy implemented by health policy makers and strategic planners. Strategies to promote and sustain health promotion activities are important considering the risk that programs may cease after initial funding ends. This study explored the factors affecting the sustainability of a sport- and recreation-based health promotion program. A stratified sampling method was used to select four of the nine Regional Sports Assemblies (RSAs) that delivered a state-wide health promotion program funded by the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation in Australia. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with four Executive Officers (EOs) and focus group discussions with their Boards of Management. A sustainability checklist with pre-specified dimensions (e.g. organisational setting, broader community environment, and program design and implementation) guided data collection and analysis. The results showed that the organisational setting and the broader community environment supported program institutionalisation; whilst the design and implementation of the program worked against institutionalisation. The capacity of the organisations to generate new funds for the program was limited; the relationship between the central funding organisation and the Boards of Management was weak; and the program did not support the retention of staff. The engagement of sport and recreation organisations has potential to facilitate health promotion and public health. To enhance organisational capacity and achieve program sustainability, it is important that organisational processes, structures, and resources that support long-term health promotion practice are effectively and efficiently planned and managed.

  14. 78 FR 69991 - Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 14 Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the termination of the Veterinary Medicine Advisory... [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Veterinary Medicine Committee was...

  15. 78 FR 32698 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an... Staff Regulations and Staff Rules --Accounts and audit: Final accounts for the finance period 2012 and...

  16. 76 FR 82027 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... open meetings, one for the International Maritime Organization's Design and Equipment Sub-Committee (DE) and one for the International Maritime Organization's Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC... Organization's Sub-Committee on Ship Design and Equipment (DE 56) to be held at the International Maritime...

  17. Committee Proposals and Restrictive Rules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeffrey S. Banks

    1999-01-01

    I analyze a game-theoretic model of committee-legislature interaction in which a majority decision to adopt either an open or closed amendment rule occurs following the committee's proposal of a bill...

  18. TRATEGIC MANAGEMENT In the FUNCTION of SPORT And RECREATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Gligović

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In countries throughout holy, sport, recreation and plays promotes the health, spirit and the tenement. They us learns important lessons from the life about the respect, leadership and controls. They promote the equality for all and remove differences among men. Modern society now takes over the power and possibilities which has the sport, recreation and plays, carrying out him in programmes its national governments throughout holy. In this way, develops partnerships with all sectors and all levels of company, from governments, over holy sport to the civil society in all his diversity, in order to affirms value which breeds sport would not perform boys and girls on sports courts and sports grounds those would teach the Deco and their families about benefits of physical activities. In order to would come about like this ambitious and the significant project indispensable precondition is the strategic planning of development of sport on the specified area and in which has been joined in top-grade managers from different domains. Special attentions must dedicate execution is adopted strategies, because if is absent the direct application is adopted strategies, the per se selected strategy not did introduce herself the no progress.

  19. 75 FR 4819 - Consumer Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... COMMISSION Consumer Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission announces the next meeting date and agenda of its Consumer Advisory Committee (``Committee''). The purpose of the Committee is to make recommendations to the Commission regarding consumer...

  20. 75 FR 9898 - Consumer Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... COMMISSION Consumer Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission announces the next meeting date and agenda of its Consumer Advisory Committee (``Committee''). The purpose of the ] Committee is to make recommendations to the Commission regarding consumer...

  1. Spatial preference heterogeneity in forest recreation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildtrup, Jens; Garcia, Serge; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the preferences for recreational use of forests in Lorraine (Northeastern France), applying stated preference data. Our approach allows us to estimate individual-specific preferences for recreational use of different forest types. These estimates are used in a second stage...... of the analysis where we test whether preferences depend on access to recreation sites. We find that there is significant preference heterogeneity with respect to most forest attributes. The spatial analysis shows that preferences for forests with parking and picnic facilities are correlated with having access...... to such forests while for the other attributes considered (dominant tree species, trekking paths and presence of lake and rivers) we find no correlation between stated preferences and accessibility. This implies that the problem of endogenous distances in the travel cost method (Parsons, 1991) may be present...

  2. The choice of forest site for recreation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agimass, Fitalew; Lundhede, Thomas; Panduro, Toke Emil

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the factors that can influence the site choice of forest recreation. Relevant attributes are identified by using spatial data analysis from a questionnaire asking people to indicate their most recent forest visits by pinpointing on a map. The main objectives of the s......In this paper, we investigate the factors that can influence the site choice of forest recreation. Relevant attributes are identified by using spatial data analysis from a questionnaire asking people to indicate their most recent forest visits by pinpointing on a map. The main objectives...... logit as well as a random parameter logit model. The variables that are found to affect the choice of forest site to a visit for recreation include: forest area, tree species composition, forest density, availability of historical sites, terrain difference, state ownership, and distance. Regarding...

  3. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  4. Rebuilding a Research Ethics Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, John S. G.; Marchesi, August

    2013-01-01

    The principal ethics committee in Australia's Capital, Canberra, underwent a major revision in the last three years based on changes debated in the literature. Committee or Board structure varies widely; regulations determining minimum size and membership differ between countries. Issues such as the effectiveness of committee management,…

  5. DEMFIL - treatment of stormwater for recreational use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørud, Mai; Nielsen, Katrine; Skau Damskier, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Decoupling of stormwater (road runoff) in a residential area has been implemented in order to reduce flooding and to increase the hydraulic capacity of a lake with a high recreational value. The object here was to evaluate a disc filter technology in combination with a green polymer for flocculat......Decoupling of stormwater (road runoff) in a residential area has been implemented in order to reduce flooding and to increase the hydraulic capacity of a lake with a high recreational value. The object here was to evaluate a disc filter technology in combination with a green polymer...

  6. Behavior Management in Physical Education, Recreation, and Sport: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavay, Barry

    1986-01-01

    This bibliography contains references specifically pertaining to physical education, recreation, or sport and to behavior management. The references are classified into areas of behavior management overview, reinforcement systems, motor performance, physical fitness, recreation, and sport. (MT)

  7. Chronic recreational physical inactivity and epithelial ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannioto, Rikki; LaMonte, Michael J.; Risch, Harvey A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite a large body of literature evaluating the association between recreational physical activity and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk, the extant evidence is inconclusive, and little is known about the independent association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC ri...

  8. 77 FR 34971 - Request for Applicants for Appointment to the Advisory Committee on Commercial Operations of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... two-year term, the Committee will consider issues relating to enhanced border and cargo supply chain... procedures, strategic planning, northern border and southern border issues, and import safety. Committee... discriminate in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation...

  9. 75 FR 21678 - Business and Operations Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... Management/Leadership Development. May 19, 2010 NSF Strategic Plan Update--2010-2015; Future NSF-2013 Lease... of NSF's business operations. Agenda May 18, 2010 Welcome/Introductions; OIRM/CIO/BFA Updates; Post... Director; Closing Committee Discussion/Wrap-Up. Dated: April 21, 2010. Susanne Bolton, Committee Management...

  10. 78 FR 72718 - NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration announces a meeting of the Audit, Finance and Analysis Committee of the NASA Advisory Council...: Finance Update Budget Update NASA Strategic Planning and Performance Conference Reporting Update System...

  11. Vandalism and outdoor recreation: symposium proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam S. Alfano; Arthur W. [tech. coord.] Magil

    1976-01-01

    Resource managers, law enforcement officers, designers, and social scientists provide 24 papers giving an overview of vandalism on outdoor recreation areas; a measure of the difficult control problems which must be solved; some insights for design of buildings, fixtures, and site layouts to reduce or repel vandalism; and a profile of vandals, with respect to the...

  12. Psychological demands experienced by recreational endurance athletes

    OpenAIRE

    McCormick, Alister; Meijen, Carla; Marcora, Samuele

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify psychological demands that are commonly experienced by endurance athletes so that these demands could inform the design of performance-enhancement psychological interventions for endurance athletes. Focus group interviews were conducted with 30 recreational endurance athletes of various sports (running, cycling, and triathlon), distances, and competitive levels to explore the psychological demands of training, competition preparation, and competition participation...

  13. From recreational to regular drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvinen, Margaretha; Ravn, Signe

    2011-01-01

    to extricate themselves from this pattern. Hence, when regular drug users talk about their future, it is not a future characterised by total abstinence from illegal drugs but a future where they have rolled back their drug use career to the recreational drug use pattern they started out with. Empirically...

  14. Star Trek as Recreational Reading for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, Mecedes

    A study investigated the appropriateness of the "Star Trek" book series for use as recreational reading material for elementary school children. The 12 books were adapted from the television series by James Blish. Appropriateness was determined by evaluating the quality and the readability levels of the books. Quality was ascertained by examining…

  15. THE IMPACT OF RECREATIONAL IN HUMAN HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enver Tahiraj

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Of Recreation knows no gender or age, knows no season or time of day. Health is a state of complete, physical, mental and social well-being and not merely absence of disease. The movement is an important feature of life. Therefore, the muscle activity of the best physiological way to stimulate the body's various systems

  16. THE IMPACT OF RECREATIONAL IN HUMAN HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    Enver Tahiraj; Admira Koničanin; Afrim Shabani; Fikret Shatri; Bahri Gjinovci; Malësor Gjonbalaj

    2012-01-01

    Of Recreation knows no gender or age, knows no season or time of day. Health is a state of complete, physical, mental and social well-being and not merely absence of disease. The movement is an important feature of life. Therefore, the muscle activity of the best physiological way to stimulate the body's various systems

  17. Re-Creating Pablo Picasso's "Guernica"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daseler, Jack C.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the teachers at the author's school completed a group project with their eighth-graders in which they recreated a mural version of the famous painting by Pablo Picasso, "Guernica." This activity was aimed at: (1) studying the rise of Fascism in Spain and Germany during the Spanish Civil War prior to World War II; (2) learning…

  18. Perspectives on law enforcement in recreation areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence C. Hadley

    1971-01-01

    The nature and scope of law-enforcement problems in the National Park System are of increasing concern to park and recreation area managers. A positive response by management in terms of formulating and executing a fully professional and effective enforcement program is vital for sustaining public confidence that Parks are safe for individual and family use. Law...

  19. Public attitudes about financing municipal recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney R. Zwick; Thomas A. More; Tad Nunez

    2008-01-01

    Communities constantly seek creative financing for public services like recreation. Property tax remains central for financing, but user fees, grants, sales taxes, sponsorship, and bond issues have increased. This paper examines preferences for alternative funding mechanisms in a survey of Hartford, VT residents. Public support for municipal facilities and programs...

  20. Recreation in the Bear Lake basin

    OpenAIRE

    Palacios, Patsy; Luecke, Chris; Robinson, Justin

    2007-01-01

    Bear Lake has a long history of recreation and tourism. Activities such as waterskiing, swimming, and sailing are popular during the summer seasons. In the winter snowmobilers and ice anglers are drawn to the area. In January, fishing for the rare Bonneville cicso is a major event for local fishermen and tourists. No other lake in the continental United States offers such an opportunity....

  1. Creating and Recreating. Microcomputing Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arms, Valarie

    This document describes a software program, CREATE, which was developed at Drexel University to guide students in creating English compositions. A second program, ReCREATE, guides students in reading their finished papers and making global revisions. CREATE asks 20 questions that a teacher might ask a student in a pre-writing conference. Unlike…

  2. Converging social trends - emerging outdoor recreation issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl H. Reidel

    1980-01-01

    I can't recall when I have attended a national conference with a more clearly defined objective than this one. We are here to document outdoor recreation trends and explore their meaning for the future. The word "trend" appears no less than 45 times in the conference brochure, and the symposium organizers are determined that the proceedings will be...

  3. Outdoor Recreation in the Northern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Carter J. Betz; Shela H. Mou; Dale D. Gormanson

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, the North's population grew at a considerably slower rate than the Nation as a whole. Nevertheless, this region's population is large and in all likelihood will continue to grow. This means greater development of land and water resources at the same time that there is growth in demand for outdoor recreation. This report looks at...

  4. Outdoor Recreation in Two European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, James M.

    1987-01-01

    Questionnaires completed by older adults in Luxembourg (N=138) and in France (N=100) revealed a high extent of participation in outdoor recreation (a demonstrated predictor of successful aging) in the two countries. Identified similarities and differences in socioeconomic characteristics, attitudes, and environmental factors associated with…

  5. Measuring users' response to higher recreation fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen D. Reiling; Hsiang Tai Cheng; Cheryl Trott

    1992-01-01

    One of the arguments against higher fees at publicly-provided recreational facilities is that higher fees may force low-income users to reduce their use of facilities more than high-income users, or force them to stop using the facilities altogether if they cannot afford the higher fee. Measuring the impact of higher fees on current users with different income levels...

  6. Improving our understanding of recreation and tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda E. Kruger; Susan J. Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Over the past century, American society has hanged in many ways that affect the management of natural resources for recreation and tourism. The nation's population is more racially and ethnically diverse. Baby boomers are reaching retirement age and many have money to travel. The nation's population has more than tripled, causing our once rural country to...

  7. Recreation intervention with adolescent offenders: Prospects and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In dealing with the dysfunctional family life and depriving environments of participants, mechanisms of the strategy amount to physical and mental challenges in order to create mastery ... Child offenders with well-established defence mechanisms and resistance to change appear less amenable to recreation intervention.

  8. Lake Holloman Recreational Area Development Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    1-4 1.4 Summary of Key Environmental Requirements ......................................................1-5 1.4.1 National...and Need for Development of Holloman Lake Recreational Area 1.4 Summary of Key Environmental Requirements 1.4.1 National Environmental Policy Act...Sylvilagus audubonii), kangaroo rats ( Dipodomys spp.), White sands woodrat (Neotomamicropus leaucophaea), house mouse (Mus musculus), long-tailed

  9. International Fisheries Management and Recreational Benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oinonen, Soile; Grønbæk, Lone; Laukkanen, Marita

    2016-01-01

    scenarios. In the first scenario, countries take their participation decision for the IFA based only on the net present value of profits from commercial fisheries. In the second scenario, the net present value of the recreational benefits from angling is also considered. The results show that accounting...

  10. Hunting Plan Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan sets forth a proposal for public hunting on the refuge as a form of wildlife-oriented recreation. Hunting of deer, waterfowl, other migratory game birds...

  11. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Management Plan will provide the framework for making decisions on conserving natural, cultural, and recreational resources, managing visitor use,...

  12. Medical and recreational marijuana: commentary and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Samuel T

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen substantial shifts in cultural attitudes towards marijuana for medical and recreational use. Potential problems with the approval, production, dispensation, route of administration, and negative health effects of medical and recreational marijuana are reviewed. Medical marijuana should be subject to the same rigorous approval process as other medications prescribed by physicians. Legalizing recreational marijuana may have negative public health effects.

  13. 77 FR 71191 - 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... AGENCY 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability of the 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 304... availability of the 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria (RWQC). The document contains the EPA's...

  14. 36 CFR 7.79 - Amistad Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amistad Recreation Area. 7.79... REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.79 Amistad Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. (1) Hunting is... (PWC). (1) PWCs are allowed within Amistad National Recreation Area with the following exceptions: (i...

  15. Sports and recreation participation in three communities in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A questionnaire was used to gather information about sports and recreation participation, participation in sports and recreation activities, using the integrated sports facilities and reasons for low participation in sports and recreation activities. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. The results showed that soccer ...

  16. Physical Recreation of Blind Adults: Present Practices and Childhood Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Claudine; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of tape-recorded responses of 30 blind adults to a 22-question interview showed that most respondents had positive attitudes toward physical education and recreation, but felt that little encouragement had been offered them. Leisure education and counseling for blind persons and recreation personnel can improve physical recreation and…

  17. Proceedings of the 2001 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon. Comp, ed. Todd

    2002-01-01

    Contains 71 articles presented at the 2001 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium which seeks to foster quality information exchange between recreation, tourism, and resource managers and researchers throughout the Northeast. The forum provides opportunities for recreation and tourism research managers from different agencies, state, and government levels, as well...

  18. Managing recreation areas for quality user experiences: a theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. More; Gregory J. Buhyoff

    1979-01-01

    The production of opportunities for high-quality visitor experiences is a basic goal of recreation management. Recreation quality can be interpreted using concepts from psychological field theory to relate emotion to the strength of motivation. Applications to on-site management for recreation quality and use regulation are suggested.

  19. Index to Selected Outdoor Recreation Literature. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A partial index to selected outdoor recreation literature received by the Department of the Interior Library during 1966 provides 991 abstracts retrievable by subject index, name index, geographic index, and publications appendices. Subject categories include outdoor recreation resources, administration of resources and programs, recreation users'…

  20. The Future of Outdoor Recreation. What the Trends Tell Us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Gina

    1986-01-01

    The author looked at trend data presented at the 1985 National Outdoor Recreation Trends Symposium and synthesized the results to offer insights into the future of outdoor recreation. Discussed are social, activity, private sector recreational, economic, tourism, and policy trends. (MT)

  1. America's Outdoor Recreation Areas--Playgrounds for the Affluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, John D.

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the societal benefits of outdoor recreation and to determine the relationship of social stratification to utilization of outdoor recreation facilities. Conclusions are that many of America's outdoor recreation sites are located at considerable distances from population concentrations and require substantial…

  2. 36 CFR 327.23 - Recreation use fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation use fees. 327.23... § 327.23 Recreation use fees. (a) In accordance with the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965... Engineers collects day use fees, special recreation use fees and/or special permit fees for the use of...

  3. 36 CFR 7.62 - Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Recreation Area. 7.62 Section 7.62 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Recreation Area. (a) Snowmobiles. After consideration of existing special situations, i.e., depth of snow... snowmobiles the following locations within the Lake Chelan National Recreation Area: (1) All open areas...

  4. 36 CFR 7.51 - Curecanti Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Curecanti Recreation Area. 7... SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.51 Curecanti Recreation Area. (a) Hunting... to operate within the boundaries of Curecanti National Recreation Area provided: (1) That the...

  5. 36 CFR 7.69 - Ross Lake National Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ross Lake National Recreation... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.69 Ross Lake National Recreation Area... snowmobiles the following locations within the Ross Lake National Recreation Area: (1) State Highway 20, that...

  6. 36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Recreation Area. 7.55 Section 7.55 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. Hunting is allowed at times and locations designated as open for hunting. (b... Recreation Area except in the following areas: (i) Crescent Bay Lake. (ii) Kettle River above the Hedlund...

  7. 76 FR 58403 - Prohibitions-Developed Recreation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Forest Service 36 CFR Part 261 RIN 0596-AC98 Prohibitions--Developed Recreation Sites AGENCY: Forest.... Section-by-Section Analysis 36 CFR Part 261, Subpart A Section 261.16 Developed Recreation Sites.... 261.16 Developed recreation sites. * * * * * (j) Bringing in or possessing an animal, other than a...

  8. 36 CFR 7.57 - Lake Meredith National Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Meredith National Recreation Area. 7.57 Section 7.57 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Recreation Area. (a) The operation of motor vehicles within the Lake Meredith Recreation Area is prohibited...

  9. 20 CFR 638.515 - Recreation/avocational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recreation/avocational program. 638.515... PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.515 Recreation/avocational program. The center operator shall develop a recreation/avocational program in accordance with...

  10. 78 FR 48136 - Notice of New Recreation Fee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Doc No: 2013-19047] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Notice of New Recreation Fee AGENCY: Prescott National Forest, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of New Recreation Fee... following proposed fees: (1) Osprey recreation fee is proposed at $75/night for up to 50 persons or $125...

  11. A role for first-person science in recreation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert Schroeder

    2008-01-01

    Most if not all recreation researchers are also recreationists. This paper explores the possibility that recreation researchers could use their own recreation experiences as a source of insight into the phenomena they are trying to understand. Such a strategy of "first-person science" is embraced by practitioners of phenomenological psychology, experiential...

  12. Diffusion of Innovation: A Roadmap for Inclusive Community Recreation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleien, Stuart J.; Miller, Kimberly D.

    2010-01-01

    Inclusive community recreation is an optimal environment for the development of recreation and sports skills and social relationships between people with and without disabilities. Although we know much about best practices for inclusion, little systemic change in recreation agencies has transpired. Diffusion of Innovation Theory is proposed as a…

  13. Econonmic effects of river recreation on local economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; John C. Bergstrom; Gregory A. Ashley; John Karish

    1990-01-01

    Outdoor recreation is a major, growing use of water resources in the United States. The economic effects of expenditures by visitors to three recreational river sites on local economies surrounding the sites were estimated using an input-output model (IMPLAN). Expenditure data were from the Public Area Recreation Visitors Study (PARVS). Results indicate that visitor...

  14. 40 CFR 230.51 - Recreational and commercial fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreational and commercial fisheries... Potential Effects on Human Use Characteristics § 230.51 Recreational and commercial fisheries. (a) Recreational and commercial fisheries consist of harvestable fish, crustaceans, shellfish, and other aquatic...

  15. PREFACE: Conference Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    ORGANISING COMMITTEE: Alexander Petrov - Chairman, Kiril Blagoev - Vice-Chairman, Margarita Grozeva - Scientific secretary, Kostadinka Gesheva, Anna Szekeres, Hassan Chamati, Diana Nesheva, Peter Rafailov, Yordan Marinov, Emilia Dimova, Tatyana Ivanova, Radostina Kamburova, Ekaterina Iordanova, Julia Genova, Alexander Donkov, Emilia Vlaikova SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Alexander Petrov, Bulgaria; Nikola Sabotinov, Bulgaria; Kiril Blagoev, Bulgaria; Nicholay Tonchev, Bulgaria; Hassan Chamati, Bulgaria; Marin Gospodinov, Bulgaria; Peter Rafailov, Bulgaria; Emil Vlakhov, Bulgaria; Kostadinka Gesheva, Bulgaria; Anna Szekeres, Bulgaria; Diana Nesheva, Bulgaria; Albena Paskaleva, Bulgaria; Tatyana Ivanova, Bulgaria; Alexander Dreischuh, Bulgaria; Evgenia Valcheva, Bulgaria; Miglena Nikolaeva-Dimitrova, Bulgaria; Sanka Gateva, Bulgaria; Frank Hamelmann, Germany; Nicola Scaramuzza, Italy; G.M.W. Kroesen, Netherlands; Jan van Dijk Netherlands; Andrzej Szewczyk, Poland; Henryk Szymczak, Poland; Krzistof Rogacki, Poland; Ion Mihailescu, Romania; Claes-Goran Granqvist, Sweden; Mikael Jonsson, Sweden; Andrew Livingston, UK; Ludmila Peeva, UK

  16. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee in the first quarter of 2009 included: Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS) 2009 exercise The committee took note of 2009 MARS ceiling guidelines giving the advancement budget by career path and amounting to approx 1.80% of the basic salary bill. To this will be added 250 steps CERN-wide, financed by savings from implementation of the international indemnity for 2007, 2008 and the first half of 2009. The specific Senior Staff Guidelines, including the proposed number of promotions from Career Path E to F, were also noted. The guidelines with respect to step distribution were also noted: the minima and maxima remain the same as in previous years. Compliance with the guidelines will continue to be monitored closely (more details, including a frequently asked questions section). It was also noted that Financial Awards (awards for extraordinary service and responsibility allowances) may b...

  17. Committees and sponsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    International Advisory Committee Richard F CastenYale, USA Luiz Carlos ChamonSão Paulo, Brazil Osvaldo CivitareseLa Plata, Argentina Jozsef CsehATOMKI, Hungary Jerry P DraayerLSU, USA Alfredo Galindo-UribarriORNL & UT, USA James J KolataNotre Dame, USA Jorge López UTEP, USA Joseph B NatowitzTexas A & M, USA Ma Esther Ortiz IF-UNAM Stuart PittelDelaware, USA Andrés SandovalIF-UNAM Adam SzczepaniakIndiana, USA Piet Van IsackerGANIL, France Michael WiescherNotre Dame, USA Organizing Committee Libertad Barrón-Palos (Chair)IF-UNAM Roelof BijkerICN-UNAM Ruben FossionICN-UNAM David LizcanoININ Sponsors Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAMInstituto de Física, UNAMInstituto Nacional de Investigaciones NuclearesDivisión de Física Nuclear de la SMFCentro Latinoamericano de Física

  18. MDCT findings in sports and recreational accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensch, Frank V; Koivikko, Mika P; Koskinen, Seppo K (Dept. of Radiology, Toeoeloe Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)), email: frank.bensch@hus.fi

    2011-12-15

    Background. Sports and recreational accidents involving critical areas of the body occur commonly in the general population. Reports on their demographics and recommendations for screening procedures are, however, few. Purpose. To assess injuries of the craniofacial area, spine, and torso resulting from sports and recreational accidents with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as primary imaging method in a Level I trauma center. Material and Methods. All emergency room CT requests over a time span of 105 months were reviewed retrospectively for trauma mechanism and injury. Patients were identified using an electronic picture archiving and communications system (PACS), and MDCT studies interpreted by two radiologists independently. Results. Of a total of 5898 patients, 492 patients (301 boys/men, 191 girls/women, age range 2-76 years, mean 33.5 years, median 29.5 years) with sports or recreational accidents emerged. A total of 102 traumatic findings were diagnosed, thereof 72 (71%) serious. The three most commonly encountered serious injuries were intracranial injury, fractures of facial bones, and vertebral injuries. The three most common injury mechanisms were bicycling, horseback riding, and team ball sports. Patients from recreational activities were on average significantly younger (29.2 years) than those from sports accidents (36.9 years; P < 0.001). Only age groups <21 years and 41-50 years differed in injury severity from the other age groups (P = 0.004 and P = 0.063, respectively). Of all trauma mechanisms, only bicycling had a significantly increased risk of injury (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Injuries in sports and recreational accidents presented with an overall incidence of 21%, of which 71% are serious. The most common mechanisms of injury were bicycling, horseback riding, and team ball sports. The largest incidence of serious injury involved bicycling. Because of the high probability of a serious injury and the high energies that are often involved

  19. Recreational use management and wildfires in Southern California: Using GIS and visual landscape simulation models for economic assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Moya; Armando González-Cabán; José J. Sánchez; José de la Heras

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in fire behavior are conforming strategies for forest management in nonindustrial private and public forests in the western United States. The strategy developed should include identifying the most cost-effective ways for allocating fire management budgets. In recreational areas, visitors’ opinion should be included in forest planning decisions and...

  20. 78 FR 36568 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the Approved Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... of the CDCA. The primary recreation activities in the ISDRA include off- highway vehicle use, camping... Heritage Commission, and the State Historic Preservation Office. The Proposed RAMP/CDCA Plan Amendment and... paleontological resources; Management and design of actions and facilities to meet visual resources management...

  1. Stakeholders' relationships with the USDA Forest Service at the Spruce Knob-Seneca Rocks National Recreation Area, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine A. Thompson; Chad D. Pierskalla; Steven W. Selin

    2007-01-01

    The Spruce Knob-Seneca Rocks National Recreation Area (NRA) is developing a collaborative management plan. To develop a public involvement strategy, it is necessary to assess the social conditions in the area. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship local stakeholders in the NRA have with the USDA Forest Service (USFS) with regard to the...

  2. 77 FR 70413 - Information Collection; Flathead and McKenzie Rivers and McKenzie National Recreational Trail...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... most important indicators to monitor over the life of the plan, determine if any thresholds are being... ask visitors to provide information about their trip and activities, environmental and social conditions that may alter the quality of their recreational experience, and their attitudes toward different...

  3. 75 FR 45653 - Notice of Re-Opening of Comment Period for the Draft Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Re-Opening of Comment Period for the Draft Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area Management Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement, California AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Cottage Way, Sacramento, California 95825. Interested persons may also review the Draft Resource...

  4. Community participation in the decentralised district health systems in Tanzania: why do some health committees perform better than others?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluka, Stephen Oswald; Bukagile, Godfrey

    2016-04-01

    Over the past two decades, community participation has emerged as an important dimension within decentralised district healthcare systems. In Tanzania, initiatives to strengthen community participation have focused on the formation of the health committees. Studies have reported variations in the performance of the committees. An exploratory case study design focusing on two districts was adopted to explore the differences in practice of the health facility committees in a well-functioning district and one that is not. In both study districts, the committees were in place. The most common activities of the health committees were assisting the clinic in day-to-day running. The health committees' influence on policy, planning and budgeting was limited. Managerial and leadership practices of the district health managers, including effective supervision and personal initiatives of the top-district health officials coupled with incentives, are the major factors for the good performance of the health facility committees and the boards. Inadequate training and low public awareness affected the performance of the committees. A greater role in governance and oversight is essential for effective and meaningful health committees. To achieve impact, health committees will require adequate training on the following: roles and functions of the health facility committees and the boards; interaction between the committees and the communities and the health workers; development of health plans and budgets at the local and district level; and monitoring and tracking. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Ordinary meeting on 30 January 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 30 January 2007 included: Administrative Circular No. 26: with the introduction of the merit recognition system in the framework of the 5-yearly review of CERN employment conditions, Administrative Circular No. 26 has been revised. The committee took note of the revised document which is being finalized for submission to the Director-General for approval in the near future. Technical analysis of CERN Health Insurance Scheme: the Committee was informed that a group has been set up by the Director-General to analyse the financial situation of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme in the short and long term, and to propose measures to ensure that the Scheme remains in financial balance, with adequate cover, over the medium term. The group's terms of reference and membership were communicated. Voluntary programmes It was announced that the programmes: 'part-time work as a pre-retirement measure...

  6. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 30 JANUARY 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 30 January 2007 included: Administrative Circular No. 26: with the introduction of the merit recognition system in the framework of the 5-yearly review of CERN employment conditions, Administrative Circular No. 26 has been revised. The Committee took note of the revised document which is being finalized for submission to the Director-General for approval in the near future. Technical analysis of CERN Health Insurance Scheme: the Committee was informed that a group has been set up by the Director-General to analyse the financial situation of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme in the short and long term, and to propose measures to ensure that the Scheme remains in financial balance, with adequate cover, over the medium term. The group's terms of reference and membership were communicated. Voluntary programmes It was announced that the programmes: 'part-time work as a pre-retirement mea...

  7. Spatial planning of sports infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Leskovec

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Harmonious development of sports deals with the development of sports centres, buildings and training grounds in the built environment. Their basic objective is to provide to needs of professional and top quality sports, sports recreation and sports education in space. The methodological basis for establishing a spatial sports scheme was the Steinitz-Rogers model of planning sports-recreation centres, buildings and training grounds. One of the results of the scheme is a cartographically and digitally supported data base that can be complemented.

  8. 78 FR 68811 - National Advisory Committee for Implementation of the National Forest System Land Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... Management Planning Rule AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Advisory Committee for Implementation of the National Forest System Land Management Planning Rule will meet... the National Forest System Land Management Planning Rule. The purpose of this meeting is to present...

  9. 78 FR 46565 - National Advisory Committee for Implementation of the National Forest System Land Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... Management Planning Rule AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Advisory Committee for Implementation of the National Forest System Land Management Planning Rule will meet... of the National Forest System Land Management Planning Rule. The purpose of this meeting is to...

  10. Recent advances in recreation ecology and the implications of different relationships between recreation use and ecological impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher A. Monz; Catherine M. Pickering; Wade L. Hadwen

    2013-01-01

    Recreation ecology - the study of the environmental consequences of outdoor recreation/nature-based tourism activities and their effective management - is an emerging field of global importance. A primary research generalization in this field, the use-impact relationship, is commonly described as curvilinear, with proportionally more impact from initial recreation/...

  11. Outdoor recreation participation of people with mobility disabilities: selected results of the national survey of recreation and the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Williams; Hans Vogelsong; Gary Green; Ken Cordell

    2004-01-01

    Outdoor recreation is an important and meaningful experience that carries numerous benefits for people with and without disabilities. Traditionally, relatively few recreation services and facilities were accessible to people with disabilities. Recent legislation such as the Americans with Disabilities Act has increased the accessibility of many outdoor recreation...

  12. 75 FR 26711 - Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... No: 2010-11040] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447) AGENCY: National Forests in Mississippi, USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of New Recreation Fee Site. SUMMARY: Bethel Motorcycle and Bethel...

  13. 75 FR 26714 - Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... No: 2010-11042] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447) AGENCY: National Forests in Mississippi, USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Site. SUMMARY: Rattlesnake Bay...

  14. 77 FR 6535 - Notice of the Advisory Committee on Agriculture Statistics; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... Assisted Personal Interview Technology Applications, Census of Agriculture Updates, Census Follow-on Survey Plans, and Cultural Transformation Initiatives. The Committee meeting is open to the public. The public...

  15. 76 FR 18800 - NASA Advisory Council; Information Technology Infrastructure Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The topics of discussion for the meeting are the following: Computing Environment... Ethics Briefing IT Committee Work Plan Actions/Assignments/Logistics The meeting will be open to the...

  16. 76 FR 75565 - NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Subcommittee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Aeronautics Committee; Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS... National Airspace System project. UAS Subcommittee 2012 Planning. It is imperative that these meetings be...

  17. 75 FR 36722 - Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology; National Science and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology; National Science... development of the draft National Aeronautics Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) Infrastructure Plan. SUMMARY: The Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee (ASTS) of the National Science...

  18. Delivering the International Olympic Committee's mandate on Youth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The International Olympic Committee (IOC) is currently planning the historic Youth Olympic Games (YOG), an international mul ti-sport event that will be inaugurated in Singapore in 2010. On the 6t h of July 2007, the establishment of the YOG was approved and will feature 14 to 18 year-old athletes. The purpose of the YOG ...

  19. 78 FR 30328 - Announcement of National Geospatial Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... NSDI Strategic Plan Geospatial Platform OMB Circular A-16 Portfolio Management Landsat Advisory Group... composed of representatives from governmental, private sector, non-profit, and academic organizations, was established to advise the Federal Geographic Data Committee on management of Federal geospatial programs, the...

  20. The Learning Organization Implemented in Education through Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jason Lee; Davis, Harley

    2009-01-01

    Advisory committees have an established history as effective leadership components to assist in planning and evaluating vocational programs and in establishing communication links between institutions and communities. Authorities in the concepts of learning teams, such as Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Peter Senge, Harvard Business…

  1. Policing the Void: Recreation, Social Inclusion and the Baltimore Police Athletic League

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob J. Bustad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we explore the relationship between public recreation policy and planning and the transformation of urban governance in the context of the Police Athletic League centers in Baltimore, Maryland. In light of contemporary discussions of the role of youth programs for sport and physical activity within post-industrial cities, the origination, development, and eventual demise of Baltimore’s network of Police Activity League centers is an instructive, if disheartening, saga. It illustrates the social and political rationales mobilized in justifying recreation policy and programming, the framing of sport and physical activity as preventative measures towards crime and juvenile delinquency, and the precarity of such initiatives given the efficiency-driven orthodoxies of neoliberal urban entrepreneurialism (Harvey, 1989. This analysis emphasizes how the PAL centers were designed to ‘fill the void’ left by a declining system of public recreation, thereby providing an example of a recreation program as part of the “social problems industry” (Pitter & Andrews 1997.

  2. Analysis of terrains suitable for tourism and recreation by using geographic information system (GIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklıbaşında, Meliha; Bulut, Yahya

    2014-09-01

    The use and utilization areas of geographic information system (GIS) increase every day due to both enabling easiness in storing, updating, grouping, analyzing, correlating, and mapping of data about evaluation factors in planning studies and having quite low error margin depending on the accuracy of data stored. In fact, GIS is also used both in visualization and in various analyses in planning tourism terrains. In this study, the effectiveness of GIS on holistic evaluation of natural and cultural resources in planning tourism terrains was analyzed. Natural and cultural resources in Kayseri Yahyalı were quantified by using ArcGIS 9.3 software from GIS software; data were analyzed and potential tourism and recreation terrains, level of suitability, and rate of coverage were determined. As a result of the analyses, it was determined that 11.847 ha area (6,53%) was quite suitable for such kind of activities, 103.010 ha (56,77%) was suitable, 39.278 ha (21,65%) was less suitable, and 27.314 ha area (15,05%) was not suitable. In the next stage, landscape properties which are suitable for tourism and recreation were evaluated and landscape types were classified in the sense of their tourist attraction. It was determined that the water resources and valley landscapes were the basic sources of the tourism and recreation activities of Yahyalı, and it was determined that the landscape of the forest and mountain was important for variety of the tourism and recreation activities of Yahyalı.

  3. Lightning injuries in sports and recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Eric M; Howard, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    The powers of lightning have been worshiped and feared by all known human cultures. While the chance of being struck by lightning is statistically very low, that risk becomes much greater in those who frequently work or play outdoors. Over the past 2 yr, there have been nearly 50 lightning-related deaths reported within the United States, with a majority of them associated with outdoor recreational activities. Recent publications primarily have been case studies, review articles, and a discussion of a sixth method of injury. The challenge in reducing lightning-related injuries in organized sports has been addressed well by both the National Athletic Trainers' Association and the National Collegiate Athletic Association in their guidelines on lightning safety. Challenges remain in educating the general population involved in recreational outdoor activities that do not fall under the guidelines of organized sports.

  4. Hydration for recreational sport and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2012-11-01

    This review presents recommendations for fluid needs and hydration assessment for recreational activity. Fluid needs are based on sweat losses, dependent on intensity and duration of the activity, and will vary among individuals. Prolonged aerobic activity is adversely influenced by dehydration, and heat exposure will magnify this effect. Fluid needs predicted for running 5-42 km at recreational paces show that fluid losses are sport drinks, gels, bars) can benefit high-intensity (≤ 1 h) and less-intense, long-duration activity (≥ 1 h). Spot measures of urine color or urine-specific gravity to assess hydration status have limitations. First morning urine concentration and body mass with gross thirst perception can be simple ways to assess hydration status. © 2012 International Life Sciences Institute.

  5. Modeling the Demand for Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Robert

    1987-05-01

    This paper critically reviews several of the new methodologies developed in the last 10 years to model the demand for recreation. There are three competing approaches to modeling heterogeneous recreation sites: partitioning, hedonic, and index models. Partitioning involves grouping sites into small homogeneous sets and treating each set as a unique good (multiple-site travel cost models). Hedonic involves disaggregating goods into their component characteristics and modeling the prices and demands for the characteristics (hedonic property value and the hedonic travel cost method). The index models involve measuring choices among limited alternatives using an index of characteristics (generalized travel cost, gravity, and discrete choice models). Although much work has been done on each method, limitations are noted with each approach, and additional research needs are identified.

  6. Impaired inhibitory control in recreational cocaine users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza S Colzato

    Full Text Available Chronic use of cocaine is associated with impairment in response inhibition but it is an open question whether and to which degree findings from chronic users generalize to the upcoming type of recreational users. This study compared the ability to inhibit and execute behavioral responses in adult recreational users and in a cocaine-free-matched sample controlled for age, race, gender distribution, level of intelligence, and alcohol consumption. Response inhibition and response execution were measured by a stop-signal paradigm. Results show that users and non users are comparable in terms of response execution but users need significantly more time to inhibit responses to stop-signals than non users. Interestingly, the magnitude of the inhibitory deficit was positively correlated with the individuals lifetime cocaine exposure suggesting that the magnitude of the impairment is proportional to the degree of cocaine consumed.

  7. 78 FR 37846 - Resource Management Plan/General Plan and Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Resource Management Plan/General Plan and Environmental Impact Statement... from various resource management alternatives contained in the subject document. The Final EIS/EIR: (1... Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the San Luis Reservoir State Recreation Area Resource...

  8. 78 FR 71631 - Committee Name: Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... SECURITY Committee Name: Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC) AGENCY... Management; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Information Network... Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC) is an advisory body to the Homeland...

  9. [Transfusion safety and haemovigilance committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, J-F; Canivet, N; Courbil, R; Raucoules-Aimé, M

    2007-05-01

    Transfusion safety and haemovigilance committees (TSHC) were initially created in the public health care sector. Nowadays, they are also a mandatory committee of private health care institutions. The members of the TSHC, as well as the way the committee is driven and organized, are defined by law. The aim of the committee is focused on the management of transfusion safety and haemovigilance. The TSHC takes part in the improvement of the safety of transfused patients, and monitors the applying of haemovigilance rules. It also handles the training of all staff members involved in the blood transfusion process.

  10. 47 CFR 90.1211 - Regional plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regional plan. 90.1211 Section 90.1211... § 90.1211 Regional plan. (a) To facilitate the shared use of the 4.9 GHz band, each region may submit a... numbers and organizational affiliations of the chairperson(s) and all members of the planning committee...

  11. Crime and the Legalization of Recreational Marijuana

    OpenAIRE

    Dragone, Davide; Prarolo, Giovanni; Vanin, Paolo; Zanella, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    We provide first-pass evidence that the legalization of the cannabis market across US states may be inducing a crime drop. Exploiting the recent staggered legalization enacted by the adjacent states of Washington (end of 2012) and Oregon (end of 2014) we find, combining county-level difference-in-differences and spatial regression discontinuity designs, that the legalization of recreational marijuana caused a significant reduction of rapes and thefts on the Washington side of the border in 20...

  12. Facilitating "flow" through therapeutic recreation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, G D; Witt, P A; Aguilar, T

    1983-01-01

    The rationale and means for facilitating flow for disabled individuals in situational and community recreation settings is discussed. The flow model and arousal model are discussed and implications of leadership aimed at facilitating flow are delineated. Specific principles discussed are: attracting attention, arranging complexity to provide optimal challenge, narrowing the stimulus field, minimizing extrinsic rewards, arranging for immediate feedback, and minimizing the individual's awareness of and focusing on the outcomes of involvements.

  13. Youth Voice in Nigerian School-based Management Committees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashiru Bako Umar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Nigeria, School-Based Management Committees (SBMCs aim to provide an opportunity for all stakeholders, particularly the vulnerable groups in the school’s host communities such as young people and women to partake in school governance. Research on the experiences of youth voice in the committees is scant, however, as much of the existing literature on SBMCs focuses on program outcomes. Using qualitative research interviews, observations, and document analysis, this study addressed this gap by exploring how youth participate and express themselves in two SBMCs in Niger State, Nigeria. The findings, which were derived from 19 youth and adult participants, were drawn from SBMC members out of which 12 were youth between the ages 13 and 25, while 7 were adults aged 40 and above. The participants revealed that youth committee members expressed their voice in the committees through participating in a number of committee activities. Specifically, the youth participated in decision-making during meetings, aided in the construction of committee projects, undertook administrative/managerial functions and monitored the committee’s projects. They also participated in revenue generation, planning, school visits and supervision, advocacy, and sensitization campaigns.

  14. Standing Concertation Committee - Ordinary Meeting on 30 September 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 30 September 2008 included: Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to extend the scheme of part-time work as a pre-retirement measure by one year, i.e. until 31 December 2009. Preparation of TREF on 7 October 2008 The Committee took note that the TREF agenda would cover: Annual salary adjustment; Voluntary programmes; Five-yearly review of financial & social conditions of members of the personnel; Update on 2005 review; Preparation for 2010 review; TREF workplan 2009; Update on CHIS actuarial study. The proposals and presentations which the Management planned to present to TREF were discussed and some clarifications were agreed. Follow-up of Finance Committee and Council The Committee took note of a report by the Chairman of points related to personnel matters discussed in those committees. He mentioned in particular the annu...

  15. 78 FR 14400 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... open meeting for the International Maritime Organization's Marine Environment Protection Committee... Organization's Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 65) to be held at the International Maritime Organization in London, United Kingdom from May 13 to 17, 2013. The primary matters to be considered include...

  16. 77 FR 54648 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... International Maritime Organization's Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC). The meeting will be held... prepare for the sixty-fourth session of the International Maritime Organization's Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 64) to be held at the International Maritime Organization in London, United...

  17. 77 FR 52105 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... open meeting for the International Maritime Organization's Marine Environment Protection Committee... Organization's Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 64) to be held at the International Maritime Organization in London, United Kingdom from October 1st to 5th, 2012. The primary matters to be considered...

  18. Recreation impacts to cliff resources in the Potomac Gorge: Final report, June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Jeffrey L.; Carr, C.; Davis, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Managers of the National Park Service (NPS) are directed by law to accommodate appropriate types and amounts of visitation while ensuring that: any adverse impacts are the minimum necessary, unavoidable, cannot be further mitigated, and do not constitute impairment or derogation of park resources and values. (NPS 2006). The increasing popularity of the national park system presents substantial management challenges. High visitatation may cause unacceptable impacts to fragile natural and cultural resources, and may also cause crowding and other social impacts, which can also degrade the quality of visitor experiences. Responding to these concerns, NPS managers at Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (CHOH) and George Washington Memorial Parkway (GWMP) sponsored this research within the upper Potomac Gorge portions of these parks to investigate visitation-related impacts to the park?s cliff resources. The cliffs and rocky areas within the Great Falls and Mather Gorge areas provide important habitats for numerous sensitive rare plants and plant communities. A recent General Management Planning process for Great Falls Park (GFP), a portion of GWMP, highlighted the potential impacts of cliff-associated recreational activities, including hiking, climbing, and fishing, on sensitive cliff resources. The planning process identified the need for development of a Climbing Management Plan and a Trail Plan to more specifically address site and visitor management actions needed to protect rare and sensitive natural and cultural resources. Good science to assess cliff-associated rare plants and communities and to determine the existing and potential effects of cliff-related recreational activities is required for these new planning efforts. This research is designed to specifically address these informational needs and to assist park managers on both sides of the river with current and future cliff and recreation management decisions.

  19. 76 FR 22395 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Open Internet Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Open Internet Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications... ``Open Internet Advisory Committee'' (hereinafter ``the Committee''), is being established. FOR FURTHER... the Committee. The purpose of the Committee is to track and evaluate the effects of the FCC's Open...

  20. Ecophysiological variation of European hornbeams along the foliation period in semi-rural recreational forest landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melih Öztürk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the ecophysiological characteristics of deciduous trees in the recreational areas allows construction of planning objectives particularly for the urban forests. Analysis of a multipurpose vegetation parameter; LAI (Leaf Area Index together with some meteorological variables supplies to an extent the comprehension of those ecophysiological characteristics. Around this scope, the LAI dynamics of Carpinus betulus L. trees in a recreational area were monitored and analyzed along the foliation period of approximately three months. The mean LAI which was only 0.80 during the budburst stage gradually escalated reaching 1.49 after the flushing stage. The increment of the leaves in size and numbers led to the mean LAI achieve its climax with 3.41 in early May. Then, the mean LAI experienced a stable period until the end of May. The change in the mean LAI were subjected to correlation test especially with the air and soil temperatures. The correlations between the mean LAI and, in particular the soil temperature (r≥0.95 and air temperature were high and significant (P<0.01. There were no definite correlation between the mean LAI and mean sunlight duration, air humidity and total precipitation. Impact of air temperature on the LAI of Carpinus betulus L. trees indicates the vulnerability of the recreational area to possible urban heat oriented climate warming. On the other hand, the influence of soil temperature on the mean LAI warns the susceptibility of the recreational area to possible anthropogenic pressure resulting in soil compaction and regeneration difficulties. Consequently, sustainable management of this recreational area necessitates the anticipation and mitigation of these possible destructions.

  1. EMSL Strategic Plan 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2008-08-15

    This Strategic Plan is EMSL’s template for achieving our vision of simultaneous excellence in all aspects of our mission as a national scientific user facility. It reflects our understanding of the long-term stewardship we must work toward to meet the scientific challenges of the Department of Energy and the nation. During the next decade, we will implement the strategies contained in this Plan, working closely with the scientific community, our advisory committees, DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and other key stakeholders. This Strategic Plan is fully aligned with the strategic plans of DOE and its Office of Science. We recognize that shifts in science and technology, national priorities, and resources made available through the Federal budget process create planning uncertainties and, ultimately, a highly dynamic planning environment. Accordingly, this Strategic Plan should be viewed as a living document for which we will continually evaluate changing needs and opportunities posed by our stakeholders (i.e., DOE, users, staff, advisory committees), work closely with them to understand and respond to those changes, and align our strategy accordingly.

  2. The Respite and Recreation: An Innovative Recreation Service to Adopted Children with Special Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Yang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Often, youth in the foster care system have traumatic experiences associated with abuse and separation from their biological family. These experiences may lead to emotional, psychological, and behavioral problems that challenge the new adoptive family dynamic. This article introduces the Respite and Recreation (R & R program in a Midwestern area. R & R combines faculty, staff, and graduate students from a local University, local community resources, and staff from a local adoption agency to provide recreation, respite, and professional support services for children with special needs and their adoptive parents. The R & R program provides the adopted children with structured recreation programs for their growth, the parents with a break from stress, and volunteer students with opportunities to incorporate their academic learning into real life situations. Service learning programs such as the R & R also provide university faculty with excellent opportunities to conduct action research.

  3. Summary of findings of the R&D committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenley, C.R. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls (United States); Kokenge, B.R. [BRK Associates Inc., Farmersville, OH (United States)

    1996-05-01

    In March 1995, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMST) chartered a committee to formulate a research and development (R&D) plan in response to Sub-recommendation (2) of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. The NMSTG was established as an organizational unit operating under the auspices of the DOE Office of the Environmental Management. As a result of its efforts, the Research Committee concluded that, in general, the technology needs for stabilizing 94-1 nuclear materials are being adequately met by existing or planned DOE programs. At the same time, the committee, in the form of recommendations, noted specific R&D program areas that should be addressed by the NMSTG. These recommendations are documented in the R&D plan and formulated based on: (1) existing {open_quotes}gaps{close_quotes} in DOE`s R&D stabilization program, (2) the relative maturity of various technologies, and (3) other important R&D program issues that, in the judgement of the committee, should be addressed by the NMSTG. A systems engineering approach, derived form the aerospace industry, was applied to the various stabilization technologies to assess their relative maturity and availability for use in treating 94-1 nuclear materials.

  4. 78 FR 11727 - National Freight Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... transportation issues. Some Committee members may be appointed as representative members; other Committee members... Committee members. Nominations are open to all individuals without regard to race, color, religion, sex...

  5. 75 FR 36698 - Committee Management Renewals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... Physical Sciences, 66 Advisory Committee for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences, 1171 Business and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Committee Management Renewals The NSF management officials having responsibility for the advisory committees...

  6. 75 FR 9416 - Advisory Committee Information Hotline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... 3014512532 Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee 3014512533 Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs... Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee 3014512543 Pharmaceutical Science & Clinical Pharmacology... Reproductive Health Drugs, Advisory Committee for 3014512537 CENTER FOR FOOD SAFETY AND APPLIED NUTRITION Food...

  7. Beyond the Fringe: The Role of Recreation in Multi-Functional Urban Fringe Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian GILHESPY

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews some of the academic literature and policy documents that relate to and promote the need for urban design and the re-invigoration of the processes and practices of ‘masterplanning’. Specifically, this paper concerns the implications for recreation in areas that have been conceptualised in a number of ways including ‘urban fringe’ and ‘fringe-belt’ and the ways in which these areas are being re-developed as multi-functional spaces in the planning process. The paper pays particular attention to the proposed development of the ‘North Plymouth Community Park’ examining the claims made for the sustainable characteristics of the development and questioning the absence of the cultural aspects of recreation.

  8. PROGRAM OF RECREATIONAL AND HEALTH ACTIVITIES FOR ADOLESCENTS WITH CHARACTER'S ACCENTUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobiova A.V.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of using psychosomatic approach for correction the behavior of adolescents with character's accentuations was considered. The author's program of recreational and health activities for adolescents was grounded and offered, taking into account the level of social adaptation and psychological features of character. The researches were conducted on the basis of secondary schools № 5, 7, 11 of the Romny town, Sumy region with 12-16 years old teens (n=412, including 218 girls and 194 boys. It is determined that psychosomatic approach in health and recreation program provides for the development and planning means and methods that influence not only on the level of somatic and physical health, but also on the structure of adolescents' personality. It is recommended the author's program, that consists of three stages and solved the three groups of problems: health, training and educational, was developed and inculcated in an educational process.

  9. Internet plan and planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahriman Emina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper discuss specific features of internet plan as well as planning as management process in general in the contemporary environment. No need to stress out that marketing plan and marketing planning is core activity in approaching to market. At the same time, there are a lot specific c request in preparing marketing plan comparing to business planning due to marketing plan is an essential part. The importance of internet plan and planning rely on specific features of the internet network but as a part of general corporate as well as marketing strategy.

  10. 78 FR 66681 - Census Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... Populations (NAC). The committee will address census policies, research and methodology, tests, operations.... Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to the Committee...

  11. 21 CFR 26.73 - Joint Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS... Committee shall make its decisions by unanimous consent. The Joint Committee shall determine its own rules...

  12. 78 FR 38736 - Committee Management; Renewals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources, 1119 Advisory Committee for Engineering, 1170..., 10751 Proposal Review Panel for Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences, 10747 Proposal Review Panel for...

  13. Committees and organizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Chairman:Jozef Spałek (Kraków) Program Committee:Stephen Blundell (Oxford), J Michael D Coey (Dublin), Dominique Givord (Grenoble), Dariusz Kaczorowski (Wrocław), Roman Micnas (Poznań), Marek Przybylski (Halle), Ludiwig Schultz (Dresden), Vladimir Sechovsky (Prague), Jozef Spałek (Kraków), Henryk Szymczak (Warszawa), Manuel Vázquez (Madrid) Publication Committee:Dariusz Kaczorowski, Robert Podsiadły, Jozef Spałek, Henryk Szymczak, Andrzej Szytuła Local committee:Maria Bałanda, Anna Majcher, Robert Podsiadły, Michał Rams, Andrzej Ślebarski, Krzysztof Tomala Editors of the Proceedings:Jozef Spałek, Krzysztof Tomala, Danuta Goc-Jagło, Robert Podsiadły, Michał Rams, Anna Majcher Plenary, semi-plenary and tutorial speakers:Ernst Bauer (Wien)Stephen Blundell (Oxford)J Michael D Coey (Dublin)Russell P Cowburn (London)Burkard Hillebrands (Kaiserslautern)Claudine Lacroix (Grenoble)Lluís Mañosa (Barcelona)María del Carmen Muñoz (Madrid)Bernard Raveau (Caen)Pedro Schlottmann (Tallahassee)Frank Steglich (Dresden)Oliver Waldmann (Freiburg) Invited speakers within symposia: R Ahuja (Uppsala)A Kirilyuk (Nijmegen) M Albrecht (Vienna)L Theil Kuhn (Roskilde) K Bärner (Göttingen)J Liu (Dresden) U Bovensiepen (Duisburg)G Lorusso (Modena) V Buchelnikov (Chelyabinsk)M M Maska (Katowice) B Chevalier (Bordeaux)Y Mukovskii (Moscow) O Chubykalo-Fesenko (Madrid)M Pannetier-Lecoeur (Saclay) A V Chumak (Kaiserslautern)G Papavassiliou (Athens) J M D Coey (Dublin)K R Pirota (Campinas) B Dabrowski (DeKalb)P Przyslupski (Warszawa) S Das (Aveiro)M Reiffers (Košice) A del Moral (Zaragoza)K Sandeman (London) V E Demidov (Muenster)D Sander (Halle) B Djafari-Rouhani (Lille)M Sawicki (Sendai/Warsaw) H A Dürr (Menlo Park)J Schaefer (Würzburg) J Fassbender (Dresden)H Schmidt (Wetzikon) J Fontcuberta (Barcelona)J Spałek (Kraków) V Garcia (Orsay)L Straka (Helsinki) J N Gonçalves (Aveiro)A Szewczyk (Warszawa) M E Gruner (Duisburg)Y Taguchi (Wako) G Gubbiotti (Perugia)A Thiaville

  14. Evaluation of body position of competitive and recreational cyclists

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Pivetta Carpes; Julio Francisco Kleinpaul; Frederico Dagnese; Elisandro de Assis Martins; Carlos Bolli Mota

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and to compare the body position when cycling of cyclists of different levels. The subjects were classifi ed as athletes (competitive) or non-athletes (recreational). A total of 36 recreational (n=17) competitive (n=19) cyclists were evaluated in their own bicycles. The body position assessment was carried out using a protocol that is well-recognized in the literature. The results demonstrated misalignment in the body positioning of 82% of the recreat...

  15. Contributions of the US state park system to nature recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siikamäki, Juha

    2011-08-23

    Nature recreation in the United States concentrates in publicly provided natural areas. They are costly to establish and maintain, but their societal contributions are difficult to measure. Here, a unique approach is developed to quantifying nature recreation services generated by the US state park system. The assessment first uses data from five national surveys conducted between 1975 and 2007 to consistently measure the amount of time used for nature recreation. The surveys comprise two official federal surveys and their predecessors. Each survey was designed to elicit nationally representative, detailed data on how people divide their time into different activities. State-level data on time use for nature recreation were then matched with information on the availability of state parks and other potentially important drivers of recreation, so that statistical estimation methods for nonexperimental panel data (difference-in-differences) could be used to examine the net contribution of state parks to nature recreation. The results show that state parks have a robust positive effect on nature recreation. For example, the approximately 2 million acres of state parks established between 1975 and 2007 are estimated to contribute annually 600 million hours of nature recreation (2.7 h per capita, approximately 9% of all nature recreation). All state parks generate annually an estimated 2.2 billion hours of nature recreation (9.7 h per capita; approximately 33% of all nature recreation). Using conventional approaches to valuing time, the estimated time value of nature recreation services generated by the US state park system is approximately $14 billion annually.

  16. RECREATIONAL GEOGRAPHY AND DEVELOPMENT OF ECOLOGICAL TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Arpentieva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to theoretical analysis of the problems of ecological tourism as a component of the theory and practice of recreational geography (geography, nature. The article reveals the essence and characteristics of ecotourism identifying its issues and determining the direction and tasks of its development. Special attention is paid to types and objects of ecological tourism, main problems and aspects of its development in the context of recreational geography and tourism are highlighted, such as the lack of an overall national concept for the development of rural tourism or the lack of clearly articulated public policies. There are neither standards and regulations applicable to rural tourism nor qualified personnel, knowledge and experience in the service sector of foreign and domestic tourists.There are no regulatory legal acts in the field of rural and ecological tourism which is aggravated by the unwillingness and inability to efficiently use private recreation resources. One of the key problems connected with the development of domestic tourism, including such types as agrotourism (“green tourism”, coupled with the experience of participation in rural works, and rural tourism as a whole, attracting people to rural life. The business problems of development of ecological tourism as an independent tourism industry cannot and should not be addressed to without strategic analysis and forecasting varied (including negative consequences of tourist activity for society, culture and environment as well as without and without the development and implementation of forms of ecological tourism aimed at harmonizing nature and culture of nature management by the population.

  17. Recreational nitrous oxide use: Prevalence and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Nabben, Ton; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O; laughing gas) is clinically used as a safe anesthetic (dentistry, ambulance, childbirth) and appreciated for its anti-anxiety effect. Since five years, recreational use of N2O is rapidly increasing especially in the dance and festival scene. In the UK, N2O is the second most popular recreational drug after cannabis. In most countries, nitrous oxide is a legal drug that is widely available and cheap. Last month prevalence of use among clubbers and ravers ranges between 40 and almost 80 percent. Following one inhalation, mostly from a balloon, a euphoric, pleasant, joyful, empathogenic and sometimes hallucinogenic effect is rapidly induced (within 10 s) and disappears within some minutes. Recreational N2O use is generally moderate with most users taking less than 10 balloons of N2O per episode and about 80% of the users having less than 10 episodes per year. Side effects of N2O include transient dizziness, dissociation, disorientation, loss of balance, impaired memory and cognition, and weakness in the legs. When intoxicated accidents like tripping and falling may occur. Some fatal accidents have been reported due to due to asphyxia (hypoxia). Heavy or sustained use of N2O inactivates vitamin B12, resulting in a functional vitamin B12 deficiency and initially causing numbness in fingers, which may further progress to peripheral neuropathy and megaloblastic anemia. N2O use does not seem to result in dependence. Considering the generally modest use of N2O and its relative safety, it is not necessary to take legal measures. However, (potential) users should be informed about the risk of vitamin B12-deficiency related neurological and hematological effects associated with heavy use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Innovative trends in recreation: aspects of psychoanalysis and art resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Kostikova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the problem of updating the art features of psychoanalytic concepts in the perspective of innovations in the recreation. Material & Methods: theoretical analysis and synthesis of domestic and foreign publications on the research problem. Results: analyzed current trends current research in the field of health and recreational activities. The paper considers the classical aspects of the art modification of psychoanalysis in the context of innovation strategies in recreation. Conclusions: theoretically probable positive effect of the implementation of the ideas of psychoanalysis and possibilities of art in productive innovation recreative process.

  19. Does getting a dog increase recreational walking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knuiman Matthew W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examines changes in socio-demographic, environmental and intrapersonal factors associated with dog acquisition in non-dog owners at baseline to 12-months follow-up and the effect of dog acquisition on minutes per week of recreational walking. Methods RESIDE study participants completed self-administered questionnaires (baseline and 12-months follow-up measuring physical activity, dog ownership, dog walking behavior as well as environmental, intrapersonal and socio-demographic factors. Analysis was restricted to 'Continuing non-owners' (i.e., non-owners at both baseline and follow-up; n = 681 and 'New dog owners' (i.e., non-owners who acquired a dog by follow-up; n = 92. Results Overall, 12% of baseline non-owners had acquired a dog at follow-up. Dog acquisition was associated with working and having children at home. Those who changed from single to couple marital status were also more likely to acquire a dog. The increase in minutes of walking for recreation within the neighborhood from baseline to follow-up was 48 minutes/week for new dog owners compared with 12 minutes/week for continuing non-owners (p p p > 0.05 after further adjustment for change in baseline to follow-up variables. Increase in intention to walk was the main factor contributing to attenuation of the effect of dog acquisition on recreational walking. Conclusion This study used a large representative sample of non-owners to examine the relationship between dog acquisition and recreational walking and provides evidence to suggest that dog acquisition leads to an increase in walking. The most likely mechanism through which dog acquisition facilitates increased physical activity is through behavioral intention via the dog's positive effect on owner's cognitive beliefs about walking, and through the provision of motivation and social support for walking. The results suggest that behavioral intention mediates the relationship between dog acquisition

  20. Management implications of changes in recreation activity motivation across physical settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    David A Graefe; Rudy M. Schuster; Gary T. Green; H. Ken. Cordell

    2010-01-01

    Outdoor recreation management frameworks suggest that a diverse set of recreation opportunities is necessary to meet the needs and desires of a diverse population of recreationists. Managers of recreation resources must understand recreational demand if they wish to provide high-quality recreation opportunities to their users. The purpose of this study was to examine...