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Sample records for reconstruction teams meet

  1. Forging Provincial Reconstruction Teams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Honore, Russel L; Boslego, David V

    2007-01-01

    The Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) training mission completed by First U.S. Army in April 2006 was a joint Service effort to meet a requirement from the combatant commander to support goals in Afghanistan...

  2. Landsat Science Team: 2017 Winter Meeting Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Todd A.; Loveland, Thomas; Wulder, Michael A.; Irons, James R.

    2017-01-01

    The summer meeting of the joint U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)-NASA Landsat Science Team (LST) was held July 26-28, 2016, at South Dakota State University (SDSU) in Brookings, SD. LST co-chair Tom Loveland [USGS’s Earth Resources Observation and Science Center (EROS)] and Kevin Kephart [SDSU] welcomed more than 80 participants to the three-day meeting. That attendance at such meetings continues to increase—likely due to the development of new data products and sensor systems—further highlights the growing interest in the Landsat program. The main objectives of this meeting were to provide a status update on Landsat 7 and 8, review team member research activities, and to begin identifying priorities for future Landsat missions.

  3. Multidisciplinary team meetings in urogynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Deepa; Jha, Swati

    2015-08-01

    The concept of multidisciplinary team (MDT) is well accepted in the current National Health Service (NHS) and is considered good practice for the management of chronic conditions. There has been a recent drive to have MDTs in managing women with incontinence and complex prolapse as a result of recommendations by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance, Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) etc. Currently, there are no data on the outcome of case discussion at urogynaecology MDTs. The aim of this study was to review the clinical impact of discussion of a select group of cases at an urogynaecology MDT and review the clinical literature to justify the MDT approach. MDT proformas of cases discussed from October 2012 to December 2013 were reviewed. Outcomes of the MDT were compared with recommendations at the initial consultation. This included change in management plan, type of surgery and surgeon as well as time delay due to MDT discussion. One hundred six proformas were available for analysis. Age range was 23-89 (58) years. Average time from clinic visit to MDT discussion was 8.32 + 5.9 days. The MDT recommended a change in management plan in 31 cases (29.3%), with 11 cases (10.4%) resulting in alternative surgery and 1 case (0.9%) with an alternative surgeon. In 18.5% of cases, MDT discussion formulated the initial management plan. Case discussions at our MDT provide an effective clinical forum to formulate management plans for complex cases. The decision-making process is made robust, without significant impact on waiting time. Investment in setting up MDTs has financial implications but provides patient benefit.

  4. Landsat Science Team meeting: Winter 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Todd A.; Loveland, Thomas; Wulder, Michael A.; Irons, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The summer meeting of the joint U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)–NASA Landsat Science Team (LST) was held at the USGS’s Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center July 7-9, 2015, in Sioux Falls, SD. The LST co-chairs, Tom Loveland [EROS—Senior Scientist] and Jim Irons [NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)—Landsat 8 Project Scientist], opened the three-day meeting on an upbeat note following the recent successful launch of the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-2 mission on June 23, 2015 (see image on page 14), and the news that work on Landsat 9 has begun, with a projected launch date of 2023.With over 60 participants in attendance, this was the largest LST meeting ever held. Meeting topics on the first day included Sustainable Land Imaging and Landsat 9 development, Landsat 7 and 8 operations and data archiving, the Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) stray-light issue, and the successful Sentinel-2 launch. In addition, on days two and three the LST members presented updates on their Landsat science and applications research. All presentations are available at landsat.usgs.gov/science_LST_Team_ Meetings.php.

  5. Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning…

  6. Landsat science team meeting: Summer 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Todd; Loveland, Thomas; Wulder, Michael A.; Irons, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The summer meeting of the joint U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)–NASA Landsat Science Team (LST) was held at the USGS’s Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center July 7-9, 2015, in Sioux Falls, SD. The LST co-chairs, Tom Loveland [EROS—Senior Scientist] and Jim Irons [NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)—Landsat 8 Project Scientist], opened the three-day meeting on an upbeat note following the recent successful launch of the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-2 mission on June 23, 2015 (see image on page 14), and the news that work on Landsat 9 has begun, with a projected launch date of 2023.

  7. The Search for Stability: Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wardle, Russel

    2004-01-01

    ... and international bodies as well as the military. Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs), as employed in Afghanistan, are used as a vehicle to examine the wide range of activities necessary for Nation Building...

  8. Interprofessional team meetings: Opportunities for informal interprofessional learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Gillian; Dunn, Stewart; Lincoln, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the potential for workplace interprofessional learning, specifically the learning that occurs between health professionals as part of their attendance at their regular interprofessional team meetings. While most interprofessional learning research to date has focused on formal structured education programs, this study adds to our understanding of the complexities of the learning processes occurring between health professionals as part of everyday practice. Through observations of team meetings and semi-structured interviews, we found that the interprofessional team meeting provided a practical, time-efficient, and relevant means for interprofessional learning, resulting in perceived benefits to individuals, teams, and patients. The learning process, however, was influenced by members' conceptions of learning, participation within the meeting, and medical presence. This study provides a basis for further research to assist health professionals capitalize on informal learning opportunities within the interprofessional meeting.

  9. Head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings: Effect on patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Markus; Gore, Sinclair M; Read, Rebecca L; Alexander, Ashlin; Mehta, Ankur; Elliot, Michael; Milross, Chris; Boyer, Michael; Clark, Jonathan R

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was for us to present our findings on the prospectively audited impact of head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings on patient management. We collected clinical data, the pre-multidisciplinary team meeting treatment plan, the post-multidisciplinary team meeting treatment plans, and follow-up data from all patients discussed at a weekly multidisciplinary team meeting and we recorded the changes in management. One hundred seventy-two patients were discussed in 39 meetings. In 52 patients (30%), changes in management were documented of which 20 (67%) were major. Changes were statistically more likely when the referring physician was a medical or radiation oncologist, when the initial treatment plan did not include surgery, and when the histology was neither mucosal squamous cell cancer nor a skin malignancy. Compliance to the multidisciplinary team meeting treatment recommendation was 84% for all patients and 70% for patients with changes in their treatment recommendation. Head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings changed management in almost a third of the cases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Milestone Report - M31SW030904 - Sigma Team Coordination Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2010-11-24

    This documents the completion of the FCR&D Level 3 milestone for the Off-Gas Sigma Team - ORNL work package (FTOR11SW0309), “Sigma Team Coordination Meeting” (M31SW030904), due 30 November 10. The subject meeting was held at Idaho National Laboratory on October 12 and 13, 2010. The agenda and meeting minutes are attached to this memo.

  11. The second Team Haemophilia Education Meeting, 2016, Frankfurt, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntorp, Erik; Dargaud, Yesim; Hart, Daniel; Lobet, Sébastien; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; d'Oiron, Roseline; Perry, David; Pollard, Debra; van den Berg, Marijke; Blatný, Jan; Chambost, Hervé; Doria, Andrea S; Holme, Pål André; Kaczmarek, Radoslaw; Mantovani, Lorenzo; McLaughlin, Paul; Nanayakkara, Lochana; Petrini, Pia; Sannié, Thomas; Laane, Edward; Maia, Raquel; Dettoraki, Athina; Farrell, Anna; Halimeh, Susan; Raza, Sayma; Taylor, Stephanie

    The first Team Haemophilia Education (THE) Meeting was held on 7-8 May 2015 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. It aimed to promote the optimal care of patients with haemophilia through education of the multidisciplinary treatment team. This was achieved by reviewing the latest developments in

  12. 2010 Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team Meeting Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, DL

    2011-05-04

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented in poster format at the March 2010 Atmospheric System Research Science Team Meeting held in Bethesda, Maryland. More than 260 posters were presented during the Science Team Meeting. Posters were sorted into the following subject areas: aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions, aerosol properties, atmospheric state and surface, cloud properties, field campaigns, infrastructure and outreach, instruments, modeling, and radiation. To put these posters in context, the status of ASR at the time of the meeting is provided here.

  13. How to Get It -- Step 2: Meet the Palliative Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Talk to your Doctor Find a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Resources Links ... to Your Doctor 2. Find a Provider 3. Meet the Team Palliative Care Team The palliative care ...

  14. Mission Status at Aura Science Team MOWG Meeting: EOS Aura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Presentation at the 24797-16 Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Science Team Meeting (Mission Operations Work Group (MOWG)) at Rotterdam, Netherlands August 29, 2016. Presentation topics include mission summary, spacecraft subsystems summary, recent and planned activities, spacecraft anomalies, data capture, propellant usage and lifetime estimates, spacecraft maneuvers and ground track history, mission highlights and past spacecraft anomalies and reliability estimates.

  15. [Better multidisciplinary team meetings are linked to better care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drielen, E. van; Vries, A.W. de; Ottevanger, P.B.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Discussing a patient in an oncology multidisciplinary team meeting (MTM) increases the value of the quality of the treatment chosen. MTMs are increasingly mentioned in guidelines and indicator sets. Based on literature review and observations, the Comprehensive Cancer Centre Netherlands (CCCNL), in

  16. A Contemporary Blueprint for North Atlantic Treaty Organization Provisional Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-25

    means of keeping a lid on the situation in Afghanistan, while coalition forces and resources moved to Iraq. 13 Mark Sedra . May/June 2005. “The...58 Mark Sedra . May/June 2005. “The Provincial Reconstruction Team: The Future of Civil- Military Relations?” Article in SITREP, A Publication of the...challenge. 105 Mark Sedra . May/June 2005. “The Provincial Reconstruction Team: The Future of

  17. FAA and NASA UTM Research Transition Team: Communications and Navigation (CN) Working Group (WCG) Kickoff Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaewoo; Larrow, Jarrett

    2017-01-01

    This is NASA FAA UTM Research Transition Team Communications and Navigation working group kick off meeting presentation that addresses the followings. Objectives overview Overall timeline and scope Outcomes and expectations Communication method and frequency of meetings Upcoming evaluation Next steps.

  18. In Absentia: An Exploratory Study of How Patients Are Considered in Multidisciplinary Cancer Team Meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahlweg, P.; Hoffmann, J.; Harter, M.; Frosch, D.L.; Elwyn, G.; Scholl, I.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary team meetings and shared decision-making are potential means of delivering patient-centred care. Not much is known about how those two paradigms fit together in cancer care. This study aimed to investigate how decisions are made in multidisciplinary team meetings and

  19. Multi-disciplinary team meetings in stroke rehabilitation: an observation study and conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, S F; Burton, L; McGovern, A

    2014-12-01

    To explore how multi-disciplinary team meetings operate in stroke rehabilitation. Non-participant observation of multi-disciplinary team meetings and semi-structured interviews with attending staff. Twelve meetings were observed (at least one at each site) and 18 staff (one psychologist, one social worker; four nurses; four physiotherapists four occupational therapists, two speech and language therapists, one stroke co-ordinator and one stroke ward manager) were interviewed in eight in-patient stroke rehabilitation units. Multi-disciplinary team meetings in stroke rehabilitation were complex, demanding and highly varied. A model emerged which identified the main inputs to influence conduct of the meetings were personal contributions of the members and structure and format of the meetings. These were mediated by the team climate and leadership skills of the chair. The desired outputs; clinical decisions and the attributes of apparently effective meetings were identified by the staff. A notable difference between the meetings that staff considered effective and those that were not, was their structure and format. Successful meetings tended to feature a set agenda, structured documentation; formal use of measurement tools; pre-meeting preparation and skilled chairing. These features were often absent in meetings perceived to be ineffective. The main features of operation of multi-disciplinary team meetings have been identified which will enable assessment tools and interventions to improve effectiveness to be developed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Successful participation of patients in interprofessional team meetings: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Jerôme Jean Jacques; Habets, Iris Gerarda Josephine; Beurskens, Anna; van Bokhoven, Marloes Amantia

    2017-08-01

    The number of people with multiple chronic conditions increases as a result of ageing. To deal with the complex health-care needs of these patients, it is important that health-care professionals collaborate in interprofessional teams. To deliver patient-centred care, it is often recommended to include the patient as a member of the team. To gain more insight into how health-care professionals and patients, who are used to participate in interprofessional team meetings, experience and organize patient participation in the team meetings. A qualitative study including observations of meetings (n=8), followed by semi-structured interviews with participating health-care professionals (n=8), patients and/or relatives (n=11). Professionals and patients were asked about their experiences of patient participation immediately after the team meetings. Results from both observations and interviews were analysed using content analysis. The findings show a variety of influencing factors related to patient participation that can be divided into five categories: (i) structure and task distribution, (ii) group composition, (iii) relationship between professionals and patients or relatives, (iv) patients' characteristics and (v) the purpose of the meeting. Patient participation during team meetings was appreciated by professionals and patients. A tailored approach to patient involvement during team meetings is preferable. When considering the presence of patients in team meetings, it is recommended to pay attention to patients' willingness and ability to participate, and the necessary information shared before the meeting. Participating patients seem to appreciate support and preparation for the meeting. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Provincial Reconstruction Teams : Symbool van NAVO-commitment in Afghanistan of meer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Grandia Mantas

    2010-01-01

    De Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRT’s) zijn voor de NAVO het belangrijkste middel geweest om haar gebiedsuitbreiding naar geheel Afghanistan te realiseren. Daarnaast zijn PRT’S populair bij de media omdat ze veel met de lokale bevolking werken en projecten opzetten. De PRT’s zijn er in

  2. The productivity of teams in the meeting context: Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gonçalves

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Organizational life encompasses complex processes and daily activities aimed at increasing efficiency and effectiveness. Workplace meetings are one of such activities that, despite their usefulness in helping organizations to achieve their goals, can be an overlooked practice, with high financial burdens. This exploratory study intends to build an organizational diagnosis formula aimed at assessing the cost-benefit effectiveness of workplace meetings. Based on a sample of seven meetings in a management unit of a higher education public institution, our data show that each meeting results, on average, in six decisions, with the estimated cost in personnel time for each meeting of 496.68€ and a resulting productivity ratio of 198.67€ per decision. The application of our diagnosis formula might contribute to maximize the effectiveness of meetings and organizational performance.

  3. Consequences of Participating in Multidisciplinary Medical Team Meetings for Surgical, Nonsurgical, and Supporting Specialties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, Eric; Broekhuis, Manda; Stoffels, Renee; Jaspers, Frans

    This study examines the consequences for medical specialists of participating in multidisciplinary medical team meetings in terms of perceived clinical autonomy, domain distinctiveness, and professional accountability. These consequences may influence their willingness to cooperate and the quality

  4. 76 FR 72904 - National Construction Safety Team Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... in the meeting from remote locations by calling into a central phone number. DATES: The NCST Advisory... his phone number is (301) 975-5412. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The NCST Advisory Committee was... into a central phone number. The primary purpose of this meeting is to discuss the NCST Advisory...

  5. 77 FR 74828 - National Construction Safety Team Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... able to participate in the meeting from remote locations by calling into a central phone number. DATES... is [email protected] and his phone number is (301) 975-5412. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The NCST... into a central phone number. The primary purpose of this meeting is to discuss the NCST Advisory...

  6. Is there a Benefit of Multidisciplinary Cancer Team Meetings for Patients with Gastrointestinal Malignancies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basta, Yara L.; Baur, Onno L.; van Dieren, Susan; Klinkenbijl, Jean H. G.; Fockens, Paul; Tytgat, Kristien M. A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Multidisciplinary cancer team meetings are intended to optimize the diagnosis of a patient with a malignancy. The aim of this study was to assess the number of correct diagnoses formulated by the multidisciplinary team (MDT) and whether MDT decisions were implemented. In a prospective study, data of

  7. In Absentia: An Exploratory Study of How Patients Are Considered in Multidisciplinary Cancer Team Meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahlweg, Pola; Hoffmann, Jana; Härter, Martin; Frosch, Dominick L; Elwyn, Glyn; Scholl, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team meetings and shared decision-making are potential means of delivering patient-centred care. Not much is known about how those two paradigms fit together in cancer care. This study aimed to investigate how decisions are made in multidisciplinary team meetings and whether patient perspectives are incorporated in these decisions. A qualitative study was conducted using non-participant observation at multidisciplinary team meetings (also called tumor boards) at the University Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany. Two researchers recorded structured field notes from a total of N = 15 multidisciplinary team meetings. Data were analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics. Physicians mainly exchanged medical information and based their decision-making on this information. Individual patient characteristics or their treatment preferences were rarely considered or discussed. In the few cases where patient preferences were raised as a topic, this information did not seem to be taken into account in decision-making processes about treatment recommendations. The processes in multidisciplinary team meetings we observed did not exhibit shared decision-making. Patient perspectives were absent. If multidisciplinary team meetings wish to become more patient-centred they will have to modify their processes and find a way to include patient preferences into the decision-making process.

  8. In Absentia: An Exploratory Study of How Patients Are Considered in Multidisciplinary Cancer Team Meetings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pola Hahlweg

    Full Text Available Multidisciplinary team meetings and shared decision-making are potential means of delivering patient-centred care. Not much is known about how those two paradigms fit together in cancer care. This study aimed to investigate how decisions are made in multidisciplinary team meetings and whether patient perspectives are incorporated in these decisions.A qualitative study was conducted using non-participant observation at multidisciplinary team meetings (also called tumor boards at the University Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany. Two researchers recorded structured field notes from a total of N = 15 multidisciplinary team meetings. Data were analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics.Physicians mainly exchanged medical information and based their decision-making on this information. Individual patient characteristics or their treatment preferences were rarely considered or discussed. In the few cases where patient preferences were raised as a topic, this information did not seem to be taken into account in decision-making processes about treatment recommendations.The processes in multidisciplinary team meetings we observed did not exhibit shared decision-making. Patient perspectives were absent. If multidisciplinary team meetings wish to become more patient-centred they will have to modify their processes and find a way to include patient preferences into the decision-making process.

  9. 75 FR 2853 - False Killer Whale Take Reduction Team Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XT76 False Killer Whale Take Reduction Team... (NOAA), Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of establishment of a False Killer Whale Take Reduction... Insular, and Palmyra Atoll stocks of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) in the Hawaii-based deep...

  10. Proceedings of the third Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science team meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1993 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held in Morman, Oklahoma. To put these papers in context, it is useful to consider the history and status of the ARM Program at the time of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  11. Team communication amongst clinical teachers in a formal meeting of post graduate medical training

    OpenAIRE

    Irene A Slootweg; Scherpbier, Albert; de Leeuw, Ren?e; Heineman, Maas Jan; Vleuten, Cees; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of team communication, or more specifically speaking up, for safeguarding quality of patient care is increasingly being endorsed in research findings. However, little is known about speaking up of clinical teachers in postgraduate medical training. In order to determine how clinical teachers demonstrate speaking up in formal teaching team meetings and what factors influence this, the authors carried out an exploratory study based on ethnographic principles. The authors selected...

  12. COPD Multidisciplinary Team Meetings in the United Kingdom: Health Care Professionals' Perceptions of Aims and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Annemarije L; Soljak, Michael; Chavannes, Niels H; Elkin, Sarah L

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 10 years, community and hospital-based multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) have been set up for the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the UK. Meetings of the MDTs have become a regular occurrence, mostly on healthcare professionals' own initiatives. There are no standardized methods to conduct an MDT meeting, and although cancer MDT meetings are widely implemented, the value and purpose of COPD MDT meetings are less clear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct a cross-sectional descriptive online survey to explore COPD MDT members' perceptions of the purpose and usefulness of MDT meetings, and to identify suggestions or requirements to improve the meetings. In total, we received 68 responses from 10 MDTs; six teams (n = 36 members) were located in London and four (n = 32 members) outside. Analysis of the replies by two independent researchers found that MDT meetings aim to optimise management and improve pathways for respiratory patients by improving communication between providers across settings and disciplines. Education of the MDT members also occurs with the aim of safer practice. Discussed patients are characterised by (multiple) co-morbidities, frequent exacerbations and admissions, social and mental health problems, unclear diagnosis and suboptimal responses to interventions. Members reported participating in a COPD MDT as very useful (74%) or useful (20%). Meetings could be improved by ensuring attendance through requirement in job plans, by clear documentation and sharing of derived plans with a wider audience including general practitioners and patients.

  13. Developing a rheumatology team to meet a growing need in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Developing a rheumatology team to meet a growing need in Africa: let's not forget to feed the cow. MR Backhouse, M Ndosi, S Oliver. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  14. Minutes of TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team Meeting and Ocean Tides Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This third TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team meeting was held on December 4, 1994 to review progress in defining ocean tide models, precision Earth orbits, and various science algorithms. A related workshop on ocean tides convened to select the best models to be used by scientists in the Geophysical Data Records.

  15. Multidisciplinary team meetings and their impact on workflow in radiology and pathology departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Briain D Sean

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTMs for radiology and pathology is a burgeoning area that increasingly impacts on work processes in both of these departments. The aim of this study was to examine work processes and quantify the time demands on radiologists and pathologists associated with MDTM practices at a large teaching hospital. The observations reported in this paper reflect a general trend affecting hospitals and our conclusions will have relevance for others implementing clinical practice guidelines. Methods For one month, all work related to clinical meetings between pathology and radiology with clinical staff was documented and later analysed. Results The number of meetings to which pathology and radiology contribute at a large university teaching hospital, ranges from two to eight per day, excluding grand rounds, and amounts to approximately 50 meetings per month for each department. For one month, over 300 h were spent by pathologists and radiologists on 81 meetings, where almost 1000 patients were discussed. For each meeting hour, there were, on average, 2.4 pathology hours and 2 radiology hours spent in preparation. Two to three meetings per week are conducted over a teleconferencing link. Average meeting time is 1 h. Preparation time per meeting ranges from 0.3 to 6 h for pathology, and 0.5 to 4 for radiology. The review process in preparation for meetings improves internal quality standards. Materials produced externally (for example imaging can amount to almost 50% of the material to be reviewed on a single patient. The number of meetings per month has increased by 50% over the past two years. Further increase is expected in both the numbers and duration of meetings when scheduling issues are resolved. A changing trend in the management of referred patients with the development of MDTMs and the introduction of teleconferencing was noted. Conclusion Difficulties are being experienced by

  16. Impact of the lung oncology multidisciplinary team meetings on the management of patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Kim Ann; Campbell, Belinda A; Duplan, Danny; Ball, David; David, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are increasingly regarded as a component of multidisciplinary cancer care. We aimed to prospectively measure the impact of MDT meetings on clinicians' management plans for lung oncology patients, and the implementation rate of the meeting recommendations. Consecutive patient cases presented at the weekly lung oncology MDT meetings were prospectively enrolled. Investigators compared the clinicians' management plans pre-meeting with the consensus plans post-meeting. The meeting was considered to have an impact on management plans if ≥1 of the following changes were detected: tumor stage, histology, treatment intent or treatment modality, or if additional investigations were recommended. Investigators reviewed hospital patient records at 4 months to determine if the meeting recommendations were implemented. Reasons for non-implementation were also recorded. Of the 55 eligible cases, the MDT meeting changed management plans in 58% (CI 45-71%; P oncology patients. The majority of MDT recommendations (72%) were implemented into patient care. These findings provide further evidence to support the role of MDT meetings as an essential part of the decision-making process for the optimal multidisciplinary management of patients with cancer. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Radiological input during paediatric multidisciplinary team meetings and its influence on clinical patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn-Jones, Glyn; Pereira, John

    2016-04-01

    There is little information about the role of the radiologist at multidisciplinary team meetings; in particular their influence on patient management. To evaluate the influence of radiologists on clinical patient management during multidisciplinary meetings. Prospective data were collected over a 5-week period from multidisciplinary team meetings across four paediatric clinical domains. Radiological input was recorded for each case discussion, including the type of influence and its potential effect on clinical patient management. One hundred and forty paediatric cases were reviewed. Radiological advice was requested from the radiologist for 25.7% (N = 36) of cases. In 17.9% (N = 25) this advice was judged to have influenced clinical patient management. There were two cases where new imaging findings were discovered. Radiologists influence clinical patient management during multidisciplinary team meetings primarily by providing differential diagnoses and guidance regarding future imaging, with respect to both the necessity and the modality. Occasionally, when imaging is reviewed at these meetings, new findings are discovered that impact on patient management. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  18. Reconstruction of the pedagogical-research matrix: meeting our paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Pereira Scherre

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This abstract has its origins in the call of some authors who indicated the need for developing an Education, teacher-training, and scientific knowledge production, based upon the Complexity and Transdisciplinarity. My goal is to reflect on a (transformative path of reconstruction of the pedagogical-research matrix, developing awareness of the subjacent pragmatic roots of the professional being and doing, as well as teachers and researchers. This meeting was possible through the formative methodology and the research called ‘Autoformative Narrative’ resulting from a qualitative study which has been systematized and theorized throughout my PhD in Education. As a result, we have the present matrix identification, in its pedagogical and research dimensions, the recognition of its foundations in a Cartesian Newtonian paradigm and the openness to the building of another emerging matrix under the Complexity Paradigm, and the Emerging Educational Paradigm. Even knowing that the different paradigms will keep co-existing within me, being aware of how they influence me allows me to improve my professional being and doing. I believe this (Autoformative process enables us to take control of the different formation types and contexts, to empower ourselves with our history and life project, to attribute sense to what is experienced and learned, to value knowledge, learning processes and experiences, in a continued dialogue with disciplinary and theoretical knowledge. I aim to contribute so that learning environments (in class, virtual, and hybrid can be places and times of (transformation, self-knowledge, research, authorship, meaning, creativity, self-knowledge production, and scientific knowledge.

  19. TEAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document presents materials covering the television campaign against drunk driving called "TEAM" (Techniques for Effective Alcohol Management). It is noted that TEAM's purpose is to promote effective alcohol management in public facilities and other establishments that serve alcoholic beverages. TEAM sponsors are listed, including…

  20. [Evaluation of multidisciplinary team meeting; the example of gynecological mammary cancers in a tertiary referral center in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouki, Wahid; Mimouni, Mohsine; Boutayeb, Saber; Hachi, Hafid; Errihani, Hassan; Benjaafar, Noureddine

    The multidisciplinary team meeting has become a standard medical practice in oncology. However, no evaluation of this activity was carried out in Morocco. The aim of this study was to evaluate the multidisciplinary team meeting of gynecological mammary cancers in a National Tertiary Referral Center. The study was carried out by retrospective analysis of 207 cases of patients randomly selected among the 1190 cases recruited during the year 2015. Completeness and quality criteria were evaluated. The global completeness rate of passage in multidisciplinary team meeting is 38%. According to the therapeutic specialities, the completeness of passage in multidisciplinary team meeting is 68% of surgery, 35% of medical oncology and 19% of radiotherapy. As far as localizations are concerned, the completeness of passage in multidisciplinary team meeting is 43% for the breast and only 19% for the cervix. A quorum was met 100% of the cases. In 96% of cases the treatment performed is in accordance with the decision of the multidisciplinary team meeting. Eighty-four percent of cases performed multidisciplinary team meeting within less than one month. This analysis shows that the completeness of the transition to multidisciplinary team meeting has not reached the 100% planned by our institution. However, the requirements for conducting the multidisciplinary team meeting were generally met. This study shows an organizational evolution of our structure based on collective and multidisciplinary medical decision. The national obligation measure of multidisciplinary team meeting is necessary. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Determinants of variable resource use for multidisciplinary team meetings in cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersson, Nathalie; Rosell, Linn; Wihl, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTMs) have developed into standard of care to provide expert opinion and to grant evidence-based recommendations on diagnostics and treatment of cancer. Though MDTMs are associated with a range of benefits, a growing number of cases, complex case...... influenced by cancer diagnosis, hospital type and use of video facilities. When preparatory work, participation and post-MDTM work were considered, physicians spent mean 4.1 h per meeting. The cost per case discussion was mean 212 (range 91-595) EUR and the cost per MDTM was mean 2675 (range 1439-4070) EUR...

  2. 76 FR 6766 - Veterans' Advisory Board on Dose Reconstruction; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... were prisoners of war in those regions at the conclusion of World War II. In addition, the advisory... Veterans' Advisory Board on Dose Reconstruction. Speaking time will be assigned on a first-come, first...

  3. 77 FR 12576 - Veterans' Advisory Board on Dose Reconstruction; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... were prisoners of war in those regions at the conclusion of World War II. In addition, the advisory... Dose Reconstruction. Speaking time will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. The amount of...

  4. Multidisciplinary team meetings and their impact on workflow in radiology and pathology departments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2007-01-01

    The development of multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTMs) for radiology and pathology is a burgeoning area that increasingly impacts on work processes in both of these departments. The aim of this study was to examine work processes and quantify the time demands on radiologists and pathologists associated with MDTM practices at a large teaching hospital. The observations reported in this paper reflect a general trend affecting hospitals and our conclusions will have relevance for others implementing clinical practice guidelines.

  5. Using a Team-Based Learning Approach at National Meetings to Teach Residents Genomic Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haspel, Richard L; Ali, Asma M; Huang, Grace C

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating data suggest that team-based learning (TBL) is more effective than lecture-based teaching strategies. Educational sessions at national meetings, however, tend to be lecture-based, and unlike most examples of TBL, involve participants who do not know each other or the instructor. We evaluated a 1-day TBL genomic pathology workshop for residents held at 3 national meetings. A committee of experts developed the workshop. Prior to attending, participants were provided access to readings and asked to answer preparation questions. Each of the 4 modules within the workshop consisted of a 60-minute TBL activity flanked by 15- to 30-minute preactivity and postactivity lectures. We used surveys to acquire participant evaluation of the workshop. From 2013-2014, 86 pathology residents from 61 programs participated in 3 workshops at national meetings. All workshops were well received, with over 90% of attendees indicating that they would recommend them to other residents and that the material would help them as practicing pathologists. An incremental approach facilitated decreasing faculty presence at the workshops: the first 2 workshops had 7 faculty each (1 facilitator for each team and 1 circulating faculty member), while the final workshop involved only 2 faculty for 6 teams. For this final session, participants agreed that circulating faculty provided adequate support. Participant "buy-in" (requiring completion of a preworkshop survey) was critical in enabling a TBL approach. These results demonstrate that TBL is a feasible and effective strategy for teaching genomic medicine that is acceptable to pathology residents at national meetings.

  6. Do patients discussed at a lung cancer multidisciplinary team meeting receive guideline-recommended treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Miriam M; Duggan, Kirsten J; Descallar, Joseph; Vinod, Shalini K

    2016-03-01

    Clinical guidelines provide evidence-based management recommendations to guide practice. This study aimed to evaluate whether patients discussed at a lung cancer multidisciplinary team meeting received guideline-recommended treatment and determine reasons for not receiving guideline-recommended treatment. All new lung cancer patients discussed at the Liverpool/Macarthur lung cancer multidisciplinary team meeting between 1 December 2005 and 31 December 2010 were included. Guideline-recommended treatment was assigned according to pathology, stage and ECOG (Eastern Co-operative Oncology Group) performance status as per the 2004 Australian Lung Cancer Guidelines. This was compared with actual treatment received to determine adherence to guidelines. For those patients who did not receive guideline-recommended treatment, the medical record was reviewed to determine the reason(s) for this. Survival was compared between those who did and did not receive guideline-recommended treatment. 808 new patients were discussed at the multidisciplinary team meeting. Guideline-recommended treatment could not be assigned in 2% of patients due to missing data. 435 patients (54%) received guideline-recommended treatment, and 356 (44%) did not. The most common reasons for not receiving guideline-recommended treatment were a decline in ECOG performance status (24%), large tumor volume precluding radical radiotherapy (17%), comorbidities (15%) and patient preference (13%). Patients less than 70 years who received guideline-recommended treatment had improved survival compared with those who did not. A significant proportion of lung cancer patients did not receive guideline-recommended treatment due to legitimate reasons. Alternative guidelines are needed for patients not suitable for current best practice. Treatment according to guidelines was a predictor for survival. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. The role of a multidisciplinary team meeting in an antiretroviral treatment programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C van deventer

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The multidisciplinary team at the wellness clinic, Potchefstroom hospital has been having regular meetings since the clinic was accredited as a treatment site for HAART. The meetings have concentrated on patients who have experienced problems on treatment. The aim was to understand and overcome barriers to adherence and any other patient related issues at the clinic. Method. Minutes of 2006 were audited in order to acquire an understanding of the difficulties faced by patients and to investigate outcomes of corrective interventions. Results 17% of the files could not be traced in order to obtain more information. 36% of patients had stabilized with improved or undetectable viral loads. Alcohol and work related matters played an important role in poor adherence. There were however many other factors identified

  8. Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings: Evidence, Challenges, and the Role of Clinical Decision Support Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patkar, Vivek; Acosta, Dionisio; Davidson, Tim; Jones, Alison; Fox, John; Keshtgar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) model in cancer care was introduced and endorsed to ensure that care delivery is consistent with the best available evidence. Over the last few years, regular MDT meetings have become a standard practice in oncology and gained the status of the key decision-making forum for patient management. Despite the fact that cancer MDT meetings are well accepted by clinicians, concerns are raised over the paucity of good-quality evidence on their overall impact. There are also concerns over lack of the appropriate support for this important but overburdened decision-making platform. The growing acceptance by clinical community of the health information technology in recent years has created new opportunities and possibilities of using advanced clinical decision support (CDS) systems to realise full potential of cancer MDT meetings. In this paper, we present targeted summary of the available evidence on the impact of cancer MDT meetings, discuss the reported challenges, and explore the role that a CDS technology could play in addressing some of these challenges. PMID:22295234

  9. Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings: Evidence, Challenges, and the Role of Clinical Decision Support Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Patkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidisciplinary team (MDT model in cancer care was introduced and endorsed to ensure that care delivery is consistent with the best available evidence. Over the last few years, regular MDT meetings have become a standard practice in oncology and gained the status of the key decision-making forum for patient management. Despite the fact that cancer MDT meetings are well accepted by clinicians, concerns are raised over the paucity of good-quality evidence on their overall impact. There are also concerns over lack of the appropriate support for this important but overburdened decision-making platform. The growing acceptance by clinical community of the health information technology in recent years has created new opportunities and possibilities of using advanced clinical decision support (CDS systems to realise full potential of cancer MDT meetings. In this paper, we present targeted summary of the available evidence on the impact of cancer MDT meetings, discuss the reported challenges, and explore the role that a CDS technology could play in addressing some of these challenges.

  10. [Should cases of hepatocellular carcinoma be discussed by non-specialized multidisciplinary team meetings?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbare, Jean-Claude; Franco, Dominique; André, Thierry; Bronowicki, Jean-Pierre; Merle, Philippe; Péron, Jean-Marie; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Seitz, Jean-François; Ychou, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is difficult due to the underlying cirrhosis which has its own influence on therapeutic issues. An inquiry was performed in centres with specialized multidisciplinary team meetings dedicated to HCC (HCC-MTM) or in centres with non-specialized (digestive oncology or general oncology) multidisciplinary team meetings (NS-MTM). The number of cases of HCCs taken in charge yearly was significantly higher in HCC-MTM than in NS-MTM (p=0,0014). Interventional radiologists and transplant surgeons were more frequently implied in HCC-MTM than in NS-MTM (respectively p=0,009 and p=0,02). On site availability of every treatment of HCC was higher in RCP-MTM than in NS-MTM (p=0,015). There were no inclusion in clinical trials in 40.5 % of NS-MTM versus only 17.6 % of HCC-MTM (p=0,0086). In three clinical cases out of seven there were discrepancies between the therapeutic options of HCC-MTM and NS-MTM. In all three cases, the treatment offered to the patient by HCC-MTM was more consistent with clinical standards. These results prompt to perform more studies on the quality of management of patients with HCCs by MTMs.

  11. How fun are your meetings? Investigating the relationship between humor patterns in team interactions and team performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Allen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Research on humor in organizations has rarely considered the social context in which humor occurs. One such social setting that most of us experience on a daily basis concerns the team context. Building on recent theorizing about the humor–performance link in teams, this study seeks to increase our

  12. Challenges and Approaches to Make Multidisciplinary Team Meetings Interoperable - The KIMBo Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Oliver; Holzer, Karl; Schuler, Andreas; Egelkraut, Reinhard; Franz, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTMs) are already in use for certain areas in healthcare (e.g. treatment of cancer). Due to the lack of common standards and accessibility for the applied IT systems, their potential is not yet completely exploited. Common requirements for MDTMs shall be identified and aggregated into a process definition to be automated by an application architecture utilizing modern standards in electronic healthcare, e.g. HL7 FHIR. To identify requirements, an extensive literature review as well as semi-structured expert interviews were conducted. Results showed, that interoperability and flexibility in terms of the process are key requirements to be addressed. An architecture blueprint as well as an aggregated process definition were derived from the insights gained. To evaluate the feasibility of identified requirements, methods of explorative prototyping in software engineering were used. MDTMs will become an important part of modern and future healthcare but the need for standardization in terms of interoperability is imminent.

  13. Process quality of decision-making in multidisciplinary cancer team meetings: a structured observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahlweg, Pola; Didi, Sarah; Kriston, Levente; Härter, Martin; Nestoriuc, Yvonne; Scholl, Isabelle

    2017-11-17

    The quality of decision-making in multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTMs) depends on the quality of information presented and the quality of team processes. Few studies have examined these factors using a standardized approach. The aim of this study was to objectively document the processes involved in decision-making in MDTMs, document the outcomes in terms of whether a treatment recommendation was given (none vs. singular vs. multiple), and to identify factors related to type of treatment recommendation. An adaptation of the observer rating scale Multidisciplinary Tumor Board Metric for the Observation of Decision-Making (MDT-MODe) was used to assess the quality of the presented information and team processes in MDTMs. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and mixed logistic regression analysis. N = 249 cases were observed in N = 29 MDTMs. While cancer-specific medical information was judged to be of high quality, psychosocial information and information regarding patient views were considered to be of low quality. In 25% of the cases no, in 64% one, and in 10% more than one treatment recommendations were given (1% missing data). Giving no treatment recommendation was associated with duration of case discussion, duration of the MDTM session, quality of case history, quality of radiological information, and specialization of the MDTM. Higher levels of medical and treatment uncertainty during discussions were found to be associated with a higher probability for more than one treatment recommendation. The quality of different aspects of information was observed to differ greatly. In general, we did not find MDTMs to be in line with the principles of patient-centered care. Recommendation outcome varied substantially between different specializations of MDTMs. The quality of certain information was associated with the recommendation outcome. Uncertainty during discussions was related to more than one recommendation being considered. Time constraints

  14. Team dynamics, decision making, and attitudes toward multidisciplinary cancer meetings: health professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Bianca; Philip, Jennifer; McLachlan, Sue-Anne

    2010-11-01

    Multidisciplinary cancer care is a standard feature of high quality care. In many centers, the multidisciplinary meeting (MDM) is an integral component. A qualitative study was performed to explore health professionals' attitudes towards this model of care, the decision making processes, and dynamics among team members. A series of focus groups was conducted with health professionals who attend MDMs at our institution. Focus groups followed a semistructured format with open-ended questions. A thematic analysis was performed. Four focus groups were held, attended by 23 participants including allied health professionals, specialist nurses, medical oncologists, and surgeons. All participants believed the primary objective of the MDM was to develop an individualized treatment plan. Several other key themes emerged. The MDM provided opportunities to improve communication, efficiency, and education as well as enhance professional relationships. Medical information was prioritized ahead of psychosocial details, with allied health professionals describing difficulty contributing to MDM discussion. Patient attendance at MDMs was opposed by health professionals because of concerns about the patient's ability to cope with the information discussed and the effect their presence would have on the dynamics of the decision-making process. Health professionals endorse MDMs as a useful tool in treating patients with cancer. Within this forum, both opportunities and constrains exist, with many benefits extending beyond the meeting itself into other clinical areas. Further study is warranted to establish an evidence base to ensure that both the possibilities and the limitations of this model of care are fully understood.

  15. Proceedings of the sixth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1996 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held at San Antonio, Texas. The history and status of the ARM program at the time of the meeting helps to put these papers in context. The basic themes have not changed. First, from its beginning, the Program has attempted to respond to the most critical scientific issues facing the US Global Change Research Program. Second, the Program has been strongly coupled to other agency and international programs. More specifically, the Program reflects an unprecedented collaboration among agencies of the federal research community, among the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) national laboratories, and between DOE`s research program and related international programs, such as Global Energy and Water Experiment (GEWEX) and the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program. Next, ARM has always attempted to make the most judicious use of its resources by collaborating and leveraging existing assets and has managed to maintain an aggressive schedule despite budgets that have been much smaller than planned. Finally, the Program has attracted some of the very best scientific talent in the climate research community and has, as a result, been productive scientifically.

  16. Carbon Capture Multidisciplinary Simulation Center Trilab Support Team (TST) Fall Meeting 2016 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draeger, Erik W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-03

    The theme of this year’s meeting was “Predictivity: Now and in the Future”. After welcoming remarks, Erik Draeger gave a talk on the NNSA Labs’ history of predictive simulation and the new challenges faced by upcoming architecture changes. He described an example where the volume of analysis data produced by a set of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) simulations on the Trinity machine was too large to store or transfer, and the steps needed to reduce it to a manageable size. He also described the software re-engineering plan for LLNL’s suite of multiphysics codes and physics packages with a new push toward common components, making collaboration with teams like the CCMSC who already have experience trying to architect complex multiphysics code infrastructure on next-generation architectures all the more important. Phil Smith then gave an overview outlining the goals of the project, namely to accelerate development of new technology in the form of high efficiency carbon capture pulverized coal power generation as well as further optimize existing state of the art designs. He then presented a summary of the Center’s top-down uncertainty quantification approach, in which ultimate target predictivity informs uncertainty targets for lower-level components, and gave data on how close all the different components currently are to their targets. Most components still need an approximately two-fold reduction in uncertainty to hit the ultimate predictivity target, but the current accuracy is already rather impressive.

  17. Cancer multidisciplinary team meetings in practice: Results from a multi-institutional quantitative survey and implications for policy change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Nicole M; Lai, Michelle; Miller, Danielle; Beale, Philip; Spigelman, Allan; Prest, Gabrielle; Turley, Kim; Simes, John

    2018-02-01

    Multidisciplinary care is advocated as best practice in cancer care. Relatively little is documented about multidisciplinary team (MDT) meeting functioning, decision making and the use of evidence to support decision making in Australia. This descriptive study aimed to examine team functioning, the role of team meetings and evidence use in MDTs whose institutions are members of Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre. We designed a structured 40-item survey instrument about topics that included meeting purpose, organization, resources and documentation; caseload estimates; use of evidence and quality assurance; patient involvement and supportive care needs; and open-ended items about the MDTs strengths and weaknesses. Participants were invited to participate via email and the survey was administered online. Data were analyzed using descriptive and comparative statistics. Thirty-seven MDTs from seven hospitals participated (100% response) and represented common (70%) and rare tumor groups (30%). MDT meeting purpose was reported as treatment (100%) or diagnostic decision making (88%), or for education purposes (70%). Most MDTs based treatment decisions on group consensus (92%), adherence to clinical practice guidelines (57%) or other evidence-based medicine sources (33%). The majority of MDTs discussed only a proportion of new patients at each meeting emphasizing the importance of educational aspects for other cases. Barriers exist in the availability of data to enable audit and reflection on evidence-based practice. MDT strengths included collaboration and quality discussion about patients. MDT meetings focus on treatment decision making, with group consensus playing a significant role in translating research evidence from guidelines into clinical decision making. With a varying proportion of patients discussed in each MDT meeting, a wider audit of multidisciplinary care would enable more accurate assessments of whether treatment recommendations are in

  18. What is the role of a specialist regional mesothelioma multidisciplinary team meeting? A service evaluation of one tertiary referral centre in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibby, Anna C; Williams, Katie; Smith, Sarah; Bhatt, Nidhi; Maskell, Nick A

    2016-09-08

    Multidisciplinary team meetings are standard care for cancer in the UK and Europe. Professional bodies recommend that mesothelioma cases should be discussed at specialist multidisciplinary team meetings. However, no evidence exists exploring the role of the specialist mesothelioma multidisciplinary team meeting. To evaluate the clinical activity of 1 specialist mesothelioma multidisciplinary team meeting and to determine how often a definitive diagnosis was made, whether the core requirements of the meeting were met and whether there was any associated benefit or detriment. A service evaluation using routinely collected data from 1 specialist mesothelioma multidisciplinary team meeting in a tertiary referral hospital in the South-West of England. All cases discussed between 1/1/2014 and 31/12/2015. The primary outcome measure was whether a definitive diagnosis was made. Secondary outcomes included whether treatment advice was offered, information on clinical trials provided or further investigations suggested. Additional benefits of the multidisciplinary team meeting and time taken from referral to outcome were also collected. A definitive diagnosis was reached in 171 of 210 cases discussed (81%). Mesothelioma was diagnosed in 153/210 (73%). Treatment advice was provided for 127 of 171 diagnostic cases (74%) and further investigations suggested for all 35 non-diagnostic cases. 86/210 cases (41%) were invited to participate in a trial, of whom 43/86 (50%) subsequently enrolled. Additional benefits included the avoidance of postmortem examination if the coroner was satisfied with the multidisciplinary team decision. The overall process from referral to outcome dispatch was multidisciplinary team meeting was effective at making diagnoses and providing recommendations for further investigations or treatment. The core requirements of a specialist mesothelioma multidisciplinary team meeting were met. The process was timely, with most outcomes returned within 2 weeks of

  19. Report on the Global Data Assembly Center (GDAC) to the 12th GHRSST Science Team Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Edward M.; Bingham, Andrew; Vazquez, Jorge; Thompson, Charles; Huang, Thomas; Finch, Chris

    2011-01-01

    In 2010/2011 the Global Data Assembly Center (GDAC) at NASA's Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) continued its role as the primary clearinghouse and access node for operational Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) datastreams, as well as its collaborative role with the NOAA Long Term Stewardship and Reanalysis Facility (LTSRF) for archiving. Here we report on our data management activities and infrastructure improvements since the last science team meeting in June 2010.These include the implementation of all GHRSST datastreams in the new PO.DAAC Data Management and Archive System (DMAS) for more reliable and timely data access. GHRSST dataset metadata are now stored in a new database that has made the maintenance and quality improvement of metadata fields more straightforward. A content management system for a revised suite of PO.DAAC web pages allows dynamic access to a subset of these metadata fields for enhanced dataset description as well as discovery through a faceted search mechanism from the perspective of the user. From the discovery and metadata standpoint the GDAC has also implemented the NASA version of the OpenSearch protocol for searching for GHRSST granules and developed a web service to generate ISO 19115-2 compliant metadata records. Furthermore, the GDAC has continued to implement a new suite of tools and services for GHRSST datastreams including a Level 2 subsetter known as Dataminer, a revised POET Level 3/4 subsetter and visualization tool, a Google Earth interface to selected daily global Level 2 and Level 4 data, and experimented with a THREDDS catalog of GHRSST data collections. Finally we will summarize the expanding user and data statistics, and other metrics that we have collected over the last year demonstrating the broad user community and applications that the GHRSST project continues to serve via the GDAC distribution mechanisms. This report also serves by extension to summarize the

  20. Themes and time use by participants in general team meetings at a psychiatric day hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scherer, Edson Arthur; Campos, Maria Auxiliadora; Scherer, Zeyne Alves Pires

    2007-01-01

    This naturalistic study was realized through observation and aimed to characterize general staff meetings held at a day hospital regarding theme and the professionals' participation in the use of time...

  1. A practical guide to failure mode and effects analysis in health care: making the most of the team and its meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Laura; Armitage, Gerry; Neary, Maria; Hollingsworth, Gillian

    2010-08-01

    Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a proactive risk assessment tool used to identify potential vulnerabilities in complex, high-risk processes and to generate remedial actions before the processes result in adverse events. FMEA is increasingly used to proactively assess and improve the safety of complex health care processes such as drug administration and blood transfusion. A central feature of FMEA is that it is undertaken by a multidisciplinary team, and because it entails numerous analytical steps, it takes a series of several meetings. Composing a team of busy health care professionals with the appropriate knowledge, skill mix, and logistical availability for regular meetings is, however, a serious challenge. Despite this, information and advice on FMEA team assembly and meetings scheduling are scarce and diffuse and often presented without the accompanying rationale. Assemble an eight-member team composed of clinically active health care staff, from every profession involved in delivery of the process-and who regularly perform it; staff from a range of seniority levels; outsider(s) to the process-and perhaps even to health care; a leader (and facilitator); and researchers. Plan for 10-15 hours of team meeting time for first-time, narrowly defined FMEAs, scheduled as four to six meetings lasting 2 to 3 hours each, spaced weekly to biweekly. Meet in a venue that seats the team around one table and is off the hospital floor but within its grounds. FMEA, generally acknowledged to be a useful addition to the patient safety toolkit, is a meticulous and time- and resource-intensive methodology, and its successful completion is highly dependent on the team members' aptitude and on the facility's and team members' commitment to hold regular, productive meetings.

  2. NASA Physical Sciences - Presentation to Annual Two Phase Heat Transfer International Topical Team Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Francis; Motil, Brian; McQuillen, John

    2014-01-01

    The Two-phase Heat Transfer International Topical Team consists of researchers and members from various space agencies including ESA, JAXA, CSA, and RSA. This presentation included descriptions various fluid experiments either being conducted by or planned by NASA for the International Space Station in the areas of two-phase flow, flow boiling, capillary flow, and crygenic fluid storage.

  3. Successful participation of patients in interprofessional team meetings : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iris Habets; Anna Beurskens; Marloes Amantia van Bokhoven; Jerôme Jean Jacques van Dongen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The number of people with multiple chronic conditions increases as a result of ageing. To deal with the complex health-care needs of these patients, it is important that health-care professionals collaborate in interprofessional teams. To deliver patient-centred care, it is often

  4. Team communication amongst clinical teachers in a formal meeting of post graduate medical training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, Irene A.; Scherpbier, Albert; van der Leeuw, Renée; Heineman, Maas Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of team communication, or more specifically speaking up, for safeguarding quality of patient care is increasingly being endorsed in research findings. However, little is known about speaking up of clinical teachers in postgraduate medical training. In order to determine how clinical

  5. Team Communication amongst Clinical Teachers in a Formal Meeting of Post Graduate Medical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootweg, Irene A.; Scherpbier, Albert; van der Leeuw, Renée; Heineman, Maas Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of team communication, or more specifically speaking up, for safeguarding quality of patient care is increasingly being endorsed in research findings. However, little is known about speaking up of clinical teachers in postgraduate medical training. In order to determine how clinical teachers demonstrate speaking up in formal…

  6. The multidisciplinary team meeting in the UK from the patients’ perspective: comments and observations from cholangiocarcinoma patients and their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morement H

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Helen Morement,1 Rachel Harrison,2 Simon D Taylor-Robinson3 1AMMF – The Cholangiocarcinoma Charity, Enterprise House, Stansted, Essex, 2Department of South East Asia, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, 3Division of Digestive Health, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK Background: The multidisciplinary team (MDT meeting has become the hallmark for cancer care in the UK. While standardizing care through adherence to guidelines, the MDT process can make the decision-making process somewhat remote from the patient perspective. The Cholangiocarcinoma Charity (AMMF is the UK’s only cholangiocarcinoma charity and is at the forefront of patient empowerment for those with this condition and for their families. It provides much needed support not only via personal contact but also through its website and on the social media platforms, Facebook and Twitter. Methods: AMMF conducted a survey of patient attitudes to and experience of the MDT process through a simple questionnaire posted on Facebook in 2014. We report the results of the responses received, which we believe are worthy of further thought. Findings: In the main, while treatment decisions are not queried, there is distress at the lack of involvement, the lack of representation, the lack of communication and at not knowing who to approach for answers to questions. Conclusion: This snapshot, although small, provides some insight to clinicians not to forget the constituency they serve, as communication is all important. Keywords: cholangiocarcinoma, multidisciplinary team meeting, management, patient perspectives

  7. "They Are Talking About Me, but Not with Me": A Focus Group Study to Explore the Patient Perspective on Interprofessional Team Meetings in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Jerôme Jean Jacques; de Wit, Maarten; Smeets, Hester Wilhelmina Henrica; Stoffers, Esther; van Bokhoven, Marloes Amantia; Daniëls, Ramon

    2017-08-01

    The number of people with multiple chronic conditions receiving primary care services is growing. To deal with their increasingly complex health care demands, professionals from different disciplines need to collaborate. Interprofessional team (IPT) meetings are becoming more popular. Several studies describe important factors related to conducting IPT meetings, mostly from a professional perspective. However, in the light of patient-centeredness, it is valuable to also explore the patients' perspective. The aim was to explore the patients' perspectives regarding IPT meetings in primary care. A qualitative study with a focus group design was conducted in the Netherlands. Two focus group meetings took place, for which the same patients were invited. The participants, chronically ill patients with experience on interprofessional collaboration, were recruited through the regional patient association. Participants discussed viewpoints, expectations, and concerns regarding IPT meetings in two rounds, using a focus group protocol and selected video-taped vignettes of team meetings. The first meeting focused on conceptualization and identification of themes related to IPT meetings that are important to patients. The second meeting aimed to gain more in-depth knowledge and understanding of the priorities. Discussions were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by means of content analysis. The focus group meetings included seven patients. Findings were divided into six key categories, capturing the factors that patients found important regarding IPT meetings: (1) putting the patient at the center, (2) opportunities for patients to participate, (3) appropriate team composition, (4) structured approach, (5) respectful communication, and (6) informing the patient about meeting outcomes. Patients identified different elements regarding IPT meetings that are important from their perspective. They emphasized the right of patients or their representatives to take part

  8. Effects of meeting room interior design on team performance in a creativity task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, E. de; Kuijt, L.; Kleij, R. van der

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of spatial characteristics of meeting rooms on the divergent phase in the creativity process of a group and on the mood states arousal and psychological safety. Thirty participants (12 male and 18 female) were randomly allocated to 10 mixed-gender three-person groups.

  9. Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks: The Language Classroom as a Meeting Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ohashi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper, drawing on Pratt’s notion of ‘transculturation’ and Bhabha’s ‘third space’, presents an example of language learning tasks that empower learners’ agency and promote their cross-cultural awareness and sensitivities to a different set of cultural expectations, using a naturally occurred Japanese thanking episodes. The paper discusses the merits of Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks (NCRTs as a practical method for helping L2 learners develop this ‘intercultural competence’. It is based on a qualitative study of the results of one NCRT created for use in the context of teaching Japanese as a L2 in a multicultural society. It suggests the NCRT encourages the learners to explore the intersection where language use, speaker intention and L1 and L2 cultural norms meet. Such a process helps the learners become aware of socially expected patterns of communication in L1 and L2 in terms of the choices of speech act, formulaic expressions, sequential organization and politeness orientation. The learners’ comments suggest that the NCRT helps learners transcend their cultural boundaries by overcoming their narrow understanding of ‘thanking’ as ‘expressions of gratitude and appreciation’ and by cross-culturally widening their views of what counts as thanking. The NCRT with rich contextual information promotes the learners’ intercultural awareness, sensitivity to context and intercultural exploration in the space between L1 and L2, where they have authority and freedom of making sense of conversations, and pragmatics is fully integrated into language pedagogy.

  10. Development and evaluation of a checklist to support decision making in cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: MDT-QuIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, B W; Sevdalis, N; Vincent, C; Green, J S A

    2012-06-01

    The quality of decision-making in cancer multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings is variable, which can result in suboptimal clinical decision making. We developed MDT-QuIC, an evidence-based tool to support clinical decision making by MDTs, which was evaluated by key users. Following a literature review, factors important for high-quality clinical decision making were listed and then converted into a preliminary checklist by clinical and safety experts. Attitudes of MDT members toward the tool were evaluated via an online survey, before adjustments were made giving rise to a final version: MDT-QuIC. The checklist was evaluated by 175 MDT members (surgeons = 38, oncologists = 40, specialist nurses = 62, and MDT coordinators = 35). Attitudes toward the checklist were generally positive (P < 0.001, 1-sample t test), although nurses were more positive than other groups regarding whether the checklist would improve their contribution in MDT meetings (P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Participants thought that the checklist could be used to prepare cases for MDT meetings, to structure and guide case discussions, or as a record of MDT discussion. Regarding who could use the checklist, 70% thought it should be used by the MDT chair, 54% by the MDT coordinator, and 38% thought all MDT members should use it. We have developed and validated an evidence-based tool to support the quality of MDT decision making. MDT members were positive about the checklist and felt it may help to structure discussion, improve inclusivity, and patient centeredness. Further research is needed to assess its effect on patient care and outcomes.

  11. The impact of multidisciplinary team meetings on patient assessment, management and outcomes in oncology settings: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Brindha; Wootten, Addie C; Crowe, Helen; Corcoran, Niall; Tran, Ben; Bowden, Patrick; Crowe, Jane; Costello, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Conducting regular multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings requires significant investment of time and finances. It is thus important to assess the empirical benefits of such practice. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the literature regarding the impact of MDT meetings on patient assessment, management and outcomes in oncology settings. Relevant studies were identified by searching OVID MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EMBASE databases from 1995 to April 2015, using the keywords: multidisciplinary team meeting* OR multidisciplinary discussion* OR multidisciplinary conference* OR case review meeting* OR multidisciplinary care forum* OR multidisciplinary tumour board* OR case conference* OR case discussion* AND oncology OR cancer. Studies were included if they assessed measurable outcomes, and used a comparison group and/or a pre- and post-test design. Twenty-seven articles met inclusion criteria. There was limited evidence for improved survival outcomes of patients discussed at MDT meetings. Between 4% and 45% of patients discussed at MDT meetings experienced changes in diagnostic reports following the meeting. Patients discussed at MDT meetings were more likely to receive more accurate and complete pre-operative staging, and neo-adjuvant/adjuvant treatment. Quality of studies was affected by selection bias and the use of historical cohorts impacted study quality. MDT meetings impact upon patient assessment and management practices. However, there was little evidence indicating that MDT meetings resulted in improvements in clinical outcomes. Future research should assess the impact of MDT meetings on patient satisfaction and quality of life, as well as, rates of cross-referral between disciplines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The multidisciplinary team meeting in the UK from the patients' perspective: comments and observations from cholangiocarcinoma patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morement, Helen; Harrison, Rachel; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2017-01-01

    The multidisciplinary team (MDT) meeting has become the hallmark for cancer care in the UK. While standardizing care through adherence to guidelines, the MDT process can make the decision-making process somewhat remote from the patient perspective. The Cholangiocarcinoma Charity (AMMF) is the UK's only cholangiocarcinoma charity and is at the forefront of patient empowerment for those with this condition and for their families. It provides much needed support not only via personal contact but also through its website and on the social media platforms, Facebook and Twitter. AMMF conducted a survey of patient attitudes to and experience of the MDT process through a simple questionnaire posted on Facebook in 2014. We report the results of the responses received, which we believe are worthy of further thought. In the main, while treatment decisions are not queried, there is distress at the lack of involvement, the lack of representation, the lack of communication and at not knowing who to approach for answers to questions. This snapshot, although small, provides some insight to clinicians not to forget the constituency they serve, as communication is all important.

  13. 78 FR 38302 - Veterans' Advisory Board on Dose Reconstruction; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... Nagasaki, Japan; and veterans who were prisoners of war in those regions at the conclusion of World War II... Dose Reconstruction. Speaking time will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. The amount of...

  14. Team Learning in Teacher Teams: Team Entitativity as a Bridge between Teams-in-Theory and Teams-in-Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangrieken, Katrien; Dochy, Filip; Raes, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate team learning in the context of teacher teams in higher vocational education. As teacher teams often do not meet all criteria included in theoretical team definitions, the construct "team entitativity" was introduced. Defined as the degree to which a group of individuals possesses the quality of being a…

  15. Multicentre evaluation of multidisciplinary team meeting agreement on diagnosis in diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a case-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Simon L F; Wells, Athol U; Desai, Sujal R; Poletti, Venerino; Piciucchi, Sara; Dubini, Alessandra; Nunes, Hilario; Valeyre, Dominique; Brillet, Pierre Y; Kambouchner, Marianne; Morais, António; Pereira, José M; Moura, Conceição Souto; Grutters, Jan C; van den Heuvel, Daniel A; van Es, Hendrik W; van Oosterhout, Matthijs F; Seldenrijk, Cornelis A; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Rasmussen, Finn; Madsen, Line B; Gooptu, Bibek; Pomplun, Sabine; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuoka, Junya; Johkoh, Takeshi; Nicholson, Andrew G; Sayer, Charlie; Edmunds, Lilian; Jacob, Joseph; Kokosi, Maria A; Myers, Jeffrey L; Flaherty, Kevin R; Hansell, David M

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease represents a diverse and challenging group of pulmonary disorders. A consistent diagnostic approach to diffuse parenchymal lung disease is crucial if clinical trial data are to be applied to individual patients. We aimed to evaluate inter-multidisciplinary team agreement for the diagnosis of diffuse parenchymal lung disease. We did a multicentre evaluation of clinical data of patients who presented to the interstitial lung disease unit of the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust (London, UK; host institution) and required multidisciplinary team meeting (MDTM) characterisation between March 1, 2010, and Aug 31, 2010. Only patients whose baseline clinical, radiological, and, if biopsy was taken, pathological data were undertaken at the host institution were included. Seven MDTMs, consisting of at least one clinician, radiologist, and pathologist, from seven countries (Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Portugal, and the UK) evaluated cases of diffuse parenchymal lung disease in a two-stage process between Jan 1, and Oct 15, 2015. First, the clinician, radiologist, and pathologist (if lung biopsy was completed) independently evaluated each case, selected up to five differential diagnoses from a choice of diffuse lung diseases, and chose likelihoods (censored at 5% and summing to 100% in each case) for each of their differential diagnoses, without inter-disciplinary consultation. Second, these specialists convened at an MDTM and reviewed all data, selected up to five differential diagnoses, and chose diagnosis likelihoods. We compared inter-observer and inter-MDTM agreements on patient first-choice diagnoses using Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ). We then estimated inter-observer and inter-MDTM agreement on the probability of diagnosis using weighted kappa coefficient (κw). We compared inter-observer and inter-MDTM confidence of patient first-choice diagnosis. Finally, we evaluated the prognostic significance of a

  16. Hybrid reconstruction of quantum density matrix: when low-rank meets sparsity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kezhi; Zheng, Kai; Yang, Jingbei; Cong, Shuang; Liu, Xiaomei; Li, Zhaokai

    2017-12-01

    Both the mathematical theory and experiments have verified that the quantum state tomography based on compressive sensing is an efficient framework for the reconstruction of quantum density states. In recent physical experiments, we found that many unknown density matrices in which people are interested in are low-rank as well as sparse. Bearing this information in mind, in this paper we propose a reconstruction algorithm that combines the low-rank and the sparsity property of density matrices and further theoretically prove that the solution of the optimization function can be, and only be, the true density matrix satisfying the model with overwhelming probability, as long as a necessary number of measurements are allowed. The solver leverages the fixed-point equation technique in which a step-by-step strategy is developed by utilizing an extended soft threshold operator that copes with complex values. Numerical experiments of the density matrix estimation for real nuclear magnetic resonance devices reveal that the proposed method achieves a better accuracy compared to some existing methods. We believe that the proposed method could be leveraged as a generalized approach and widely implemented in the quantum state estimation.

  17. Team Leader Structuring for Team Effectiveness and Team Learning in Command-and-Control Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Haar, Selma; Koeslag-Kreunen, Mieke; Euwe, Eline; Segers, Mien

    2017-04-01

    Due to their crucial and highly consequential task, it is of utmost importance to understand the levers leading to effectiveness of multidisciplinary emergency management command-and-control (EMCC) teams. We argue that the formal EMCC team leader needs to initiate structure in the team meetings to support organizing the work as well as facilitate team learning, especially the team learning process of constructive conflict. In a sample of 17 EMCC teams performing a realistic EMCC exercise, including one or two team meetings (28 in sum), we coded the team leader's verbal structuring behaviors (1,704 events), rated constructive conflict by external experts, and rated team effectiveness by field experts. Results show that leaders of effective teams use structuring behaviors more often (except asking procedural questions) but decreasingly over time. They support constructive conflict by clarifying and by making summaries that conclude in a command or decision in a decreasing frequency over time.

  18. 17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

  19. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At the invitation of the Regional Research laboratory, Hyderabad, the Academy held its 53rd. Annual Meeting at RRl from Saturday 7 November to Monday 9 November 1987. The meeting began with the inaugural function in the RRl Auditorium at 0930 hours on Saturday 7. November. Dr A V Rama Rao, Director, RRL,.

  20. Do Major League Baseball Team Physicians Harvest the Semitendinosus From the Drive Leg or Landing Leg When Performing Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction on Elite Baseball Pitchers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Brandon J; Chalmers, Peter N; Dugas, Jeffrey R; Bach, Bernard R; Nicholson, Gregory P; Verma, Nikhil N; Ahmad, Christopher S; Romeo, Anthony A

    2017-07-01

    Hamstring autograft is a common graft choice when performing ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR). The purpose of this study was to survey Major League Baseball (MLB) team physicians and determine whether these physicians harvest the hamstring (semitendinosus or gracilis) from the drive leg (ipsilateral to surgical site) or landing leg (contralateral to surgical site) when performing UCLR on elite-level pitchers. The hypothesis was that the majority of surgeons harvest the hamstring from the drive leg when performing a UCLR. Descriptive epidemiology study. Overall, 52 MLB team orthopaedic surgeons were sent the 5-question online survey. The survey assessed surgeon UCLR volume, surgical technique, which leg the hamstring graft was harvested from, the reasoning for choosing that particular leg, and whether the surgeon would change their practice if evidence showed the hamstring from one of the legs was more important than the other. The survey was sent out 5 separate times to maximize the response rate. Forty (77%) MLB team physicians completed the survey. The largest number of surgeons (n = 16; 40%) performed between 5 and 14 UCLRs annually, while 6 (15%) performed more than 50 UCLRs annually. Most surgeons (n = 23; 57.5%) used the docking technique. Significantly more surgeons harvested the hamstring from the landing leg (n = 29; 72.5%) compared with the drive leg (n = 11; 27.5%) (P = .007). More surgeons cited the reason for their choice of leg as a belief that the hamstring they harvested plays less of a role in the ability of a pitcher to generate a forceful pitch (n = 25; 62.5%) than for logistical reasons in the operating room (n = 15; 37.5%); this difference was not statistically significant. Significantly more surgeons would change their practice (n = 35; 87.5%) if evidence showed the hamstrings from a specific (drive or landing) leg to be more active in the throwing motion compared with those who would not (P majority of MLB team physicians

  1. Interdisciplinary Teaming: Solution to Instructing Heterogeneous Groups of Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Robert A.; Manning, M. Lee

    1999-01-01

    Discusses interdisciplinary team collaboration for teachers, including structuring a successful team meeting, the 10-step interdisciplinary problem-solving meeting, evaluation of team collaboration, and effective team communication. (SR)

  2. Detecting the Norovirus Season in Sweden Using Search Engine Data – Meeting the Needs of Hospital Infection Control Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Michael; Wallensten, Anders; Zetterqvist, Inga; Hulth, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus outbreaks severely disrupt healthcare systems. We evaluated whether Websök, an internet-based surveillance system using search engine data, improved norovirus surveillance and response in Sweden. We compared Websök users' characteristics with the general population, cross-correlated weekly Websök searches with laboratory notifications between 2006 and 2013, compared the time Websök and laboratory data crossed the epidemic threshold and surveyed infection control teams about their perception and use of Websök. Users of Websök were not representative of the general population. Websök correlated with laboratory data (b = 0.88-0.89) and gave an earlier signal to the onset of the norovirus season compared with laboratory-based surveillance. 17/21 (81%) infection control teams answered the survey, of which 11 (65%) believed Websök could help with infection control plans. Websök is a low-resource, easily replicable system that detects the norovirus season as reliably as laboratory data, but earlier. Using Websök in routine surveillance can help infection control teams prepare for the yearly norovirus season. PMID:24955857

  3. Detecting the norovirus season in Sweden using search engine data--meeting the needs of hospital infection control teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Michael; Wallensten, Anders; Zetterqvist, Inga; Hulth, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus outbreaks severely disrupt healthcare systems. We evaluated whether Websök, an internet-based surveillance system using search engine data, improved norovirus surveillance and response in Sweden. We compared Websök users' characteristics with the general population, cross-correlated weekly Websök searches with laboratory notifications between 2006 and 2013, compared the time Websök and laboratory data crossed the epidemic threshold and surveyed infection control teams about their perception and use of Websök. Users of Websök were not representative of the general population. Websök correlated with laboratory data (b = 0.88-0.89) and gave an earlier signal to the onset of the norovirus season compared with laboratory-based surveillance. 17/21 (81%) infection control teams answered the survey, of which 11 (65%) believed Websök could help with infection control plans. Websök is a low-resource, easily replicable system that detects the norovirus season as reliably as laboratory data, but earlier. Using Websök in routine surveillance can help infection control teams prepare for the yearly norovirus season.

  4. Statements of Agreement From the Targeted Evaluation and Active Management (TEAM) Approaches to Treating Concussion Meeting Held in Pittsburgh, October 15-16, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael W; Kontos, Anthony P; Okonkwo, David O; Almquist, Jon; Bailes, Julian; Barisa, Mark; Bazarian, Jeffrey; Bloom, O Josh; Brody, David L; Cantu, Robert; Cardenas, Javier; Clugston, Jay; Cohen, Randall; Echemendia, Ruben; Elbin, R J; Ellenbogen, Richard; Fonseca, Janna; Gioia, Gerard; Guskiewicz, Kevin; Heyer, Robert; Hotz, Gillian; Iverson, Grant L; Jordan, Barry; Manley, Geoffrey; Maroon, Joseph; McAllister, Thomas; McCrea, Michael; Mucha, Anne; Pieroth, Elizabeth; Podell, Kenneth; Pombo, Matthew; Shetty, Teena; Sills, Allen; Solomon, Gary; Thomas, Danny G; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C; Yates, Tony; Zafonte, Ross

    2016-12-01

    Conventional management for concussion involves prescribed rest and progressive return to activity. Recent evidence challenges this notion and suggests that active approaches may be effective for some patients. Previous concussion consensus statements provide limited guidance regarding active treatment. To describe the current landscape of treatment for concussion and to provide summary agreements related to treatment to assist clinicians in the treatment of concussion. On October 14 to 16, 2015, the Targeted Evaluation and Active Management (TEAM) Approaches to Treating Concussion meeting was convened in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Thirty-seven concussion experts from neuropsychology, neurology, neurosurgery, sports medicine, physical medicine and rehabilitation, physical therapy, athletic training, and research and 12 individuals representing sport, military, and public health organizations attended the meeting. The 37 experts indicated their agreement on a series of statements using an audience response system clicker device. A total of 16 statements of agreement were supported covering (1) Summary of the Current Approach to Treating Concussion, (2) Heterogeneity and Evolving Clinical Profiles of Concussion, (3) TEAM Approach to Concussion Treatment: Specific Strategies, and (4) Future Directions: A Call to Research. Support (ie, response of agree or somewhat agree) for the statements ranged from to 97% to 100%. Concussions are characterized by diverse symptoms and impairments and evolving clinical profiles; recovery varies on the basis of modifying factors, injury severity, and treatments. Active and targeted treatments may enhance recovery after concussion. Research is needed on concussion clinical profiles, biomarkers, and the effectiveness and timing of treatments. ARS, audience response systemCDC, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionDoD, Department of DefensemTBI, mild traumatic brain injuryNCAA, National Collegiate Athletic AssociationNFL, National

  5. Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Business Meeting of Fellows was held in the Space Applications Centre Auditorium late in the evening on 8 November. There were brief talks by P K Kaw on .... specifically the "Antarctic Ozone. Hole" are well-known. Another recent development relates to the Greenhouse Effect and the Global Warming phenomenon.

  6. Improving the quality of handover by addressing handover culture and introducing a new, multi-disciplinary, team-based handover meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Henry; Munro, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Handover is a "major preventable cause of patient harm"[1] and this project aims to improve the quality of night handover within a teaching hospitals general medicine department, resulting in the safe transfer of patient care to the night team. Quality of handover was assessed both qualitatively, via structured qualitative interviews with trainees and a baseline survey assessing doctor's opinions of night handover, and quantitatively through the collection of a data set during regular observation of night handover. The initial intervention instituted a new handover meeting with a set time and new location and invited the night nurse practitioner to attend. A prompt card, standardised documentation, defined leadership, and an attendance register were also introduced. Successive PDSA cycles introduced technology to the intervention, enabled the nurse night practitioners to actually attend and re-branded the prompt card as an agenda. Results show a sustained reduction in length of handover from 70 minutes (n=7) to 34 minutes (n=13) post-intervention as well as a reduction in the number of distractions occurring during each handover from a mean of 14 to a mean of 8.5. An improved quality of handover was also demonstrated with an overall increase in the percentage of task handovers containing hospital number, an admitting diagnosis, comorbidities and a time allocated for the task to be performed of at least 10%. When trainees were surveyed post-implementation they unanimously identified the new handover system as safer than the previous handover process (n=30). This project demonstrates that replacing an ad-hoc system of handover with a multi-disciplinary, team based approach to handover improves handover quality. In addition it provides a useful guide to introducing a new handover meeting to a department and contains useful lessons on how to combat cultural barriers to change within a department.

  7. Meeting the needs of vulnerable patients: The need for team working across general practice and community nursing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Julie; While, Alison E

    2014-01-01

    General practitioners and district nurses have a long history of providing care outside the hospital setting. With health care increasingly moving out of the hospital setting, there are more opportunities for general practitioners and district nurses to work together to meet the health needs of the local population. However, the reduction in qualified specialist practitioner district nurses over the last decade is concerning. The need for an effective district nursing service has been recognised by the Department of Health in their own model - the nature of district nursing work, often over a long period, enables relationships to develop with the patient, family and informal carers as a basis for anticipatory care to manage long-term conditions. Communication and understanding of the role are central to enhance effective working between general practitioners and district nurses, which can be fostered by engagement in community-oriented integrated care and case management.

  8. Wartime rugby and football: sports elites, French military teams and international meets during the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waquet, Arnaud; Vincent, Joris

    2011-01-01

    The First World War is traditionally considered in history as a temporary halt for cultural and sporting activities. If the Olympic Games and the Tour de France were actually cancelled, football and rugby were in fact stimulated by the circumstances of war. Indeed, the gathering of allied nations behind the Western Front emerged as the main factor in the development of these two sports. Reading the sporting press and military archives shows that international sporting exchanges were stimulated during the Great War. To be specific, France benefited from the golden opportunity provided by the presence of the masters of the game to strengthen its practices and affirm its status as a sporting nation. Inter-allied sporting exchanges were primarily characterised by informal encounters between military selections. Then, following the recognition of these sports by the military authorities, the number of exchanges increased. At the end of 1917, the official status acquired by sport within the military forces created the conditions for the structuring of the French sporting elite. From that point, we can witness the birth of the first French military rugby and football teams, as they demonstrate, through their good performances during the demobilisation period, the progressive build-up of the international dimension of French sport during the war years.

  9. Concussion is Treatable: Statements of Agreement from the Targeted Evaluation and Active Management (TEAM) Approaches to Treating Concussion Meeting held in Pittsburgh, October 15–16, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael W.; Kontos, Anthony P.; Okonkwo, David O.; Almquist, Jon; Bailes, Julian; Barisa, Mark; Bazarian, Jeffrey; Bloom, O. Josh; Brody, David; Cantu, Robert; Cardenas, Javier; Clugston, Jay; Cohen, Randall; Echemendia, Ruben; Elbin, R.J.; Ellenbogen, Richard; Fonseca, Janna; Gioia, Gerard; Guskiewicz, Kevin; Heyer, Robert; Hotz, Gillian; Iverson, Grant L.; Jordan, Barry; Manley, Geoffrey; Maroon, Joseph; McAllister, Thomas; McCrea, Michael; Mucha, Anne; Pieroth, Elizabeth; Podell, Kenneth; Pombo, Matthew; Shetty, Teena; Sills, Allen; Solomon, Gary; Thomas, Danny G.; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.; Yates, Tony; Zafonte, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Background Conventional management for concussion involves prescribed rest and progressive return to activity. Recent evidence challenges this notion and suggests that active approaches may be effective for some patients. Previous concussion consensus statements provide limited guidance regarding active treatment. Objective To describe the current landscape of treatment for concussion and provide summary agreements related to treatment in order to assist clinicians in the treatment of concussion. Methods On October 14–16, 2015, the Targeted Evaluation & Active Management (TEAM) Approaches To Treating Concussion meeting was convened in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. 37 concussion experts from neuropsychology, neurology, neurosurgery, sports medicine, physical medicine and rehabilitation, physical therapy, athletic training, and research, and 12 individuals representing sport, military, and public health organizations attended the meeting. The 37 experts indicated their agreement on a series of statements using an audience response system clicker device. Results A total of 16 statements of agreement were supported covering: 1) Summary of the Current Approach to Treating Concussion, 2) Heterogeneity and Evolving Clinical Profiles of Concussion, 3) Targeted Evaluation and Active Management Approach to Concussion Treatment: Specific Strategies, and 4) Future Directions: A Call to Research. Support (ie, response of agree or somewhat agree) for the statements ranged from to 97–100%. Conclusion Concussions are characterized by diverse symptoms and impairments and evolving clinical profiles; recovery varies based on modifying factors, injury severity, and treatments. Active and targeted treatments may enhance recovery following concussion. Research is needed on concussion clinical profiles, biomarkers, and the effectiveness and timing of treatments. PMID:27741219

  10. Review/decide and inquiry/decide. Two approaches to decision making. Report from a team syntegrity meeting. Project RISCOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kjell [ed.] [Karinta-Konsult, Taeby (Sweden)

    1998-01-01

    The meeting addressed the question how it is possible to make decision processes and risk assessment for deep repository development more transparent. The two dominant decision approaches used in Sweden and the UK, review/decide(r/d) and inquiry/decide(i/d), were discussed. The main conclusions from group discussions were: It was acknowledged that the concept of transparency includes three equally important aspects: factual issues, value issues, and stake holder`s authenticity. There is a need in both countries to bring in the best aspects of both the r/d and the i/d approaches. Both approaches seem to offer possibilities and suffer limitations with respect to the segregation of facts, uncertainties and value judgements, and some sort of combination of the two may present a valuable development. However, neither the i/d nor the r/d approach seems to provide a good framework for clarification of the value issue. Experts have dominated the decision process in both countries. There is a need for a more genuine consultation process. The Swedish EIA is evolving in this direction. The regulator should take part in the process, also at an early stage. It is important that the integrity of the regulator is maintained. Rules and responsibilities of implementers, regulators, planning authorities and other decision-makers should be established early in the process. The public should know that they have access to a process that clarifies value judgements, facts, uncertainties and questions. It is necessary for the public to know what the technical issues are, and to have the means to evaluate the authenticity of the experts. It is important that political decisions are not taken without due consideration of scientific and technical arguments. There are factors beside safety assessments which are completely legitimate to consider. An approach with intense interaction between politicians, experts and the public is needed.

  11. Young Athletes Cleared for Sports Participation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: How Many Actually Meet Recommended Return-to-Sport Criterion Cutoffs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toole, Allison R; Ithurburn, Matthew P; Rauh, Mitchell J; Hewett, Timothy E; Paterno, Mark V; Schmitt, Laura C

    2017-11-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Background While meeting objective criterion cutoffs is recommended prior to return to sports following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the number of young athletes who meet recommended cutoffs and the impact of cutoffs on longitudinal sports participation are unknown. Objectives To test the hypothesis that a higher proportion of young athletes who meet recommended cutoffs will maintain the same level of sports participation over the year following return-to-sport clearance compared to those who do not meet recommended cutoffs. Methods At the time of return-to-sport clearance, the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form (IKDC), quadriceps and hamstring strength limb symmetry index (LSI), and single-leg hop test LSI were assessed. Proportions of participants who met individual (IKDC score of 90 or greater; strength and hop test LSIs of 90% or greater) and combined cutoffs were calculated. Proportions of participants who continued at the same level of sports participation over the year following return-to-sport clearance (assessed using the Tegner activity scale) were compared between those who met and did not meet cutoffs. Results Participants included 115 young athletes (88 female). The proportions meeting individual cutoffs ranged from 43.5% to 78.3%. The proportions meeting cutoffs for all hop tests, all strength tests, and all combined measures were 53.0%, 27.8%, and 13.9%, respectively. A higher proportion of participants who met cutoffs for both strength tests maintained the same level of sports participation over the year following return-to-sport clearance than those who did not (81.3% versus 60.2%, P = .02). Conclusion The proportions of young athletes after ACL reconstruction recently cleared for return to sports who met the combined criterion cutoffs were low. Those who met the criterion cutoffs for both strength tests maintained the same level of sports

  12. Team Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living with Paralysis > Health > Staying active > Team sports Team sports ☷ ▾ Page contents Basketball Quad rugby Sled hockey ... on the East and West coasts. There are teams and divisions all over the country for men, ...

  13. Summary of the March 25--26, 1991 atmospheric model working meeting. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1992-07-01

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations for the initial phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project were made using the MESOILT2 computer code (Ramsdell and Burk 1991). This code implemented a Lagrangian trajectory, puff dispersion model using components from other models designed primarily for regulatory applications. Uncertainty in the dispersion calculations was estimated following model calculations. The results of the atmospheric dispersion calculations were summarized in frequency distributions by location for use in preliminary dose calculations.

  14. Prairie Reconstruction Initiative Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Prairie Reconstruction Initiative Advisory Team (PRIAT) is to identify and take steps to resolve uncertainties in the process of prairie...

  15. Management Teams

    CERN Document Server

    Belbin, R Meredith Meredith

    2012-01-01

    Meredith Belbin's work on teams has become part of everyday language in organizations all over the world. All kinds of teams and team behaviours are covered. At the end of the book is a self-perception inventory so that readers can match their own personalities to particular team roles. Management Teams is required reading for managers concerned with achieving results by getting the best from their key personnel.

  16. Team Learning Ditinjau dari Team Diversity dan Team Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Vivi Gusrini Rahmadani Pohan; Djamaludin Ancok

    2015-01-01

    This research attempted to observe team learning from the level of team diversity and team efficacy of work teams. This research used an individual level of analysis rather than the group level. The team members measured the level of team diversity, team efficacy and team learning of the teams through three scales, namely team learning scale, team diversity scale, and team efficacy scale. Respondents in this research were the active team members in a company, PT. Alkindo Mitraraya. The total ...

  17. Team Learning Ditinjau dari Team Diversity dan Team Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Pohan, Vivi Gusrini Rahmadani; Ancok, Djamaludin

    2010-01-01

    This research attempted to observe team learning from the level of team diversity and team efficacy of work teams. This research used an individual level of analysis rather than the group level. The team members measured the level of team diversity, team efficacy and team learning of the teams through three scales, namely team learning scale, team diversity scale, and team efficacy scale. Respondents in this research were the active team members in a company, PT. Alkindo Mitraraya. The total ...

  18. Multidisciplinary safety team (MDST) factors of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This project included a literature review and summary that focused on subjects related to team building, team/committee member : motivational strategies, and tools for effective and efficient committee meetings. It also completed an online survey of ...

  19. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  20. Fuel Cell Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Fuel Cell Technical Team promotes the development of a fuel cell power system for an automotive powertrain that meets the U.S. DRIVE Partnership (United States Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) goals.

  1. Teaming up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warhuus, Jan; Günzel-Jensen, Franziska; Robinson, Sarah

    Questions we care about (Objectives): When students have to work on challenging tasks, as it is often the case in entrepreneurship classrooms that leverage experiential learning, team success becomes central to the students learning. Yet, the formation of teams is often left up to the students....... A rigorous coding and inductive analysis process was undertaken. Pattern and relationship coding were used to reveal underlying factors, which helped to unveil important similarities and differences between student in different teams’ project progress and perception of learning. Results: When students...... functioning entrepreneurial student teams as most teams lack personal chemistry which makes them anchor their work too much in a pre-defined project. In contrast, we find that students that can form their own teams aim for less diverse teams than what is achieved by random assignment. However, the homophily...

  2. Team cohesiveness, team size and team performance in team-based learning teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Britta M; Haidet, Paul; Borges, Nicole J; Carchedi, Lisa R; Roman, Brenda J B; Townsend, Mark H; Butler, Agata P; Swanson, David B; Anderson, Michael P; Levine, Ruth E

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among variables associated with teams in team-based learning (TBL) settings and team outcomes. We administered the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Psychiatry Subject Test first to individuals and then to teams of Year three students at four medical schools that used TBL in their psychiatry core clerkships. Team cohesion was analysed using the Team Performance Scale (TPS). Bivariate correlation and linear regression analysis were used to analyse the relationships among team-level variables (mean individual TPS scores for each team, mean individual NBME scores of teams, team size, rotation and gender make-up) and team NBME test scores. A hierarchical linear model was used to test the effects of individual TPS and individual NBME test scores within each team, as well as the effects of the team-level variables of team size, team rotation and gender on team NBME test scores. Individual NBME test and TPS scores were nested within teams and treated as subsampling units. Individual NBME test scores and individual TPS scores were positively and statistically significantly (p team NBME test scores, when team rotation, team size and gender make-up were controlled for. Higher team NBME test scores were associated with teams rotating later in the year and larger teams (p teams at four medical schools suggest that larger teams on later rotations score higher on a team NBME test. Individual NBME test scores and team cohesion were positively and significantly associated with team NBME test scores. These results suggest the need for additional studies focusing on team outcomes, team cohesion, team size, rotation and other factors as they relate to the effective and efficient performance of TBL teams in health science education. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Editorial Team

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Editorial Team. Journal Home > About the Journal > Editorial Team. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editors. admin · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  4. Aditya Team

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. Aditya Team. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 55 Issue 5-6 November-December 2000 pp 727-732 Contributed Papers. Tokamak Plasmas : Mirnov coil data analysis for tokamak ADITYA · D Raju R Jha P K Kaw S K Mattoo Y C Saxena Aditya Team.

  5. Team Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, L. W.

    The purpose of this study was to review current developments in team teaching and to assess its potential in the Calgary, Alberta, schools. An investigation into team teaching situations in schools in the eastern half of the United States and Canada revealed characteristics common to successful programs (e.g., charismatic leadership and innovative…

  6. Effects of facilitated team meetings and learning collaboratives on colorectal cancer screening rates in primary care practices: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Eric K; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A; Piasecki, Alicja; Hudson, Shawna V; Ferrante, Jeanne M; McDaniel, Reuben R; Nutting, Paul A; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a primary care practice-based quality improvement (QI) intervention aimed at improving colorectal cancer screening rates. The Supporting Colorectal Cancer Outcomes through Participatory Enhancements (SCOPE) study was a cluster randomized trial of New Jersey primary care practices. On-site facilitation and learning collaboratives were used to engage multiple stakeholders throughout the change process to identify and implement strategies to enhance colorectal cancer screening. Practices were analyzed using quantitative (medical records, surveys) and qualitative data (observations, interviews, and audio recordings) at baseline and a 12-month follow-up. Comparing intervention and control arms of the 23 participating practices did not yield statistically significant improvements in patients' colorectal cancer screening rates. Qualitative analyses provide insights into practices' QI implementation, including associations between how well leaders fostered team development and the extent to which team members felt psychologically safe. Successful QI implementation did not always translate into improved screening rates. Although single-target, incremental QI interventions can be effective, practice transformation requires enhanced organizational learning and change capacities. The SCOPE model of QI may not be an optimal strategy if short-term guideline concordant numerical gains are the goal. Advancing the knowledge base of QI interventions requires future reports to address how and why QI interventions work rather than simply measuring whether they work.

  7. Atherosclerosis is an old disease: Summary of the Ruffer Centenary Symposium, The Paleocardiology of Ancient Egypt, a meeting report of the Horus Study team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Caleb E

    2011-11-01

    A symposium in January 2011 "The Paleocardiology of Ancient Egypt" reviewed old and new evidence for the presence of advanced atherosclerotic lesions in ancient Egyptian mummies. This symposium was dedicated as a Centenary for the pioneering report of Marc Ruffer in 1911 (Ruffer, 1911). Based on CT scans, the Horus Study team concluded that atherosclerosis was present in the ancient Egyptian elites and is not a disease new to the 20th Century. Presentations included radiological data on vasculature, skeleton, and teeth, indicating degenerative diseases and poor health before age 50 in these specimens. Comparisons were made with the Bolivian Tsimane, a 20th Century population living without access to modern medicine with short life expectancy. Further research is needed to develop an epidemiological context for estimating population level prevalence of vascular disease and its risk factors in ancient Egyptian societies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. DIFFERENT DIMENSIONS OF TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goparaju Purna SUDHAKAR

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Popularity ofteams is growing in 21st Century. Organizations are getting theirwork done through different types of teams. Teams have proved that thecollective performance is more than the sum of the individual performances.Thus, the teams have got different dimensions such as quantitative dimensionsand qualitative dimensions. The Quantitative dimensions of teams such as teamperformance, team productivity, team innovation, team effectiveness, teamefficiency, team decision making and team conflicts and Qualitative dimensionsof teams such as team communication, team coordination, team cooperation, teamcohesion, team climate, team creativity, team leadership and team conflictshave been discussed in this article.

  9. Meeting excellence: 33 tools to lead meetings that get results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Glenn; Hoffman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    ... Chapter 17 - TELECONFERENCE TIPS Chapter 18 - ACHIEVING CLEAR COMMUNICATION IN A MULTICULTURAL MEETING Chapter 19 - HOW TO MAKE A DECISION Chapter 20 - PRESENTING AT A TEAM MEETINGChapter 21 - ...

  10. DIFFERENT DIMENSIONS OF TEAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Goparaju Purna SUDHAKAR

    2013-01-01

    Popularity of teams is growing in 21st Century. Organizations are getting their work done through different types of teams. Teams have proved that the collective performance is more than the sum of the individual performances. Thus, the teams have got different dimensions such as quantitative dimensions and qualitative dimensions. The Quantitative dimensions of teams such as team performance, team productivity, team innovation, team effectiveness, team efficiency, team decision making and tea...

  11. The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Higdon, S.; Balonek, T. J.; Haynes, M. P.; Giovanelli, R.

    2010-01-01

    The Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team is a consortium of 16 institutions engaged in an NSF-sponsored program to promote undergraduate research within the extragalactic ALFALFA HI blind survey project. In the first two years of the program, more than three dozen undergraduate students have been closely involved in ALFALFA science, observing, and data analysis. A total of 34 students have attended the annual undergraduate workshops at Arecibo Observatory, interacting with faculty, their peers, ALFALFA experts, and Arecibo staff in lectures, group activities, tours, and observing runs. Team faculty have supervised 26 summer research projects and 14 academic year (e.g., senior thesis) projects. Students and faculty have traveled to Arecibo Observatory for observing runs and to national meetings to present their results. Eight Team schools have joined to work collaboratively to analyze HI properties of galaxy groups within the ALFALFA volume. (See O'Brien et al., O'Malley et al., and Odekon et al. posters, this meeting.) Students involved in this program are learning how science is accomplished in a large collaboration while contributing to the scientific goals of a major legacy survey. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918, AST-0725267, and AST-0725380.

  12. Task-Team-Process: The Development of Shared Representations in a Engineeing Design Team

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badke-Schaub, Petra; Lauche, Kristina; Neumann, Andre

    2009-01-01

    categorised referring to underlying cognitive acts and design strategies. The results are largely consistent with the assumptions of the model indicating a lack of sharedness. This was confirmed by changes of frequencies linked to task-, team-, and processrelated cognitive acts within and between the two......In this article, an analysis of the development of team mental models in two engineering meetings is described. The authors present a two-stage model of the development of sharedness in teams, which formed the basis for a communication analysis of both meetings. The transcripts of the meetings were...... meetings. Implications of the findings and the model are discussed....

  13. What are the communication challenges for politicians, experts and stakeholders in order to enhance transparency in nuclear waste management decisions? Report from a Team Syntegrity Meeting. The European Project RISCOM-II. Work Package 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kjell [Karinta-Konsult, Taeby (Sweden); Espejo, Raul [Syncho Ltd., Birmingham (United Kingdom); Wene, Clas-Otto [Wenergy, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-09-01

    The Team Syntegrity Meeting is a special part of the project. It aims for increased awareness among key stakeholder groups in Europe about how nuclear waste decision processes should be developed in order to increase transparency and trust. Team Syntegrity is conducted with a special meeting format. The self-organisation of the meeting is a strong positive feature of the format. Instead of having a project leader setting the agenda, the participants formulate their own topics of relevance starting from an opening question. This report documents the meeting that was held in Lanaken, Belgium on 14-17 May 2002. The opening question for the meeting was: What are communication challenges for politicians, experts and stakeholders in order to enhance transparency in nuclear waste management decisions? There are different opinions about how communication on nuclear waste issues should be done. There are differences between stakeholder groups, and there are different approaches taken in various countries. Still it should be possible to reach a deeper understanding of social communications, that is, understanding the requirements to have effective communications between policy makers, experts and stakeholders. The aim was thus not to develop common views on the nuclear waste problem as such, but rather common grounds for developing procedures for effective communication. Hopefully, this meeting made some progress in this direction. The call for the Team Syntegrity (TS) Meeting resulted in 105 Statements of Importance given in Appendix 2. Following the TS format the meeting then formed its own agenda by first producing 30 Aggregated Statements of Importance (Appendix 3), which were grouped into 12 Consolidated Statements of Importance or topics. The group discussions were thus held under the twelve topics of: Consultation, communication and participation; Mutual learning; Roles and arenas; Heritage; Transparency; Wider context; Process; Risk; Institutional cultures

  14. Team designing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denise J. Stokholm, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Future wellbeing is depending on human competences in order to strengthen a sustainable development. This requires system thinking and ability to deal with complexity, dynamic and a vast of information. `We need to move away from present principles of breaking down problems into components and give...... and intercultural teams in design and the understanding of design as a process of transformation and information management call for a model with capacity to facilitate both `the what` and `the how` This paper will describe a systemic model of design based on a holistic approach to design developed by the author...... in relation to a design-engineering education at Aalborg University. It will exemplify how the model has been used in workshops on team designing, challenged design learning and affected design competence. In specific it will investigate the influence of visual models of the perception of design, design...

  15. MEET ISOLDE - Target Production

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    MEET ISOLDE - Target Production. Everything at ISOLDE starts with a target and the target production team realise on more then 50 years of experience to build and develop new targets for ISOLDE’s wide physics program.

  16. How We Trimmed Meeting Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Raj K.

    1989-01-01

    Some Kansas school administrators are spending less time in meetings and accomplishing more by (1) asking if a meeting is necessary; (2) being punctual; (3) stating the focus of the meeting; (4) limiting meetings to five to seven participants; (5) providing minutes; and (6) using team-based management. (MLF)

  17. Building a leadership team that works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomenberg, Emily M

    2005-01-01

    Radiology administrators often are challenged to do more with less. In today's fast-paced work environment, leaders must be creative. They must surround themselves with good people in order to successfully achieve their organizations' goals. Once a radiology administrator is satisfied and comfortable that he or she has, the right staff involved, a leadership team can be formally establislished. Howard Regional Health System established an Imaging Services Leadership Team with a vision to provide leaders for the staff to "follow," just as team members learn from the radiology administrator. In addition, team members are vital in assisting the radiology administrator in managing the department The process of building the team consisted of 3 steps: selecting team members (the most challenging and time-consuming component), formalizing a functional team, and putting the team into action. Finding the right people, holding regular meetings, and making those team meetings meaningful are keys to a successful leadership team. The implementation of the team has had a positive effect on imaging services: the number of procedures has increased, the team is used as a communication tool for front-line staff, front-line staff are becoming more comfortable with making decisions.

  18. Team Work: Time well Spent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore Johnson, Susan; Reinhorn, Stefanie K.; Simon, Nicole S.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers in high-poverty schools often feel stressed and fatigued. We might expect that if we ask these teachers to take on even more work by meeting regularly in collaborative improvement teams, they will respond with skepticism, even resentment. But in a study of 83 teachers in six outstanding high-poverty schools, these researchers found the…

  19. Knowledge sharing in international product development teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Anne-Mette; Harmsen, Hanne

    development process is by using teams. Teams are considered one of the best tools for exchanging especially tacit knowledge, since this kind of knowledge is transferred best through personal interaction and face-to-face meetings (Madhavan & Grover, 1998; Nonaka, 1994). In accordance with this, more and more...... multinational firms rely on international product development teams (McDonough et al., 2001) as a means to make the most effective use of the company's resources scattered around the world. While a substantial amount of research exists on groups in general, research into new product development teams is more...... limited and especially empirical research on global new product development teams is sparse (McDonough, et al., 2001). Findings from research on teams cannot automatically be generalized and applied to multinational product development teams, since these differ on a range of parameters from domestic teams...

  20. Leading the Team You Inherit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Most leaders don't have the luxury of building their teams from scratch. Instead they're put in charge of an existing group, and they need guidance on the best way to take over and improve performance. Watkins, an expert on transitions, suggests a three-step approach: Assess. Act quickly to size up the personnel you've inherited, systematically gathering data from one-on-one chats, team meetings, and other sources. Reflect, too, on the business challenges you face, the kinds of people you want in various roles, and the degree to which they need to collaborate. Reshape. Adjust the makeup of the team by moving people to new positions, shifting their responsibilities, or replacing them. Make sure that everyone is aligned on goals and how to achieve them--you may need to change the team's stated direction. Consider also making changes in the way the team operates (reducing the frequency of meetings, for example, or creating new subteams). Then establish ground rules and processes to sustain desired behaviors, and revisit those periodically. Accelerate team development. Set your people up for some early wins. Initial successes will boost everyone's confidence and reinforce the value of your new operating model, thus paving the way for ongoing growth.

  1. Creating Shared Understanding in Product development Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise Møller; Tollestrup, Christian

    if they have reached an agreement and everyone nods their approval. Everyone leaves the meeting, confident that they know what to do. A few weeks after, it is time for the second meeting. The team spirit is still high and there is a nice buzz in the meeting room, before the meeting starts. The introduction...... and that nobody really understood each other. The situation described above could perhaps be taken out of several different contexts and scenarios. Most people, who have been working in teams, probably recognize it, and especially people with experi-ences from interdisciplinary teams can confirm...... that this situation is part of many projects. Lack of shared understanding or frames is just one of the difficulties facing interdisciplinary design teams working in the early phases of innovation. Besides managing their different values, perspectives and interests that cause them to see different things as important...

  2. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  3. Reconstructing Parents’ Meetings in Primary Schools: The Teacher as Expert, the Parent as Advocate and the Pupil as Self-Advocate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Inglis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of parents’ meetings in primary schools in the UK is anarea in need of research. This article uses an approach informed by grounded theory to explore the experiences and satisfaction of parents, teachers and pupils regarding bi-annual meetings to discuss pupil progress. A two-phase approach was utilised, with diary-interviews with parents and teachers and group pupil interviews in Phase 1, followed by a parents’ questionnaire in Phase 2 derived from Phase 1 data. The findings from a doctoral study provide an overall more positive depiction of these meetings compared to existing research in the secondary sector. A model of the teacher as the expert and information-giver persists, but a consumerist ideology appears evident as parents seek to participate and advocate on behalf of their child. As parents become more proactive and teachers act to retain their professional authority, the interaction of the professional and advocate has excluded the perspective of the child. This leaves pupils in search of self-advocacy at meetings in which they are the object of discussion, but cannot be present. While pupils generally favour involvement, adults express a protectionist perspective on pupil exclusion with exceptional factors indicated as being the age of the child and the content of the meeting.

  4. An interdisciplinary team communication framework and its application to healthcare 'e-teams' systems design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKenzie Patricia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few studies that examine the processes that interdisciplinary teams engage in and how we can design health information systems (HIS to support those team processes. This was an exploratory study with two purposes: (1 To develop a framework for interdisciplinary team communication based on structures, processes and outcomes that were identified as having occurred during weekly team meetings. (2 To use the framework to guide 'e-teams' HIS design to support interdisciplinary team meeting communication. Methods An ethnographic approach was used to collect data on two interdisciplinary teams. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data according to structures, processes and outcomes. Results We present details for team meta-concepts of structures, processes and outcomes and the concepts and sub concepts within each meta-concept. We also provide an exploratory framework for interdisciplinary team communication and describe how the framework can guide HIS design to support 'e-teams'. Conclusion The structures, processes and outcomes that describe interdisciplinary teams are complex and often occur in a non-linear fashion. Electronic data support, process facilitation and team video conferencing are three HIS tools that can enhance team function.

  5. Team learning center design principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, B.; Loveland, J.; Whatley, A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    This is a preliminary report of a multi-year collaboration of the authors addressing the subject: Can a facility be designed for team learning and would it improve the efficiency and effectiveness of team interactions? Team learning in this context is a broad definition that covers all activities where small to large groups of people come together to work, to learn, and to share through team activities. Multimedia, networking, such as World Wide Web and other tools, are greatly enhancing the capability of individual learning. This paper addresses the application of technology and design to facilitate group or team learning. Many organizational meetings need tens of people to come together to do work as a large group and then divide into smaller subgroups of five to ten to work and then to return and report and interact with the larger group. Current facilities were not, in general, designed for this type of meeting. Problems with current facilities are defined and a preliminary design solution to many of the identified problems is presented.

  6. Automatic analysis of multiparty meetings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NXT tool for annotating dialogue acts in a multiparty conversation. designer, marketing expert and interface designer), and the team participated in a series of four meetings. The meetings took place over 3–4 hours: about half of this time was spent in meetings, the remainder was spent in preparation, with each participant ...

  7. Consequences of team charter quality: Teamwork mental model similarity and team viability in engineering design student teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway Hughston, Veronica

    Since 1996 ABET has mandated that undergraduate engineering degree granting institutions focus on learning outcomes such as professional skills (i.e. solving unstructured problems and working in teams). As a result, engineering curricula were restructured to include team based learning---including team charters. Team charters were diffused into engineering education as one of many instructional activities to meet the ABET accreditation mandates. However, the implementation and execution of team charters into engineering team based classes has been inconsistent and accepted without empirical evidence of the consequences. The purpose of the current study was to investigate team effectiveness, operationalized as team viability, as an outcome of team charter implementation in an undergraduate engineering team based design course. Two research questions were the focus of the study: a) What is the relationship between team charter quality and viability in engineering student teams, and b) What is the relationship among team charter quality, teamwork mental model similarity, and viability in engineering student teams? Thirty-eight intact teams, 23 treatment and 15 comparison, participated in the investigation. Treatment teams attended a team charter lecture, and completed a team charter homework assignment. Each team charter was assessed and assigned a quality score. Comparison teams did not join the lecture, and were not asked to create a team charter. All teams completed each data collection phase: a) similarity rating pretest; b) similarity posttest; and c) team viability survey. Findings indicate that team viability was higher in teams that attended the lecture and completed the charter assignment. Teams with higher quality team charter scores reported higher levels of team viability than teams with lower quality charter scores. Lastly, no evidence was found to support teamwork mental model similarity as a partial mediator of the team charter quality on team viability

  8. Work team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RBE Editorial

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Work Team 2016 (Jan-Jul1. Editorial TeamChief-editorsBayardo Bapstista Torres, Instituto de Química (USP, BrasilEduardo Galembeck, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade de Campinas (Unicamp, Brasil Co-editorsGabriel Gerber Hornink, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade - Federal de Alfenas (Unifal-MG, BrasilVera Maria Treis Trindade, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS, Brasil Editorial BoardAdriana Cassina, Department of Biochemistry, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, UruguayAngel Herráez, Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología molecular, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, SpainAndré Amaral Gonçalves Bianco, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp, BrasilDenise Vaz de Macedo, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp, BrasilEneida de Paula, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp, BrasilJose Antonio Martinez Oyanedel, Universidad de Concepción, ChileJosep Maria Fernández Novell, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry, Universitat de Barcelona, SpainLeila Maria Beltramini, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo (USP, BrasilManuel João da Costa, Escola de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Minho, PortugalMaria Lucia Bianconi, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, BrasilMaría Noel Alvarez, Department of Biochemistry, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, UruguayMiguel Ángel Medina Torres, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry Faculty of Sciences University of Málaga, SpainNelma Regina Segnini Bossolan, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (USP, BrasilPaulo De Avila Junior, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas (CCNH Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC

  9. Trust in Diverse Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lisbeth

    Multicultural membership and diversity in teams are important to maintain effectiveness in organizations in a global business environment. Multicultural teams offer great potential in international collaboration just as top management teams are becoming increasingly diversified. However......, maintaining team cohesiveness in multicultural teams to collaborate effectively presents a number of challenges. The present study employs the concept of trust to explore influences on team collaboration in high performing teams. The study is based on observation of teams in seven multinational corporations...... as nationalities, gender, functional expertise and international experience. The study contributes insights to diverse teams through a processual study of micro-processes in global organizational contexts crossing multicultural boundaries....

  10. 50 CFR 259.31 - Acquisition, construction, or reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... reconstruction. 259.31 Section 259.31 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC... meet conditional fishery requirements for reconstruction as set forth in § 259.32 and from all... meet conditional fishery requirements for reconstruction as set forth in § 259.32, and shall be exempt...

  11. 439 Motivation, Personal Satisfaction of Team Members and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-07-21

    Jul 21, 2011 ... between motivation, personal satisfaction of team members, conformity to team norms and team players generally rendered their services in order to meet certain needs as highlighted in Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Locke and. Latham (1998) also argued that an individual motivation is enhanced when.

  12. Factors Affecting University Teaching Team Effectiveness in Detached Working Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of a study of the factors that contribute to teaching team effectiveness in situations where team members rarely meet face to face. Academic faculty within a university Business School were asked to report the degrees to which they believed that the module teaching teams to which they belonged contained members who…

  13. Getting Groups to Develop Good Strategies: Effects of Reflexivity Interventions on Team Process, Team Performance, and Shared Mental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtner, Andrea; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K.; Nagele, Christof

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the effect of guided reflection on team processes and performance, based on West's (1996, 2000) concept of reflexivity. Communicating via e-mail, 49 hierarchically structured teams (one commander and two specialists) performed seven 15 min shifts of a simulated team-based military air-surveillance task (TAST) in two meetings, a…

  14. Leading Strategic Leader Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-25

    develop teams which provide them capacity and diversity to make sound decisions.1 Strategic leader and top management teams exist throughout...looks at whether a leader should use a team to make a decision; it does not look at how to manage a team process to produce desired outcomes. Yet, the...choices on how to operate his/her team. Leaders of strategic leader teams must recognize and understand how they can manage the processes utilized

  15. Using teams and committees effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, B

    1998-09-01

    In a corporate setting, the term "team" usually refers to members of a group with different responsibilities and/or skills working together to achieve a common goal or objective. The major reason why a company desires group as opposed to individual involvement is to derive sounder decisions. Two essential issues to resolve in establishing teams or committees are 1) who should be a member or representative; and 2) what is the charter or mandate for the group. Representatives join a team or group in numerous ways; four common methods are 1) appointment by the group member's supervisor; 2) recruitment by the team leader; 3) appointment by a senior manager; and 4) volunteering. There are various profiles of how groups can approach a decision, including "groupthink," the "ideal group process" and the "debating society" approach. Group meetings must be structured to ensure that decisions are reached and then implemented. Foresight and planning are essential prerequisites to have efficient teams and committees that work effectively and achieve their goals. (c) 1998 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  16. Organizational structure, team process, and future directions of interprofessional health care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Kenneth D; Waite, Martha S; Nichols, Linda O

    2003-01-01

    For a nationwide Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training (GITT) program evaluation of 8 sites and 26 teams, team evaluators developed a quantitative and qualitative team observation scale (TOS), examining structure, process, and outcome, with specific focus on the training function. Qualitative data provided an important expansion of quantitative data, highlighting positive effects that were not statistically significant, such as role modeling and training occurring within the clinical team. Qualitative data could also identify "too much" of a coded variable, such as time spent in individual team members' assessments and treatment plans. As healthcare organizations have increasing demands for productivity and changing reimbursement, traditional models of teamwork, with large teams and structured meetings, may no longer be as functional as they once were. To meet these constraints and to train students in teamwork, teams of the future will have to make choices, from developing and setting specific models to increasing the use of information technology to create virtual teams. Both quantitative and qualitative data will be needed to evaluate these new types of teams and the important outcomes they produce.

  17. The importance of multidisciplinary teamwork and team climate for relational coordination among teams delivering care to older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartgerink, J M; Cramm, J M; Bakker, T J E M; van Eijsden, A M; Mackenbach, J P; Nieboer, A P

    2014-04-01

    To identify predictors of relational coordination among professionals delivering care to older patients. Relational coordination is known to enhance quality of care in hospitals. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. This cross-sectional study was part of a larger evaluation study examining the opportunity to prevent loss of function in older patients due to hospitalization in the Netherlands. This study was performed in spring 2010 among team members delivering care to older hospitalized patients (192 respondents; 44% response rate) in one hospital. Relational coordination was measured by the Relational Coordination survey; team climate by the Team Climate Inventory and questions were asked about participation in multidisciplinary team meetings and disciplines represented in these meetings. To account for the hierarchical structure, a multilevel analysis was performed. Correlation analysis revealed a positive relationship among being female, being a nurse and relational coordination; medical specialists showed a negative relationship. The number of disciplines represented during multidisciplinary team meetings and team climate were positively related with relational coordination. The multilevel analysis showed a positive relationship between the number of disciplines represented during multidisciplinary team meetings and team climate with relational coordination. The enhancement of team climate and attendance of diverse professionals during multidisciplinary team meetings are expected to improve relational coordination. Furthermore, this study underscores the importance of enhancing relational coordination between medical specialists and other professionals. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Diabetic foot ulcer teams in Norwegian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robberstad, Mari; Bentsen, Signe Berit; Berg, Tore Julsrud; Iversen, Marjolein M

    2017-09-19

    The national clincial guidelines for diabetes recommend that diabetic foot ulcers be treated by interdisciplinary diabetic foot ulcer teams. This study aims to survey the extent of diabetic foot ulcer teams in the specialist health service in Norwegian hospitals and to describe their clinical composition, organisation and working routines. The study is cross-sectional with the use of a questionnaire survey. The criteria for participating were somatic hospitals with 24-hour operations and a specialist function for patients with diabetes mellitus. A total of 41 hospitals participated of the 51 that fulfilled the criteria. Altogether 17 of 41 hospitals had diabetic foot ulcer teams. The teams had a broad clinical composition and followed national recommendations for surveying risk factors and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Nine foot ulcer teams had written routines for assessment, five used the Noklus diabetes patient records to document ulcer treatment, and ten had planned interdisciplinary meetings. Only one-quarter of the teams included both medical and surgical competence in the planned interdisciplinary collaboration. The diabetic foot ulcer teams had broad clinical competence and followed national clinical guidelines. The teams had a short waiting time for the initial consultation, half had written guidelines, and 60 % had planned interdisciplinary meetings. Far fewer had included both medical and surgical competence in the planned interdisciplinary collaboration.

  19. Trauma Team Activation: Not Just for Trauma Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Phoenix Vuong; Jason Sample; Mary Ellen Zimmermann; Pierre Saldinger

    2017-01-01

    Specialized trauma teams have been shown to improve outcomes in critically injured patients. At our institution, an the American College of Surgeons Committee on trauma level I Trauma center, the trauma team activation (TTA) criteria includes both physiologic and anatomic criteria, but any attending physician can activate the trauma team at their discretion outside criteria. As a result, the trauma team has been activated for noninjured patients meeting physiologic criteria secondary to nontr...

  20. [Orthognathic surgery: a team effort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, C; Soubry, R; Wackens, G

    1989-01-01

    Patients in daily practice can be asking us about the problems they experience with their occlusal relationship, facial esthetics and joint dysfunction. If this dysfunction is present in a harmonious facial balance, the treatment plan should be classically dental (building-up plate to free the joint, occlusal equilibration, amalgam reconstructions, crown and bridgework, orthodontics). If the dentist observe a facial imbalance, whether it is antero-posterior, vertical or transversal, the treatment should be in cooperation with an orthognathic team (orthodontist and maxillo-facial surgeon). If the clinical problem is exclusively esthetic, without any relation with dental malocclusion and/or joint dysfunction, the treatment planning can be plastic surgery only.

  1. Assessing Team Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Susan; Rottier, Jerry

    Interdisciplinary middle school level teams capitalize on the idea that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Administrators and team members can maximize the advantages of teamwork using team assessments to increase the benefits for students, teachers, and the school environment. Assessing team performance can lead to high performing…

  2. Speeding Up Team Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Amy; Bohmer, Richard; Pisano, Gary

    2001-01-01

    A study of 16 cardiac surgery teams looked at how the teams adapted to new ways of working. The challenge of team management is to implement new processes as quickly as possible. Steps for creating a learning team include selecting a mix of skills and expertise, framing the challenge, and creating an environment of psychological safety. (JOW)

  3. Travelling with football teams

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Football fans will always converge at a stadium on the day of the match to watch their favourite team play against a visiting team. The atmosphere at these matches is almost always electric with fans cheering their favourite teams on. The focus for everybody is ultimately on the performance of the teams on the playing field ...

  4. Developing Your Dream Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, Kenda

    2005-01-01

    Almost anyone has held various roles on a team, be it a family unit, sports team, or a project-oriented team. As an educator, one must make a conscious decision to build and invest in a team. Gathering the best team possible will help one achieve one's goals. This article explores some of the key reasons why it is important to focus on the team…

  5. Building an inclusive research team: the importance of team building and skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnadová, Iva; Cumming, Therese M; Knox, Marie; Parmenter, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Inclusive research teams typically describe their experiences and analyse the type of involvement of researchers with disability, but the process of building research teams and the need for research training still remain underexplored in the literature. Four researchers with intellectual disabilities and four academic researchers developed an inclusive research team. The team conducted 15 research training sessions, focused on investigating the well-being of older women with intellectual disabilities. They used mobile technology to support research skills acquisition. Findings included the experiences of all team members regarding the team building during training. To become an effective inclusive research team, all team members, regardless of ability, need to bring their own experiences and also learn necessary research skills. This paper highlights the need for team building, joint research training among all members of the research team and strategies supporting the peer-mentoring within the team. We are a team of four researchers with intellectual disabilities and four academic researchers without an intellectual disability. Our aim has been to learn about research together. We want to do this so that we can carry out a research project together about how older women with intellectual disabilities live. We have decided to call our team 'Welcome to our Class'. We have been working together for 9 months. In this time we have had 15 research training meetings. We have learned What research is How to work out a research question, that is what we want to find out about How to get information on what we want to find out. Here we thought of interview questions we could ask older women with intellectual disabilities. We are now meeting once a month, and have just begun our research on finding out how older women with intellectual disabilities live. We are now starting to use what we have learned. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Structuring Successful Global Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    effectively complete complex tasks that are beyond the scope of what an individual could reasonably accomplish. In particular, teams ...conditions for team effectiveness (Tannenbaum, Mathieu, Salas, & Cohen, 2012). When compared to traditional or conventional teams , organizational leaders may...following topics will be combined: global teams , virtual teams , multicultural teams , distributed teams , team diversity, S. Miloslavic et al. 21 22 23

  7. Training a team with simulated team members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafstal, A.M.; Hoeft, R.M.; Schaik, M. van

    2002-01-01

    The process of training teams increasingly occurs in synthetic environments. However, it is often still modeled after live team training, including the disadvantages of live training, for example, the fact that all teammates must be available. This paper explores overcoming the disadvantages of

  8. MANAGING MULTICULTURAL PROJECT TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar SCARLAT

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is based on literature review and authors’ own recent experience in managing multicultural project teams, in international environment. This comparative study considers two groups of projects: technical assistance (TA projects versus information technology (IT projects. The aim is to explore the size and structure of the project teams – according to the team formation and its lifecycle, and to identify some distinctive attributes of the project teams – both similarities and differences between the above mentioned types of projects. Distinct focus of the research is on the multiculturalism of the project teams: how the cultural background of the team members influences the team performance and team management. Besides the results of the study are the managerial implications: how the team managers could soften the cultural clash, and avoid inter-cultural misunderstandings and even conflicts – in order to get a better performance. Some practical examples are provided as well.

  9. Report on the 9th International Exchange/Inspection Team - 2000 ASHRAE Winter Meeting and the situation of the U.S. being activated by deregulation/IT technology innovation; Dai 9 kai kokusai koryu shisatsudan hokoku. 2000 nen ASHRAE toki taikai to kisei kanwa IT gijutsu kakumei de kakkizuku Beikoku no genjo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Y. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-06-05

    We (25 members) attended ASHRAE Winter Meeting held in Dallas, Texas, as the 9th international exchange/inspection team sponsored by The Society of Heating, Air-Conditioning and Sanitary Engineers of Japan. About 3000 researchers, engineers, etc. participated in the meeting from 25 countries including not only the whole U.S. but Europe and Asia, and had vigorous discussions. At the same time, AHR EXPO 2000 was held in a convention center of the city. More than 1,000 companies joined in the exposition, and the participants numbered approximately 20,000, according to the sponsor. Further, using this opportunity, visits were paid to official research institutes and 5 companies in the Central West with the aim of investigating the present situation in the U.S. where new businesses of energy service are being developed by various new comers. The inspection of the related facilities and useful information exchanges with researchers were made. (translated by NEDO)

  10. Toward Learning Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoda, Rashina; Babb, Jeff; Nørbjerg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Today's software development challenges require learning teams that can continuously apply new engineering and management practices, new and complex technical skills, cross-functional skills, and experiential lessons learned. The pressure of delivering working software often forces software teams...... to sacrifice learning-focused practices. Effective learning under pressure involves conscious efforts to implement original agile practices such as retrospectives and adapted strategies such as learning spikes. Teams, their management, and customers must all recognize the importance of creating learning teams...

  11. Climate Reconstructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Paleoclimatology Program archives reconstructions of past climatic conditions derived from paleoclimate proxies, in addition to the Program's large holdings...

  12. Team Building Activities for Young Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Team building activities are an excellent way to challenge students and teach them the critical communication and problem solving skills that encourage trust, empathy, and ability to work together. They create an atmosphere that enhances the ability to meet fitness and skill goals because students, regardless of skill level, will possess increased…

  13. Leadership for Distributed Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Rooij, J.P.G.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation was to study the little examined, yet important issue of leadership for distributed teams. Distributed teams are defined as: “teams of which members are geographically distributed and are therefore working predominantly via mediated communication means on an

  14. Tracking dynamic team activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambe, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Rey, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    AI researchers are striving to build complex multi-agent worlds with intended applications ranging from the RoboCup robotic soccer tournaments, to interactive virtual theatre, to large-scale real-world battlefield simulations. Agent tracking - monitoring other agent`s actions and inferring their higher-level goals and intentions - is a central requirement in such worlds. While previous work has mostly focused on tracking individual agents, this paper goes beyond by focusing on agent teams. Team tracking poses the challenge of tracking a team`s joint goals and plans. Dynamic, real-time environments add to the challenge, as ambiguities have to be resolved in real-time. The central hypothesis underlying the present work is that an explicit team-oriented perspective enables effective team tracking. This hypothesis is instantiated using the model tracing technology employed in tracking individual agents. Thus, to track team activities, team models are put to service. Team models are a concrete application of the joint intentions framework and enable an agent to track team activities, regardless of the agent`s being a collaborative participant or a non-participant in the team. To facilitate real-time ambiguity resolution with team models: (i) aspects of tracking are cast as constraint satisfaction problems to exploit constraint propagation techniques; and (ii) a cost minimality criterion is applied to constrain tracking search. Empirical results from two separate tasks in real-world, dynamic environments one collaborative and one competitive - are provided.

  15. Leadership for Distributed Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriessen, J.H.T.H.; Den Hartog, D.N.; De Rooij, J.P.G.

    The aim of this dissertation was to study the little examined, yet important issue of leadership for distributed teams. Distributed teams are defined as: “teams of which members are geographically distributed and are therefore working predominantly via mediated communication means on an

  16. Multicultural team conflict management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Heinz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the potential problems related to conflict resolution while cooperating in multicultural teams. Special attention is paid to specific character of such teams as well as to the concept of productive conflict and the ways of resolving it. The experiences gained in the Erasmus Intenstive Programme - Effective Working in Multicultural Teams were used.

  17. Multicultural team conflict management

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the potential problems related to conflict resolution while cooperating in multicultural teams. Special attention is paid to specific character of such teams as well as to the concept of productive conflict and the ways of resolving it. The experiences gained in the Erasmus Intenstive Programme - Effective Working in Multicultural Teams were used.

  18. Fostering teachers' team learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmans, Machiel; Runhaar, Piety; Wesselink, Renate; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of educational innovations by teachers seems to benefit from a team approach and team learning. The study's goal is to examine to what extent transformational leadership is associated with team learning, and to investigate the mediating roles of participative decision-making,

  19. Endogenous leadership in teams

    OpenAIRE

    Huck, S; Rey Biel, P.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study the mechanics of ``leading by example'' in teams. Leadership is beneficial for the entire team when agents are conformists, i.e., dislike effort differentials. We also show how leadership can arise endogenously and discuss what type of leader benefits a team most.

  20. Teams and teamwork at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The recent reorganization and shift to managing total quality at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has placed an increasing emphasis on teams and teamwork in accomplishing day-to-day work activities and long-term projects. The purpose of this research was to review the nature of teams and teamwork at LaRC. Models of team performance and teamwork guided the gathering of information. Current and former team members served as participants; their collective experience reflected membership in over 200 teams at LaRC. The participants responded to a survey of open-ended questions which assessed various aspects of teams and teamwork. The participants also met in a workshop to clarify and elaborate on their responses. The work accomplished by the teams ranged from high-level managerial decision making (e.g., developing plans for LaRC reorganization) to creating scientific proposals (e.g., describing spaceflight projects to be designed, sold, and built). Teams typically had nine members who remained together for six months. Member turnover was around 20 percent; this turnover was attributed to heavy loads of other work assignments and little formal recognition and reward for team membership. Team members usually shared a common and valued goal, but there was not a clear standard (except delivery of a document) for knowing when the goal was achieved. However, members viewed their teams as successful. A major factor in team success was the setting of explicit a priori rules for communication. Task interdependencies between members were not complex (e.g., sharing of meeting notes and ideas about issues), except between members of scientific teams (i.e., reliance on the expertise of others). Thus, coordination of activities usually involved scheduling and attendance of team meetings. The team leader was designated by the team's sponsor. This leader usually shared power and responsibilities with other members, such that team members established their own operating

  1. Planetary Protection Technology Definition Team: Tasks, Status, and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. A.; Rummel, J. D.

    2016-10-01

    A Planetary Protection and Technology Definition Team will assess challenges to meeting planetary protection requirements to instruments and will suggest technological solutions. Status and initial findings will be reported.

  2. 2013 Building America Research Planning Meeting Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hunt, S. [Confluence Communications, Missoula, MT (united States)

    2014-02-01

    The Building America Research Planning Meeting was held October 28-30, 2013, in Washington, DC. This meeting provides one opportunity each year for the research teams, national laboratories and Department of Energy (DOE) managers to meet in person to share the most pertinent information and collaboration updates. This report documents the presentations, highlights key program updates, and outlines next steps for the program.

  3. Nice Teams Finish Last The Secret to Unleashing Your Team's Maximum Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Brian Cole

    2010-01-01

    Don't rock the boat. Don't make waves. Don't offend anyone. There's a palpable feeling that clouds many team meetings and keeps them from being productive: over-politeness. And while the conflict that naturally exists in most organizations hasn't gone away, it manifests itself in passive-aggression, mediocrity, and a molasses-like inability to get anything done. Nice Teams Finish Last provides the antidote to this all-too-common tendency, giving managers, team leaders and members, and facilitators the practical support they need to battle "the nice trap" and start getting results! The book hel

  4. [Eyebrow reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraër, F; Darsonval, V; Lejeune, F; Bochot-Hermouet, B; Rousseau, P

    2013-10-01

    The eyebrow is an essential anatomical area, from a social point of view, so its reconstruction, in case of skin defect, must be as meticulous as possible, with the less residual sequela. Capillary density extremely varies from one person to another and the different methods of restoration of this area should absolutely take this into consideration. We are going to review the various techniques of reconstruction, according to the sex and the surface to cover. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Primary care team working in Ireland: a qualitative exploration of team members' experiences in a new primary care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Norelee; Armstrong, Claire; Woodward, Oonagh; Cullen, Walter

    2015-07-01

    Team working is an integral aspect of primary care, but barriers to effective team working can limit the effectiveness of a primary care team (PCT). The establishment of new PCTs in Ireland provides an excellent opportunity to explore team working in action. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of team members working in a PCT. Team members (n = 19) from two PCTs were interviewed from May to June 2010 using a semi-structured interview guide. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were analysed using NVivo (version 8). Thematic analysis was used to explore the data. We identified five main themes that described the experiences of the team members. The themes were support for primary care, managing change, communication, evolution of roles and benefits of team working. Team members were generally supportive of primary care and had experienced benefits to their practice and to the care of their patients from participation in the team. Regular team meetings enabled communication and discussion of complex cases. Despite the significant scope for role conflict due to the varied employment arrangements of the team members, neither role nor interpersonal conflict was evident in the teams studied. In addition, despite the unusual team structure in Irish PCTs - where there is no formally appointed team leader or manager - general issues around team working and its benefits and challenges were very similar to those found in other international studies. This suggests, in contrast to some studies, that some aspects of the leadership role may not be as important in successful PCT functioning as previously thought. Nonetheless, team leadership was identified as an important issue in the further development of the teams. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Leadership for Distributed Teams

    OpenAIRE

    De Rooij, J.P.G.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation was to study the little examined, yet important issue of leadership for distributed teams. Distributed teams are defined as: “teams of which members are geographically distributed and are therefore working predominantly via mediated communication means on an interdependent task and in realizing a joint goal” (adapted from Bell & Kozlowski, 2002 and Dubé & Paré, 2004). Chapter 1 first presents the outline of the dissertation. Next, several characteristics of distri...

  7. Managing multicultural teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Jeanne; Behfar, Kristin; Kern, Mary C

    2006-11-01

    Multicultural teams offer a number of advantages to international firms, including deep knowledge of different product markets, culturally sensitive customer service, and 24-hour work rotations. But those advantages may be outweighed by problems stemming from cultural differences, which can seriously impair the effectiveness of a team or even bring itto a stalemate. How can managers best cope with culture-based challenges? The authors conducted in-depth interviews with managers and members of multicultural teams from all over the world. Drawing on their extensive research on dispute resolution and teamwork and those interviews, they identify four problem categories that can create barriers to a team's success: direct versus indirect communication, trouble with accents and fluency, differing attitudes toward hierarchy and authority, and conflicting norms for decision making. If a manager--or a team member--can pinpoint the root cause of the problem, he or she is likelier to select an appropriate strategy for solving it. The most successful teams and managers, the authors found, dealt with multicultural challenges in one of four ways: adaptation (acknowledging cultural gaps openly and working around them), structural intervention (changing the shape or makeup of the team), managerial intervention (setting norms early or bringing in a higher-level manager), and exit (removing a team member when other options have failed). Which strategy is best depends on the particular circumstances--and each has potential complications. In general, though, managers who intervene early and set norms; teams and managers who try to engage everyone on the team; and teams that can see challenges as stemming from culture, not personality, succeed in solving culture-based problems with good humor and creativity. They are the likeliest to harvest the benefits inherent in multicultural teams.

  8. Scheduling for production teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Mauergauz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of calendar (weekly scheduling for production teams, when the average orders utility function is used as the quality criterion. The method is based on the concept of “production intensity”, which is a dynamic parameter of production process. Applied software package allows scheduling for medium quantity of jobs. The result of software application is the team load on the planning horizon. The computed schedule may be corrected and recalculated in interactive mode. Current load of every team is taken into account at each recalculation. The method may be used for any combination of complex and specialized teams.

  9. The NPD team conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Zheng; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Tanev, Stoyan

    2012-01-01

    elaborates on the role of culture diversity and geographical dispersion in NPD team conflict. A simulation is conducted where organizations may be regarded as complex systems to affect the team conflict with a variety of influences. The results firstly indicate that there are two dimensions of NPD team...... conflict: stable and unstable dimensions with four elements: task characteristics, group members’ relationship, cultural diversity and geographical dispersion; secondly, there are two phenomena whereby the geographical dispersion influences the NPD team interaction, and the influence between cultural...

  10. Vaginal reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  11. Exploring Relational Communication Patterns in Prereferral Intervention Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Megan S.; Erchul, William P.; Young, Hannah L.; Bartel, Chelsea M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to understand the relational communication patterns that characterize school-based prereferral intervention teams (PITs). Fifteen PIT meetings were used as the basis for analyses, with each meeting audiotaped, transcribed, and coded using the Family Relational Communication Control Coding System (Heatherington…

  12. Expert Meeting Report: Foundations Research Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojczyk, C.; Huelman, P.; Carmody, J.

    2013-05-01

    In the Expert Meeting Plan, the NorthernSTAR Team proposed to host two Expert Meetings in calendar year 2011. Invitees to the meetings would include experts in the current field of study, other BA team members, and representatives from DOE and NREL. They will invite leading industry experts to present at these meetings. The Expert Meetings will focus on key systems areas that will be required to meet the Building America performance goals and shall be sufficiently narrow in scope that specific conclusions, action items, and delegation of future tasks can be identified and completed. The two expert meeting topics are 'Foundations' and 'Window Retrofit.' The first session is designed as a webinar only and the second will be a live meeting.

  13. Breast reconstruction following amputation for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Višnjić Milan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Today, breast reconstruction is a widely accepted method in the treatment of breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy. Reconstruction methods are associated with an acceptable number of complications and reconstruction favorably impacts quality of life. The aim of the study was to present our experience in breast reconstruction. Methods. We presented here a four-year experience with 84 patients with breast reconstruction after modified radical mastectomy. Results. Implant reconstructions were most common, 44 (52.3%, with primary reconstruction in 31(70.4% and secondary in 13 (29.5% women. Lattisimus dorsi flap (LDF and implant were utilized in 32 (38% of the patients, with primary reconstruction in 24 (75% and secondary in 8 (25% women. Transversal rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM flap was rarely used - just in 8 (9.5% patients and only for secondary breast reconstruction. Postoperatively, some early complications such as hematoma, seroma, infections and partial flap necrosis were observed in 10 (11.9% patients. Late complications, such as implant rejection, hypertrophic scarring and hernias at the flap elevation site, were noted in 10 (11.9% cases. Implant loss occurred in 5 (5.9% cases. All the complications were successfully managed, and patients rated their reconstruction as follows: excellent, 49 (59% cases; very good, 20 (24%, and good, 14 (16.8%. In one case, disease progression was observed 6 months after the primary breast reconstruction. Conclusion. Breast reconstruction is an acceptable method in the treatment of breast cancer in patients in the need for or with already performed mastectomy. The choice of reconstruction approach depends on the breast volume, patient's wish and experience of surgical team. Our results suggest the advantage of breast reconstruction with LDF with implant, since the technique is safe, complications relatively rare and easily manageable, and the results are excellent or very good

  14. Virtual Trauma Team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Valerie M.; Bults, Richard G.A.

    2001-01-01

    The clinical motivation for Virtual Trauma Team is to improve quality of care in trauma care in the vital first "golden hour" where correct intervention can greatly improve likely health outcome. The motivation for Virtual Homecare Team is to improve quality of life and independence for patients by

  15. Interactive Team Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Myers, Christopher W.; Duran, Jasmine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team…

  16. Formative Assessment of Collaborative Teams (FACT): Development of a Grade-Level Instructional Team Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Matthew J.; Hallam, Pamela R.; Charlton, Cade T.; Wall, D. Gary

    2014-01-01

    Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) have become increasingly popular in schools. PLCs are groups of teachers, administrators, parents, and students who collaborate to improve their practices and focus on results (DuFour, 2004). Grade-level and department teachers participate in regularly scheduled collaborative team meetings; however, many…

  17. Virtual Project Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille

    in virtual project teams whose members are spread across various geographical locations. The aim is to understand the specific factors, conditions and challenges underpinning such situations. This thesis describes, analyses and discusses three in-depth empirical studies on the practices and use of groupware...... technology in six real-life virtual teams, two in industry and four in education, applying interpretative research and action research methods. Two main lines of investigation are pursued: the first involves an examination of the organisational issues related to groupware adaptation in virtual project teams......, while the second looks at the social context and practices of virtual project teams. Two of the key findings are 1) that the process of groupware adaptation by virtual project teams can be viewed as a process of expanding and aligning the technological frames of the participants, which includes mutual...

  18. When Teams Go Crazy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhrmann, Marco; Münch, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Software development consists to a large extend of human-based processes with continuously increasing demands regarding interdisciplinary team work. Understanding the dynamics of software teams can be seen as highly important to successful project execution. Hence, for future project managers......, knowledge about non-technical processes in teams is significant. In this paper, we present a course unit that provides an environment in which students can learn and experience the impact of group dynamics on project performance and quality. The course unit uses the Tuckman model as theoretical framework...... of those factors. Moreover, students experienced what problems occur when teams work under stress and how to form a performing team despite exceptional situations....

  19. Trust in agile teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnehøj, Gitte; Fransgård, Mette; Skalkam, Signe

    2012-01-01

    of the problems of DSD. However important incompatibilities between the challenges of DSD and the key tenets of agility exist and achieving a beneficially balanced agile practice in DSD can be difficult. Trust could be the key to this, since trust is crucial for the necessary corporate behavior that leads to team...... success. This article reports from a study of two agile DSD teams with very different organization and collaboration patterns. It addresses the role of trust and distrust in DSD by analyzing how the team members’ trust developed and erode through the lifetime of the two collaborations and how management...... actions influenced this. We see two important lessons from the analysis. First the agile practices of daily Scrum and self organizing team can empower DSD teams to manage their own development of trust and thereby alleviate the obstacles of DSD. Second if management fails to support the development...

  20. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy On This Page What is breast reconstruction? How ... are some new developments in breast reconstruction after mastectomy? What is breast reconstruction? Many women who have ...

  1. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... to make reconstruction easier. If you will have breast reconstruction later, your surgeon will remove enough skin ...

  2. A Four-Phase Model of Transdisciplinary Team-Based Research: Goals, Team Processes, and Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kara L; Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke; Stokols, Daniel; Morgan, Glen; Gehlert, Sarah

    2012-12-01

    The complexity of social and public health challenges has led to burgeoning interest and investments in cross-disciplinary team-based research, and particularly in transdisciplinary (TD) team-based research. TD research aims to integrate and ultimately extend beyond discipline-specific concepts, approaches, and methods to accelerate innovations and progress toward solving complex real-world problems. While TD research offers the promise of novel, wide-reaching and important discoveries, it also introduces unique challenges. In particular, today's investigators are generally trained in unidisciplinary approaches, and may have little training in, or exposure to, the scientific skills and team processes necessary to collaborate successfully in teams of colleagues from widely disparate disciplines and fields. Yet these skills are essential to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of TD team-based research. In the current article we propose a model of TD team-based research that includes four relatively distinct phases: development, conceptualization, implementation, and translation. Drawing on the science of team science (SciTS) field, as well as the findings from previous research on group dynamics and organizational behavior, we identify key scientific goals and team processes that occur in each phase and across multiple phases. We then provide real-world exemplars for each phase that highlight strategies for successfully meeting the goals and engaging in the team processes that are hallmarks of that phase. We conclude by discussing the relevance of the model for TD team-based research initiatives, funding to support these initiatives, and future empirical research that aims to better understand the processes and outcomes of TD team-based research.

  3. Nonlinear reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Yu, Yu; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Yu, Hao-Ran

    2017-12-01

    We present a direct approach to nonparametrically reconstruct the linear density field from an observed nonlinear map. We solve for the unique displacement potential consistent with the nonlinear density and positive definite coordinate transformation using a multigrid algorithm. We show that we recover the linear initial conditions up to the nonlinear scale (rδrδL>0.5 for k ≲1 h /Mpc ) with minimal computational cost. This reconstruction approach generalizes the linear displacement theory to fully nonlinear fields, potentially substantially expanding the baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift space distortions information content of dense large scale structure surveys, including for example SDSS main sample and 21 cm intensity mapping initiatives.

  4. Causal Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    suitable source of core events supporting causal reconstruction in a range of domains might be a combination of bodily - kinesthetic and simple...suggested in the previ- ous section, a good place to start might be with causal situations involving bodily - kinesthetic events or simple mechanical events...ANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(LS) tý PJIfORMIN’, CRGANIZATION !.LPDRT NUMBEK Artificial Intelligence Laboratory 545 Technology Square AIM 1403 Cambridge

  5. Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours in Response Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Anne; Raes, Elisabeth; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Teams, teamwork and team learning have been the subject of many research studies over the last decades. This article aims at investigating and confirming the Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours (TLB&B) model within a very specific population, i.e. police and firemen teams. Within this context, the paper asks whether the team's…

  6. Dream team or nightmare? Collaboration in project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffeld, S.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Grote, S.; Wastian, M.; von Rosenstiel, L.; Braumandl, I.; West, M.

    2015-01-01

    Project teams are a contemporary organizing principle. They work on non-routine tasks. Team composition in project teams is often interdisciplinary (i.e., uniting team members from different departments or areas of expertise within an organization). Project teams face a number of challenges. In

  7. Team Psychological Safety and Team Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauwelier, Peter; Ribière, Vincent M.; Bennet, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if the concept of team psychological safety, a key driver of team learning and originally studied in the West, can be applied in teams from different national cultures. The model originally validated for teams in the West is applied to teams in Thailand to evaluate its validity, and the views team…

  8. Measuring Team Learning Behaviours through Observing Verbal Team Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Elisabeth; Boon, Anne; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore, as an answer to the observed lack of knowledge about actual team learning behaviours, the characteristics of the actual observed basic team learning behaviours and facilitating team learning behaviours more in-depth of three project teams. Over time, team learning in an organisational context has been…

  9. Building the team for team science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Emily K.; O'Rourke, M.; Hong, G. S.; Hanson, P. C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Crowley, S.; Brewer, C. A.; Weathers, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to effectively exchange information and develop trusting, collaborative relationships across disciplinary boundaries is essential for 21st century scientists charged with solving complex and large-scale societal and environmental challenges, yet these communication skills are rarely taught. Here, we describe an adaptable training program designed to increase the capacity of scientists to engage in information exchange and relationship development in team science settings. A pilot of the program, developed by a leader in ecological network science, the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON), indicates that the training program resulted in improvement in early career scientists’ confidence in team-based network science collaborations within and outside of the program. Fellows in the program navigated human-network challenges, expanded communication skills, and improved their ability to build professional relationships, all in the context of producing collaborative scientific outcomes. Here, we describe the rationale for key communication training elements and provide evidence that such training is effective in building essential team science skills.

  10. Focus Meetings for Pesticide Registration Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focus meetings with affected registrants and possibly other stakeholders are based around the information needs identified by the EPA chemical review team and management for consideration during our registration reevaluation of a pesticide.

  11. Primary care multidisciplinary teams in practice: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Brandi; Morgan, Perri; Strand de Oliveira, Justine; Hull, Sharon; Østbye, Truls; Everett, Christine

    2017-12-29

    Current recommendations for strengthening the US healthcare system consider restructuring primary care into multidisciplinary teams as vital to improving quality and efficiency. Yet, approaches to the selection of team designs remain unclear. This project describes current primary care team designs, primary care professionals' perceptions of ideal team designs, and perceived facilitating factors and barriers to implementing ideal team-based care. Qualitative study of 44 health care professionals at 6 primary care practices in North Carolina using focus group discussions and surveys. Data was analyzed using framework content analysis. Practices used a variety of multidisciplinary team designs with the specific design being influenced by the social and policy context in which practices were embedded. Practices overwhelmingly located barriers to adopting ideal multidisciplinary teams as being outside of their individual practices and outside of their control. Participants viewed internal organizational contexts as the major facilitators of multidisciplinary primary care teams. The majority of practices described their ideal team design as including a social worker to meet the needs of socially complex patients. Primary care multidisciplinary team designs vary across practices, shaped in part by contextual factors perceived as barriers outside of the practices' control. Facilitating factors within practices provide a culture of support to team members, but they are insufficient to overcome the perceived barriers. The common desire to add social workers to care teams reflects practices' struggles to meet the complex demands of patients and external agencies. Government or organizational policies should avoid one-size-fits-all approaches to multidisciplinary care teams, and instead allow primary care practices to adapt to their specific contextual circumstances.

  12. Next generation red teaming

    CERN Document Server

    Dalziel, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Red Teaming is can be described as a type of wargaming.In private business, penetration testers audit and test organization security, often in a secretive setting. The entire point of the Red Team is to see how weak or otherwise the organization's security posture is. This course is particularly suited to CISO's and CTO's that need to learn how to build a successful Red Team, as well as budding cyber security professionals who would like to learn more about the world of information security. Teaches readers how to dentify systemic security issues based on the analysis of vulnerability and con

  13. School wellness team best practices to promote wellness policy implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profili, Erika; Rubio, Diana S; Lane, Hannah G; Jaspers, Lea H; Lopes, Megan S; Black, Maureen M; Hager, Erin R

    2017-08-01

    Schools with wellness teams are more likely to implement federally mandated Local Wellness Policies (LWPs, Local Education Agency-level policies for healthy eating/physical activity). Best practices have been developed for wellness teams based on minimal empirical evidence. The purpose of this study is to determine, among schools with wellness teams, associations between LWP implementation and six wellness team best practices (individually and as a sum score). An online survey targeting Maryland school wellness leaders/administrators (52.4% response rate, 2012-2013 school year) was administered that included LWP implementation (17-item scale: categorized as no, low, and high implementation) and six wellness team best practices. Analyses included multi-level multinomial logistic regression. Wellness teams were present in 311/707 (44.0%) schools, with no (19.6%), low (36.0%), and high (44.4%) LWP implementation. A sum score representing active wellness teams (mean=2.6) included: setting healthy eating/physical activity goals (66.9%), informing the public of LWP activities (71.4%), meeting ≥4times/year (45.8%), and having school staff (46.9%), parent (25.4%), or student (14.8%) representation. In adjusted models, goal setting, meeting ≥4times/year, and student representation were associated with high LWP implementation. For every one-unit increase in active wellness team sum score, schools were 41% more likely to be in high versus no implementation (Likelihood Ratio=1.41, 95% C.I.=1.13, 1.76). In conclusion, wellness teams meeting best practices are more likely to implement LWPs. Interventions should focus on the formation of wellness teams with recommended composition/activities. Study findings provide support for wellness team recommendations stemming from the 2016 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act final rule. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Team-Based Global Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Lena; Butler, Christina Lea; Mockaitis, Audra

    2015-01-01

    questions at three levels for bringing research on team-based organizing in global organizations forward. At the within-Team individual level, we discuss the criticality of process and leadership in teams. At the between-Teams group level, we draw attention to that global teams also need to focus...

  15. Should this team be saved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbouch, H

    2001-01-01

    As far as anyone could tell, Vigor Skin Care's star was rising, mostly on the strength of Ageless Vigor, its new line of enriched skin cleansers and cosmetics. In fact, this evening, the three employees responsible for developing the product line were slated to receive the parent company's highest award for performance. But CEO Peter Markles knew that despite the accolades, the business unit--and its "fearsome threesome"--had hit a rough patch in recent months. When Peter took the reins four years ago, Vigor Skin Care was the sleeping dog of the health-and-beauty industry; his challenge was to rejuvenate the maturing business. He knew a turnaround would require equal parts discipline, politics, and creativity--so he pulled together a team that could address those needs. Peter relied on Sandy Fryda, Vigor's longtime marketing director, to help him navigate the tricky political waters at headquarters. And he tapped 30-year-old Josh Bartola, a maverick contributor to Vigor Skin Care's research group, for his independent spirit and new product ideas. Their all-consuming, intensely collaborative efforts resulted in the successful Ageless Vigor line. Then reality set in. The team found the day-to-day operations of manufacturing Ageless Vigor, for all their necessity and urgency, a bit tedious. Peter felt relegated to troubleshooting distribution problems. Josh was having meetings with executives from another division who were actively recruiting the wunderkind. And Sandy was simply on the verge of burnout. Tonight, at the award ceremony, there would be speeches and applause and toasts. But tomorrow, Peter would have to face the question: Should he try to salvage the Ageless Vigor team? Four commentators offer their advice in this fictional case study.

  16. A Project Team: A Team or Just a Group?

    OpenAIRE

    Katerina Hrazdilova Bockova; Daniela Maťovcikova

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with issues related to work in either teams or groups. The theoretical part which discusses a team and a group with regards to its definition, classification and basic distinction brings in more on the typology of team roles, personality assessment and sociometric methods. The analytical part tests the project (work) team of a medical center represented in terms of personality and motivational types, team roles and interpersonal team relations concerning t...

  17. A Project Team: a Team or Just a Group?

    OpenAIRE

    Kateřina; Daniela; Martina

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with issues related to work in either teams or groups. The theoretical part discusses a team and a group with regards to its definition, classification and basic distinction, brings in more on the typology of team roles, personality assessment and sociometric methods. The analytical part tests the project (work) team of a medical center represented in terms of personality and motivational types, team roles and interpersonal team relations concerning the willingness of coopera...

  18. Submarine Medicine Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Submarine Medicine Team conducts basic and applied research on biomedical aspects of submarine and diving environments. It focuses on ways to optimize the health...

  19. Biological Monitoring Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Biological Monitoring Team (BMT) was a pilot project focused on addressing NWRS inventory and monitoring needs in Regions 3 and 5. The BMT was a precursor to the...

  20. Hearing Conservation Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hearing Conservation Team focuses on ways to identify the early stages of noise-induced damage to the human ear.Our current research involves the evaluation of...

  1. Environmental Response Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    This website will serve as a resource directory of the Environmental Response Team's roles and capabilities as well as list contacts for each discipline to provide information to EPA personnel and the public.

  2. Leading Strategic Leader Teams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burleson, Willard M

    2008-01-01

    .... Although only 1 to 2 percent of the Army's senior leaders will attain a command position of strategic leadership, they are assisted by others, not only by teams specifically designed and structured...

  3. Regional Response Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are thirteen in the U.S., each representing a geographic region (including the Caribbean and the Pacific Basin). Composed of representatives from field offices of the agencies that make up the National Response Team, and state representatives.

  4. Media and Security Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Media And Security Team led by Prof. Min Wu was established in Fall 2001 at University of Maryland, College Park. A number of research and education activities...

  5. Making Teamwork Work: Team Knowledge for Team Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchait, Priyanko; Lei, Puiwa; Tews, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of two types of team knowledge on team effectiveness. The study assessed the impact of taskwork knowledge and teamwork knowledge on team satisfaction and performance. A longitudinal study was conducted with 27 service-management teams involving 178 students in a real-life restaurant setting. Teamwork knowledge was found to impact both team outcomes. Furthermore, team learning behavior was found to mediate the relationships between teamwork knowledge and team outcomes. Educators and managers should therefore ensure these types of knowledge are developed in teams along with learning behavior for maximum effectiveness.

  6. Managing Global Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Stan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Every global company’s competitive advantage depends on its ability to coordinate critical resources and information that are spread across different geographical locations. As a result of the increasingly global business environment, many companies are building teams that cross- national borders and / or include members from different countries of origin. Global teams are formed to enhance the efficiency of an organization by making effective use of the diversity or viewpoints.

  7. Team Modelling: Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    cognitive and/or reasoning ability (g), spatial orientation, and verbal comprehension. In terms of personality, Jordan (2001) has argued that research on...broadminded ( Jordan , 2001). Most of the team research pertaining to the Big Five factors has focused on the conscientiousness and agreeableness factors...transformational leadership on team performance, the findings have generally been positive. Dvir, Eden, Avolio, & Shamir (2002; cited in Lim & Ployhart

  8. The Motivated Project Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Recognition for exceptional per- formance. Motivator/Hygiene Theory ( Frederick Herzberg ) Herzberg believed that motivators such as the following...vating team members. It is very important to recognize that motivation is an intrinsic phenomenon. According to noted industrial psychologist Frederick ... Herzberg , “Extrinsic satisfaction only leads to movements, not mo- tivation.” Motivated team mem- bers, on the other hand, possess an internal

  9. Transforming Virtual Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille

    2005-01-01

    Investigating virtual team collaboration in industry using grounded theory this paper presents the in-dept analysis of empirical work conducted in a global organization of 100.000 employees where a global virtual team with participants from Sweden, United Kingdom, Canada, and North America were...... multiple communities, and bringing visibility to articulation work, and that groupware technology should facilitate communication and negotiation instead of implementing the workflows just enhancing existing abilities, practices, and skills....

  10. Self-reported teamwork in family health team practices in Ontario: organizational and cultural predictors of team climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Michelle; Brazil, Kevin; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Agarwal, Gina

    2011-05-01

    To determine the organizational predictors of higher scores on team climate measures as an indicator of the functioning of a family health team (FHT). Cross-sectional study using a mailed survey. Family health teams in Ontario. Twenty-one of 144 consecutively approached FHTs; 628 team members were surveyed. Scores on the team climate inventory, which assessed organizational culture type (group, developmental, rational, or hierarchical); leadership perceptions; and organizational factors, such as use of electronic medical records (EMRs), team composition, governance of the FHT, location, meetings, and time since FHT initiation. All analyses were adjusted for clustering of respondents within the FHT using a mixed random-intercepts model. The response rate was 65.8% (413 of 628); 2 were excluded from analysis, for a total of 411 participants. At the time of survey completion, there was a median of 4 physicians, 11 other health professionals, and 4 management and clerical staff per FHT. The average team climate score was 3.8 out of a possible 5. In multivariable regression analysis, leadership score, group and developmental culture types, and use of more EMR capabilities were associated with higher team climate scores. Other organizational factors, such as number of sites and size of group, were not associated with the team climate score. Culture, leadership, and EMR functionality, rather than organizational composition of the teams (eg, number of professionals on staff, practice size), were the most important factors in predicting climate in primary care teams.

  11. Trauma team activation: Not just for trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phoenix Vuong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialized trauma teams have been shown to improve outcomes in critically injured patients. At our institution, an the American College of Surgeons Committee on trauma level I Trauma center, the trauma team activation (TTA criteria includes both physiologic and anatomic criteria, but any attending physician can activate the trauma team at their discretion outside criteria. As a result, the trauma team has been activated for noninjured patients meeting physiologic criteria secondary to nontraumatic hemorrhage. We present two cases in which the trauma team was activated for noninjured patients in hemorrhagic shock. The utilization of the TTA protocol and subsequent management by the trauma team are reviewed as we believe these were critical factors in the successful recovery of both patients. Beyond the primary improved survival outcomes of severely injured patients, trauma center designation has a “halo effect” that encompasses patients with nontraumatic hemorrhage.

  12. Teams make it work: how team work engagement mediates between social resources and performance in teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Pedro; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2012-02-01

    In this study we analyze the mediating role of team work engagement between team social resources (i.e., supportive team climate, coordination, teamwork), and team performance (i.e., in-role and extra-role performance) as predicted by the Job Demands-Resources Model. Aggregated data of 533 employees nested within 62 teams and 13 organizations were used, whereas team performance was assessed by supervisor ratings. Structural equation modeling revealed that, as expected, team work engagement plays a mediating role between social resources perceived at the team level and team performance as assessed by the supervisor.

  13. How to Collaborate through Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conderman, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Teachers are spending more of their time and making more decisions within teams. Effective teacher-based teams provide academic and behavioral support for students as well as professional development for teachers. Learn how the best teams function.

  14. Afghanistan Provincial Reconstruction Team Handbook: Observations, Insights, and Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    tobacco, sugar extracts, and cotton being the major products. The sector of small industries specializes in honey, dried sugar, karakul skin, confection ... confection , Karakul skins, and dried sugar being their major products. Handicrafts, on the other hand, are produced in all districts with rugs, jewelry...well developed; silk, confection , and sugar candy are the chief products. In the area of handicrafts, carpets and rugs are the most prominent. On

  15. Iraq Provincial Reconstruction Team Handbook: Observations, Insights, and Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    beef and lamb feedlots, five forage sites, two packing sheds, six feed mills, an olive factory, 10 strawberry farms, 20 farmer associations, over 500...comparison to the world: 144 Male: 68.6 years Female: 71.34 years (2009 estimate) Total fertility rate: 3.86 children born/woman (2009 estimate) Country

  16. Provincial Reconstruction Teams: How Do We Know They Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Kashmir, and speaks Urdu, Pakistan’s national language . Dr. Meyerle holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Virginia. vii...the Semiotics of Power,” Philip Khoury and Joseph Kostiner, eds., Tribes and State Formation in the Middle East, Berkeley: University of California

  17. The Search for Stability: Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-07

    force protection. Mine removal will allow civilian freedom of movement, and therefore help galvanise the local economy. Equally, demining...involving the US is clear and unambiguous Presidential direction. The desired 14 effect would be to focus, direct, galvanise and properly resource the

  18. Provincial Reconstruction Teams: Who’s in Charge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    media.web.britannica.com/ ebsco /pdf/757/44809757.pdf (accessed March 29, 2011). 29 even though their work often overlapped,” 103 resembling interagency...Foreign Service Journal 86, no. 9 (September 2009): 28-34. http://media.web.britannica.com/ ebsco /pdf/757/44809757.pdf (accessed March 29, 2011

  19. The issue of virtual teams

    OpenAIRE

    Fleiberková, Šárka

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this diploma thesis is the introduction of teamwork and virtual teams. The theoretical part of this work describes the birth of teamwork, its definition, properties, advantages and disadvantages. Next part of diploma thesis is dedicated to the virtual team. It describes the difference among virtual and traditional team, definition and characteristics of virtual team as well as tools that are used in virtual team. The second, practical, unit is focused on virtual teams at universiti...

  20. The Research of Self-Management Team and Superior-Direction Team in Team Learning Influential Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Team learning is a cure for bureaucracy; it facilitates team innovation and team performance. But team learning occurs only when necessary conditions were met. This research focused on differences of team learning influential factors between self-management team and superior-direction team. Four variables were chosen as predictors of team learning though literature review and pilot interview. The 4 variables are team motivation, team trust, team conflict and team leadership. Selected 54 self ...

  1. Building Trust in High-Performing Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Soudunsaari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Facilitation of growth is more about good, trustworthy contacts than capital. Trust is a driving force for business creation, and to create a global business you need to build a team that is capable of meeting the challenge. Trust is a key factor in team building and a needed enabler for cooperation. In general, trust building is a slow process, but it can be accelerated with open interaction and good communication skills. The fast-growing and ever-changing nature of global business sets demands for cooperation and team building, especially for startup companies. Trust building needs personal knowledge and regular face-to-face interaction, but it also requires empathy, respect, and genuine listening. Trust increases communication, and rich and open communication is essential for the building of high-performing teams. Other building materials are a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, willingness for cooperation, and supporting and encouraging leadership. This study focuses on trust in high-performing teams. It asks whether it is possible to manage trust and which tools and operation models should be used to speed up the building of trust. In this article, preliminary results from the authors’ research are presented to highlight the importance of sharing critical information and having a high level of communication through constant interaction.

  2. Meaning Making during Parent-Physician Bereavement Meetings after a Child’s Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Kathleen L.; Eggly, Susan; Kavanaugh, Karen; Berg, Robert A.; Wessel, David L.; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Harrison, Rick; Dalton, Heidi; Dean, J. Michael; Doctor, Allan; Jenkins, Tammara; Park, Crystal L

    2014-01-01

    Objective Identify and describe types of meaning-making processes that occur among parents during bereavement meetings with their child’s intensive care physician after their child’s death in a pediatric intensive care unit. Methods Fifty-three parents of 35 deceased children participated in a bereavement meeting with their child’s physician 14.5±6.3 weeks after the child’s death. One meeting was conducted per family. Meetings were video recorded and transcribed verbatim. Using a directed content analysis, an interdisciplinary team analyzed the transcripts to identify and describe meaning-making processes that support and extend extant meaning-making theory. Results Four major meaning-making processes were identified: (1) sense making, (2) benefit finding, (3) continuing bonds, and (4) identity reconstruction. Sense making refers to seeking biomedical explanations for the death, revisiting parents' prior decisions and roles, and assigning blame. Benefit finding refers to exploring positive consequences of the death including ways to help others such as giving feedback to the hospital, making donations, participating in research, volunteering, and contributing to new medical knowledge. Continuing bonds refers to parents’ ongoing connection with the deceased child manifested by reminiscing about the child, sharing photographs, and discussing personal rituals, linking objects and community events to honor the child. Identity reconstruction refers to changes in parents' sense of self including changes in relationships, work, home, and leisure. Conclusions Parent-physician bereavement meetings facilitate several types of meaning-making processes among bereaved parents. Further research should evaluate the extent to which meaning making during bereavement meetings affects parents’ health outcomes. PMID:25822059

  3. Meaning making during parent-physician bereavement meetings after a child's death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Kathleen L; Eggly, Susan; Kavanaugh, Karen; Berg, Robert A; Wessel, David L; Newth, Christopher J L; Shanley, Thomas P; Harrison, Rick; Dalton, Heidi; Dean, J Michael; Doctor, Allan; Jenkins, Tammara; Park, Crystal L

    2015-04-01

    Our goal was to identify and describe types of meaning-making processes that occur among parents during bereavement meetings with their child's intensive care physician after their child's death in a pediatric intensive care unit. Fifty-three parents of 35 deceased children participated in a bereavement meeting with their child's physician 14.5 ± 6.3 weeks after the child's death. One meeting was conducted per family. Meetings were video recorded and transcribed verbatim. Using a directed content analysis, an interdisciplinary team analyzed the transcripts to identify and describe meaning-making processes that support and extend extant meaning-making theory. Four major meaning-making processes were identified: (1) sense making, (2) benefit finding, (3) continuing bonds, and (4) identity reconstruction. Sense making refers to seeking biomedical explanations for the death, revisiting parents' prior decisions and roles, and assigning blame. Benefit finding refers to exploring positive consequences of the death, including ways to help others, such as giving feedback to the hospital, making donations, participating in research, volunteering, and contributing to new medical knowledge. Continuing bonds refers to parents' ongoing connection with the deceased child manifested by reminiscing about the child, sharing photographs and discussing personal rituals, linking objects, and community events to honor the child. Identity reconstruction refers to changes in parents' sense of self, including changes in relationships, work, home, and leisure. Parent-physician bereavement meetings facilitate several types of meaning-making processes among bereaved parents. Further research should evaluate the extent to which meaning making during bereavement meetings affects parents' health outcomes. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. A.A., constructivism, and reflecting teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevels, B

    1997-12-01

    Numerous studies and clinical anecdotes reveal a relationship between attendance at A.A. meetings and/or degree of involvement in A.A. and maintenance of sobriety. Hypotheses as to how A.A. and/or the A.A. meeting is helpful to its members have ranged from a focus on factors common to all therapy groups, to aspects of A.A. "treatment" which are behavioral in nature. Presented here is another way of understanding A.A.'s effectiveness within the frame of more recent, constructivistic approaches to family therapy. In particular, the A.A. topic meeting is compared to the reflecting team concept of Tom Anderson.

  5. Reconstructing Normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bradley, Stephen K.; Fristed, Peter Billeskov

    2012-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry is an area of priority for the Danish Government. As the field expands, this calls for increased knowledge about mental health nursing practice, as this is part of the forensic psychiatry treatment offered. However, only sparse research exists in this area. The aim of this study...... was to investigate the characteristics of forensic mental health nursing staff interaction with forensic mental health inpatients and to explore how staff give meaning to these interactions. The project included 32 forensic mental health staff members, with over 307 hours of participant observations, 48 informal...... interviews, and seven semistructured interviews. The findings show that staff interaction is typified by the use of trust and relationship-enabling care, which is characterized by the establishment and maintenance of an informal, trusting relationship through a repeated reconstruction of normality...

  6. Expertise of Team Leaders in Analysing Team Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, Maria; Strasser, Josef; Gruber, Hans; Harteis, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Team leaders are expected to adequately analyse team conflicts. Both content and analytical depth of cognitive processes determine team leaders' performance and are assumed to differ with level of expertise. A study is reported in which team leaders at four different levels of expertise (novices, semi-experts, experts, mediators) were compared in…

  7. Team members' emotional displays as indicators of team functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homan, A.C.; van Kleef, G.A.; Sanchez-Burks, J.

    2016-01-01

    Emotions are inherent to team life, yet it is unclear how observers use team members’ emotional expressions to make sense of team processes. Drawing on Emotions as Social Information theory, we propose that observers use team members’ emotional displays as a source of information to predict the

  8. Resource assessment/commercialization planning meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy and Division of Geothermal Resource Management, sponsored a Resource Assessment/Commercialization Planning meeting in Salt Lake City on January 21-24, 1980. The meeting included presentations by state planning and resource teams from all DOE regions. An estimated 130 people representing federal, state and local agencies, industry and private developers attended.

  9. Creativity and Creative Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the linkage between knowledge, creativity, and design is presented and related to the best practices of multidisciplinary design teams. The discussion related to design and design teams is presented in the context of both the complete aerodynamic design community and specifically the work environment at the NASA Langley Research Center. To explore ways to introduce knowledge and creativity into the research and design environment at NASA Langley Research Center a creative design activity was executed within the context of a national product development activity. The success of the creative design team activity gave rise to a need to communicate the experience in a straightforward and managed approach. As a result the concept of creative potential its formulated and assessed with a survey of a small portion of the aeronautics research staff at NASA Langley Research Center. The final section of the paper provides recommendations for future creative organizations and work environments.

  10. Virtual team collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Ngwenyama, Ojelanki

    2009-01-01

    as the foundation for building shared meaning at three levels. Also we investigate communication breakdowns that can be attributed to differences in lifeworld structures, organizational structures, and work process structures within a virtual team. We find that all communication breakdowns are manifested...... and experienced by the participants at the work process level; however, resolving breakdowns may require critical reflection at other levels. Where previous research argues that face-to-face interaction is an important variable for virtual team performance, our empirical observations reveal that communication......Managing international teams with geographically distributed participants is a complex task. The risk of communication breakdowns increases due to cultural and organizational differences grounded in the geographical distribution of the participants. Such breakdowns indicate general...

  11. Beautiful Teams Inspiring and Cautionary Tales from Veteran Team Leaders

    CERN Document Server

    Stellman, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    What's it like to work on a great software development team facing an impossible problem? How do you build an effective team? Beautiful Teams takes you behind the scenes with some of the most interesting teams in software engineering history. You'll learn from veteran team leaders' successes and failures, told through a series of engaging personal stories -- and interviews -- by leading programmers, architects, project managers, and thought leaders.

  12. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  13. The cohesiveness of sourcing teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Sourcing teams are introduced as an approach to achieving the interdepartmental integration necessary for companies to address the complexity of strategic sourcing. Companies aim at facilitating teams capable of balancing the goals and tasks of the team with departmental expectations; however......, the practical implementation is often unsuccessful leading to poor performance. Originating in PSM literature, factors influencing sourcing team performance are categorised into three: top management support, organisational structures, and those related to team members. In this paper, the concept...... of cohesiveness is introduced as an explanatory factor and, consequently, linkages between team cohesiveness and team performance are proposed....

  14. Transformational Leadership and Team Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Wen Chou

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationships among transformational leadership style, cognitive trust, and collective efficacy as well as the impact of these variables on distal team performance. Data collected from 39 teams find that team cognitive trust as two process variables involves a transformational leadership process in which cognitive trust in the team leader and cognitive trust among team members mediate the impact of this leadership style on collective efficacy. Unlike previous studies, our results show that leveraging cognitive trust in the team leader is necessary but not sufficient for better proximal collective efficacy, which in turn facilitates distal team performance. Although cognitive trust among team members was more closely related to proximal collective efficacy than cognitive trust in the team leader was, the factors that foster the development of cognitive trust among team members remain scantly explored in the transformational leadership literature and deserve more attention in future research.

  15. Reconstructive Urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Fatih Önol

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of urethral stricture, Buccal Mucosa Graft (BMG and reconstruction is applied with different patch techniques. Recently often prefered, this approach is, in bulber urethra strictures of BMG’s; by “ventral onley”, in pendulous urethra because of thinner spingiosis body, which provides support and nutrition of graft; by means of “dorsal inley” being anastomosis. In the research that Cordon et al. did, they compared conventional BMJ “onley” urethroplast and “pseudo-spongioplasty” which base on periurethral vascular tissues to be nourished by closing onto graft. In repairment of front urethras that spongiosis supportive tissue is insufficient, this method is defined as peripheral dartos [çevre dartos?] and buck’s fascia being mobilized and being combined on BMG patch. Between the years 2007 and 2012, assessment of 56 patients with conventional “ventral onley” BMG urethroplast and 46 patients with “pseudo-spongioplasty” were reported to have similar success rates (80% to 84% in 3.5 year follow-up on average. While 74% of the patients that were applied pseudo-spongioplasty had disease present at distal urethra (pendulous, bulbopendulous, 82% of the patients which were applied conventional onley urethroplast had stricture at proximal (bulber urethra yet. Also lenght of the stricture at the pseudo-spongioplasty group was longer in a statistically significant way (5.8 cm to 4.7 cm on average, p=0.028. This study which Cordon et al. did, shows that conditions in which conventional sponjiyoplasti is not possible, periurethral vascular tissues are adequate to nourish BMG. Even it is an important technique in terms of bringing a new point of view to today’s practice, data especially about complications that may show up after pseudo-spongioplasty usage on long distal strictures (e.g. appearance of urethral diverticulum is not reported. Along with this we think that, providing an oppurtinity to patch directly

  16. LEADING EFFECTIVE MEETINGS IN A HOSPITALITY ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Ivanovic

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Today’s business environment demands of the individual manager to lead effective meetings. This is a skill which has to be studied and to be used and constantly optimized in order to keep the team focused on the goals that were set. Meetings keep track of a teams and the organizations goals that are being met or not being met. The specific focus of a certain meeting depends on what on what is to be achieved, whether that be setting goals or keeping evidence of what is being done, and to do this one needs the proper information tolead it correctly and efficiently.

  17. The Czech Provincial Reconstruction Team: Civil-Military Teaming in Logar Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    development are closely connected in building government capacity, infrastructure, and security with an emphasis on the diversification of actors...agricultural livelihood of the population. After the completion of these projects, people no longer had to go to their local springs for water as they had

  18. 2013 Building America Research Planning Meeting Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, C. E.; Hunt, S.

    2014-02-01

    The Building America (BA) Research Planning Meeting was held October 28-30, 2013, in Washington, DC. This meeting provides one opportunity each year for the research teams, national laboratories and Department of Energy (DOE) managers to meet in person to share the most pertinent information and collaboration updates. This report documents the presentations, highlights key program updates, and outlines next steps for the program.

  19. GUEST EDITORIAL TEAM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gratitude goes to the guest editorial team, for their tireless efforts and commitment shown throughout the compilation of this issue of the Journal. I also wish to recognize the immense contributions made by Professor. Bellington Vwalika, Specialty Editor (Obstetrics &. Gynaecology/ Epidemiology) and this issue's sponsoring.

  20. Team Collaboration Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Schrock, Mitchell; Baldwin, John R.; Borden, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The Ground Resource Allocation and Planning Environment (GRAPE 1.0) is a Web-based, collaborative team environment based on the Microsoft SharePoint platform, which provides Deep Space Network (DSN) resource planners tools and services for sharing information and performing analysis.

  1. Facilitating leadership team communication

    OpenAIRE

    Hedman, Eerika

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand and describe how to facilitate competent communication in leadership teamwork. Grounded in the premises of social constructionism and informed by such theoretical frameworks as coordinated management of meaning theory (CMM), dialogic organization development (OD), systemic-constructionist leadership, communication competence, and reflexivity, this study seeks to produce further insights into understanding leadership team communicati...

  2. Web Team Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jennifer; Felker, Kyle

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic world of the Web has provided libraries with a wealth of opportunities, including new approaches to the provision of information and varied internal staffing structures. The development of self-managed Web teams, endowed with authority and resources, can create an adaptable and responsive culture within libraries. This new working team…

  3. Heterogeneity and Work Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyaram, Lata; Kamalanabhan, T. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempts to extend and contribute to the domestic diversity literature by presenting a comprehensive model that takes into consideration the Indian work set up. It proposes to examine the effects of the composition of information systems development teams in Indian firms. Besides the conventional demographics which were studied…

  4. [Medical emergency teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, G.; Lund, C.; Petersen, John Asger

    2008-01-01

    The aim of medical emergency teams (MET) is to identify and treat deteriorating patients on general wards, and to avoid cardiac arrest, unplanned intensive care unit admission and death. The effectiveness of METs has yet to be proven, as the only two randomised, controlled trials on the subject...

  5. AA magnet measurement team

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    Quickly improvised measurement equipment for the AA (Antiproton Accumulator) was all the tight schedule permitted, but the high motivation of the team made up for the lack of convenience. From left to right: Roy Billinge (Joint AA Project Leader, the other one was Simon van der Meer); Bruno Autin, Brian Pincott, Colin Johnson.

  6. Materials Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-08-01

    Roadmap identifying the efforts of the Materials Technical Team (MTT) to focus primarily on reducing the mass of structural systems such as the body and chassis in light-duty vehicles (including passenger cars and light trucks) which enables improved vehicle efficiency regardless of the vehicle size or propulsion system employed.

  7. The CHIK Team

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. The CHIK Team. Arankalle VA, Mishra AC. Tandale BV Clinical. Yergolkar P, Sudeep Balan Virus Isolations. Cherian S, Walimbe A Bioinformatics. Sathe PS, Supriya Serology. Swati, Shubham, Supriya Sequence analysis. Tripathy AS Immunological. Parashar D ...

  8. The Adaptability of Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Boer, Harry

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, data from a longitudinal case study in an organization attempting to adapt its internal work processes to changes in its external context are presented, analyzed and discussed. Specifically, functionally structured work teams in one department of a Danish production facility were...

  9. Aircrew team management program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margerison, Charles; Mccann, Dick; Davies, Rod

    1987-01-01

    The key features of the Aircrew Team Management Workshop which was designed for and in consultation with Trans Australia Airlines are outlined. Five major sections are presented dealing with: (1) A profile of the airline and the designers; (2) Aircrew consultation and involvement; (3) Educational design and development; (4) Implementation and instruction; and (5) Evaluation and assessment. These areas are detailed.

  10. Survey team on

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Mogens Allan; Bruder, Regina; Planas, Núria

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of the work of the ICME 13 Survey Team on ‘Conceptualisation and the role of competencies, knowing and knowledge in mathematics education research’. It surveys a variety of historical and contemporary views and conceptualisations of what it means to master...

  11. Effects of team emotional authenticity on virtual team performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Connelly

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Members of virtual teams lack many of the visual or auditory cues that are usually used as the basis for impressions about fellow team members. We focus on the effects of the impressions formed in this context, and use social exchange theory to understand how these impressions affect team performance. Our pilot study, using content analysis (n = 191 students, suggested that most individuals believe that they can assess others’ emotional authenticity in online settings by focusing on the content and tone of the messages. Our quantitative study examined the effects of these assessments. Structural equation modeling (SEM analysis (n = 81 student teams suggested that team-level trust and teamwork behaviors mediate the relationship between team emotional authenticity and team performance, and illuminate the importance of team emotional authenticity for team processes and outcomes.

  12. A Project Team: a Team or Just a Group?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with issues related to work in either teams or groups. The theoretical part discusses a team and a group with regards to its definition, classification and basic distinction, brings in more on the typology of team roles, personality assessment and sociometric methods. The analytical part tests the project (work team of a medical center represented in terms of personality and motivational types, team roles and interpersonal team relations concerning the willingness of cooperation and communication. The main objective of this work is to verify the validity of the assumptions that the analyzed team represents a very disparate group as for its composition from the perspective of personality types, types of motivation, team roles and interpersonal relations in terms of the willingness of cooperation and communication. A separate output shall focus on sociometric investigation of those team members where willingness to work together and communicate is based on the authors’ assumption of tight interdependence.

  13. Employee Knowledge Sharing in Work Teams: Effects of Team Diversity, Emergent States, and Team Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jae Hang

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge sharing in work teams is one of the critical team processes. Without sharing of knowledge, work teams and organizations may not be able to fully utilize the diverse knowledge brought into work teams by their members. The purpose of this study was to investigate antecedents and underlying mechanisms influencing the extent to which team…

  14. Putting the "Team" in the Fine Arts Team: An Application of Business Management Team Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses current challenges to the idea of teamwork in fine arts teams, redefines the terms team and collaboration using a business management perspective, discusses the success of effective teams in the business world and the characteristics of those teams, and proposes the implementation of the business model of…

  15. Collaboration and team science: from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, L Michelle; Gadlin, Howard

    2012-06-01

    Interdisciplinary efforts are becoming more critical for scientific discovery and translational research efforts. Highly integrated and interactive research teams share a number of features that contribute to their success in developing and sustaining their efforts over time. Through analysis of in-depth interviews with members of highly successful research teams and others who did not meet their goals or ended because of conflicts, we identified key elements that are critical for team success and effectiveness. There is no debate that the scientific goal sits at the center of the collaborative effort. However, supporting features need to be in place to avoid the derailment of the team. Among the most important of these is trust: without trust, the team dynamic runs the risk of deteriorating over time. Other critical factors of which both leaders and participants need to be aware include developing a shared vision, strategically identifying team members and purposefully building the team, promoting disagreement while containing conflict, and setting clear expectations for sharing credit and authorship. Self-awareness and strong communication skills contribute greatly to effective leadership and management strategies of scientific teams. While all successful teams share the characteristic of effectively carrying out these activities, there is no single formula for execution with every leader exemplifying different strengths and weaknesses. Successful scientific collaborations have strong leaders who are self-aware and are mindful of the many elements critical for supporting the science at the center of the effort.

  16. Team Mentoring for Interdisciplinary Team Science: Lessons From K12 Scholars and Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Geller, Stacie; Regensteiner, Judith G; Raymond, Nancy; Nagel, Joan

    2017-02-01

    Mentoring is critical for academic success. As science transitions to a team science model, team mentoring may have advantages. The goal of this study was to understand the process, benefits, and challenges of team mentoring relating to career development and research. A national survey was conducted of Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) program directors-current and former scholars from 27 active National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded BIRCWH NIH K12 programs-to characterize and understand the value and challenges of the team approach to mentoring. Quantitative data were analyzed descriptively, and qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Responses were received from 25/27 (93%) program directors, 78/108 (72%) current scholars, and 91/162 (56%) former scholars. Scholars reported that team mentoring was beneficial to their career development (152/169; 90%) and research (148/169; 88%). Reported advantages included a diversity of opinions, expanded networking, development of stronger study designs, and modeling of different career paths. Challenges included scheduling and managing conflicting opinions. Advice by directors offered to junior faculty entering team mentoring included the following: not to be intimidated by senior mentors, be willing to navigate conflicting advice, be proactive about scheduling and guiding discussions, have an open mind to different approaches, be explicit about expectations and mentors' roles (including importance of having a primary mentor to help navigate discussions), and meet in person as a team. These findings suggest that interdisciplinary/interprofessional team mentoring has many important advantages, but that skills are required to optimally utilize multiple perspectives.

  17. Experience as Knowledge in a New Product Development Team: Implications for Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to better understand how New Product Development (NPD) team members apply their experiences to meet the task needs of their project. Although "experience" is highly valued in team members, little research has looked specifically at experiences as a type of knowledge, and how this knowledge is used in work settings. This research evaluated nearly 200 instances where team members referenced past experiences during team meetings. During these experience exchanges, team members structured the sharing of their experiences to include three common elements: the source of the experience, the nature of the experience, and the degree of relevance to the current work of the team. The experiences fell into four categories: people (relationships), process, product, and politics. This paper describes how team members structured, applied, and integrated their individual experiences and presents the resulting implications for knowledge management systems that wish to exploit experience knowledge.

  18. Sounds like Team Spirit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always

  19. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances. We ensured exogenous...... increases and then decreases with ability dispersion. We seek to understand this finding by developing a model in which team members of different ability levels form sub-teams with other team members with similar ability levels to specialize in different productive tasks. Diversity spreads production over...

  20. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances for one year. We ensured...... increases and then decreases with ability dispersion. We seek to understand this finding by developing a model in which team members of different ability levels form sub-teams with other team members with similar ability levels to specialize in different productive tasks. Diversity spreads production over...

  1. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 (student) teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances for one year. We...... increases and then decreases with ability dispersion. We seek to understand this finding by developing a model in which team members of different ability levels form sub- teams with other team members with similar ability levels to specialize in different productive tasks. Diversity spreads production over...

  2. Team Leader System description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, B.J.; Lundeen, T.F.; Moon, B.D.

    1996-10-01

    Purpose of the project is to design, develop, and demonstrate an advanced, prototype computer system to support on-site inspections. The system is a highly portable field computer with on-line access to facilities information, real-time communications, positioning information, and an electronic notebook for data capture. The Team Leader System provides an inspection team with a suite of advanced communication, data gathering, and data analysis tools and can be implemented on many PC-based hardware platforms. The suitcase unit is a transportable system for on-site support in a vehicle or at a stationary location at an inspection site; the personal unit is a wearable computer for in-facility or on-foot inspections.

  3. Professional Team Sports Clubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Rasmus K.

    Professional football in Europe is characterized by persistent deficits, growing debts and additional financial problems among the majority of the top league clubs. Despite these problems, these clubs have an abnormally high survival rate. This paper focuses on this apparent paradox and poses the...... in Europe, this paper argues that professional team sports clubs (PTSCs) are cases of an economic phenomenon normally found in socialist or post-socialist economies....

  4. Automated Cyber Red Teaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Technology Organisation DSTO-TN-1420 ABSTRACT Cyber Red Teaming (CRT) is an important exercise to conduct for Defence agencies built on large...and Electronic Warfare Division DSTO Defence Science and Technology Organisation PO Box 1500 Edinburgh South Australia 5111 Australia...referred to as the World Model [4] [5]. This naming captures the idea that cyber systems are large, complex digital ecosystems with many intelligent

  5. Transformational Leadership and Team Innovation : Integrating Team Climate Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenbeiss, Silke Astrid; Boerner, Sabine; Knippenberg, Daan

    2008-01-01

    Fostering team innovation is increasingly an important leadership function. However, the empirical evidence for the role of transformational leadership in engendering team innovation is scarce and mixed. To address this issue, the authors link transformational leadership theory to principles of M. A. West s (1990) team climate theory and propose an integrated model for the relationship between transformational leadership and team innovation. This model involves support for innovation as a med...

  6. Mechanisms for communicating within primary health care teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Judith Belle; Lewis, Laura; Ellis, Kathy; Stewart, Moira; Freeman, Thomas R.; Kasperski, M. Janet

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore the types of communication used within primary health care teams (PHCTs), with a particular focus on the mechanisms teams use to promote optimal clinical and administrative information sharing. DESIGN A descriptive qualitative study. SETTING Primary health care teams in Ontario between August 2004 and October 2005. PARTICIPANTS Purposive sampling was used to recruit 121 members from 16 PHCTs reflecting a range of health care professionals, including family physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, pharmacists, dietitians, social workers, office managers, health promoters, and receptionists. METHODS Individual in-depth interviews were conducted. An iterative analysis process was used to examine the verbatim transcripts created from the interviews. Techniques of immersion and crystallization were used in the analysis. MAIN FINDINGS Analysis of the data revealed that communication occurs through formal and informal means. Formal communication included regular team meetings with agendas and meeting minutes, memorandums, computer-assisted communication, and communication logs. Informal communication methods were open and opportunistic, reflecting the traditional hallway consultation. For patient care issues, face-to-face communication was preferred. Team member attributes facilitating communication included approachability, availability, and proximity. Finally, funding issues could be an impediment to optimal communication. CONCLUSION Primary health care is experiencing demands for enhanced and efficient communication that optimizes team functioning and patient care. This study describes formal and informal mechanisms of communication currently used by PHCTs. Attributes that facilitate team communication, such as approachability, availability, and proximity of team members, were highlighted. New funding arrangements might alleviate concerns about remuneration for attendance at meetings. PMID:20008604

  7. Understanding medical practice team roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Do you believe that the roles your employees play on your medical practice team are identical to their job titles or job descriptions? Do you believe that team roles are determined by personality type? This article suggests that a more effective way to build and manage your medical practice team is to define team roles through employee behaviors. It provides 10 rules of behavioral team roles that can help practice managers to select and build high-performing teams, build more productive team relationships, improve the employee recruitment process, build greater team trust and understanding; and increase their own effectiveness. This article describes in detail Belbin's highly regarded and widely used team role theory and summarizes four additional behavioral team role theories and systems. It offers lessons learned when applying team role theory to practice. Finally, this article offers an easy-to-implement method for assessing current team roles. It provides a simple four-question checklist that will help practice managers balance an imbalanced medical practice team.

  8. Collocation Impact on Team Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eccles

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The collocation of software development teams is common, specially in agile software development environments. However little is known about the impact of collocation on the team’s effectiveness. This paper explores the impact of collocating agile software development teams on a number of team effectiveness factors. The study focused on South African software development teams and gathered data through the use of questionnaires and interviews. The key finding was that collocation has a positive impact on a number of team effectiveness factors which can be categorised under team composition, team support, team management and structure and team communication. Some of the negative impact collocation had on team effectiveness relate to the fact that team members perceived that less emphasis was placed on roles, that morale of the group was influenced by individuals, and that collocation was invasive, reduced level of privacy and increased frequency of interruptions. Overall through it is proposed that companies should consider collocating their agile software development teams, as collocation might leverage overall team effectiveness.

  9. Logic Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Tugué, Tosiyuki; Slaman, Theodore

    1989-01-01

    These proceedings include the papers presented at the logic meeting held at the Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto University, in the summer of 1987. The meeting mainly covered the current research in various areas of mathematical logic and its applications in Japan. Several lectures were also presented by logicians from other countries, who visited Japan in the summer of 1987.

  10. Using artificial team members for team training in virtual environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diggelen, J. van; Muller, T.; Bosch, K. van den

    2010-01-01

    In a good team, members do not only perform their individual task, they also coordinate their actions with other members of the team. Developing such team skills usually involves exercises with all members playing their role. This approach is costly and has organizational and educational drawbacks.

  11. The Team Boat Exercise: Enhancing Team Communication Midsemester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Pamela L.; Friedman, Barry A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the Team Boat Exercise, which was developed to provide students with a mechanism for addressing team problems and enhancing team communication midsemester. The inspiration for the exercise came from a video by Prentice Hall, Inc. (2001). Part III of the video, entitled "Corporate Coaching," shows senior staff members from the…

  12. Cohesion in Online Student Teams versus Traditional Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have found that the electronic methods in use for online team communication today increase communication quality in project-based work situations. Because communication quality is known to influence group cohesion, the present research examined whether online student project teams are more cohesive than traditional teams. We tested…

  13. Engaging in Collaboration: A Team of Teams Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Carol; Hill, Rachel; Morris, Greg; Woods, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Adapting a Team of Teams model to a school environment provides a framework for a collaborative team culture based on trust, common vision, purposeful conversations, and interconnectivity. School leaders facilitate collaboration by modeling teamwork, as well as transparency and adaptability, to create a positive school culture and thereby improve…

  14. Team Machine: A Decision Support System for Team Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergey, Paul; King, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the cross-disciplinary research that resulted in a decision-support tool, Team Machine (TM), which was designed to create maximally diverse student teams. TM was used at a large United States university between 2004 and 2012, and resulted in significant improvement in the performance of student teams, superior overall balance…

  15. Learning and performance in multidisciplinary teams : The importance of collective team identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, Gerben S.; Bunderson, J. Stuart

    2005-01-01

    In multidisciplinary teams in the oil and gas industry, we examined expertise diversity's relationship with team learning and team performance under varying levels of collective team identification. In teams with low collective identification, expertise diversity was negatively related to team

  16. Communication skills to develop trusting relationships on global virtual engineering capstone teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Holt; Davies, Randall S.

    2013-05-01

    As universities seek to provide cost-effective, cross-cultural experiences using global virtual (GV) teams, the 'soft' communication skills typical of all teams, increases in importance for GV teams. Students need to be taught how to navigate through cultural issues and virtual tool issues to build strong trusting relationships with distant team members. Weekly team meetings provide an excellent opportunity to observe key team interactions that facilitate relationship and trust-building among team members. This study observed the weekly team meetings of engineering students attending two US universities and one Asian university as they collaborated as a single GV capstone GV team. In addition local team members were interviewed individually and collectively throughout the project to determine strategies that facilitated team relations and trust. Findings indicate the importance of student choice of virtual communication tools, the refining of communication practices, and specific actions to build trusting relationships. As student developed these attributes, collaboration and success was experienced on this GV team.

  17. Cultural Diversity and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Van Praag, Mirjam

    similar circumstances. We vary the cultural composition of otherwise randomly composed teams in a multi-cultural student population. Our data indicate that a moderate level of cultural diversity has no effect on team performance in terms of business outcomes (sales, profits and profits per share). However......One of the most salient and relevant dimensions of team heterogeneity is cultural background. We measure the impact of cultural diversity on the performance of business teams using a field experiment. Companies are set up by teams of undergraduate students in business studies in realistic though......, if at least the majority of team members is culturally diverse then more cultural diversity seems to affect the performance of teams positively. Our data suggest that this might be related to the more diverse pool of relevant knowledge facilitating (mutual) learning within culturally diverse teams....

  18. Diverse Teams Drive Leadership Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Lotte; Hjortlund Andersen, Lotte

    New research from ISS Denmark shows that leading diverse teams strengthens leaders’ competencies within communication, relationship building and talent development and ensures inclusion. This has a reinforcing effect as the better the leadership, the better the heterogeneous team will function....

  19. Training a Bicultural Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Bernice

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the unique training problems of Witan Associates Limited, a company with Japanese and American employees. Their three-part training program is described: (1) contact with the training company, (2) two-day classroom seminar for all staff, and (3) corporate and departmental meetings. Results of the program are discussed. (CT)

  20. Interdisciplinary Team Care and Hospice Team Provider Visit Patterns during the Last Week of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Clayton, Margaret F; Reblin, Maija; Cloyes, Kristin; Beck, Anna C; Harrold, Joan K; Harris, Pamela; Casarett, David

    2016-05-01

    Hospice provides intensive end-of-life care to patients and their families delivered by an interdisciplinary team of nurses, aides, chaplains, social workers, and physicians. Significant gaps remain about how team members respond to diverse needs of patients and families, especially in the last week of life. The study objective was to describe the frequency of hospice team provider visits in the last week of life, to examine changes in frequency over time, and to identify patient characteristics that were associated with an increase in visit frequency. This was a retrospective cohort study using electronic medical record data. From U.S. not-for-profit hospices, 92,250 records were used of patients who died at home or in a nursing home, with a length of stay of at least seven days. Data included basic demographic variables, diagnoses, clinical markers of illness severity, patient functioning, and number of hospice team member visits in the last seven days of life. On average the total number of hospice team member visits in the last week of life was 1.36 visits/day. Most were nurse visits, followed by aides, social workers, and chaplains. Visits increased over each day on average across the last week of life. Greater increase in visits was associated with patients who were younger, male, Caucasian, had a spouse caregiver, and shorter lengths of stay. This study provides important information to help hospices align the interdisciplinary team configuration with the timing of team member visits, to better meet the needs of the patients and families they serve.

  1. The Role Of The Multidisciplinary Team Meeting in An Antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of adherence in the management of patients on combination antiretroviral therapy has been well documented.1-6 However, for sustainability of the overall programme adequate patient 'tracking' is required in order to understand where the programme may be failing.

  2. Creating and supporting a mixed methods health services research team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Barbara; Cohen, Lauren W; Elliot, Amy E; Grabowski, David C; Fishman, Nancy W; Sharkey, Siobhan S; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Horn, Susan D; Kemper, Peter

    2013-12-01

    To use the experience from a health services research evaluation to provide guidance in team development for mixed methods research. The Research Initiative Valuing Eldercare (THRIVE) team was organized by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to evaluate The Green House nursing home culture change program. This article describes the development of the research team and provides insights into how funders might engage with mixed methods research teams to maximize the value of the team. Like many mixed methods collaborations, the THRIVE team consisted of researchers from diverse disciplines, embracing diverse methodologies, and operating under a framework of nonhierarchical, shared leadership that required new collaborations, engagement, and commitment in the context of finite resources. Strategies to overcome these potential obstacles and achieve success included implementation of a Coordinating Center, dedicated time for planning and collaborating across researchers and methodologies, funded support for in-person meetings, and creative optimization of resources. Challenges are inevitably present in the formation and operation of effective mixed methods research teams. However, funders and research teams can implement strategies to promote success. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Operating Room Team Training with Simulation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jamie M; Dias, Roger D; Yule, Steven; Smink, Douglas S

    2017-05-01

    Nontechnical skills (NTS) such as teamwork and communication play an important role in preventing adverse outcomes in the operating room (OR). Simulation-based OR team training focused on these skills provides an environment where team members can learn with and from one another. We sought to conduct a systematic review to identify simulation-based approaches to NTS training for surgical teams. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed, ERIC, and the Cochrane Database using keywords and MeSH terms for studies describing simulation-based training for OR teams, including members from surgery, anesthesia, and nursing in September 2016. Information on the simulations, participants, and NTS assessments were abstracted from the articles meeting our search criteria. We identified 10 published articles describing simulation-based OR team-training programs focused on NTS. The primary focus of these programs was on communication, teamwork, leadership, and situation awareness. Only four of the programs used a validated instrument to assess the NTS of the individuals or teams participating in the simulations. Simulation-based OR team-training programs provide opportunities for NTS development and reflection by participants. Future programs could benefit from involving the full range of disciplines and professions that compose an OR team, as well as increased use of validated assessment instruments.

  4. The home care team approach to self-neglecting elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Ellen W; Sonstegard-Gamm, Janel

    2006-04-01

    Elderly patients who neglect their own health present special challenges. This article describes techniques for establishing rapport, understanding the patient's world, using a team approach to care, and achieving closure. At each step the clinician must find a balance between respecting the elder's rights and meeting his or her healthcare needs.

  5. Developing a Preference for Collaboration Using Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Karl L.; Berry, Robert; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Poonam; Scott, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Increased accountability in education has brought renewed emphasis on the assurance of learning, making certain that students meet specified learning objectives. Additional research has focused on ways individuals learn. Building upon research on learning styles, active learning, and team-based learning (TBL), this study assesses the impact of TBL…

  6. Macrocognition in Teams - Macrocognition in Collaboration and Knowledge Interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    tracing, automated latent semantic analysis, automated communication flow analysis, and dynamic modeling of communication data MACROCOGNITION IN...Team revises solution option if option does not meet goal. • Cognitive maps • Discourse analysis • Think aloud • Latent Semantic Analysis

  7. Multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach to management of malignant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multidisciplinary Team meetings (MDTs) in cancer management emphasize collaborative decision making and treatment planning among core members of the specialties relevant to an index case, who come together to share their knowledge and make recommendations for an 'all-inclusive' patient ...

  8. What Is the Half-Life of Basketball Teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrepic, Zdeslav

    2013-01-01

    What do basketball teams have in common with radioactive nuclei? It turns out, there is more here than first meets the eye. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball tournaments feeds fans' craving when NBA competitions are not in swing, and the college tournament time has been referred to as "March Madness" or…

  9. Extended Teams in Vocational Education: Collaboration on the Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazereeuw, Marco; Wopereis, Iwan; McKenney, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Extended Teams (ETs), in which teachers and workplace supervisors are jointly responsible for the quality of education, were established to solve problems concerning school-workplace connections in vocational and professional education. Six ETs were investigated during their 1st year of collaboration. In addition to recordings of ET meetings,…

  10. Entrepreneurial team cognition: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, E.; Khapova, S.N.; Elfring, T.

    2015-01-01

    Entrepreneurial team scholars highlight the importance of studying entrepreneurial team cognition in gaining a better understanding of why some entrepreneurial teams are capable of developing teamwork leading to successful entrepreneurial outcomes while others are not. However, in the absence of a

  11. Team Building through Physical Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Sandra L.

    The enhancement of positive self-concept has been identified as a key benefit of participation in team-building programs. This paper reviews research on the impact of team-building activities that include demanding physical challenges on the self-concept of physical education students. Team Building through Physical Challenges (TBPC) is a program…

  12. Team Based Engineering Design Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to explore design thinking among teams of high school students. This objective was encompassed in the research question driving the inquiry: How do teams of high school students allocate time across stages of design? Design thinking on the professional level typically occurs in a team environment. Many…

  13. Team perfectionism and team performance: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew P; Stoeber, Joachim; Brown, Anna; Appleton, Paul R

    2014-06-01

    Perfectionism is a personality characteristic that has been found to predict sports performance in athletes. To date, however, research has exclusively examined this relationship at an individual level (i.e., athletes' perfectionism predicting their personal performance). The current study extends this research to team sports by examining whether, when manifested at the team level, perfectionism predicts team performance. A sample of 231 competitive rowers from 36 boats completed measures of self-oriented, team-oriented, and team-prescribed perfectionism before competing against one another in a 4-day rowing competition. Strong within-boat similarities in the levels of team members' team-oriented perfectionism supported the existence of collective team-oriented perfectionism at the boat level. Two-level latent growth curve modeling of day-by-day boat performance showed that team-oriented perfectionism positively predicted the position of the boat in midcompetition and the linear improvement in position. The findings suggest that imposing perfectionistic standards on team members may drive teams to greater levels of performance.

  14. A Project Team: A Team or Just a Group?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Hrazdilova Bockova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with issues related to work in either teams or groups. The theoretical part which discusses a team and a group with regards to its definition, classification and basic distinction brings in more on the typology of team roles, personality assessment and sociometric methods. The analytical part tests the project (work team of a medical center represented in terms of personality and motivational types, team roles and interpersonal team relations concerning the willingness of cooperation and communication. The main objective of this work was to determine whether the existing team is not by its nature rather a working group that contributes to the generally perceived stagnation of that field.

  15. Neuromagnetic source reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, P.S.; Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In neuromagnetic source reconstruction, a functional map of neural activity is constructed from noninvasive magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements. The overall reconstruction problem is under-determined, so some form of source modeling must be applied. We review the two main classes of reconstruction techniques-parametric current dipole models and nonparametric distributed source reconstructions. Current dipole reconstructions use a physically plausible source model, but are limited to cases in which the neural currents are expected to be highly sparse and localized. Distributed source reconstructions can be applied to a wider variety of cases, but must incorporate an implicit source, model in order to arrive at a single reconstruction. We examine distributed source reconstruction in a Bayesian framework to highlight the implicit nonphysical Gaussian assumptions of minimum norm based reconstruction algorithms. We conclude with a brief discussion of alternative non-Gaussian approachs.

  16. Geospatial Information Response Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Emitt C.

    2010-01-01

    Extreme emergency events of national significance that include manmade and natural disasters seem to have become more frequent during the past two decades. The Nation is becoming more resilient to these emergencies through better preparedness, reduced duplication, and establishing better communications so every response and recovery effort saves lives and mitigates the long-term social and economic impacts on the Nation. The National Response Framework (NRF) (http://www.fema.gov/NRF) was developed to provide the guiding principles that enable all response partners to prepare for and provide a unified national response to disasters and emergencies. The NRF provides five key principles for better preparation, coordination, and response: 1) engaged partnerships, 2) a tiered response, 3) scalable, flexible, and adaptable operations, 4) unity of effort, and 5) readiness to act. The NRF also describes how communities, tribes, States, Federal Government, privatesector, and non-governmental partners apply these principles for a coordinated, effective national response. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has adopted the NRF doctrine by establishing several earth-sciences, discipline-level teams to ensure that USGS science, data, and individual expertise are readily available during emergencies. The Geospatial Information Response Team (GIRT) is one of these teams. The USGS established the GIRT to facilitate the effective collection, storage, and dissemination of geospatial data information and products during an emergency. The GIRT ensures that timely geospatial data are available for use by emergency responders, land and resource managers, and for scientific analysis. In an emergency and response capacity, the GIRT is responsible for establishing procedures for geospatial data acquisition, processing, and archiving; discovery, access, and delivery of data; anticipating geospatial needs; and providing coordinated products and services utilizing the USGS' exceptional pool of

  17. Targeted On-Demand Team Performance App Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    epistemology of interdisciplinary inquiry. Journal of Aesthetic Education, 10, 29-43. 12. Petrioni, P. (1994). Interprofessional teamwork. In A...Urgent Emergent Care Teams, Emergency Medicine Teams, Impactful Team Factors, Team Training, Team Optimization, Team Performance Improvement, Emergency...Urgent Emergent Care Teams, Emergency Medicine Teams, Urgent Care Teams, Impactful Team Factors, Team Training, Team Optimization, Team Performance

  18. A Common Criteria-Based Team Project for High Assurance Secure Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irvine, Cynthia E

    2005-01-01

    .... To complement a course in secure systems that focuses on foundational principles of constructive security, a laboratory project that requires students to work in teams while meeting Common Criteria...

  19. Team player styles, team design variables and team work effectiveness in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan El-Kot, Ghada Awed

    2001-01-01

    The literature has revealed few studies of management in Arab countries in general and particularly in Egypt. Many Egyptian organisations implemented the team concept a number of years ago, however, there do not appear to be any studies investicitaýt inc",D team work effectiveness in Egypt. The literature review and the findings of a pilot study emphasised the need for empirical research in team work in Egypt. Team effectiveness models are examined in order to identify the fact...

  20. Professional Team Foundation Server 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Blankenship, Ed; Holliday, Grant; Keller, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Authoritative guide to TFS 2010 from a dream team of Microsoft insiders and MVPs!Microsoft Visual Studio Team Foundation Server (TFS) has evolved until it is now an essential tool for Microsoft?s Application Lifestyle Management suite of productivity tools, enabling collaboration within and among software development teams. By 2011, TFS will replace Microsoft?s leading source control system, VisualSourceSafe, resulting in an even greater demand for information about it. Professional Team Foundation Server 2010, written by an accomplished team of Microsoft insiders and Microsoft MVPs, provides

  1. Commodity team motivation and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Englyst, Linda; Jørgensen, Frances; Johansen, John

    2007-01-01

    In this article, an in-depth single case study is presented in order to explore and discuss the functioning of commodity teams in a global sourcing context. Specifically the study aimed at identifying factors that may influence team members' motivation to participate in activities consistent...... with a commodity team's objective of creating opportunities for synergy and coordination of purchasing. In the teams studied, motivation appeared to be influenced to some degree by a number of factors, including rewards, leadership behaviors, goal setting, and the career goals of the commodity team members...

  2. TEAM GOAL COMMITMENT IN INNOVATIVE PROJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    MARTIN HOEGL; K Praveen Parboteeah

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a relatively neglected but important aspect of team research, namely team goal commitment or the team member's attachment to the team goal. Specifically, we examine whether the performance effect of team goal commitment is contingent on the level of innovativeness of the team task. Furthermore, we also examine five controllable team-level antecedent factors to team goal commitment. Results provide support for the hypothesis that team goal commitment is related to...

  3. Leading Teams of Higher Education Administrators: Integrating Goal Setting, Team Role, and Team Life Cycle Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthuma, Richard; Al-Riyami, Said

    2012-01-01

    Leaders of higher education institutions can create top management teams of academic administrators to guide and improve their organizations. This study illustrates how the leadership of top management teams can be accomplished successfully through a combination of goal setting (Doran, 1981; Locke & Latham, 1990), understanding of team roles…

  4. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Do you have questions about the elections to the Staff Council, 2017 MERIT exercise, EVE and School, LD to IC exercise, CHIS, the Pension Fund… Come get informed and ask your questions at our public meetings. These public meetings are also an opportunity to get the more information on current issues. Benefit from this occasion to get the latest news and to discuss with the representatives of the statutory body that is the Staff Association!

  5. 78 FR 20356 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Astrophysics Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY... Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC... following topics: --Astrophysics Division Update --Report from Astrophysics Roadmap Team --James Webb Space...

  6. Building a rapid response team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Lisa; Garolis, Salomeja; Wallace-Scroggs, Allyson; Stenstrom, Judy; Maunder, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The use of rapid response teams is a relatively new approach for decreasing or eliminating codes in acute care hospitals. Based on the principles of a code team for cardiac and/or respiratory arrest in non-critical care units, the rapid response teams have specially trained nursing, respiratory, and medical personnel to respond to calls from general care units to assess and manage decompensating or rapidly changing patients before their conditions escalate to a full code situation. This article describes the processes used to develop a rapid response team, clinical indicators for triggering a rapid response team call, topics addressed in an educational program for the rapid response team members, and methods for evaluating effectiveness of the rapid response team.

  7. Cheap Talk: “Team Factors and Management Practices Influence on Team Trust”

    OpenAIRE

    Doris Padmini Selvaratnam; Aini Aman; Muhamad Maziz Mahyuddin Bin Kamaludin; Gary Lynn; Richard Reilly

    2016-01-01

    Team trust has been cited as a contributing factor towards team performance. This paper looks at the antecedents of team trust and to what extent they influence team trust. The antecedents of team trust are team factors like team autonomy, team stability and team member experience; and the management practices are top management involvement and management support. The results demonstrated that team factors and management practices influence team trust individually. The key find...

  8. GLOBAL TEAM MANAGEMENT: AN ESSENTIAL COMPONENT OF FIRMS’ INNOVATION STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZİM ÖZTÜRK

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the world marketplace some firms compete successfully and others fail to gain global competitive advantage. Some researchers argue that innovation strategy is the answer to successfully meeting today’s and tomorrow’s global business challenges.  An important aspect of the innovation strategy is managing global teams effectively.  Thus, firms of tomorrow will be characterized by values such as teamwork, innovation, cultural diversity, and a global mindset.  The rapid globalization of business, and increasing competition will continue to drive the need for effective teamwork and/in innovation management.  The purpose of our research is to gain insight into global team management and its role as a major component of innovation strategy.  We discuss the changing and developing functions of teamwork, examine the characteristics of global teams, and finally offer a process to achieve effective global team management.

  9. Assessing Teamwork Skills for Assurance of Learning Using CATME Team Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughry, Misty L.; Ohland, Matthew W.; Woehr, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Colleges of business must meet assurance of learning requirements to gain or maintain AACSB accreditation under the new standards adopted April 8, 2013. Team skills are among the most important skills desired by recruiters, yet employers and scholars perceive that team skills are frequently deficient in college graduates. This article describes…

  10. After Years of Scrutiny, Hundreds of Teams Still Fail to Make the NCAA's Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Libby

    2009-01-01

    Despite years of prodding from officials at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) to bolster athletes' performance in the classroom, nearly 10 percent of all athletics teams in the NCAA's top division failed to meet the association's annual benchmark for academic progress, new data show. Of the 6,300 or so teams in Division I, the…

  11. An Examination of Leadership Types among Generation Y and Its Impact on Virtual Team Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, C. Matt

    2013-01-01

    The majority of database system development projects end in failure. Reasons that include, the system not being developed on time, the system was developed over budget, and the system developed did not meet the planned project's criteria. These failures are compounded by the use of virtual teams which includes problems with team formation, the…

  12. Intelligent Virtual Assistant's Impact on Technical Proficiency within Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Christian; Jones, Nory B.

    2016-01-01

    Information-systems development continues to be a difficult process, particularly for virtual teams that do not have the luxury of meeting face-to-face. The research literature on this topic reinforces this point: the greater part of database systems development projects ends in failure. The use of virtual teams to complete projects further…

  13. Intelligent Virtual Assistant's Impact on Technical Proficiency within Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Christian; Jones, Nory B.

    Information-systems development continues to be a difficult process, particularly for virtual teams that do not have the luxury of meeting face-to-face. The research literature on this topic reinforces this point: the greater part of database systems development projects ends in failure. The use of virtual teams to complete projects further…

  14. ASTER Expedited L1A Reconstructed Unprocessed Instrument Data V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ASTER Expedited L1A Reconstructed Unprocessed Instrument Data is produced with the express purpose of providing the ASTER Science Team members and others, data...

  15. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscle flap; TRAM; Latissimus muscle flap with a breast implant; DIEP flap; DIEAP flap; Gluteal free flap; Transverse upper gracilis flap; TUG; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with natural tissue; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction ...

  16. Head and face reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002980.htm Head and face reconstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Head and face reconstruction is surgery to repair or reshape deformities ...

  17. 99th ACCU meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 March 2013 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002.   1. Chairperson's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda      3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. News from the CERN Management 5. Report on services from GS department      6. Overview on Service Desk and Management status 7. CHIS/UNIQA health insurance issues 8. Users’ Office News 9. CERN Team & Collaboration Accounts 10. Diversity at CERN 11. Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees       a. Academic Training Committee 12. Matters arising 13. Any Other Business 14. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under “Any Other Business” is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail. Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and...

  18. Academic family health teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, June C.; Talbot, Yves; Permaul, Joanne; Tobin, Anastasia; Moineddin, Rahim; Blaine, Sean; Bloom, Jeff; Butt, Debra; Kay, Kelly; Telner, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore patients’ perceptions of primary care (PC) in the early development of academic family health teams (aFHTs)—interprofessional PC teams delivering care where family medicine and other health professional learners are trained—focusing on patients’ perceptions of access and patients’ satisfaction with services. Design Self-administered survey. Setting Six aFHTs in Ontario. Participants Adult patients attending appointments and administrators at each of the aFHTs. Main outcome measures Answers to questions about access from the Primary Care Assessment Tool Adult Expanded Version, the Primary Care Assessment Survey, and research team questions. Results The response rate was 47.3% (1026 of 2167). The mean (SD) Primary Care Assessment Tool first-contact accessibility score was 2.28 (0.36) out of 4, with 96.5% of patients rating access less than 3, which was the minimum expected level of care. Two-thirds (66.6%) indicated someone from their aFHTs would definitely or probably see them the same day if they were sick, 56.8% could definitely or probably get advice quickly by telephone, and 14.5% indicated it was definitely or probably difficult to be seen by their primary health care provider (HCP). Additionally, 46.9% indicated they would like to get medical advice by e-mail. For a routine or follow-up visit, 73.4% would be willing to see another aFHT physician if their regular provider were unavailable, while only 48.3% would see a nonphysician HCP. If sick, 88.2% would see another aFHT physician and 55.2% would see a nonphysician HCP. Most (75.3%) were satisfied with access to their regular HCP. Conclusion Although patients are generally satisfied with care, there is room for improvement in access. Strategies are needed to enhance access to care, including addressing appropriate roles and scopes of practice for nonphysician HCPs. The accessibility challenges for aFHTs will likely affect new family physicians and other HCPs training in

  19. Transformational leadership and team innovation: integrating team climate principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbeiss, Silke A; van Knippenberg, Daan; Boerner, Sabine

    2008-11-01

    Fostering team innovation is increasingly an important leadership function. However, the empirical evidence for the role of transformational leadership in engendering team innovation is scarce and mixed. To address this issue, the authors link transformational leadership theory to principles of M. A. West's (1990) team climate theory and propose an integrated model for the relationship between transformational leadership and team innovation. This model involves support for innovation as a mediating process and climate for excellence as a moderator. Results from a study of 33 research and development teams confirmed that transformational leadership works through support for innovation, which in turn interacts with climate for excellence such that support for innovation enhances team innovation only when climate for excellence is high.

  20. A Data Scheduling and Management Infrastructure for the TEAM Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andelman, S.; Baru, C.; Chandra, S.; Fegraus, E.; Lin, K.; Unwin, R.

    2009-04-01

    currently partnering with the San Diego Super Computer Center to build the data management infrastructure. Data collected from the three core protocols as well as others are currently made available through the TEAM Network portal, which provides the content management framework, the data scheduling and management framework, an administrative framework to implement and manage TEAM sites, collaborative tools and a number of tools and applications utilizing Google Map and Google Earth products. A critical element of the TEAM Network data management infrastructure is to make the data publicly available in as close to real-time as possible (the TEAM Network Data Use Policy: http://www.teamnetwork.org/en/data/policy). This requires two essential tasks to be accomplished, 1) A data collection schedule has to be planned, proposed and approved for a given TEAM site. This is a challenging process since TEAM sites are geographically distributed across the tropics and hence have different seasons where they schedule field sampling for the different TEAM protocols. Capturing this information and ensuring that TEAM sites follow the outlined legal contract is key to the data collection process and 2) A stream-lined and efficient information management system to ensure data collected from the field meet the minimum data standards (i.e. are of the highest scientific quality) and are securely transferred, archived, processed and be rapidly made publicaly available, as a finished consumable product via the TEAM Network portal. The TEAM Network is achieving these goals by implementing an end-to-end framework consisting of the Sampling Scheduler application and the Data Management Framework. Sampling Scheduler The Sampling Scheduler is a project management, calendar based portal application that will allow scientists at a TEAM site to schedule field sampling for each of the TEAM protocols implemented at that site. The sampling scheduler addresses the specific requirements established in the

  1. Individual and team performance in team-handball: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Herbert; Finkenzeller, Thomas; Würth, Sabine; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2014-12-01

    Team handball is a complex sport game that is determined by the individual performance of each player as well as tactical components and interaction of the team. The aim of this review was to specify the elements of team-handball performance based on scientific studies and practical experience, and to convey perspectives for practical implication. Scientific studies were identified via data bases of PubMed, Web of Knowledge, SPORT Discus, Google Scholar, and Hercules. A total of 56 articles met the inclusion criteria. In addition, we supplemented the review with 13 additional articles, proceedings and book sections. It was found that the specific characteristics of team-handball with frequent intensity changes, team-handball techniques, hard body confrontations, mental skills and social factors specify the determinants of coordination, endurance, strength and cognition. Although we found comprehensive studies examining individual performance in team-handball players of different experience level, sex or age, there is a lack of studies, particularly for team-handball specific training, as well as cognition and social factors. Key PointsThe specific characteristics of team-handball with frequent intensity changes, specific skills, hard body confrontations, mental skills and social factors define the determinants of coordination, endurance, strength and cognition.To increase individual and team performance in team-handball specific training based on these determinants have been suggested.Although there are comprehensive studies examining individual performance in team-handball players of different experience level, sex, or age are published, there is a lack of training studies, particularly for team-handball specific techniques and endurance, as well as cognition and social factors.

  2. Team Work Engagement: Considering Team Dynamics for Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia L. Costa; Ana Passos; Arnold B. Bakker

    2012-01-01

    Although teams are an important structure of organizations, most studies on work engagement focus almost exclusively the individual-level. The main goals of this paper are to argue that the construct of work engagement can be conceptualized at the team level and to discuss theoretically some of its possible emergence processes. A conceptual model that explains under which conditions team work engagement is more likely to emerge is developed. This model is developed based on the literature on ...

  3. Highly effective cystic fibrosis clinical research teams: critical success factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsch-Bogart, George Z; Van Dalfsen, Jill M; Marshall, Bruce C; George, Cynthia; Pilewski, Joseph M; Nelson, Eugene C; Goss, Christopher H; Ramsey, Bonnie W

    2014-08-01

    Bringing new therapies to patients with rare diseases depends in part on optimizing clinical trial conduct through efficient study start-up processes and rapid enrollment. Suboptimal execution of clinical trials in academic medical centers not only results in high cost to institutions and sponsors, but also delays the availability of new therapies. Addressing the factors that contribute to poor outcomes requires novel, systematic approaches tailored to the institution and disease under study. To use clinical trial performance metrics data analysis to select high-performing cystic fibrosis (CF) clinical research teams and then identify factors contributing to their success. Mixed-methods research, including semi-structured qualitative interviews of high-performing research teams. CF research teams at nine clinical centers from the CF Foundation Therapeutics Development Network. Survey of site characteristics, direct observation of team meetings and facilities, and semi-structured interviews with clinical research team members and institutional program managers and leaders in clinical research. Critical success factors noted at all nine high-performing centers were: 1) strong leadership, 2) established and effective communication within the research team and with the clinical care team, and 3) adequate staff. Other frequent characteristics included a mature culture of research, customer service orientation in interactions with study participants, shared efficient processes, continuous process improvement activities, and a businesslike approach to clinical research. Clinical research metrics allowed identification of high-performing clinical research teams. Site visits identified several critical factors leading to highly successful teams that may help other clinical research teams improve clinical trial performance.

  4. Teams, Team Motivation, and the Theory of the Firm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Lindenberg, Siegwart

    A concern with teams was central to early attempts to grasp the nature of the firm, but fell out of favor in later work. We encourage a return to the emphasis on teams, but argue that the idea of teams as central to the nature of the firm needs to be grounded in an appreciation of the importance...... of We frames and group agency. We use converging insights from evolutionary anthropology, cognitive social psychology and work on team agency to develop such a grounding, and link it to the issues of the existence and boundaries of firms....

  5. Teams Talking Trials: results of an RCT to improve the communication of cancer teams about treatment trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, V A; Farewell, D; Farewell, V; Batt, L; Wagstaff, J; Langridge, C; Fallowfield, L J

    2013-05-01

    Previous research has shown that communication between members of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) is often suboptimal and communication about trials between MDTs and their patients is difficult. Educational interventions can help dyadic exchanges with different aspects of trial recruitment but less work has focussed on team interventions. 22 multidisciplinary cancer teams in the UK participated in an RCT of a novel Teams Talking Trials (TTT) Workshop aimed at improving the following: awareness, involvement, communication and recruitment to cancer trials. MDTs were randomised following either 6 or 12 months of audits, which were repeated after the intervention. Audits included numbers approached about trials, team members' attitudes, involvement and awareness of their teams' trial portfolios. There was no significant difference in the rate of approaching patients about trials post workshop (estimated improvement 22% higher regression coefficient of 0.2, exp. (0.2)=1.22). There was improvement in team members' involvement in trials in 4 areas (p≤0.04): the pressure to enter patients into RCTs, the likelihood of a start-up meeting to discuss a newly accepted trial, the informational role played by individuals and recognition of this HCP's role by other team members. Also, confidence in communication about RCTS increased and awareness of different aspects of trial management improved on all 14 aspects (p=0.001). Attendance by teams at focussed workshops designed to enhance communication and trial recruitment improved several aspects of team functioning, but a significant impact on the number of patients approached could not be demonstrated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, I am pleased to invite you to a public meeting which will be held on Thursday 11 November 2010 at 2:30 p.m., in the Main Auditorium (welcome coffee from 2 p.m.) In this meeting Sigurd Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure will present the Management’s proposals towards restoring full funding of the Pension Fund. The meeting will follow discussions which took place with the Staff Association, at the Standing Concertation Committee (CCP) of 1 November 2010 and will be held with the Members States, at the Tripartite Employment Conditions Forum (TREF) of 4 November 2010. You will be able to attend this presentation in the Main Auditorium or via the webcast. The Management will also be available to reply to your questions on this subject. Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin

  7. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 June 2010 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department CERN Global Network An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) ...

  8. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 March 2011 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Update on Safety at CERN The new account management system Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting   Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium ...

  9. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 September 2010 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS Department An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Summer Student program Bringing Library services to users Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): ...

  10. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 December 2010 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department The CERN Ombuds The new account management system Crèche progress + Restaurants Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch   Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): ...

  11. Team-based global organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Lena; Butler, Christina; Mockaitis, Audra

    2015-01-01

    of challenges and opportunities of future global organizing as being team-based, we presented new advancements in the study of global teams, leadership, process and outcomes divided into four themes. Two specifically address processes in global teams: 1) the benefits of openness towards linguistic and value......This chapter draws on a panel discussion of the future of global organizing as a team-based organization at EIBA 2014 in Uppsala, Sweden. We began by discussing contemporary developments of hybrid forms of hierarchy and teams-based organizing, but we venture to propose that as organizations become...... characterized by decreased importance of hierarchal structures, more fluidity across borders, even a possible dissolution of firm boundaries, we move towards team-based organizing as an alternative to more traditional forms of hierarchical-based organizing in global firms. To provide input for a discussion...

  12. Basketball Teams as Strategic Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer H. Fewell; Dieter Armbruster; John Ingraham; Alexander Petersen; James S Waters

    2012-01-01

    We asked how team dynamics can be captured in relation to function by considering games in the first round of the NBA 2010 play-offs as networks. Defining players as nodes and ball movements as links, we analyzed the network properties of degree centrality, clustering, entropy and flow centrality across teams and positions, to characterize the game from a network perspective and to determine whether we can assess differences in team offensive strategy by their network properties. The compiled...

  13. Roles in Innovative Software Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    With inspiration from role-play and improvisational theater, we are developing a framework for innovation in software teams called Essence. Based on agile principles, Essence is designed for teams of developers and an onsite customer. This paper reports from teaching experiments inspired by design...... science, where we tried to assign differentiated roles to team members. The experiments provided valuable insights into the design of roles in Essence. These insights are used for redesigning how roles are described and conveyed in Essence....

  14. Activity Recognition for Agent Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    particle filters that can han- dle partial observability and deep behavior hierarchies better than exact inference meth- ods. Often the specialized...after, around). Jug et al. [50] used a similar framework for basketball analysis. These frameworks do not address the problem of dynamic team...critical need for (1) supporting human team members in accessing, filtering , and synthesizing information from disparate sources; (2) increasing team

  15. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Public meetings : Come and talk about your future employment conditions !   The Staff Association will come and present the results of our survey on the 2015 five-yearly review. Following the survey, the topics discussed, will be contract policy, recognition of merit (MARS), working time arrangements and family policy. After each meeting and around a cup of coffee or tea you will be able to continue the discussions. Do not hesitate to join us, the five-yearly review, it is with YOU!

  16. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Tuesday 13 January 2004 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year and to present a perspective of CERN's future activities. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  17. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Tuesday 13 January 2004 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year and to present a perspective of CERN's future activities. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  18. STAFF MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Robert Aymar

    2005-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Thursday 12 January 2006 at 4:00 p.m. - Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN's activities during 2005 and to present the perspectives for this coming year. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). A simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season Robert AYMAR

  19. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Thursday 18 January 2007 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg.. 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN's activities during 2006 and to present the perspectives for this special year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg.. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg.. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  20. Worlds meet in Building 180.

    CERN Multimedia

    Raphael Vuillermet

    In the assembly hall of Building 180, several teams of various nationalities and different countries work together for the ATLAS forward muon detector. For nearly two years, Americans, Chinese, Europeans, Israelis, Japanese, Pakistanis and Russians are assembling and testing the so-called "Big Wheels" and the muon EIL4 stations. Each team is independent in its tasks: one team is assembling the mechanical structure, another one is installing services and muon chambers, while a third is testing the electronics and the gas system. A team is in charge of the transport and storage of the sectors and another is assembling the sectors in the ATLAS cavern. A total of nearly 60 people are participating in this project. Some members for the ATLAS Big Wheel team in the assembly hall of building 180. People from different cultures and religions and with different mother tongues are working side by side in harmony. Everyone in building 180, from technicians to professors, has the opportunity to meet and work with...

  1. High-Performance Photovoltaic Project: Identifying Critical Pathways; Kickoff Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symko-Davis, M.

    2001-11-07

    The High Performance Photovoltaic Project held a Kickoff Meeting in October, 2001. This booklet contains the presentations given by subcontractors and in-house teams at that meeting. The areas of subcontracted research under the HiPer project include Polycrystalline Thin Films and Multijunction Concentrators. The in-house teams in this initiative will focus on three areas: (1) High-Performance Thin-Film Team-leads the investigation of tandem structures and low-flux concentrators, (2) High-Efficiency Concepts and Concentrators Team-an expansion of an existing team that leads the development of high-flux concentrators, and (3) Thin-Film Process Integration Team-will perform fundamental process and characterization research, to resolve the complex issues of making thin-film multijunction devices.

  2. The organizational neurodynamics of teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Ronald; Gorman, Jamie C; Amazeen, Polemnia; Likens, Aaron; Galloway, Trysha

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to apply ideas from complexity theory to derive expanded neurodynamic models of Submarine Piloting and Navigation showing how teams cognitively organize around task changes. The cognitive metric highlighted was an electroencephalography-derived measure of engagement (termed neurophysiologic synchronies of engagement) that was modeled into collective team variables showing the engagement of each of six team members as well as that of the team as a whole. We modeled the cognitive organization of teams using the information content of the neurophysiologic data streams derived from calculations of their Shannon entropy. We show that the periods of team cognitive reorganization (a) occurred as a natural product of teamwork particularly around periods of stress, (b) appeared structured around episodes of communication, (c) occurred following deliberate external perturbation to team function, and (d) were less frequent in experienced navigation teams. These periods of reorganization were lengthy, lasting up to 10 minutes. As the overall entropy levels of the neurophysiologic data stream are significantly higher for expert teams, this measure may be a useful candidate for modeling teamwork and its development over prolonged periods of training.

  3. Commodity Team Motivation and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Englyst, Linda; Jørgensen, Frances; Johansen, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article, an in-depth single case study is presented in order to explore and discuss the functioning of commodity teams in a global sourcing context. Specifically, the study aimed at identifying factors that may influence team members' motivation to participate in activities that create...... opportunities for synergy and coordination of purchasing. In the teams studied, motivation appeared to be influenced to some degree by a number of factors, including rewards, leadership behaviours, goal setting, and the career goals of the commodity team members. In some cases, inconsistencies between...

  4. Commodity team motivation and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Englyst, Linda; Jørgensen, Frances; Johansen, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article, an in-depth single case study is presented in order to explore and discuss the functioning of commodity teams in a global sourcing context. Specifically, the study aimed at identifying factors that may influence team members' motivation to participate in activities that create...... opportunities for synergy and coordination of purchasing. In the teams studied, motivation appeared to be influenced to some degree by a number of factors, including rewards, leadership behaviours, goal setting, and the career goals of the commodity team members. In some cases, inconsistencies between...

  5. Developing an Effective Board-Administrative Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David B.

    It is beneficial to identify three administrative teams through linking pins: the principal is the linking pin between the instructional team and the administrative team; the superintendent is the linking pin between the administrative team and the policy team, which includes the board of education; the administrative team consisting of all…

  6. C1-1: Portfolio Management: Using Lean Tools to Support Project Teams with Grant Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinig, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Group Health Research Institute (GHRI) utilizes Lean tools and techniques to enhance customer service, monitor compliance, and enhance project team interactions and communications. GHRI’s Grants and Contracts Administration (GCA) recently used Lean tools to design and implement a grant “portfolio management” system and process to support Principal Investigators (PIs). The system tracks six key indicators of funded grants: award status, budgetary spend rate, effort reporting, subaward execution, subawardee invoicing, and progress reporting. The process allows issues to be identified, tracked, and resolved early on with the project team before any serious problems arise. Methods GCA conducted a series of stakeholder interviews to determine the viability of quarterly portfolio review meetings. Project teams liked the idea of discussing the PI’s portfolio, but were leery about quarterly meetings. Therefore, we constructed a process that maximized technology and built in flexibility regarding quarter meetings. The six key indicators were selected, defined, and placed on a dashboard in SharePoint. Each PI has a customized SharePoint page with a calendar showing all major grant deadlines and deliverables; a folder of documents related to the rankings and discussion during each quarterly meeting; and an issue tracker to follow-up on team-identified issues and problems requiring attention. Customer satisfaction data was also collected after each initial quarterly meeting. Results As of October 2012, approximately 25 face-to-face meetings and 5 virtual meetings (i.e., materials and links emailed to the project team) have been completed (210 projects and 85 subawards will have been reviewed by the end of 2012). Satisfaction survey data indicates over 75% of team members (22 of 30 individuals) like the face-to-face meetings and hope to continue the quarterly review process. Conclusions The new portfolio management process has been received favorably by

  7. The impact of team and work characteristics on team functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, E.; Slomp, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors seek to strengthen the theoretical foundation of team and cell formation through the inclusion of human factors. They distinguish three types of team characteristics: global, shared, and compositional attributes. In this last category, they also deal with diversity in

  8. Leadership for Team Learning: The Case of University Teacher Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeslag-Kreunen, Mieke G. M.; Van der Klink, Marcel R.; Van den Bossche, Piet; Gijselaers, Wim H.

    2018-01-01

    Teacher team involvement is considered a key factor in achieving sustainable innovation in higher education. This requires engaging in team learning behaviors that should result in new knowledge and solutions. However, university teachers are not used to discussing their work practices with one another and tend to neglect any innovation in their…

  9. Improving Team Performance: Proceedings of the Rand Team Performance Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    interaction as one promising area. For example, sexually , racially, or ethnically mixed teams may experience 86 i&: " 87 unique team problems, especially...Naval Research Arlinqton VA 22217 61 Chief of Naval Education and Traininq (N-5) ACOS Research & Proqram Development Naval Air Station Pensacola FL

  10. Virtual Team and Trust Relationship: Focus Group Interviews in Multimedia Super Corridor Status Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norizah Aripin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the trust relationship in virtual teams in Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC status companies. The study used qualitative method that is phenomenology approach through focus group interviews. In-depth interview were also used with semi-structured and openended questions. The interviews involved six staffs at different position in virtual team (two team leaders, and four team members. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed according to the thematic analysis. Results showed that dimensions on virtual team trust relationship including interpersonal communication, personality, team members size, face-to-face meeting needs, safety information when discussing face-to-face in public places, and difficulty to recall interaction via video conferencing with other team members.

  11. Planning a pharmacy-led medical mission trip, part 2: servant leadership and team dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dana A; Brown, Daniel L; Yocum, Christine K

    2012-06-01

    While pharmacy curricula can prepare students for the cognitive domains of pharmacy practice, mastery of the affective aspects can prove to be more challenging. At the Gregory School of Pharmacy, medical mission trips have been highly effective means of impacting student attitudes and beliefs. Specifically, these trips have led to transformational changes in student leadership capacity, turning an act of service into an act of influence. Additionally, building team unity is invaluable to the overall effectiveness of the trip. Pre-trip preparation for teams includes activities such as routine team meetings, team-building activities, and implementation of committees, as a means of promoting positive team dynamics. While in the field, team dynamics can be fostered through activities such as daily debriefing sessions, team disclosure times, and provision of medical services.

  12. Managing a Team of Former Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Becoming a manager of former peers is a common occurrence in medical practice management, but it can be awkward and challenging. This article describes the specific staff management challenges that recently promoted practice managers encounter. It urges promoted managers to seek support outside the practice through new friendships, mentoring, and leadership networks. This article also describes how best to announce the promotion and suggests that new managers hold one-on-one meetings with each employee. It offers the agenda for those meetings and for the manager's first whole-team leadership kickoff meeting. This article also describes smart first tasks for a promoted practice manager and considers the possibility that some employees may not come on board with the changing social and leadership structures in the practice, and what to do about them. Finally, this article suggests that preparation to become a medical practice manager should start early. It offers a strategy for handling former peers who continue to overshare personal information with the manager. It describes how to handle four common authority challenges newly promoted practice managers may face, with sample dialogue. And it suggests a social media strategy medical practice managers can use when they are connected electronically to their former peers.

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 4 December 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Fellows, Associates and Summer Student Programmes Particle Data Book distribution Revoking Computer accounts Equipment insurance on site Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Dates for meetings in 2003 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (74837...

  14. Board meetings

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ruxandra Staicu

    Purpose: Board meetings. Date(s):. 2015-11-16 to 2015-11-19. Destination(s):. Ottawa. Airfare: $5,596.11. Other. Transportation: $67.54. Accommodation: $340.45. Meals and. Incidentals: $175.39. Other: $0.00. Total: $6,179.49. Comments: 2015-2016 Travel and Hospitality Expense. Reports for Shainoor Khoja, Governor.

  15. Board meetings

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ruxandra Staicu

    Purpose: Board meetings. Date(s):. 2015-07-13 to 2015-07-14. Destination(s):. Ottawa. Airfare: $5,687.53. Other Transportation: $60.14. Accommodation: $344.56. Meals and. Incidentals: $150.00. Other: Total: $6,242.23. Comments: 2015-2016 Travel and Hospitality Expense. Reports for Shainoor Khoja, Governor.

  16. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Equal Opportunities at CERN The Summer Student programme CERN Programme for Physics High School Teachers Users' Office News Any Other Business Dates for Meetings in 2001 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) : Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Re...

  17. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Equal Opportunities at CERN The Summer Student programme CERN Programme for Physics High School Teachers Users' Office News Any Other Business Dates for Meetings in 2001 Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) :   Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958)...

  18. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. Matters arising 5. News from the CERN Management 6. Housing 7. Restaurant Surveillance Committee 8. Users' Office news 9. Election of ACCU chairman 10. Any Other Business 11. Dates for meetings in 2002 12. Agenda for the next meetingAnyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiiskinen (79387) Fr...

  19. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 4. Matters arising 5. News from the CERN Management 6. Housing 7. Restaurant Surveillance Committee 8. Users' Office news 9. Election of ACCU chairman 10. Any Other Business 11. Dates for meetings in 2002 12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria  W. Adam  (71661) Belgium  G. Wilquet  (74664) Bulgaria  R. Tzenov  (77958) Czech Republic  P. Závada&am...

  20. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 15 June 2011 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other Committees a. Scientific Information Policy Board (SIPB) b. IT Service Review Meeting (ITSRM) c. GS User Commission Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in bra...

  1. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk ! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Wednesday 2nd April at 10:30 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned !

  2. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Thursday 7th May 2015 at 9 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned!

  3. Desafios do processo grupal em reuniões de equipe da estratégia saúde da família Desafíos del proceso grupal en reuniones de equipo de la estrategia salud de la familia Challenges of the group process in team meetings on family health strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristel Kasper Grando

    2010-09-01

    ón permanecía solamente en el plan de la idealización. Se propone la técnica de grupo operativo, postulada por Pichon-Rivière (2005, como una posibilidad de construcción colectiva genuina, considerándose no sólo los resultados sino el proceso recorrido por los sujetos con vistas al aprendizaje grupal.Considering the Pichonian reference of an operative group, a qualitative, exploratory study was developed to analyze the meetings of a Family Health Strategy team through observation and focus groups. Among the findings a protocol practice appeared, focusing on technical aspects, to the detriment of important issues which provide support to the group process, including those involving the organization and logistics. Difficulties in expressing ideas and giving contrary opinions emerged as obstacles to group dynamics and the adoption of a critical attitude risked segregation of the group. However, the debates favored new insights among the participants, breaking down the illusion of a "perfect team" with the gradual recognition that this concept remained only at the level of idealization. The operative group technique postulated by Pichon-Rivière (2005 is proposed as a possibility of genuine collective construction, considering not only the results, but the process undergone by the subjects, with a view to group learning.

  4. [Reconstruction of the ear in the burns patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Córdova, Jorge Raúl; Jiménez Murat, Yusef; Apellaniz-Campo, Armando; Bracho-Olvera, Hazel; Carrillo Esper, Raúl

    Face burns are a singular pathology with great functional and psychological impact in the patients suffering them. The ears play a fundamental role in personal interactions and damage to this organ results in physical and emotional distress. The reconstructive treatment of the burned ear is a challenge. Multiple procedures have been described to achieve success in the reconstruction of the burned ear; immediate reconstruction with autologous rib cartilage, secondary reconstruction, alloplastic material reconstruction, tissue expansion, skin grafts and also microvascular flaps are some of the most common procedures used in this patients. All these techniques focus on giving a natural appearance to the patient. Burns to the ears affect 30% of the patients with facial burns, they require an excellent treatment given by a multidisciplinary team. Copyright © 2017 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Complexity of health-care needs and interactions in multidisciplinary medical teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, E.; Broekhuis, Manda; Stoffels, A.M.R.R.; Jaspers, F.

    By using an information processing and social identity approach, this study examines the relationships between the complexity of the health care needs of a patient and (1) the interactions among physicians during team meetings and (2) how the meeting participants evaluate the discussion. Three

  6. Team behaviors in emergency care: a qualitative study using behavior analysis of what makes team work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocato, Pamela; Forsberg, Helena Hvitfeldt; Schwarz, Ulrica von Thiele

    2011-11-15

    Teamwork has been suggested as a promising approach to improving care processes in emergency departments (ED). However, for teamwork to yield expected results, implementation must involve behavior changes. The aim of this study is to use behavior analysis to qualitatively examine how teamwork plays out in practice and to understand eventual discrepancies between planned and actual behaviors. The study was set in a Swedish university hospital ED during the initial phase of implementation of teamwork. The intervention focused on changing the environment and redesigning the work process to enable teamwork. Each team was responsible for entire care episodes, i.e. from patient arrival to discharge from the ED. Data was collected through 3 days of observations structured around an observation scheme. Behavior analysis was used to pinpoint key teamwork behaviors for consistent implementation of teamwork and to analyze the contingencies that decreased or increased the likelihood of these behaviors. We found a great discrepancy between the planned and the observed teamwork processes. 60% of the 44 team patients observed were handled solely by the appointed team members. Only 36% of the observed patient care processes started according to the description in the planned teamwork process, that is, with taking patient history together. Beside this behavior, meeting in a defined team room and communicating with team members were shown to be essential for the consistent implementation of teamwork. Factors that decreased the likelihood of these key behaviors included waiting for other team members or having trouble locating each other. Getting work done without delay and having an overview of the patient care process increased team behaviors. Moreover, explicit instructions on when team members should interact and communicate increased adherence to the planned process. This study illustrates how behavior analysis can be used to understand discrepancies between planned and observed

  7. Team behaviors in emergency care: a qualitative study using behavior analysis of what makes team work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzocato Pamela

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Teamwork has been suggested as a promising approach to improving care processes in emergency departments (ED. However, for teamwork to yield expected results, implementation must involve behavior changes. The aim of this study is to use behavior analysis to qualitatively examine how teamwork plays out in practice and to understand eventual discrepancies between planned and actual behaviors. Methods The study was set in a Swedish university hospital ED during the initial phase of implementation of teamwork. The intervention focused on changing the environment and redesigning the work process to enable teamwork. Each team was responsible for entire care episodes, i.e. from patient arrival to discharge from the ED. Data was collected through 3 days of observations structured around an observation scheme. Behavior analysis was used to pinpoint key teamwork behaviors for consistent implementation of teamwork and to analyze the contingencies that decreased or increased the likelihood of these behaviors. Results We found a great discrepancy between the planned and the observed teamwork processes. 60% of the 44 team patients observed were handled solely by the appointed team members. Only 36% of the observed patient care processes started according to the description in the planned teamwork process, that is, with taking patient history together. Beside this behavior, meeting in a defined team room and communicating with team members were shown to be essential for the consistent implementation of teamwork. Factors that decreased the likelihood of these key behaviors included waiting for other team members or having trouble locating each other. Getting work done without delay and having an overview of the patient care process increased team behaviors. Moreover, explicit instructions on when team members should interact and communicate increased adherence to the planned process. Conclusions This study illustrates how behavior analysis

  8. The reablement team's voice: a qualitative study of how an integrated multidisciplinary team experiences participation in reablement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelle, Kari Margrete; Skutle, Olbjørg; Førland, Oddvar; Alvsvåg, Herdis

    2016-01-01

    Reablement is an early and time-limited home-based rehabilitation intervention that emphasizes intensive, goal-oriented, and multidisciplinary assistance for people experiencing functional decline. Few empirical studies to date have examined the experiences of the integrated multidisciplinary teams involved in reablement. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to explore and describe how an integrated multidisciplinary team in Norway experienced participation in reablement. An integrated multidisciplinary team consisting of health care professionals with a bachelor's degree (including a physiotherapist, a social educator, occupational therapists, and nurses) and home-based care personnel without a bachelor's degree (auxiliary nurses and nursing assistants) participated in focus group discussions. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the resulting data. Three main themes emerged from the participants' experiences with participating in reablement, including "the older adult's goals are crucial", "a different way of thinking and acting - a shift in work culture", and "a better framework for cooperation and application of professional expertise and judgment". The integrated multidisciplinary team and the older adults collaborated and worked in the same direction to achieve the person's valued goals. The team supported the older adults in performing activities themselves rather than completing tasks for them. To facilitate cooperation and application of professional expertise and judgment, common meeting times and meeting places for communication and supervision were necessary. Structural factors that promote integrated multidisciplinary professional decisions include providing common meeting times and meeting places as well as sufficient time to apply professional knowledge when supervising and supporting older persons in everyday activities. These findings have implications for practice and suggest future directions for improving health care services. The

  9. Commodity Team Motivation and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Englyst, Linda; Jørgensen, Frances; Johansen, John

    2007-01-01

    system which was intended to support collective team effort, yet enhanced conflicts of interest in the matrix structure, discuss leadership, goal alignment and career tracks, and debate when and whether a team structure is appropriate in the pursuit of corporate purchasing synergies. The article is based...... on an in-depth case study in a multinational industrial company....

  10. Implementing the Change Team Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Robert J.; Zaltman, Gerald

    This paper focuses on variables to be considered in implementing the team approach to planned change in educational organizations. The first part deals with team considerations -- recruitment and selection, composition, training, and future roles of members in the client system. The second section presents various strategies and tactics for…

  11. Virtual Teams and Knowledge Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtonen, Miikka; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    How does culture affect virtual teams and the knowledge communication processes in which they engage? As virtual spaces are increasingly used to support teams and establish collaboration in cross-cultural projects, the notion of cross-cultural communication can be understood as shifting from...

  12. The Virtual Intercultural Team Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Calin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Virtual Intercultural Team Tool (VITT) and discusses its processes and benefits. VIIT is a virtual platform designed with the aim of assisting European project teams to improve intercultural communication and build on their cultural diversity for effective implementation of their projects. It is a process-focused tool,…

  13. Data Teams for School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildkamp, Kim; Poortman, Cindy L.; Handelzalts, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The use of data for educational decision making has never been more prevalent. However, teachers and school leaders need support in data use. Support can be provided by means of professional development in the form of "data teams". This study followed the functioning of 4 data teams over a period of 2 years, applying a qualitative case…

  14. ELI-NP Science Team

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. ELI-NP Science Team. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 83 Issue 5 November 2014 pp 713-718. Physics studies with brilliant narrow-width -beams at the new ELI-NP Facility · Dimiter L Balabanski ELI-NP Science Team · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  15. LANL MTI science team experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balick, Lee K.; Borel, Christopher C.; Chylek, Petr; Clodius, William B.; Davis, Anthony B.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Galbraith, Amy E.; Lawson, Stefanie L.; Pope, Paul A.; Rodger, Andrew P.; Theiler, James P.

    2004-01-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) is a technology test and demonstration satellite whose primary mission involved a finite number of technical objectives. MTI was not designed, or supported, to become a general purpose operational satellite. The role of the MTI science team is to provide a core group of system-expert scientists who perform the scientific development and technical evaluations needed to meet programmatic objectives. Another mission for the team is to develop algorithms to provide atmospheric compensation and quantitative retrieval of surface parameters to a relatively small community of MTI users. Finally, the science team responds and adjusts to unanticipated events in the life of the satellite. Broad or general lessons learned include the value of working closely with the people who perform the calibration of the data as well as those providing archived image and retrieval products. Close interaction between the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) teams was very beneficial to the overall effort as well as the science effort. Secondly, as time goes on we make increasing use of gridded global atmospheric data sets which are products of global weather model data assimilation schemes. The Global Data Assimilation System information is available globally every six hours and the Rapid Update Cycle products are available over much of the North America and its coastal regions every hour. Additionally, we did not anticipate the quantity of validation data or time needed for thorough algorithm validation. Original validation plans called for a small number of intensive validation campaigns soon after launch. One or two intense validation campaigns are needed but are not sufficient to define performance over a range of conditions or for diagnosis of deviations between ground and satellite products. It took more than a year to accumulate a good set of validation data. With regard to the specific programmatic objectives, we feel that we can do a

  16. Summary of Prioritized Research Opportunities. Building America Planning Meeting, November 2-4, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-02-01

    This report outlines the results of brainstorming sessions conducted at the Building America Fall 2010 planning meeting, in which research teams and national laboratories identified key research priorities to incorporate into multi-year planning, team research agendas, expert meetings, and technical standing committees.

  17. Team Performance in the Army Acquisition Program Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    and the installation organizacional structure. In addition, it combines the advantages of pure functional structure and the product organizational...teams, teams of psychological counselors, marketing teams, training teams, support/administrative teams, purchasing teams, a retail store team

  18. Diversity Management in Global Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    This study is based on in-depth interviews in a successful diverse team in a Japanese subsidiary of an American multinational corporation. While this study exemplifies both processes of homogenization and diversification in global team communication, the focus is an investigation of global......, national, organization, professional and individual influences on team collaboration. It answers the following questions: what are the alignments of corporate diversity strategies in different national contexts (here US and Japan) –between headquarter and subsidiary? How are corporate strategies...... implemented in the local organization? How are organizational culture, vision and images aligned with the team processes to accomplish the task? Does professional (functional) expertise influence team collaboration and finally how do individual experiences and coping strategies matter? The US and Japan...

  19. Multidisciplinary team care in rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, Anne-Mette; Rasmussen, Jens Ole; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically investigate current scientific evidence about the effectiveness of multidisciplinary team rehabilitation for different health problems. Data sources: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in Cochrane, Medline, DARE, Embase, and Cinahl databases, and research...... from existing systematic reviews was critically appraised and summarized. Study selection: Using the search terms "rehabilitation", "multidisciplinary teams" or "team care", references were identified for existing studies published after 2000 that examined multidisciplinary rehabilitation team care......, interventions, and findings. Data synthesis: A total of 14 reviews were included to summarize the findings of 12 different study populations. Evidence was found to support improved functioning following multidisciplinary rehabilitation team care for 10 of 12 different study population: elderly people, elderly...

  20. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN’s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  1. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    MARS PENSIONS CONTRACT POLICY GENERAL INFORMATION   PUBLIC MEETINGS COME AND BE INFORMED! Public meetings Monday 15 Oct. 2 pm Amphi IT, 31-3-004 Meyrin Wednesday 17 Oct. 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Thursday 18 Oct. 10 am Salle du Conseil/ Council Chamber 503-1-001 Meyrin Thursday 18 Oct. 2 pm Filtration Plant, 222-R-001(in English) Meyrin   Overview of the topics to be discussed Recognition of Merit – MARS Outcome of last exercise 2007 to 2012 : lessons learned Pension Fund Capital preservation policy : what is it ? Contract policy LC2IC statistics SA proposal General information CVI 2013 Voluntary programmes (PRP, SLS)  

  2. Growing our own: building a native research team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jacqueline S; Carter, Paula M

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) made up less than 1% of the science, engineering and health doctorates in the U.S. Early introduction of AI/AN students to research and continued opportunities are necessary to develop successful AI/AN researchers who can better serve their communities. This team was developed to form a cohort of American Indian students, staff and faculty interested in research and becoming researchers. Since implementation, the program grew from one student to over 20 AI students ranging from freshmen just entering college to doctoral students working to complete their dissertations. This article highlights the team growth, increasing structure, student needs and the faculty and staff involved. It further addresses the support and educational aspects of growing an ongoing, multidisciplinary research team committed to ethical research in Native communities. The team addresses substance use prevalence, the relationship of substance abuse to other mental health diagnoses, and treatment issues. The team includes weekly team meetings, a Blackboard site on the Internet that is populated with resources and focused on sharing materials and information, a weekly journal club discussion of research articles, and collaborative discussions on each project and the barriers and challenges that need to be addressed to move forward.

  3. Themes and time use by participants in general team meetings at a psychiatric day hospital Temas y utilización del tiempo por los participantes de reuniones del equipo general en un hospital día psiquiátrico Temas e utilização do tempo pelos participantes de reuniões de equipe geral em um hospital-dia psiquiátrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Arthur Scherer

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This naturalistic study was realized through observation and aimed to characterize general staff meetings held at a day hospital regarding theme and the professionals' participation in the use of time. We observed 21 meetings, during which 144 announcements were made and 46 issues were discussed, with greater participation in discussions by fixed team members. In 18 of these meetings, the discussed themes corresponded to daily situations registered during the weeks preceding the meetings. Our findings reveal that these meetings are inserted in the service on a regular basis. Power relations and differences in experience and technical knowledge between the different professionals seem to contribute to the higher or lower number of announcements and issues presented. As this space favors exchanges, we suggest these meetings to be used in other health services working with assistance teams.La finalidad de este estudio, configurado como una investigación naturalística conducida mediante observación, fue la de caracterizar las reuniones del equipo general de un hospital día respecto a la temática y la participación de los profesionales en la utilización del tiempo. Fueron comunicados 144 avisos y discutidos 46 asuntos en 21 reuniones observadas, con mayor participación del equipo fijo en las discusiones. En 18 de las reuniones estudiadas, los temas discutidos correspondieron a las situaciones diarias registradas durante las semanas antecedentes a las mismas. Los hallazgos muestran que estas reuniones están insertadas regularmente en el servicio. Las relaciones de poder y las diferencias de experiencia y conocimientos técnicos entre los diversos profesionales parecieron contribuir para la mayor o menor colocación de avisos y asuntos. Como son un espacio que favorece cambios, sugerimos la utilización de estas reuniones en otros servicios de salud que trabajen con equipos de atención.O presente estudo, configurado como pesquisa natural

  4. HEP meets ML award talk : XGBoost

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; CHEN, Tianqi

    2015-01-01

    Tianqi Chen and Tong He (team crowwork) have provided very early in the challenge to all participants XGBoost (for eXtreme Gradient Boosted). It is a parallelised software to train boost decision trees, which has been effectively used by many participants to the challenge. For this, they have won the "HEP meets ML" award which is the invitation to CERN happening today.

  5. Facilitated IEP Meetings. PHP-c90

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2004

    2004-01-01

    To help special education planning teams reach agreements, the Minnesota Department of Education and the Minnesota Special Education Mediation Service (MNSEMS) provide the option of facilitated IEP meetings. This option is available for IEP (Individualized Education Program), IIIP (Individual Interagency Intervention Plan), and IFSP (Individual…

  6. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 December 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Closure of computer accounts upon CERN contract expiry Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Election of ACCU Chair Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets). Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) ...

  7. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 September 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management The Visits Service Lifetime of Computer Accounts Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Bauer (...

  8. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 September 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management The Visits Service Lifetime of Computer Accounts Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Bauer (7...

  9. ACCU meeting

    CERN Document Server

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be heldon Wednesday 5 March 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Ombudsperson proposal Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) BelgiumnC. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denm...

  10. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be heldon Wednesday 5 March 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN The CERN Ombudsperson proposal Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) BelgiumnC. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denm...

  11. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 September 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Logistics and Self-service stores EP Space management follow-up How to improve IT User Support? Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Roger.Jones@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiiskin...

  12. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions (Secretary)

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 June 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Logistics and Self-service stores EP Space management follow-up How to improve IT User Support? Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Roger.Jones@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiis...

  13. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 September 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 8. Registration plans for portables 2. Adoption of the agenda 9. Reports from ACCU representatives 3. Minutes of the previous meeting on other committees 4. Matters arising 10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 11. Any Other Business 6. The Press Office 12. Agenda for the next meeting 7. Equal Opportunities Commission Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): AustriaW. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgari...

  14. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 September 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Equal Opportunities Commission 2. Adoption of the agenda 8. Registration plans for portables 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 9. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 11. Any Other Business 6. The Press Office 12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgar...

  15. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 March 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Equipment insurance on site 2. Adoption of the agenda,8. ACCU reporting mechanisms in the different countries 3. Minutes of the previous meeting9. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management11. Any Other Business 6. CHIS news and follow-up of survey12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661)NorwayH. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (7591...

  16. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 June 2004 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Update on CERN's 50th anniversary celebrations Report from the EPOG (European Particle Physics Outreach Group) Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941...

  17. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 September 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Logistics at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Bauer S. Laplace...

  18. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 6. The PH Department 2. Adoption of the agenda 7. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 8. Users' Office news 4. News from the CERN Management 9. Any Other Business 5. Matters arising 10. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Portugal P. Bordalo (74704) Czech Republic P. Závada ...

  19. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting News from the CERN Management Matters arising The PH Department Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin...

  20. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 December 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 8. Report from IT division on Computing matters 2. Adoption of the agenda 9. Young Particle Physicists Association 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 10. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 11. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 12. Election of the ACCU Chair 6. Report from the new Director-General 13. Any Other Business 7. CERN's 50th anniversary 14. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 13 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (716...

  1. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 June 2004 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Update on CERN's 50th anniversary celebrations Report from the EPOG (European Particle Physics Outreach Group) Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finlan...

  2. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 December 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 8. Report from IT division on Computing matters 2. Adoption of the agenda 9. Young Particle Physicists Association 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 10. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 11. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 12. Election of the ACCU Chair 6. Report from the new Director-General 13. Any Other Business 7. CERN's 50th anniversary 14. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 13 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Ada...

  3. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 June 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Reports from ACCU representatives 2. Adoption of the agenda on other committees 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 8. Users' Office news 4. Matters arising 9. Any Other Business 5. News from the CERN Management 10. Agenda for the next meeting 6. Property Protection at CERN Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland Z. Hajduk (75917) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (74837) Portugal P. Bordalo (74704) Czech Republic ...

  4. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 June 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Logistics at CERN Open Access Publishing Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini ...

  5. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda of the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 March 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Proposal for a centralised access control service Report from PH Space Management Policy Board Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under Item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives on ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) ...

  6. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2005-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 March 2005 At 9:15 a.m. in room 160-1-009 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Purchasing procedures at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news CERN Clubs Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Las...

  7. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 March 2003 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1. Chairman's remarks 7. Equipment insurance on site 2. Adoption of the agenda 8. ACCU reporting mechanisms in the different countries 3. Minutes of the previous meeting 9. Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4. Matters arising 10. Users' Office news 5. News from the CERN Management 11. Any Other Business 6. Health Insurance news and follow-up of survey 12. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway H. Helstrup (73601) Belgium G. Wil...

  8. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agendafor the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 March 2006At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Proposal for a centralised access control service Report from PH Space Management Policy Board Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Fin...

  9. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 December 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting The effects of the reorganization of CERN's structure, one year on Matters arising News from the CERN Management Computer Security The new CERN Dosimeter Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (7594...

  10. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2004-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 8 December 2004 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting The effects of the reorganization of CERN's structure, one year on Matters arising News from the CERN Management Computer Security The new CERN Dosimeter Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tsenov (79573) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark P. Hansen (75941) Finl...

  11. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 June 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tAn update on safety at CERN 7.\tChildcare initiative 8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 9.\tUsers’ Office news 10.\tAny Other Business 11.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under Item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75...

  12. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 September 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tCode of conduct 7.\tEqual Opportunities at CERN 8.\tAn update on safety at CERN 9.\tThe CERN shuttle service 10.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 11.\tUsers’ Office news 12.\tOther business 13.\tAgenda of the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives on ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Re...

  13. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 September 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria, W. Adam (71661) Belgium, C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic, P. Závada (75877) Denmark, J.B. Hansen (...

  14. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 March 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tThe CERN Press Office 7.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 8.\tThe Burotel project 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tAny Other Business 12.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel () Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria C...

  15. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 June 2008 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management An update on Safety at CERN Childcare initiative Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria - W. Adam (71661) Belgium - C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic - P. Závada (75877) Denmark - J.B. Hansen...

  16. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 September 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tCode of Conduct 7.\tEqual Opportunities at CERN 8.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 9.\tThe CERN shuttle service 10.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 11.\tUsers’ Office news 12.\tAny Other Business 13.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Cze...

  17. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 March 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management The CERN Press Office An update on Safety at CERN The Burotel project Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel () Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark...

  18. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2009-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 June 2009At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management CERN Social Services User services in GS Department An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to mailto:Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria - G. Walzel (76592) Belgium - C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic - P. Závada (7587...

  19. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 3 December 2008 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tReport from the new Director-General 7.\tReport on the Fellows and Associates programme 8.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tAny Other Business 12.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium C. ...

  20. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 September 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks7.\tCar sharing pilot project 2.\tAdoption of the agenda\t8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting9.\tUsers’ Office newss 4.\tMatters arising10.\tAny Other Business 5.\tNews from the CERN Management11.\tAgenda for the next meeting 6.\tLogistics and transport at CERN Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria\tW. Adam (71661)NorwayG. Løvhøiden (73176)Belgium\tG. Wilquet (74664)PolandM. Witek (78967)...

  1. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks7.\tEmergency Services at CERN 2.\tAdoption of the agenda\t8.\tThe Meyrin Tram project 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4.\tMatters arising10.\tUsers’ Office news 5.\tNews from the CERN Management11.\tElection of ACCU Chair 6. LHC 2008 start-up events 6.\tLogistics and transport at CERN 12.\tAny Other Business 13.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Aust...

  2. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 June 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management PIE procedures CERN Cars EP Electronics Advisory Board Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin (71143) Germany H. Kroha ...

  3. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 March 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in the Council Chamber Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Follow-up on Space Management Users' Desktop needs PIE procedures Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer L. Serin (712...

  4. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 June 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management PIE procedures CERN Cars EP Electronics Advisory Board Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch   ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin (71143) Germany H. Kroha...

  5. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions / EP Division

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 June 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising EP Space management Cars Housing EDH from the User's point of view VRVS Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland A. Kiiskinen (79387) France M. Déj...

  6. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 September 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building 1. Chairman's remarks 2. Adoption of the agenda 3. News from the CERN Management 4. Minutes of the previous meeting 5. Matters arising 6. Report from the Scientific Information Policy Board 7. Report from ETT Division: The Press Office 8. Update on Computing Issues 9. Users' Office News 10. Any Other Business 11. Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Bryan Pattison (Secretary). ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) : Austria G. Neuhofer (74094) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Z vada (75...

  7. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Document Server

    Chris Onions

    2001-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 March 2001 At 9:15 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda News from the CERN Management Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising Video-conferencing/recording Fellows programme Operational Circular No. 6 EP Space management Update on Computing Issues Users' Office News Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary)  ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic...

  8. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Bryan Pattison

    2000-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 September 2000 At 10 a.m. in the 6th floor Conference Room, Main Building1. Chairman's remarks2. Adoption of the agenda3. News from the CERN Management4. Minutes of the previous meeting5. Matters arising6. Report from the Scientific Information Policy Board7. Report from ETT Division: The Press Office8. Update on Computing Issues9. Users' Office News10. Any Other Business11. Agenda for the next meetingAnyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Secretary in writing via the CERN Users' Office or by e-mail toBryan Pattison(Secretary).ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets) :Austria G. Neuhofer (74094)Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958)Czech Republic P. Závada (75877)Den...

  9. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 12 September 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks6.\tLogistics and transport at CERN2.\tAdoption of the agenda\t7.\tCar sharing pilot project3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees4.\tMatters arising9.\tUsers’ Office newss5.\tNews from the CERN Management10.\tAny Other Business11.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria\tW. Adam (71661)NorwayG. Løvhøiden (73176)Belgium\tG. Wilquet (74664)PolandM. Witek (78967)Bulgaria\tPortugalP...

  10. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda of the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 September 2006 at 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on Fellows and Associates Programme Overview of safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under Item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K....

  11. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 September 2006 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.     Chairman's remarks 2.     Adoption of the agenda 3.     Minutes of the previous meeting 4.     Matters arising 5.     News from the CERN Management 6.     Report on Fellows and Associates programme 7.     Overview of safety at CERN 8.     Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees 9.     Users' Office news 10.  Any Other Business 11.  Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets):Austria W. Adam  (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria ...

  12. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 March 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car-sharing pilot project Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Kunne S. ...

  13. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Safety at CERN Car sharing pilot project CERN Public Web Sites and Intranet Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria   Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finl...

  14. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 March 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car-sharing pilot project Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (79354) France F. Kunne S. La...

  15. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 June 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 6.\tDosimetry at CERN 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 7.\tStatus of collaborative tools at CERN 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 8.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 4.\tMatters arising 9.\tUsers’ Office newss 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 10.\tAny Other Business 11.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Norway G. Løvhøiden (73176) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Poland M. Witek (78967) Bulgaria Portugal...

  16. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 6 December 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Safety at CERN Car sharing pilot project CERN Public Web Sites and Intranet Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria   Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finl...

  17. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 13 June 2007 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Dosimetry at CERN Status of collaborative tools at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office newss Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark J.B. Hansen (75941) Finland K. Lassila-Perini (7935...

  18. ACCU meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 5 December 2007 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tLHC 2008 start-up events 7.\tEmergency Services at CERN 8.\tThe Meyrin Tram project 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tElection of ACCU Chair 12.\tAny Other Business 13.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 12 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilq...

  19. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 7 September 2011 at 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002   Chairperson's remarks Adoption of the agenda      Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising       News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department Report on new CHIS rules Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 9 is invited to send them to the Chairperson in writing or by e-mail to Michael.Hauschild@cern.ch Michael Hauschild (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria M. Jeitler (76307) Belgium C. Vander Velde (Chairperson)...

  20. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2002-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 11 September 2002 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Health Insurance Questionnaire Host States Relations Service Update on EP Space management Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria R. Tzenov (77958) Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) Denmark A. Waananen (75941) Finland E. Tuominen (71534) France F. Bauer (71247) L. Serin (...

  1. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 14 June 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car sharing pilot project The CERN Document Server : the portal to Open Access Videoconferencing and collaborative tools at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users'Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (75877) ...

  2. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    2006-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 14 June 2006 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairman's remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Car sharing pilot project The CERN Document Server : the portal to Open Access Videoconferencing and collaborative tools at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users' Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium G. Wilquet (74664) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Závada (7...

  3. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 10 March 2010 At 9:15 a.m. in room 60-6-002 Chairperson’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Report on services from GS department An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 10 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives on ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (Chairperson) (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic S. Nemecek (71144) ...

  4. ACCU Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Onions

    DRAFT Agenda for the meeting to be held on Wednesday 9 December 2009 At 9:15 a.m. in Room 60-6-002 Chairman’s remarks Adoption of the agenda Minutes of the previous meeting Matters arising News from the CERN Management Restaurant No. 1 extension An update on Safety at CERN Reports from ACCU representatives on other committees Users’ Office news Election of the ACCU Chair Any Other Business Agenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria G. Walzel (76592) Belgium C. Vander Velde (71539) Bulgaria Czech Republic P. Záv...

  5. Virtual anthropology meets biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gerhard W; Bookstein, Fred L; Strait, David S

    2011-05-17

    A meeting in Vienna in October 2010 brought together researchers using Virtual Anthropology (VA) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in order to explore the benefits and problems facing a collaboration between the two fields. FEA is used to test mechanical hypotheses in functional anatomy and VA complements and augments this process by virtue of its tools for acquiring data, for segmenting and preparing virtual specimens, and for generating reconstructions and artificial forms. This represents a critical methodological advance because geometry is one of the crucial inputs of FEA and is often the variable of interest in functional anatomy. However, we currently lack tools that quantitatively relate differences in geometry to differences in stress and strain, or that evaluate the impact on FEA of variation within and between biological samples. Thus, when comparing models of different geometry, we do not currently obtain sufficiently informative answers to questions such as "How different are these models, and in what manner are they different? Are they different in some anatomical regions but not others?" New methodologies must be developed in order to maximize the potential of FEA to address questions in comparative and evolutionary biology. In this paper we review these and other important issues that were raised during our Vienna meeting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Harnessing members' positive mood for team-directed learning behaviour and team innovation : The moderating role of perceived team feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, Frank; van der Vegt, Gerben S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the role of individual team members' positive mood and perceived team feedback for their team-directed learning behaviour. Results obtained in a sample of 186 members from 27 work teams showed that positive mood was positively associated with team-directed learning behaviour if

  7. Reoperative midface reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Julio; García, Eloy

    2011-02-01

    Reoperative reconstruction of the midface is a challenging issue because of the complexity of this region and the severity of the aesthetic and functional sequela related to the absence or failure of a primary reconstruction. The different situations that can lead to the indication of a reoperative reconstructive procedure after previous oncologic ablative procedures in the midface are reviewed. Surgical techniques, anatomic problems, and limitations affecting the reoperative reconstruction in this region of the head and neck are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Teaching Engineering Students Team Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide professor's in engineering classes which the background necessary to use student team projects effectively. This manual describes some of the characteristics of student teams and how to use them in class. It provides a set of class activities and films which can be used to introduce and support student teams. Finally, a set of teaching modules used in freshmen, sophomore, and senior aeronautical engineering classes are presented. This manual was developed as part of a NASA sponsored project to improve the undergraduate education of aeronautical engineers. The project has helped to purchase a set of team work films which can be checked out from Cal Poly's Learning Resources Center in the Kennedy Library. Research for this project has included literature reviews on team work and cooperative learning; interviews, observations, and surveys of Cal Poly students from Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Psychology; participation in the Aeronautical Engineering senior design lab; and interviews with engineering faculty. In addition to this faculty manual, there is a student team work manual which has been designed to help engineering students work better in teams.

  9. Collaborative transdisciplinary team approach for dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, James E; Valois, Licet; Zweig, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has high economic impact and places significant burden on patients, caregivers, providers and healthcare delivery systems, fostering the need for an evaluation of alternative approaches to healthcare delivery for dementia. Collaborative care models are team-based, multicomponent interventions that provide a pragmatic strategy to deliver integrated healthcare to patients and families across a wide range of populations and clinical settings. Healthcare reform and national plans for AD goals to integrate quality care, health promotion and preventive services, and reduce the impact of disease on patients and families reinforcing the need for a system-level evaluation of how to best meet the needs of patients and families. We review collaborative care models for AD and offer evidence for improved patient- and family-centered outcomes, quality indicators of care and potential cost savings.

  10. Collaborative transdisciplinary team approach for dementia care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, James E; Valois, Licet; Zweig, Yael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Alzheimer's disease (AD) has high economic impact and places significant burden on patients, caregivers, providers and healthcare delivery systems, fostering the need for an evaluation of alternative approaches to healthcare delivery for dementia. Collaborative care models are team-based, multicomponent interventions that provide a pragmatic strategy to deliver integrated healthcare to patients and families across a wide range of populations and clinical settings. Healthcare reform and national plans for AD goals to integrate quality care, health promotion and preventive services, and reduce the impact of disease on patients and families reinforcing the need for a system-level evaluation of how to best meet the needs of patients and families. We review collaborative care models for AD and offer evidence for improved patient- and family-centered outcomes, quality indicators of care and potential cost savings. PMID:25531688

  11. Expert Meeting Report: Retrofit Implementation - A Neighborhood at a Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Dianne [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about a Building America expert meeting hosted by research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) on October 25, 2011, in New York City. The meeting discussed several community residential retrofit projects underway across the United States, and included representatives from utilities, energy program implementation firms, affordable housing agencies, and the financing industry.

  12. Expert Meeting Report: Retrofit Implementation - A Neighborhood at a Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, D.

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about a Building America expert meeting hosted by research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings on October 25, 2011, in New York City. The meeting discussed several community residential retrofit projects underway across the United States, and included representatives from utilities, energy program implementation firms, affordable housing agencies, and the financing industry.

  13. Making a team of experts into an expert team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charney, Carol

    2011-10-01

    Health care has traditionally been delivered primarily by experts working individually in a decentralized system lacking cohesive organization among professional disciplines. Only recently have the advantages of teamwork training been acknowledged in health care. This article explores the history, benefits, and recommendations for team training in neonatal care. TeamSTEPPS (Rockville, MD) and the revised Neonatal Resuscitation Program are cited as promising models for improved neonatal outcomes through professional teamwork.

  14. Leading a Virtual Intercultural Team. Implications for Virtual Team Leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Chutnik, Monika; Grzesik, Katarzyna

    2009-01-01

    Increasing number of companies operate in the setup of teams whose members are geographically scattered and have different cultural origins. They work through access to the same digital network and communicate by means of modern technology. Sometimes they are located in different time zones and have never met each other face to face. This is the age of a virtual team leader. Virtual leadership in intercultural groups requires special skills from leaders. Many of these reflect leadership s...

  15. Real teams and their effect on the quality of care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havig, Anders Kvale; Skogstad, Anders; Veenstra, Marijke; Romøren, Tor Inge

    2013-12-01

    Use of teams has shown to be an important factor for organizational performance. However, research has shown that a team has to meet certain criteria and operate in a certain way to realize the potential benefits of team organizing. There are few studies that have examined how teams operate in the nursing home sector and their effect on quality of care. This study investigates the relationship between teams that meet an academic definition of the team concept and quality of care in nursing homes. A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilized to test our research question: (1) self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, (2) interviews with 40 ward managers, (3) self-report questionnaires to 40 ward managers, (4) telephone interviews with 378 relatives, and (5) 900 hours of field observations. Use of teams in nursing home wards was assessed by field observations and by interviews with ward mangers. Quality of care was assessed by data from surveys and interviews with relatives and staff and through field observations. All data were aggregated to the ward level and two-level analyses were used to assess the relationships. The multi-level analyses showed that teams - as operationalized in the present study - were significantly positively related to two out of the three quality of care indices when controlled for ward size, days of sick leave and care level. One significant interaction effect was found between teams and days of sick leave, implying that the effect of teams decreased with higher numbers of days of sick leave. The results suggest that teams are related to higher levels of quality of care in nursing homes. However, the study shows that there is a substantial difference between real, functional teams that meet an academic definition of the concept and quasi teams, the latter having a significantly lower effect on quality of care. Hence, nursing home leaders

  16. Team networking in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odette Spruyt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "If you want to travel quickly, go alone. But if you want to travel far, you must go together". African proverb. The delivery of palliative care is often complex and always involves a group of people, the team, gathered around the patient and those who are close to them. Effective communication and functional responsive systems of care are essential if palliative care is to be delivered in a timely and competent way. Creating and fostering an effective team is one of the greatest challenges for providers of palliative care. Teams are organic and can be life giving or life sapping for their members.

  17. Interdisciplinary team working in physical and rehabilitation medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Vera; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Christodoulou, Nicolas; Varela, Enrique; Giustini, Alessandro; Delarque, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Effective team working plays a crucial role in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM). As part of its role of optimizing and harmonizing clinical practice across Europe, the Professional Practice Committee of Union of European Medical Specialists (UEMS) Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) Section reviewed patterns of team working and debated recommendations for good practice at a meeting of national UEMS delegates held in Riga, Latvia, in September 2008. This consensus statement is derived from that discussion and from a review of the literature concerning team working. Effective team working produces better patient outcomes (including better survival rates) in a range of disorders, notably following stroke. There is limited published evidence concerning what constitute the key components of successful teams in PRM programmes. However, the theoretical basis for good team working has been well-described in other settings and includes agreed aims, agreement and understanding on how best to achieve these, a multi-professional team with an appropriate range of knowledge and skills, mutual trust and respect, willingness to share knowledge and expertise and to speak openly. UEMS PRM Section strongly recommends this pattern of working. PRM specialists have an essential role to play in interdisciplinary teams; their training and specific expertise enable them to diagnose and assess severity of health problems, a prerequisite for safe intervention. Training spans 4-5 years in Europe, and includes knowledge and critical analysis of evidence-based rehabilitation strategies. PRM physicians are therefore well-placed to coordinate PRM programmes and to develop and evaluate new management strategies. Their broad training also means that they are able to take a holistic view of an individual patient's care.

  18. [Breast reconstruction after mastectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Quoc, C; Delay, E

    2013-02-01

    The mutilating surgery for breast cancer causes deep somatic and psychological sequelae. Breast reconstruction can mitigate these effects and permit the patient to help rebuild their lives. The purpose of this paper is to focus on breast reconstruction techniques and on factors involved in breast reconstruction. The methods of breast reconstruction are presented: objectives, indications, different techniques, operative risks, and long-term monitoring. Many different techniques can now allow breast reconstruction in most patients. Clinical cases are also presented in order to understand the results we expect from a breast reconstruction. Breast reconstruction provides many benefits for patients in terms of rehabilitation, wellness, and quality of life. In our mind, breast reconstruction should be considered more as an opportunity and a positive choice (the patient can decide to do it), than as an obligation (that the patient would suffer). The consultation with the surgeon who will perform the reconstruction is an important step to give all necessary informations. It is really important that the patient could speak again with him before undergoing reconstruction, if she has any doubt. The quality of information given by medical doctors is essential to the success of psychological intervention. This article was written in a simple, and understandable way to help gynecologists giving the best information to their patients. It is maybe also possible to let them a copy of this article, which would enable them to have a written support and would facilitate future consultation with the surgeon who will perform the reconstruction. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. MANAGEMENT TEAM CHARACTERISTICS: EVIDENCE FROM UNIVERSITY GOVERNANCE AND SCHOOL PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiang-Tsai Chiang; Mei-Chih Lin

    2013-01-01

    The paper examines cognition from the viewpoint of internal management teams of private universities against satisfaction with school performance, applying the SEM model. Empirical results show that the board’s operational effectiveness and attendance rate for internal important meetings held on campus have a significantly positive relationship with implementing effectiveness and satisfaction with school administrative performance. The satisfaction with school administrative performance and...

  20. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      MARS 2015 FIVE YEARLY REVIEW CONTRACT POLICY PENSION FUND GENERAL INFORMATION   COME AND BE INFORMED! PUBLIC MEETINGS Friday 3rd October at 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Friday 3rd October at 2 pm Salle du Conseil / Council Chamber, 503-1-001 (in English) Meyrin Monday 6th October at 10 am Kjell Johnsen Auditorium, 30-7-018 Meyrin Monday 6th October at 2 pm Salle du Conseil / Council Chamber, 503-1-001 Meyrin  

  1. Staff meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, 2007 is a very special year for CERN. I would like to review the status of our activities with you, and I invite you to a presentation on Wednesday 27 June 2007 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg. 500) Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the Main Auditorium. Robert AYMAR

  2. Culturally diverse management teams. Mercy International sponsors project on Guam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K R

    1995-06-01

    In 1989 Mercy International Health Services (MIHS) sent a team of advisers to help upgrade the skills of the managers of Guam Memorial Hospital. Their experience offers lessons for U.S. healthcare organizations as they become culturally diverse. The hospital had a number of problems, including high management turnover, troubles with financial resources, political interference, and a building that did not meet codes. The advisers also planned to prepare the hospital for an accreditation survey by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). MIHS, which has a growing presence in the Pacific, does not take charge of healthcare organizations. Instead, it trains local persons to assume leadership roles. At Guam Memorial Hospital, the MIHS advisers spent their first year assessing the organization and the various cultures represented on its staff. Then the advisers devoted three years to coaching and mentoring their Guamanian counterparts. The advisers learned that the hospital had basically been run by one person. It had no management team, either formal or informal. The advisers began their coaching by forming a management team in the dietary department. When the rest of the hospital staff saw that team perform successfully, they became willing to join similar teams themselves. Guam Memorial Hospital had changed by the time the MIHS advisers left the island in 1993. It has not yet been accredited, but it does have management teams working to meet JCAHO standards. The hospital also has in place a continuous quality improvement system, with more than three years of documentation. And the hospital building now conforms to codes.

  3. Diving and Environmental Simulation Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Diving and Environmental Simulation Team focuses on ways to optimize the performance and safety of Navy divers. Our goal is to increase mission effectiveness by...

  4. Family, Team or Something Else?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Murtha

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available When referring to staff, is the term "family" or "team" most accurate? John Murtha explores the importance of setting a company's core value to create and maintain a positive culture, expectations, and support hiring practices.

  5. SYNERGY EFFECTS IN WORK TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca C. ZOLTAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Today’s organization increasingly utilizes all kind of teams in order to surpass their competitors through flexibility, adaptability and innovation, features which are seen to characterize the teams. For this purpose, the concept of synergy in teams’ activity is often mentioned as the prime reason for which collective work is considered to be superior comparative with individual work. But what exactly does it mean? The present paper aims to shed some light on the concept of synergy in work teams and its positive effects, namely, the social consequences of collective work such as social compensation, social indispensability, social comparison, social identity, but also its negative effects, such as free-riding, social loafing and sucker effect. These are important group phenomena that managers should be aware of because they have a major impact on team performance, and consequently, on organization performance.

  6. Valuing Gender Diversity in Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Villeseche, Florence

    Team gender diversity has been much debated in many different contexts – not least since the search for a main effect of diversity on performance was launched. However, results have so far been inconclusive, and a number of scholars suggest that more attention should be directed at contextual...... factors which could influence the effect of gender diversity on team performance. In this study, we explore the effect of positive diversity attitudes and assess the degree of gender diversity where such group attitudes have greater impact. This is done by using a sample of 1085 leaders of academic...... research teams. Findings show that positive diversity attitude in the form of group openness to diversity is strongly associated with team performance. We also find a moderating effect of gender diversity meaning that the effect of openness to diversity is stronger when gender groups are more balanced...

  7. Personnel Turnover and Team Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levine, John M; Moreland, Richard L; Argote, Linda; Carley, Kathleen M

    2005-01-01

    ...) were employed. Experimental studies using the production task investigated how newcomers affect a team's transactive memory system--a shared mental model about how task competencies are distributed across members...

  8. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during...... reconstruction approaches other than implants should be seriously considered among women who have received radiation therapy....

  9. Team Effectiveness and Leadership Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Duygulu, Ethem; Ciraklar, Nurcan

    2008-01-01

    In this study we aim to explain the patterns of leadership roles for team effectiveness in non economic organizations compared to economic organizations. For this purpose, we studied three successful organization types, i.e the amateur sports clubs (football, basketball), theater companies and, regional folk groups. Our basic hypothesis is that the relationship between the type of organization (specially teams) and the role of leadership is not random. Therefore, we believe that a...

  10. Review of child development teams.

    OpenAIRE

    Zahir, M; Bennett, S

    1994-01-01

    Since the Court report was published in 1976 there has been a consensus that the needs of children with disabilities are best met by child development teams. This study explored the structure, facilities, and organisational elements of child development teams operating in the South East Thames region by means of a structured interview with senior professionals involved with organising services for children with disabilities in 14 of 15 health districts in the region. Although all districts ha...

  11. Optimisation of the ATLAS Track Reconstruction Software for Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Salzburger, Andreas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Track reconstruction is one of the most complex element of the reconstruction of events recorded by ATLAS from collisions delivered by the LHC. It is the most time consuming reconstruction component in high luminosity environments. The flat budget projections for computing resources for Run-2 of the LHC together with the demands of reconstructing higher pile-up collision data at rates more than double those in Run-1 (an increase from 400 Hz to 1 kHz in trigger output) have put stringent requirements on the track reconstruction software. The ATLAS experiment has performed a two year long software campaign which aimed to reduce the reconstruction rate by a factor of three to meet the resource limitations for Run-2: the majority of the changes to achieve this were improvements to the track reconstruction software. The CPU processing time of ATLAS track reconstruction was reduced by more than a factor of three during this campaign without any loss of output information of the track reconstruction. We present the ...

  12. Team research at the biology-mathematics interface: project management perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, John G; Radunskaya, Ami E; Lee, Arthur H; de Pillis, Lisette G; Bartlett, Diana F

    2010-01-01

    The success of interdisciplinary research teams depends largely upon skills related to team performance. We evaluated student and team performance for undergraduate biology and mathematics students who participated in summer research projects conducted in off-campus laboratories. The student teams were composed of a student with a mathematics background and an experimentally oriented biology student. The team mentors typically ranked the students' performance very good to excellent over a range of attributes that included creativity and ability to conduct independent research. However, the research teams experienced problems meeting prespecified deadlines due to poor time and project management skills. Because time and project management skills can be readily taught and moreover typically reflect good research practices, simple modifications should be made to undergraduate curricula so that the promise of initiatives, such as MATH-BIO 2010, can be implemented.

  13. Team Research at the Biology–Mathematics Interface: Project Management Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunskaya, Ami E.; Lee, Arthur H.; de Pillis, Lisette G.; Bartlett, Diana F.

    2010-01-01

    The success of interdisciplinary research teams depends largely upon skills related to team performance. We evaluated student and team performance for undergraduate biology and mathematics students who participated in summer research projects conducted in off-campus laboratories. The student teams were composed of a student with a mathematics background and an experimentally oriented biology student. The team mentors typically ranked the students' performance very good to excellent over a range of attributes that included creativity and ability to conduct independent research. However, the research teams experienced problems meeting prespecified deadlines due to poor time and project management skills. Because time and project management skills can be readily taught and moreover typically reflect good research practices, simple modifications should be made to undergraduate curricula so that the promise of initiatives, such as MATH-BIO 2010, can be implemented. PMID:20810964

  14. The Role of the Pulmonary Embolism Response Team: How to Build One, Who to Include, Scenarios, Organization, and Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmer, Andrew; Weinberg, Ido; Giri, Jay; Jaff, Michael; Weinberg, Mitchell

    2017-09-01

    Pulmonary embolism response teams (PERTs) are multidisciplinary response teams aimed at delivering a range of diagnostic and therapeutic modalities to patients with pulmonary embolism. These teams have gained traction on a national scale. However, despite sharing a common goal, individual PERT programs are quite individualized-varying in their methods of operation, team structures, and practice patterns. The tendency of such response teams is to become intensely structured, algorithmic, and inflexible. However, in their current form, PERT programs are quite the opposite. They are being creatively customized to meet the needs of the individual institution based on available resources, skills, personnel, and institutional goals. After a review of the essential core elements needed to create and operate a PERT team in any form, this article will discuss the more flexible feature development of the nascent PERT team. These include team planning, member composition, operational structure, benchmarking, market analysis, and rudimentary financial operations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Anatomical Individualized ACL Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ata Rahnemai-Azar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is composed of two bundles, which work together to provide both antero-posterior and rotatory stability of the knee. Understanding the anatomy and function of the ACL plays a key role in management of patients with ACL injury. Anatomic ACL reconstruction aims to restore the function of the native ACL. Femoral and tibial tunnels should be placed in their anatomical location accounting for both the native ACL insertion site and bony landmarks. One main component of anatomical individualized ACL reconstruction is customizing the treatment according to each patient’s individual characteristics, considering preoperative and intraoperative evaluation of the native ACL and knee bony anatomy. Anatomical individualized reconstruction surgery should also aim to restore the size of the native ACL insertion as well. Using this concept, while single bundle ACL reconstruction can restore the function of the ACL in some patients, double bundle reconstruction is indicated in others to achieve optimal outcome.

  16. ACCU MEETING

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    DRAFT Agenda for the meetingto be held on Wednesday 3 December 2008 at 9:15 a.m.in Room 60-6-002 1.\tChairman’s remarks 2.\tAdoption of the agenda 3.\tMinutes of the previous meeting 4.\tMatters arising 5.\tNews from the CERN Management 6.\tReport from the new Director-General 7.\tReport on the Fellows and Associates programme 8.\tAn update on Safety at CERN 9.\tReports from ACCU representatives on other committees 10.\tUsers’ Office news 11.\tAny Other Business 12.\tAgenda for the next meeting Anyone wishing to raise any points under item 11 is invited to send them to the Chairman in writing or by e-mail to Christopher.Onions@cern.ch Chris Onions (Secretary) ACCU is the forum for discussion between the CERN Management and the representatives of CERN Users to review the practical means taken by CERN for the work of Users of the Laboratory. The User Representatives to ACCU are (CERN internal telephone numbers in brackets): Austria W. Adam (71661) Belgium C. Va...

  17. Using Teams to Improve Outcomes and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Beth; Crider, Nancy Manning

    2017-01-01

    Mastering the use of teams in healthcare organizations can maximize outcomes and optimize the use of resources. Most work in healthcare organizations is done by teams, whether it's the clinical team taking care of patients on a unit, the leadership team accountable for operations of the organization, or a team formed to solve a specific problem, improve quality, or plan an event. Effective teams make organizations successful; ineffective teams can create more problems than they solve. This article describes how to successfully use the power of teams within the healthcare setting, create and develop teams, be a team leader or member, create conditions for team effectiveness and high performance, and provide team training. Copyright© by the American Nephrology Nurses Association.

  18. CORPORATIONS AND THE 99%: TEAM PRODUCTION REVISITED

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shlomit Azgad-Tromer

    2015-01-01

    .... Revisiting team production analysis, this Article redefines the corporate team and argues that while several constituencies indeed form part of the corporate team, others are exogenous to the corporate enterprise...

  19. Embracing transformational leadership: team values and the impact of leader behavior on team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaubroeck, John; Lam, Simon S K; Cha, Sandra E

    2007-07-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between transformational leadership behavior and group performance in 218 financial services teams that were branches of a bank in Hong Kong and the United States. Transformational leadership influenced team performance through the mediating effect of team potency. The effect of transformational leadership on team potency was moderated by team power distance and team collectivism, such that higher power distance teams and more collectivistic teams exhibited stronger positive effects of transformational leadership on team potency. The model was supported by data in both Hong Kong and the United States, which suggests a convergence in how teams function in the East and West and highlights the importance of team values.

  20. Peer Effects in Team Sports: Empirical Evidence from NCAA Relay Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Craig A. Depken, II; Lisa E. Haglund

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates whether disparity in team member quality impacts team production using NCAA 4x400m relay teams. The net peer effects are estimated to have both an absolute and relative negative effect on the team performance. Because NCAA relay teams are comprised of unpaid amateurs, we utilize a direct measure of team-member quality rather than indirect measures such as wages. The evidence suggests that a greater disparity in team member quality reduces team performance, that is, it ...

  1. A systematic review of team formulation in clinical psychology practice: Definition, implementation, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geach, Nicole; Moghaddam, Nima G; De Boos, Danielle

    2017-10-03

    Team formulation is promoted by professional practice guidelines for clinical psychologists. However, it is unclear whether team formulation is understood/implemented in consistent ways - or whether there is outcome evidence to support the promotion of this practice. This systematic review aimed to (1) synthesize how team formulation practice is defined and implemented by practitioner psychologists and (2) analyse the range of team formulation outcomes in the peer-reviewed literature. Seven electronic bibliographic databases were searched in June 2016. Eleven articles met inclusion criteria and were quality assessed. Extracted data were synthesized using content analysis. Descriptions of team formulation revealed three main forms of instantiation: (1) a structured, consultation approach; (2) semi-structured, reflective practice meetings; and (3) unstructured/informal sharing of ideas through routine interactions. Outcome evidence linked team formulation to a range of outcomes for staff teams and service users, including some negative outcomes. Quality appraisal identified significant issues with evaluation methods; such that, overall, outcomes were not well-supported. There is weak evidence to support the claimed beneficial outcomes of team formulation in practice. There is a need for greater specification and standardization of 'team formulation' practices, to enable a clearer understanding of any relationships with outcomes and implications for best-practice implementations. Under the umbrella term of 'team formulation', three types of practice are reported: (1) highly structured consultation; (2) reflective practice meetings; and (3) informal sharing of ideas. Outcomes linked to team formulation, including some negative outcomes, were not well evidenced. Research using robust study designs is required to investigate the process and outcomes of team formulation practice. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  2. Making meetings work

    OpenAIRE

    Ochs, M.A.; Van Solingen, R.

    2004-01-01

    Every one of us has spent many hours, days, maybe even years in meetings. We all have experienced good meetings and bad meetings. Do software engineers spend large portions of their time in meetings? What factors make such meetings successful? This article presents the results of an industrial measurement study conducted to determine why some meetings are successful while other are not.

  3. Sobradinho, Bahia. Meeting lost identity

    OpenAIRE

    Falsarella, Ana Maria; de Blasis, Eloísa Barbosa; Garcia, Maria Guillermina

    2006-01-01

    Sobradinho is a new city that was created when a dam of the same name was built by Hidrelétrica de São Francisco, in 1973; it became an incorporated municipality in 1989. It is located in the north of the state of Bahia and entered the Better Municipal Education Program (Programa Melhoria da Educação do Município) in 2003, when the team at the Municipal Secretariat of Education took part in a meeting in Juazeiro. The biggest contribution of Programa Melhoria was a proposal to develop educatio...

  4. Meeting Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Aspaas, Per Pippin

    2013-06-01

    On 2-3 June 2012, the University of Tromsoe hosted a conference about the cultural and scientific history of the transits of Venus. The conference took place in Tromsoe for two very specific reasons. First and foremost, the last transit of Venus of this century lent itself to be observed on the disc of the Midnight Sun in this part of Europe during the night of 5 to 6 June 2012. Second, several Venus transit expeditions in this region were central in the global enterprise of measuring the scale of the solar system in the eighteenth century. The site of the conference was the Nordnorsk Vitensenter (Science Centre of Northern Norway), which is located at the campus of the University of Tromsoe. After the conference, participants were invited to either stay in Tromsoe until the midnight of 5-6 June, or take part in a Venus transit voyage in Finnmark, during which the historical sites Vardoe, Hammerfest, and the North Cape were to be visited. The post-conference program culminated with the participants observing the transit of Venus in or near Tromsoe, Vardoe and even from a plane near Alta. These Proceedings contain a selection of the lectures delivered on 2-3 June 2012, and also a narrative description of the transit viewing from Tromsoe, Vardoe and Alta. The title of the book, Meeting Venus, refers the title of a play by the Hungarian film director, screenwriter and opera director Istvan Szabo (1938-). The autobiographical movie Meeting Venus (1991) directed by him is based on his experience directing Tannhauser at the Paris Opera in 1984. The movie brings the story of an imaginary international opera company that encounters a never ending series of difficulties and pitfalls that symbolise the challenges of any multicultural and international endeavour. As is evident from the many papers presented in this book, Meeting Venus not only contains the epic tales of the transits of the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it also covers the conference

  5. Meetings and meeting modeling in smart surroundings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Nishida, T.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we survey our research on smart meeting rooms and its relevance for augmented reality meeting support and virtual reality generation of meetings in real-time or off-line. Intelligent real-time and off-line generation requires understanding of what is going on during a meeting. The

  6. Meetings and Meeting Modeling in Smart Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.

    In this paper we survey our research on smart meeting rooms and its relevance for augmented reality meeting support and virtual reality generation of meetings in real time or off-line. The research reported here forms part of the European 5th and 6th framework programme projects multi-modal meeting

  7. The bigger they are, the harder they fall: linking team power, team conflict, and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greer, L.L.; Caruso, H.M.; Jehn, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Across two field studies, we investigate the impact of team power on team conflict and performance. Team power is based on the control of resources that enables a team to influence others in the company. We find across both studies that low-power teams outperform high-power teams. In both studies,

  8. Process Variables Critical for Team Effectiveness: A Delphi Study of Wraparound Team Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Janetta L.; Monda-Amaya, Lisa E.

    2001-01-01

    Wraparound team members (n=20) identified as teaming experts rated 109 items that support team effectiveness across six categories: team goals, member roles and membership, communication, cohesion, logistics, and outcomes. Items in the team outcomes, goals, and cohesion categories were ranked most critical to team effectiveness. (Contains…

  9. Enhancing the effectiveness of team science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cooke, Nancy J; Hilton, Margaret L

    2015-01-01

    ...." Scientific research is increasingly conducted by small teams and larger groups rather than individual investigators, but the challenges of collaboration can slow these teams' progress in achieving...

  10. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    MARS SURVEY 5YR 2015 GENERAL INFORMATION ELECTIONS 2013   COME AND BE INFORMED! Public meetings Tuesday 1st Oct. 10 am Amphi IT, 31-3-004 Meyrin Tuesday 1st Oct. 2 pm Council Chamber, 503-1-001 Meyrin Friday 4 Oct. 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Monday 7 Oct. 2 pm Council Chamber, 503-1-001 (in English) Meyrin Tuesday 8 Oct. 10 am Amphi Kjell Johnsen, 30-7-018 Meyrin   Overview of the topics to be discussed Recognition of Merit – MARS Outcome of last exercise 2007 to 2013: lessons learned Survey: five-yearly review, give us your opinion General information CVI 2014 Voluntary programmes (PRP, SLS) Elections 2013 Renewal of the Staff Council 2014 - 2015  

  11. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Darin P.

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  12. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin P Clark

    Full Text Available Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID. In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM. Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with

  13. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Darin P; Badea, Cristian T

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  14. Workflow enhancement (WE) improves safety in radiation oncology: putting the WE and team together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Samuel T; Meier, Tim; Hugebeck, Brian; Reddy, Chandana A; Godley, Andrew; Kolar, Matt; Suh, John H

    2014-07-15

    To review the impact of a workflow enhancement (WE) team in reducing treatment errors that reach patients within radiation oncology. It was determined that flaws in our workflow and processes resulted in errors reaching the patient. The process improvement team (PIT) was developed in 2010 to reduce errors and was later modified in 2012 into the current WE team. Workflow issues and solutions were discussed in PIT and WE team meetings. Due to tensions within PIT that resulted in employee dissatisfaction, there was a 6-month hiatus between the end of PIT and initiation of the renamed/redesigned WE team. In addition to the PIT/WE team forms, the department had separate incident forms to document treatment errors reaching the patient. These incident forms are rapidly reviewed and monitored by our departmental and institutional quality and safety groups, reflecting how seriously these forms are treated. The number of these incident forms was compared before and after instituting the WE team. When PIT was disbanded, a number of errors seemed to occur in succession, requiring reinstitution and redesign of this team, rebranded the WE team. Interestingly, the number of incident forms per patient visits did not change when comparing 6 months during the PIT, 6 months during the hiatus, and the first 6 months after instituting the WE team (P=.85). However, 6 to 12 months after instituting the WE team, the number of incident forms per patient visits decreased (P=.028). After the WE team, employee satisfaction and commitment to quality increased as demonstrated by Gallup surveys, suggesting a correlation to the WE team. A team focused on addressing workflow and improving processes can reduce the number of errors reaching the patient. Time is necessary before a reduction in errors reaching patients will be seen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Workflow Enhancement (WE) Improves Safety in Radiation Oncology: Putting the WE and Team Together

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Samuel T., E-mail: chaos@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Meier, Tim; Hugebeck, Brian; Reddy, Chandana A.; Godley, Andrew; Kolar, Matt [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Suh, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To review the impact of a workflow enhancement (WE) team in reducing treatment errors that reach patients within radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: It was determined that flaws in our workflow and processes resulted in errors reaching the patient. The process improvement team (PIT) was developed in 2010 to reduce errors and was later modified in 2012 into the current WE team. Workflow issues and solutions were discussed in PIT and WE team meetings. Due to tensions within PIT that resulted in employee dissatisfaction, there was a 6-month hiatus between the end of PIT and initiation of the renamed/redesigned WE team. In addition to the PIT/WE team forms, the department had separate incident forms to document treatment errors reaching the patient. These incident forms are rapidly reviewed and monitored by our departmental and institutional quality and safety groups, reflecting how seriously these forms are treated. The number of these incident forms was compared before and after instituting the WE team. Results: When PIT was disbanded, a number of errors seemed to occur in succession, requiring reinstitution and redesign of this team, rebranded the WE team. Interestingly, the number of incident forms per patient visits did not change when comparing 6 months during the PIT, 6 months during the hiatus, and the first 6 months after instituting the WE team (P=.85). However, 6 to 12 months after instituting the WE team, the number of incident forms per patient visits decreased (P=.028). After the WE team, employee satisfaction and commitment to quality increased as demonstrated by Gallup surveys, suggesting a correlation to the WE team. Conclusions: A team focused on addressing workflow and improving processes can reduce the number of errors reaching the patient. Time is necessary before a reduction in errors reaching patients will be seen.

  16. Demonstration Model: Garden City [Michigan] Resource Room-Helping Teacher Team. For School Year 1972-73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden City Public Schools, MI.

    Described is a multidisciplinary team approach to helping elementary and secondary students with learning or emotional problems to achieve educationally and socially. Resource room teachers and special education consultants, functioning as part of the full-time team in each school, work with the regular classroom teacher to meet student needs for…

  17. Head and Neck Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Shannon; Melin, Alyson; Reilly, Debra

    2017-10-01

    Management of head and neck burns involves acute and intermediate phases. Acutely, the goals are establish a secure airway and treat life-threatening injuries. Then, optimize nutrition, assess extent of the burn, perform local wound care, and provide eye protection. Management depends on the degree of the head and neck burn. Postinjury splinting and rehabilitation are vital to healing. After the acute inflammation has resolved and the scars have matured, reconstruction begins with the goals of restoring both function and aesthetics. Reconstruction ranges from simple scar release, to skin grafting, and possibly free flap reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Review of child development teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahir, M; Bennett, S

    1994-03-01

    Since the Court report was published in 1976 there has been a consensus that the needs of children with disabilities are best met by child development teams. This study explored the structure, facilities, and organisational elements of child development teams operating in the South East Thames region by means of a structured interview with senior professionals involved with organising services for children with disabilities in 14 of 15 health districts in the region. Although all districts had a designated child development team, not all core professionals were adequately represented and four of 14 districts had no child development centre. The quality of buildings and facilities was variable. Teams that did not have a physical base in the form of a centre had fewer staff in the service and poorer facilities. There is a need for further consensus work about broad guidelines on the requirements of child development teams. These will help to inform purchasing authorities about the needs of children with disabilities living in their districts.

  19. Reconstruction algorithm medical imaging DRR; Algoritmo de construccion de imagenes medicas DRR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada Espinosa, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    The method of reconstruction for digital radiographic Imaging (DRR), is based on two orthogonal images, on the dorsal and lateral decubitus position of the simulation. DRR images are reconstructed with an algorithm that simulates running a conventional X-ray, a single rendition team, beam emitted is not divergent, in this case, the rays are considered to be parallel in the image reconstruction DRR, for this purpose, it is necessary to use all the values of the units (HU) hounsfield of each voxel in all axial cuts that form the study TC, finally obtaining the reconstructed image DRR performing a transformation from 3D to 2D. (Author)

  20. Consequences of Team Charter Quality: Teamwork Mental Model Similarity and Team Viability in Engineering Design Student Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway Hughston, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Since 1996 ABET has mandated that undergraduate engineering degree granting institutions focus on learning outcomes such as professional skills (i.e. solving unstructured problems and working in teams). As a result, engineering curricula were restructured to include team based learning--including team charters. Team charters were diffused into…