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Sample records for recombinant respiratory syncytial

  1. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... share with twitter share with linkedin Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, is a ... States. Why Is the Study of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) a Priority for NIAID? In the United ...

  2. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... share with twitter share with linkedin Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Treatment Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Respiratory Syncytial ... Specific Aims Outline Your Experiments Know Your Audience Write Your Research Plan Plan Your Budget & Personnel Salary ...

  3. A recombinant varicella vaccine harboring a respiratory syncytial virus gene induces humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kouki; Matsuura, Masaaki; Ota, Megumi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2015-11-09

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) Oka vaccine strain (vOka) is highly efficient and causes few adverse events; therefore, it is used worldwide. We previously constructed recombinant vOka (rvOka) harboring the mumps virus gene. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka induced the production of neutralizing antibodies against the mumps virus and VZV. Here, we constructed recombinant vOka viruses containing either the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroup A fusion glycoprotein (RSV A-F) gene or RSV subgroup B fusion glycoprotein (RSV B-F) gene (rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F). Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses confirmed the expression of each recombinant RSV protein in virus-infected cells. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F led to the induction of antibodies against RSV proteins. These results suggest that the current varicella vaccine genome can be used to generate custom-made vaccine vectors to develop the next generation of live vaccines.

  4. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  5. Interferon γ expressed by a recombinant respiratory syncytial virus attenuates virus replication in mice without compromising immunogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Interferon γ (IFN-γ) has pleiotropic biological effects, including intrinsic antiviral activity as well as stimulation and regulation of immune responses. An infectious recombinant human respiratory syncytial virus (rRSV/mIFN-γ) was constructed that encodes murine (m) IFN-γ as a separate gene inserted into the G-F intergenic region. Cultured cells infected with rRSV/mIFN-γ secreted 22 μg mIFN-γ per 106 cells. The replication of rRSV/mIFN-γ, but not that of a control chimeric rRSV containing t...

  6. Novel recombinant DNA vaccine candidates for human respiratory syncytial virus: Preclinical evaluation of immunogenicity and protection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Mohamed A; Amer, Haitham M; Öhlschläger, Peter; Hamad, Maaweya E; Almajhdi, Fahad N

    2017-03-08

    The development of safe and potent vaccines for human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is still a challenge for researchers worldwide. DNA-based immunization is currently a promising approach that has been used to generate human vaccines for different age groups. In this study, novel HRSV DNA vaccine candidates were generated and preclinically tested in BALB/c mice. Three different versions of the codon-optimized HRSV fusion (F) gene were individually cloned into the pPOE vector. The new recombinant vectors either express full-length (pPOE-F), secretory (pPOE-TF), or M282-90 linked (pPOE-FM2) forms of the F protein. Distinctive expression of the F protein was identified in HEp-2 cells transfected with the different recombinant vectors using ELISA and immunofluorescence. Mice immunization verified the potential for recombinant vectors to elicit significant levels of neutralizing antibodies and CD8(+) T-cell lymphocytes. pPOE-TF showed higher levels of gene expression in cell culture and better induction of the humoral and cellular immune responses. Following virus challenge, mice that had been immunized with the recombinant vectors were able to control virus replication and displayed lower inflammation compared with mice immunized with empty pPOE vector or formalin-inactivated HRSV vaccine. Moreover, pulmonary cytokine profiles of mice immunized with the 3 recombinant vectors were similar to those of the mock infected group. In conclusion, recombinant pPOE vectors are promising HRSV vaccine candidates in terms of their safety, immunogenicity and protective efficiency. These data encourage further evaluation in phase I clinical trials.

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Julia L

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract viral disease in infants and young children. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. The virus is therefore responsible for an estimated 160,000 deaths per year worldwide. Despite half a century of dedicated research, there remains no licensed vaccine product. Herein are described past and current efforts to harness innate and adaptive immune potentials to combat RSV. A plethora of candidate vaccine products and strategies are reviewed. The development of a successful RSV vaccine may ultimately stem from attention to historical lessons, in concert with an integral partnering of immunology and virology research fields. PMID:21988307

  8. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  9. Recombinant subgroup B human respiratory syncytial virus expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein efficiently replicates in primary human cells and is virulent in cotton rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Lemon (Ken); D.T. Nguyen (Tien); M. Ludlow (Martin); L.J. Rennick (Linda); S. Yüksel (Selma); G. van Amerongen (Geert); S. McQuaid (Stephen); B.K. Rima (Bert); R.L. de Swart (Rik); W.P. Duprex (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractHuman respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is the most important viral cause of severe respiratory tract disease in infants. Two subgroups (A and B) have been identified, which cocirculate during, or alternate between, yearly epidemics and cause indistinguishable disease. Existing in vitro

  10. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new i...

  11. A Recombinant G Protein Plus Cyclosporine A-Based Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine Elicits Humoral and Regulatory T Cell Responses against Infection without Vaccine-Enhanced Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaofan; Zhou, Xian; Zhong, Yiwei; Li, Changgui; Dong, Aihua; He, Zhonghuai; Zhang, Shuren; Wang, Bin

    2016-02-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection can cause severe disease in the lower respiratory tract of infants and older people. Vaccination with a formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine (FI-RSV) and subsequent RSV infection has led to mild to severe pneumonia with two deaths among vaccinees. The vaccine-enhanced disease (VED) was recently demonstrated to be due to an elevated level of Th2 cell responses following loss of regulatory T (Treg) cells from the lungs. To induce high levels of neutralizing Abs and minimize pathogenic T cell responses, we developed a novel strategy of immunizing animals with a recombinant RSV G protein together with cyclosporine A. This novel vaccine induced not only a higher level of neutralizing Abs against RSV infection, but, most importantly, also significantly higher levels of Treg cells that suppressed VED in the lung after RSV infection. The induced responses provided protection against RSV challenge with no sign of pneumonia or bronchitis. Treg cell production of IL-10 was one of the key factors to suppress VED. These finding indicate that G protein plus cyclosporine A could be a promising vaccine against RSV infection in children and older people.

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus neutralizing antibodies in cord blood, respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization, and recurrent wheeze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Ravn, Henrik; Kristensen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization is associated with wheeze. OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of maternally derived RSV neutralizing antibodies in cord blood on RSV hospitalization and recurrent wheeze in infancy. METHODS: Among children from the Danish National Bir...

  13. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  14. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechan

  15. Mechanisms of respiratory syncytial virus specific T cell activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijsen, D.

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in infants, elderly people and immune compromised individuals. Moreover, RSV causes repeated symptomatic re-infections in healthy individuals, which is presumed to be due to ineffective acquir

  16. Palivizumab prophylaxis, respiratory syncytial virus, and subsequent recurrent wheezing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simoes, Eric A. F.; Groothuis, Jessil R.; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier; Reger, Christian H. L.; Mitchell, Ian; Fredrick, Linda M.; Kimpen, Jan L. L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Children who experience respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) early in life have high rates of subsequent recurrent wheezing. Palivizumab, an anti-RSV monoclonal antibody, has 78% to 80% efficacy in preventing RSV hospitalization in premature infants

  17. Study of montelukast for the treatment of respiratory symptoms of post-respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H.; Flores-Nunez, A.; Goh, A.;

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: A pilot study (Bisgaard H; Study Group on Montelukast and Respiratory Syncytial Virus. A randomized trial of montelukast in respiratory syncytial virus postbronchiolitis. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2003;167:379-383) reported the efficacy of montelukast in post-respiratory syncytial viru...

  18. Hot topics in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Maximillian S; Patel, Sanjay; Openshaw, Peter

    2011-03-01

    The 7th International Respiratory Syncytial Virus Symposium took place in Hotel Blijdorp, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. The series has been running since 1996; this meeting took place after a 3-year gap, and was attended by approximately 200 clinicians, scientists and industry representatives from all over the world. The conference covered all aspects of respiratory syncytial virus disease, including virology, cell biology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, immunology, vaccines, antivirals and other therapeutic approaches. Reviews by invited keynote speakers were accompanied by oral and poster presentations, with ample opportunity for discussion of unpublished work. This article summarizes a small selection of hot topics from the meeting, focused on pathogenesis, therapeutics and vaccine development.

  19. Caesarean Section and Hospitalization for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Fisker, Niels; Haerskjold, Ann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:: Hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and asthma share common determinants, and meta-analyses indicate that children delivered by caesarean section (CS) are at increased risk of asthma. We aimed to investigate whether birth by CS is associated ...

  20. Influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus-associated mortality and hospitalisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; Hoes, A W; van Loon, A M; Hak, E

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to estimate influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated mortality and hospitalisations, especially the influenza-associated burden among low-risk individuals < or =65 yrs old, not yet recommended for influenza vaccination in many European countries. R

  1. Challenges and Opportunities in Developing Respiratory Syncytial Virus Therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simoes, Eric A. F.; DeVincenzo, John P.; Boeckh, Michael; Bont, LJ; Crowe, James E.; Griffiths, Paul; Hayden, Frederick G.; Hodinka, Richard L.; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Spencer, Keith; Thirstrup, Steffen; Walsh, Edward E.; Whitley, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Two meetings, one sponsored by the Wellcome Trust in 2012 and the other by the Global Virology Foundation in 2013, assembled academic, public health and pharmaceutical industry experts to assess the challenges and opportunities for developing antivirals for the treatment of respiratory syncytial vir

  2. Influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus-associated mortality and hospitalisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; Hoes, A W; van Loon, A M; Hak, E

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to estimate influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated mortality and hospitalisations, especially the influenza-associated burden among low-risk individuals < or =65 yrs old, not yet recommended for influenza vaccination in many European countries. R

  3. Seasonal variation of maternally derived respiratory syncytial virus antibodies and association with infant hospitalizations for respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Ravn, Henrik; Kristensen, Kim;

    2009-01-01

    This study used 459 prospectively sampled cord blood samples to examine the association between maternally derived respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-neutralizing antibodies and the RSV hospitalization season in Denmark. We found a clear temporal association and suggest that RSV-neutralizing antib...

  4. Replication and clearance of respiratory syncytial virus - Apoptosis is an important pathway of virus clearance after experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2002-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is an important cause of severe respiratory disease in young children, the elderly, and in immunocompromised adults. Similarly, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is causing severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease in calves. Both viruses are pneumovirus...... and clearance in a natural target animal. Replication of BRSV was demonstrated in the luminal part of the respiratory epithelial cells and replication in the upper respiratory tract preceded the replication in the lower respiratory tract. Virus excreted to the lumen of the respiratory tract was cleared...... and the infections with human respiratory syncytial. virus and BRSV have similar clinical, pathological, and epidemiological characteristics. In this study we used experimental BRSV infection in calves as a model of respiratory syncytial virus infection to demonstrate important aspects of viral replication...

  5. Equal virulence of rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in infants hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van J.C.; Goossens, L.K.; Hendrix, R.; Palen, van der J.A.M.; Lusthusz, A.; Thio, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus (RV) are predominant viruses associated with lower respiratory tract infection in infants. We compared the symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV and RV in hospitalized infants. RV showed the same symptoms as RSV, so on clinical g

  6. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus rhinosinusitis in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Rodrigues da Silva

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reported a case of rhinosinusitis for Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Intensive Care Unit patient. The settings were Intensive Care Unit at Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil. One female HIV-infected patient with respiratory failure and circulatory shock due to splenic and renal abscesses, who developed rhinosinusitis caused by RSV and bacteria. Respiratory viruses can play a pathogenic role in airways infection allowing secondary bacterial overgrowth.

  8. Detection of respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus in healthy infants

    OpenAIRE

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Linnemann, Rachel W.; Avadhanula, Vasanthi; Mansbach, Jonathan M.; Piedra, Pedro A.; Gern, James E.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the research importance of rhinovirus detection in asymptomatic healthy infants, the literature remains sparse. Objective: To investigate the prevalence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus (and its species). Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 110 healthy, non-hospitalized infants without acute illness at an academic medical center from November 2013 through May 2014. We tested nasal swab specimens by using polymerase chain reaction and genetic...

  9. Detection of respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus in healthy infants

    OpenAIRE

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Linnemann, Rachel W.; Avadhanula, Vasanthi; Mansbach, Jonathan M.; Piedra, Pedro A.; Gern, James E.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the research importance of rhinovirus detection in asymptomatic healthy infants, the literature remains sparse. Objective To investigate the prevalence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus (and its species). Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 110 healthy, non-hospitalized infants without acute illness at an academic medical center from November 2013 through May 2014. We tested nasal swab specimens by using polymerase chain reaction and genetic se...

  10. Seasonality of long term wheezing following respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, L; Steijn, M; van Aalderen, WMC; Brus, F; Draaisma, JMT; Van Diemen-Steenvoorde, RAAM; Pekelharing-Berghuis, M; Kimpen, JLL

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is well known that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is associated with subsequent wheezing episodes, but the precise natural course of wheezing following RSV LRTI is not known. This study aimed to determine the continuous development of wheezi

  11. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus : current management and new therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazur, Natalie; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Baraldi, Eugenio; Fauroux, Brigitte; Greenough, Anne; Heikkinen, Terho; Manzoni, Paolo; Mejias, Asuncion; Nair, Harish; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Polack, Fernando P.; Ramilo, Octavio; Sharland, Mike; Stein, Renato; Madhi, Shabir A.; Bont, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Evidence-based management guidelines suggest that there is no effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and that supportive care, ie, hydration and

  12. Atypical Presentations of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection; Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawal Al-Maskari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV usually causes a lower respiratory tract infection in affected patients. RSV has also been infrequently linked to extrapulmonary diseases in children. We report four children who had unusually severe clinical manifestations of RSV infections requiring critical care admission. These patients presented to the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in December 2013 with acute necrotising encephalopathy (ANE, acute fulminant hepatic failure with encephalopathy, pneumatoceles and croup. A unique presentation of ANE has not previously been reported in association with an RSV infection. All patients had a positive outcome and recovered fully with supportive management.

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus: current and emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner TL

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tiffany L Turner,1 Benjamin T Kopp,1 Grace Paul,1 Lindsay C Landgrave,2 Don Hayes Jr,1 Rohan Thompson11Department of Pediatrics, Ohio State University College of Medicine, 2Clinical Pharmacy, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is an important respiratory pathogen in infants and children worldwide. Although RSV typically causes mild upper respiratory infections, it frequently causes severe morbidity and mortality, especially in premature infants and children with other chronic diseases. Treatment of RSV is limited by a lack of effective antiviral treatments; however, ribavirin has been used in complicated cases, along with the addition of intravenous immune globulin in specific patients. Vaccination strategies for RSV prevention are heavily studied, but only palivizumab (Synagis® has been approved for use in the United States in very select patient populations. Research is ongoing in developing additional vaccines, along with alternative therapies that may help prevent or decrease the severity of RSV infections in infants and children. To date, we have not seen a decrement in RSV morbidity and mortality with our current options; therefore, there is a clear need for novel RSV preventative and therapeutic strategies. In this review, we discuss the current and evolving trends in RSV treatment for infants and children.Keywords: bronchiolitis, lower respiratory tract infection, respiratory syncytial virus, probiotics, vitamin D

  14. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and its propensity for causing bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, Raymond J; DeVincenzo, John P

    2015-01-01

    Infants and young children with acute onset of wheezing and reduced respiratory airflows are often diagnosed with obstruction and inflammation of the small bronchiolar airways, ie bronchiolitis. The most common aetological agents causing bronchiolitis in young children are the respiratory viruses, and of the commonly encountered respiratory viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has a propensity for causing bronchiolitis. Indeed, RSV bronchiolitis remains the major reason why previously healthy infants are admitted to hospital. Why RSV infection is such a predominant cause of bronchiolitis is the subject of this review. By reviewing the available histopathology of RSV bronchiolitis, both in humans and relevant animal models, we identify hallmark features of RSV infection of the distal airways and focus attention on the consequences of columnar cell cytopathology occurring in the bronchioles, which directly impacts the development of bronchiolar obstruction, inflammation and disease. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. BIOLOGY OF HUMAN RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    50% of all pneumonia and up to 90% of the reported cases of bronchiolitis in infancy. It is a common ..... Clinical recovery from RSV bronchiolitis may occur in the presence of ..... of respiratory infections in bone marrow transplant. Pneumonia ...

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus from Lanzhou, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Chuanfeng; Fu, Shengfang; Zhou, Xv; Yu, Li

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A complete genome of human respiratory syncytial virus was sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the full-length human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) genome sequence belongs to gene type NA1. We sequenced the genome in order to create the full-length cDNA infectious clone and develop vaccines against HRSV.

  17. Need for a safe vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo-Young Kim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is a major cause of severe respiratory tract illnesses in infants and young children worldwide. Despite its importance as a respiratory pathogen, there is currently no licensed vaccine for HRSV. Following failure of the initial trial of formalin-inactivated virus particle vaccine, continuous efforts have been made for the development of safe and efficacious vaccines against HRSV. However, several obstacles persist that delay the development of HRSV vaccine, such as the immature immune system of newborn infants and the possible Th2-biased immune responses leading to subsequent vaccine-enhanced diseases. Many HRSV vaccine strategies are currently being developed and evaluated, including live-attenuated viruses, subunit-based, and vector-based candidates. In this review, the current HRSV vaccines are overviewed and the safety issues regarding asthma and vaccine-induced pathology are discussed.

  18. Overview of respiratory syncytial virus disease in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoopes JM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available J Michael Hoopes1, Veena R Kumar21Medical Information, 2Medical and Scientific Affairs, MedImmune, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD, USAAbstract: Respiratory tract illnesses associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV were first reported more than 160 years ago and gained acceptance as a major respiratory pathogen in the late 1950s. Annual epidemics show a seasonal pattern typically beginning in the late fall and ending in early spring, averaging 5 months in length, and varying in time of onset, offset, and duration depending on geographic location. Manifestations of RSV illness primarily involve the upper respiratory tract but can spread to the lower airways and lead to bronchiolitis and/or pneumonia. Initial infection occurs in approximately two-thirds of children during the first year of life; nearly all children are infected at least once by 2 years of age. Reinfection is common throughout life, but initial illness during infancy generally presents with the most severe symptoms. Medical risk conditions that consistently predispose young children to serious lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI include congenital heart disease, chronic lung disease, and premature birth. Serious LRTI due to RSV is the leading cause of hospitalization in infants and young children worldwide and annual mean hospital expenses have been estimated to exceed 1 billion dollars in the United States. Young children incur more inpatient and outpatient visits for RSV LRTI than for influenza. RSV has a greater impact than influenza on hospitalization in infants with respect to length of stay, severity/course of disease, and resultant needs for ancillary treatments. Unlike many other childhood illnesses, a vaccine is not currently available for preventing RSV disease.Keywords: bronchopulmonary dysplasia, infants, hospitalization, prematurity, respiratory syncytial virus

  19. Preventing respiratory syncytial virus in homebound premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the home health nurse's role in preventing respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) among premature infants. Thousands of children infected with RSV require hospitalization each year. Consistent contact with the infant alerts the nurse to subtle signs and symptoms of RSV infection, which may include nasal congestion, cough, low-grade fever, and malaise. By developing patient and caregiver trust, the home health nurse can implement an RSV prevention plan, leading to a decrease in hospitalization episodes of premature infants with RSV. Identification of patient risk factors contributing to RSV together with caregiver education is addressed in this article.

  20. DNase treatment for atelectasis in infants with severe respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.F.M. Merkus (Peter); M. de Hoog (Matthijs); R. van Gent; J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractRespiratory insufficiency due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is partly due to the abundance of thickened mucus and the inability to clear it from the airways. Mucus in RSV bronchiolitis contains necrotic inflammatory and epithelial cells. The

  1. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  2. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneyber, Martin C J; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W R; Plötz, Frans B; Markhors, Dick G

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus conventional gas on respiratory system resistance, air-trapping and CO2 removal. Mechanically ventilated, sedated and paralyzed infants with proven RSV were enrolled within 24 hours after paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)admission. At T = 0, respiratory system mechanics including respiratory system compliance and resistance, and peak expiratory flow rate were measured with the AVEA ventilator. The measurements were repeated at each interval (after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox, after 30 minutes of ventilation with nitrox and again after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox). Indices of gas exchange (ventilation and oxygenation index) were calculated at each interval. Air-trapping (defined by relative change in end-expiratory lung volume) was determined by electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at each interval. Thirteen infants were enrolled. In nine, EIT measurements were performed. Mechanical ventilation with heliox significantly decreased respiratory system resistance. This was not accompanied by an improved CO2 elimination, decreased peak expiratory flow rate or decreased end-expiratory lung volume. Importantly, oxygenation remained unaltered throughout the experimental protocol. Respiratory system resistance is significantly decreased by mechanical ventilation with heliox (ISCRTN98152468).

  3. Perinatal Lamb Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derscheid, Rachel J.; Ackermann, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of bronchiolitis in infants and children worldwide. Many animal models are used to study RSV, but most studies investigate disease in adult animals which does not address the unique physiology and immunology that makes infants more susceptible. The perinatal (preterm and term) lamb is a useful model of infant RSV disease as lambs have similar pulmonary structure including airway branching, Clara and type II cells, submucosal glands and Duox/lactoperoxidase (LPO) oxidative system, and prenatal alveologenesis. Lambs can be born preterm (90% gestation) and survive for experimentation although both preterm and term lambs are susceptible to ovine, bovine and human strains of RSV and develop clinical symptoms including fever, tachypnea, and malaise as well as mild to moderate gross and histologic lesions including bronchiolitis with epithelial injury, neutrophil infiltration and syncytial cell formation. RSV disease in preterm lambs is more severe than in term lambs; disease is progressively less in adults and age-dependent susceptibility is a feature similar to humans. Innate and adaptive immune responses by perinatal lambs closely parallel those of infants. The model is used to test therapeutic regimens, risk factors such as maternal ethanol consumption, and formalin inactivated RSV vaccines. PMID:23202468

  4. Perinatal Lamb Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Ackermann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most frequent cause of bronchiolitis in infants and children worldwide. Many animal models are used to study RSV, but most studies investigate disease in adult animals which does not address the unique physiology and immunology that makes infants more susceptible. The perinatal (preterm and term lamb is a useful model of infant RSV disease as lambs have similar pulmonary structure including airway branching, Clara and type II cells, submucosal glands and Duox/lactoperoxidase (LPO oxidative system, and prenatal alveologenesis. Lambs can be born preterm (90% gestation and survive for experimentation although both preterm and term lambs are susceptible to ovine, bovine and human strains of RSV and develop clinical symptoms including fever, tachypnea, and malaise as well as mild to moderate gross and histologic lesions including bronchiolitis with epithelial injury, neutrophil infiltration and syncytial cell formation. RSV disease in preterm lambs is more severe than in term lambs; disease is progressively less in adults and age-dependent susceptibility is a feature similar to humans. Innate and adaptive immune responses by perinatal lambs closely parallel those of infants. The model is used to test therapeutic regimens, risk factors such as maternal ethanol consumption, and formalin inactivated RSV vaccines.

  5. 4EBP1 Is Dephosphorylated by Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gil, Gustavo; Landa-Cardeña, Adriana; Coutiño, Rocío; García-Román, Rebeca; Sampieri, Clara L; Mora, Silvia I; Montero, Hilda

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) requires protein biosynthesis machinery to generate progeny. There is evidence that RSV might alter some translation components since stress granules are formed in their host cells. Consistent with these observations, we found that RSV induces dephosphorylation of 4EBP1 (eIF4E-binding protein), an important cellular translation factor. Our results show no correlation between the 4EBP1 dephosphorylation time and the decrease in the global rate of protein synthesis. Interestingly, treatment with rapamycin stimulates virus generation. The results suggest that RSV is a virus that still contains unknown mechanisms involved in the translation of their mRNAs through the alteration or modification of some translation factors, such as 4EBP1, possibly to favor its replicative cycle. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. A randomized trial of montelukast in respiratory syncytial virus postbronchiolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Infants often develop reactive airway disease after respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LT) are released during RSV infection and may contribute to the inflammation. We hypothesized that a cys-LT receptor antagonist would ameliorate reactive airway disease...... subsequent to RSV bronchiolitis. One hundred and thirty infants who were 3 to 36 months old, hospitalized with acute RSV bronchiolitis, were randomized into a double-blind, parallel comparison of 5-mg montelukast chewable tablets or matching placebo given for 28 days starting within 7 days of symptom debut...... = 0.015). Daytime cough was significantly reduced on active treatment (p = 0.04). Exacerbations were significantly delayed from montelukast compared with placebo (p bronchiolitis....

  7. Motavizumab for prophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus in high-risk children: a noninferiority trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier; Simões, Eric A F; Dagan, Ron

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Palivizumab reduces respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization in children at high risk by approximately 50% compared with placebo. We compared the efficacy and safety of motavizumab, an investigational monoclonal antibody with enhanced anti-RSV activity in preclinical studies, ...

  8. Invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal disease : association with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; VAN DER Ende, A; VAN Loon, A M; Hoes, A W; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between viral activity and bacterial invasive disease, considering both influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study aimed to assess the potential relationship between invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), meningococcal disease (MD), and

  9. Specific Dietary Oligosaccharides Increase Th1 Responses in a Mouse Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijf, Marcel A.; Kruijsen, Debby; Bastiaans, Jacqueline; Coenjaerts, Frank E. J.; Garssen, Johan; van Bleek, Grada M.; van't Land, Belinda

    2012-01-01

    Breast feeding reduces the risk of developing severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in infants. In addition to maternal antibodies, other immune-modulating factors in human milk contribute to this protection. Specific dietary prebiotic oligosaccharides, similar to oligosaccharides pres

  10. Invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal disease : association with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; VAN DER Ende, A; VAN Loon, A M; Hoes, A W; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between viral activity and bacterial invasive disease, considering both influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study aimed to assess the potential relationship between invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), meningococcal disease (MD), and

  11. Causal direction between respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and asthma studied in monozygotic twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorisrisak, Porntiva; Halkjaer, Liselotte Brydensholt; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis has been associated with later development of asthma, wheezing, abnormal pulmonary function, and sensitization. Our aim was to determine the differential effect within monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs discordant for severe RSV bronchiolitis in infancy...

  12. WITHDRAWN: Immunoglobulin treatment for respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Hannah L; Del Mar, Chris B

    2010-09-08

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and pneumonia hospitalise hundreds of thousands of infants every year. Treatment is largely supportive therapy, (for example, oxygen, fluids and occasionally mechanical ventilation). Ribavirin, an antiviral agent, is licensed for severe RSV infection, although systematic reviews find it of no benefit. Passive protection against RSV can be achieved through monthly intramuscular injections of the humanised monoclonal anti-RSV antibody palivizumab (Synagis), and yields a 55% reduction in RSV hospitalisation in susceptible infants. This review assesses immunoglobulin treatment of RSV infection rather than its role as a prophylactic measure. To assess the efficacy of adding human or humanised immunoglobulin therapy to supportive therapy in infants hospitalised with laboratory-determined RSV infection. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2006, issue 1) which contains the Acute Respiratory Infections Group's specialized regsiter, MEDLINE (1966 to Week 4, January 2006) and EMBASE (1980 to September 2005). We also ran searches of reference lists of relevant trials and review articles and searches of personal files. We did not impose any language restrictions. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared immunoglobulin treatment with a placebo control in children hospitalised for RSV infection with bronchiolitis or pneumonia or other lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) with laboratory-documented RSV infection. The primary outcomes of interest were mortality, length of hospitalisation, length of ventilation and oxygen dependence. Secondary outcome measures were pulmonary function and re-hospitalisations for recurrent breathing difficulties in subsequent years. Any adverse effects of the treatments were also noted, for example, hypersensitivity reactions. Data were extracted but cross-comparison was not possible due to the shortage of studies and

  13. T cell responses specific for Respiratory Syncytial Virus : Aspects of antigen presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, P.M.A. de

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus is a major cause of childhood lower respiratory tract infections. Seventy percent of all children are infected in their first year of life, and nearly all children by age three. Although the majority of patients suffer a relatively mild upper respiratory tract infection,

  14. Gene-gun DNA vaccination aggravates respiratory syncytial virus-induced pneumonitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Olszewska, Wieslawa; Stryhn, Anette

    2004-01-01

    elicited with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the complete RSV M2 protein, but stronger than those induced by a similar DNA construct without the beta2m gene. DNA vaccination led to enhanced pulmonary disease after RSV challenge, with increased weight loss and cell recruitment to the lung. Depletion......A CD8+ T-cell memory response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was generated by using a DNA vaccine construct encoding the dominant Kd-restricted epitope from the viral transcription anti-terminator protein M2 (M2(82-90)), linked covalently to human beta2-microglobulin (beta2m). Cutaneous gene......+ T-cell responses were not induced. Thus, in addition to specific CD8+ T cell-mediated immunopathology, gene-gun DNA vaccination causes non-specific enhancement of RSV disease without affecting virus clearance....

  15. Mortality due to Respiratory Syncytial Virus. Burden and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, Sarah; Erviti, Anabella; Caballero, Mauricio T; Vallone, Fernando; Zanone, Stella M; Losada, Juan Ves; Bianchi, Alejandra; Acosta, Patricio L; Talarico, Laura B; Ferretti, Adrian; Grimaldi, Luciano Alva; Sancilio, Andrea; Dueñas, Karina; Sastre, Gustavo; Rodriguez, Andrea; Ferrero, Fernando; Barboza, Edgar; Gago, Guadalupe Fernández; Nocito, Celina; Flamenco, Edgardo; Perez, Alberto Rodriguez; Rebec, Beatriz; Ferolla, F Martin; Libster, Romina; Karron, Ruth A; Bergel, Eduardo; Polack, Fernando P

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of hospitalization and an important cause of death in infants in the developing world. The relative contribution of social, biologic, and clinical risk factors to RSV mortality in low-income regions is unclear. To determine the burden and risk factors for mortality due to RSV in a low-income population of 84,840 infants. This was a prospective, population-based, cross-sectional, multicenter study conducted between 2011 and 2013. Hospitalizations and deaths due to severe lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) were recorded during the RSV season. All-cause hospital deaths and community deaths were monitored. Risk factors for respiratory failure (RF) and mortality due to RSV were assessed using a hierarchical, logistic regression model. A total of 2,588 (65.5%) infants with severe LRTI were infected with RSV. A total of 157 infants (148 postneonatal) experienced RF or died with RSV. RSV LRTI accounted for 57% fatal LRTI tested for the virus. A diagnosis of sepsis (odds ratio [OR], 17.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 13.14-21.16 for RF) (OR, 119.39; 95% CI, 50.98-273.34 for death) and pneumothorax (OR, 17.15; 95% CI, 13.07-21.01 for RF) (OR, 65.49; 95% CI, 28.90-139.17 for death) were the main determinants of poor outcomes. RSV was the most frequent cause of mortality in low-income postneonatal infants. RF and death due to RSV LRTI, almost exclusively associated with prematurity and cardiopulmonary diseases in industrialized countries, primarily affect term infants in a developing world environment. Poor outcomes at hospitals are frequent and associated with the cooccurrence of bacterial sepsis and clinically significant pneumothoraxes.

  16. Prevalence of rhinovirus in wheezing children: a comparison with respiratory syncytial virus wheezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiquan Sun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To explore the distribution and clinical manifestations of rhinovirus infection in wheezing children, and compare the clinical differences between rhinovirus- and respiratory syncytial virus-induced wheezing. Materials and methods This prospective cohort study was carried out in Children's Hospital of Soochow University from Dec 2012 to Nov 2014. We enrolled consecutive hospitalized children <60 months of age presented with wheezing. Clinical data including cough, fever, dyspnea, crackles were recorded by pediatricians on the first day of admission. Meanwhile, nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained to test for respiratory viruses, by using polymerase chain reaction method for rhinovirus, human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus, and direct immunofluorescence assay to test for respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1–3, and influenza virus types A and B. Results Rhinovirus was a main causative agent isolated in 14.7% of the hospitalized wheezing children in Suzhou, China, being second to respiratory syncytial virus (21.0%. Different from respiratory syncytial virus infection, which peaked in winter months, rhinovirus could be detected all year round, peaked between July and September, and in November. Children with rhinovirus infection were older and presented with more often allergic sensitizations, blood eosinophilia, and leukocytosis than those of respiratory syncytial virus infection. Logistic regression analysis revealed that rhinovirus-infected children experienced earlier wheezing more often than respiratory syncytial virus children (odds ratio, 3.441; 95% confidence interval, 1.187–9.979; p = 0.023. Conclusion Rhinovirus was a main viral pathogen in wheezing children, especially in summer time. Rhinovirus-induced wheezing was different from respiratory syncytial virus, apart from seasonal epidemics; these two groups differed with regard to age, allergic sensitizations, laboratory test

  17. Down syndrome : A novel risk factor for respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis - A prospective birth-cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemers, Beatrijs L. P.; van Furth, Marceline; Weijerman, Michel E.; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; Broers, Chantal J. M.; van den Ende, Kimberly; Kimpen, Jan L. L.; Strengers, Jan L. M.; Bont, Louis J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Respiratory syncytial virus is the single-most important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children. Preterm birth and congenital heart disease are known risk factors for severe respiratory syncytial virus infections. Although Down syndrome is associated with a high risk of

  18. Vaccine safety and efficacy evaluation of a recombinant bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) with deletion of the SH gene and subunit vaccines based on recombinant human RSV proteins: N-nanorings, P and M2-1, in calves with maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodörn, Krister; Hägglund, Sara; Fix, Jenna; Dubuquoy, Catherine; Makabi-Panzu, Boby; Thom, Michelle; Karlsson, Per; Roque, Jean-Louis; Karlstam, Erika; Pringle, John; Eléouët, Jean-François; Riffault, Sabine; Taylor, Geraldine; Valarcher, Jean François

    2014-01-01

    The development of safe and effective vaccines against both bovine and human respiratory syncytial viruses (BRSV, HRSV) to be used in the presence of RSV-specific maternally-derived antibodies (MDA) remains a high priority in human and veterinary medicine. Herein, we present safety and efficacy results from a virulent BRSV challenge of calves with MDA, which were immunized with one of three vaccine candidates that allow serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA): an SH gene-deleted recombinant BRSV (ΔSHrBRSV), and two subunit (SU) formulations based on HRSV-P, -M2-1, and -N recombinant proteins displaying BRSV-F and -G epitopes, adjuvanted by either oil emulsion (Montanide ISA71VG, SUMont) or immunostimulating complex matrices (AbISCO-300, SUAbis). Whereas all control animals developed severe respiratory disease and shed high levels of virus following BRSV challenge, ΔSHrBRSV-immunized calves demonstrated almost complete clinical and virological protection five weeks after a single intranasal vaccination. Although mucosal vaccination with ΔSHrBRSV failed to induce a detectable immunological response, there was a rapid and strong anamnestic mucosal BRSV-specific IgA, virus neutralizing antibody and local T cell response following challenge with virulent BRSV. Calves immunized twice intramuscularly, three weeks apart with SUMont were also well protected two weeks after boost. The protection was not as pronounced as that in ΔSHrBRSV-immunized animals, but superior to those immunized twice subcutaneously three weeks apart with SUAbis. Antibody responses induced by the subunit vaccines were non-neutralizing and not directed against BRSV F or G proteins. When formulated as SUMont but not as SUAbis, the HRSV N, P and M2-1 proteins induced strong systemic cross-protective cell-mediated immune responses detectable already after priming. ΔSHrBRSV and SUMont are two promising DIVA-compatible vaccines, apparently inducing protection by

  19. Inactivation of respiratory syncytial virus by detergents and disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krilov, L R; Harkness, S H

    1993-07-01

    The activity of a number of detergents and disinfectants against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was evaluated in an in vitro assay system. Equal volumes of RSV and serial 10-fold dilutions of the test agents were mixed at 4 degrees C for 5 minutes. The RSV titer in each mixture was compared with that of untreated RSV alone. In 14 experiments with input RSV titers ranging from 2.6 x 10(3) to 2 x 10(7) plaque-forming units/ml, a 10-fold dilution of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (generic bleach) inactivated (> or = 3-log reduction in titer) the virus. With lower RSV titers inactivation was also observed at a 100-fold dilution of bleach. Fetal calf serum concentrations up to 50% as an organic load did not diminish the bleach effect. The degree of RSV inactivation was also defined for Lysol, povidone-iodine, Amphyl, Hibiclens, Osyl, ethanol and Listermint. The short contact time, the reproducible nature of the findings and the continued effectiveness with increasing organic loads all suggest that detergents and disinfectants can potentially play an important role in decreasing the spread of RSV infection.

  20. Occurrence of human respiratory syncytial virus in summer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobugawa, Y; Takeuchi, T; Hibino, A; Hassan, M R; Yagami, R; Kondo, H; Odagiri, T; Saito, R

    2017-01-01

    In temperate zones, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) outbreaks typically occur in cold weather, i.e. in late autumn and winter. However, recent outbreaks in Japan have tended to start during summer and autumn. This study examined associations of meteorological conditions with the numbers of HRSV cases reported in summer in Japan. Using data from the HRSV national surveillance system and national meteorological data for summer during the period 2007-2014, we utilized negative binomial logistic regression analysis to identify associations between meteorological conditions and reported cases of HRSV. HRSV cases increased when summer temperatures rose and when relative humidity increased. Consideration of the interaction term temperature × relative humidity enabled us to show synergistic effects of high temperature with HRSV occurrence. In particular, HRSV cases synergistically increased when relative humidity increased while the temperature was ⩾28·2 °C. Seasonal-trend decomposition analysis using the HRSV national surveillance data divided by 11 climate divisions showed that summer HRSV cases occurred in South Japan (Okinawa Island), Kyushu, and Nankai climate divisions, which are located in southwest Japan. Higher temperature and higher relative humidity were necessary conditions for HRSV occurrence in summer in Japan. Paediatricians in temperate zones should be mindful of possible HRSV cases in summer, when suitable conditions are present.

  1. Sequential MRI, SPECT and PET in respiratory syncytial virus encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, K.; Sakazaki, Hiromi; Murakami, Seiko; Yonezawa, Sumiko [Department of Paediatrics, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Fujimoto, Keiji [Dept. of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Seto, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Katsuji; Hattori, Hideji; Matsuoka, Osamu [Dept. of Paediatrics, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Murata, Ryosuke [Children`s Medical Centre, Osaka City General Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    We report on a 3-year-old girl with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) encephalitis manifested by disturbance of consciousness, conjugate eye deviation, anuria, truncal ataxia and intention tremor. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintense areas in the cerebellar cortex. No lesion was detected in the cerebral cortex, pons or spinal cord. The hyperintense areas in the cerebellar cortex diminished with recovery from the clinical manifestations and had resolved 2 months after onset. The MRI lesions in the cerebellum were considered to be due to oedema. SPECT and positron emission tomography (PET), performed 3 months after onset, disclosed areas of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism at the same sites. One year after onset, MRI showed mild atrophy of the cerebellum. Hypoperfusion on SPECT and hypometabolism on PET remained. Neuroimaging showed that ataxia and tremor in this case were the result of cerebellitis. The patient has no neurological deficit except for mild truncal ataxia. This patient is a rare example of RSV encephalitis. (orig.) With 4 figs., 16 refs.

  2. A role for airway remodeling during respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimina Dawn M

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe respiratory syncytial virus infection (RSV during infancy has been shown to be a major risk factor for the development of subsequent wheeze. However, the reasons for this link remain unclear. The objective of this research was to determine the consequences of early exposure to RSV and allergen in the development of subsequent airway hyperreactivity (AHR using a developmental time point in the mouse that parallels that of the human neonate. Methods Weanling mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (Ova and/or infected with RSV. Eight days after the last allergen challenge, various pathophysiological endpoints were examined. Results AHR in response to methacholine was enhanced only in weanling mice exposed to Ova and subsequently infected with RSV. The increase in AHR appeared to be unrelated to pulmonary RSV titer. Total bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity in these mice increased approximately two-fold relative to Ova alone and was attributable to increases in eosinophil and lymphocyte numbers. Enhanced pulmonary pathologies including persistent mucus production and subepithelial fibrosis were observed. Interestingly, these data correlated with transient increases in TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-5, and IL-2. Conclusion The observed changes in pulmonary structure may provide an explanation for epidemiological data suggesting that early exposure to allergens and RSV have long-term physiological consequences. Furthermore, the data presented here highlight the importance of preventative strategies against RSV infection of atopic individuals during neonatal development.

  3. Increased detection of respiratory syncytial virus, influenza viruses, parainfluenza viruses, and adenoviruses with real-time PCR in samples from patients with respiratory symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, Alma C.; van Loon, Anton M.; Wolfs, Tom F. W.; Jansen, Nicolaas J. G.; Nijhuis, Monique; Breteler, Els Klein; Schuurman, Rob; Rossen, John W. A.

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory samples (n = 267) from hospitalized patients with respiratory symptoms were tested by real-time PCR, viral culture, and direct immunofluorescence for respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza viruses, and adenoviruses. Compared with conventional diagnostic tests, real-t

  4. Increased detection of respiratory syncytial virus, influenza viruses, parainfluenza viruses, and adenoviruses with real-time PCR in samples from patients with respiratory symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, Alma C.; van Loon, Anton M.; Wolfs, Tom F. W.; Jansen, Nicolaas J. G.; Nijhuis, Monique; Breteler, Els Klein; Schuurman, Rob; Rossen, John W. A.

    Respiratory samples (n = 267) from hospitalized patients with respiratory symptoms were tested by real-time PCR, viral culture, and direct immunofluorescence for respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza viruses, and adenoviruses. Compared with conventional diagnostic tests,

  5. Respiratory picornaviruses and respiratory syncytial virus as causative agents of acute expiratory wheezing in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jartti, Tuomas; Lehtinen, Pasi; Vuorinen, Tytti; Osterback, Riika; van den Hoogen, Bernadette; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Ruuskanen, Olli

    2004-06-01

    We studied the viral etiology of acute expiratory wheezing (bronchiolitis, acute asthma) in 293 hospitalized children in a 2-year prospective study in Finland. A potential causative viral agent was detected in 88% of the cases. Eleven different viruses were represented. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (27%), enteroviruses (25%), rhinovirus (24%), and nontypable rhino/enterovirus (16%) were found most frequently. In infants, RSV was found in 54% and respiratory picornaviruses (rhinovirus and enteroviruses) in 42% of the cases. In older children, respiratory picornaviruses dominated (65% of children ages 1-2 years and 82% of children ages > or =3 years). Human metapneumovirus was detected in 4% of all children and in 11% of infants. To prevent and treat acute expiratory wheezing illnesses in children, efforts should be focused on RSV, enterovirus, and rhinovirus infections.

  6. Respiratory Watch: Development of a Provincial System for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Surveillance in Nova Scotia, 2005–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaad Al-Assam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in young children and is increasingly recognized as a cause of influenza-like illness in those older than 65 years of age. A surveillance system to provide timely local information about RSV activity in Nova Scotia (NS is described.

  7. Down's syndrome is a risk factor for severe lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galleguillos, Constanza; Galleguillos, Bárbara; Larios, Guillermo; Menchaca, Gonzalo; Bont, Louis; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Previous studies have suggested that Down's syndrome is an independent risk factor for severe respiratory infection due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We compared the clinical characteristics of children with and without Down's syndrome hospitalised due to RSV. METHODS: This retrospectiv

  8. Down's syndrome is a risk factor for severe lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galleguillos, Constanza; Galleguillos, Bárbara; Larios, Guillermo; Menchaca, Gonzalo; Bont, Louis|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304813370; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Previous studies have suggested that Down's syndrome is an independent risk factor for severe respiratory infection due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We compared the clinical characteristics of children with and without Down's syndrome hospitalised due to RSV. METHODS: This retrospectiv

  9. Subgrouping of bovine respiratory syncytial virus strains detected in lung tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, R.S.; Daus, E.; Kramps, J.A.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Buijs, R.; Middel, W.G.J.; Taylor, G.; Furze, J.; Huyben, M.W.C.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    1996-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus is an important respiratory pathogen in cattle. Recently, subgroups of BRSV have been identified, based on antigenic differences. However, little is known about subgroups of BRSV that circulate in the cattle population. Therefore, we determined the reactivity of

  10. Aspects of Innate and Adaptive Immune responses during Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukens, M.V.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infections are a major cause of lower respiratory tract disease and represent a major disease burden in infants, immune compromised patients and the elderly. Despite the identification and isolation of the virus in 1956, extensive efforts since then to develop a

  11. Aspects of Innate and Adaptive Immune responses during Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukens, M.V.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infections are a major cause of lower respiratory tract disease and represent a major disease burden in infants, immune compromised patients and the elderly. Despite the identification and isolation of the virus in 1956, extensive efforts since then to develop a saf

  12. Cost-effectiveness of potential infant vaccination against respiratory syncytial virus infection in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijboom, M. J.; Rozenbaum, M. H.; Benedictus, A.; Luytjes, W.; Kneyber, M. C. J.; Wilschut, J. C.; Hak, E.; Postma, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is one of the major causes of respiratory illness in infants, infecting virtually every child before the age of 2 years. Currently, several Phase 1 trials with RSV vaccines in infants are ongoing or have been completed. As yet, no efficacy

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus infections: how antibodies and bacteria modulate innate immunity and disease severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.E.P.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can cause severe respiratory tract infections in young children. It is largely unknown why some children will develop very severe infections by RSV, whereas the majority will only get a common cold. In this doctoral thesis, we studied whether maternal antibodies and

  14. Absence of human metapneumovirus co-infection in cases of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J B M; Bos, A P; Lutter, R; Rossen, J W A; Schuurman, R

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that co-infection of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) in severe respiratory syncytial (RSV) virus bronchiolitis is very common. To evaluate the epidemiology of hMPV co-infection in children with severe lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV virus. This was an observational

  15. Treatment of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis : 1995 poll of members of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; Schaad, UB

    1997-01-01

    Background. Among the lower respiratory tract infections during infancy requiring hospitalization, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is the most frequent disease entity. Nevertheless treatment remains controversial. Methods. A poll among the European Society for Paediatric Infectious D

  16. Treatment of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis : 1995 poll of members of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; Schaad, UB

    Background. Among the lower respiratory tract infections during infancy requiring hospitalization, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is the most frequent disease entity. Nevertheless treatment remains controversial. Methods. A poll among the European Society for Paediatric Infectious

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus: the possible trigger of airway remodeling through matrix metalloproteinase activation?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Fu-qiang; LIU Dai-shun

    2007-01-01

    @@ Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of epidemic respiratory tract illness in children. Severe RSV infections involving the lower respiratory tract are primarily seen in young children with naive immune systems and/or genetic predispositions. However, RSV was not recognized as a potentially serious problem in older adults until the 1970s, when outbreaks of the virus infection occurred in long-term care facilities.

  18. Increased concordance of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection in identical twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis; Stensballe, Lone Graff; Skytthe, Axel

    2008-01-01

    in Denmark between 1994 and 2003. Latent-factor models of genetic and environmental effects were fitted to the observed data by using maximal likelihood methods. RESULTS: Identical twins resembled each other significantly more than did fraternal twins for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization...... (concordance rate: 0.66 vs 0.53), which suggests genetic influences on disease severity. Genetic factors accounted for 16%, family environment for 73%, and nonshared environment for 11% of the individual susceptibility to develop severe respiratory syncytial virus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The severity...

  19. Prolonged sinoatrial block in an infant with respiratory syncytial viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Wajed; Agoudemous, Melissa; Basnet, Sangita

    2012-10-01

    Complete heart block in children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) infections has been described. This report describes a prolonged sinoatrial block exceeding 4 s in an infant with RSV, which, to the authors' knowledge, is the longest such event described in the published literature. This block was followed by shorter episodes within the next 24 h. An extensive workup showed no other known cause of bradycardia or sinoatrial block. The infant was discharged home with 48 h Holter monitoring, which was normal. At this writing, the infant has remained asymptomatic since discharge. Respiratory syncytial viral infections may cause prolonged sinoatrial block in an otherwise healthy child.

  20. Genetic and antigenic analysis of the G attachment protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvander, M.; Vilcek, S.; Baule, C.;

    1998-01-01

    Antigenic and genetic studies of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) were made on isolates obtained from three continents over 27 years. Antigenic variation between eight isolates was initially determined using protein G-specific monoclonal antibodies. Four distinct reaction patterns were...... of a 731 nucleotide fragment in the G protein gene. Nine of the BRSV strains were analysed by direct sequencing of RT-PCR amplicons whereas sequences of 18 BRSV and three human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) strains were obtained from GenBank. The analysis revealed similarities of 88-100% among BRSV...

  1. Inactivation of respiratory syncytial virus by zinc finger reactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalova, Marina S; Prince, Gregory A; Blanco, Jorge C G

    2010-01-26

    Infectivity of retroviruses such as HIV-1 and MuLV can be abrogated by compounds targeting zinc finger motif in viral nucleocapsid protein (NC), involved in controlling the processivity of reverse transcription and virus infectivity. Although a member of a different viral family (Pneumoviridae), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) contains a zinc finger protein M2-1 also involved in control of viral polymerase processivity. Given the functional similarity between the two proteins, it was possible that zinc finger-reactive compounds inactivating retroviruses would have a similar effect against RSV by targeting RSV M2-1 protein. Moreover, inactivation of RSV through modification of an internal protein could yield a safer whole virus vaccine than that produced by RSV inactivation with formalin which modifies surface proteins. Three compounds were evaluated for their ability to reduce RSV infectivity: 2,2'-dithiodipyridine (AT-2), tetraethylthiuram disulfide and tetramethylthiuram disulfide. All three were capable of inactivating RSV, with AT-2 being the most potent. The mechanism of action of AT-2 was analyzed and it was found that AT-2 treatment indeed results in the modification of RSV M2-1. Altered intramolecular disulfide bond formation in M2-1 protein of AT-2-treated RSV virions might have been responsible for abrogation of RSV infectivity. AT-2-inactivated RSV was found to be moderately immunogenic in the cotton rats S.hispidus and did not cause a vaccine-enhancement seen in animals vaccinated with formalin-inactivated RSV. Increasing immunogenicity of AT-2-inactivated RSV by adjuvant (Ribi), however, led to vaccine-enhanced disease. This work presents evidence that compounds that inactivate retroviruses by targeting the zinc finger motif in their nucleocapsid proteins are also effective against RSV. AT-2-inactivated RSV vaccine is not strongly immunogenic in the absence of adjuvants. In the adjuvanted form, however, vaccine induces immunopathologic response. The

  2. Inactivation of respiratory syncytial virus by zinc finger reactive compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectivity of retroviruses such as HIV-1 and MuLV can be abrogated by compounds targeting zinc finger motif in viral nucleocapsid protein (NC, involved in controlling the processivity of reverse transcription and virus infectivity. Although a member of a different viral family (Pneumoviridae, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV contains a zinc finger protein M2-1 also involved in control of viral polymerase processivity. Given the functional similarity between the two proteins, it was possible that zinc finger-reactive compounds inactivating retroviruses would have a similar effect against RSV by targeting RSV M2-1 protein. Moreover, inactivation of RSV through modification of an internal protein could yield a safer whole virus vaccine than that produced by RSV inactivation with formalin which modifies surface proteins. Results Three compounds were evaluated for their ability to reduce RSV infectivity: 2,2'-dithiodipyridine (AT-2, tetraethylthiuram disulfide and tetramethylthiuram disulfide. All three were capable of inactivating RSV, with AT-2 being the most potent. The mechanism of action of AT-2 was analyzed and it was found that AT-2 treatment indeed results in the modification of RSV M2-1. Altered intramolecular disulfide bond formation in M2-1 protein of AT-2-treated RSV virions might have been responsible for abrogation of RSV infectivity. AT-2-inactivated RSV was found to be moderately immunogenic in the cotton rats S.hispidus and did not cause a vaccine-enhancement seen in animals vaccinated with formalin-inactivated RSV. Increasing immunogenicity of AT-2-inactivated RSV by adjuvant (Ribi, however, led to vaccine-enhanced disease. Conclusions This work presents evidence that compounds that inactivate retroviruses by targeting the zinc finger motif in their nucleocapsid proteins are also effective against RSV. AT-2-inactivated RSV vaccine is not strongly immunogenic in the absence of adjuvants. In the adjuvanted form

  3. Interference between respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus in respiratory tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, S; Toivonen, L; Schuez-Havupalo, L; Waris, M; Peltola, V

    2016-02-01

    An acute viral respiratory tract infection might prevent infections by other viruses because of the antiviral innate immune response. However, with the use of PCR methods, simultaneous detection of two or more respiratory viruses is frequent. We analysed the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the occurrence of simultaneous rhinovirus (RV) infection in children within a birth cohort study setting. We used PCR for virus detection in nasal swabs collected from children with an acute respiratory tract infection at the age of 0-24 months and from healthy control children, who were matched for age and date of sample collection. Of 226 children with RSV infections, 18 (8.0%) had co-infections with RV, whereas RV was detected in 31 (14%) of 226 control children (p 0.049 by chi-square test). Adjustment for sex, number of siblings and socio-economic status strengthened the negative association between RSV and RV (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.90; p 0.02). The median durations of symptoms (cough, rhinorrhoea, or fever) were 11 days in children with single RSV infections and 14 days in children with RSV-RV co-infections (p 0.02). Our results suggest that the presence of RSV reduces the probability of RV infection, but that, if a co-infection occurs, both viruses cause clinical symptoms.

  4. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) pneumonia in beef calf herds despite vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tegtmeier, C.; Pedersen, E.

    2001-01-01

    The present report describes the clinical, pathological, serological and virological findings in calves from 2 larger Danish beef herds experiencing outbreaks of pneumonia. The calves had been vaccinated with an inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine 2 months prior to the o...

  5. Cost-effectiveness of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination of dutch elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, K.; Meijboom, M.; Luytjes, W.; Hak, E.; Postma, M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is increasingly recognized as an important cause of morbidity, mortality and health-care resource use in the elderly. Therefore we determined whether there are specific levels of vaccine cost and effectiveness for which a hypothetical RSV-vaccine for Dut

  6. A randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen for respiratory syncytial infection in a bovine model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to ...

  7. Pericarditis mediated by respiratory syncytial virus in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubach, M P; Pavlisko, E N; Perfect, J R

    2013-08-01

    We describe a case of pericarditis and large pericardial effusion in a 63-year-old African-American man undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant for multiple myeloma. Pericardial tissue biopsy demonstrated fibrinous pericarditis, and immunohistochemistry stains were positive for respiratory syncytial virus. The patient improved with oral ribavirin and intravenous immune globulin infusions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Chronic diseases, chromosomal abnormalities, and congenital malformations as risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Hjuler, Thomas; Ravn, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how chronic conditions other than prematurity, heart disease, and Down syndrome affect the risk and severity of hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We assess the risk and severity of RSV hospitalization in children with chronic conditions in this register...

  9. [Application of the polymerase chain reaction for detecting respiratory syncytial virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, L; Chacón, D; Valdivia, A; Savón, C; Goyenechea, A

    1997-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed in order to identify the respiratory syncytial virus by using the reference strain. The high sensitivity and specificity obtained show the PCR utility for detecting the RSV genoma and its application on the diagnosis.

  10. Presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency with respiratory syncytial virus and pneumocystis co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Pinilla, Nerea; Allende-Martínez, Luis; Corral Sánchez, María Dolores; Arocena, Jaime de Inocencio; González-Granado, Luis Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency can cause severe, life-threatening viral, bacterial and fungal infections at an early age. We report a case of a 4-month-old boy with co-infection by respiratory syncytial virus and Pneumocystis jiroveci infection that led to recognition of severe combined immunodeficiency.

  11. Local interleukin-10 production during respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis is associated with post-bronchiolitis wheeze

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhof, Annemieke; Janssen, Riny; de Groot, Hanneke; Hodemaekers, Hennie M.; de Klerk, Arja; Kimpen, Jan L. L.; Bont, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis in infants. Following RSV bronchiolitis, 50% of children develop post-bronchiolitis wheeze (PBW). Animal studies have suggested that interleukin (IL)-10 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of RSV bronchioli

  12. Local interleukin-10 production during respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis is associated with post-bronchiolitis wheeze

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhof, Annemieke; Janssen, Riny; de Groot, Hanneke; Hodemaekers, Hennie M.; de Klerk, Arja; Kimpen, Jan L. L.; Bont, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis in infants. Following RSV bronchiolitis, 50% of children develop post-bronchiolitis wheeze (PBW). Animal studies have suggested that interleukin (IL)-10 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of RSV

  13. Nasopharyngeal gene expression, a novel approach to study the course of respiratory syncytial virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Kieboom, Corné H; Ahout, Inge M L; Zomer, Aldert; Brand, Kim H; de Groot, Ronald; Ferwerda, Gerben; de Jonge, Marien I

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes mild infections in the vast majority of children. However, in some cases, it causes severe disease, such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Development of severe RSV infection is determined by the host response. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to

  14. Increased risk of wheeze and decreased lung function after respiratory syncytial virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer-Kooijker, K.; Ent, C.K. van der; Ermers, M.J.; Uiterwaal, C.S.; Rovers, M.M.; Bont, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A relationship between hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and asthma development has been suggested in case-control studies. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the risk of current wheeze, asthma, and lung function at school age in infants

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, and mixed acute lower respiratory infections in children in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Diego Andrés; Nino, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting greater severity and worse outcomes in children with mixed as compared to single respiratory virus infections. However, studies that assess the risk factors that may predispose a child to a mixture of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenoviral infections, are scarce. In a retrospective cohort study, the study investigated the epidemiology of RSV and adenovirus infections and predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in young children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection in Bogota, Colombia, South America, over a 2-year period 2009-2011. Of a total of 5,539 children admitted with a diagnosis of acute lower respiratory infection, 2,267 (40.9%) who were positive for RSV and/or adenovirus were selected. Out the total number of cases, 1,416 (62.5%) infections occurred during the 3-month period from March to May, the first rainy season of Bogota, Colombia. After controlling for gender, month when the nasopharyngeal sample was taken, and other pre-existing conditions, it was found that an age greater than 6 months (OR:1.74; CI 95%:1.05-2.89; P = 0.030) and malnutrition as a comorbidity (OR:9.92; CI 95%:1.01-100.9; P = 0.049) were independent predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in the sample of patients. In conclusion, RSV and adenovirus are significant causes of acute lower respiratory infection in infants and young children in Bogota, Colombia, especially during the first rainy season. The identified predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections should be taken into account when planning intervention, in order to reduce the burden of acute lower respiratory infection in young children living in the country.

  16. The role of respiratory syncytial virus and other viral pathogens in acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, B S; Dollete, F R; Yolken, R H

    1982-07-01

    We utilized recently developed enzyme immunoassay techniques to examine the role of selected viruses in the etiology of acute otitis media. Viral pathogens were found in middle ear fluids obtained from 13 (24%) of 53 children with acute otitis media; respiratory syncytial virus accounted for ten of the 13 viral agents identified. In addition, respiratory syncytial viral antigen was found in nasopharyngeal washings obtained from 15 of the 53 children. Seven of these children had RSV identified as the sole middle ear pathogen, whereas six children had otitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae as either the sole middle ear pathogen or in combination with RSV. Similarly, all three children with respiratory infections caused by influenza virus had ear infections caused by bacterial pathogens, either alone or in combination with influenza virus. These findings suggest that, in patients with viral respiratory infection, coexisting acute otitis media may be associated with the recovery of either viruses or bacteria from the middle ear exudates.

  17. Mammalian Cell-Derived Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Like Particles Protect the Lower as well as the Upper Respiratory Tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramila Walpita

    Full Text Available Globally, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is a leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children less than one year of age and in USA alone, between 85,000 and 144,000 infants are hospitalized every year. To date, there is no licensed vaccine. We have evaluated vaccine potential of mammalian cell-derived native RSV virus-like particles (RSV VLPs composed of the two surface glycoproteins G and F, and the matrix protein M. Results of in vitro testing showed that the VLPs were functionally assembled and immunoreactive, and that the recombinantly expressed F protein was cleaved intracellularly similarly to the virus-synthesized F protein to produce the F1 and F2 subunits; the presence of the F1 fragment is critical for vaccine development since all the neutralizing epitopes present in the F protein are embedded in this fragment. Additional in vitro testing in human macrophage cell line THP-1 showed that both virus and the VLPs were sensed by TLR-4 and induced a Th1-biased cytokine response. Cotton rats vaccinated with RSV VLPs adjuvanted with alum and monophosphoryl lipid A induced potent neutralizing antibody response, and conferred protection in the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract based on substantial virus clearance from these sites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first VLP/virosome vaccine study reporting protection of the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract: Prevention from replication in the nose is an important consideration if the target population is infants < 6 months of age. This is because continued virus replication in the nose results in nasal congestion and babies at this age are obligate nose breathers. In conclusion, these results taken together suggest that our VLPs show promise to be a safe and effective vaccine for RSV.

  18. Vertical transmission of respiratory syncytial virus modulates pre- and postnatal innervation and reactivity of rat airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Piedimonte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental exposure to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a leading cause of respiratory infections in infants, but it remains unknown whether this infection is transmitted transplacentally from the lungs of infected mothers to the offspring. We sought to test the hypothesis that RSV travels from the respiratory tract during pregnancy, crosses the placenta to the fetus, persists in the lung tissues of the offspring, and modulates pre- and postnatal expression of growth factors, thereby predisposing to airway hyperreactivity. METHODOLOGY: Pregnant rats were inoculated intratracheally at midterm using recombinant RSV expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP. Viral RNA was amplified by RT-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. RFP expression was analyzed by flow cytometry and viral culture. Developmental and pathophysiologic implications of prenatal infection were determined by analyzing the expression of genes encoding critical growth factors, particularly neurotrophic factors and receptors. We also measured the expression of key neurotransmitters and postnatal bronchial reactivity in vertically infected lungs, and assessed their dependence on neurotrophic signaling using selective biological or chemical inhibition. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: RSV genome was found in 30% of fetuses, as well as in the lungs of 40% of newborns and 25% of adults. RFP expression was also shown by flow cytometry and replicating virus was cultured from exposed fetuses. Nerve growth factor and its TrkA receptor were upregulated in RSV- infected fetal lungs and co-localized with increased cholinergic innervation. Acetylcholine expression and smooth muscle response to cholinergic stimulation increased in lungs exposed to RSV in utero and reinfected after birth, and blocking TrkA signaling inhibited both effects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show transplacental transmission of RSV from mother to offspring and persistence of vertically transmitted virus in lungs after

  19. RAGE inhibits human respiratory syncytial virus syncytium formation by interfering with F-protein function

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection. Infection is critically dependent on the RSV fusion (F) protein, which mediates fusion between the viral envelope and airway epithelial cells. The F protein is also expressed on infected cells and is responsible for fusion of infected cells with adjacent cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleate syncytia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognitio...

  20. Prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and postbronchiolitic wheezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimpen Jan LL

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the primary cause of hospitalization for acute respiratory tract illness in general and specifically for bronchiolitis in young children. The link between RSV bronchiolitis and reactive airway disease is not completely understood, even though RSV bronchiolitis is frequently followed by recurrent episodes of wheezing. Therapy with ribavirin does not appear to significantly reduce long-term respiratory outcome of RSV lower respiratory tract infection, and corticosteroid or bronchodilator therapy may possibly improve outcomes only on a short-term basis. No vaccine against RSV is yet available. It is not known whether prophylaxis with RSV intravenous immune globulin or palivizumab can reduce postbronchiolitic wheezing.

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in immunocompetent and immunocompromised murine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUAN ZHOU; YU XIA CUI; XI QIANG YANG; ZHOU FU; LI PING JIANG; LI JIA WANG

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to distinguish respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and immunology between immunocompetent and immunocompromised murine and to explore immune mechanism of RSV infection. At various time points after RSV infection of BALB/c mice and nude mice, pulmonary viral titers were assayed, RSV antigen was tested by direct immunofluorescent assay and immunohistochemistry. Pulmonary mRNA expressions of Toll like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were assayed by RT-PCR. CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells in peripheral blood were examined by flow cytometry and plasma total IgE was assayed by ELISA. Leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and pulmonary histology were identified to reflect airway inflammation. It was found that RSV titers of both mice peaked on the 3rd day post infection with a much higher level of viral titer in nude mice than in BALB/c mice and a longer viral duration in nude mice (over 9 days post infection) than in BALB/c mice (6 days post infection). RSV infection induced higher viral antigen expression in nude mice (0.267 ±0.045) than in BALB/c mice (0. 168 ± 0.031). RSV infection enhanced pulmonary TLR4 expression of BALB/c mice (51.96% ± 11.34%) and nude mice (48.96% ± 12.35%) compared with each control (34.04% ± 10.06% and 32.37% ± 9.87% respectively). CD4+ peripheral blood cells increased in RSV infected BALB/c mice (66.51% ± 2.09% ) compared with the control BALB/c mice (51.63% ± 5.90% ), and CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells were deficient in nude mice. RSV infection increased plasma total IgE in both mice, and BALB/c mice had a larger amount of IgE on the 7th day post infection (9.02 ng/ml ± 2.90 ng/ml) and on the 14th day post infection (12.76 ng/ml ± 4.15 ng/ml) than corresponding nude mice (3.72 ng/ml ± 1.06 ng/ml and 7.62 ng/ml ± 3.08 ng/ml respectively on the 7th and 14th day post infection). RSV infected nude mice had more severe airway inflammation than infected BALB/c mice. It is concluded that BALB/c mice and

  2. Analysis of respiratory syncytial virus F, G, and SH proteins in cell fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heminway, B R; Yu, Y; Tanaka, Y; Perrine, K G; Gustafson, E; Bernstein, J M; Galinski, M S

    1994-05-01

    Recombinant expression of the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) glycoprotein, receptor-binding glycoprotein (G), and small hydrophobic (SH) protein was performed to determine the role(s) of these proteins in syncytia formation. These studies used a vaccinia virus expressing the bacteriophage (T7) RNA polymerase gene and plasmid vectors containing the RSV genes under the control of a T7 promoter. Within the context of this expression system, expression of any individual RSV gene, or coexpression of F+G genes, did not elicit the formation of syncytia. However, at plasmid input levels which were 10-fold higher than those normally used, coexpression of F+G induced low but detectable levels of cell fusion. In contrast, coexpression of F, G, and SH together elicited extensive cell fusion resembling that of an authentically infected cell monolayer. In addition, coexpression of F and SH elicited significant cell fusion, although to a lesser extent than was observed when G was included. Cell fusion induced by coexpression of F+SH was found to be specific to the RSV proteins, since coexpression of SH with the analogous F proteins from human parainfluenza virus type 3, human parainfluenza virus type 2, Sendai virus, or simian virus type 5 (SV5) did not elicit cell fusion. Finally, coexpression of the SV5 SH protein with the RSV or SV5 glycoproteins also failed to induce syncytia, suggesting type-specific restrictions between the two sets of viral proteins.

  3. Eliminating a Region of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Attachment Protein Allows Induction of Protective Immunity without Vaccine-enhanced Lung Eosinophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparer, Tim E.; Matthews, Stephen; Hussell, Tracy; Rae, Aaron J.; Garcia-Barreno, Blanca; Melero, Jose A.; Openshaw, Peter J.M.

    1998-01-01

    In a murine model of respiratory syncytial virus disease, prior sensitization to the attachment glycoprotein (G) leads to pulmonary eosinophilia and enhanced illness. Three different approaches were taken to dissect the region of G responsible for enhanced disease and protection against challenge. First, mutant viruses, containing frameshifts that altered the COOH terminus of the G protein, were used to challenge mice sensitized by scarification with recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) expressing wild-type G. Second, cDNA expressing these mutated G proteins were expressed by rVV and used to vaccinate mice before challenge with wild-type respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). These studies identified residues 193–205 to be responsible for G-induced weight loss and lung eosinophilia and showed that this region was not was not necessary for induction of protective immunity. Third, mice were sensitized using an rVV that expressed only amino acids 124–203 of the G protein. Upon RSV challenge, mice sensitized with this rVV developed enhanced weight loss and eosinophilia. This is the first time that a region within RSV (amino acids 193–203) has been shown to be responsible for induction of lung eosinophilia and disease enhancement. Moreover, we now show that it is possible to induce protective immunity with an altered G protein without inducing a pathological response. PMID:9607931

  4. High concentrations of amniotic fluid proinflammatory cytokines in healthy neonates are associated with low risk of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, M.L.; Rovers, M.M.; Wilbrink, B.; Belderbos, M.E.; Bloemen-Carlier, E.M.; Visser, G.H.; Kimpen, J.L.L.; Bont, L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: : The burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis in individual children and their families, the medical system and society is considerable. Mechanisms underlying RSV bronchiolitis in healthy term infants are largely unknown. Sterile intraamniotic inflammation and chorioamn

  5. High Concentrations of Amniotic Fluid Proinflammatory Cytokines in Healthy Neonates Are Associated With Low Risk of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, Michiel L.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Wilbrink, Berry; Belderbos, Mirjam E.; Bloemen-Carlier, Eltje M.; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Kimpen, Jan L. L.; Bont, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Background: The burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis in individual children and their families, the medical system and society is considerable. Mechanisms underlying RSV bronchiolitis in healthy term infants are largely unknown. Sterile intraamniotic inflammation and chorioamnio

  6. Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial of prednisolone in children admitted to hospital with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, JBM; Wolfs, TFW; vanAalderen, WMC; Brand, PLP; Kimpen, JLL

    Background - Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is an immune mediated disease. Corticosteroids might therefore be effective in the treatment of RSV bronchiolitis. Methods - A randomised double blind trial was conducted in children up to

  7. Sub-nucleocapsid nanoparticles: a nasal vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Roux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bronchiolitis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in infants less than two years old is a growing public health concern worldwide, and there is currently no safe and effective vaccine. A major component of RSV nucleocapsid, the nucleoprotein (N, has been so far poorly explored as a potential vaccine antigen, even though it is a target of protective anti-viral T cell responses and is remarkably conserved between human RSV A and B serotypes. We recently reported a method to produce recombinant N assembling in homogenous rings composed of 10-11 N subunits enclosing a bacterial RNA. These nanoparticles were named sub-nucleocapsid ring structure (N SRS. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The vaccine potential of N SRS was evaluated in a well-characterized and widely acknowledged mouse model of RSV infection. BALB/c adult mice were immunized intranasally with N SRS adjuvanted with the detoxified E. coli enterotoxin LT(R192G. Upon RSV challenge, vaccinated mice were largely protected against virus replication in the lungs, with a mild inflammatory lymphocytic and neutrophilic reaction in their airways. Mucosal immunization with N SRS elicited strong local and systemic immunity characterized by high titers of IgG1, IgG2a and IgA anti-N antibodies, antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells and IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+ T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of using nanoparticles formed by the recombinant nucleocapsid protein as an efficient and safe intra-nasal vaccine against RSV.

  8. Burden of Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease Among 33–35 Weeks’ Gestational Age Infants Born During Multiple Respiratory Syncytial Virus Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier; Blanken, Maarten; Lanari, Marcello; Sheridan-Pereira, Margaret; Rodgers-Gray, Barry; Fullarton, John; Rouffiac, Elisabeth; Vo, Pamela; Notario, Gerard; Campbell, Fiona; Paes, Bosco

    2017-01-01

    Background: Moderate-late preterm infants, 33–35 weeks’ gestational age (wGA), are at increased risk for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization (RSVH). The objective of this study is to quantify the burden of RSVH in moderate-late preterm infants. Methods: A pooled analysis was conducted on RSVH from 7 prospective, observational studies in the Northern Hemisphere from 2000 to 2014. Infants’ 330–356 wGA without comorbidity born during the respiratory syncytial virus season who did not receive respiratory syncytial virus immunoprophylaxis were enrolled. Data for the first confirmed RSVH during the season (+1 month) were analyzed. Incidence and hospitalization rate per 100 patient-seasons, intensive care unit admission and length of stay (LOS), oxygen support, mechanical ventilation and overall hospital LOS were assessed. Results: The pooled analysis comprised 7,820 infants; 267 experienced a confirmed RSVH at a median age of 8.4 weeks. The crude pooled RSVH incidence rate was 3.41% and the rate per 100 patient-seasons was 4.52. Median hospital LOS was 5.7 days. A total of 22.2% of infants required intensive care unit admission for a median LOS of 8.3 days. A total of 70.4% received supplemental oxygen support for a median of 4.9 days, and 12.7% required mechanical ventilation for a median of 4.8 days. Conclusions: The burden of RSVH in moderate-late, 33–35 weeks’ wGA preterm infants without comorbidities born during the viral season in Northern Hemisphere countries is substantial. Severe cases required prolonged and invasive supportive therapy. PMID:27755464

  9. Post-extubation stridor in Respiratory Syncytial Virus bronchiolitis: Is there a role for prophylactic dexamethasone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhoen, Esther S; Smulders, Charlotte A; Kappen, Teus H; Calis, Job C; van Woensel, Job; Raymakers-Janssen, Paulien A M; Bont, Louis J; Hennus, Marije P

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of reintubation due to upper airway obstruction in a homogeneous group of ventilated infants with Respiratory Syncytial Virus bronchiolitis. Our secondary objective was to determine whether prophylactic administration of dexamethasone prior to extubation was associated with decreased risk of reintubation. This retrospective observational study in two Pediatric Intensive Care Units in 2 university hospitals in The Netherlands included two hundred patients younger than 13 months admitted with respiratory insufficiency caused by Respiratory Syncytial Virus bronchiolitis, requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. A logistic regression analysis with propensity score method was used to adjust for possible confounding. Reintubation due to post-extubation stridor occurred in 17 (8.5%) of 200 patients. After propensity score matching, administration of dexamethasone prior to extubation was associated with a significantly (p = 0.0011) decreased risk of reintubation due to post-extubation stridor compared to patients not receiving prophylactic dexamethasone (absolute risk reduction 13%, 95% CI 5.3-21%). Reintubation due to post-extubation stridor is an important complication of ventilation for Respiratory Syncytial Virus bronchiolitis. Dexamethasone administered prior to extubation probably reduces the risk of post-extubation stridor necessitating reintubation in these infants. The results of this study support initiation of a placebo-controlled trial to confirm the beneficial effect of prophylactic dexamethasone.

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein expressed in insect cells form protein nanoparticles that induce protective immunity in cotton rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gale Smith

    Full Text Available Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is an important viral agent causing severe respiratory tract disease in infants and children as well as in the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. The lack of a safe and effective RSV vaccine represents a major unmet medical need. RSV fusion (F surface glycoprotein was modified and cloned into a baculovirus vector for efficient expression in Sf9 insect cells. Recombinant RSV F was glycosylated and cleaved into covalently linked F2 and F1 polypeptides that formed homotrimers. RSV F extracted and purified from insect cell membranes assembled into 40 nm protein nanoparticles composed of multiple RSV F oligomers arranged in the form of rosettes. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of purified RSV F nanoparticles was compared to live and formalin inactivated RSV in cotton rats. Immunized animals induced neutralizing serum antibodies, inhibited virus replication in the lungs, and had no signs of disease enhancement in the respiratory track of challenged animals. RSV F nanoparticles also induced IgG competitive for binding of palivizumab neutralizing monoclonal antibody to RSV F antigenic site II. Antibodies to this epitope are known to protect against RSV when passively administered in high risk infants. Together these data provide a rational for continued development a recombinant RSV F nanoparticle vaccine candidate.

  11. Genetic and antigenic analysis of the G attachment protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvander, M.; Vilcek, S.; Baule, C.

    1998-01-01

    Antigenic and genetic studies of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) were made on isolates obtained from three continents over 27 years. Antigenic variation between eight isolates was initially determined using protein G-specific monoclonal antibodies. Four distinct reaction patterns were...... of a 731 nucleotide fragment in the G protein gene. Nine of the BRSV strains were analysed by direct sequencing of RT-PCR amplicons whereas sequences of 18 BRSV and three human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) strains were obtained from GenBank. The analysis revealed similarities of 88-100% among BRSV...... strains and 38-41 % between BRSV and HRSV. A phylogenetic tree created for BRSV revealed two main branches, one of which divided into five further lineages, each representing a geographic cluster. A correlation was evident between the positions of some strains in the phylogenetic tree and their antigenic...

  12. Application of Traditional Chinese Medical Herbs in Prevention and Treatment of Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a common viral pathogen of the lower respiratory tract, which, in the absence of effective management, causes millions of cases of severe illness per year. Many of these infections develop into fatal pneumonia. In a review of English and Chinese medical literature, recent traditional Chinese medical herb- (TCMH- based progress in the area of prevention and treatment was identified, and the potential anti-RSV compounds, herbs, and formulas were explored. Traditional Chinese medical herbs have a positive effect on inhibiting viral attachment, inhibiting viral internalization, syncytial formation, alleviation of airway inflammation, and stimulation of interferon secretion and immune system; however, the anti-RSV mechanisms of TCMHs are complicated, which should be further investigated.

  13. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures on a chimeric respiratory syncytial virus protein expressed in insect cell line Sf9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wathen, M.W.; Aeed, P.A.; Elhammer, A.P. (Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, MI (United States))

    1991-03-19

    The oligosaccharide structures added to a chimeric protein (FG) composed of the extracellular domains of respiratory syncytial virus F and G proteins, expressed in the insect cell line Sf9, were investigated. Cells were labeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)glucosamine and infected wit a recombinant baculovirus containing the FG gene. The secreted chimeric protein was isolated by immunoprecipitation and subjected to oligosaccharide analysis. The FG protein contains two types of O-linked oligosaccharides: GalNAc and Gal{beta}1-3GalNAc constituting 17 and 66% of the total number of structures respectively. Only one type of N-linked oligosaccharide, constituting the remaining 17% of the structures on FG, was detected: a trimannosyl core structure with a fucose residue linked {alpha}1-6 to the asparagine-linked N-acetylglucosamine.

  14. Transcription of human respiratory syncytial virus genome RNA in vitro: requirement of cellular factor(s).

    OpenAIRE

    Barik, S

    1992-01-01

    Extracts made from human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected Hep-2 cells synthesized mRNAs encoded by all known viral genes. In contrast, RSV ribonucleoproteins purified from infected cells failed to transcribe in vitro; transcription was restored by addition of a cytoplasmic extract of uninfected Hep-2 cells, demonstrating that a cellular factor(s) has a role in RSV gene expression. Quantitation of the individual gene mRNAs transcribed in vitro revealed polarity of transcription of th...

  15. Clinical Profiles of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Subtypes A AND B Among Children Hospitalized with Bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laham, Federico R; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Piedra, Pedro A; Hasegawa, Kohei; Sullivan, Ashley F; Espinola, Janice A; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-08-01

    In this analysis of a prospective, multicenter study of children hospitalized with bronchiolitis, 925 had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-A and 649 had RSV-B. Overall, bronchiolitis severity did not differ by RSV subtype. However, among children with RSV-only bronchiolitis, those children with RSV-A had higher risk of intensive care treatment (odds ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.71; P = 0.048) when compared with those having RSV-B.

  16. Interleukin-27 inhibits vaccine-enhanced pulmonary disease following respiratory syncytial virus infection by regulating cellular memory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ruihong; Zhang, Huixian; Hai, Yan; Cui, Yuxiu; Wei, Lin; Li, Na; Liu, Jianxun; Li, Caixia; Liu, Ying

    2012-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of lower respiratory tract disease in young children. In the 1960s, infants vaccinated with formalin-inactivated RSV developed a more severe disease characterized by excessive inflammatory immunopathology in lungs upon natural RSV infection. The fear of causing the vaccine-enhanced disease (VED) is an important obstacle for development of safe and effective RSV vaccines. The recombinant vaccine candidate G1F/M2 immunization also led to VED. It has been proved that cellular memory induced by RSV vaccines contributed to VED. Interleukin-27 (IL-27) and IL-23 regulate Th1, Th17, and/or Th2 cellular immune responses. In this study, mice coimmunized with pcDNA3-IL-27 and G1F/M2 were fully protected and, importantly, did not develop vaccine-enhanced inflammatory responses and immunopathology in lungs after RSV challenge, which was correlated with moderate Th1-, suppressed Th2-, and Th17-like memory responses activated by RSV. In contrast, G1F/M2- or pcDNA3-IL-23+G1F/M2-immunized mice, in which robust Th2- and Th17-like memory responses were induced, developed enhanced pulmonary inflammation and severe immunopathology. Mice coimmunized with G1F/M2 and the two cytokine plasmids exhibited mild inflammatory responses as well as remarkable Th1-, suppressed Th2-, and Th17-like memory responses. These results suggested that Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-like memory responses and, in particular, excessive Th2- and Th17-like memory responses were closely associated with VED; IL-27 may inhibit VED following respiratory syncytial virus infection by regulating cellular memory responses.

  17. A Cysteine Zipper Stabilizes a Pre-Fusion F Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume B E Stewart-Jones

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines should contain minimal non-pathogen motifs to reduce potential off-target reactivity. We recently developed a vaccine antigen against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, which comprised the fusion (F glycoprotein stabilized in its pre-fusion trimeric conformation by "DS-Cav1" mutations and by an appended C-terminal trimerization motif or "foldon" from T4-bacteriophage fibritin. Here we investigate the creation of a cysteine zipper to allow for the removal of the phage foldon, while maintaining the immunogenicity of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen. Constructs without foldon yielded RSV F monomers, and enzymatic removal of the phage foldon from pre-fusion F trimers resulted in their dissociation into monomers. Because the native C terminus of the pre-fusion RSV F ectodomain encompasses a viral trimeric coiled-coil, we explored whether introduction of cysteine residues capable of forming inter-protomer disulfides might allow for stable trimers. Structural modeling indicated the introduced cysteines to form disulfide "rings", with each ring comprising a different set of inward facing residues of the coiled-coil. Three sets of rings could be placed within the native RSV F coiled-coil, and additional rings could be added by duplicating portions of the coiled-coil. High levels of neutralizing activity in mice, equivalent to that of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen, were elicited by a 4-ring stabilized RSV F trimer with no foldon. Structure-based alteration of a viral coiled-coil to create a cysteine zipper thus allows a phage trimerization motif to be removed from a candidate vaccine antigen.

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Persistence in Murine Macrophages Impairs IFN-β Response but Not Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Rivera-Toledo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Type-I interferon (IFN-I production is an early response to viral infection and pathogenic viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade this cellular defense. Some viruses can establish and maintain persistent infections by altering the IFN-I signaling pathway. Here, we studied IFN-I synthesis and response in an in vitro model of persistent infection by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in a murine macrophage-like cell line. In this model, interferon regulatory factor 3 was constitutively active and located at nuclei of persistently infected cells, inducing expression of IFN-beta mRNA and protein. However, persistently infected macrophages did not respond in an autocrine manner to the secreted-IFN-beta or to recombinant-IFN-beta, since phosphorylated-STAT1 was not detected by western blot and transcription of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs Mx1 and ISG56 was not induced. Treatment of non-infected macrophages with supernatants from persistently infected cells induced STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression, mediated by the IFN-I present in the supernatants, because blocking the IFN-I receptor inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation. Results suggest that the lack of autocrine response to IFN-I by the host cell may be one mechanism for maintenance of RSV persistence. Furthermore, STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression induced in non-infected cells by supernatants from persistently infected macrophages suggest that RSV persistence may trigger a proinflammatory phenotype in non-infected cells as part of the pathogenesis of RSV infection.

  19. Clinical relevance of prevention of respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection in preterm infants born between 33 and 35 weeks gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbonell-Estrany, X.; Bont, L.; Doering, G.; Gouyon, J-B; Lanari, M.

    2008-01-01

    Premature infants are vulnerable to severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) resulting in hospitalisation and the potential for longer-term respiratory morbidity. Whilst the severity and consequence of RSV LRTI are generally accepted and recognised in infants

  20. Measles-mumps-rubella vaccination and respiratory syncytial virus-associated hospital contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Sørup, Signe; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The live measles vaccine has been associated with lower non-measles mortality and admissions in low-income countries. The live measles-mumps-rubella vaccine has also been associated with lower rate of admissions with any type of infection in Danish children; the association...... was strongest for admissions with lower respiratory infections. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination was associated with reduced rate of hospital contact related to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a high-income country. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study of laboratory...

  1. Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus are the major respiratory viruses detected from prospective testing of pediatric and adult coronial autopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers, David J; Moss, Daniel M; Minney-Smith, Cara; Levy, Avram; Smith, David W

    2013-11-01

    To ascertain the full mortality of influenza and other respiratory viruses, the testing of community autopsy specimens is essential. Respiratory virus PCR and culture were performed on 2418 fresh unfrozen respiratory samples collected from 1611 coronial cases where the death was either unknown or infection was suspected, from July 2007 to June 2011, to detect the common respiratory viruses in children and adults, using standardized microbiological testing. The respiratory virus positive rate was 8·3% (134 cases) with a peak of 28% (42 of 151 cases) in children under 10 years of age. Influenza virus was the commonest respiratory virus (50 cases, 3%), followed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (30 cases, 2%). All tested respiratory viruses were found in children, most commonly adenovirus, enterovirus and RSV, and influenza A and RSV predominated in those over 60 years, but coinfection was uncommon. Almost all influenza cases occurred when influenza was widely circulating in the community but few were diagnosed pre-mortem. Influenza and RSV detection was associated with bronchitis or bronchiolitis in 7 (9%) of the 80 cases and caused pneumonia in 14 (0·8%) deaths overall. Our prospective review of respiratory viruses using standardized testing found a single lower respiratory tract autopsy specimen for respiratory virus PCR would detect most community infections at the time of death. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Simultaneous detection of respiratory syncytial virus types A and B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tharwat Ezzat Deraz

    2012-02-28

    Feb 28, 2012 ... Objectives: In this study, our aim was to determine the prevalence of influenza A and B, and .... causes of respiratory disease in these patients is the first step .... electronic microarray to enzyme hybridization assay for multiplex.

  3. Rapid antigen detection test for respiratory syncytial virus diagnosis as a diagnostic tool,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio da Silva Mesquita

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the QuickVue® RSV Test Kit (QUIDEL Corp, CA, USA as a screening tool for respiratory syncytial virus in children with acute respiratory disease in comparison with the indirect immunofluorescence assay as gold standard. In Brazil, rapid antigen detection tests for respiratory syncytial virus are not routinely utilized as a diagnostic tool, except for the diagnosis of dengue and influenza. Methods: The authors retrospectively analyzed 486 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from children under age 5 with acute respiratory infection, between December 2013 and August 2014, the samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay and QuickVue® RSV Test kit. Samples with discordant results were analyzed by real time PCR and nucleotide sequencing. Results: From 313 positive samples by immunofluorescence assays, 282 (90% were also positive by the rapid antigen detection test, two were positive only by rapid antigen detection test, 33 were positive only by immunofluorescence assays, and 171 were positive by both methods. The 35 samples with discordant results were analyzed by real time PCR; the two samples positive only by rapid antigen detection test and the five positive only by immunofluorescence assays were also positive by real time PCR. There was no relation between the negativity by QuickVue® RSV Test and viral load or specific strain. The QuickVue® RSV Test showed sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 98.8%, predictive positive value of 99.3%, and negative predictive value of 94.6%, with accuracy of 93.2% and agreement κ index of 0.85 in comparison to immunofluorescence assay. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the QuickVue® RSV Test Kit can be effective in early detection of Respiratory syncytial virus in nasopharyngeal aspirate and is reliable for use as a diagnostic tool in pediatrics.

  4. Rapid antigen detection test for respiratory syncytial virus diagnosis as a diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Flávio da Silva; Oliveira, Danielle Bruna Leal de; Crema, Daniela; Pinez, Célia Miranda Nunes; Colmanetti, Thaís Cristina; Thomazelli, Luciano Matsumia; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Vieira, Sandra Elisabeth; Martinez, Marina Baquerizo; Botosso, Viviane Fongaro; Durigon, Edison Luiz

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the QuickVue(®) RSV Test Kit (QUIDEL Corp, CA, USA) as a screening tool for respiratory syncytial virus in children with acute respiratory disease in comparison with the indirect immunofluorescence assay as gold standard. In Brazil, rapid antigen detection tests for respiratory syncytial virus are not routinely utilized as a diagnostic tool, except for the diagnosis of dengue and influenza. The authors retrospectively analyzed 486 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from children under age 5 with acute respiratory infection, between December 2013 and August 2014, the samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay and QuickVue(®) RSV Test kit. Samples with discordant results were analyzed by real time PCR and nucleotide sequencing. From 313 positive samples by immunofluorescence assays, 282 (90%) were also positive by the rapid antigen detection test, two were positive only by rapid antigen detection test, 33 were positive only by immunofluorescence assays, and 171 were positive by both methods. The 35 samples with discordant results were analyzed by real time PCR; the two samples positive only by rapid antigen detection test and the five positive only by immunofluorescence assays were also positive by real time PCR. There was no relation between the negativity by QuickVue(®) RSV Test and viral load or specific strain. The QuickVue(®) RSV Test showed sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 98.8%, predictive positive value of 99.3%, and negative predictive value of 94.6%, with accuracy of 93.2% and agreement κ index of 0.85 in comparison to immunofluorescence assay. This study demonstrated that the QuickVue(®) RSV Test Kit can be effective in early detection of Respiratory syncytial virus in nasopharyngeal aspirate and is reliable for use as a diagnostic tool in pediatrics. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential Mucin Expression by Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus Infection in Human Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Del Rocío Baños-Lara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucins (MUC constitute an important component of the inflammatory and innate immune response. However, the expression of these molecules by respiratory viral infections is still largely unknown. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV are two close-related paramyxoviruses that can cause severe low respiratory tract disease in infants and young children worldwide. Currently, there is not vaccine available for neither virus. In this work, we explored the differential expression of MUC by RSV and hMPV in human epithelial cells. Our data indicate that the MUC expression by RSV and hMPV differs significantly, as we observed a stronger induction of MUC8, MUC15, MUC20, MUC21, and MUC22 by RSV infection while the expression of MUC1, MUC2, and MUC5B was dominated by the infection with hMPV. These results may contribute to the different immune response induced by these two respiratory viruses.

  6. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus : immunopathology and vaccine evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonis, A.F.G.

    2010-01-01

    Human and bovine RSVs cause severe disease in humans and in cattle respectively. They have been recognised as important respiratory pathogens in the last five decades, and this has resulted in significant research activities on the pathogenesis and intervention strategies around the world. Physician

  7. Immunization of macaques with formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induces interleukin-13-associated hypersensitivity to subsequent RSV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. de Swart (Rik); T. Kuiken (Thijs); H.H. Timmerman (Helga); G. van Amerongen (Geert); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette); H.W. Vos (Helma); H.J. Neijens (Herman); A.C. Andeweg (Arno); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractRespiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe respiratory disease in infants and the elderly. RSV vaccine development has been hampered by results of clinical trials in the 1960s, when formalin-inactivated whole-RSV preparations adjuvated with alum (FI-RSV) were found to p

  8. Global gene expression profiling in infants with acute respiratory syncytial virus broncholitis demonstrates systemic activation of interferon signaling networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pediatric lower respiratory tract infections and has a high impact on pediatric emergency department utilization. Variation in host response may influence the pathogenesis and disease severity. We evaluated global gene expression profiles to be...

  9. Immunization of macaques with formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induces interleukin-13-associated hypersensitivity to subsequent RSV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. de Swart (Rik); T. Kuiken (Thijs); H.H. Timmerman (Helga); G. van Amerongen (Geert); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette); H.W. Vos (Helma); H.J. Neijens (Herman); A.C. Andeweg (Arno); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractRespiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe respiratory disease in infants and the elderly. RSV vaccine development has been hampered by results of clinical trials in the 1960s, when formalin-inactivated whole-RSV preparations adjuvated with alum (FI-RSV) were found to

  10. Bacteremia in Children Hospitalized with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia-Grande, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Pinnock, Elli; Salas, Antonio; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of bacteremia is considered low in children with acute bronchiolitis. However the rate of occult bacteremia in infants with RSV infection is not well established. The aim was to determine the actual rate and predictive factors of bacteremia in children admitted to hospital due to confirmed RSV acute respiratory illness (ARI), using both conventional culture and molecular techniques. Methods A prospective multicenter study (GENDRES-network) was conducted between 2011–2013 in children under the age of two admitted to hospital because of an ARI. Among those RSV-positive, bacterial presence in blood was assessed using PCR for Meningococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, in addition to conventional cultures. Results 66 children with positive RSV respiratory illness were included. In 10.6% patients, bacterial presence was detected: H. influenzae (n = 4) and S. pneumoniae (n = 2). In those patients with bacteremia, there was a previous suspicion of bacterial superinfection and had received empirical antibiotic treatment 6 out of 7 (85.7%) patients. There were significant differences in terms of severity between children with positive bacterial PCR and those with negative results: PICU admission (100% vs. 50%, P-value = 0.015); respiratory support necessity (100% vs. 18.6%, P-value < 0.001); Wood-Downes score (mean = 8.7 vs. 4.8 points, P-value < 0.001); GENVIP scale (mean = 17 vs. 10.1, P-value < 0.001); and length of hospitalization (mean = 12.1 vs. 7.5 days, P-value = 0.007). Conclusion Bacteremia is not frequent in infants hospitalized with RSV respiratory infection, however, it should be considered in the most severe cases. PMID:26872131

  11. Epidemiological changes of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infections in Israel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Hirsh

    Full Text Available RSV is the leading cause of lower respiratory-tract infections in infants and therefore demands in-depth epidemiological characterization. We investigated here the distribution of RSV types in Israel between the years 2005-2012. Clinical samples were collected from 11,018 patients hospitalized due to respiratory illnesses and were evaluated for the presence of various respiratory viruses, including RSV A and RSV B. Until 2008, each year was characterized by the presence of one dominant type of RSV. However, from 2008, both RSV A and B types were detected at significant levels, particularly among infants aged 0-2 years. Furthermore, significant changes in the RSV A and RSV B subtypes circulating in Israel since 2008 were observed. Finally, we demonstrate that, irrespectively of the changes observed in RSV epidemiology, when the pandemic H1N1pdm09 influenza virus appeared in 2009, RSV infections were delayed and were detected when infection with H1N1pdm09 had declined.

  12. Excretion patterns of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus among young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, M-L; Eugen-Olsen, J; Koch, A;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) cause serious respiratory tract infections, the routes of transmission of these viruses are important to elucidate. We examined the modes of virus shedding and shedding duration of RSV and hMPV in young children...... of the five children shedding RNA in faeces had diarrhoea and children shedding RNA in sweat were either less than five weeks of age or had a chronic lung disease. RSV and hMPV RNA was shed in nasal secretions for a median of 11.5 and 5.0 days respectively (p = 0.001). More than 75% of the family members...... of the infected children showed to have an upper respiratory tract infection when following up. CONCLUSION: Viral RNA was present in nasal secretions, saliva, sweat, and faeces, but whether or not the virions were infectious and constitute a potential mode of transmission remains to be shown in future studies....

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in children with neuromuscular impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Arne; Prusseit, Julia; Müller, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Clinically obvious reasons why children with neurological impairment (NMI) may be more severely affected in case of a viral respiratory tract infection include reduced vital capacity due to muscular weakness or spastic scoliosis, disturbed clearance of respiratory excretions (weak coughing and dysphagia), inability to comply actively with physiotherapeutic interventions, recurrent micro-aspirations (gastroesophageal reflux disease, vomiting related to coughing), a history of frequent exposure to antibiotics and health care institutions, colonization with resistant pathogens, impaired immunologic defence mechanisms due to severe malnutrition and cachexia, and early clinical deterioration in case of high fever with metabolic acidosis and hypercapnia, and maybe associated seizures or febrile convulsions.Data from the literature suggests that in all children with NMI, who have to be hospitalized with severe clinical deterioration due to an airway infection, at least one specimen of nasopharyngeal secretions should be sent as soon as possible to a virologic laboratory to detect viral pathogens. Children with severe NMI and those mechanically ventilated for other reasons being hospitalized during the RSV season must be strictly protected against nosocomial RSV infection by means of standard and droplet precautions. Finally, children with severe NMI and age below 24 months of life should receive passive immunization with palivizumab following international recommendations.

  14. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ISCOMs - protection in the presence of maternal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Sara; Hu, Ke-Fei; Larsen, Lars Erik;

    2004-01-01

    The protection induced by immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was evaluated and compared to that of a commercial inactivated vaccine (CV) in calves with BRSV-specific maternal antibodies. Following experimental challenge, controls (n = 4) and ani......The protection induced by immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was evaluated and compared to that of a commercial inactivated vaccine (CV) in calves with BRSV-specific maternal antibodies. Following experimental challenge, controls (n = 4......) and animals immunized with CV (n = 5) developed moderate to severe respiratory disease, whereas calves immunized with ISCOMS (17 = 5) remained clinically healthy. BRSV was re-isolated from the nasopharynx of all controls and from all calves immunized with CV, but from none of the calves immunized with ISCOMs....... BRSV-RNA was detected by real-time PCR from a single animal in this group. Significantly higher BRSV-specific nasal IgG, serum IgG(1) and IgG(2) titers were detected before and after challenge in animals immunized with ISCOMs versus CV. In conclusion, the ISCOMs overcame the suppressive effect...

  15. Detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus infections in young dairy and beef cattle in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej; Puchalski, Andrzej; Dec, Marta; Stęgierska, Diana; Grooms, Daniel L; Barbu, Nicolas I

    2015-03-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is a major contributor to bovine respiratory disease complex in dairy and beef calves, especially during the first year of life. There is a lack of comprehensive information about the prevalence of infection in cattle herds in Poland as well as in European countries outside the European Union. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of BRSV infections in young beef and dairy cattle in southeastern Poland, a region that has direct contact with non-EU countries. Animals & methods: Nasal swabs and sera (n = 120) were obtained from young cattle aged 6-12 months from 45 farms in eastern and southeastern Poland. BRSV antigen detection in the nasal swabs was carried out using a rapid immunomigration assay used in diagnosing human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) infections in humans, while antibodies to BRSV were detected in the sera by ELISA antibody detection. The study confirmed the presence of BRSV infections in young cattle under 12 months of age from both dairy and beef herds. BRSV was detected in 27 of the 45 herds (60%) sampled. Findings from this study indicate a high prevalence of BRSV infections in cattle in Poland, which may have a significant influence on health status and animal performance. The prevalence of infection is similar to that in other parts of Poland and other countries in Europe. Development of strategies to reduce BRSV infections is needed to improve health and productivity.

  16. The causal direction in the association between respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Simonsen, Jacob Brunbjerg; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have reported an increased risk of asthma after respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization. Other studies found that asthmatic disposition and propensity to wheeze increase the risk of RSV hospitalization. OBJECTIVE: The current study examined the causal direction......; and asthma is associated with a long-term increased susceptibility for severe RSV disease, suggesting a host factor being responsible for the severe response to RSV infection. This suggests that severe RSV infection and asthma may share a common genetic predisposition and/or environmental exposure....

  17. A Case of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in an HIV-Positive Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is commonly known to cause an influenza-like illness. However, it can also cause more severe disease in young children and older adults comprising of organ transplant patients with immunocompromised status. Till date, only four cases of RSV infections have been reported in HIV-positive adults. We describe here a case of HIV-positive female with relatively preserved immune function who presented with RSV infection requiring ventilation and showed improvement after prompt treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin.

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Increases the Virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae by Binding to Penicillin Binding Protein 1a A New Paradigm in Respiratory Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Claire M.; Sandrini, Sara; Datta, Sumit; Freestone, Primrose; Shafeeq, Sulman; Radhakrishnan, Priya; Williams, Gwyneth; Glenn, Sarah M.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Hirst, Robert A.; Easton, Andrew J.; Andrew, Peter W.; O'Callaghan, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are major respiratory pathogens. Coinfection with RSV and S. pneumoniae is associated with severe and often fatal pneumonia but the molecular basis for this remains unclear. ObjeOtives: Todetermine if interaction between RSV a

  19. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus reinfections and decreased milk yield in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Poel, W H; Mourits, M C; Nielen, M; Frankena, K; Van Oirschot, J T; Schukken, Y H

    1995-09-01

    The influence of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV) reinfections on the daily milk yield was studied by evaluating the milk production of 32 BRSV reinfected cows. For the estimation of milk production losses, four lactation curve models were used, including a gamma function, a second degree polynomial, and both of these models with a lag variable. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus reinfections seemed to have only a small effect on the daily milk production. Comparison of the true production with an estimated production according to the gamma function showed that the production for first lactation cows dropped 0.14 kg on average and for cows in their second or later lactation 0.56 kg on average, during 5 consecutive days in the infection period. For the second-degree polynomial model these values were respectively 0.42 kg and 0.80 kg. All calculated average production losses were relatively small and not significant (P > 0.15). The models without lag variable were more suitable than the models with the lag variable to estimate small production losses caused by BRSV reinfections. The power of this study was sufficient to detect a decrease in production of approximately 1-1.5 kg milk per cow per day. It was therefore concluded that BRSV reinfections were not associated with an important loss of milk production.

  20. Cytokines and chemokines in respiratory secretion and severity of disease in infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornsleth, Allan; Loland, Lotte; Larsen, Lars B.

    2001-01-01

    Background: little is known about inflammatory mediators (IM); like cytokines, chemokines and receptors; in respiratory secretion as possible indicators of the severity of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease. Nor have systematic studies been published on the ratios between IM...... as such indicators. Objective: to define the role of IM ratios as possible indicators of the severity of RSV disease. Study design: about 46 infants aged 0-9 months with acute RSV infections were studied. Prematurity (PM) and/or underlying disease (UD) were present in 11 of them. The concentrations of seven...... from 0 to 3 according to the severity of disease. Results: when 25 patients with severe disease (CS 2-3) and 21 patients with mild disease (CS 0-1) were compared with respect to different IM ratios, three ratios were related to severity of disease: IL-1/RANTES, IL-8/RANTES and TNF-R1/RANTES. When 12...

  1. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of severe respiratory syncytial virus-associated acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Bo Zhang; Li-Juan Liu; Li-Ling Qian; Gao-Li Jiang; Chuan-Kai Wang; Pin Jia; Peng Shi; Jin Xu; Li-Bo Wang

    2014-01-01

    Background: To investigate the clinical characteristics and analyze risk factors for severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in hospitalized infants with acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRIs). Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of infants with RSV-associated ALRIs between March 1st, 2011 and February 29th, 2012 was conducted. Subjects were followed up over the phone or by outpatient visit six and twelve months after discharge. Results: Among 913 RSV-associated ALRIs infants, 288 (31.5%) had severe infections, which accounted for 4.2% of hospitalized children. The hospital RSV mortality rate was 1.0%. The proportions of cases with tachypnea, apnea, cyanosis, and fine rales were significantly higher in the severe ALRIs group (all P Conclusions: Younger age, low birth weight and underlying disease are associated with severe RSVassociated ALRIs. Furthermore, severe RSV infections may be associated with a higher frequency of subsequent bronchitis, pneumonia and re-hospitalization in the following year.

  2. Circulating strains of human respiratory syncytial virus in central and south America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merly Sovero

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is a major cause of viral lower respiratory tract infections among infants and young children. HRSV strains vary genetically and antigenically and have been classified into two broad subgroups, A and B (HRSV-A and HRSV-B, respectively. To date, little is known about the circulating strains of HRSV in Latin America. We have evaluated the genetic diversity of 96 HRSV strains by sequencing a variable region of the G protein gene of isolates collected from 2007 to 2009 in Central and South America. Our results show the presence of the two antigenic subgroups of HRSV during this period with the majority belonging to the genotype HRSV-A2.

  3. Measles-mumps-rubella vaccination and respiratory syncytial virus-associated hospital contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Sørup, Signe; Stensballe, Lone Graff;

    2015-01-01

    -confirmed RSV hospital contacts at age 14-23 months in all children born in Denmark 1997-2002 who had already received the vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (acellular), polio, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib) at the recommended ages of 3, 5, and 12 months. RESULTS: The study......BACKGROUND: The live measles vaccine has been associated with lower non-measles mortality and admissions in low-income countries. The live measles-mumps-rubella vaccine has also been associated with lower rate of admissions with any type of infection in Danish children; the association...... was strongest for admissions with lower respiratory infections. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination was associated with reduced rate of hospital contact related to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a high-income country. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study of laboratory...

  4. Rapid Spread and Diversification of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genotype ON1, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, James R.; Gitahi, Caroline W.; Cane, Patricia A.; Nokes, D. James

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus genotype ON1, which is characterized by a 72-nt duplication in the attachment protein gene, has been detected in >10 countries since first identified in Ontario, Canada, in 2010. We describe 2 waves of genotype ON1 infections among children admitted to a rural hospital in Kenya during 2012. Phylogenetic analysis of attachment protein gene sequences showed multiple introductions of genotype ON1; variants distinct from the original Canadian viruses predominated in both infection waves. The genotype ON1 dominated over the other group A genotypes during the second wave, and some first wave ON1 variants reappeared in the second wave. An analysis of global genotype ON1 sequences determined that this genotype has become considerably diversified and has acquired signature coding mutations within immunogenic regions, and its most recent common ancestor dates to ≈2008–2009. Surveillance of genotype ON1 contributes to an understanding of the mechanisms of rapid emergence of respiratory viruses. PMID:24856417

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants and correlation with meteorological factors and air pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandini Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the most important cause of severe respiratory infections in infants with seasonal epidemics. Environmental factors (temperature, humidity, air pollution could influence RSV epidemics through their effects on virus activity and diffusion. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on a paediatric population who referred to our Paediatric Emergency Unit in order to analyze the correlation between weekly incidence of RSV positive cases during winter season in Bologna and meteorological factors and air pollutants concentration. Results We observed a significant correlation between the incidence of RSV infections and the mean minimum temperature registered during the same week and the previous weeks. The weekly number of RSV positive cases was also correlated to the mean PM10 concentration of the week before. Conclusions RSV epidemic trend in Bologna (Italy is related to the mean minimum temperature, and the mean PM10 concentration.

  6. A Decade of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Epidemiology and Prophylaxis: Translating Evidence into Everyday Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosco A Paes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a common infection in infancy, with nearly all children affected by two years of age. Approximately 0.5% to 2.0% of all children are hospitalized with lower respiratory tract disease, of which 50% to 90% have bronchiolitis and 5% to 40% have pneumonia. Morbidity and mortality are highest in children with nosocomial infection and in those with underlying medical illnesses such as cardiac and chronic lung disease. Aboriginal children residing in remote northern regions are specifically considered to be at high risk for hospitalization due to RSV infection. Thorough hand washing and health education are the principal strategies in primary prevention. In the absence of a vaccine, palivizumab prophylaxis is currently the best intervention to reduce the burden of illness and RSV-related hospitalization in high-risk children. Health care professionals should provide palivizumab prophylaxis cost effectively in accordance with recommendations issued by pediatric societies and national advisory bodies.

  7. Genotypes and clinical data of respiratory syncytial virus and metapneumovirus in brazilian infants: a new perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Gut Lopes Riccetto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine if there was a correlation between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and metapneumovirus (MPV genotypes and clinical data of Brazilian infants hospitalized for acute lower respiratory infection. The viruses in the patients' nasopharyngeal secretions were studied using the polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis. The study assessed 144 infants; 31.9% were RSV positive and 5.6% were MPV positive. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-squared test, Fisher's test, Odds ratio, univariate logistic regression, non-conditional multivariate logistic regression and the forward - stepwise method. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant relationship between a positive PCR test for RSV and hospitalization during the month of May and with pulse oximetry less than 90%. The phylogenetic analysis indicated the genotypes GA2, GA5, SAA1 (Group A, SAB1, SAB3 and BA (Group B for RSV and Group B, subgroup B1, for MPV.

  8. Potent single-domain antibodies that arrest respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein in its prefusion state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossey, Iebe; Gilman, Morgan S. A.; Kabeche, Stephanie C.; Sedeyn, Koen; Wrapp, Daniel; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Chen, Man; Mas, Vicente; Spitaels, Jan; Melero, José A.; Graham, Barney S.; Schepens, Bert; McLellan, Jason S.; Saelens, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the main cause of lower respiratory tract infections in young children. The RSV fusion protein (F) is highly conserved and is the only viral membrane protein that is essential for infection. The prefusion conformation of RSV F is considered the most relevant target for antiviral strategies because it is the fusion-competent form of the protein and the primary target of neutralizing activity present in human serum. Here, we describe two llama-derived single-domain antibodies (VHHs) that have potent RSV-neutralizing activity and bind selectively to prefusion RSV F with picomolar affinity. Crystal structures of these VHHs in complex with prefusion F show that they recognize a conserved cavity formed by two F protomers. In addition, the VHHs prevent RSV replication and lung infiltration of inflammatory monocytes and T cells in RSV-challenged mice. These prefusion F-specific VHHs represent promising antiviral agents against RSV. PMID:28194013

  9. Clinical outcomes in outpatient respiratory syncytial virus infection in immunocompromised children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Helen Y; Chin, Jennifer; Pollard, Jessica; Zerr, Danielle M; Englund, Janet A

    2016-05-01

    Immunocompromised patients are at high risk for morbidity and mortality due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Increasingly, pediatric patients with malignancy or undergoing transplantation are managed primarily as outpatients. Data regarding the clinical presentation and outcomes of RSV in the outpatient pediatric immunocompromised population are limited. We performed a retrospective cohort study of children with hematologic malignancy or hematopoietic or solid organ transplant with laboratory-confirmed RSV infection diagnosed as outpatients at an academic medical center between 2008 and 2013. Of 54 patients with RSV detected while outpatients, 15 (28%) were hospitalized, 7 (13%) received ribavirin, and one (2%) received intravenous immunoglobulin. One (2%) patient was critically ill, but there were no deaths due to RSV infection. Fever (P therapies should consider inclusion of patients in an ambulatory setting. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Spontaneous Pneumothorax With Subcutaneous Emphysema: A Rare Complication of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carmen; Almeida, Ana Filipe; Ferraz, Catarina; Nunes, Teresa; Guedes Vaz, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    Viral bronchiolitis is the most common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and children under the age of 2. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the infecting agent in more than 50% of the cases. Usually the clinical course is uneventful and complications are uncommon. Secondary air leaks are a recognized rare complication of bronchiolitis, although the real incidence remains unknown. We report a case of a 21-month-old female that developed a spontaneous pneumothorax (PNO) with subcutaneous emphysema (SE) late in the course of RSV acute bronchiolitis. Additional investigation ruled out any underlying disease predisposing to spontaneous PNO. Physicians, especially those who work with small children, must be aware of this uncommon complication of bronchiolitis that may appear late in the course of the disease despite an initial clinical improvement.

  11. Validation of a pediatric caregiver diary to measure symptoms of postacute respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santanello, Nancy C; Norquist, Josephine M; Nelsen, Linda M

    2005-01-01

    Acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced bronchiolitis is often associated with continuing respiratory symptoms following hospitalization. To date, there is no validated objective measure to evaluate symptoms of RSV-induced bronchiolitis. We report on the reliability, validity......, and responsiveness of the bronchiolitis caregiver diary (BCD) of symptoms and healthcare utilization associated with postacute RSV. The BCD measures four symptoms (daytime cough, wheeze, trouble breathing, and nighttime cough), healthcare utilization, and rescue medication for worsening of lung symptoms. Data from......-group differences were statistically significant in the appropriate direction. Responsiveness analyses indicated moderate effect sizes for percentage of SFD. In conclusion, the BCD provides a valid, reliable, and responsive tool for the assessment of symptoms of postacute RSV-induced bronchiolitis, capable...

  12. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of severe acute respiratory infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in children under 5 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVES: To compare the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of severe acute respiratory infection in children under 5 years old with and without infection due to respiratory syncytial virus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective study in a sample of 65 cases and 65 controls in children under 5 years old with acute respiratory infection (SARI treated at the Pediatric Emergency Hospital during 2014. The diagnosis of RSV test was performed using direct inmufluorescencia (IFD in nasal and throat samples (D3 Ultra DFA Respiratory Virus 8 ™ Screening & ID Kit. The results were expressed in absolute and relative terms; the analysis was performed by measures of central tendency, chi-square, “t” Student and Mann Whitney tests. RESULTS: Significant differences were found between cases and controls in the average age in the month of infection, the average respiratory rate, use of mechanical ventilation in antibiotic treatment and diagnosis of bronchiolitis at medical discharge. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that there are clinical and epidemiological differences between the cases and controls

  13. Protection against respiratory disease in calves induced by vaccines containing respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, Mycoplasma bovis and M dispar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, C J; Stott, E J; Thomas, L H; Gourlay, R N; Taylor, G

    1987-10-17

    A field trial to assess the ability of two vaccines to protect calves against respiratory disease was carried out on a large beef rearing unit in southern England over the two winters of 1983 to 1984 and 1984 to 1985. A quadrivalent vaccine containing the killed antigens of respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus type 3, Mycoplasma bovis and M dispar or a vaccine containing only the respiratory syncytial virus component were inoculated into 246 and 245 calves, respectively; 245 calves remained as unvaccinated controls. The calves were reared in seven batches and outbreaks of disease occurred in five; significant protection was achieved in the four batches in which disease was associated with respiratory syncytial virus and M bovis infection, together or independently. The death rate from pneumonia was 9 per cent in the control group, 2 per cent in the calves inoculated with the quadrivalent vaccine (P less than 0.001), a protection rate of 77 per cent, and 3 per cent in the calves inoculated with the respiratory syncytial virus vaccine (P less than 0.01), a protection rate of 68 per cent. The proportion of calves receiving treatment for respiratory disease was 38 per cent in the control group, 25 per cent in the calves inoculated with the quadrivalent vaccine (P less than 0.001) and 27 per cent in the calves inoculated with the respiratory syncytial virus vaccine (P less than 0.01). The results show that protection against respiratory disease can be achieved by parenteral vaccination of calves with the appropriate inactivated microorganisms.

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV RNA loads in peripheral blood correlates with disease severity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres Juan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV infection is usually restricted to the respiratory epithelium. Few studies have documented the presence of RSV in the systemic circulation, however there is no consistent information whether virus detection in the blood correlates with disease severity. Methods Balb/c mice were inoculated with live RSV, heat-inactivated RSV or medium. A subset of RSV-infected mice was treated with anti-RSV antibody 72 h post-inoculation. RSV RNA loads were measured by PCR in peripheral blood from day 1-21 post-inoculation and were correlated with upper and lower respiratory tract viral loads, the systemic cytokine response, lung inflammation and pulmonary function. Immunohistochemical staining was used to define the localization of RSV antigens in the respiratory tract and peripheral blood. Results RSV RNA loads were detected in peripheral blood from day 1 to 14 post-inoculation, peaked on day 5 and significantly correlated with nasal and lung RSV loads, airway obstruction, and blood CCL2 and CXCL1 expression. Treatment with anti-RSV antibody reduced blood RSV RNA loads and improved airway obstruction. Immunostaining identified RSV antigens in alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood monocytes. Conclusions RSV RNA was detected in peripheral blood upon infection with live RSV, followed a time-course parallel to viral loads assessed in the respiratory tract and was significantly correlated with RSV-induced airway disease.

  15. ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION IN CHILDREN IN THE AGE ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Rovny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical features of laboratory-confirmed acute respiratory syncytial virus infection (ARSVI are described in 221 children of the age from 1 month to 5 years. Febrile fever has been recorded in 76% of patients with ARSVI, and significantly more often in children in the second year of life (92%, but the difference in the temerature or duration has not been found. 98% of children have had symptoms of the lower respiratory tract lesions. The most common ARSVI manifestations in the patients of the first year of life were obstructive diseases of the lower respiratory tract (obstructive bronchitis in 53% and bronchiolitis in 11% of children, in the patients of the second year of life — pneumonia (28%, p < 0,05 and catarrhal otitis (26%; p < 0,05. Bronchial obstruction syndrome in children of the first year of life was characterized by the significantly higher frequency (73% and the maximal duration (9,7 ± 1,08 days. The largest number of cases of the severe respiratory failure has been recorded among patients of the second year of life (3 degree of respiratory failure in 22% of patients, p < 0,05.

  16. Sites of replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally infected calves as determined by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Uttenthal, Åse; Tegtmeier, C.

    1996-01-01

    Replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was studied in three naturally infected calves by in situ hybridization using strand-specific RNA probes. One of the calves was a 5-month-old Friesian, the other two calves were a 3-month-old and a 2-week-old Jersey. Two Jersey calves, 3 mo...

  17. Antibody responses against epitopes on the F protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus differ in infected or vaccinated cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, R.S.; Hensen, E.J.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Daus, F.; Middel, W.G.J.; Kramps, J.A.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    1997-01-01

    The fusion protein F of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an important target for humoral and cellular immune responses, and antibodies against the F protein have been associated with protection. However, the F protein can induce antibodies with different biological activity, possibly

  18. Timing of infection and prior immunization with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in RSV-enhanced allergic inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Barends (Marion); C.G. de Rond; J.A.M.A. Dormans (Jan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.J. Neijens (Herman); T.G. Kimman

    2004-01-01

    textabstractRespiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of allergy in humans and mice. The allergy-enhancing properties of RSV may be dependent on atopic background and an individual's history of RSV infection. We examined the influence of the

  19. Crawling with Virus: Translational Insights from a Neonatal Mouse Model on the Pathogenesis of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Dahui; Saravia, Jordy; Siefker, David; Shrestha, Bishwas; Cormier, Stephania A

    2015-10-07

    The infant immune response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains incompletely understood. Here we review the use of a neonatal mouse model of RSV infection to mimic severe infection in human infants. We describe numerous age-specific responses, organized by cell type, observed in RSV-infected neonatal mice and draw comparisons (when possible) to human infants.

  20. Diagnostic virology practices for respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus among children in the hospital setting: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafri, Hasan S; Ramilo, Octavio; Makari, Doris; Charsha-May, Deborah; Romero, José R

    2007-10-01

    A survey was sent to the emergency room and laboratory directors of 400 randomly selected US hospitals to assess the diagnostic testing practices for respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus in children. The results demonstrate that the majority of hospitals routinely perform viral testing for both viruses and use virology testing practices appropriate for the reasons reported for testing.

  1. Defining the Epidemiology and Burden of Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Among Infants and Children in Western Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, Louis; Checchia, Paul A; Fauroux, Brigitte; Figueras-Aloy, Josep; Manzoni, Paolo; Paes, Bosco; Simões, Eric A F; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The REGAL (RSV [respiratory syncytial virus] Evidence-a Geographical Archive of the Literature) series provides a comprehensive review of the published evidence in the field of RSV in Western countries over the last 20 years. This first of seven publications covers the epidemiology and

  2. Defining the Risk and Associated Morbidity and Mortality of Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Among Infants with Chronic Lung Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paes, Bosco; Fauroux, Brigitte; Figueras-Aloy, Josep; Bont, Louis; Checchia, Paul A; Simões, Eric A F; Manzoni, Paolo; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The REGAL (RSV evidence-a geographical archive of the literature) series provide a comprehensive review of the published evidence in the field of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in Western countries over the last 20 years. This third publication covers the risk and burden of RSV infe

  3. Timing of infection and prior immunization with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in RSV-enhanced allergic inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Barends (Marion); C.G. de Rond; J.A.M.A. Dormans (Jan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.J. Neijens (Herman); T.G. Kimman

    2004-01-01

    textabstractRespiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of allergy in humans and mice. The allergy-enhancing properties of RSV may be dependent on atopic background and an individual's history of RSV infection. We examined the influence of the t

  4. Immunogenicity and Protective Capacity of a Virosomal Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine Adjuvanted with Monophosphoryl Lipid A in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Tobias; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Stegmann, Toon; Lederhofer, Julia; Wilschut, Jan; de Haan, Aalzen

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a major cause of viral brochiolitis in infants and young children and is also a significant problem in elderly and immuno-compromised adults. To date there is no efficacious and safe RSV vaccine, partially because of the outcome of a clinical trial in the 1960s w

  5. An In vitro Model to Study Immune Responses of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.; Habets, M.N.; Ahout, I.M.L.; Jans, J.; Jonge, M.I. de; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Ferwerda, G.

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infections present a broad spectrum of disease severity, ranging from mild infections to life-threatening bronchiolitis. An important part of the pathogenesis of severe disease is an enhanced immune response leading to immunopathology. Here, we describe a

  6. Exploring the association between severe respiratory syncytial virus infection and asthma: a registry-based twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis; van der Sluis, Sophie; Stensballe, Lone G;

    2009-01-01

    RATIONALE: Severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is associated with asthma but the nature of this association is imperfectly understood. OBJECTIVES: To examine the nature of the association between severe RSV infection and asthma in a population-based sample of twins. METHODS: Data...

  7. Infants with severe respiratory syncytial virus needed less ventilator time with nasal continuous airways pressure then invasive mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borckink, Ilse; Essouri, Sandrine; Laurent, Marie; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Tissieres, Pierre; Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) has been proposed as an early first-line support for infants with severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. We hypothesised that infants <6 months with severe RSV would require shorter ventilator support on NCPAP than invasive mechanic

  8. Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial of prednisolone in children admitted to hospital with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, JBM; Wolfs, TFW; vanAalderen, WMC; Brand, PLP; Kimpen, JLL

    1997-01-01

    Background - Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is an immune mediated disease. Corticosteroids might therefore be effective in the treatment of RSV bronchiolitis. Methods - A randomised double blind trial was conducted in children up to t

  9. Intranasal Administration of Antibody-Bound Respiratory Syncytial Virus Particles Efficiently Primes Virus-Specific Immune Responses in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijsen, Debby; Einarsdottir, Helga K.; Schijf, Marcel A.; Coenjaerts, Frank E.; van der Schoot, Ellen C.; Vidarsson, Gestur; van Bleek, Grada M.

    2013-01-01

    Infants are protected from a severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in the first months of life by maternal antibodies or by prophylactically administered neutralizing antibodies. Efforts are under way to produce RSV-specific antibodies with increased neutralizing capacity compared to th

  10. An In vitro Model to Study Immune Responses of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.; Habets, M.N.; Ahout, I.M.L.; Jans, J.; Jonge, M.I. de; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Ferwerda, G.

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infections present a broad spectrum of disease severity, ranging from mild infections to life-threatening bronchiolitis. An important part of the pathogenesis of severe disease is an enhanced immune response leading to immunopathology. Here, we describe a pro

  11. Infants with severe respiratory syncytial virus needed less ventilator time with nasal continuous airways pressure then invasive mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borckink, Ilse; Essouri, Sandrine; Laurent, Marie; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Tissieres, Pierre; Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    AIM: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) has been proposed as an early first-line support for infants with severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. We hypothesised that infants <6 months with severe RSV would require shorter ventilator support on NCPAP than invasive

  12. HLA class I-restricted cytotoxic T-cell epitopes of the respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Brandenburg (Afke); L. de Waal (Leon); H.H. Timmerman (Helga); P. Hoogerhout (Peter); R.L. de Swart (Rik); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractVirus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) play a major role in the clearance of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. We have generated cytotoxic T-cell clones (TCC) from two infants who had just recovered from severe RSV infection. These TCC were

  13. Molecular Basis for the Selective Inhibition of Respiratory Syncytial Virus RNA Polymerase by 2'-Fluoro-4'-Chloromethyl-Cytidine Triphosphate.

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    Jerome Deval

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV causes severe lower respiratory tract infections, yet no vaccines or effective therapeutics are available. ALS-8176 is a first-in-class nucleoside analog prodrug effective in RSV-infected adult volunteers, and currently under evaluation in hospitalized infants. Here, we report the mechanism of inhibition and selectivity of ALS-8176 and its parent ALS-8112. ALS-8176 inhibited RSV replication in non-human primates, while ALS-8112 inhibited all strains of RSV in vitro and was specific for paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses. The antiviral effect of ALS-8112 was mediated by the intracellular formation of its 5'-triphosphate metabolite (ALS-8112-TP inhibiting the viral RNA polymerase. ALS-8112 selected for resistance-associated mutations within the region of the L gene of RSV encoding the RNA polymerase. In biochemical assays, ALS-8112-TP was efficiently recognized by the recombinant RSV polymerase complex, causing chain termination of RNA synthesis. ALS-8112-TP did not inhibit polymerases from host or viruses unrelated to RSV such as hepatitis C virus (HCV, whereas structurally related molecules displayed dual RSV/HCV inhibition. The combination of molecular modeling and enzymatic analysis showed that both the 2'F and the 4'ClCH2 groups contributed to the selectivity of ALS-8112-TP. The lack of antiviral effect of ALS-8112-TP against HCV polymerase was caused by Asn291 that is well-conserved within positive-strand RNA viruses. This represents the first comparative study employing recombinant RSV and HCV polymerases to define the selectivity of clinically relevant nucleotide analogs. Understanding nucleotide selectivity towards distant viral RNA polymerases could not only be used to repurpose existing drugs against new viral infections, but also to design novel molecules.

  14. Evaluation of reverse transcription-PCR protocols based on the fusion gene for diagnosis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Selim A.; Gaede W.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is a pneumovirus in the family paramyxoviridae, is an important cause of acute respiratory disease in postweaning calves and feedlot cattle. The real-time reverse transcriptase PCR protocols were developed to detect BRSV infection in infected animals. The sensitivity of RT-PCR protocols based on fusion gene were evaluated using different Mastermixes such as Qiagen One Step RT-PCR (Qiagen) for conventional RT-PCR, Su...

  15. Global respiratory syncytial virus-associated mortality in young children (RSV GOLD): a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheltema, Nienke M; Gentile, Angela; Lucion, Florencia; Nokes, D James; Munywoki, Patrick K; Madhi, Shabir A; Groome, Michelle J; Cohen, Cheryl; Moyes, Jocelyn; Thorburn, Kentigern; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Lupisan, Socorro P; Gordon, Aubree; Sánchez, José F; O'Brien, Katherine L; Gessner, Bradford D; Sutanto, Agustinus; Mejias, Asuncion; Ramilo, Octavio; Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Halasa, Natasha; de-Paris, Fernanda; Pires, Márcia Rosane; Spaeder, Michael C; Paes, Bosco A; Simões, Eric A F; Leung, Ting F; da Costa Oliveira, Maria Tereza; de Freitas Lázaro Emediato, Carla Cecília; Bassat, Quique; Butt, Warwick; Chi, Hsin; Aamir, Uzma Bashir; Ali, Asad; Lucero, Marilla G; Fasce, Rodrigo A; Lopez, Olga; Rath, Barbara A; Polack, Fernando P; Papenburg, Jesse; Roglić, Srđan; Ito, Hisato; Goka, Edward A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Nair, Harish; Bont, Louis J

    2017-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is an important cause of pneumonia mortality in young children. However, clinical data for fatal RSV infection are scarce. We aimed to identify clinical and socioeconomic characteristics of children aged younger than 5 years with RSV-related mortality using individual patient data. In this retrospective case series, we developed an online questionnaire to obtain individual patient data for clinical and socioeconomic characteristics of children aged younger than 5 years who died with community-acquired RSV infection between Jan 1, 1995, and Oct 31, 2015, through leading research groups for child pneumonia identified through a comprehensive literature search and existing research networks. For the literature search, we searched PubMed for articles published up to Feb 3, 2015, using the key terms "RSV", "respiratory syncytial virus", or "respiratory syncytial viral" combined with "mortality", "fatality", "death", "died", "deaths", or "CFR" for articles published in English. We invited researchers and clinicians identified to participate between Nov 1, 2014, and Oct 31, 2015. We calculated descriptive statistics for all variables. We studied 358 children with RSV-related in-hospital death from 23 countries across the world, with data contributed from 31 research groups. 117 (33%) children were from low-income or lower middle-income countries, 77 (22%) were from upper middle-income countries, and 164 (46%) were from high-income countries. 190 (53%) were male. Data for comorbidities were missing for some children in low-income and middle-income countries. Available data showed that comorbidities were present in at least 33 (28%) children from low-income or lower middle-income countries, 36 (47%) from upper middle-income countries, and 114 (70%) from high-income countries. Median age for RSV-related deaths was 5·0 months (IQR 2·3-11·0) in low-income or lower middle-income countries, 4·0 years (2·0-10·0) in upper middle

  16. Bronchiolitis outbreak caused by respiratory syncytial virus in southwest Bangladesh, 2010☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Farhana; Husain, M. Mushtuq; Ameen, Kazi Mohammad Hassan; Rahima, Refat; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Alamgir, A.S.M.; Rahman, Mustafizur; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background During July 2010, newspapers reported a respiratory disease outbreak in southwestern Bangladesh resulting in the admission of children to a secondary care hospital. We investigated this outbreak to determine the etiology and explore possible risk factors. Methods The hospital’s physician diagnosed children aged bronchiolitis. We reviewed the hospital records and listed case patients admitted between 26 June and 26 July 2010. We surveyed the case patients and collected nasal and throat swabs to test for respiratory viruses. Results We identified 101 admitted acute bronchiolitis case patients. Fifty-nine (58%) of these were admitted between 16 and 20 July. Among the 29 case patients surveyed, the median age was 4 months and 65% were males. We identified respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in 91% (21/23) of the samples, 43% of which had a dual viral infection. Most case patients (90%) were treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. There were no reported deaths. Conclusions The sudden increase in admitted acute bronchiolitis case patients, their median age, and identification of RSV in the majority of samples suggest an outbreak of RSV bronchiolitis. Research to identify strategies to prevent respiratory infections including RSV in low-income settings should be prioritized. Factors that perpetuate antibiotic use in managing this viral syndrome should also be explored. PMID:22938872

  17. Systemic signature of the lung response to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen L A Pennings

    Full Text Available Respiratory Syncytial Virus is a frequent cause of severe bronchiolitis in children. To improve our understanding of systemic host responses to RSV, we compared BALB/c mouse gene expression responses at day 1, 2, and 5 during primary RSV infection in lung, bronchial lymph nodes, and blood. We identified a set of 53 interferon-associated and innate immunity genes that give correlated responses in all three murine tissues. Additionally, we identified blood gene signatures that are indicative of acute infection, secondary immune response, and vaccine-enhanced disease, respectively. Eosinophil-associated ribonucleases were characteristic for the vaccine-enhanced disease blood signature. These results indicate that it may be possible to distinguish protective and unfavorable patient lung responses via blood diagnostics.

  18. Development of a high-throughput replicon assay for the identification of respiratory syncytial virus inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong-Yip, Choi-Lai; Plant, Helen; Sharpe, Paul; Fan, Jun; Rich, Kirsty; Gorseth, Elise; Yu, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) drug discovery has been hindered by the lack of good chemistry starting points and would benefit from robust and convenient assays for high-throughput screening (HTS). In this paper, we present the development and optimization of a 384-well RSV replicon assay that enabled HTS for RSV replication inhibitors with a low bio-containment requirement. The established replicon assay was successfully implemented for high-throughput screening. A validation screen was performed which demonstrated high assay performance and reproducibility. Assay quality was further confirmed via demonstration of appropriate pharmacology for different classes of RSV replication tool inhibitors. RSV replicon and cytotoxicity assays were further developed into a multiplexed format that measured both inhibition of viral replication and cytotoxicity from the same well. This provided a time and cost efficient approach to support lead optimization. In summary, we have developed a robust RSV replicon assay to help expedite the discovery of novel RSV therapeutics.

  19. Cellular reactivity to respiratory syncytial virus in human colostrum and breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R; Scott, M; Toms, G L

    1985-09-01

    Colostrum and breast-milk samples were taken from 23 mothers between 2 days and 7 weeks postpartum and were examined for the presence of cellular reactivity to respiratory syncytial (RS) virus using a lymphocyte transformation assay. Positive responses were detected in nine of the 23 (39%) samples taken at 2-5 days postpartum, but this reactivity was undetectable at 3 weeks. Positive responses developed in a further three mothers during the 3-7-week period of lactation, suggesting a response to virus infection. Colostral whey was found to suppress the cellular response to RS virus and inhibition was related to the level of specific IgA antibody to RS virus present in the whey. The role of colostral cellular reactivity in protection of breast-fed infants from RS virus bronchiolitis is discussed.

  20. Molecular evolution of the fusion protein (F) gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hirokazu; Nagasawa, Koo; Kimura, Ryusuke; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyotaka; Hirano, Eiko; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Misaki, Takako; Oishi, Kazunori; Kuroda, Makoto; Ryo, Akihide

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we examined the molecular evolution of the fusion protein (F) gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup B (HRSV-B). First, we performed time-scale evolution analyses using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. Next, we performed genetic distance, linear B-cell epitope prediction, N-glycosylation, positive/negative selection site, and Bayesian skyline plot analyses. We also constructed a structural model of the F protein and mapped the amino acid substitutions and the predicted B-cell epitopes. The MCMC-constructed phylogenetic tree indicated that the HRSV F gene diverged from the bovine respiratory syncytial virus gene approximately 580years ago and had a relatively low evolutionary rate (7.14×10(-4)substitutions/site/year). Furthermore, a common ancestor of HRSV-A and -B diverged approximately 290years ago, while HRSV-B diverged into three clusters for approximately 60years. The genetic similarity of the present strains was very high. Although a maximum of 11 amino acid substitutions were observed in the structural model of the F protein, only one strain possessed an amino acid substitution located within the palivizumab epitope. Four epitopes were predicted, although these did not correspond to the neutralization sites of the F protein including the palivizumab epitope. In addition, five N-glycosylation sites of the present HRSV-B strains were inferred. No positive selection sites were identified; however, many sites were found to be under negative selection. The effective population size of the gene has remained almost constant. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that the HRSV-B F gene is highly conserved, as is the F protein of HRSV-A. Moreover, our prediction of B-cell epitopes does not show that the palivizumab reaction site may be recognized as an epitope during naturally occurring infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Potential therapeutic implications of new insights into respiratory syncytial virus disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Openshaw Peter JM

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral bronchiolitis is the most common cause of hospitalization in infants under 6 months of age, and 70% of all cases of bronchiolitis are caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. Early RSV infection is associated with respiratory problems such as asthma and wheezing later in life. RSV infection is usually spread by contaminated secretions and infects the upper then lower respiratory tracts. Infected cells release proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, and IL-8. These activate other cells and recruit inflammatory cells, including macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, and T lymphocytes, into the airway wall and surrounding tissues. The pattern of cytokine production by T lymphocytes can be biased toward 'T-helper-1' or 'T-helper-2' cytokines, depending on the local immunologic environment, infection history, and host genetics. T-helper-1 responses are generally efficient in antiviral defense, but young infants have an inherent bias toward T-helper-2 responses. The ideal intervention for RSV infection would be preventive, but the options are currently limited. Vaccines based on protein subunits, live attenuated strains of RSV, DNA vaccines, and synthetic peptides are being developed; passive antibody therapy is at present impractical in otherwise healthy children. Effective vaccines for use in neonates continue to be elusive but simply delaying infection beyond the first 6 months of life might reduce the delayed morbidity associated with infantile disease.

  2. Altered cardiac rhythm in infants with bronchiolitis and respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galeone Carlotta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the most frequent extra-pulmonary manifestations of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection involve the cardiovascular system, no data regarding heart function in infants with bronchiolitis associated with RSV infection have yet been systematically collected. The aim of this study was to verify the real frequency of heart involvement in patients with bronchiolitis associated with RSV infection, and whether infants with mild or moderate disease also risk heart malfunction. Methods A total of 69 otherwise healthy infants aged 1-12 months with bronchiolitis hospitalised in standard wards were enrolled. Pernasal flocked swabs were performed to collect specimens for the detection of RSV by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and a blood sample was drawn to assess troponin I concentrations. On the day of admission, all of the infants underwent 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring and a complete heart evaluation with echocardiography. Patients were re-evaluated by investigators blinded to the etiological and cardiac findings four weeks after enrolment. Results Regardless of their clinical presentation, sinoatrial blocks were identified in 26/34 RSV-positive patients (76.5% and 1/35 RSV-negative patients (2.9% (p Conclusions RSV seems associated with sinoatrial blocks and transient rhythm alterations even when the related respiratory problems are mild or moderate. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms of these rhythm problems and whether they remain asymptomatic and transient even in presence of severe respiratory involvement or chronic underlying disease.

  3. Premature infants have impaired airway antiviral IFNγ responses to human metapneumovirus compared to respiratory syncytial virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancham, Krishna; Perez, Geovanny F.; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Jain, Amisha; Kurdi, Bassem; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Preciado, Diego; Rose, Mary C.; Nino, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is unknown why human metapneumovirus (HMPV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) cause severe respiratory infection in children, particularly in premature infants. Our aim was to investigate if there are defective airway antiviral responses to these viruses in young children with history of prematurity. METHODS Nasal airway secretions were collected from 140 children ≤3 y old without detectable virus (n = 80) or with PCR-confirmed HMPV or RSV infection (n = 60). Nasal protein levels of IFNγ, CCL5/RANTES, IL-10, IL-4, and IL-17 were determined using a multiplex magnetic bead immunoassay. RESULTS Full-term children with HMPV and RSV infection had increased levels of nasal airway IFNγ, CCL5, and IL-10 along with an elevation in Th1 (IFNγ)/Th2 (IL-4) ratios, which is expected during antiviral responses. In contrast, HMPV-infected premature children (< 32 wk gestation) did not exhibit increased Th1/Th2 ratios or elevated nasal airway secretion of IFNγ, CCL5, and IL-10 relative to uninfected controls. CONCLUSION Our study is the first to demonstrate that premature infants have defective IFNγ, CCL5/RANTES, and IL-10 airway responses during HMPV infection and provides novel insights about the potential reason why HMPV causes severe respiratory disease in children with history of prematurity. PMID:26086642

  4. Detection of an untyped strain of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in a dairy herd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Bortolin Affonso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV causes important lower respiratory tract illness in calves. According to F and G proteins genetic sequences, three BRSV subgroups have been reported and characterized in several countries, showing differences in its distribution. In Brazil, the virus is widely disseminated throughout the herds and the few characterized isolates revealed the solely occurrence of the subgroup B. This study describes the detection and characterization of an untyped BRSV strain from a twenty-days-old calf from a herd without clinical respiratory disease. Nasal swabs were analyzed by RT-nested PCR for the F and G proteins genes. One sample has amplified the F protein gene. Sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic reconstruction were accomplished, revealing that the strain could not be grouped with any other BRSV subgroups reported. This result may suggest that the BRSV is in constantly evolution, even in Brazil, where the vaccination is not a common practice. More detailed studies about BRSV characterization are necessary to know the virus subgroups distribution among the Brazilian herds to recommend appropriated immunoprophylaxis.

  5. Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Other Respiratory Viral Infections in Older Adults With Moderate to Severe Influenza-like Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsey, Ann R.; McElhaney, Janet E.; Beran, Jiri; van Essen, Gerrit A.; Duval, Xavier; Esen, Meral; Galtier, Florence; Gervais, Pierre; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Kremsner, Peter; Launay, Odile; Leroux-Roels, Geert; McNeil, Shelly A.; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo; St Rose, Suzanne; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie; Oostvogels, Lidia; Durviaux, Serge; Taylor, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Few studies have prospectively assessed viral etiologies of acute respiratory infections in community-based elderly individuals. We assessed viral respiratory pathogens in individuals ≥65 years with influenza-like illness (ILI). Methods. Multiplex reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction identified viral pathogens in nasal/throat swabs from 556 episodes of moderate-to-severe ILI, defined as ILI with pneumonia, hospitalization, or maximum daily influenza symptom severity score (ISS) >2. Cases were selected from a randomized trial of an adjuvanted vs nonadjuvanted influenza vaccine conducted in elderly adults from 15 countries. Results. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was detected in 7.4% (41/556) moderate-to-severe ILI episodes in elderly adults. Most (39/41) were single infections. There was a significant association between country and RSV detection (P = .004). RSV prevalence was 7.1% (2/28) in ILI with pneumonia, 12.5% (8/64) in ILI with hospitalization, and 6.7% (32/480) in ILI with maximum ISS > 2. Any virus was detected in 320/556 (57.6%) ILI episodes: influenza A (104/556, 18.7%), rhinovirus/enterovirus (82/556, 14.7%), coronavirus and human metapneumovirus (each 32/556, 5.6%). Conclusions. This first global study providing data on RSV disease in ≥65 year-olds confirms that RSV is an important respiratory pathogen in the elderly. Preventative measures such as vaccination could decrease severe respiratory illnesses and complications in the elderly. PMID:24482398

  6. The respiratory syncytial virus G protein conserved domain induces a persistent and protective antibody response in rodents.

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    Thien N Nguyen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is an important cause of severe upper and lower respiratory disease in infants and in the elderly. There are 2 main RSV subtypes A and B. A recombinant vaccine was designed based on the central domain of the RSV-A attachment G protein which we had previously named G2Na (aa130-230. Here we evaluated immunogenicity, persistence of antibody (Ab response and protective efficacy induced in rodents by: (i G2Na fused to DT (Diphtheria toxin fragments in cotton rats. DT fusion did not potentiate neutralizing Ab responses against RSV-A or cross-reactivity to RSV-B. (ii G2Nb (aa130-230 of the RSV-B G protein either fused to, or admixed with G2Na. G2Nb did not induce RSV-B-reactive Ab responses. (iii G2Na at low doses. Two injections of 3 µg G2Na in Alum were sufficient to induce protective immune responses in mouse lungs, preventing RSV-A and greatly reducing RSV-B infections. In cotton rats, G2Na-induced RSV-reactive Ab and protective immunity against RSV-A challenge that persisted for at least 24 weeks. (iv injecting RSV primed mice with a single dose of G2Na/Alum or G2Na/PLGA [poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide]. Despite the presence of pre-existing RSV-specific Abs, these formulations effectively boosted anti-RSV Ab titres and increased Ab titres persisted for at least 21 weeks. Affinity maturation of these Abs increased from day 28 to day 148. These data indicate that G2Na has potential as a component of an RSV vaccine formulation.

  7. Impact of severe disease caused by respiratory syncytial virus in children living in developed countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Eric A; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2003-02-01

    Among industrialized nations, the rate of rehospitalization in the United States for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is approximately 30 per 1000, exceptions being noted for American Indians and Alaskan natives, two ethnic groups who tend toward higher rates of RSV hospitalization. In distinction Japan reports an admission rate of 60 per 1000 for RSV disease. Yet Japan ranks considerably lower than many of its western counterparts in premature births. Whether an RSV subtype, a new viral genotype or some other unifying characteristic exists that might explain the severity of adenovirus, parainfluenza and RSV infections in this region of Asia remains to be determined. Outcomes trials in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark and Japan all identified crowding and exposure to tobacco smoke as significant and independent risk factors for disease severity of RSV. The epidemiology of RSV is largely consistent throughout Europe, with peak outbreaks occurring in December and January. In Europe RSV accounts for 42 to 45% of hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract infections in children younger than 2 years of age, and inpatient populations tend to be younger and to experience greater disease severity. For RSV bronchiolitis lengths of stay in European hospitals range from a low of 4 days to a high of 10 days. The Infección Respiratoria Infantil por Virus Respiratorio Sincitial Study Group in Spain conducted 2 prospective observational studies in 14 and 26 neonatal units, respectively, on nonprophylaxed neonates to determine hospitalization rates for respiratory syncytial viral illness during 2 consecutive RSV seasons. Throughout each respiratory season the study group followed premature infants of < or =32 weeks gestational age at birth, representing an annual birth cohort of approximately 100 000 infants. A total of 584 infants who were < or =32 weeks gestational age in the first season and 999 in the second season were followed at monthly intervals

  8. [Preliminary analysis on respiratory syncytial virus identified in children with acute respiratory infections in Tibet Autonomous Region, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Zhu, Ru-Nan; Qian, Yuan; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Lin-Qing; Wang, Fang; Wu, Hong; Shan, Min-Na; Deji, Mei-Duo

    2012-03-01

    To understand the role of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) in Tibet Autonomous Region and the contribution of two major groups of RSV, nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were collected from hospitalized children with ARI in Department of Pediatrics, Tibet People's Hospital in Lasa, Tibet from April to July in 2011 and tested for seven common respiratory viruses and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) by direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA). Total RNAs were extracted from RSV positive samples by DFA and reverse transcripted to cDNA. Nested-PCR was employed to determine the genogroups of RSV, which were confirmed by real time-PCR and sequence analysis for G protein encoding gene. The Characteristics and variations of G genes from RSV in this project were identified by sequence comparison with those G genes in GenBank. Out of 167 samples, 65 were positive for respiratory viruses with a total positive rate of 38.9%, including 45 (69.2%, 45/65)positive samples for RSV. Among 42 samples that were positive for RSV and genotyped, 40 were identified as group A and 2 as group B. Sequence analysis of full-length G genes for 7 RSV of group A indicated that all of these belonged to subgroup GA2. The nucleotide identities between RSVs from Tibet and prototype A2 strain were 90.7%-91.8%, with 86.5%-87.2% identities of amino acid. The mutations of amino acids were mainly located in both ends of a highly conserved region in the ectodomain of the G proteins. The data indicated that RSV was the most important viral etiologic agent of ARI in spring of 2011 in Tibet and group A of RSV was predominant during the study period. High divergence existed in the ectodomain of G proteins of RSVs from Tibet.

  9. Lamb Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus–Associated Lung Disease: Insights to Pathogenesis and Novel Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a risk factor for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and hospitalization. The pathogenesis underlying this is not fully understood, and in vivo studies are needed to better clarify essential cellular features and molecular mechanisms. Such studies include analysis of lung tissue from affected human infants and various animal models. The preterm and newborn lamb lung has developmental, structural, cellular, physiologic, and immunologic features similar to that of human infants. Also, the lamb lung is susceptible to various strains of RSV that infect infants and cause similar bronchiolar lesions. Studies in lambs suggest that viral replication in airways (especially bronchioles) is extensive by 4 days after infection, along with bronchiolitis characterized by degeneration and necrosis of epithelial cells, syncytial cell formation, neutrophil infiltration, epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and innate and adaptive immune responses. RSV bronchiolitis greatly affects airflow and gaseous exchange. RSV disease severity is increased in preterm lambs compared with full-term lambs; similar to human infants. The lamb is conducive to experimental assessment of novel, mechanistic therapeutic interventions such as delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor and enhancement of airway epithelial oxidative responses, Club (Clara) cell protein 10, and synthesized compounds such as nanobodies. In contrast, exposure of the fetal ovine lung in vivo to ethanol, a risk factor for preterm birth, reduces pulmonary alveolar development and surfactant protein A expression. Because the formalin-inactivated RSV vaccination enhances some inflammatory responses to RSV infection in lambs, this model has the potential to assess mechanisms of formalin-inactivated RSV enhanced disease as well as newly developed vaccines. PMID:24936027

  10. Macronutrients during pregnancy and life-threatening respiratory syncytial virus infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferolla, F Martín; Hijano, Diego R; Acosta, Patricio L; Rodríguez, Andrea; Dueñas, Karina; Sancilio, Andrea; Barboza, Edgar; Caría, Adriana; Gago, Guadalupe Fernández; Almeida, Rodrigo Egües; Castro, Laura; Pozzolo, Cecilia; Martínez, María V; Grimaldi, Luciano Alva; Rebec, Beatriz; Calvo, Mariel; Henrichsen, Julieta; Nocito, Celina; González, Mariela; Barbero, Guillermo; Losada, Juan Ves; Caballero, Mauricio T; Zurankovas, Valeria; Raggio, Mirta; Schavlovsky, Graciela; Kobylarz, Alicia; Wimmenauer, Vera; Bugna, Jimena; Williams, John V; Sastre, Gustavo; Flamenco, Edgardo; Pérez, Alberto Rodríguez; Ferrero, Fernando; Libster, Romina; Grijalva, Carlos G; Polack, Fernando P

    2013-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of hospitalization and death in infants worldwide. Most RSV deaths occur in developing countries, where burden and risk factors for life-threatening illness are unclear. We defined the burden of life-threatening (O(2) saturation [O(2) sat] ≤ 87%) and fatal RSV infection, and characterized risk factors for life-threatening disease in hospitalized children. Special emphasis was placed on studying the impact of dietary habits during pregnancy. We hypothesized that dietary preferences, differing from those of our remote ancestors, would negatively impact children's pulmonary health. For instance, a diet rich in carbohydrates is a signature of recent millennia and typical of low-income populations, heavily burdened by life-threatening RSV disease. Prospective study in a catchment population of 56,560 children under 2 years of age during the RSV season in Argentina. All children with respiratory signs and O(2) sat less than 93% on admission were included. Among 1,293 children with respiratory infections, 797(61.6%) were infected with RSV: 106 of these had life-threatening disease; 1.9 per 1,000 children (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-2.2/1,000) under 24 months. A total of 22 hospitalized children died (9 RSV(+)), 26 died at home due to acute respiratory infection (14 attributed to RSV); all were under 12 months old. The annual attributable mortality rate for RSV was 0.7 per 1,000 infants (95% CI, 0.4-1.1/1,000). Life-threatening disease was dose-dependently associated with carbohydrate ingestion during pregnancy (adjusted odds ratio from 3.29 [95% CI, 1.15-9.44] to 7.36 [95% CI, 2.41-22.5] versus the lowest quartile). Life-threatening and fatal RSV infections are a heavy burden on infants in the developing world. Diets rich in carbohydrates during pregnancy are associated with these severe outcomes.

  11. [Clinical value of a rapid respiratory syncytial virus antigen detection in point-of-care testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Y X; Tian, R; Qian, Y; Sun, Y; Deng, J; Wang, F; Zhu, R N; Zhao, L Q

    2017-02-02

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of a rapid respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antigen detection in point-of-care testing (POCT). Method: A total of 209 specimens, including 78 throat swabs (TS) and 131 nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs), were collected from inpatients who visited the Children's Hospital Affiliated to the Capital Institute of Pediatrics and were diagnosed as acute respiratory infection from 5 January to 7 February, 2015. These specimens were tested for RSV by a rapid antigen detection kit which was compared with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA) for RSV detection. Result: Compared with DFA for NPAs, the sensitivity and specificity of rapid antigen detection were 83.9% and 97.3%, respectively, with Kappa value of 0.86; Compared with RT-PCR, the sensitivity (NPAs, 74.2%; TS, 77.8%) and specificity (NPAs, 100.0%; TS, 92.0%) of rapid antigen detection were high, too, with Kappa value of 0.74 in NPAs and 0.62 in TS. However, the RSV positive rate of rapid antigen detection in TS (21.7%) from pediatric patients with acute lower respiratory tract infection was lower than that in NPAs (78.3%), as well as that of RT-PCR (7.3% in TS verse 78% in NPAs). The RSV rapid antigen detection kit can be finished in about 10 minutes. Conclusion: With characteristics of high specificity, high sensitivity, being rapid, efficient and easy to operate in comparison with DFA and RT-PCR, RSV rapid antigen detection in this study is suitable for POCT. For pediatric patients with acute respiratory tract infection, NPA was better than TS for RSV detection.

  12. Comparison of severe pneumonia caused by Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the incidence and clinical characteristics of severe pneumonia caused by Human metapneumovirus (hMPV to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection in children. Patients and Methods: A total of 151 children hospitalized with severe pneumonia, were tested for hMPV using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. At the same time, samples were tested for RSV and other common respiratory viruses. Medical records, including clinical, laboratory data, and chest radiography findings, were reviewed for all children. Results: Of the 151 samples, 88 (58.3% were positive for respiratory viruses. Of the 88 positive, there were 6 (4.0% with hMPV, 66 (43.7% with RSV, 13 (8.6% with influenza A, 2 (1.3% with parainfluenza virus III, 1 (0.7% with parainfluenza virus I, 1 (0.7% with adenovirus and 1 (0.7% with influenza B. hMPV-infected patients were significantly older than RSV-infected patients (P < 0.001. Children with hMPV pneumonia had fever more frequently (P = 0.03. Two hMPV-positive patients (33.3% required admission to an intensive care unit, and two patients (33.3% required mechanical ventilation. The duration of illness was 18.33 ± 7.09 days. These characteristics of hMPV infections were similar to patients with RSV infections. Conclusion: Human metapneumovirus is an infrequent viral pathogen causing severe pneumonia in children. Children with hMPV were older than those with RSV. The disease caused by hMPV was similar in presentation and severity to RSV, with a minority of children requiring additional respiratory support.

  13. Interferon gamma Profile in Egyptian Infants with Respiratory Syncytial Virus bronchiolitis

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    Maha E. Omran1, Mohamed AE. Fahmy2, Manal M. Zaher3

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Viral bronchiolitis is one of the leading causes for hospitalization of infants in the world and causes an estimated one million deaths per year worldwide. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is associated with the majority of cases. During the last few years it has become increasingly clear that T cells contribute to the abnormal regulation of the immune response in viral diseases since these cells are potent producers of a large variety of cytokines. It was reported that cord blood interferon gamma (IFN- responses were inversely related to the frequency of viral respiratory infections. To ascertain whether RSV infection promotes a different IFN- profile to that induced by other respiratory infections, thirty-two infants with severe bronchiolitis were enrolled in this study. RSV-IgM was detected by immunofluorescent technique in 23/32 patients. Serum IFN- levels in RSV+ infants were significantly lower than RSV- (p < 0.001. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood cells followed by flow cytometery combined with intracellular cytokine staining revealed that both CD4+ and CD8+ cells contribute in IFN- production. The percentage of CD4+ cells producing IFN- in RSV+ was significantly lower (P < 0.05 than those in RSV-, while the difference in % of CD8+ between RSV+ and RSV- was non significant. Our conclusions are that RSV infection is associated with severe decreased IFN- responses. Both CD4+ and CD8+ cells contribute in IFN- production during RSV bronchiolitis. RSV infection promotes a different IFN- profile from that induced by other respiratory infections.

  14. Genomic Loads and Genotypes of Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Viral Factors during Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Chilean Hospitalized Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Yazmín; San Martín, Camila; Torres, Alejandro A.; Farfán, Mauricio J.; Torres, Juan P.; Avadhanula, Vasanthi; Piedra, Pedro A.; Tapia, Lorena I.

    2017-01-01

    The clinical impact of viral factors (types and viral loads) during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is still controversial, especially regarding newly described genotypes. In this study, infants with RSV bronchiolitis were recruited to describe the association of these viral factors with severity of infection. RSV antigenic types, genotypes, and viral loads were determined from hospitalized patients at Hospital Roberto del Río, Santiago, Chile. Cases were characterized by demographic and clinical information, including days of lower respiratory symptoms and severity. A total of 86 patients were included: 49 moderate and 37 severe cases. During 2013, RSV-A was dominant (86%). RSV-B predominated in 2014 (92%). Phylogenetic analyses revealed circulation of GA2, Buenos Aires (BA), and Ontario (ON) genotypes. No association was observed between severity of infection and RSV group (p = 0.69) or genotype (p = 0.87). After a clinical categorization of duration of illness, higher RSV genomic loads were detected in infants evaluated earlier in their disease (p < 0.001) and also in infants evaluated later, but coursing a more severe infection (p = 0.04). Although types and genotypes did not associate with severity in our children, higher RSV genomic loads and delayed viral clearance in severe patients define a group that might benefit from new antiviral therapies. PMID:28335547

  15. Inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus replication and virus-induced p38 kinase activity by berberine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Han-Bo; Choi, Myung-Soo; Yi, Chae-Min; Lee, Jun; Kim, Nam-Jung; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infection and poses a major public health threat worldwide. No effective vaccines or therapeutics are currently available; berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid from various medicinal plants, has been shown to exert antiviral and several other biological effects. Recent studies have shown that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity is implicated in infection by and replication of viruses such as RSV and the influenza virus. Because berberine has previously been implicated in modulating the activity of p38 MAPK, its effects on RSV infection and RSV-mediated p38 MAPK activation were examined. Replication of RSV in epithelial cells was significantly reduced by treatment with berberine. Berberine treatment caused decrease in viral protein and mRNA syntheses. Similar to previously reported findings, RSV infection caused phosphorylation of p38 MAPK at a very early time point of infection, and phosphorylation was dramatically reduced by berberine treatment. In addition, production of interleukin-6 mRNA upon RSV infection was significantly suppressed by treatment with berberine, suggesting the anti-inflammatory role of berberine during RSV infection. Taken together, we showed that berberine, a natural compound already proven to be safe for human consumption, suppresses the replication of RSV. In addition, the current study suggests that inhibition of RSV-mediated early p38 MAPK activation, which has been implicated as an early step in viral infection, as a potential molecular mechanism.

  16. RAGE inhibits human respiratory syncytial virus syncytium formation by interfering with F-protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jane; Huang, Kelly; Krishnan, Subramaniam; Svabek, Catherine; Rowe, Daniel C; Brewah, Yambasu; Sanjuan, Miguel; Patera, Andriani C; Kolbeck, Roland; Herbst, Ronald; Sims, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection. Infection is critically dependent on the RSV fusion (F) protein, which mediates fusion between the viral envelope and airway epithelial cells. The F protein is also expressed on infected cells and is responsible for fusion of infected cells with adjacent cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleate syncytia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor that is constitutively highly expressed by type I alveolar epithelial cells. Here, we report that RAGE protected HEK cells from RSV-induced cell death and reduced viral titres in vitro. RAGE appeared to interact directly with the F protein, but, rather than inhibiting RSV entry into host cells, virus replication and budding, membrane-expressed RAGE or soluble RAGE blocked F-protein-mediated syncytium formation and sloughing. These data indicate that RAGE may contribute to protecting the lower airways from RSV by inhibiting the formation of syncytia, viral spread, epithelial damage and airway obstruction.

  17. Retrospective Parameter Estimation and Forecast of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that systems combining mathematical modeling and Bayesian inference methods can be used to generate real-time forecasts of future infectious disease incidence. Here we develop such a system to study and forecast respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). RSV is the most common cause of acute lower respiratory infection and bronchiolitis. Advanced warning of the epidemic timing and volume of RSV patient surges has the potential to reduce well-documented delays of treatment in emergency departments. We use a susceptible-infectious-recovered (SIR) model in conjunction with an ensemble adjustment Kalman filter (EAKF) and ten years of regional U.S. specimen data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The data and EAKF are used to optimize the SIR model and i) estimate critical epidemiological parameters over the course of each outbreak and ii) generate retrospective forecasts. The basic reproductive number, R0, is estimated at 3.0 (standard deviation 0.6) across all seasons and locations. The peak magnitude of RSV outbreaks is forecast with nearly 70% accuracy (i.e. nearly 70% of forecasts within 25% of the actual peak), four weeks before the predicted peak. This work represents a first step in the development of a real-time RSV prediction system. PMID:27716828

  18. Biophysical characterization of G protein ectodomain of group B human respiratory syncytial virus from E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Wajihul Hasan; Srungaram, V L N Raghuram; Islam, Asimul; Beg, Ilyas; Haider, Md Shakir H; Ahmad, Faizan; Broor, Shobha; Parveen, Shama

    2016-07-03

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is an important pathogen of acute respiratory tract infection. The G protein of hRSV is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is a neutralizing antigen and is thus a vaccine candidate. In this study, synthetic codon optimized ectodomain G protein [G(ΔTM)] of BA genotype of group B hRSV was cloned, expressed, and characterized using biophysical techniques. The molar absorption coefficient and mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm ([θ]222) of G (ΔTM) was found to be 7950 M(-1) cm(-1) and -19701.7 deg cm(2) dmol(-1) respectively. It was concluded that G(ΔTM) mainly consist of α-helix (74.9%) with some amount of β-sheet (4%). The protein was stable up to 85°C without any transition curve. However, heat-induced denaturation of G(ΔTM) resulted in total loss of β-sheet whereas not much change was observed in the α-helix part of the secondary structure. It was concluded that G(ΔTM) is an α-helical protein and it is highly stable at high temperature, but could be easily denatured using high concentrations of GdmCl/urea or acidic condition. This is the first investigation of cloning, expression, and characterization of G(ΔTM) of BA viruses from India. Structural characterization of G protein will assist in drug designing and vaccine development for hRSV.

  19. Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulates Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Replication and Lung Pathogenesis during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Janyra A; León, Miguel A; Céspedes, Pablo F; Gómez, Roberto S; Canedo-Marroquín, Gisela; Riquelme, Sebastían A; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Blancou, Phillipe; Simon, Thomas; Anegon, Ignacio; Lay, Margarita K; González, Pablo A; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in children. The development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic antiviral drugs against hRSV is imperative to control the burden of disease in the susceptible population. In this study, we examined the effects of inducing the activity of the host enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on hRSV replication and pathogenesis on lung inflammation induced by this virus. Our results show that after hRSV infection, HO-1 induction with metalloporphyrin cobalt protoporphyrin IX significantly reduces the loss of body weight due to hRSV-induced disease. Further, HO-1 induction also decreased viral replication and lung inflammation, as evidenced by a reduced neutrophil infiltration into the airways, with diminished cytokine and chemokine production and reduced T cell function. Concomitantly, upon cobalt protoporphyrin IX treatment, there is a significant upregulation in the production of IFN-α/β mRNAs in the lungs. Furthermore, similar antiviral and protective effects occur by inducing the expression of human HO-1 in MHC class II(+) cells in transgenic mice. Finally, in vitro data suggest that HO-1 induction can modulate the susceptibility of cells, especially the airway epithelial cells, to hRSV infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Immunological Features of Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Caused Pneumonia—Implications for Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2017-01-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the causative agent for high rates of hospitalizations due to viral bronchiolitis and pneumonia worldwide. Such a disease is characterized by an infection of epithelial cells of the distal airways that leads to inflammation and subsequently to respiratory failure. Upon infection, different pattern recognition receptors recognize the virus and trigger the innate immune response against the hRSV. Further, T cell immunity plays an important role for virus clearance. Based on animal studies, it is thought that the host immune response to hRSV is based on a biased T helper (Th)-2 and Th17 T cell responses with the recruitment of T cells, neutrophils and eosinophils to the lung, causing inflammation and tissue damage. In contrast, human immunity against RSV has been shown to be more complex with no definitive T cell polarization profile. Nowadays, only a humanized monoclonal antibody, known as palivizumab, is available to protect against hRSV infection in high-risk infants. However, such treatment involves several injections at a significantly high cost. For these reasons, intense research has been focused on finding novel vaccines or therapies to prevent hRSV infection in the population. Here, we comprehensively review the recent literature relative to the immunological features during hRSV infection, as well as the new insights into preventing the disease caused by this virus. PMID:28273842

  1. Cholesterol is required for stability and infectivity of influenza A and respiratory syncytial viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajimaya, Shringkhala; Frankl, Tünde; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Takimoto, Toru

    2017-10-01

    Cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains in the plasma membrane are considered to play a major role in the enveloped virus lifecycle. However, the functional role of cholesterol in assembly, infectivity and stability of respiratory RNA viruses is not fully understood. We previously reported that depletion of cellular cholesterol by cholesterol-reducing agents decreased production of human parainfluenza virus type 1 (hPIV1) particles by inhibiting virus assembly. In this study, we analyzed the role of cholesterol on influenza A virus (IAV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) production. Unlike hPIV1, treatment of human airway cells with the agents did not decrease virus particle production. However, the released virions were less homogeneous in density and unstable. Addition of exogenous cholesterol to the released virions restored virus stability and infectivity. Collectively, these data indicate a critical role of cholesterol in maintaining IAV and RSV membrane structure that is essential for sustaining viral stability and infectivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pattern recognition receptors for respiratory syncytial virus infection and design of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ruihong; Cui, Yuxiu; Hai, Yan; Liu, Ying

    2012-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants and young children. Host immune response has been implicated in both the protection and immunopathological mechanisms. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on innate immune cells during RSV infection recognize the RSV-associated molecular patterns and activate innate immune cells as well as mediate airway inflammation, protective immune response, and pulmonary immunopathology. The resident and recruited innate immune cells play important roles in the protection and pathogenesis of an RSV disease by expressing these PRRs. Agonist-binding PRRs are the basis of many adjuvants that are essential for most vaccines. In the present review, we highlight recent advances in the innate immune recognition of and responses to RSV through PRRs, including toll-like receptors (TLRs), retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs). We also describe the role of PRRs in the design of RSV vaccines.

  3. Sirtuin 1 Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Autophagy during Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarczyk, Anna B; Schaller, Matthew A; Reed, Michelle; Rasky, Andrew J; Lombard, David B; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2015-08-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, has been associated with the induction of autophagy and the regulation of inflammatory mediators. We found that Sirt1 was upregulated in mouse lung after RSV infection. Infected animals that received EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, displayed exacerbated lung pathology, with increased mucus production, elevated viral load, and enhanced Th2 cytokine production. Gene expression analysis of isolated cell populations revealed that Sirt1 was most highly upregulated in RSV-treated dendritic cells (DCs). Upon RSV infection, EX-527-treated DCs, Sirt1 small interfering RNA-treated DCs, or DCs from conditional knockout (Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+)) mice showed downregulated inflammatory cytokine gene expression and attenuated autophagy. Finally, RSV infection of Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+) mice resulted in altered lung and lymph node cytokine responses, leading to exacerbated pathology. These data indicate that SIRT1 promotes DC activation associated with autophagy-mediated processes during RSV infection, thereby directing efficient antiviral immune responses.

  4. Differential cytopathogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus prototypic and clinical isolates in primary pediatric bronchial epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyle Peter V

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV causes severe respiratory disease in infants. Airway epithelial cells are the principle targets of RSV infection. However, the mechanisms by which it causes disease are poorly understood. Most RSV pathogenesis data are derived using laboratory-adapted prototypic strains. We hypothesized that such strains may be poorly representative of recent clinical isolates in terms of virus/host interactions in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs. Methods To address this hypothesis, we isolated three RSV strains from infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis and compared them with the prototypic RSV A2 in terms of cytopathology, virus growth kinetics and chemokine secretion in infected PBEC monolayers. Results RSV A2 rapidly obliterated the PBECs, whereas the clinical isolates caused much less cytopathology. Concomitantly, RSV A2 also grew faster and to higher titers in PBECs. Furthermore, dramatically increased secretion of IP-10 and RANTES was evident following A2 infection compared with the clinical isolates. Conclusions The prototypic RSV strain A2 is poorly representative of recent clinical isolates in terms of cytopathogenicity, viral growth kinetics and pro-inflammatory responses induced following infection of PBEC monolayers. Thus, the choice of RSV strain may have important implications for future RSV pathogenesis studies.

  5. Immunological Features of Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Caused Pneumonia—Implications for Vaccine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Rey-Jurado

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV is the causative agent for high rates of hospitalizations due to viral bronchiolitis and pneumonia worldwide. Such a disease is characterized by an infection of epithelial cells of the distal airways that leads to inflammation and subsequently to respiratory failure. Upon infection, different pattern recognition receptors recognize the virus and trigger the innate immune response against the hRSV. Further, T cell immunity plays an important role for virus clearance. Based on animal studies, it is thought that the host immune response to hRSV is based on a biased T helper (Th-2 and Th17 T cell responses with the recruitment of T cells, neutrophils and eosinophils to the lung, causing inflammation and tissue damage. In contrast, human immunity against RSV has been shown to be more complex with no definitive T cell polarization profile. Nowadays, only a humanized monoclonal antibody, known as palivizumab, is available to protect against hRSV infection in high-risk infants. However, such treatment involves several injections at a significantly high cost. For these reasons, intense research has been focused on finding novel vaccines or therapies to prevent hRSV infection in the population. Here, we comprehensively review the recent literature relative to the immunological features during hRSV infection, as well as the new insights into preventing the disease caused by this virus.

  6. Expression of recombinant respiratory syncytial virus F protein in eukaryotic cells and establishment of ELISA for detectiing the protein%呼吸道合胞病毒F蛋白基因片段真核细胞表达纯化及其ELISA建立的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包洪; 刘爱忠; 尹文东; 李艳蕾; 于庭

    2011-01-01

    目的 表达纯化人呼吸道合胞病毒(HRSV)F蛋白基因片段,建立间接夹心酶联免疫吸附分析法(ELISA),为进一步大量表达F基因、构建基因工程疫苗和快速临床检测奠定基础.方法 逆转录并扩增F基因中的F1片段,连接到载体中,转染真核细胞,诱导并纯化重组F蛋白.将纯化重组F蛋白免疫小鼠制备抗体血清,并建立间接夹心ELISA.通过100份标本,应用"金标法"对所建立的方法 进行验证.结果 成功获得F基因中F.片段的扩增产物,筛选阳性克隆,得到相对分子质量为45000的大最表达蛋白.确定了间接夹心ELISA的最佳反应条件和工作浓度;鼠抗F1IgG最佳质量浓度为3.2μg/mL,样品最佳反应时间为37℃70min,酶标兔抗鼠IgG最佳工作浓度为1:6000.与"金标法"对比,阳性样品的变异系数为3.2%~8.6%,阴性样品的变异系数为5.1%~8.3%,均小于10.0%,表明该方法 有良好的重复性.结论 构建的重组真核细胞能够大量表达F蛋白,纯化的F蛋白具有很好的免疫原性,制备的抗体血清用于ELISA能够得到准确的检测结果.%Objective To express human respiratory syncytial virus(HRSV) F protein fragment in eukaryotic system and establish a double antihody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA) for detecting the protein. so as to lay the foundation for larger scale expression of the F protein, generation of genetic engineering vaccine, and quick detection of the disease in clinic.Methods The cDNA encoding HRSV F protein F, fragment amplified by RT-PCR was inserted into the expression vector and transformed into COS 27 cells. The recombinant protein was punfied after expression and was subsequently used to immunize rat for the Seneration of antiserum. Double antibody sandwich ELISA was established and verified with 100 specimens in comparison to "gold standard" method. Results An F gene F, fragment of 45 000 Daltons was successfully expressed in COS 27 cells. The optimal

  7. Efficacy of a modified live intranasal bovine respiratory syncytial virus vaccine in three-week-old calves experimentally challenged with BRSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vangeel, I.; Antonis, A.F.G.; Fluess, M.; Peters, A.R.; Harmeyer, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is a widespread cause of lower respiratory tract disease in cattle. Calves less than four months of age are often involved in outbreaks of respiratory disease. We evaluated the efficacy of a single intranasal dose of a bivalent modified live vaccine containi

  8. A Respiratory Syncytial Virus Replicon That Is Noncytotoxic and Capable of Long-Term Foreign Gene Expression▿

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of most cultured cell lines causes cell-cell fusion and death. Cell fusion is caused by the fusion (F) glycoprotein and is clearly cytopathic, but other aspects of RSV infection may also contribute to cytopathology. To investigate this possibility, we generated an RSV replicon that lacks all three of its glycoprotein genes and so cannot cause cell-cell fusion or virus spread. This replicon includes a green fluorescent protein gene and an antibiotic ...

  9. Olfactomedin 4 Serves as a Marker for Disease Severity in Pediatric Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H K Brand

    Full Text Available Respiratory viral infections follow an unpredictable clinical course in young children ranging from a common cold to respiratory failure. The transition from mild to severe disease occurs rapidly and is difficult to predict. The pathophysiology underlying disease severity has remained elusive. There is an urgent need to better understand the immune response in this disease to come up with biomarkers that may aid clinical decision making.In a prospective study, flow cytometric and genome-wide gene expression analyses were performed on blood samples of 26 children with a diagnosis of severe, moderate or mild Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV infection. Differentially expressed genes were validated using Q-PCR in a second cohort of 80 children during three consecutive winter seasons. FACS analyses were also performed in the second cohort and on recovery samples of severe cases in the first cohort.Severe RSV infection was associated with a transient but marked decrease in CD4+ T, CD8+ T, and NK cells in peripheral blood. Gene expression analyses in both cohorts identified Olfactomedin4 (OLFM4 as a fully discriminative marker between children with mild and severe RSV infection, giving a PAM cross-validation error of 0%. Patients with an OLFM4 gene expression level above -7.5 were 6 times more likely to develop severe disease, after correction for age at hospitalization and gestational age.By combining genome-wide expression profiling of blood cell subsets with clinically well-annotated samples, OLFM4 was identified as a biomarker for severity of pediatric RSV infection.

  10. Molecular Characterization of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the Philippines, 2012-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rungnapa Malasao

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children worldwide. We performed molecular analysis of HRSV among infants and children with clinical diagnosis of severe pneumonia in four study sites in the Philippines, including Biliran, Leyte, Palawan, and Metro Manila from June 2012 to July 2013. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected and screened for HRSV using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Positive samples were tested by conventional PCR and sequenced for the second hypervariable region (2nd HVR of the G gene. Among a total of 1,505 samples, 423 samples were positive for HRSV (28.1%, of which 305 (72.1% and 118 (27.9% were identified as HRSV-A and HRSV-B, respectively. Two genotypes of HRSV-A, NA1 and ON1, were identified during the study period. The novel ON1 genotype with a 72-nucleotide duplication in 2nd HVR of the G gene increased rapidly and finally became the predominant genotype in 2013 with an evolutionary rate higher than the NA1 genotype. Moreover, in the ON1 genotype, we found positive selection at amino acid position 274 (p<0.05 and massive O- and N-glycosylation in the 2nd HVR of the G gene. Among HRSV-B, BA9 was the predominant genotype circulating in the Philippines. However, two sporadic cases of GB2 genotype were found, which might share a common ancestor with other Asian strains. These findings suggest that HRSV is an important cause of severe acute respiratory infection among children in the Philippines and revealed the emergence and subsequent predominance of the ON1 genotype and the sporadic detection of the GB2 genotype. Both genotypes were detected for the first time in the Philippines.

  11. Latitudinal variations in seasonal activity of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV: a global comparative review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Bloom-Feshbach

    Full Text Available There is limited information on influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV seasonal patterns in tropical areas, although there is renewed interest in understanding the seasonal drivers of respiratory viruses.We review geographic variations in seasonality of laboratory-confirmed influenza and RSV epidemics in 137 global locations based on literature review and electronic sources. We assessed peak timing and epidemic duration and explored their association with geography and study settings. We fitted time series model to weekly national data available from the WHO influenza surveillance system (FluNet to further characterize seasonal parameters.Influenza and RSV activity consistently peaked during winter months in temperate locales, while there was greater diversity in the tropics. Several temperate locations experienced semi-annual influenza activity with peaks occurring in winter and summer. Semi-annual activity was relatively common in tropical areas of Southeast Asia for both viruses. Biennial cycles of RSV activity were identified in Northern Europe. Both viruses exhibited weak latitudinal gradients in the timing of epidemics by hemisphere, with peak timing occurring later in the calendar year with increasing latitude (P<0.03. Time series model applied to influenza data from 85 countries confirmed the presence of latitudinal gradients in timing, duration, seasonal amplitude, and between-year variability of epidemics. Overall, 80% of tropical locations experienced distinct RSV seasons lasting 6 months or less, while the percentage was 50% for influenza.Our review combining literature and electronic data sources suggests that a large fraction of tropical locations experience focused seasons of respiratory virus activity in individual years. Information on seasonal patterns remains limited in large undersampled regions, included Africa and Central America. Future studies should attempt to link the observed latitudinal gradients in

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in Navajo and White Mountain Apache children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockova, Jana; O'Brien, Katherine L; Oski, Jane; Croll, Janne'; Reid, Raymond; Weatherholtz, Robert C; Santosham, Mathuram; Karron, Ruth A

    2002-08-01

    The hospitalization rate for bronchiolitis of any cause among US children younger than 1 year is estimated at 31.2 per 1000. No data exist on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-specific hospitalization rates among high-risk Native Americans other than Alaska Natives, for whom the incidence of RSV hospitalization was estimated at 150 per 1000 among infants younger than 1 year. We aimed to estimate RSV hospitalization rates among Navajo and White Mountain Apache children younger than 2 years. We conducted prospective population-level hospital-based surveillance to determine RSV hospitalization rates among Navajo and White Mountain Apache children younger than 2 years. From 1997 to 2000, all children who were admitted for acute lower respiratory tract infection between October 1 and March 31 had a nasopharyngeal aspirate obtained and tested for RSV by commercial enzyme immunoassay kits. We reviewed charts of children who tested positive for RSV antigen to determine disease severity. During 3 RSV seasons (1997-2000), 51.3% of 1837 admissions for acute lower respiratory tract infection among children younger than 2 years were attributed to RSV infection. The overall seasonal RSV hospitalization rate among children younger than 2 years was 63.6 per 1000 and 91.3 per 1000 among children younger than 1 year. In a univariate analysis, predictors of severity included age <6 months (relative risk: 6.8; 95% confidence interval: 3.1-17.0). Navajo and White Mountain Apache children are at high risk for RSV disease requiring hospitalization. A lower threshold for hospitalization or underlying chronic conditions that predispose to severe RSV disease do not seem to explain high RSV hospitalization rates in this population.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the Philippines, 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malasao, Rungnapa; Okamoto, Michiko; Chaimongkol, Natthawan; Imamura, Tadatsugu; Tohma, Kentaro; Dapat, Isolde; Dapat, Clyde; Suzuki, Akira; Saito, Mayuko; Saito, Mariko; Tamaki, Raita; Pedrera-Rico, Gay Anne Granada; Aniceto, Rapunzel; Quicho, Reynaldo Frederick Negosa; Segubre-Mercado, Edelwisa; Lupisan, Socorro; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children worldwide. We performed molecular analysis of HRSV among infants and children with clinical diagnosis of severe pneumonia in four study sites in the Philippines, including Biliran, Leyte, Palawan, and Metro Manila from June 2012 to July 2013. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected and screened for HRSV using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Positive samples were tested by conventional PCR and sequenced for the second hypervariable region (2nd HVR) of the G gene. Among a total of 1,505 samples, 423 samples were positive for HRSV (28.1%), of which 305 (72.1%) and 118 (27.9%) were identified as HRSV-A and HRSV-B, respectively. Two genotypes of HRSV-A, NA1 and ON1, were identified during the study period. The novel ON1 genotype with a 72-nucleotide duplication in 2nd HVR of the G gene increased rapidly and finally became the predominant genotype in 2013 with an evolutionary rate higher than the NA1 genotype. Moreover, in the ON1 genotype, we found positive selection at amino acid position 274 (p<0.05) and massive O- and N-glycosylation in the 2nd HVR of the G gene. Among HRSV-B, BA9 was the predominant genotype circulating in the Philippines. However, two sporadic cases of GB2 genotype were found, which might share a common ancestor with other Asian strains. These findings suggest that HRSV is an important cause of severe acute respiratory infection among children in the Philippines and revealed the emergence and subsequent predominance of the ON1 genotype and the sporadic detection of the GB2 genotype. Both genotypes were detected for the first time in the Philippines. PMID:26540236

  14. Curcumin modified silver nanoparticles for highly efficient inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao Xi; Li, Chun Mei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nanoparticles and viruses have attracted increasing attention due to the antiviral activity of nanoparticles and the resulting possibility to be employed as biomedical interventions. In this contribution, we developed a very simple route to prepare uniform and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antiviral properties by using curcumin, which is a member of the ginger family isolated from rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa and has a wide range of biological activities like antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and acts as reducing and capping agents in this synthetic route. The tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay showed that the curcumin modified silver nanoparticles (cAgNPs) have a highly efficient inhibition effect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, giving a decrease of viral titers about two orders of magnitude at the concentration of cAgNPs under which no toxicity was found to the host cells. Mechanism investigations showed that cAgNPs could prevent RSV from infecting the host cells by inactivating the virus directly, indicating that cAgNPs are a novel promising efficient virucide for RSV.Interactions between nanoparticles and viruses have attracted increasing attention due to the antiviral activity of nanoparticles and the resulting possibility to be employed as biomedical interventions. In this contribution, we developed a very simple route to prepare uniform and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antiviral properties by using curcumin, which is a member of the ginger family isolated from rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa and has a wide range of biological activities like antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and acts as reducing and capping agents in this synthetic route. The tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay showed that the curcumin modified silver nanoparticles (cAgNPs) have a highly efficient inhibition

  15. Respiratory picornaviruses and respiratory syncytial virus as causative agents of acute expiratory wheezing in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Jartti; P. Lehtinen; T. Vuorinen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); O. Ruuskanen; R. Österback (Riika); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the viral etiology of acute expiratory wheezing (bronchiolitis, acute asthma) in 293 hospitalized children in a 2-year prospective study in Finland. A potential causative viral agent was detected in 88% of the cases. Eleven different viruses were represented. Respiratory

  16. Antibody Tracing, Seroepidemiology and Risk Factors of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Bovine Adenovirus-3 in Dairy Holstein Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa FARZINPOUR

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody tracing, risk factors and seroepidemiology of bovine respiratory syncytial virus and bovine adenovirus-3 were investigated in 22 Industrial and Semi-Industrial dairy Holstein farms. Serum samples (n=736 from various ages of unvaccinated cows were collected from May to September 2012. Risk factors including age, past history of respiratory diseases, amount of milk production, husbandry type and herd size were considered. Data were analyzed by Chi-square and logistic regression. Results indicated that the infection with some of individual viruses was related to past history of respiratory disease and herd size. No specific pattern was seen on the effect of level of milk production on seropositivity of animals. The seroprevalence for BRSV and BAV-3 were 89.1% and 88%, respectively. The present study indicates that infections of bovine respiratory viruses frequently occur in cattle of Fars province and the main viral cause of primary occurrence of respiratory diseases may be due to aforementioned viruses.

  17. Incidence and clinical features of hospitalization because of respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory illness among children less than two years of age in a rural Asian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelantik, I G; Gessner, Bradford D; Soewignjo, S; Steinhoff, Mark; Sutanto, Augustinis; Widjaya, Anton; Linehan, Mary; Moniaga, Vanda; Ingerani

    2003-02-01

    Lower respiratory illness is the leading cause of child death in the developing world. Despite this few reports on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory illness disease burden exist from rural areas of the developing world, and none exist for Indonesia. We evaluated children living in any of 83 villages on Lombok Island, Indonesia who were Lombok were included in the evaluation. We obtained the number of births and deaths that occurred within the study villages and time frame, allowing for incidence determination. Of 2677 children hospitalized for severe lower respiratory illness whose RSV status was determined, 23% had a positive test; this percentage varied from 50% at the end of the rainy season to 0% shortly before the start of the rainy season. Among children Lombok has a large burden of severe childhood RSV lower respiratory illness, and death occurs frequently. Novel RSV vaccines thus could have a substantial positive impact on lower respiratory illness morbidity and mortality.

  18. Increased pulmonary secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in calves experimentally infected with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rontved, C. M.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an important cause of respiratory disease among calves in the Danish cattle industry. An experimental BRSV infection model was used to study the pathogenesis of the disease in calves. Broncho alveolar lung lavage (BAL) was performed on 28 Jersey calves...... of the infection, as well as BRSV-infected calves free of bacteria reached the same level of TNF-alpha as animals from which bacteria were isolated from the lungs. It is concluded that significant quantities of TNF-alpha are produced in the lungs of the calves on PID 6-7 of BRSV infection. The involvement of TNF...

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus increases lung cellular bioenergetics in neonatal C57BL/6 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsuwaidi, Ahmed R., E-mail: alsuwaidia@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Albawardi, Alia, E-mail: alia.albawardi@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pathology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Almarzooqi, Saeeda, E-mail: saeeda.almarzooqi@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pathology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Benedict, Sheela, E-mail: sheela.benedict@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Othman, Aws R., E-mail: aws.rashad@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Hartwig, Stacey M., E-mail: stacey-hartwig@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Varga, Steven M., E-mail: steven-varga@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Souid, Abdul-Kader, E-mail: asouid@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2014-04-15

    We have previously reported that lung cellular bioenergetics (cellular respiration and ATP) increased in 4–10 week-old BALB/c mice infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study examined the kinetics and changes in cellular bioenergetics in ≤2-week-old C57BL/6 mice following RSV infection. Mice (5–14 days old) were inoculated intranasally with RSV and the lungs were examined on days 1–10 post-infection. Histopathology and electron microscopy revealed preserved pneumocyte architectures and organelles. Increased lung cellular bioenergetics was noted from days 1–10 post-infection. Cellular GSH remained unchanged. These results indicate that the increased lung cellular respiration (measured by mitochondrial O{sub 2} consumption) and ATP following RSV infection is independent of either age or genetic background of the host. - Highlights: • RSV infection increases lung cellular respiration and ATP in neonatal C57BL/6 mice. • Increased lung cellular bioenergetics is a biomarker of RSV infection. • Lung cellular glutathione remains unchanged in RSV infection.

  20. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-01

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target.

  1. Risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalisation in children with heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, K; Stensballe, L G; Bjerre, J;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk and risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalisation and determinants of the severity of RSV disease in children with heart disease. METHODS: By using a database on RSV tests in Denmark all children with RSV diagnosed with heart disease in Denmark...... from January 1996 to April 2003 were identified. For each case child one control child matched for age and centre was drawn from the population of children with heart disease. Clinical information was obtained through a review of all records. RESULTS: Data were obtained on 313 pairs. Median age...... at admission was 280 days (range 15-2379). In the multivariate analysis predictors of RSV hospitalisation were Down syndrome (odds ratio (OR) 3.24, 95% CI 1.80 to 5.80), cardiomyopathy (OR 5.84, 95% CI 1.26 to 27.16) and haemodynamically significant heart disease (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.26). During RSV...

  2. Secretion of respiratory syncytial virus inhibitors and antibody in human milk throughout lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toms, G L; Gardner, P S; Pullan, C R; Scott, M; Taylor, C

    1980-01-01

    Neutralising inhibitors to respiratory syncytial (RS) virus have been demonstrated in the whey of most samples of human milk tested. Although high titres were secreted in colostra of some mothers (1/10-1/2,560; median 1/40) inhibitor levels in milk collected after the first week of lactation were uniformly low (median 1/10). High neutralising titres correlated with high colostral levels of specific antiviral IgA but, unlike neutralising activity, IgA antiviral antibody persisted in the milk of only four of 18 mothers. Similarly, antiviral IgG and IgM antibodies were not generally detected after the first post-partum week. Differences in antibody secretion among mothers did not correlate with differences in total protein or total immunoglobulin secretion, and appeared to reflect maternal immune status. In one mother a marked rise in specific antiviral IgA and IgG secretions during the second and third months of lactation suggested a response to virus infection. The relevance of maternal immunity and colostral and milk antiviral antibody to protection of breast-fed babies from RS-virus bronchiolitis is discussed.

  3. A Classification Study of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV Inhibitors by Variable Selection with Random Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuwei Zhang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental pEC50s for 216 selective respiratory syncytial virus (RSV inhibitors are used to develop classification models as a potential screening tool for a large library of target compounds. Variable selection algorithm coupled with random forests (VS-RF is used to extract the physicochemical features most relevant to the RSV inhibition. Based on the selected small set of descriptors, four other widely used approaches, i.e., support vector machine (SVM, Gaussian process (GP, linear discriminant analysis (LDA and k nearest neighbors (kNN routines are also employed and compared with the VS-RF method in terms of several of rigorous evaluation criteria. The obtained results indicate that the VS-RF model is a powerful tool for classification of RSV inhibitors, producing the highest overall accuracy of 94.34% for the external prediction set, which significantly outperforms the other four methods with the average accuracy of 80.66%. The proposed model with excellent prediction capacity from internal to external quality should be important for screening and optimization of potential RSV inhibitors prior to chemical synthesis in drug development.

  4. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Role of Innate Immunity in Clearance and Disease Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Mohamed A; Almajhdi, Fahad N

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infections have worldwide records. The virus is responsible for bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma in humans of different age groups. Premature infants, young children, and immunocompromised individuals are prone to severe HRSV infection that may lead to death. Based on worldwide estimations, millions of cases were reported in both developed and developing countries. In fact, HRSV symptoms develop mainly as a result of host immune response. Due to inability to establish long lasting adaptive immunity, HRSV infection is recurrent and hence impairs vaccine development. Once HRSV attached to the airway epithelia, interaction with the host innate immune components starts. HRSV interaction with pulmonary innate defenses is crucial in determining the disease outcome. Infection of alveolar epithelial cells triggers a cascade of events that lead to recruitment and activation of leukocyte populations. HRSV clearance is mediated by a number of innate leukocytes, including macrophages, natural killer cells, eosinophils, dendritic cells, and neutrophils. Regulation of these cells is mediated by cytokines, chemokines, and other immune mediators. Although the innate immune system helps to clear HRSV infection, it participates in disease progression such as bronchiolitis and asthma. Resolving the mechanisms by which HRSV induces pathogenesis, different possible interactions between the virus and immune components, and immune cells interplay are essential for developing new effective vaccines. Therefore, the current review focuses on how the pulmonary innate defenses mediate HRSV clearance and to what extent they participate in disease progression. In addition, immune responses associated with HRSV vaccines will be discussed.

  5. Human CD8(+) T Cells Target Multiple Epitopes in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbulla, Daniel; Günther, Patrick S; Peper, Janet K; Jahn, Gerhard; Dennehy, Kevin M

    2016-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a serious health problem in young children, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The development of novel prevention strategies, such as a vaccine to RSV, is a high priority. One strategy is to design a peptide-based vaccine that activates appropriate CD8(+) T-cell responses. However, this approach is limited by the low number of RSV peptide epitopes defined to date that activate CD8(+) T cells. We aimed to identify peptide epitopes that are presented by common human leukocyte antigen types (HLA-A*01, -A*02, and -B*07). We identify one novel HLA-A*02-restricted and two novel HLA-A*01-restricted peptide epitopes from RSV polymerase. Peptide-HLA multimer staining of specific T cells from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cell, the memory phenotype of such peptide-specific T cells ex vivo, and functional IFNγ responses in short-term stimulation assays suggest that these peptides are recognized during RSV infection. Such peptides are candidates for inclusion into a peptide-based RSV vaccine designed to stimulate defined CD8(+) T-cell responses.

  6. An attraction-repulsion point process model for respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joshua; Haran, Murali; Simeonov, Ivan; Fricks, John; Chiaromonte, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    How is the progression of a virus influenced by properties intrinsic to individual cells? We address this question by studying the susceptibility of cells infected with two strains of the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV-A and RSV-B) in an in vitro experiment. Spatial patterns of infected cells give us insight into how local conditions influence susceptibility to the virus. We observe a complicated attraction and repulsion behavior, a tendency for infected cells to lump together or remain apart. We develop a new spatial point process model to describe this behavior. Inference on spatial point processes is difficult because the likelihood functions of these models contain intractable normalizing constants; we adapt an MCMC algorithm called double Metropolis-Hastings to overcome this computational challenge. Our methods are computationally efficient even for large point patterns consisting of over 10,000 points. We illustrate the application of our model and inferential approach to simulated data examples and fit our model to various RSV experiments. Because our model parameters are easy to interpret, we are able to draw meaningful scientific conclusions from the fitted models.

  7. The respiratory syncytial virus nucleoprotein-RNA complex forms a left-handed helical nucleocapsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Saskia E; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Galloux, Marie; Loney, Colin; Conner, Edward; Eléouët, Jean-François; Rey, Félix A; Bhella, David

    2013-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important human pathogen. Its nucleocapsid (NC), which comprises the negative sense RNA viral genome coated by the viral nucleoprotein N, is a critical assembly that serves as template for both mRNA synthesis and genome replication. We have previously described the X-ray structure of an NC-like structure: a decameric ring formed of N-RNA that mimics one turn of the helical NC. In the absence of experimental data we had hypothesized that the NC helix would be right-handed, as the N-N contacts in the ring appeared to more easily adapt to that conformation. We now unambiguously show that the RSV NC is a left-handed helix. We further show that the contacts in the ring can be distorted to maintain key N-N-protein interactions in a left-handed helix, and discuss the implications of the resulting atomic model of the helical NC for viral replication and transcription.

  8. Group B strains of human respiratory syncytial virus in Saudi Arabia: molecular and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almajhdi, Fahad N; Farrag, Mohamed A; Amer, Haitham M

    2014-04-01

    The genetic variability and circulation pattern of human respiratory syncytial virus group B (HRSV-B) strains, identified in Riyadh during the winters of 2008 and 2009, were evaluated by partial sequencing of the attachment (G) protein gene. The second hypervariable region (HVR-2) of G gene was amplified by RT-PCR, sequenced and compared to representatives of different HRSV-B genotypes. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed that all Saudi strains belonged to the genotype BA, which is characterized by 60-nucleotide duplication at HVR-2. Only strains of 2008 were clustered with subgroup BA-IV, while those isolated at 2009 were clustered among the most recent subgroups (particularly BA-X and CB-B). Amino acid sequence analysis demonstrated 18 amino acid substitutions in Saudi HRSV-B strains; among which five are specific for individual strains. Furthermore, two potential N-glycosylation sites at residues 230 and 296 were identified for all Saudi strains, and an additional site at amino acid 273 was found only in Riyadh 28/2008 strain. O-glycosylation was predicted in 42-43 sites, where the majority (no = 38) are highly conserved among Saudi strains. The average ratio between non-synonymous and synonymous mutations (ω) implied stabilizing selection pressure on G protein, with evidences of positive selection on certain Saudi strains. This report provides preliminary data on the circulation pattern and molecular characteristics of HRSV-B strains circulating in Saudi Arabia.

  9. CT manifestations of respiratory syncytial virus infection in lung transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J P; Shepard, J A; Sproule, M W; Trotman-Dickenson, B; Drucker, E A; Ginns, L C; Wain, J C; McLoud, T C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate CT findings during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in lung transplant recipients and to identify sequelae. Thirty-nine CT scans prior to, during, and following acute infection in 10 lung transplant recipients were reviewed. Abnormalities that were new from baseline observations and occurred within 4 weeks of diagnosis were defined as acute. Chronic findings were defined as those present >4 weeks after diagnosis. Findings in nine patients were ground-glass (seven), air-space (five), and tree-in-bud (four) opacities and acute bronchial dilatation (four) and wall thickening (four). Patients lacked pleural effusions or lymph node enlargement. Five of seven patients with follow-up exams had new air trapping (three), persistent bronchial dilatation (three), and thickening (two). Three and 2 of the 10 patients developed bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and obliterative bronchiolitis, respectively. During acute infection, patients commonly had ground-glass opacities but lacked pleural effusions and lymph node enlargement. There can be chronic sequelae after infection.

  10. Parainfluenza-3 and bovine respiratory syncytial virus: intraherd correlation adjusted for sensitivity and specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Segura C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC and design effects (D estimates adjusted or unadjusted for sensibility (Se and specificity (Sp of the diagnostic tests using a Bayesian procedure. Materials and methods. Sera from 232 animals from 44 randomly selected herds, to detect antibodies against parainfluenza-3 virus (PIV3 from non-vaccinated dual-purpose cattle from Colima Mexico, were used. Only 176 animals from 33 herds were used to evaluate the presence of the bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV. Results. The ICC and D values adjusted and unadjusted for PIV3 were 0.33, 2.73, 0.32, and 2.71, respectively. For BRSV the values were 0.31, 2.64, 0.28 and 2.49. Conclusions. The adjusted or unadjusted ICC and D estimates were similar because of the high Se and Sp of the diagnostic tests and the relatively high prevalence of the diseases here studied.

  11. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Quistgaard, Esben M. [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordlund, Par [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Thanabalu, Thirumaran [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Torres, Jaume, E-mail: jtorres@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore)

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus assembles into structured filamentous virion particles independently of host cytoskeleton and related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fyza Y Shaikh

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a single-stranded RNA virus that assembles into viral filaments at the cell surface. Virus assembly often depends on the ability of a virus to use host proteins to accomplish viral tasks. Since the fusion protein cytoplasmic tail (FCT is critical for viral filamentous assembly, we hypothesized that host proteins important for viral assembly may be recruited by the FCT. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that filamin A interacted with FCT, and mammalian cell experiments showed it localized to viral filaments but did not affect viral replication. Furthermore, we found that a number of actin-associated proteins also were excluded from viral filaments. Actin or tubulin cytoskeletal rearrangement was not necessary for F trafficking to the cell surface or for viral assembly into filaments, but was necessary for optimal viral replication and may be important for anchoring viral filaments. These findings suggest that RSV assembly into filaments occurs independently of actin polymerization and that viral proteins are the principal drivers for the mechanical tasks involved with formation of complex, structured RSV filaments at the host cell plasma membrane.

  13. Local interleukin-10 production during respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis is associated with post-bronchiolitis wheeze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodemaekers Hennie M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis in infants. Following RSV bronchiolitis, 50% of children develop post-bronchiolitis wheeze (PBW. Animal studies have suggested that interleukin (IL-10 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of RSV bronchiolitis and subsequent airway hyperresponsiveness. Previously, we showed that ex vivo monocyte IL-10 production is a predictor of PBW. Additionally, heterozygosity of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1800872 in the IL10 promoter region was associated with protection against RSV bronchiolitis. Methods This study aimed to determine the in vivo role of IL-10 in RSV pathogenesis and recurrent wheeze in a new cohort of 235 infants hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis. IL-10 levels in nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs were measured at the time of hospitalization and the IL10 SNP rs1800872 genotype was determined. Follow-up data were available for 185 children (79%. Results Local IL-10 levels during RSV infection turned out to be higher in infants that later developed physician diagnosed PBW as compared to infants without PBW in the first year after RSV infection (958 vs 692 pg/ml, p = 0.02. The IL10 promoter SNP rs1800872 was not associated with IL-10 concentration in NPAs. Conclusion The relationship between high local IL-10 levels during the initial RSV infection and physician diagnosed PBW provides further evidence of the importance of the IL-10 response during RSV bronchiolitis.

  14. Climatic, temporal, and geographic characteristics of respiratory syncytial virus disease in a tropical island population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, S B; Sutanto, A; Sarwo, H; Linehan, M; Djelantik, I G G; Mercer, D; Moniaga, V; Moulton, L H; Widjaya, A; Muljati, P; Gessner, B D; Steinhoff, M C

    2008-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of morbidity in children worldwide, although data from equatorial regions are limited. We analysed climatic, spatial, and temporal data for children presenting to hospitals in Lombok island, Indonesia with clinical pneumonia. During the study period, 2878 children presented and 741 RSV cases were identified. In multivariate analysis with an 8-day lag, occurrence of rain was associated with 64% higher incidence of RSV disease [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-2.38]. A 1% rise in mean relative humidity and 1 degree C increase in mean air temperature was associated with a 6% (IRR 1.06, 95% CI 1.03-1.10) and 44% (IRR 1.44, 95% CI 1.24-1.66) increase in RSV cases, respectively. Four statistically significant local clusters of RSV pneumonia were identified within the annual island-wide epidemics. This study demonstrates statistical association of monsoon-associated weather in equatorial Indonesia with RSV. Moreover, within the island-wide epidemics, localized RSV outbreaks suggest local factors influence RSV disease.

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in children under one year of age hospitalized for acute respiratory diseases in Pelotas, RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Elaine Cardozo Macedo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory diseases (ARDs are a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: The present case-controlled study investigated the hospitalizations by ARDs in children under one year of age and the association with the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in za Pelotas, RS. METHODS: All children under one year of age hospitalized due to ARDs from August 1997 to July of 1998 were followed-up in the four hospitals of the city. A standardized questionnaire was applied to the children's mother regarding symptoms of the actual illness in addition to social and demographic variables, nutrition, and previous morbidity. The final diagnosis of ARDs was performed by an arbiter (a pediatrician based on the hospital records of the children and the data on the questionnaire. Nasopharyngeal secretions were collected for RSV detection by direct immunofluorescence. RESULTS: The study included 650 children and the annual incidence rate of hospital admissions for ARDs was 13.9%. Admissions showed a seasonal pattern with most of the hospitalizations occurring from July to October. The main causes of admission were: pneumonia (43.7%, bronchiolitis (31.0%, asthma (20.3%, influenza (3.5%, otitis media (0.8% and laryngitis (0.6%. The overall prevalence of RSV was 30.7%, with 40.2% in bronchiolitis, 28.6% in influenza, 27.4% in asthma, 26.3% in pneumonia, and 25% in otitis media. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study confirm the high morbidity of ARDs in childhood and the seasonal pattern of ARDs hospitalizations and their association with RSV infection.

  16. Direct Inhibition of Cellular Fatty Acid Synthase Impairs Replication of Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Other Respiratory Viruses.

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    Yamini M Ohol

    Full Text Available Fatty acid synthase (FASN catalyzes the de novo synthesis of palmitate, a fatty acid utilized for synthesis of more complex fatty acids, plasma membrane structure, and post-translational palmitoylation of host and viral proteins. We have developed a potent inhibitor of FASN (TVB-3166 that reduces the production of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV progeny in vitro from infected human lung epithelial cells (A549 and in vivo from mice challenged intranasally with RSV. Addition of TVB-3166 to the culture medium of RSV-infected A549 cells reduces viral spread without inducing cytopathic effects. The antiviral effect of the FASN inhibitor is a direct consequence of reducing de novo palmitate synthesis; similar doses are required for both antiviral activity and inhibition of palmitate production, and the addition of exogenous palmitate to TVB-3166-treated cells restores RSV production. TVB-3166 has minimal effect on RSV entry but significantly reduces viral RNA replication, protein levels, viral particle formation and infectivity of released viral particles. TVB-3166 substantially impacts viral replication, reducing production of infectious progeny 250-fold. In vivo, oral administration of TVB-3166 to RSV-A (Long-infected BALB/c mice on normal chow, starting either on the day of infection or one day post-infection, reduces RSV lung titers 21-fold and 9-fold respectively. Further, TVB-3166 also inhibits the production of RSV B, human parainfluenza 3 (PIV3, and human rhinovirus 16 (HRV16 progeny from A549, HEp2 and HeLa cells respectively. Thus, inhibition of FASN and palmitate synthesis by TVB-3166 significantly reduces RSV progeny both in vitro and in vivo and has broad-spectrum activity against other respiratory viruses. FASN inhibition may alter the composition of regions of the host cell membrane where RSV assembly or replication occurs, or change the membrane composition of RSV progeny particles, decreasing their infectivity.

  17. Nasopharyngeal Microbiota, Host Transcriptome, and Disease Severity in Children with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Heinonen, Santtu; Hasrat, Raiza; Bunsow, Eleonora; Smith, Bennett; Suarez-Arrabal, Maria-Carmen; Chaussabel, Damien; Cohen, Daniel M; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Ramilo, Octavio; Bogaert, Debby; Mejias, Asuncion

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections and hospitalizations in infants worldwide. Known risk factors, however, incompletely explain the variability of RSV disease severity, especially among healthy children. We postulate that the severity of RSV infection is influenced by modulation of the host immune response by the local bacterial ecosystem. To assess whether specific nasopharyngeal microbiota (clusters) are associated with distinct host transcriptome profiles and disease severity in children less than 2 years of age with RSV infection. We characterized the nasopharyngeal microbiota profiles of young children with mild and severe RSV disease and healthy children by 16S-rRNA sequencing. In parallel, using multivariable models, we analyzed whole-blood transcriptome profiles to study the relationship between microbial community composition, the RSV-induced host transcriptional response, and clinical disease severity. We identified five nasopharyngeal microbiota clusters characterized by enrichment of either Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus, Corynebacterium, Moraxella, or Staphylococcus aureus. RSV infection and RSV hospitalization were positively associated with H. influenzae and Streptococcus and negatively associated with S. aureus abundance, independent of age. Children with RSV showed overexpression of IFN-related genes, independent of the microbiota cluster. In addition, transcriptome profiles of children with RSV infection and H. influenzae- and Streptococcus-dominated microbiota were characterized by greater overexpression of genes linked to Toll-like receptor and by neutrophil and macrophage activation and signaling. Our data suggest that interactions between RSV and nasopharyngeal microbiota might modulate the host immune response, potentially affecting clinical disease severity.

  18. Marked induction of matrix metalloproteinase-10 by respiratory syncytial virus infection in human nasal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Satoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Obata, Kazufumi; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi; Nomura, Kazuaki; Obonai, Toshimasa; Fuchimoto, Jun; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Norimasa

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important pathogen of bronchiolitis, asthma, and severe lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play key roles in viral infection, inflammation and remodeling of the airway. However, the roles and regulation of MMPs in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) after RSV infection remain unclear. To investigate the regulation of MMP induced after RSV infection in HNECs, an RSV-infected model of HNECs in vitro was used. It was found that mRNA of MMP-10 was markedly increased in HNECs after RSV infection, together with induction of mRNAs of MMP-1, -7, -9, and -19. The amount of MMP-10 released from HNECs was also increased in a time-dependent manner after RSV infection as was that of chemokine RANTES. The upregulation of MMP-10 in HNECs after RSV infection was prevented by inhibitors of NF-κB and pan-PKC with inhibition of RSV replication, whereas it was prevented by inhibitors of JAK/STAT, MAPK, and EGF receptors without inhibition of RSV replication. In lung tissue of an infant with severe RSV infection in which a few RSV antibody-positive macrophages were observed, MMP-10 was expressed at the apical side of the bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar epithelial cells. In conclusion, MMP-10 induced by RSV infection in HNECs is regulated via distinct signal transduction pathways with or without relation to RSV replication. MMP-10 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of RSV diseases and it has the potential to be a novel marker and therapeutic target for RSV infection.

  19. The impact of viral dynamics on the clinical severity of infants with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lili; Xiao, Qiuyan; Zhao, Yao; Huang, Ailong; Ren, Luo; Liu, Enmei

    2015-08-01

    The impact of dynamic respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) load on the clinical severity of hospitalized infants with bronchiolitis has not been clarified. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from 60 infants who were diagnosed with bronchiolitis within 96 hr of wheezing onset upon admission and on days 3, 5, and 7 in the hospital, and 17 respiratory viruses were detected. The RSV load was quantified by real-time qPCR for RSV subtypes A and B at different time points. Scoring criteria were used to evaluate the degree of severity. A total of 40 infants were determined to be RSV-positive, nine were identified as RSV subtype A (RSVA), and 31 were RSV subtype B (RSVB). The peak RSV load was observed upon admission, and the RSV load decreased significantly over time; in addition, this decrease began to have significant differences on day 5. There was a positive correlation between the RSV load and the clinical score (r(2)  = 0.121 and P < 0.001). According to the clinical scores, the infants in the severe group tended to have higher RSV loads than those in the moderate and mild groups. Multivariate logistic regression models revealed that the viral load on day 3 was independently associated with the degree of severity. This study elucidated that a higher mean RSV load was associated with a more severe disease and a longer duration of hospitalization and symptoms. This study also clarified RSV replication in infants and provides a theoretical basis for specifying an anti-RSV therapy strategy.

  20. Weaning infants with respiratory syncytial virus from mechanical ventilation through a fuzzy-logic controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olliver, S; Davis, G M; Hatzakis, G E

    2003-01-01

    We have previously developed a fuzzy logic controller for weaning adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using pressure support ventilation (PSV). We used the core of our fuzzy logic-based weaning platform and further developed parametrizable components for weaning newborns of differing body size and disease-state. The controller was validated on neonates recovering from congenital heart disease (CHD) while receiving synchronous intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV). We wished to compare the efficacy of this controller versus the bedside weaning protocol in children with respiratory syncytial virus pneumonitis/bronchiolitis (RSV) in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). The fuzzy controller evaluated the "current" and "trend" weaning status of the newborn to quantitatively determine the change in the SIMV integrated ventilatory setting. For the "current" status it used heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (VT) and oxygen saturation (SaO2), while for the "trend" status the differences of deltaRR/ deltat, deltaHR/ deltat, and deltaSaO2/ deltat recorded between two subsequent time points were utilized. The enumerated vital signs were fuzzified and then probability levels of occurrence were assigned. Individualized "golden" goals for SaO2 were set for each newborn. We retrospectively assessed the charts of 19 newborns, 113+/-128 days old, 5,546+/-2,321 gr body weight, weaning for 99+/-46 days, at 2-hour intervals. The SIMV levels proposed by the fuzzy controller were matched to those levels actually applied. In 60% of the time both values coincided. For the remaining 40%, the controller was more aggressive suggesting lower values of SIMV than the applied ones. The Area under the SIMV curves over time was 1,969+/-1,044 for the applied vs 1,886+/-978 for the suggested levels, respectively. The fuzzy controller adjusted for body size and disease-pattern can approximate the actual weaning course of newborns with RSV.

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus-related encephalitis: magnetic resonance imaging findings with diffusion-weighted study

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    Park, Arim; Suh, Sang-il; Seol, Hae-Young [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Gyu-Ri; Lee, Nam-Joon [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hen; Seo, Hyung Suk [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Baik-Lin [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common pathogen causing acute respiratory infection in children. Herein, we describe the incidence and clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of RSV-related encephalitis, a major neurological complication of RSV infection. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and imaging findings of the patients over the past 7 years who are admitted to our medical center and are tested positive for RSV-RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. In total, 3,856 patients were diagnosed with RSV bronchiolitis, and 28 of them underwent brain MRI for the evaluation of neurologic symptoms; 8 of these 28 patients had positive imaging findings. Five of these 8 patients were excluded because of non-RSV-related pathologies, such as subdural hemorrhage, brain volume loss due to status epilepticus, periventricular leukomalacia, preexisting ventriculomegaly, and hypoxic brain injury. The incidence of RSV-related encephalitis was as follows: 3/3,856 (0.08 %) of the patients are positive for RSV RNA, 3/28 (10.7 %) of the patient underwent brain MRI for neurological symptom, and 3/8 (37.5 %) of patients revealed abnormal MR findings. The imaging findings were suggestive of patterns of rhombenmesencephalitis, encephalitis with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and limbic encephalitis. They demonstrated no diffusion abnormality on diffusion-weighted image and symptom improvement on the follow-up study. Encephalitis with RSV bronchiolitis occurs rarely. However, on brain MRI performed upon suspicion of neurologic involvement, RSV encephalitis is not infrequently observed among the abnormal MR findings and may mimic other viral and limbic encephalitis. Physicians should be aware of this entity to ensure proper diagnosis and neurologic care of RSV-positive patients. (orig.)

  2. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein promotes TLR-4-dependent neutrophil extracellular trap formation by human neutrophils.

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    Giselle A Funchal

    Full Text Available Acute viral bronchiolitis by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the most common respiratory illness in children in the first year of life. RSV bronchiolitis generates large numbers of hospitalizations and an important burden to health systems. Neutrophils and their products are present in the airways of RSV-infected patients who developed increased lung disease. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs are formed by the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli and recent studies have proposed a role for NETs in viral infections. In this study, we show that RSV particles and RSV Fusion protein were both capable of inducing NET formation by human neutrophils. Moreover, we analyzed the mechanisms involved in RSV Fusion protein-induced NET formation. RSV F protein was able to induce NET release in a concentration-dependent fashion with both neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase expressed on DNA fibers and F protein-induced NETs was dismantled by DNase treatment, confirming that their backbone is chromatin. This viral protein caused the release of extracellular DNA dependent on TLR-4 activation, NADPH Oxidase-derived ROS production and ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Together, these results demonstrate a coordinated signaling pathway activated by F protein that led to NET production. The massive production of NETs in RSV infection could aggravate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection in young children and babies. We propose that targeting the binding of TLR-4 by F protein could potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammatory consequences and pathology of viral bronchiolitis.

  3. Increased risk of wheeze and decreased lung function after respiratory syncytial virus infection.

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    Kim Zomer-Kooijker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A relationship between hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV bronchiolitis and asthma development has been suggested in case-control studies. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the risk of current wheeze, asthma, and lung function at school age in infants previously hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis compared to non-hospitalized children. METHODS: For this study, data from a prospective birth cohort of unselected, term-born infants (n = 553, of whom 4 (0.7% were hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis, and a prospective patient cohort of 155 term infants hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis were used. Respiratory outcomes at age 6 in children hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis were compared to non-hospitalized children. RESULTS: The risk of current wheeze was higher in hospitalized patients (n = 159 compared to non-hospitalized children (n = 549 (adjusted odds ratio (OR 3.2 (95% CI 1.2-8.1. Similarly, the risk of current asthma, defined as a doctor's diagnosis of asthma plus current symptoms or medication use, was higher in hospitalized patients (adjusted OR 3.1 (95% CI 1.3-7.5. Compared to non-hospitalized children, RSV bronchiolitis hospitalization was associated with lower lung function (mean difference FEV1% predicted -6.8 l (95% CI (-10.2 to -3.4. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This is the first study showing that hospitalization for RSV bronchiolitis during infancy is associated with increased risk of wheezing, current asthma, and impaired lung function as compared to an unselected birth cohort at age 6.

  4. Immunization with Low Doses of Recombinant Postfusion or Prefusion Respiratory Syncytial Virus F Primes for Vaccine-Enhanced Disease in the Cotton Rat Model Independently of the Presence of a Th1-Biasing (GLA-SE) or Th2-Biasing (Alum) Adjuvant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Ohrum, Kirsten; Bennett, Angie Snell; Rajani, Gaurav Manohar; McTamney, Patrick; Nacel, Krystal; Hostetler, Leigh; Cheng, Lily; Ren, Kuishu; O'Day, Terrence; Prince, Gregory A.; McCarthy, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of children previously immunized with a nonlive, formalin-inactivated (FI)-RSV vaccine has been associated with serious enhanced respiratory disease (ERD). Consequently, detailed studies of potential ERD are a critical step in the development of nonlive RSV vaccines targeting RSV-naive children and infants. The fusion glycoprotein (F) of RSV in either its postfusion (post-F) or prefusion (pre-F) conformation is a target for neutralizing antibodies and therefore an attractive antigen candidate for a pediatric RSV subunit vaccine. Here, we report the evaluation of RSV post-F and pre-F in combination with glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) integrated into stable emulsion (SE) (GLA-SE) and alum adjuvants in the cotton rat model. Immunization with optimal doses of RSV F antigens in the presence of GLA-SE induced high titers of virus-neutralizing antibodies and conferred complete lung protection from virus challenge, with no ERD signs in the form of alveolitis. To mimic a waning immune response, and to assess priming for ERD under suboptimal conditions, an antigen dose de-escalation study was performed in the presence of either GLA-SE or alum. At low RSV F doses, alveolitis-associated histopathology was unexpectedly observed with either adjuvant at levels comparable to FI-RSV-immunized controls. This occurred despite neutralizing-antibody titers above the minimum levels required for protection and with no/low virus replication in the lungs. These results emphasize the need to investigate a pediatric RSV vaccine candidate carefully for priming of ERD over a wide dose range, even in the presence of strong neutralizing activity, Th1 bias-inducing adjuvant, and protection from virus replication in the lower respiratory tract. IMPORTANCE RSV disease is of great importance worldwide, with the highest burden of serious disease occurring upon primary infection in infants and children. FI-RSV-induced enhanced disease, observed in the

  5. Immunization with Low Doses of Recombinant Postfusion or Prefusion Respiratory Syncytial Virus F Primes for Vaccine-Enhanced Disease in the Cotton Rat Model Independently of the Presence of a Th1-Biasing (GLA-SE) or Th2-Biasing (Alum) Adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Ohrum, Kirsten; Cayatte, Corinne; Bennett, Angie Snell; Rajani, Gaurav Manohar; McTamney, Patrick; Nacel, Krystal; Hostetler, Leigh; Cheng, Lily; Ren, Kuishu; O'Day, Terrence; Prince, Gregory A; McCarthy, Michael P

    2017-04-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of children previously immunized with a nonlive, formalin-inactivated (FI)-RSV vaccine has been associated with serious enhanced respiratory disease (ERD). Consequently, detailed studies of potential ERD are a critical step in the development of nonlive RSV vaccines targeting RSV-naive children and infants. The fusion glycoprotein (F) of RSV in either its postfusion (post-F) or prefusion (pre-F) conformation is a target for neutralizing antibodies and therefore an attractive antigen candidate for a pediatric RSV subunit vaccine. Here, we report the evaluation of RSV post-F and pre-F in combination with glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) integrated into stable emulsion (SE) (GLA-SE) and alum adjuvants in the cotton rat model. Immunization with optimal doses of RSV F antigens in the presence of GLA-SE induced high titers of virus-neutralizing antibodies and conferred complete lung protection from virus challenge, with no ERD signs in the form of alveolitis. To mimic a waning immune response, and to assess priming for ERD under suboptimal conditions, an antigen dose de-escalation study was performed in the presence of either GLA-SE or alum. At low RSV F doses, alveolitis-associated histopathology was unexpectedly observed with either adjuvant at levels comparable to FI-RSV-immunized controls. This occurred despite neutralizing-antibody titers above the minimum levels required for protection and with no/low virus replication in the lungs. These results emphasize the need to investigate a pediatric RSV vaccine candidate carefully for priming of ERD over a wide dose range, even in the presence of strong neutralizing activity, Th1 bias-inducing adjuvant, and protection from virus replication in the lower respiratory tract.IMPORTANCE RSV disease is of great importance worldwide, with the highest burden of serious disease occurring upon primary infection in infants and children. FI-RSV-induced enhanced disease, observed in the 1960s

  6. NGF is an essential survival factor for bronchial epithelial cells during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

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    Sreekumar Othumpangat

    Full Text Available Overall expression of neurotrophins in the respiratory tract is upregulated in infants infected by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, but it is unclear where (structural vs. inflammatory cells, upper vs. lower airways and why, these changes occur. We analyzed systematically the expression of neurotrophic factors and receptors following RSV infection of human nasal, tracheal, and bronchial epithelial cells, and tested the hypothesis that neurotrophins work as innate survival factors for infected respiratory epithelia.Expression of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, NGF; brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF and receptors (trkA, trkB, p75 was analyzed at the protein level by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry and at the mRNA level by real-time PCR. Targeted siRNA was utilized to blunt NGF expression, and its effect on virus-induced apoptosis/necrosis was evaluated by flow cytometry following annexin V/7-AAD staining.RSV infection was more efficient in cells from more distal (bronchial vs. more proximal origin. In bronchial cells, RSV infection induced transcript and protein overexpression of NGF and its high-affinity receptor trkA, with concomitant downregulation of the low-affinity p75(NTR. In contrast, tracheal cells exhibited an increase in BDNF, trkA and trkB, and nasal cells increased only trkA. RSV-infected bronchial cells transfected with NGF-specific siRNA exhibited decreased trkA and increased p75(NTR expression. Furthermore, the survival of bronchial epithelial cells was dramatically decreased when their endogenous NGF supply was depleted prior to RSV infection.RSV infection of the distal airway epithelium, but not of the more proximal sections, results in overexpression of NGF and its trkA receptor, while the other p75(NTR receptor is markedly downregulated. This pattern of neurotrophin expression confers protection against virus-induced apoptosis, and its inhibition amplifies programmed cell death in the infected

  7. The burden of hospitalized lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in rural Thailand.

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    Alicia M Fry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We describe the epidemiology of hospitalized RSV infections for all age groups from population-based surveillance in two rural provinces in Thailand. METHODS: From September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007, we enrolled hospitalized patients with acute lower respiratory tract illness, who had a chest radiograph ordered by the physician, from all hospitals in SaKaeo and Nakhom Phanom Provinces. We tested nasopharyngeal specimens for RSV with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assays and paired-sera from a subset of patients with IgG enzyme immunoassay. Rates were adjusted for enrollment. RESULTS: Among 11,097 enrolled patients, 987 (8.9% had RSV infection. Rates of hospitalized RSV infection overall (and radiographically-confirmed pneumonia were highest among children aged<1 year: 1,067/100,000 (534/100,000 radiographically-confirmed pneumonia and 1-4 year: 403/100,000 (222/100,000, but low among enrolled adults aged≥65 years: 42/100,000. Age<1 year (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=13.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.7, 22.5 and 1-4 year (aOR=8.3, 95% CI 5.0, 13.9 were independent predictors of hospitalized RSV infection. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of hospitalized RSV lower respiratory tract illness among children<5 years was high in rural Thailand. Efforts to prevent RSV infection could substantially reduce the pneumonia burden in children aged<5 years.

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus outbreak in neonatal intensive care unit: Impact of infection control measures plus palivizumab use

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    Silva Camila de A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occurrence of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV outbreak in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU is related to unfavorable outcomes, as this infection can lead to respiratory distress and death in premature in infants. Report the successful control of an outbreak that occurred in April 2010 in a NICU. Methods After the index case, of 18 premature infants placed in the same room 10 infants were infected. Of those 10, 6 developed mild to moderate respiratory symptoms, 4 persisted asymptomatic and no death occurred. Contact and respiratory precautions were rapidly initiated, the infants were cohorted in 3 different rooms and palivizumab was administered to all contacts. Results The outbreak was controlled and no new cases were subsequently indentified. Conclusion Standard infection control measures plus palivizumab prophylaxis were efficient in rapid control of the outbreak.

  9. A virosomal respiratory syncytial virus vaccine adjuvanted with monophosphoryl lipid A provides protection against viral challenge without priming for enhanced disease in cotton rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Tobias; Stegmann, Toon; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; de Haan, Aalzen

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-replicating respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine candidates could potentially prime for enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) due to a T-cell-mediated immunopathology, following RSV infection. Vaccines with built-in immune response modifiers, such as Toll-like receptor (TLR)

  10. Induction of mucosal and systemic immunity against respiratory syncytial virus by inactivated virus supplemented with TLR9 and NOD2 ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shafique, Muhammad; Wilschut, Jan; de Haan, Aalzen

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the most important viral cause of severe respiratory disease in infants and children worldwide and also forms a serious threat in the elderly. The development of RSV vaccine, however, has been hampered by the disastrous outcome of an earlier trial using

  11. MicroRNA expression profiling in tonsils of calves challenged with a laboratory strain or field isolates of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is a leading cause of bovine respiratory disease in cattle worldwide. MicroRNAs have been suggested to play a role in viral infections via their regulation of cellular molecules involved in either viral replication or in host innate immunity to infection. Th...

  12. Differential expression of cytokines in response to respiratory syncytial virus infection of calves with high or low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deficiency of serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 has been related to increased risk of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in children. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of LRTI in infants and young children. The neonatal calf model of RSV infection shares many features ...

  13. A community study of clinical traits and risk factors for human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection during the first year of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Høgh, Mette; Nordbø, Svein;

    2008-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are important respiratory pathogens with similar symptomatology. The aim of this prospective birth cohort study was to identify risk factors for an hMPV or RSV infection during the first year of life in unselected healthy children...

  14. Respiratory system mechanics in patients receiving aerosolized ribavirin during mechanical ventilation for suspected respiratory syncytial viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, L S; Coss-Bu, J A; Englund, J A; Walding, D; Stein, F

    1999-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important respiratory pathogen for infants. Aerosolized ribavirin (AR) has been used in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with RSV bronchiolitis. The purpose of this study was to measure respiratory system mechanics (RSM) in pediatric patients requiring MV and receiving AR for suspected RSV. Patients were prospectively randomized to receive AR, either at a regular dose (RD) (6 g/300 mL over 18 hr/day) or a high dose (HD) (6 g/100 mL over 2 hr, three times a day). To measure changes in RSM, a passive exhalation technique was used before and after each dose of AR; time constant (tc) in s, resistance (Rrs) in cmH(2)O/mL/kg/s, and quasistatic compliance (Crs) in mL/cmH(2)O/kg were measured. Airway pressure and flow signals were obtained and analyzed using a pneumotachograph, a differential pressure transducer, and a computer interface. Statistical analysis was done by Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon rank tests. Thirteen patients were enrolled: 5 patients in the HD group (mean age of 52 months), and 8 patients in the RD group (mean age of 10 months). Four and 5 patients were positive for RSV by ELISA in the HD and RD groups, respectively. The RSM in the HD group were: tc, 0.58 +/- 0.15 s and 0.55 +/- 0.20 s before and after AR, respectively; Rrs, 0.03 +/- 0. 03 cmH(2)0/mL/kg/s and 0.02 +/- 0.02 cmH(2)0/mL/kg/s, respectively; and Crs, 0.63 +/- 0.21 mL/cmH(2)O/kg and 0.70 +/- 0.13 mL/cmH(2)O/kg, respectively. In the RD group, the RSM were: tc, 0.37 +/- 0.12 s and 0.31 +/- 0.10 s before and after AR, respectively; Rrs, 0.03 +/- 0.02 cmH(2)0/mL/kg/s and 0.02 +/- 0.01 cmH(2)0/mL/kg/s, respectively (P mechanical ventilation does not worsen RSM.

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus genotypes circulating in urban Ghana: February to November 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obodai, Evangeline; Asmah, Richard; Boamah, Isaac; Goka, Bamenla; Odoom, John Kofi; Adiku, Theophilus

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI) in young children. RSV strains have been divided into 2 major antigenic groups (A and B), which are further divided into several genotypes, but very little is known about its circulating genotypes in Ghana. This study characterized RSV genotypes detected in children with ALRI in Accra between February and November 2006. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were obtained from children diagnosed with ALRI between February and November 2006. The NPA were screened for RSV using a nested multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method for genotyping RSV. Viral RNA was extracted from the NPA using guanidinium isothiocyanate method and purified with an RNAID commercial kit. Care-givers gave their consent prior to specimen collection. Administered questionnaires captured information on patient demographic and clinical history. A total of 53 children were enrolled in the study with a male to female ratio of 3:1. Of the 53 NPA analyzed, 60.4% (32/53) were positive for RSV. Subsequent genotypic analysis showed that 72% (23/32) of the 60.4% RSV infections were RSV B only and 28% (9/32) were co-infections of both RSV A and B. Children between the ages of 2 - 12 months were the most affected age group per an RSV infection rate of 37.5% (12/32). No significant difference was detected in the recovery rate of ALRI (98.1%) and RSV (96.9%) positive patients from the infection. One patient died resulting in a mortality rate of 3.1%. Bronchopneumonia (20 out of 32 cases) was the major diagnosis on admission. RSV infection was seasonal dependent, described by 2 peaks in October and April-May. Both RSV A and RSV B genotypes co-circulated during the study period with RSV B predominating. RSV may possibly be the main pathogen of lower respiratory tract illness during epidemics in the wet seasons. Genotyping by the multiplex RT-PCR is one of the first attempts at

  16. Risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus illness among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Jyotsna; Walsh, Edward E; Mahadevia, Parthiv J; Falsey, Ann R

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), although not typically considered an important pathogen in adults, may cause acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is unclear which COPD patients are at highest risk for developing serious RSV illness. Our objective was to identify risk factors for RSV illness among adult patients with COPD. We conducted a pooled analysis of data from COPD patients in 2 previously published longitudinal studies that examined RSV infection in high risk adults for ≤ 2 RSV seasons. Risk factors for RSV illness studied included age, sex, race, smoking status, exposure to children, home oxygen use, inhaled or oral steroid use, instrumental activities of daily living scores, and co-morbid conditions. Outcomes studied included symptomatic and medically attended RSV illness. Logistic regression was used to identify significant risk factors for RSV illness among older adults with COPD. Among 379 patients with COPD, the rate of symptomatic RSV illness was 11.1% (42/379); almost half (20/42) of whom required medical attention. In multivariable analyses, congestive heart failure (odds ratio [OR] = 4.18; 95% CI: 1.38, 12.69) and exposure to children (OR = 2.38; 95% CI: 1.03, 5.51) were risk factors for symptomatic RSV illness. Congestive heart failure (OR = 4.16; 95% CI: 1.02, 17.01) was the only significant risk factor for developing medically attended RSV illness. Exposure to children and congestive heart failure are risk factors for RSV illness among adult patients with COPD. Future prospective, well-designed studies are needed to corroborate these findings and examine other risk factors, including history of exacerbations.

  17. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Aggravates Renal Injury through Cytokines and Direct Renal Injury

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    Songhui Zhai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between renal injury and reinfection that is caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and to analyze the mechanism of renal injury. Rats were repeatedly infected with RSV on days 4, 8, 14, and 28, then sacrificed and examined on day 56 after the primary infection. Renal injury was examined by transmission electron microscopy and histopathology. The F protein of RSV was detected in the renal tissue by indirect immunofluorescence. Proteinuria and urinary glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, serum levels of albumin, urea nitrogen, and creatinine, secretion of cytokines, T lymphocyte population and subsets, and dendritic cell (DC activation state were examined. The results showed that renal injury was more serious in the reinfection group than in the primary infection group. At a higher infection dose, 6×106 PFU, the renal injury was more severe, accompanied by higher levels of proteinuria and urinary GAGs excretion, and lower levels of serum albumin. Podocyte foot effacement was more extensive, and hyperplasia of mesangial cells and proliferation of mesangial matrix were observed. The maturation state of DCs was specific, compared with the primary infection. There was also a decrease in the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+T lymphocytes, due to an increase in the percentage of CD8+T lymphocytes and a decrease in the percentage of CD4+T lymphocytes, and a dramatic increase in the levels of IL-6 and IL-17. In terms of the different reinfection times, the day 14 reinfection group yielded the most serious renal injury and the most significant change in immune function. RSV F protein was still expressed in the glomeruli 56 days after RSV infection. Altogether, these results reveal that RSV infection could aggravate renal injury, which might be due to direct renal injury caused by RSV and the inflammatory lesions caused by the anti-virus response induced by RSV.

  18. Macrophages are required for dendritic cell uptake of respiratory syncytial virus from an infected epithelium.

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    Ugonna, Kelechi; Bingle, Colin D; Plant, Karen; Wilson, Kirsty; Everard, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] can productively infect monocyte derived dendritic cells [MoDC] and remain dormant within the same cells for prolonged periods. It is therefore possible that infected dendritic cells act as a reservoir within the airways of individuals between annual epidemics. In the present study we explored the possibility that sub-epithelial DCs can be infected with RSV from differentiated bronchial epithelium and that in turn RSV from DCs can infect the epithelium. A dual co-culture model was established in which a differentiated primary airway epithelium on an Air Liquid Interface (ALI) was cultured on a transwell insert and MoDCs were subsequently added to the basolateral membrane of the insert. Further experiments were undertaken using a triple co-culture model in which in which macrophages were added to the apical surface of the differentiated epithelium. A modified RSV [rr-RSV] expressing a red fluorescent protein marker of replication was used to infect either the MoDCs or the differentiated epithelium and infection of the reciprocal cell type was assessed using confocal microscopy. Our data shows that primary epithelium became infected when rr-RSV infected MoDCs were introduced onto the basal surface of the transwell insert. MoDCs located beneath the epithelium did not become infected with virus from infected epithelial cells in the dual co-culture model. However when macrophages were present on the apical surface of the primary epithelium infection of the basal MoDCs occurred. Our data suggests that RSV infected dendritic cells readily transmit infection to epithelial cells even when they are located beneath the basal layer. However macrophages appear to be necessary for the transmission of infection from epithelial cells to basal dendritic cells.

  19. Roflumilast inhibits respiratory syncytial virus infection in human differentiated bronchial epithelial cells.

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    Manuel Mata

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV causes acute exacerbations in COPD and asthma. RSV infects bronchial epithelial cells (HBE that trigger RSV associated lung pathology. This study explores whether the phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4 inhibitor Roflumilast N-oxide (RNO, alters RSV infection of well-differentiated HBE (WD-HBE in vitro. WD-HBE were RSV infected in the presence or absence of RNO (0.1-100 nM. Viral infection (staining of F and G proteins, nucleoprotein RNA level, mRNA of ICAM-1, ciliated cell markers (digital high speed videomicroscopy, β-tubulin immunofluorescence, Foxj1 and Dnai2 mRNA, Goblet cells (PAS, mRNA of MUC5AC and CLCA1, mRNA and protein level of IL-13, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, formation of H2O2 and the anti-oxidative armamentarium (mRNA of Nrf2, HO-1, GPx; total antioxidant capacity (TAC were measured at day 10 or 15 post infection. RNO inhibited RSV infection of WD-HBE, prevented the loss of ciliated cells and markers, reduced the increase of MUC5AC and CLCA1 and inhibited the increase of IL-13, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα and ICAM-1. Additionally RNO reversed the reduction of Nrf2, HO-1 and GPx mRNA levels and consequently restored the TAC and reduced the H2O2 formation. RNO inhibits RSV infection of WD-HBE cultures and mitigates the cytopathological changes associated to this virus.

  20. Predicting the start week of respiratory syncytial virus outbreaks using real time weather variables

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    Gesteland Per H

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV, a major cause of bronchiolitis, has a large impact on the census of pediatric hospitals during outbreak seasons. Reliable prediction of the week these outbreaks will start, based on readily available data, could help pediatric hospitals better prepare for large outbreaks. Methods Naïve Bayes (NB classifier models were constructed using weather data from 1985-2008 considering only variables that are available in real time and that could be used to forecast the week in which an RSV outbreak will occur in Salt Lake County, Utah. Outbreak start dates were determined by a panel of experts using 32,509 records with ICD-9 coded RSV and bronchiolitis diagnoses from Intermountain Healthcare hospitals and clinics for the RSV seasons from 1985 to 2008. Results NB models predicted RSV outbreaks up to 3 weeks in advance with an estimated sensitivity of up to 67% and estimated specificities as high as 94% to 100%. Temperature and wind speed were the best overall predictors, but other weather variables also showed relevance depending on how far in advance the predictions were made. The weather conditions predictive of an RSV outbreak in our study were similar to those that lead to temperature inversions in the Salt Lake Valley. Conclusions We demonstrate that Naïve Bayes (NB classifier models based on weather data available in real time have the potential to be used as effective predictive models. These models may be able to predict the week that an RSV outbreak will occur with clinical relevance. Their clinical usefulness will be field tested during the next five years.

  1. Exposure of neonates to Respiratory Syncytial Virus is critical in determining subsequent airway response in adults

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    Daly Melissa

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common cause of acute bronchiolitis in infants and the elderly. Furthermore, epidemiological data suggest that RSV infection during infancy is a potent trigger of subsequent wheeze and asthma development. However, the mechanism by which RSV contributes to asthma is complex and remains largely unknown. A recent study indicates that the age of initial RSV infection is a key factor in determining airway response to RSV rechallenge. We hypothesized that severe RSV infection during neonatal development significantly alters lung structure and the pulmonary immune micro-environment; and thus, neonatal RSV infection is crucial in the development of or predisposition to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Methods To investigate this hypothesis the present study was conducted in a neonatal mouse model of RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation and airway dysfunction. Seven-day-old mice were infected with RSV (2 × 105 TCID50/g body weight and allowed to mature to adulthood. To determine if neonatal RSV infection predisposed adult animals to enhanced pathophysiological responses to allergens, these mice were then sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Various endpoints including lung function, histopathology, cytokine production, and cellularity in bronchoalveolar lavage were examined. Results RSV infection in neonates alone led to inflammatory airway disease characterized by airway hyperreactivity, peribronchial and perivascular inflammation, and subepithelial fibrosis in adults. If early RSV infection was followed by allergen exposure, this pulmonary phenotype was exacerbated. The initial response to neonatal RSV infection resulted in increased TNF-α levels in bronchoalveolar lavage. Interestingly, increased levels of IL-13 and mucus hyperproduction were observed almost three months after the initial infection with RSV. Conclusion Neonatal RSV exposure results in long term

  2. Cytokine Elevation in Sudden Death With Respiratory Syncytial Virus: A Case Report of 2 Children.

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    Kakimoto, Yu; Seto, Yoshihisa; Ochiai, Eriko; Satoh, Fumiko; Osawa, Motoki

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in young children worldwide. Premature birth, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, congenital heart disease, and Down syndrome are risk factors for high mortality and prolonged morbidity after RSV infection. Conversely, many previously healthy, full-term children are also admitted to the hospital because of RSV, and some of them experience severe sequelae or die due to the virus. Various complications of RSV infection have been reported, such as encephalopathy, encephalitis, and cardiomyopathy. However, the pathogenesis of serious cases in children without an underlying disease has not been elucidated. In this report, we present 2 RSV-related deaths of children who were born at full-term and developed normally up to the age of 19 months. Their cardiopulmonary arrests occurred within half a day after the onset of symptoms, such as cough and high fever. Many postmortem examinations were performed to investigate their unexpected deaths. Histopathological examinations revealed extensive bronchiolitis and mild pneumonia accompanying airway obstruction. Immunostaining revealed the presence of the virus mainly in bronchial epithelia, but not in alveoli. Complete brain edema was prominent, and encephalopathy was developing. Blood tests revealed that the IL-6 level was elevated more than >200-fold above normal, despite a normal C-reactive protein level. Because IL-6 may reflect the severity of bronchial epithelial damage and contribute to brain edema, an extreme elevation of IL-6 may predict the risk for sudden death in children with RSV infection. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Duration of shedding of respiratory syncytial virus in a community study of Kenyan children

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    Ngama Mwanajuma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the transmission dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection will be better informed with improved data on the patterns of shedding in cases not limited only to hospital admissions. Methods In a household study, children testing RSV positive by direct immunofluorescent antibody test (DFA were enrolled. Nasal washings were scheduled right away, then every three days until day 14, every 7 days until day 28 and every 2 weeks until a maximum of 16 weeks, or until the first DFA negative RSV specimen. The relationship between host factors, illness severity and viral shedding was investigated using Cox regression methods. Results From 151 families a total of 193 children were enrolled with a median age of 21 months (range 1-164 months, 10% infants and 46% male. The rate of recovery from infection was 0.22/person/day (95% CI 0.19-0.25 equivalent to a mean duration of shedding of 4.5 days (95%CI 4.0-5.3, with a median duration of shedding of 4 days (IQR 2-6, range 1-14. Children with a history of RSV infection had a 40% increased rate of recovery i.e. shorter duration of viral shedding (hazard ratio 1.4, 95% CI 1.01-1.86. The rate of cessation of shedding did not differ significantly between males and females, by severity of infection or by age. Conclusion We provide evidence of a relationship between the duration of shedding and history of infection, which may have a bearing on the relative role of primary versus re-infections in RSV transmission in the community.

  4. Pharyngeal microflora disruption by antibiotics promotes airway hyperresponsiveness after respiratory syncytial virus infection.

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    Ke Ni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells (Treg cells, which are essential for regulation of immune response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection, are promoted by pharyngeal commensal pneumococcus. The effects of pharyngeal microflora disruption by antibiotics on airway responsiveness and relative immune responses after RSV infection have not been clarified. METHODS: Female BALB/c mice (aged 3 weeks were infected with RSV and then treated with either oral antibiotics or oral double distilled water (ddH(2O from 1 d post infection (pi. Changes in pharyngeal microflora were analyzed after antibiotic treatment for 7 d and 14 d. At 8 d pi and 15 d pi, the inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were investigated in combination with tests of pulmonary histopathology, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, pulmonary and splenic Treg cells responses. Pulmonary Foxp3 mRNA expression, IL-10 and TGF-β1 in BALF and lung homogenate were investigated at 15 d pi. Ovalbumin (OVA challenge was used to induce AHR after RSV infection. RESULTS: The predominant pharyngeal commensal, Streptococcus, was cleared by antibiotic treatment for 7 d. Same change also existed after antibiotic treatment for 14 d. After RSV infection, AHR was promoted by antibiotic treatment at 15 d pi. Synchronous decreases of pulmonary Treg cells, Foxp3 mRNA and TGF-β1 were detected. Similar results were observed under OVA challenge. CONCLUSIONS: After RSV infection, antibiotic treatment cleared pharyngeal commensal bacteria such as Streptococcus, which consequently, might induce AHR and decrease pulmonary Treg cells.

  5. [Respiratory syncytial virus outbreak in a tertiary hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit].

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    Moreno Parejo, Carlos; Morillo García, Aurea; Lozano Domínguez, Carmen; Carreño Ochoa, Concepción; Aznar Martín, Javier; Conde Herrera, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Investigation and control of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreak that affected the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of a university hospital from October to December 2012. Cohort study of children admitted to the NICU. The infection attack rate was calculated. A descriptive analysis of the cases and a multivariate analysis was performed using the variables that were shown to be risk factors for RSV infection. Preventive measures taken were: contact isolation; hand hygiene training and observation; exclusivity of a health team of nurses and physicians for positive cases, restrictions on visitor numbers; surveillance RSV testing, and palivizumab prophylaxis. The outbreak had three epidemic waves and 20 positive cases out of a total of 48 children admitted. The overall attack rate was 42%. Half of positive cases were children, with a median age of 36 days (p25=22, p75=58). The independent risk factors for RSV infection were birth weight below 1000 grams (OR=23.5; P=.002) and to have another nosocomial infection the week before the diagnosis of RSV infection (OR=19.98; P=.016). It was an outbreak with a high number of cases, due to the delay in notification, prolonged RSV carrier status, and low adherence to hand hygiene practice, which favoured the cross-transmission of infection. The most effective preventive measures were direct observation of hand hygiene and supervision of isolation measures. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Induces Host RNA Stress Granules To Facilitate Viral Replication▿

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    Lindquist, Michael E.; Lifland, Aaron W.; Utley, Thomas J.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Crowe, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian cell cytoplasmic RNA stress granules are induced during various conditions of stress and are strongly associated with regulation of host mRNA translation. Several viruses induce stress granules during the course of infection, but the exact function of these structures during virus replication is not well understood. In this study, we showed that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induced host stress granules in epithelial cells during the course of infection. We also showed that stress granules are distinct from cytoplasmic viral inclusion bodies and that the RNA binding protein HuR, normally found in stress granules, also localized to viral inclusion bodies during infection. Interestingly, we demonstrated that infected cells containing stress granules also contained more RSV protein than infected cells that did not form inclusion bodies. To address the role of stress granule formation in RSV infection, we generated a stable epithelial cell line with reduced expression of the Ras-GAP SH3 domain-binding protein (G3BP) that displayed an inhibited stress granule response. Surprisingly, RSV replication was impaired in these cells compared to its replication in cells with intact G3BP expression. In contrast, knockdown of HuR by RNA interference did not affect stress granule formation or RSV replication. Finally, using RNA probes specific for RSV genomic RNA, we found that viral RNA predominantly localized to viral inclusion bodies but a small percentage also interacted with stress granules during infection. These results suggest that RSV induces a host stress granule response and preferentially replicates in host cells that have committed to a stress response. PMID:20844027

  7. Role of Bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza-3 virus in bighorn sheep pneumonia.

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    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Subramaniam, Renuka; Herndon, Caroline N; Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Haldorson, Gary J; Foreyt, William J; Evermann, James F; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; Knowles, Donald P; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2013-02-22

    Pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS) have been found to be culture- and/or sero-positive for Bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI-3). The objective of this study was to determine whether these pathogens can cause fatal pneumonia in BHS. In the first study, two groups of four BHS each were intra-tracheally administered with leukotoxin-positive (Group I) or leukotoxin-negative (Group II) B. trehalosi. All four animals in Group I developed severe pneumonia, and two of them died within 3 days. The other two animals showed severe pneumonic lesions on euthanasia and necropsy. Animals in Group II neither died nor showed gross pneumonic lesions on necropsy, suggesting that leukotoxin-positive, but not leukotoxin-negative, B. trehalosi can cause fatal pneumonia in BHS. In the second study, two other groups of four BHS (Groups III and IV) were intra-nasally administered with a mixture of RSV and PI-3. Four days later, RSV/PI-3-inoculated Group IV and another group of four BHS (Group V, positive control) were intra-nasally administered with Mannheimia haemolytica, the pathogen that consistently causes fatal pneumonia in BHS. All four animals in group III developed pneumonia, but did not die during the study period. However all four animals in Group IV, and three animals in Group V developed severe pneumonia and died within two days of M. haemolytica inoculation. The fourth animal in Group V showed severe pneumonic lesions on euthanasia and necropsy. These findings suggest that RSV/PI-3 can cause non-fatal pneumonia, but are not necessary predisposing agents for M. haemolytica-caused pneumonia of BHS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Whole blood gene expression in infants with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

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    Skjaeret Camilla

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a major cause of viral bronchiolitis in infants worldwide, and environmental, viral and host factors are all of importance for disease susceptibility and severity. To study the systemic host response to this disease we used the microarray technology to measure mRNA gene expression levels in whole blood of five male infants hospitalised with acute RSV, subtype B, bronchiolitis versus five one year old male controls exposed to RSV during infancy without bronchiolitis. The gene expression levels were further evaluated in a new experiment using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR both in the five infants selected for microarray and in 13 other infants hospitalised with the same disease. Results Among the 30 genes most differentially expressed by microarray nearly 50% were involved in immunological processes. We found the highly upregulated interferon, alpha-inducible protein 27 (IFI27 and the highly downregulated gene Charcot-Leyden crystal protein (CLC to be the two most differentially expressed genes in the microarray study. When performing QRT-PCR on these genes IFI27 was upregulated in all but one infant, and CLC was downregulated in all 18 infants, and similar to that given by microarray. Conclusion The gene IFI27 is upregulated and the gene CLC is downregulated in whole blood of infants hospitalised with RSV, subtype B, bronchiolitis and is not reported before. More studies are needed to elucidate the specificity of these gene expressions in association with host response to this virus in bronchiolitis of moderate severity.

  9. IgE anti-respiratory syncytial virus antibodies detected in serum of pediatric patients with asthma.

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    Smith-Norowitz, Tamar A; Mandal, Mira; Joks, Rauno; Norowitz, Levana T; Weaver, Diana; Durkin, Helen G; Bluth, Martin H; Kohlhoff, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children, and is a public health concern, as is the increase in pediatric asthma. Respiratory viral infections may trigger asthma exacerbations. However, it remains unknown whether RSV infection may have a specific association with asthma. Total serum IgE, and IgE- and IgG-anti-RSV Ab responses were studied in older asthmatic compared with non-asthmatic children (M/F, mean age: 14) (N=30, N=43, respectively). We found: (1) total serum IgE was higher in asthmatic compared with non-asthmatics (Pasthma compared with no asthma (P=0.003; asthma (P=0.008), but not in asthma (P=0.64). Our findings indicate that IgE-anti-RSV Ab responses may play important roles in RSV infection and asthma.

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus groups A and B in Porto Alegre, Brazil, from 1990 to 1995 and 1998

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    Straliotto Selir M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV groups and their epidemiological pattern that were detected over the course of seven years in southern Brazil. The two RSV groups co-circulated each year, but frequencies of groups A and B varied both between and within yearly outbreaks. In 1991, group A predominated over group B (p=0.0016. RSV outbreaks analyzed showed a temperature-dependent pattern and no association with rainfall, similarly to other countries from southern South America. Knowledge of the variants is important in terms of both diagnosis and definition of a vaccine composition.

  11. Structure-Based Design of Head-Only Fusion Glycoprotein Immunogens for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

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    Jeffrey C Boyington

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a significant cause of severe respiratory illness worldwide, particularly in infants, young children, and the elderly. Although no licensed vaccine is currently available, an engineered version of the metastable RSV fusion (F surface glycoprotein-stabilized in the pre-fusion (pre-F conformation by "DS-Cav1" mutations-elicits high titer RSV-neutralizing responses. Moreover, pre-F-specific antibodies, often against the neutralization-sensitive antigenic site Ø in the membrane-distal head region of trimeric F glycoprotein, comprise a substantial portion of the human response to natural RSV infection. To focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø, we designed a series of RSV F immunogens that comprised the membrane-distal head of the F glycoprotein in its pre-F conformation. These "head-only" immunogens formed monomers, dimers, and trimers. Antigenic analysis revealed that a majority of the 70 engineered head-only immunogens displayed reactivity to site Ø-targeting antibodies, which was similar to that of the parent RSV F DS-Cav1 trimers, often with increased thermostability. We evaluated four of these head-only immunogens in detail, probing their recognition by antibodies, their physical stability, structure, and immunogenicity. When tested in naïve mice, a head-only trimer, half the size of the parent RSV F trimer, induced RSV titers, which were statistically comparable to those induced by DS-Cav1. When used to boost DS-Cav1-primed mice, two head-only RSV F immunogens, a dimer and a trimer, boosted RSV-neutralizing titers to levels that were comparable to those boosted by DS-Cav1, although with higher site Ø-directed responses. Our results provide proof-of-concept for the ability of the smaller head-only RSV F immunogens to focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø. Decent primary immunogenicity, enhanced physical stability, potential ease of manufacture, and potent

  12. Comparison of Cepheid Xpert Flu/RSV XC and BioFire FilmArray for Detection of Influenza A, Influenza B, and Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

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    Wahrenbrock, Mark G; Matushek, Scott; Boonlayangoor, Sue; Tesic, Vera; Beavis, Kathleen G; Charnot-Katsikas, Angella

    2016-07-01

    The Xpert Flu/RSV XC was compared to the FilmArray respiratory panel for detection of influenza (Flu) A, Flu B, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), using 128 nasopharyngeal swabs. Positive agreements were 100% for Flu A and RSV and 92.3% for Flu B. The Xpert may be useful in clinical situations when extensive testing is not required and may serve an important role in laboratories already performing broader respiratory panel testing.

  13. Immunogenicity and safety of a respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein (RSV F) nanoparticle vaccine in older adults.

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    Fries, Louis; Shinde, Vivek; Stoddard, Jeffrey J; Thomas, D Nigel; Kpamegan, Eloi; Lu, Hanxin; Smith, Gale; Hickman, Somia P; Piedra, Pedro; Glenn, Gregory M

    2017-01-01

    A preventative strategy for Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infection constitutes an under-recognized unmet medical need among older adults. Four formulations of a novel recombinant RSV F nanoparticle vaccine (60 or 90 μg RSV F protein, with or without aluminum phosphate adjuvant) administered concurrently with a licensed inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) in older adult subjects were evaluated for safety and immunogenicity in this randomized, observer-blinded study. A total of 220 healthy males and females ≥ 60 years of age, without symptomatic cardiopulmonary disease, were vaccinated concurrently with TIV and RSV F vaccine or placebo. All vaccine formulations produced an acceptable safety profile, with no vaccine-related serious adverse events or evidence of systemic toxicity. Vaccine-induced immune responses were rapid, rising as early as 7 days post-vaccination; and were comparable in all formulations in terms of magnitude, with maximal levels attained within 28 (unadjuvanted) or 56 (adjuvanted) days post-vaccination. Peak anti-F protein IgG antibody levels rose 3.6- to 5.6-fold, with an adjuvant effect observed at the 60 μg dose, and a dose-effect observed between the unadjuvanted 60 and 90 μg regimens. The anti-F response persisted through 12 months post-vaccination. Palivizumab-competitive antibodies were below quantifiable levels (F protein, closely paralleled the anti-F response. However, a larger proportion of antibodies in adjuvanted vaccine recipients bound to the Site II peptide at high avidity. Day 0 neutralizing antibodies were high in all subjects and rose 1.3- to 1.7-fold in response to vaccination. Importantly, the RSV F vaccine co-administered with TIV did not impact the serum hemagglutination inhibition antibody responses to a standard-dose TIV, and TIV did not impact the immune response to the RSV F vaccine. RSV F protein nanoparticle vaccine induced increases in measures of functional immunity to RSV in older adults

  14. Immunogenicity and efficacy of alphavirus-derived replicon vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus in nonhuman primates.

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    Bates, John T; Pickens, Jennifer A; Schuster, Jennifer E; Johnson, Monika; Tollefson, Sharon J; Williams, John V; Davis, Nancy L; Johnston, Robert E; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Slaughter, James C; Smith-House, Frances; Crowe, James E

    2016-02-10

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are major causes of illness among children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. No vaccine has been licensed for protection against either of these viruses. We tested the ability of two Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-based viral replicon particle (VEE-VRP) vaccines that express the hRSV or hMPV fusion (F) protein to confer protection against hRSV or hMPV in African green monkeys. Animals immunized with VEE-VRP vaccines developed RSV or MPV F-specific antibodies and serum neutralizing activity. Compared to control animals, immunized animals were better able to control viral load in the respiratory mucosa following challenge and had lower levels of viral genome in nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. The high level of immunogenicity and protective efficacy induced by these vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates suggest that they hold promise for further development.

  15. A multi-tiered time-series modelling approach to forecasting respiratory syncytial virus incidence at the local level.

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    Spaeder, M C; Fackler, J C

    2012-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of documented viral respiratory infections, and the leading cause of hospitalization, in young children. We performed a retrospective time-series analysis of all patients aged Forecasting models of weekly RSV incidence for the local community, inpatient paediatric hospital and paediatric intensive-care unit (PICU) were created. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals calculated around our models' 2-week forecasts were accurate to ±9·3, ±7·5 and ±1·5 cases/week for the local community, inpatient hospital and PICU, respectively. Our results suggest that time-series models may be useful tools in forecasting the burden of RSV infection at the local and institutional levels, helping communities and institutions to optimize distribution of resources based on the changing burden and severity of illness in their respective communities.

  16. Affinity-purified respiratory syncytial virus antibodies from intravenous immunoglobulin exert potent antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

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    Nimesh Gupta

    Full Text Available Mixed infections are one of the major therapeutic challenges, as the current strategies have had limited success. One of the most common and widespread conditions of mixed infection is respiratory syncytial virus-mediated pathology of the respiratory tract in children. There is a dire need for the development of novel therapeutic approaches during mixed infections. Therapeutic intravenous immunoglobulin preparations, obtained from plasma pools of healthy donors have been used in immune deficiencies. This study was thus designed to characterize the functional efficacy of RSV-specific antibodies in IVIg. To explore the functional ability of these affinity-purified RSV-specific antibodies, the antibody-dependent and complement dependent cytotoxicity was determined using peripheral cells of healthy donors. This study demonstrates the existence of highly potent RSV-specific antibodies in IVIg preparations and provides the basis for the use of IVIg as broad-spectrum protective shield to RSV-infected children during mixed infections.

  17. Converting everolimus to mycophenolate mofetil ameliorated prolonged respiratory syncytial virus infection in a child after heart transplantation.

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    Suginobe, Hidehiro; Nawa, Nobutoshi; Ishida, Hidekazu; Kogaki, Shigetoyo

    2017-08-03

    In immunocompromised patients, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections are known to be severe and prolonged, and have significant mortality and morbidity. However, little is known about the clinical courses and treatment strategy of RSV infection in heart transplant recipients. Here, we report a 6-year-old female with heart transplantation who had exhibited prolonged respiratory symptoms and shedding of RSV. She had received everolimus as an immunosuppressant. As immunosuppressants could have been responsible for the prolonged activation of RSV, we converted everolimus to mycophenolate mofetil. After the conversion, RSV promptly disappeared, and her symptoms improved. We speculate that converting the immunosuppressant may be effective for prolonged RSV infection due to the different immunosuppressive mechanisms. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. [Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in the pediatric teaching hospital Charles de Gaulle of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouédraogo Yugbaré, S O; Ouédraogo, R; Nenebi, A; Traoré, B; Congo, L; Yonli, F; Kima, D; Bonané, P; Yé, D; Plantier, J-C; Vabret, A; Marguet, C; Gueudin, M

    2016-02-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections are little known in Burkina Faso. The objective of our work is to study the epidemiological and clinical aspects of RSV infections in infants in the Pediatric Teaching Hospital Charles de Gaulle of Ouagadougou. Between July 1(st) 2010 and June 30(th) 2011, we analyzed by direct immunofluorescence and PCR nasopharyngeal swabs from children from 0 to 36 months old. All in all, 210 patients among whom 74 from the external consultation (35.2%) and 136 hospitalized (64.7%) benefited from a nasopharyngeal aspiration. The motives for consultation were cough (91.7%), rhinitis (79.2%), fever (79.2%) and respiratory distress syndrome (66.7%). The evoked diagnoses were predominantly the acute bronchiolitis in 14 cases (58.3%) followed by the acute pulmonary disease in 7 patients (26.2%) then flue in 1 patient (16.7%). We detected by direct immunofluorescence the antigens of the respiratory viruses in 21 nasopharyngeal aspirations with 10 cases of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections (47.6%). The PCR realized on 208 samples allowed to identify 153 positive samples (73.2%) with 24 RSV, i.e. a global prevalence of 16.1% with a peak of 18 cases (75%). In October, all the patients benefited from an often multiple antibiotic treatment of at least 10 days which was not still necessary. The evolution was favorable for all patients. This study confirms the important place of the viruses which are detected in 70% of the cases. The PCR multiplex, certainly expensive but effective and successful, deserves to be used in our developing countries to avoid the irrational prescription of antibiotic.

  19. Molecular characterization of an outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (subgroup A) in Havana, Cuba, by monoclonal antibodies and restriction mapping (N gene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, A; Chacón, D; Savón, C; Oropesa, S; Sarmiento, L; Valdes, O; Otero, A; Rosario, D; Goyenechea, A

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-one respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) strains isolated from one outbreak in Havana, Cuba (1994 to 1995), were analyzed to determine their relatedness. All isolated strains were classified as subgroup A by monoclonal antibodies. Of 21 RSV strains examined, 20 were classified as having restriction pattern NP4 and only 1 was classified as having restriction pattern NP5. PMID:9302221

  20. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison) with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison) caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been shown to augment infection with...

  1. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison) with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Larsen, Lars Erik;

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison) caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been shown to augment infection with...

  2. Population based external validation of a European predictive model for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization of premature infants born 33 to 35 weeks of gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone G; Fullarton, John R; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Prospectively collected population-based data on 2529 Danish infants born at 33 to 35 weeks of gestation were used to validate an European predictive model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization. The model was found to be robust with a diagnostic accuracy of 65.9% to distinguish bet...

  3. Restriction enzyme analysis of RT-PCR amplicons as a rapid method for detection of genetic diversity among bovine respiratory syncytial virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentova, V.; Antonis, A.F.G.; Kovarcik, K.

    2005-01-01

    Our current knowledge of antigenic variability of the bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is quite limited and is mainly dependent on the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAb). In this study, we present not only analysis of the antigenic, but also of the genetic variability of BRSV. Using a panel

  4. Defining the Risk and Associated Morbidity and Mortality of Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Among Preterm Infants Without Chronic Lung Disease or Congenital Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figueras-Aloy, Josep; Manzoni, Paolo; Paes, Bosco; Simões, Eric A F; Bont, Louis; Checchia, Paul A; Fauroux, Brigitte; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The REGAL (RSV Evidence-a Geographical Archive of the Literature) series provide a comprehensive review of the published evidence in the field of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in Western countries over the last 20 years. This second publication covers the risk and burden of RSV inf

  5. A peptide mimic of a protective epitope of respiratory syncytial virus selected from a combinatorial library induces virus-neutralizing antibodies and reduces viral load in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chargelegue, D.; Obeid, O.E.; Hsu, S.C.; Shaw, M.D.; Denbury, A.N.; Taylor, G.; Steward, M.W.

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and young children worldwide. As yet, there is no effective vaccine against RSV infection, and previous attempts to develop a formalin-inactivated vaccine resulted in exacerbated disease in recipi

  6. Safety and pharmacokinetics of an intramuscular monoclonal antibody (SB209763) against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in infants and young children at risk for severe RSV disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meissner, HC; Groothuis, [No Value; Rodriguez, WJ; Welliver, RC; Hogg, G; Gray, PH; Loh, R; Simoes, EAF; Sly, P; Miller, AK; Nichols, AI; Jorkasky, DK; Everitt, DE; Thompson, KA

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of a humanized monoclonal antibody against a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein (SE 209763) to evaluate its safety, pharmacokinetics, and fusion inhibition and neutralization titers. Forty-three infants who

  7. Lack of long-term effects of high-dose inhaled beclomethasone for respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer-Kooijker, K.; Ent, C.K. van der; Ermers, M.J.; Rovers, M.M.; Bont, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, we showed that high-dose early initiated inhaled corticosteroids during respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis partially and transiently prevents subsequent recurrent wheeze. Here, we study treatment effect on lung function at age 6. METHODS: This is a 6-year follow-up

  8. Opposing Roles of Membrane and Soluble Forms of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Primary Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a common respiratory pathogen in infants and the older population, causes pulmonary inflammation and airway occlusion that leads to impairment of lung function. Here, we have established a role for receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in RSV infection. RAGE-deficient (ager−/− ) mice were protected from RSV-induced weight loss and inflammation. This protection correlated with an early increase in type I interferons, later decreases in proinflam...

  9. Monoclonal antibody for reducing the risk of respiratory syncytial virus infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andabaka, Tea; Nickerson, Jason W; Rojas-Reyes, Maria Ximena; Rueda, Juan David; Bacic Vrca, Vesna; Barsic, Bruno

    2013-04-30

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most important viral pathogens causing acute respiratory infections in children. It results in about 3.4 million hospitalisations annually in children under five. Palivizumab is an anti-RSV monoclonal antibody, administered intramuscularly at a dose of 15 mg/kg once every 30 days. The efficacy and safety of palivizumab has been evaluated in multicentre, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and a large number of economic evaluations (EEs) have tested its cost-effectiveness. To assess the effectiveness and safety of palivizumab prophylaxis compared with placebo, or another type of prophylaxis, in reducing the risk of complications (hospitalisation due to RSV infection) in high-risk infants and children. To assess the cost-effectiveness (or cost-utility) of palivizumab prophylaxis compared with no prophylaxis in infants and children in different risk groups. We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 7, MEDLINE (1996 to July week 4, 2012), EMBASE (1996 to August 2012), CINAHL (1996 to August 2012) and LILACS (1996 to August 2012) for studies of effectiveness and safety. We searched the NHS Economic Evaluations Database (NHS EED 2012, Issue 4), Health Economics Evaluations Database (HEED, 9 August 2012) and Paediatric Economic Database Evaluations (PEDE, 1980 to 2009), MEDLINE (1996 to July week 4, 2012) and EMBASE (1996 to August 2012) for economic evaluations. We included RCTs comparing palivizumab prophylaxis with a placebo, no prophylaxis or another type of prophylaxis in preventing serious lower respiratory tract disease caused by RSV in paediatric patients at high risk. We included cost-effectiveness analyses and cost-utility analyses comparing palivizumab prophylaxis with no prophylaxis. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias for the included studies and extracted data for both the RCTs and EEs. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) and their associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dichotomous outcomes and for

  10. Evaluation of recent New Vaccine Surveillance Network data regarding respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization rates in US preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVincenzo, John P; Ambrose, Christopher S; Makari, Doris; Weiner, Leonard B

    2016-04-01

    In July 2014, the Committee on Infectious Diseases (COID) updated their guidance on the use of palivizumab, recommending against use in preterm infants 29 to 35 weeks' gestational age (wGA). A primary data source cited to support this significant change was the low respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization rate observed in the subpopulation of preterm (preterm infant data from the NVSN in the context of data regarding the use of palivizumab in this same time period. Data from the NVSN, an analysis of Florida Medicaid data, and a national survey of US in-hospital palivizumab administration demonstrated that during 2001 to 2007, palivizumab was administered to 59% to 83% of preterm infants born at preterm infants (preterm infant subgroups were evaluated as a function of chronologic age, preterm infants preterm infants given the small size of the analyzed subpopulation and the high use of palivizumab during the study period.

  11. Innate and adaptive cellular phenotypes contributing to pulmonary disease in mice after respiratory syncytial virus immunization and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Youri; Kwon, Young-Man; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major leading cause of infantile viral bronchiolitis. However, cellular phenotypes contributing to the RSV protection and vaccine-enhanced disease remain largely unknown. Upon RSV challenge, we analyzed phenotypes and cellularity in the lung of mice that were naïve, immunized with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV), or re-infected with RSV. In comparison with naïve and live RSV re-infected mice, the high levels of eosinophils, neutrophils, plasmacytoid and CD11b(+) dendritic cells, and IL-4(+) CD4(+) T cells were found to be contributing to pulmonary inflammation in FI-RSV immune mice despite lung viral clearance. Alveolar macrophages appeared to play differential roles in protection and inflammation upon RSV infection of different RSV immune mice. These results suggest that multiple innate and adaptive immune components differentially contribute to RSV disease and inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunogenicity and efficacy of codon optimized DNA vaccines encoding the F-protein of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternette, Nicola; Tippler, Bettina; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2007-10-10

    Respiratory syncytial virus F-protein (RSV-F) is poorly expressed from DNA expression plasmids containing the wild type RSV-F open reading frame. By codon optimization, premature polyadenylation signals were deleted and a striking enhancement of RSV-F expression levels was achieved. Therefore, the immunogenicity and efficacy of wild type DNA vaccines were compared to codon optimized expression plasmids encoding full-length RSV-F or its ectodomain. Mice were immunized twice with the different DNA vaccines followed by an RSV challenge. Only codon optimized DNA vaccines and in particular the one encoding the ectodomain of RSV-F induced substantial antibody levels and reduced viral load 13-170-fold. Thus, codon optimization enhances the immunogenicity and efficacy of RSV encoding DNA vaccines.

  13. The effects of disodium cromoglycate on enhanced adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to A549 cells infected with respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasawa, Chie; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Ogita, Junko; Hishiki, Haruka; Kohno, Yoichi

    2009-08-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) secondary infection often complicates respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. Previous studies have revealed that RSV infections enhance NTHi adherence to airway epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and corticosteroids, which are frequently used for the treatment of wheezing often related to RSV infections, on the adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells. DSCG inhibited enhanced adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells, whereas dexamethasone (Dex) and fluticasone propionate (Fp) did not. DSCG suppressed the expression of ICAM-1, which is one of the NTHi receptors. Furthermore, DSCG exhibited an inhibitory effect on RSV infections. It is suggested that DSCG exerts an anti-RSV effect, and consequently attenuates the expression of NTHi receptors.

  14. The eukaryotic elongation factor 1A is critical for genome replication of the paramyxovirus respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wei

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic translation factor eEF1A assists replication of many RNA viruses by various mechanisms. Here we show that down-regulation of eEF1A restricts the expression of viral genomic RNA and the release of infectious virus, demonstrating a biological requirement for eEF1A in the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV life cycle. The key proteins in the replicase/transcriptase complex of RSV; the nucleocapsid (N protein, phosphoprotein (P and matrix (M protein, all associate with eEF1A in RSV infected cells, although N is the strongest binding partner. Using individually expressed proteins, N, but not P or M bound to eEF1A. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between eEF1A and the RSV replication complex, through binding to N protein, to facilitate genomic RNA synthesis and virus production.

  15. A Bayesian SIRS model for the analysis of respiratory syncytial virus in the region of Valencia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corberán-Vallet, Ana; Santonja, Francisco J

    2014-09-01

    We present a Bayesian stochastic susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible (SIRS) model in discrete time to understand respiratory syncytial virus dynamics in the region of Valencia, Spain. A SIRS model based on ordinary differential equations has also been proposed to describe RSV dynamics in the region of Valencia. However, this continuous-time deterministic model is not suitable when the initial number of infected individuals is small. Stochastic epidemic models based on a probability of disease transmission provide a more natural description of the spread of infectious diseases. In addition, by allowing the transmission rate to vary stochastically over time, the proposed model provides an improved description of RSV dynamics. The Bayesian analysis of the model allows us to calculate both the posterior distribution of the model parameters and the posterior predictive distribution, which facilitates the computation of point forecasts and prediction intervals for future observations. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Lower number of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in peripheral blood of children with bronchiolitis following respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Kaizhi; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Mei, Xuqiao; Wu, Ayang; Zhang, Baozhong; Cai, Mengyun; Zheng, Yuanhai; Ke, Zhuanye

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Dendritic cells (DCs) are key mediators of allergic airway inflammation. Thus, it is important to understand the relationship between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and DCs, especially in children with RSV bronchiolitis. Methods We collected peripheral blood from 71 children with RSV bronchiolitis at the time of admission and 28 children who were followed up 3 months following admission. Flow cytometry was performed to detect dendritic cell immunophenotypes. Results Patients with RSV bronchiolitis exhibited significantly higher number of myeloid DCs and lower number of plasmacytoid DCs at the time of admission and 3 months following discharge, compared with healthy controls. These children had a significantly higher myeloid/plasmacytoid ratio 3 months after discharge compared with healthy controls. Conclusions Among children with RSV bronchiolitis, there is an imbalance in peripheral blood myeloid/plasmacytoid ratio. The low number of plasmacytoid DCs in peripheral blood indicates the development of bronchiolitis due to RSV infection. PMID:24528606

  17. Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infections Prevenção das infecções pelo vírus sincicial respiratório

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Ferro Bricks

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus is the most important cause of viral lower respiratory illness in infants and children worldwide. By the age of 2 years, nearly every child has become infected with respiratory syncytial virus and re-infections are common throughout life. Most infections are mild and can be managed at home, but this virus causes serious diseases in preterm children, especially those with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Respiratory syncytial virus has also been recognized as an important pathogen in people with immunossupressive and other underlying medical problems and institutionalizated elderly, causing thousands of hospitalizations and deaths every year. The burden of these infections makes the development of vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus highly desirable, but the insuccess of a respiratory syncytial virus formalin-inactivated vaccine hampered the progress in this field. To date, there is no vaccine available for preventing respiratory syncytial virus infections, however, in the last years, there has been much progress in the understanding of immunology and immunopathologic mechanisms of respiratory syncytial virus diseases, which has allowed the development of new strategies for passive and active prophylaxis. In this article, the author presents a review about novel approaches to the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infections, such as: passive immunization with human polyclonal intravenous immune globulin and humanized monoclonal antibodies (both already licensed for use in premature infants and children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and many different vaccines that are potential candidates for active immunization against respiratory syncytial virus.Em todo o mundo, o vírus sincicial respiratório é o principal agente de infecções agudas das vias aéreas baixas em lactentes jovens e crianças. Aos dois anos de idade, praticamente todas as crianças já foram infectadas, e as reinfeções são comuns

  18. Protective efficacy and immunogenicity of a combinatory DNA vaccine against Influenza A Virus and the Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Stab

    Full Text Available The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV and Influenza A Virus (IAV are both two major causative agents of severe respiratory tract infections in humans leading to hospitalization and thousands of deaths each year. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a combinatory DNA vaccine in comparison to the single component vaccines against both diseases in a mouse model. Intramuscular electroporation with plasmids expressing the hemagglutinin (HA of IAV and the F protein of RSV induced strong humoral immune responses regardless if they were delivered in combination or alone. In consequence, high neutralizing antibody titers were detected, which conferred protection against a lethal challenge with IAV. Furthermore, the viral load in the lungs after a RSV infection could be dramatically reduced in vaccinated mice. Concurrently, substantial amounts of antigen-specific, polyfunctional CD8⁺ T-cells were measured after vaccination. Interestingly, the cellular response to the hemagglutinin was significantly reduced in the presence of the RSV-F encoding plasmid, but not vice versa. Although these results indicate a suppressive effect of the RSV-F protein, the protective efficacy of the combinatory vaccine was comparable to the efficacy of both single-component vaccines. In conclusion, the novel combinatory vaccine against RSV and IAV may have great potential to reduce the rate of severe respiratory tract infections in humans without increasing the number of necessary vaccinations.

  19. Protective efficacy and immunogenicity of a combinatory DNA vaccine against Influenza A Virus and the Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stab, Viktoria; Nitsche, Sandra; Niezold, Thomas; Storcksdieck Genannt Bonsmann, Michael; Wiechers, Andrea; Tippler, Bettina; Hannaman, Drew; Ehrhardt, Christina; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas; Tenbusch, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and Influenza A Virus (IAV) are both two major causative agents of severe respiratory tract infections in humans leading to hospitalization and thousands of deaths each year. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a combinatory DNA vaccine in comparison to the single component vaccines against both diseases in a mouse model. Intramuscular electroporation with plasmids expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) of IAV and the F protein of RSV induced strong humoral immune responses regardless if they were delivered in combination or alone. In consequence, high neutralizing antibody titers were detected, which conferred protection against a lethal challenge with IAV. Furthermore, the viral load in the lungs after a RSV infection could be dramatically reduced in vaccinated mice. Concurrently, substantial amounts of antigen-specific, polyfunctional CD8⁺ T-cells were measured after vaccination. Interestingly, the cellular response to the hemagglutinin was significantly reduced in the presence of the RSV-F encoding plasmid, but not vice versa. Although these results indicate a suppressive effect of the RSV-F protein, the protective efficacy of the combinatory vaccine was comparable to the efficacy of both single-component vaccines. In conclusion, the novel combinatory vaccine against RSV and IAV may have great potential to reduce the rate of severe respiratory tract infections in humans without increasing the number of necessary vaccinations.

  20. A Network Flow Approach to Predict Protein Targets and Flavonoid Backbones to Treat Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Vargas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in lower respiratory tract in infants and young children. Attempts to develop effective vaccines or pharmacological treatments to inhibit RSV infection without undesired effects on human health have been unsuccessful. However, RSV infection has been reported to be affected by flavonoids. The mechanisms underlying viral inhibition induced by these compounds are largely unknown, making the development of new drugs difficult. Methods. To understand the mechanisms induced by flavonoids to inhibit RSV infection, a systems pharmacology-based study was performed using microarray data from primary culture of human bronchial cells infected by RSV, together with compound-proteomic interaction data available for Homo sapiens. Results. After an initial evaluation of 26 flavonoids, 5 compounds (resveratrol, quercetin, myricetin, apigenin, and tricetin were identified through topological analysis of a major chemical-protein (CP and protein-protein interacting (PPI network. In a nonclustered form, these flavonoids regulate directly the activity of two protein bottlenecks involved in inflammation and apoptosis. Conclusions. Our findings may potentially help uncovering mechanisms of action of early RSV infection and provide chemical backbones and their protein targets in the difficult quest to develop new effective drugs.

  1. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protects human airway epithelial cells from a subsequent respiratory syncytial virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Stacey M; Ketterer, Margaret; Apicella, Michael A; Varga, Steven M

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and the common commensal and opportunistic pathogen, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) both serve as a frequent cause of respiratory infection in children. Although it is well established that some respiratory viruses can increase host susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections, few studies have examined how commensal bacteria could influence a secondary viral response. Here, we examined the impact of NTHi exposure on a subsequent RSV infection of human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-). Co-culture of 16HBE14o- cells with NTHi resulted in inhibition of viral gene expression following RSV infection. 16HBE14o- cells co-cultured with heat-killed NTHi failed to protect against an RSV infection, indicating that protection requires live bacteria. However, NTHi did not inhibit influenza A virus replication, indicating that NTHi-mediated protection was RSV-specific. Our data demonstrates that prior exposure to a commensal bacterium such as NTHi can elicit protection against a subsequent RSV infection.

  2. Autocrine regulation of pulmonary inflammation by effector T-cell derived IL-10 during infection with respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Sun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection is the leading viral cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in young infants. Clinical studies have documented that certain polymorphisms in the gene encoding the regulatory cytokine IL-10 are associated with the development of severe bronchiolitis in RSV infected infants. Here, we examined the role of IL-10 in a murine model of primary RSV infection and found that high levels of IL-10 are produced in the respiratory tract by anti-viral effector T cells at the onset of the adaptive immune response. We demonstrated that the function of the effector T cell -derived IL-10 in vivo is to limit the excess pulmonary inflammation and thereby to maintain critical lung function. We further identify a novel mechanism by which effector T cell-derived IL-10 controls excess inflammation by feedback inhibition through engagement of the IL-10 receptor on the antiviral effector T cells. Our findings suggest a potentially critical role of effector T cell-derived IL-10 in controlling disease severity in clinical RSV infection.

  3. Inhibition of G1P3 expression found in the differential display study on respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading viral pathogen associated with bronchiolitis and lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children worldwide. The respiratory epithelium is the primary initiator of pulmonary inflammation in RSV infections, which cause significant perturbations of global gene expression controlling multiple cellular processes. In this study, differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed to examine mRNA expression in a human alveolar cell line (SPC-A1 infected with RSV. Results Of the 2,500 interpretable bands on denaturing polyacrylamide gels, 40 (1.6% cDNA bands were differentially regulated by RSV, in which 28 (70% appeared to be upregulated and another 12 (30% appeared to be downregulated. Forty of the expressed sequence tags (EST were isolated, and 20 matched homologs in GenBank. RSV infection upregulated the mRNA expression of chemokines CC and CXC and interfered with type α/β interferon-inducible gene expression by upregulation of MG11 and downregulation of G1P3. Conclusion RSV replication could induce widespread changes in gene expression including both positive and negative regulation and play a different role in the down-regulation of IFN-α and up-regulation of IFN-γ inducible gene expression, which suggests that RSV interferes with the innate antiviral response of epithelial cells by multiple mechanisms.

  4. Multiple Functional Domains and Complexes of the Two Nonstructural Proteins of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Contribute to Interferon Suppression and Cellular Location▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedan, Samer; Andrews, Joel; Majumdar, Tanmay; Musiyenko, Alla; Barik, Sailen

    2011-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a major cause of severe respiratory diseases, efficiently suppresses cellular innate immunity, represented by type I interferon (IFN), using its two unique nonstructural proteins, NS1 and NS2. In a search for their mechanism, NS1 was previously shown to decrease levels of TRAF3 and IKKε, whereas NS2 interacted with RIG-I and decreased TRAF3 and STAT2. Here, we report on the interaction, cellular localization, and functional domains of these two proteins. We show that recombinant NS1 and NS2, expressed in lung epithelial A549 cells, can form homo- as well as heteromers. Interestingly, when expressed alone, substantial amounts of NS1 and NS2 localized to the nuclei and to the mitochondria, respectively. However, when coexpressed with NS2, as in RSV infection, NS1 could be detected in the mitochondria as well, suggesting that the NS1-NS2 heteromer localizes to the mitochondria. The C-terminal tetrapeptide sequence, DLNP, common to both NS1 and NS2, was required for some functions, but not all, whereas only the NS1 N-terminal region was important for IKKε reduction. Finally, NS1 and NS2 both interacted specifically with host microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B). The contribution of MAP1B in NS1 function was not tested, but in NS2 it was essential for STAT2 destruction, suggesting a role of the novel DLNP motif in protein-protein interaction and IFN suppression. PMID:21795342

  5. Activation of cytokines and NF-kappa B in corneal epithelial cells infected by respiratory syncytial virus: potential relevance in ocular inflammation and respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oakes John E

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infection, claiming millions of lives annually. The virus infects various cells of the respiratory tract as well as resident inflammatory cells such as macrophages. Infection activates a variety of cellular factors such as cytokines and the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-kappa B, all of which are important players in the respiratory disease. However, the exact natural route of RSV infection and its etiology remain relatively unknown. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that human corneal epithelial cells, which constitute the outermost layer of the cornea, can be infected with RSV, and that the infection leads to the activation of proinflammatory macromolecules. Results Corneal swabs obtained from pediatric patients with acute respiratory disease were found to contain RSV at a high frequency (43 positive out of 72 samples, i.e., 60%. Primary corneal epithelial cells in tissue culture supported robust infection and productive growth of RSV. Infection resulted in the activation of TNF-α, IL-6 and sixteen chemokines as well as NF-κB. Three proinflammatory CXC chemokines (MIG, I-TAC, IP-10 underwent the greatest activation. Conclusions The ocular epithelium is readily infected by RSV. The pro-inflammatory cytokines are likely to play critical roles in the etiology of inflammation and conjunctivitis commonly seen in pediatric patients with respiratory infections. RSV-eye interactions have important implications in RSV transmission, immunopathology of RSV disease, and in the management of conjunctivitis.

  6. Clinical and epidemiological aspects related to the detection of adenovirus or respiratory syncytial virus in infants hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A. Ferone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize and compare clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory aspects ofinfants with acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI associated with the detection of adenovirus(ADV or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. METHODS: A preliminary respiratory infection surveillance study collected samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA for viral research, linked to the completion of a standard protocol, from children younger than two years admitted to a university hospital with ALRI, between March of 2008 and August of 2011. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used for eight viruses: ADV, RSV, metapneumovirus, Parainfluenza 1, 2, and 3, and Influenza A and B. Cases with NPA collectedduring the first 24 hours of admission, negative results of blood culture, and exclusive detection of ADV (Gadv group or RSV (Grsv group were selected for comparisons. RESULTS: The preliminary study included collection of 1,121 samples of NPA, 813 collected in thefirst 24 hours of admission, of which 50.3% were positive for at least one virus; RSV was identifiedin 27.3% of cases surveyed, and ADV was identified in 15.8%. Among the aspects analyzed inthe Gadv (n = 58 and Grsv (n = 134 groups, the following are noteworthy: the higher meanage, more frequent prescription of antibiotics, and the highest median of total white blood cellcount and C-reactive protein values in Gadv. CONCLUSIONS: PCR can detect persistent/latent forms of ADV, an aspect to be considered wheninterpreting results. Additional studies with quantitative diagnostic techniques could elucidatethe importance of the high frequency observed.

  7. Independent lung ventilation in a newborn with asymmetric acute lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Nardo Matteo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Independent lung ventilation is a form of protective ventilation strategy used in adult asymmetric acute lung injury, where the application of conventional mechanical ventilation can produce ventilator-induced lung injury and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Only a few experiences have been published on the use of independent lung ventilation in newborn patients. Case presentation We present a case of independent lung ventilation in a 16-day-old infant of 3.5 kg body weight who had an asymmetric lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis. We used independent lung ventilation applying conventional protective pressure controlled ventilation to the less-compromised lung, with a respiratory frequency proportional to the age of the patient, and a pressure controlled high-frequency ventilation to the atelectatic lung. This was done because a single tube conventional ventilation protective strategy would have exposed the less-compromised lung to a high mean airways pressure. The target of independent lung ventilation is to provide adequate gas exchange at a safe mean airways pressure level and to expand the atelectatic lung. Independent lung ventilation was accomplished for 24 hours. Daily chest radiograph and gas exchange were used to evaluate the efficacy of independent lung ventilation. Extubation was performed after 48 hours of conventional single-tube mechanical ventilation following independent lung ventilation. Conclusion This case report demonstrates the feasibility of independent lung ventilation with two separate tubes in neonates as a treatment of an asymmetric acute lung injury.

  8. The preventive effect of vaccine prophylaxis on severe respiratory syncytial virus infection:A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tongna; Zhu; Chuanlong; Zhang; Li; Yu; Jingxian; Chen; Huan; Qiu; Weiwei; Lyu; Shenghai; Huang

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus(RSV) is the key underlying cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection in infants; however, no licensed vaccine against RSV infection is currently available. This study was undertaken to assess the preventive effect of vaccine on RSV infection. In this metaanalysis, 1,792 published randomized clinical trials of RSV vaccines from Jan 1973 to Sep 2015 were examined. Among thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria, eleven studies estimated the impact of RSV vaccines and four studies estimated the effect of adjuvants. The odds ratios(ORs) were 0.31(95% CI, 0.15–0.67) and 0.62(95% CI, 0.29–1.34), respectively. We found that RSV subunit vaccines can significantly reduce the incidence of RSV infection and that whether vaccination with adjuvant therapy was an effective strategy still remained to be studied. This analysis of the preventive effect of vaccines on RSV infection has direct applications for the prevention of RSV infections.

  9. [Clinical and epidemiological differences between Bordetella pertussis and respiratory syncytial virus infections in infants: a matched case control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cobos-Carrascosa, Elena; Sánchez-Forte, Miguel; López-Sánchez, María Ángeles; González-Jiménez, Yolanda; Azor-Martínez, Ernestina

    2014-01-01

    An increase in cases of pertussis, mainly in young infants, has been reported in the last few years. The clinical presentation of this disease is very similar to that produced by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which makes the diagnosis difficult. To compare the clinical and epidemiological characteristics between Bordetella pertussis and RSV infections in infants admitted to hospital. An analytical matched case-control study was conducted during the period 2008-2011. Cases were defined as infants admitted with pertussis confirmed by PCR in nasopharyngeal aspirate. Each case was matched by age, sex and date of admission to two controls defined as patients with RSV infection detected by immunochromatography in nasal aspirate. Demographic, clinical, laboratory data were compared. Seventy eight patients (26 cases of pertussis and 52 controls RSV+) were included. Sociodemographic characteristics were similar in both groups. Cases had more days of symptoms prior to admission, longer hospital stays, and increased frequency of epidemic family environment. Apnoea and cyanosis were more frequent. Cases of pertussis were more likely to have apnoea, cyanosis, and lymphocytosis while RSV infections had more frequent fever, vomiting and respiratory distress. The clinical presentations of pertussis and RSV infection are similar, but there are some characteristics that can help to distinguish between them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  10. Intranasal Administration of Maleic Anhydride-Modified Human Serum Albumin for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

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    Zhiwu Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading cause of pediatric viral respiratory tract infections. Neither vaccine nor effective antiviral therapy is available to prevent and treat RSV infection. Palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, is the only product approved to prevent serious RSV infection, but its high cost is prohibitive in low-income countries. Here, we aimed to identify an effective, safe, and affordable antiviral agent for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP of RSV infection in children at high risk. We found that maleic anhydride (ML-modified human serum albumin (HSA, designated ML-HSA, exhibited potent antiviral activity against RSV and that the percentages of the modified lysines and arginies in ML- are correlated with such anti-RSV activity. ML-HSA inhibited RSV entry and replication by interacting with viral G protein and blocking RSV attachment to the target cells, while ML-HAS neither bound to F protein, nor inhibited F protein-mediated membrane fusion. Intranasal administration of ML-HSA before RSV infection resulted in significant decrease of the viral titers in the lungs of mice. ML-HSA shows promise for further development into an effective, safe, affordable, and easy-to-use intranasal regimen for pre-exposure prophylaxis of RSV infection in children at high risk in both low- and high-income countries.

  11. Seasonal incidence of medically attended respiratory syncytial virus infection in a community cohort of adults ≥50 years old.

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    David L McClure

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnostic testing for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is not routinely performed in adults. We estimated medically attended RSV seasonal incidence in a community cohort of adults ≥50 years old during four influenza seasons (2006-07 through 2009-10. METHODS: Patients seeking care for acute respiratory illness (ARI were prospectively enrolled and tested for RSV by multiplex RT-PCR. Results from enrolled patients were used to estimate projected cases among non-enrolled patients with ARI. The seasonal incidence of medically attended RSV was the sum of actual and projected cases divided by the community cohort denominator. Since each enrollment period did not include the entire RSV season, incidence estimates were adjusted to account for the statewide proportion of RSV occurring outside the study enrollment period. RESULTS: There were 16,088 to 17,694 adults in the cohort each season and 164 RSV cases in all 4 seasons. The overall seasonal incidence of medically attended RSV was 154 episodes (95% CI, 132-180 per 10,000 persons; the incidence was highest in 2007-08 (179 and lowest in 2006-07 (110. Among persons 50-59, 60-69, and ≥70 years old, RSV incidence was 124 (95% CI, 99-156, 147 (95% CI, 110-196, and 199 (95% CI, 153-258, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of medically attended RSV increased with age and was similar during four seasons.

  12. Positive selection results in frequent reversible amino acid replacements in the G protein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus.

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    Viviane F Botosso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children under 5 years of age and the elderly, causing annual disease outbreaks during the fall and winter. Multiple lineages of the HRSVA and HRSVB serotypes co-circulate within a single outbreak and display a strongly temporal pattern of genetic variation, with a replacement of dominant genotypes occurring during consecutive years. In the present study we utilized phylogenetic methods to detect and map sites subject to adaptive evolution in the G protein of HRSVA and HRSVB. A total of 29 and 23 amino acid sites were found to be putatively positively selected in HRSVA and HRSVB, respectively. Several of these sites defined genotypes and lineages within genotypes in both groups, and correlated well with epitopes previously described in group A. Remarkably, 18 of these positively selected tended to revert in time to a previous codon state, producing a "flip-flop" phylogenetic pattern. Such frequent evolutionary reversals in HRSV are indicative of a combination of frequent positive selection, reflecting the changing immune status of the human population, and a limited repertoire of functionally viable amino acids at specific amino acid sites.

  13. Prevalence and clinical features of respiratory syncytial virus in children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in northern Brazil

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    Lamarão Letícia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood pneumonia and bronchiolitis is a leading cause of illness and death in young children worldwide with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV as the main viral cause. RSV has been associated with annual respiratory disease outbreaks and bacterial co-infection has also been reported. This study is the first RSV epidemiological study in young children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in Belém city, Pará (Northern Brazil. Methods With the objective of determining the prevalence of RSV infection and evaluating the patients’ clinical and epidemiological features, we conducted a prospective study across eight hospitals from November 2006 to October 2007. In this study, 1,050 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were obtained from hospitalized children up to the age of three years with CAP, and tested for RSV antigen by direct immunofluorescence assay and by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR for RSV Group identification. Results RSV infection was detected in 243 (23.1% children. The mean age of the RSV-positive group was lower than the RSV-negative group (12.1 months vs 15.5 months, pppppp Conclusion The present study highlights the relevance of RSV infection in hospitalized cases of CAP in our region; our findings warrant the conduct of further investigations which can help design strategies for controlling the disease.

  14. Long-Term Shedding of Influenza Virus, Parainfluenza Virus, Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Nosocomial Epidemiology in Patients with Hematological Disorders.

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    Nicola Lehners

    Full Text Available Respiratory viruses are a cause of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI, but can be associated with severe lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI in immunocompromised patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic variability of influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and the duration of viral shedding in hematological patients. Nasopharyngeal swabs from hematological patients were screened for influenza, parainfluenza and RSV on admission as well as on development of respiratory symptoms. Consecutive swabs were collected until viral clearance. Out of 672 tested patients, a total of 111 patients (17% were infected with one of the investigated viral agents: 40 with influenza, 13 with parainfluenza and 64 with RSV; six patients had influenza/RSV or parainfluenza/RSV co-infections. The majority of infected patients (n = 75/111 underwent stem cell transplantation (42 autologous, 48 allogeneic, 15 autologous and allogeneic. LRTI was observed in 48 patients, of whom 15 patients developed severe LRTI, and 13 patients with respiratory tract infection died. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a variety of influenza A(H1N1pdm09, A(H3N2, influenza B, parainfluenza 3 and RSV A, B viruses. RSV A was detected in 54 patients, RSV B in ten patients. The newly emerging RSV A genotype ON1 predominated in the study cohort and was found in 48 (75% of 64 RSV-infected patients. Furthermore, two distinct clusters were detected for RSV A genotype ON1, identical RSV G gene sequences in these patients are consistent with nosocomial transmission. Long-term viral shedding for more than 30 days was significantly associated with prior allogeneic transplantation (p = 0.01 and was most pronounced in patients with RSV infection (n = 16 with a median duration of viral shedding for 80 days (range 35-334 days. Long-term shedding of respiratory viruses might be a catalyzer of nosocomial transmission and must be considered for

  15. Prospective and retrospective evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert® Flu/RSV XC assay for rapid detection of influenza A, influenza B, and respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salez, Nicolas; Nougairede, Antoine; Ninove, Laetitia; Zandotti, Christine; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Charrel, Remi N

    2015-04-01

    A total of 281 clinical specimens (nasal swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates) were tested with the Xpert® Flu/RSV XC. The results were compared to those obtained with the real-time retro transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays routinely used in our laboratory. The Xpert® Flu/RSV XC showed sensitivity/specificity of 97.8%/100% and 97.9%/100% for flu and respiratory syncytial virus, respectively.

  16. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants: Detel1ninants of Clinical Severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Brandenburg (Afke)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn 1955 a virus was isolated by Morris et al. from a chimpanzee with an upper respiratory tract infection. This apparently new virus was originally called chimpanzee coryza agent. Soon aftclwards, when it was isolated from children with respiratory disease, it became clear that this viru

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus inhibits ciliagenesis in differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells: effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Manuel; Sarrion, Irene; Armengot, Miguel; Carda, Carmen; Martinez, Isidoro; Melero, Jose A; Cortijo, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Persistent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections have been associated with the exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This virus infects the respiratory epithelium, leading to chronic inflammation, and induces the release of mucins and the loss of cilia activity, two factors that determine mucus clearance and the increase in sputum volume. These alterations involve reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has proven useful in the management of COPD, reducing symptoms, exacerbations, and accelerated lung function decline. NAC inhibits RSV infection and mucin release in human A549 cells. The main objective of this study was to analyze the effects of NAC in modulating ciliary activity, ciliagenesis, and metaplasia in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cell (NHBEC) cultures infected with RSV. Our results indicated that RSV induced ultrastructural abnormalities in axonemal basal bodies and decreased the expression of β-tubulin as well as two genes involved in ciliagenesis, FOXJ1 and DNAI2. These alterations led to a decrease in ciliary activity. Furthermore, RSV induced metaplastic changes to the epithelium and increased the number of goblet cells and the expression of MUC5AC and GOB5. NAC restored the normal functions of the epithelium, inhibiting ICAM1 expression, subsequent RSV infection through mechanisms involving nuclear receptor factor 2, and the expression of heme oxygenase 1, which correlated with the restoration of the antioxidant capacity, the intracellular H(2)O(2) levels and glutathione content of NHBECs. The results presented in this study support the therapeutic use of NAC for the management of chronic respiratory diseases, including COPD.

  18. Characterization of Pre-F-GCN4t, a Modified Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein Stabilized in a Noncleaved Prefusion Conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Normand; Gagné, Martin; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Rheault, Patrick; Boyer, Martine; Steff, Ann-Muriel; Baudoux, Guy; Dewar, Vincent; Demers, Josée; Ruelle, Jean-Louis; Martin, Denis

    2017-07-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) fusion (F) protein is considered a major target of the neutralizing antibody response to hRSV. This glycoprotein undergoes a major structural shift from the prefusion (pre-F) to the postfusion (post-F) state at the time of virus-host cell membrane fusion. Recent evidences suggest that the pre-F state is a superior target for neutralizing antibodies compared to the post-F state. Therefore, for vaccine purposes, we have designed and characterized a recombinant hRSV F protein, called Pre-F-GCN4t, stabilized in a pre-F conformation. To show that Pre-F-GCN4t does not switch to a post-F conformation, it was compared with a recombinant post-F molecule, called Post-F-XC. Pre-F-GCN4t was glycosylated and trimeric and displayed a conformational stability different from that of Post-F-XC, as shown by chemical denaturation. Electron microscopy analysis suggested that Pre-F-GCN4t adopts a lollipop-like structure. In contrast, Post-F-XC had a typical elongated conical shape. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry demonstrated that the two molecules had common rigid folding core and dynamic regions and provided structural insight for their biophysical and biochemical properties and reactivity. Pre-F-GCN4t was shown to deplete hRSV-neutralizing antibodies from human serum more efficiently than Post-F-XC. Importantly, Pre-F-GCN4t was also shown to bind D25, a highly potent monoclonal antibody specific for the pre-F conformation. In conclusion, this construct presents several pre-F characteristics, does not switch to the post-F conformation, and presents antigenic features required for a protective neutralizing antibody response. Therefore, Pre-F-GCN4t can be considered a promising candidate vaccine antigen.IMPORTANCE Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a global leading cause of infant mortality and adult morbidity. The development of a safe and efficacious RSV vaccine remains an important goal. The RSV class I fusion (F

  19. Genetic variation of human respiratory syncytial virus among children with fever and respiratory symptoms in Shanghai, China, from 2009 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Mu, Yonglin; Dong, Wei; Yao, Fujia; Wang, Lili; Yan, Huajie; Lan, Ke; Zhang, Chiyu

    2014-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) of genus Pneumovirus is one of the most common pathogens causing severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in infants and children. No information on the genotype distribution of HRSV is available in East China (e.g. Shanghai). From August 2009 to December 2012, 2407 nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from outpatient children with fever and respiratory symptoms in Shanghai. HRSV infection was determined using a multiplex RT-PCR assay. The second hypervariable region (HVR2) of G protein gene of HRSV was amplified and sequenced from HRSV positive samples. Genotypes were characterized by phylogenetic analyses. Of 2407 nasopharyngeal samples, 184 (7.6%) were tested as HRSV positive. From 160 positive subjects with sufficient nasopharyngeal samples, 69 HVR2 sequences were obtained by RT-PCR and sequencing. Three HRSV epidemic seasons were observed from August 2009 to December 2012, and an extreme outbreak of HRSV occurred in the 2009-2010 epidemic season. A genotype shift of predominant HRSV strains from B group in the 2009-2010 epidemic season to group A in the subsequent epidemic seasons was observed. Ten HRSV genotypes, including four group A genotypes NA1, NA3, NA4, and ON1, and six group B genotypes BA9, BA10, SAB4, CB1, BAc, and BA?, were detected in Shanghai. Seven genotypes (NA1, BA9-10, SAB4, CB1, BAc and BA?) were found in the 2009-2010 epidemic season. The co-circulation of multiple genotypes was associated with the extreme outbreak of HRSV among children with fever and respiratory symptoms in the 2009-2010 epidemic season.

  20. 牛呼吸道合胞体病毒检测方法研究进展%Progress on the Detection Methods for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洺扬; 王炜; 李真光; 董鹏; 胡桂学; 武华; 陈立志; 程世鹏; 冷雪

    2014-01-01

    牛呼吸道合胞体病毒是引起牛呼吸道疾病的主要病原之一。进行牛呼吸道合胞体病诊断时,首先通过临床症状观察以及病理剖检变化进行初诊,然后再进行实验室诊断。其实验室检测主要依赖于病原学诊断和血清学诊断,病原学诊断方法主要包括细胞分离培养鉴定、聚合酶链反应。血清学方法包括中和试验、免疫荧光试验、酶联免疫吸附试验等。近年来聚合酶链反应!酶联免疫吸附试验等方法得到快速发展,凭借其高效、快速、灵敏性高的特点成为牛呼吸道合胞体病毒检测的常用方法。牛呼吸道合胞体病在全球范围内流行,对各国养牛业造成极大危害。论文综述了牛呼吸道合胞体病毒检测方法的研究进展,为牛呼吸道合胞体病的诊断和预防提供参考。%Bovine respiratory syncytial virus is recognized as one of the crucial causes of bovine respiratory disease,which has a marked impact on the cattle industry and the dairy industry.Bovine respiratory syncy-tial virus is preliminarily diagnosed based on the clinical symptoms and pathological anatomy changes,and then through the laboratory tests.The laboratory tests of bovine respiratory syncytial virus mainly rely on etiology diagnosis and serological diagnosis.The methods for etiology diagnosis consists of cell-culture iso-lation techniques,polymerase chain reaction.And the serological methods consists of neutralization tests, immunofluorescence method,enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.For the past few years,the experimen-tal methods,such as polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were developed rapidly,and became the main methods for the diagnosis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus due to their high efficiency,rapidness and high sensitivity.The bovine respiratory syncytial disease has spread world-wide and impacted production and animal welfare in the cattle industry.The article

  1. Low CCR7-mediated migration of human monocyte derived dendritic cells in response to human respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Le Nouën

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV and, to a lesser extent, human metapneumovirus (HMPV and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3, can re-infect symptomatically throughout life without significant antigenic change, suggestive of incomplete or short-lived immunity. In contrast, re-infection by influenza A virus (IAV largely depends on antigenic change, suggestive of more complete immunity. Antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DC is critical in initiating the adaptive immune response. Antigen uptake by DC induces maturational changes that include decreased expression of the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 that maintain DC residence in peripheral tissues, and increased expression of CCR7 that mediates the migration of antigen-bearing DC to lymphatic tissue. We stimulated human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC with virus and found that, in contrast to HPIV3 and IAV, HMPV and HRSV did not efficiently decrease CCR1, 2, and 5 expression, and did not efficiently increase CCR7 expression. Consistent with the differences in CCR7 mRNA and protein expression, MDDC stimulated with HRSV or HMPV migrated less efficiently to the CCR7 ligand CCL19 than did IAV-stimulated MDDC. Using GFP-expressing recombinant virus, we showed that the subpopulation of MDDC that was robustly infected with HRSV was particularly inefficient in chemokine receptor modulation. HMPV- or HRSV-stimulated MDDC responded to secondary stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide or with a cocktail of proinflammatory cytokines by increasing CCR7 and decreasing CCR1, 2 and 5 expression, and by more efficient migration to CCL19, suggesting that HMPV and HRSV suboptimally stimulate rather than irreversibly inhibit MDDC migration. This also suggests that the low concentration of proinflammatory cytokines released from HRSV- and HMPV-stimulated MDDC is partly responsible for the low CCR7-mediated migration. We propose that inefficient migration of HRSV- and HMPV-stimulated DC to

  2. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison) with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison) caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been shown to augment infection with P....... aeruginosa in mice and to promote adhesion of P. aeruginosa to human respiratory cells. Findings We tested 50 lung specimens from mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia for bovine RSV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for human RSV by a commercial real-time PCR. RSV was not found...

  3. A community study of clinical traits and risk factors for human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection during the first year of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linstow, Michael Ernst Von; Hogh, M.; Nordbo, S.A.;

    2008-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are important respiratory pathogens with similar symptomatology. The aim of this prospective birth cohort study was to identify risk factors for an hMPV or RSV infection during the first year of life in unselected healthy children......% CI:0.09-0.85). Risk factors for RSV hospitalisation (n = 11) were: (1) older siblings (OR = 4.49; 95% CI: 1.08-18.73) and (2) smoking in the household (OR = 5.06; 95% CI: 1.36-18.76). Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 14 days of life protected against hospitalisation (OR = 0.21; 95% CI:0...

  4. Estimating the hospitalization burden associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in New York City, 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Edward; Greene, Sharon K; Olson, Donald R; Hanage, William P; Lipsitch, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Hospitalization burden associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is uncertain due to ambiguity in the inference methodologies employed for its estimation. Utilization of a new method to quantitate the above burden. Weekly hospitalization rates for several principal diagnoses from 2003 to 2011 in New York City by age group were regressed linearly against incidence proxies for the major influenza subtypes and RSV adjusting for temporal trends and seasonal baselines. Average annual rates of influenza-associated respiratory hospitalizations per 100 000 were estimated to be 129 [95% CI (79, 179)] for age <1, 36·3 (21·6, 51·4) for ages 1-4, 10·6 (7·5, 13·7) for ages 5-17, 25·6 (21·3, 29·8) for ages 18-49, 65·5 (54·0, 76·9) for ages 50-64, 125 (105, 147) for ages 65-74, and 288 (244, 331) for ages ≥75. Additionally, influenza had a significant contribution to hospitalization rates with a principal diagnosis of septicemia for ages 5-17 [0·76 (0·1, 1·4)], 18-49 [1·02 (0·3, 1·7)], 50-64 [4·0 (1·7, 6·3)], 65-74 [8·8 (2·2, 15·6)], and ≥75 [38·7 (25·7, 52·9)]. RSV had a significant contribution to the rates of respiratory hospitalizations for age <1 [1900 (1740, 2060)], ages 1-4 [117 (70, 167)], and ≥75 [175 (44, 312)] [including chronic lower respiratory disease, 90 (43, 140)] as well as pneumonia & influenza hospitalizations for ages 18-49 [6·2 (1·1, 11·3)] and circulatory hospitalizations for ages ≥75 [199 (13, 375)]. The high burden of RSV hospitalizations among young children and seniors age ≥75 suggests the need for additional control measures such as vaccination to mitigate the impact of annual RSV epidemics. Our estimates for influenza-associated hospitalizations provide further evidence of the burden of morbidity associated with influenza, supporting current guidelines regarding influenza vaccination and antiviral treatment. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus infection facilitates acute colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vrankrijker, Angélica M M; Wolfs, Tom F W; Ciofu, Oana;

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals and patients ventilated mechanically and is the major pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, in which it causes chronic infections. Epidemiological, in vitro and animal data suggest a role for respiratory ...

  6. Residues in human respiratory syncytial virus P protein that are essential for its activity on RNA viral synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Ana; Mendieta, Jesús; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Villanueva, Nieves

    2008-03-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) P protein, 241 amino acid long, is a structural homotetrameric phosphoprotein. Viral transcription and replication processes are dependent on functional P protein interactions inside viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs). Binding capacity to RNPs proteins and transcription and replication complementation analyses, using inactive P protein variants, have identified residues essential for functional interactions with itself, L, N and M2-1 proteins. P protein may establish some of these interactions as monomer, but efficient viral transcription and replication requires P protein oligomerization through the central region of the molecule. A structurally stable three-dimensional model has been generated in silico for this region (residues 98-158). Our analysis has indicated that P protein residues L135, D139, E140 and L142 are involved in homotetramerization. Additionally, the residues D136, S156, T160 and E179 appear to be essential for P protein activity on viral RNA synthesis and very high turnover phosphorylation at S143, T160 and T210 could regulate it. Thus, compounds targeted to those of these residues, located in the modeled three-dimensional structure, could have specific anti-HRSV effect.

  7. A respiratory syncytial virus replicon that is noncytotoxic and capable of long-term foreign gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykhina, Olga; Yednak, Mark A; Collins, Peter L; Olivo, Paul D; Peeples, Mark E

    2011-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of most cultured cell lines causes cell-cell fusion and death. Cell fusion is caused by the fusion (F) glycoprotein and is clearly cytopathic, but other aspects of RSV infection may also contribute to cytopathology. To investigate this possibility, we generated an RSV replicon that lacks all three of its glycoprotein genes and so cannot cause cell-cell fusion or virus spread. This replicon includes a green fluorescent protein gene and an antibiotic resistance gene to enable detection and selection of replicon-containing cells. Adaptive mutations in the RSV replicon were not required for replicon maintenance. Cells containing the replicon could be cloned and passaged many times in the absence of antibiotic selection, with 99% or more of the cells retaining the replicon after each cell division. Transient expression of the F and G (attachment) glycoproteins supported the production of virions that could transfer the replicon into most cell lines tested. Since the RSV replicon is not toxic to these cultured cells and does not affect their rate of cell division, none of the 8 internal viral proteins, the viral RNA transcripts, or the host response to these molecules or their activities is cytopathic. However, the level of replicon genome and gene expression is controlled in some manner well below that of complete virus and, as such, might avoid cytotoxicity. RSV replicons could be useful for cytoplasmic gene expression in vitro and in vivo and for screening for compounds active against the viral polymerase.

  8. Vaccination against respiratory syncytial virus in pregnancy: a suitable tool to combat global infant morbidity and mortality?

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    Saso, Anja; Kampmann, Beate

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important viral cause of pneumonia in early childhood (ie, younger than 2 years), responsible for high infant morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is widely accepted that an effective vaccine against RSV would have a major impact on child health globally. Despite the setbacks of the clinical trials in the 1960s, there has been a recent and significant revival of interest in vaccines against RSV, with several promising candidates undergoing evaluation. In this Review, we describe the epidemiological and immunological background to RSV infection and subsequently focus on the promising pipeline of RSV vaccine development. We discuss the potential for implementation of a safe and immunogenic RSV vaccine within the context of global health and with regards to a range of strategies, including vaccination of women during pregnancy, which is likely to emerge as a beneficial and feasible public health tool. This approach would provide interim protection to vulnerable, RSV-naive infants and other high risk groups, in which the burden of admission to hospital and death is greatest. Extending research and implementation from resource-rich to resource-poor settings is required to enhance our understanding of RSV immunity and inform vaccine development and delivery strategies for all settings. We summarise key outstanding issues for researchers and policy makers to understand the interplay of biological and non-biological factors affecting design and distribution of a successful RSV vaccine globally.

  9. Protective efficacy and immunogenicity of an adenoviral vector vaccine encoding the codon-optimized F protein of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, Rebekka; Schwannecke, Sarah; Tippler, Bettina; Ternette, Nicola; Temchura, Vladimir V; Tenbusch, Matthias; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) have received considerable attention for vaccine development because of their high immunogenicity and efficacy. In previous studies, it was shown that DNA immunization of mice with codon-optimized expression plasmids encoding the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) resulted in enhanced protection against RSV challenge compared to immunization with plasmids carrying the wild-type cDNA sequence of RSV F. In this study, we constructed AdV carrying the codon-optimized full-length RSV F gene (AdV-F) or the soluble form of the RSV F gene (AdV-Fsol). BALB/c mice were immunized twice with AdV-F or AdV-Fsol and challenged with RSV intranasally. Substantial levels of antibody to RSV F were induced by both AdV vaccines, with peak neutralizing-antibody titers of 1:900. Consistently, the viral loads in lung homogenates and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were significantly reduced by a factor of more than 60,000. The protection against viral challenge could be measured even 8 months after the booster immunization. AdV-F and AdV-Fsol induced similar levels of immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Therefore, these results encourage further development of AdV vaccines against RSV infection in humans.

  10. Protective Efficacy and Immunogenicity of an Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Encoding the Codon-Optimized F Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, Rebekka; Schwannecke, Sarah; Tippler, Bettina; Ternette, Nicola; Temchura, Vladimir V.; Tenbusch, Matthias; Überla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) have received considerable attention for vaccine development because of their high immunogenicity and efficacy. In previous studies, it was shown that DNA immunization of mice with codon-optimized expression plasmids encoding the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F) resulted in enhanced protection against RSV challenge compared to immunization with plasmids carrying the wild-type cDNA sequence of RSV F. In this study, we constructed AdV carrying the codon-optimized full-length RSV F gene (AdV-F) or the soluble form of the RSV F gene (AdV-Fsol). BALB/c mice were immunized twice with AdV-F or AdV-Fsol and challenged with RSV intranasally. Substantial levels of antibody to RSV F were induced by both AdV vaccines, with peak neutralizing-antibody titers of 1:900. Consistently, the viral loads in lung homogenates and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were significantly reduced by a factor of more than 60,000. The protection against viral challenge could be measured even 8 months after the booster immunization. AdV-F and AdV-Fsol induced similar levels of immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Therefore, these results encourage further development of AdV vaccines against RSV infection in humans. PMID:19776123

  11. Contribution of cysteine residues in the extracellular domain of the F protein of human respiratory syncytial virus to its function

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    Melero José A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mature F protein of all known isolates of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV contains fifteen absolutely conserved cysteine (C residues that are highly conserved among the F proteins of other pneumoviruses as well as the paramyxoviruses. To explore the contribution of the cysteines in the extracellular domain to the fusion activity of HRSV F protein, each cysteine was changed to serine. Mutation of cysteines 37, 313, 322, 333, 343, 358, 367, 393, 416, and 439 abolished or greatly reduced cell surface expression suggesting these residues are critical for proper protein folding and transport to the cell surface. As expected, the fusion activity of these mutations was greatly reduced or abolished. Mutation of cysteine residues 212, 382, and 422 had little to no effect upon cell surface expression or fusion activity at 32°C, 37°C, or 39.5°C. Mutation of C37 and C69 in the F2 subunit either abolished or reduced cell surface expression by 75% respectively. None of the mutations displayed a temperature sensitive phenotype.

  12. A novel inactivated intranasal respiratory syncytial virus vaccine promotes viral clearance without Th2 associated vaccine-enhanced disease.

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    Lindell, Dennis M; Morris, Susan B; White, Maria P; Kallal, Lara E; Lundy, Phillip K; Hamouda, Tarek; Baker, James R; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in young children worldwide, and no vaccine is currently available. Inactivated RSV vaccines tested in the 1960's led to vaccine-enhanced disease upon viral challenge, which has undermined RSV vaccine development. RSV infection is increasingly being recognized as an important pathogen in the elderly, as well as other individuals with compromised pulmonary immunity. A safe and effective inactivated RSV vaccine would be of tremendous therapeutic benefit to many of these populations. In these preclinical studies, a mouse model was utilized to assess the efficacy of a novel, nanoemulsion-adjuvanted, inactivated mucosal RSV vaccine. Our results demonstrate that NE-RSV immunization induced durable, RSV-specific humoral responses, both systemically and in the lungs. Vaccinated mice exhibited increased protection against subsequent live viral challenge, which was associated with an enhanced Th1/Th17 response. In these studies, NE-RSV vaccinated mice displayed no evidence of Th2 mediated immunopotentiation, as has been previously described for other inactivated RSV vaccines. These studies indicate that nanoemulsion-based inactivated RSV vaccination can augment viral-specific immunity, decrease mucus production and increase viral clearance, without evidence of Th2 immune mediated pathology.

  13. A Numerically Subdominant CD8 T Cell Response to Matrix Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Controls Infection with Limited Immunopathology.

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    Jie Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CD8 T cells are involved in pathogen clearance and infection-induced pathology in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection. Studying bulk responses masks the contribution of individual CD8 T cell subsets to protective immunity and immunopathology. In particular, the roles of subdominant responses that are potentially beneficial to the host are rarely appreciated when the focus is on magnitude instead of quality of response. Here, by evaluating CD8 T cell responses in CB6F1 hybrid mice, in which multiple epitopes are recognized, we found that a numerically subdominant CD8 T cell response against DbM187 epitope of the virus matrix protein expressed high avidity TCR and enhanced signaling pathways associated with CD8 T cell effector functions. Each DbM187 T effector cell lysed more infected targets on a per cell basis than the numerically dominant KdM282 T cells, and controlled virus replication more efficiently with less pulmonary inflammation and illness than the previously well-characterized KdM282 T cell response. Our data suggest that the clinical outcome of viral infections is determined by the integrated functional properties of a variety of responding CD8 T cells, and that the highest magnitude response may not necessarily be the best in terms of benefit to the host. Understanding how to induce highly efficient and functional T cells would inform strategies for designing vaccines intended to provide T cell-mediated immunity.

  14. A Preliminary Assessment of the Role of Ambient Nitric Oxide Exposure in Hospitalization with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis

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    Nuredin I. Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Some in vitro studies have indicated a possible link between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection and exposure to Nitric Oxide (NO. However, these studies used much higher NO concentrations than normally found in the ambient environment. This preliminary study explored whether an association was present with short-term exposure to NO in the environment. RSV-related admission data between November 2011 and February 2012 were obtained from Sheffield Children’s Hospital. The dates of admission were linked to contemporaneous ambient NO derived from sentinel air monitors. The case-crossover design was used to study the relationship between daily RSV admissions and NO, controlling for temperature and relative humidity. We found little evidence of association between daily RSV admission rates and exposure to ambient NO at different lags or average exposure across several lags. The findings should, however, be viewed with caution due to the low number of events observed during the time frame. It is possible that the apparent lack of association may be accounted for by the timing of the seasonal RSV epidemic in relation to peaks in NO concentrations. A larger study incorporating a wider range of RSV and NO peaks would determine whether said peaks enhanced the number of RSV hospitalizations in children.

  15. Kinetics of antibody-induced modulation of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in a human epithelial cell line

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    Gómez-Garcia Beatriz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of viral-specific antibodies to cell-surface antigens usually results in down modulation of the antigen through redistribution of antigens into patches that subsequently may be internalized by endocytosis or may form caps that can be expelled to the extracellular space. Here, by use of confocal-laser-scanning microscopy we investigated the kinetics of the modulation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV antigen by RSV-specific IgG. RSV-infected human epithelial cells (HEp-2 were incubated with anti-RSV polyclonal IgG and, at various incubation times, the RSV-cell-surface-antigen-antibody complexes (RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins were detected by indirect immunoflourescence. Results Interaction of anti-RSV polyclonal IgG with RSV HEp-2 infected cells induced relocalization and aggregation of viral glycoproteins in the plasma membrane formed patches that subsequently produced caps or were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis participation. Moreover, the concentration of cell surface RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins showed a time dependent cyclic variation and that anti-RSV IgG protected HEp-2 cells from viral-induced death. Conclusion The results from this study indicate that interaction between RSV cell surface proteins and specific viral antibodies alter the expression of viral antigens expressed on the cells surface and intracellular viral proteins; furthermore, interfere with viral induced destruction of the cell.

  16. Management of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis: 2015 Survey of Members of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases

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    Elliott J. Carande

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1995, the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases (ESPID carried out a survey of its members to assess the variation in management of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV bronchiolitis. The aim of the current study was to carry out a similar survey 20 years later to assess how the management had changed. An electronic, structured, English language survey, based on the United Kingdom National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE bronchiolitis draft guideline, was sent to ESPID members in March 2015. Questions asked included information on treatment practices of infants with bronchiolitis and doctor demographics. We received responses from 135 doctors (14% of the ESPID members who worked in 115 hospitals. 56% of the doctors used a written guideline to manage bronchiolitic infants. All doctors stated that they isolated individually or in cohorts all hospitalised bronchiolitis infants. The level of oxygen saturation suggested as an indication to administer supplemental oxygen varied between <89% and <95%. We found significant reductions in the use of ribavirin, bronchodilators, and corticosteroids from 1995 to 2015 (ribavirin 57% to 13%, P<0.0001; bronchodilators 95% to 82%, P=0.0024; corticosteroids 81% to 45%, P<0.0001. Although variability in management remains high, encouragingly significantly fewer doctors are prescribing ribavirin, bronchodilators, and corticosteroids compared to 20 years ago.

  17. Structural basis for immunization with postfusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion F glycoprotein (RSV F) to elicit high neutralizing antibody titers

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    Swanson, Kurt A.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Shaw, Christine A.; Dey, Antu K.; Rappuoli, Rino; Mandl, Christian W.; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Carfi, Andrea (Novartis)

    2012-02-07

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the main cause of infant bronchiolitis, remains a major unmet vaccine need despite more than 40 years of vaccine research. Vaccine candidates based on a chief RSV neutralization antigen, the fusion (F) glycoprotein, have foundered due to problems with stability, purity, reproducibility, and potency. Crystal structures of related parainfluenza F glycoproteins have revealed a large conformational change between the prefusion and postfusion states, suggesting that postfusion F antigens might not efficiently elicit neutralizing antibodies. We have generated a homogeneous, stable, and reproducible postfusion RSV F immunogen that elicits high titers of neutralizing antibodies in immunized animals. The 3.2-{angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of this substantially complete RSV F reveals important differences from homology-based structural models. Specifically, the RSV F crystal structure demonstrates the exposure of key neutralizing antibody binding sites on the surface of the postfusion RSV F trimer. This unanticipated structural feature explains the engineered RSV F antigen's efficiency as an immunogen. This work illustrates how structural-based antigen design can guide the rational optimization of candidate vaccine antigens.

  18. Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis, weather conditions and air pollution in an Italian urban area: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenna, Raffaella; Evangelisti, Melania; Frassanito, Antonella; Scagnolari, Carolina; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Antonelli, Guido; Nicolai, Ambra; Arima, Serena; Moretti, Corrado; Papoff, Paola; Villa, Maria Pia; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-10-01

    In this study we sought to evaluate the association between viral bronchiolitis, weather conditions, and air pollution in an urban area in Italy. We included infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis from 2004 to 2014. All infants underwent a nasal washing for virus detection. A regional agency network collected meteorological data (mean temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity) and the following air pollutants: sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, benzene and suspended particulate matter measuring less than 10µm (PM10) and less than 2.5µm (PM2.5) in aerodynamic diameter. We obtained mean weekly concentration data for the day of admission, from the urban background monitoring sites nearest to each child's home address. Overdispersed Poisson regression model was fitted and adjusted for seasonality of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, to evaluate the impact of individual characteristics and environmental factors on the probability of a being positive RSV. Of the 723 nasal washings from the infants enrolled, 266 (68%) contained RSV, 63 (16.1%) rhinovirus, 26 (6.6%) human bocavirus, 20 (5.1%) human metapneumovirus, and 16 (2.2%) other viruses. The number of RSV-positive infants correlated negatively with temperature (p bronchiolitis epidemics in an Italian urban area. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Structure of a Major Antigenic Site on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in Complex with Neutralizing Antibody 101F

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    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Chang, Jung-San; Yang, Yongping; Kim, Albert; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D. (NIH)

    2010-11-19

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and elderly people. Currently there is no effective vaccine against RSV, but passive prophylaxis with neutralizing antibodies reduces hospitalizations. To investigate the mechanism of antibody-mediated RSV neutralization, we undertook structure-function studies of monoclonal antibody 101F, which binds a linear epitope in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Crystal structures of the 101F antigen-binding fragment in complex with peptides from the fusion glycoprotein defined both the extent of the linear epitope and the interactions of residues that are mutated in antibody escape variants. The structure allowed for modeling of 101F in complex with trimers of the fusion glycoprotein, and the resulting models suggested that 101F may contact additional surfaces located outside the linear epitope. This hypothesis was supported by surface plasmon resonance experiments that demonstrated 101F bound the peptide epitope {approx}16,000-fold more weakly than the fusion glycoprotein. The modeling also showed no substantial clashes between 101F and the fusion glycoprotein in either the pre- or postfusion state, and cell-based assays indicated that 101F neutralization was not associated with blocking virus attachment. Collectively, these results provide a structural basis for RSV neutralization by antibodies that target a major antigenic site on the fusion glycoprotein.

  20. Design and characterization of epitope-scaffold immunogens that present the motavizumab epitope from respiratory syncytial virus.

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    McLellan, Jason S; Correia, Bruno E; Chen, Man; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S; Schief, William R; Kwong, Peter D

    2011-06-24

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, but an effective vaccine has not yet been developed. An ideal vaccine would elicit protective antibodies while avoiding virus-specific T-cell responses, which have been implicated in vaccine-enhanced disease with previous RSV vaccines. We propose that heterologous proteins designed to present RSV-neutralizing antibody epitopes and to elicit cognate antibodies have the potential to fulfill these vaccine requirements, as they can be fashioned to be free of viral T-cell epitopes. Here we present the design and characterization of three epitope-scaffolds that present the epitope of motavizumab, a potent neutralizing antibody that binds to a helix-loop-helix motif in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Two of the epitope-scaffolds could be purified, and one epitope-scaffold based on a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain bound motavizumab with kinetic and thermodynamic properties consistent with the free epitope-scaffold being stabilized in a conformation that closely resembled the motavizumab-bound state. This epitope-scaffold was well folded as assessed by circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry, and its crystal structure (determined in complex with motavizumab to 1.9 Å resolution) was similar to the computationally designed model, with all hydrogen-bond interactions critical for binding to motavizumab preserved. Immunization of mice with this epitope-scaffold failed to elicit neutralizing antibodies but did elicit sera with F binding activity. The elicitation of F binding antibodies suggests that some of the design criteria for eliciting protective antibodies without virus-specific T-cell responses are being met, but additional optimization of these novel immunogens is required. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus infection down-regulates antioxidant enzyme expression by triggering deacetylation-proteasomal degradation of Nrf2.

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    Komaravelli, Narayana; Tian, Bing; Ivanciuc, Teodora; Mautemps, Nicholas; Brasier, Allan R; Garofalo, Roberto P; Casola, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of viral acute respiratory tract infections and hospitalizations in children, for which no vaccine or treatment is available. RSV infection in cells, mice, and children leads to rapid generation of reactive oxygen species, which are associated with oxidative stress and lung damage, due to a significant decrease in the expression of airway antioxidant enzymes (AOEs). Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of RSV-induced lung disease, as antioxidants ameliorate clinical disease and inflammation in vivo. The aim of this study is to investigate the unknown mechanism(s) of virus-induced inhibition of AOE expression. RSV infection is shown to induce a progressive reduction in nuclear and total cellular levels of the transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), resulting in decreased binding to endogenous AOE gene promoters and decreased AOE expression. RSV induces Nrf2 deacetylation and degradation via the proteasome pathway in vitro and in vivo. Histone deacetylase and proteasome inhibitors block Nrf2 degradation and increase Nrf2 binding to AOE endogenous promoters, resulting in increased AOE expression. Known inducers of Nrf2 are able to increase Nrf2 activation and subsequent AOE expression during RSV infection in vitro and in vivo, with significant amelioration of oxidative stress. This is the first study to investigate the mechanism(s) of virus-induced inhibition of AOE expression. RSV-induced inhibition of Nrf2 activation, due to deacetylation and proteasomal degradation, could be targeted for therapeutic intervention aimed to increase airway antioxidant capacity during infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of an improved microneutralization assay for respiratory syncytial virus by automated plaque counting using imaging analysis

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    Quiroz Jorge

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children. Although several experimental RSV vaccines are under investigation, immuno therapy is the only treatment currently available. In assessing the immunogenicity of various vaccine formulations, a plaque reduction neutralization assay for the evaluation of RSV neutralizing antibody has been widely used. The method produces reliable results, but it is tedious and labor intensive as it relies on manual counting by laboratory personnel. To facilitate evaluation of phase II and phase III vaccine clinical trials, a more rapid, reliable and efficient neutralization assay is needed. Results An improved microneutralization assay for quantifying RSV neutralizing antibodies was developed using an ImmunoSpot® Series I Analyzer (Cellular Technology Ltd., Cleveland, OH for automated plaque counting. The method is an improvement of the established classical microneutralization assay in which immunostained plaques on transparent tissue culture plates are counted manually under a dissecting microscope. Image analyzer technology allows for fully automated counting of plaques distributed throughout an entire well. Adjustments, such as the use of opaque tissue culture plates and the TMB substrate, True Blue™ (KPL, Gaithersburg, MD, were required to adapt the assay for optimal detection of plaques by the image analyzer. The suitability and the accuracy of the method for counting RSV plaques were determined by comparative testing of a reference serum and two control sera by manual and automated counting methods. The results showed that the two methods were highly correlated (R = 0.9580 and the titers generated by them were within two-fold. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the semi-automated assay is rapid and reliable. It provides results within two fold to the classical plaque microneutralization assay and is readily

  3. Comparing Human Metapneumovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Viral Co-Detections, Genotypes and Risk Factors for Severe Disease

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    Moe, Nina; Krokstad, Sidsel; Stenseng, Inger Heimdal; Christensen, Andreas; Skanke, Lars Høsøien; Risnes, Kari Ravndal; Nordbø, Svein Arne; Døllner, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Background It is unclarified as to whether viral co-detection and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) genotypes relate to clinical manifestations in children with HMPV and lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), and if the clinical course and risk factors for severe LRTI differ between HMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Methods We prospectively enrolled hospitalized children aged <16 years with LRTI from 2006 to 2015. Children were clinically examined, and nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed using semi-quantitative, real-time polymerase chain reaction tests for HMPV, RSV and 17 other pathogens. HMPV-positive samples were genotyped. Results A total of 171 children had HMPV infection. HMPV-infected children with single virus (n = 106) and co-detections (n = 65) had similar clinical manifestations. No clinical differences were found between HMPV genotypes A (n = 67) and B (n = 80). The HMPV-infected children were older (median 17.2 months) than RSV-infected children (median 7.3 months, n = 859). Among single virus-infected children, no differences in age-adjusted LRTI diagnoses were found between HMPV and RSV. Age was an important factor for disease severity among single virus-infected children, where children <6 months old with HMPV had a milder disease than those with RSV, while in children 12–23 months old, the pattern was the opposite. In multivariable logistic regression analysis for each virus type, age ≥12 months (HMPV), and age <6 months (RSV), prematurity, ≥1 chronic disease and high viral loads of RSV, but not high HMPV viral loads, were risk factors for severe disease. Conclusions Among hospitalized children with LRTI, HMPV manifests independently of viral co-detections and HMPV genotypes. Disease severity in HMPV- and RSV-infected children varies in relation to age. A history of prematurity and chronic disease increases the risk of severe LRTI among HMPV- and RSV-infected children. PMID:28095451

  4. Vaccine Induced Herd Immunity for Control of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease in a Low-Income Country Setting.

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    Timothy M Kinyanjui

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is globally ubiquitous, and infection during the first six months of life is a major risk for severe disease and hospital admission; consequently RSV is the most important viral cause of respiratory morbidity and mortality in young children. Development of vaccines for young infants is complicated by the presence of maternal antibodies and immunological immaturity, but vaccines targeted at older children avoid these problems. Vaccine development for young infants has been unsuccessful, but this is not the case for older children (> 6 m. Would vaccinating older children have a significant public health impact? We developed a mathematical model to explore the benefits of a vaccine against RSV.We have used a deterministic age structured model capturing the key epidemiological characteristics of RSV and performed a statistical maximum-likelihood fit to age-specific hospitalization data from a developing country setting. To explore the effects of vaccination under different mixing assumptions, we included two versions of contact matrices: one from a social contact diary study, and the second a synthesised construction based on demographic data. Vaccination is assumed to elicit an immune response equivalent to primary infection. Our results show that immunisation of young children (5-10 m is likely to be a highly effective method of protection of infants (<6 m against hospitalisation. The majority benefit is derived from indirect protection (herd immunity. A full sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using Latin Hypercube Sampling of the parameter space shows that our results are robust to model structure and model parameters.This result suggests that vaccinating older infants and children against RSV can have a major public health benefit.

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants admitted to paediatric intensive care units in London, and in their families.

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    Crowcroft, N S; Zambon, M; Harrison, T G; Mok, Q; Heath, P; Miller, E

    2008-04-01

    We carried out a study in five London paediatric intensive care units (PICUs), with the objectives of describing a cohort of infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, comparing hospital diagnosis with PCR results and investigating the spread of RSV in families. Eligible infants were under 5 months old and admitted betweem November 1998 and October 1999 with respiratory failure, apnoea and/or bradycardia or acute life threatening episodes (ALTE). We diagnosed RSV by PCR analysis of nasopharyngeal aspirate, and in contacts by PCR of pernasal swabs. Of the 137 eligible infants, 66% (91/137) were recruited; of these, 82% (75/91) had RSV, with 47% (35/75) diagnosed by hospital laboratory tests and 93% (70/75) by PCR. The median duration of ventilation was 4.4 days, the length of stay on PICU, 8.6 days, and the length of stay in hospital, 15.9 days. In most families (62%), the parents and siblings developed symptoms of RSV infection at the same time as the infant. When the index infant was a secondary case, primary cases occurred in both older siblings (16 families) and adults (11 families). Silent RSV infection occurred frequently amongst children and adults. RSV is under-diagnosed in PICUs. PCR increases the rate of diagnosis of RSV compared to routine hospital diagnostic methods. Young infants are most often infected at the same time as or before their parents and siblings, indicating that the source may be outside the household; vaccinating family members may not prevent RSV infection in infants.

  6. Prospective validation of a prognostic model for respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in late preterm infants: a multicenter birth cohort study.

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    Maarten O Blanken

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to update and validate a prediction rule for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV hospitalization in preterm infants 33-35 weeks gestational age (WGA. STUDY DESIGN: The RISK study consisted of 2 multicenter prospective birth cohorts in 41 hospitals. Risk factors were assessed at birth among healthy preterm infants 33-35 WGA. All hospitalizations for respiratory tract infection were screened for proven RSV infection by immunofluorescence or polymerase chain reaction. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to update an existing prediction model in the derivation cohort (n = 1,227. In the validation cohort (n = 1,194, predicted versus actual RSV hospitalization rates were compared to determine validity of the model. RESULTS: RSV hospitalization risk in both cohorts was comparable (5.7% versus 4.9%. In the derivation cohort, a prediction rule to determine probability of RSV hospitalization was developed using 4 predictors: family atopy (OR 1.9; 95%CI, 1.1-3.2, birth period (OR 2.6; 1.6-4.2, breastfeeding (OR 1.7; 1.0-2.7 and siblings or daycare attendance (OR 4.7; 1.7-13.1. The model showed good discrimination (c-statistic 0.703; 0.64-0.76, 0.702 after bootstrapping. External validation showed good discrimination and calibration (c-statistic 0.678; 0.61-0.74. CONCLUSIONS: Our prospectively validated prediction rule identifies infants at increased RSV hospitalization risk, who may benefit from targeted preventive interventions. This prediction rule can facilitate country-specific, cost-effective use of RSV prophylaxis in late preterm infants.

  7. Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis in Infants Is Associated with Reduced Airway Interferon Gamma and Substance P

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    Semple, Malcolm G.; Dankert, Hinke M.; Ebrahimi, Bahram; Correia, Jailson B.; Booth, J. Angela; Stewart, James P.; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Hart, C. Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Background Severe human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) bronchiolitis in previously well infants may be due to differences in the innate immune response to hRSV infection. Aim: to determine if factors mediating proposed mechanisms for severe bronchiolitis differ with severity of disease. Methodology/Principle Findings 197 infants admitted to hospital with hRSV bronchiolitis were recruited and grouped according to no oxygen requirement (n = 27), oxygen dependence (n = 114) or mechanical ventilation (n = 56). We collected clinical data, nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and if ventilated bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), substance P (SP), interleukin 9 (IL-9), urea and hRSV load, were measured in cell free supernatant from NPA and BAL. Multivariate analysis compared independent effects of clinical, virological and immunological variables upon disease severity. IFN-γ and SP concentrations were lower in NPA from infants who required oxygen or mechanical ventilation. Viral load and IL-9 concentrations were high but did not vary with severity of disease. Independent predictors of severe disease (in diminishing size of effect) were low weight on admission, low gestation at birth, low NPA IFN-γ and NPA SP. Nasal airway sampling appears to be a useful surrogate for distal airway sampling since concentrations of IFN-γ, SP, IL-9 and viral load in NPA correlate with the same in BAL. Conclusions Our data support two proposed mechanisms for severe hRSV disease; reduced local IFN-γ response and SP mediated inflammation. We found large amounts of hRSV and IL-9 in airways secretions from the upper and lower respiratory tract but could not associate these with disease severity. PMID:17940602

  8. Immunogenicity and protective capacity of a virosomal respiratory syncytial virus vaccine adjuvanted with monophosphoryl lipid A in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kamphuis

    Full Text Available Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is a major cause of viral brochiolitis in infants and young children and is also a significant problem in elderly and immuno-compromised adults. To date there is no efficacious and safe RSV vaccine, partially because of the outcome of a clinical trial in the 1960s with a formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine (FI-RSV. This vaccine caused enhanced respiratory disease upon exposure to the live virus, leading to increased morbidity and the death of two children. Subsequent analyses of this incident showed that FI-RSV induces a Th2-skewed immune response together with poorly neutralizing antibodies. As a new approach, we used reconstituted RSV viral envelopes, i.e. virosomes, with incorporated monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA adjuvant to enhance immunogenicity and to skew the immune response towards a Th1 phenotype. Incorporation of MPLA stimulated the overall immunogenicity of the virosomes compared to non-adjuvanted virosomes in mice. Intramuscular administration of the vaccine led to the induction of RSV-specific IgG2a levels similar to those induced by inoculation of the animals with live RSV. These antibodies were able to neutralize RSV in vitro. Furthermore, MPLA-adjuvanted RSV virosomes induced high amounts of IFNγ and low amounts of IL5 in both spleens and lungs of immunized and subsequently challenged animals, compared to levels of these cytokines in animals vaccinated with FI-RSV, indicating a Th1-skewed response. Mice vaccinated with RSV-MPLA virosomes were protected from live RSV challenge, clearing the inoculated virus without showing signs of lung pathology. Taken together, these data demonstrate that RSV-MPLA virosomes represent a safe and efficacious vaccine candidate which warrants further evaluation.

  9. Design and Characterization of Epitope-Scaffold Immunogens That Present the Motavizumab Epitope from Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLellan, Jason S.; Correia, Bruno E.; Chen, Man; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Schief, William R.; Kwong, Peter D. (UWASH); (NIH)

    2012-06-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, but an effective vaccine has not yet been developed. An ideal vaccine would elicit protective antibodies while avoiding virus-specific T-cell responses, which have been implicated in vaccine-enhanced disease with previous RSV vaccines. We propose that heterologous proteins designed to present RSV-neutralizing antibody epitopes and to elicit cognate antibodies have the potential to fulfill these vaccine requirements, as they can be fashioned to be free of viral T-cell epitopes. Here we present the design and characterization of three epitope-scaffolds that present the epitope of motavizumab, a potent neutralizing antibody that binds to a helix-loop-helix motif in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Two of the epitope-scaffolds could be purified, and one epitope-scaffold based on a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain bound motavizumab with kinetic and thermodynamic properties consistent with the free epitope-scaffold being stabilized in a conformation that closely resembled the motavizumab-bound state. This epitope-scaffold was well folded as assessed by circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry, and its crystal structure (determined in complex with motavizumab to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution) was similar to the computationally designed model, with all hydrogen-bond interactions critical for binding to motavizumab preserved. Immunization of mice with this epitope-scaffold failed to elicit neutralizing antibodies but did elicit sera with F binding activity. The elicitation of F binding antibodies suggests that some of the design criteria for eliciting protective antibodies without virus-specific T-cell responses are being met, but additional optimization of these novel immunogens is required.

  10. Genetic diversity in the G protein gene of group A human respiratory syncytial viruses circulating in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almajhdi, Fahad N; Farrag, Mohamed A; Amer, Haitham M

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a frequent cause of hospitalization and mortality in children worldwide. The molecular epidemiology and circulation pattern of HRSV in Saudi Arabia is mostly uncharted. In the current study, the genetic variability and phylogenetic relationships of HRSV type A strains circulating in Riyadh Province were explored. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from hospitalized children with acute respiratory symptoms during the winter-spring seasons of 2007/08 and 2008/09. Among 175 samples analyzed, 39 (22.3 %) were positive for HRSV by one-step RT-PCR (59 % type A and 41 % type B). Propagation of positive samples in HEp-2 cells permitted the recovery of the first Saudi HRSV isolates. Genetic variability among Saudi HRSV-A strains was evaluated by sequence analysis of the complete attachment (G) protein gene. The nucleotide sequence was compared to representatives of the previously identified HRSV-A genotypes. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that the strains examined in this study were very closely related at both the nucleotide and amino acid level, and all of them are clustered in the GA2 genotype (and mostly belonged to the NA-1 subtype). A total of 23 mutation sites, 14 of which resulted in an amino acid change, were recorded only in Saudi strains. This is the first report on genetic diversity of HRSV-A strains in Saudi Arabia. Further analysis of strains on a geographical and temporal basis is needed to fully understand HRSV-A circulation patterns in Saudi Arabia.

  11. Epidemiology and Clinical Presentations of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Subgroups A and B Detected with Multiplex Real-Time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenkuan; Chen, Dehui; Tan, Weiping; Xu, Duo; Qiu, Shuyan; Zeng, Zhiqi; Li, Xiao; Zhou, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most important pathogenic infections of children and requires in-depth research worldwide, and especially in developing countries. We used a novel multiplex real-time PCR to test 5483 patients (≤ 14 years old) hospitalized with respiratory illness in Guangzhou, China, over a 3-year period. Of these patients, 729 were positive for RSV-A (51.2%, 373/729) or RSV-B (48.8%, 356/729), but none was infected with both viruses. Two seasonal peaks in total RSV were detected at the changes from winter to spring and from summer to autumn. RSV-B was dominant in 2013 and RSV-A in 2015, whereas RSV-A and RSV-B cocirculated in 2014. The clinical presentations of 645 RSV-positive patients were analyzed. Bronchiolitis, dyspnea, coryza, vomiting, poor appetite, and diarrhea occurred more frequently in RSV-A-positive than RSV-B-positive patients, whereas chill, headache, myalgia, debility, and rash etc. were more frequent in RSV-B-positive than RSV-A-positive patients, suggesting specific clinical characteristics for RSV-A and RSV-B. Coinfectons with other pathogens were common and diverse. Bronchiolitis, fever (≥ 38°C), and poor appetite were more frequent in patients with single RSV infections than in coinfected patients, suggesting the key pathogenic activity of RSV. Analysis of the relationships between the comparative viral load and clinical presentations showed significant differences in bronchiolitis, fever (≥ 38°C), and rash etc. among patients with different viral loads. This study provides a novel rapid method for detecting RSV subgroups, and provides new insights into the epidemiology and clinical implications of RSV. PMID:27764220

  12. Palivizumab prophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus disease in 2000-2001: results from The Palivizumab Outcomes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnes, Curt; Guillermin, Judith; Habersang, Rolf; Nicholes, Peggy; Chawla, Vijay; Kelly, Tammy; Fishbein, Judith; McRae, Patty; Goessler, Mary; Gatti, Antoinette; Calcagno, John A; Eki, Cheryl; Harris, Kristen A; Joyave, Joseph; McFarland, Kathy; Protter, Paul; Sullivan, Mary; Stanford, Allan; Lovett, Nancy; Ortiz, Marisol; Rojas, Sharon; Cyrus, Scott; Cyrus, Janell; Cohen, Stuart; Buchin, Debbie; Riordan, Linda; Zuniga, Monica; Shah, Rupa; Minard, Carmen; Quintin, Arden; Douglas, Glenda; van Houten, John; Freutner, Sharyn; Chartrand, Stephen; Nowatzke, Patsy; Romero, Jose; Rhodes, Torunn; Benoit, Michelle; Walter, Emmanuel; Walker, Leslie; DeBonnett, Laurie; Cross, Mia; Free, Teresa; Martin, Sharman; Shank, Karen; Guedes, Ben; Atkinson, Lee Ann; Halpin, George J; Rouse, Kathy; Hand, Ivan; Geiss, Donna; Marshall, James R; Burleson, Lois; Boland, Jim; Seybold, Kelsey; Hunter, Vicki; Unfer, Susan; Schmucker, Jackie; Gley, Margaret; Marcus, Michael; Thompson, Patricia; Milla, Paulino; Young, Connie; Zanni, Robert; Zinno, Virginia; Fetter-Zarzeka, Alexandra; Busey, Amanda; Sokunbi, Modupe A; Airington, Sherrie; Richard, Nancy; Muraligopal, Vellore; Lewis, Stephanie; Weber, F Thomas; Giordano, Beverly P; Linehan, Denise; Roach, Jane; Davis, Randle; Rzepka, Andrew A; Booth, Teri; Smeltzer, David; Walsh, Jeanne; Arispe, Emilio; Rowley, Rhonda; Bolling, Christopher; Botts, Tanya; Haskett, Kateri; Raby, Deana; Batiz, Evelyn; Gelfand, Andrew; Farrell, Lynn; Butler, Stephen; Colby, Linda; Schochet, Peter; Bentler, Julie; Hirsch, David; Wilkinson, Lisa; Aaronson, Allen; Bennett, Eleanora; Wingate, Julie; Quinn, Dawn; Komendowski, Katherine; Deckard, Marcia; Frogel, Michael; Nerwen, Cliff; Copenhaver, Steven; Prater, Michele; Wolsztein, Jacob; Mackey, Kristine; Benbow, Marshall; Naranjo, Marisela; Hensley, Sandra; Hayes, Cindy; Sadeghi, Hossein; Lawson, Sally May; McCall, Mark; Combs, Karla; Ledbetter, Joel; Sarnosky, Karen; Swafford, Cathy; Speer, Michael; Barton, Wendy J; Mink, J W; Lemm, Dianne; Hudak, Mark; Case, Elizabeth; Rowen, Judith; Fuentes, Sandra; Pane, Carly; Richardson, Leslie; Chavarria, Cesar; Cassino, Deanne; Ghaffari, Kourosh; Carroll, Carol; Lee, Haesoon; Guclu, Lydia; Johnson, Christopher; Blum, Valerie; Boron, Marnie L; Sorrentino, Mark; Hirsch, Robert L; Van Veldhuisen, Paul C; Smith, Carol

    2003-06-01

    The objective of the Registry was to characterize the population of infants receiving prophylaxis for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease by describing the patterns and scope of usage of palivizumab in a cross section of US infants. RSV hospitalization outcomes were also described. The Palivizumab (Synagis, MedImmune, Inc., 25 West Watkins Mill Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878) Outcomes Registry was a prospective multicenter survey conducted at 63 sites. Demographics, injection history, and RSV hospitalization outcomes were collected on 2,116 infants receiving palivizumab. Infants were enrolled in the Registry between September 1, 2000-March 1, 2001, at the time of their first injection. Infants born at less than 32 weeks of gestation accounted for 47% of infants enrolled, and those between 32-35 weeks accounted for 45%; approximately 8% were greater than 35 weeks of gestation. Lower RSV hospitalization rates were observed in infants who had greater adherence to regularly scheduled injections. Nearly one-half of all hospitalizations occurred within the first and second injection intervals, suggesting the importance of early RSV protection. The confirmed RSV hospitalization rate of all infants in the Registry was 2.9%; the rate was 5.8% in infants with chronic lung disease of infancy, and 2.1% in premature infants without chronic lung disease. In conclusion, these data support the continued effectiveness of palivizumab prophylaxis for severe RSV lower respiratory tract disease in a large cohort of high-risk infants from geographically diverse pediatric offices and clinics. The Palivizumab Outcomes Registry provides an opportunity to assess palivizumab utilization and clinical effectiveness in the US.

  13. Modulation of Host Immunity by Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Virulence Factors: A Synergic Inhibition of Both Innate and Adaptive Immunity

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    Gisela Canedo-Marroquín

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ARTIs and high rates of hospitalizations in children and in the elderly worldwide. Symptoms of hRSV infection include bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The lung pathology observed during hRSV infection is due in part to an exacerbated host immune response, characterized by immune cell infiltration to the lungs. HRSV is an enveloped virus, a member of the Pneumoviridae family, with a non-segmented genome and negative polarity-single RNA that contains 10 genes encoding for 11 proteins. These include the Fusion protein (F, the Glycoprotein (G, and the Small Hydrophobic (SH protein, which are located on the virus surface. In addition, the Nucleoprotein (N, Phosphoprotein (P large polymerase protein (L part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex, the M2-1 protein as a transcription elongation factor, the M2-2 protein as a regulator of viral transcription and (M protein all of which locate inside the virion. Apart from the structural proteins, the hRSV genome encodes for the non-structural 1 and 2 proteins (NS1 and NS2. HRSV has developed different strategies to evade the host immunity by means of the function of some of these proteins that work as virulence factors to improve the infection in the lung tissue. Also, hRSV NS-1 and NS-2 proteins have been shown to inhibit the activation of the type I interferon response. Furthermore, the hRSV nucleoprotein has been shown to inhibit the immunological synapsis between the dendritic cells and T cells during infection, resulting in an inefficient T cell activation. Here, we discuss the hRSV virulence factors and the host immunological features raised during infection with this virus.

  14. Novel respiratory syncytial virus (RSV genotype ON1 predominates in Germany during winter season 2012-13.

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    Julia Tabatabai

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading cause of hospitalization especially in young children with respiratory tract infections (RTI. Patterns of circulating RSV genotypes can provide a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of RSV infection. We retrospectively analyzed the genetic diversity of RSV infection in hospitalized children with acute RTI admitted to University Hospital Heidelberg/Germany between October 2012 and April 2013. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA were routinely obtained in 240 children younger than 2 years of age who presented with clinical symptoms of upper or lower RTI. We analyzed NPAs via PCR and sequence analysis of the second variable region of the RSV G gene coding for the attachment glycoprotein. We obtained medical records reviewing routine clinical data. RSV was detected in 134/240 children. In RSV-positive patients the most common diagnosis was bronchitis/bronchiolitis (75.4%. The mean duration of hospitalization was longer in RSV-positive compared to RSV-negative patients (3.5 vs. 5.1 days; p<0.01. RSV-A was detected in 82.1%, RSV-B in 17.9% of all samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 112 isolates revealed that the majority of RSV-A strains (65% belonged to the novel ON1 genotype containing a 72-nucleotide duplication. However, genotype ON1 was not associated with a more severe course of illness when taking basic clinical/laboratory parameters into account. Molecular characterization of RSV confirms the co-circulation of multiple genotypes of subtype RSV-A and RSV-B. The duplication in the G gene of genotype ON1 might have an effect on the rapid spread of this emerging RSV strain.

  15. Whole genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of human respiratory syncytial virus A and B from Milwaukee, WI 1998-2010.

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    Cecilia Rebuffo-Scheer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the leading cause of lower respiratory-tract infections in infants and young children worldwide. Despite this, only six complete genome sequences of original strains have been previously published, the most recent of which dates back 35 and 26 years for RSV group A and group B respectively. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a semi-automated sequencing method allowing for the sequencing of four RSV whole genomes simultaneously. We were able to sequence the complete coding sequences of 13 RSV A and 4 RSV B strains from Milwaukee collected from 1998-2010. Another 12 RSV A and 5 RSV B strains sequenced in this study cover the majority of the genome. All RSV A and RSV B sequences were analyzed by neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and Bayesian phylogeny methods. Genetic diversity was high among RSV A viruses in Milwaukee including the circulation of multiple genotypes (GA1, GA2, GA5, GA7 with GA2 persisting throughout the 13 years of the study. However, RSV B genomes showed little variation with all belonging to the BA genotype. For RSV A, the same evolutionary patterns and clades were seen consistently across the whole genome including all intergenic, coding, and non-coding regions sequences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The sequencing strategy presented in this work allows for RSV A and B genomes to be sequenced simultaneously in two working days and with a low cost. We have significantly increased the amount of genomic data that is available for both RSV A and B, providing the basic molecular characteristics of RSV strains circulating in Milwaukee over the last 13 years. This information can be used for comparative analysis with strains circulating in other communities around the world which should also help with the development of new strategies for control of RSV, specifically vaccine development and improvement of RSV diagnostics.

  16. Study of montelukast for the treatment of respiratory symptoms of post-respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Flores-Nunez, Alejandro; Goh, Anne

    2008-01-01

    (RSV) bronchiolitic respiratory symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of montelukast, 4 and 8 mg, in treating recurrent respiratory symptoms of post-RSV bronchiolitis in children in a large, multicenter study. METHODS: This was a double-blind study of 3- to 24-month-old children who...... had been hospitalized for a first or second episode of physician-diagnosed RSV bronchiolitis and who tested positive for RSV. Patients (n = 979) were randomized to placebo or to montelukast at 4 or 8 mg/day for 4 weeks (period I) and 20 weeks (period II). The primary end point was percentage symptom.......7 (0.0, 11.3) for montelukast (4 mg) minus placebo and 5.9 (0.1, 11.7) for montelukast (8 mg) minus placebo. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, montelukast did not improve respiratory symptoms of post-RSV bronchiolitis in children....

  17. Water extract of Pueraria lobata Ohwi has anti-viral activity against human respiratory syncytial virus in human respiratory tract cell lines

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    Tzeng-Jih Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV infects all age groups and causes bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome with a significant mortality rate. To date, only ribavirin has been used to manage HRSV infection. However, ribavirin is expensive with an only modest effect. Furthermore, ribavirin has several side effects, which means it has limited clinical benefit. Pueraria lobata Ohwi (P. lobata is a common ingredient of Ge-Gen-Tang (Kakkon-to and Sheng-Ma-Ge-Gen-Tang (Shoma-kakkon-to, which are prescriptions of Chinese traditional medicine proven to have antiviral activity against HRSV. Therefore, it was hypothesized that P. lobata might be effective against HRSV. To find a cost-effective therapeutic modality, both human upper (HEp-2 and lower (A549 respiratory tract cell lines were used to test the hypothesis that P. lobata could inhibit HRSV-induced plaque formation. Results showed that the water extract of P. lobata was effective (p < 0.0001 against HRSV-induced plaque formation. P. lobata was more effective when given prior to viral inoculation (p < 0.0001 by inhibiting viral attachment (p < 0.0001 and penetration (p < 0.0001. However, supplementation with P. lobata could not stimulate interferon secretion after HRSV infection. In conclusion, P. lobata has antiviral activity against HRSV-induced plaque formation in airway mucosa mainly by inhibiting viral attachment and internalization. Further identification of effective constituents could contribute to the prevention of HRSV infection.

  18. Respiratory Commensal Bacteria Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum Improves Resistance of Infant Mice to Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae Superinfection

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    Paulraj Kanmani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum is a Gram-positive bacterium found as a member of the normal microbiota of the upper respiratory tract. It was suggested that C. pseudodiphtheriticum may be potentially used as a next-generation probiotic for nasal application, although no deep studies were performed in this regard. We hypothesized that human isolate C. pseudodiphtheriticum strain 090104 is able to modulate the respiratory innate immune response and beneficially influence the resistance to viral and bacterial infections. Therefore, in the present study we investigated how the exposure of infant mice to nasal priming with viable or non-viable C. pseudodiphtheriticum 090104 influences the respiratory innate immune response triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR-3 activation, the susceptibility to primary Respiratory Synsytial Virus (RSV infection, and the resistance to secondary Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. We demonstrated that the nasal priming with viable C. pseudodiphtheriticum 090104 differentially modulated TLR3-mediated innate antiviral immune response in the respiratory tract of infant mice, improving their resistance to primary RSV infection, and secondary pneumococcal pneumonia. In association with the protection against RSV-pneumococcal superinfection, we found that viable C. pseudodiphtheriticum improved lung CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+, and CD3+CD4+IL-10+ T cells as well as CD11c+SiglecF+IFN-β+ alveolar macrophages. Of interest, non-viable bacteria did not have the same protective effect, suggesting that C. pseudodiphtheriticum colonization is needed for achieving its protective effect. In conclusion, we present evidence that nasal application of viable C. pseudodiphtheriticum could be thought as an alternative to boost defenses against RSV and secondary pneumococcal pneumonia, which should be further studied and validated in clinical trials. Due to the absence of a long-lasting immunity, re-infection with RSV throughout life is common

  19. Broadly Reactive Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus G Antibodies from Exposed Individuals Effectively Inhibit Infection of Primary Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortjens, B; Yasuda, E; Yu, X; Wagner, K; Claassen, Y B; Bakker, A Q; van Woensel, J B M; Beaumont, T

    2017-05-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe respiratory disease in young children. Antibodies specific for the RSV prefusion F protein have guided RSV vaccine research, and in human serum, these antibodies contribute to >90% of the neutralization response; however, detailed insight into the composition of the human B cell repertoire against RSV is still largely unknown. In order to study the B cell repertoire of three healthy donors for specificity against RSV, CD27(+) memory B cells were isolated and immortalized using BCL6 and Bcl-xL. Of the circulating memory B cells, 0.35% recognized RSV-A2-infected cells, of which 59% were IgA-expressing cells and 41% were IgG-expressing cells. When we generated monoclonal B cells selected for high binding to RSV-infected cells, 44.5% of IgG-expressing B cells and 56% of IgA-expressing B cells reacted to the F protein, while, unexpectedly, 41.5% of IgG-expressing B cells and 44% of IgA expressing B cells reacted to the G protein. Analysis of the G-specific antibodies revealed that 4 different domains on the G protein were recognized. These epitopes predicted cross-reactivity between RSV strain A (RSV-A) and RSV-B and matched the potency of antibodies to neutralize RSV in HEp-2 cells and in primary epithelial cell cultures. G-specific antibodies were also able to induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis of RSV-A2-infected cells. However, these processes did not seem to depend on a specific epitope. In conclusion, healthy adults harbor a diverse repertoire of RSV glycoprotein-specific antibodies with a broad range of effector functions that likely play an important role in antiviral immunity.IMPORTANCE Human RSV remains the most common cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease in premature babies, young infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients and plays an important role in asthma exacerbations. In developing countries, RSV lower respiratory tract disease

  20. The synthetic bacterial lipopeptide Pam3CSK4 modulates respiratory syncytial virus infection independent of TLR activation.

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    D Tien Nguyen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is an important cause of acute respiratory disease in infants, immunocompromised subjects and the elderly. However, it is unclear why most primary RSV infections are associated with relatively mild symptoms, whereas some result in severe lower respiratory tract infections and bronchiolitis. Since RSV hospitalization has been associated with respiratory bacterial co-infections, we have tested if bacterial Toll-like receptor (TLR agonists influence RSV-A2-GFP infection in human primary cells or cell lines. The synthetic bacterial lipopeptide Pam3-Cys-Ser-Lys4 (Pam3CSK4, the prototype ligand for the heterodimeric TLR1/TLR2 complex, enhanced RSV infection in primary epithelial, myeloid and lymphoid cells. Surprisingly, enhancement was optimal when lipopeptides and virus were added simultaneously, whereas addition of Pam3CSK4 immediately after infection had no effect. We have identified two structurally related lipopeptides without TLR-signaling capacity that also modulate RSV infection, whereas Pam3CSK4-reminiscent TLR1/2 agonists did not, and conclude that modulation of infection is independent of TLR activation. A similar TLR-independent enhancement of infection could also be demonstrated for wild-type RSV strains, and for HIV-1, measles virus and human metapneumovirus. We show that the effect of Pam3CSK4 is primarily mediated by enhanced binding of RSV to its target cells. The N-palmitoylated cysteine and the cationic lysines were identified as pivotal for enhanced virus binding. Surprisingly, we observed inhibition of RSV infection in immortalized epithelial cell lines, which was shown to be related to interactions between Pam3CSK4 and negatively charged glycosaminoglycans on these cells, which are known targets for binding of laboratory-adapted but not wild-type RSV. These data suggest a potential role for bacterial lipopeptides in enhanced binding of RSV and other viruses to their target cells, thus affecting

  1. Risk factors for admission and the role of respiratory syncytial virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Respiratory illnesses account for an estimated 4 million deaths each year ... CD23 + B cells, immunoglobulin E (IgE) and RSV-specific IL4 responses ..... Allergy. Clin Immunol1998; 102: 618-620. 12. Adcock PM, Sanders CL, Marshall GS.

  2. Proteomic analysis of mitochondria in respiratory epithelial cells infected with human respiratory syncytial virus and functional implications for virus and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Diane C; Howell, Gareth; Barr, John N; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterise the mitochondrial proteome of airway epithelial cells infected with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV), a major cause of paediatric illness. Quantitative proteomics, underpinned by stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture, coupled to LC-MS/MS, was applied to mitochondrial fractions prepared from HRSV-infected and mock-infected cells 12 and 24 h post-infection. Datasets were analysed using ingenuity pathway analysis, and the results were validated and characterised using bioimaging, targeted inhibition and gene depletion. The data quantitatively indicated that antiviral signalling proteins converged on mitochondria during HRSV infection. The mitochondrial receptor protein Tom70 was found to act in an antiviral manner, while its chaperone, Hsp90, was confirmed to be a positive viral factor. Proteins associated with different organelles were also co-enriched in the mitochondrial fractions from HRSV-infected cells, suggesting that alterations in organelle dynamics and membrane associations occur during virus infection. Protein and pathway-specific alterations occur to the mitochondrial proteome in a spatial and temporal manner during HRSV infection, suggesting that this organelle may have altered functions. These could be targeted as part of potential therapeutic strategies to disrupt virus biology. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Whole blood gene expression profiles to assess pathogenesis and disease severity in infants with respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuncion Mejias

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading cause of viral lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI and hospitalization in infants. Mostly because of the incomplete understanding of the disease pathogenesis, there is no licensed vaccine, and treatment remains symptomatic. We analyzed whole blood transcriptional profiles to characterize the global host immune response to acute RSV LRTI in infants, to characterize its specificity compared with influenza and human rhinovirus (HRV LRTI, and to identify biomarkers that can objectively assess RSV disease severity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This was a prospective observational study over six respiratory seasons including a cohort of infants hospitalized with RSV (n = 135, HRV (n = 30, and influenza (n = 16 LRTI, and healthy age- and sex-matched controls (n = 39. A specific RSV transcriptional profile was identified in whole blood (training cohort, n = 45 infants; Dallas, Texas, US and validated in three different cohorts (test cohort, n = 46, Dallas, Texas, US; validation cohort A, n = 16, Turku, Finland; validation cohort B, n = 28, Columbus, Ohio, US with high sensitivity (94% [95% CI 87%-98%] and specificity (98% [95% CI 88%-99%]. It classified infants with RSV LRTI versus HRV or influenza LRTI with 95% accuracy. The immune dysregulation induced by RSV (overexpression of neutrophil, inflammation, and interferon genes, and suppression of T and B cell genes persisted beyond the acute disease, and immune dysregulation was greatly impaired in younger infants (<6 mo. We identified a genomic score that significantly correlated with outcomes of care including a clinical disease severity score and, more importantly, length of hospitalization and duration of supplemental O2. CONCLUSIONS: Blood RNA profiles of infants with RSV LRTI allow specific diagnosis, better understanding of disease pathogenesis, and assessment of disease severity. This study opens new avenues

  4. Corticosteroid use as adjunct therapy for respiratory syncytial virus infection in adult allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damlaj, M; Bartoo, G; Cartin-Ceba, R; Gijima, D; Alkhateeb, H B; Merten, J; Hashmi, S; Litzow, M; Gastineau, D; Hogan, W; Patnaik, M M

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection causes significant morbidity and mortality in allogeneic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT) recipients. Although ribavirin and immunoglobulins are common components of therapy, the role of adjunct corticosteroids is not established. We sought to evaluate corticosteroid utilization in the setting of post-allo-SCT RSV infection in our center and assess post-transplant outcomes including pulmonary function decline. Patients with a history of RSV infection from 2008 to 2014 seen at our institution were identified. Treatment and outcome data were retrospectively collected. Forced expiratory volume at 1 s (FEV1) and carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DLCO) were collected pre- and post-RSV infection. During the observation period, RSV was isolated in 53 of 552 patients undergoing allo-SCT (10%) and 45 had evaluable therapy data. RSV-related mortality in this cohort was 4/45 (9%). Twenty-one (47%) were on corticosteroids prior to RSV diagnosis, of whom 11 (24%) had a dose increase post symptom onset. Eight (18%) patients were started on corticosteroids at the time of RSV infection. Corticosteroid therapy at symptom onset was associated with a higher rate of upper respiratory infection (URTI) to lower respiratory infection (LRTI) progression risk ratio (RR) 2.49 (1.21-5.13; P = 0.016), hospital admission RR 2.05 (1.24-3.37; P = 0.005), or intensive care unit admission RR 2.91 (1.89-5.01; P = 0.002). No significant difference was seen with FEV1 and DLCO decline (P = 0.3 and 0.24, respectively) or mortality (P = 0.26). Adjunct corticosteroid use in the setting of RSV infection did not improve RSV-related outcomes including long-term pulmonary function. Our results do not support the routine use of corticosteroids; however, this finding does need to be verified in a larger cohort of patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Global burden of acute lower respiratory infections due to respiratory syncytial virus in young children: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Harish; Nokes, D James; Gessner, Bradford D; Dherani, Mukesh; Madhi, Shabir A; Singleton, Rosalyn J; O'Brien, Katherine L; Roca, Anna; Wright, Peter F; Bruce, Nigel; Chandran, Aruna; Theodoratou, Evropi; Sutanto, Agustinus; Sedyaningsih, Endang R; Ngama, Mwanajuma; Munywoki, Patrick K; Kartasasmita, Cissy; Simões, Eric AF; Rudan, Igor; Weber, Martin W; Campbell, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background The global burden of disease attributable to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains unknown. We aimed to estimate the global incidence of and mortality from episodes of acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) due to RSV in children younger than 5 years in 2005. Methods We estimated the incidence of RSV-associated ALRI in children younger than 5 years, stratified by age, using data from a systematic review of studies published between January, 1995, and June, 2009, and ten unpublished population-based studies. We estimated possible boundaries for RSV-associated ALRI mortality by combining case fatality ratios with incidence estimates from hospital-based reports from published and unpublished studies and identifying studies with population-based data for RSV seasonality and monthly ALRI mortality. Findings In 2005, an estimated 33·8 (95% CI 19·3–46·2) million new episodes of RSV-associated ALRI occurred worldwide in children younger than 5 years (22% of ALRI episodes), with at least 3·4 (2·8–4·3) million episodes representing severe RSV-associated ALRI necessitating hospital admission. We estimated that 66 000–199 000 children younger than 5 years died from RSV-associated ALRI in 2005, with 99% of these deaths occurring in developing countries. Incidence and mortality can vary substantially from year to year in any one setting. Interpretation Globally, RSV is the most common cause of childhood ALRI and a major cause of admission to hospital as a result of severe ALRI. Mortality data suggest that RSV is an important cause of death in childhood from ALRI, after pneumococcal pneumonia and Haemophilus influenzae type b. The development of novel prevention and treatment strategies should be accelerated as a priority. Funding WHO; Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. PMID:20399493

  6. Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate Immunity via Interferon Beta and Indoleamine-2,3-Dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Michael B.; Sampayo-Escobar, Viviana; Green, Ryan; Moore, Martin L.; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been reported to infect human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) but the consequences are poorly understood. MSCs are present in nearly every organ including the nasal mucosa and the lung and play a role in regulating immune responses and mediating tissue repair. We sought to determine whether RSV infection of MSCs enhances their immune regulatory functions and contributes to RSV-associated lung disease. RSV was shown to replicate in human MSCs by fluorescence microscopy, plaque assay, and expression of RSV transcripts. RSV-infected MSCs showed differentially altered expression of cytokines and chemokines such as IL-1β, IL6, IL-8 and SDF-1 compared to epithelial cells. Notably, RSV-infected MSCs exhibited significantly increased expression of IFN-β (~100-fold) and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) (~70-fold) than in mock-infected MSCs. IDO was identified in cytosolic protein of infected cells by Western blots and enzymatic activity was detected by tryptophan catabolism assay. Treatment of PBMCs with culture supernatants from RSV-infected MSCs reduced their proliferation in a dose dependent manner. This effect on PBMC activation was reversed by treatment of MSCs with the IDO inhibitors 1-methyltryptophan and vitamin K3 during RSV infection, a result we confirmed by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of IDO in MSCs. Neutralizing IFN-β prevented IDO expression and activity. Treatment of MSCs with an endosomal TLR inhibitor, as well as a specific inhibitor of the TLR3/dsRNA complex, prevented IFN-β and IDO expression. Together, these results suggest that RSV infection of MSCs alters their immune regulatory function by upregulating IFN-β and IDO, affecting immune cell proliferation, which may account for the lack of protective RSV immunity and for chronicity of RSV-associated lung diseases such as asthma and COPD. PMID:27695127

  7. Profilin is required for viral morphogenesis, syncytium formation, and cell-specific stress fiber induction by respiratory syncytial virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is required for the gene expression and morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, a clinically important Pneumovirus of the Paramyxoviridae family. In HEp-2 cells, RSV infection also induces actin stress fibers, which may be important in the immunopathology of the RSV disease. Profilin, a major regulator of actin polymerization, stimulates viral transcription in vitro. Thus, we tested the role of profilin in RSV growth and RSV-actin interactions in cultured cells (ex vivo. Results We tested three cell lines: HEp-2 (human, A549 (human, and L2 (rat. In all three, RSV grew well and produced fused cells (syncytium, and two RSV proteins, namely, the phosphoprotein P and the nucleocapsid protein N, associated with profilin. In contrast, induction of actin stress fibers by RSV occurred in HEp-2 and L2 cells, but not in A549. Knockdown of profilin by RNA interference had a small effect on viral macromolecule synthesis but strongly inhibited maturation of progeny virions, cell fusion, and induction of stress fibers. Conclusions Profilin plays a cardinal role in RSV-mediated cell fusion and viral maturation. In contrast, interaction of profilin with the viral transcriptional proteins P and N may only nominally activate viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Stress fiber formation is a cell-specific response to infection, requiring profilin and perhaps other signaling molecules that are absent in certain cell lines. Stress fibers per se play no role in RSV replication in cell culture. Clearly, the cellular architecture controls multiple steps of host-RSV interaction, some of which are regulated by profilin.

  8. Cellular and antibody response to respiratory syncytial (RS) virus in human colostrum, maternal blood, and cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R; Scott, M; Toms, G L

    1981-01-01

    Samples of colostrum, maternal blood, and cord blood from a group of 21 women were examined for the presence of cellular reactivity to respiratory syncytial (RS) virus using a transformation assay and for the level of specific IgA, and IgG, and IgM antibodies to RS virus by membrane immunofluorescence. Six of the 18 colostral cell cultures and six of the 16 maternal blood cultures gave a significant proliferative response to RS virus antigen, although a positive response in both local and systemic cell cultures was found in only one another. In addition, one of 18 samples of cord blood gave a proliferative response to RS virus antigen. Detectable titres of IgA antibodies to RS virus were found in 15 of the 20 samples of colostral whey and in 13 of the 17 samples of maternal plasma examined. RS virus-specific IgG antibodies were detected in 10 of 20 colostral whey samples and in all samples of maternal cord plasma. In this study, it was not possible to demonstrate a relationship between a positive proliferative response of colostral cell cultures to RS virus and the level of specific IgA and IgG antibodies in colostral whey. Similarly, the proliferative response of material blood cultures was unrelated to the titre of specific IgA or IgG antibodies in maternal plasma. The relevance of the local cellular proliferative response to RS virus in colostral cell cultures to the protection afforded by breast-feeding is discussed.

  9. Human respiratory syncytial virus nucleoprotein and inclusion bodies antagonize the innate immune response mediated by MDA5 and MAVS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifland, Aaron W; Jung, Jeenah; Alonas, Eric; Zurla, Chiara; Crowe, James E; Santangelo, Philip J

    2012-08-01

    Currently, the spatial distribution of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) proteins and RNAs in infected cells is still under investigation, with many unanswered questions regarding the interaction of virus-induced structures and the innate immune system. Very few studies of hRSV have used subcellular imaging as a means to explore the changes in localization of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors or the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein, in response to the infection and formation of viral structures. In this investigation, we found that both RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) colocalized with viral genomic RNA and the nucleoprotein (N) as early as 6 h postinfection (hpi). By 12 hpi, MDA5 and MAVS were observed within large viral inclusion bodies (IB). We used a proximity ligation assay (PLA) and determined that the N protein was in close proximity to MDA5 and MAVS in IBs throughout the course of the infection. Similar results were found with the transient coexpression of N and the phosphoprotein (P). Additionally, we demonstrated that the localization of MDA5 and MAVS in IBs inhibited the expression of interferon β mRNA 27-fold following Newcastle disease virus infection. From these data, we concluded that the N likely interacts with MDA5, is in close proximity to MAVS, and localizes these molecules within IBs in order to attenuate the interferon response. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a specific function for hRSV IBs and of the hRSV N protein as a modulator of the innate immune response.

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization risk in the second year of life by specific congenital heart disease diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah; Fryzek, Jon; Jiang, Xiaohui; Bloomfield, Adam; Ambrose, Christopher S.; Wong, Pierre C.

    2017-01-01

    Children with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease (CHD) are at elevated risk of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease compared to their healthy peers. Previous studies have demonstrated lower RSV hospitalization risk among all children with CHD at 12–23 months of age versus 0–11 months of age. However, RSV hospitalization risk at 12–23 months of age by specific CHD diagnosis has not been characterized. Both case-control and cohort studies were conducted using data from the US National Inpatient Sample from 1997 to 2013 to characterize relative risk of RSV hospitalization among children 12–23 months of age with CHD. Related CHD diagnoses were combined for analysis. Hospitalizations for RSV and unspecified bronchiolitis were described by length of stay, mechanical ventilation use, mortality, and total charges. Over the 17-year period, 1,168,886 live birth hospitalizations with CHD were identified. Multiple specific CHD conditions had an elevated odds ratio or relative risk of RSV hospitalization. Mean total RSV hospitalization charges were significantly higher among children with CHD relative to those without CHD ($19,650 vs $7,939 in 2015 dollars) for this period. Compared to children without CHD, children with Ebstein’s anomaly, transposition of the great arteries, aortic stenosis, heterotaxia, and aortic arch anomalies had 367-, 344-, 203-, 117- and 47-fold increased risk of inpatient RSV mortality, respectively. Unspecified bronchiolitis hospitalization odds and relative risk across CHD diagnoses were similar to those observed with RSV hospitalization; however, unspecified bronchiolitis hospitalizations were associated with shorter mean days of stay and less frequently associated with mechanical ventilation or mortality. Among children with more severe CHD diagnoses, RSV disease remains an important health risk through the second year of life. These data can help inform decisions regarding

  11. Transforming Growth Factor Beta Is a Major Regulator of Human Neonatal Immune Responses following Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburg, Natalie J.; Shepherd, Bryan; Crowe, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have suggested that T-cell responses may contribute to RSV immunopathology, which could be driven by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are productively infected by RSV, and during RSV infections, there is an increase of DCs in the lungs with a decrease in the blood. Pediatric populations are particularly susceptible to severe RSV infections; however, DC responses to RSV from pediatric populations have not been examined. In this study, primary isolated DCs from cord blood and adult peripheral blood were compared after RSV infection. Transcriptional profiling and biological network analysis identified transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and associated signaling molecules as differentially regulated in the two age groups. TGF-β1 was decreased in RSV-infected adult-blood DCs but increased in RSV-infected cord blood DCs. Coculture of adult RSV-infected DCs with autologous T cells induced secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin 12p70 (IL-12p70), IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Conversely, coculture of cord RSV-infected DCs and autologous T cells induced secretion of IL-4, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-17. Addition of purified TGF-β1 to adult DC-T-cell cocultures reduced secretion of IFN-γ, IL-12p70, IL-2, and TNF-α, while addition of a TGF-β chemical inhibitor to cord DC-T-cell cocultures increased secretion of IL-12p70. These data suggest that TGF-β acts as a major regulator of RSV DC-T-cell responses, which could contribute to immunopathology during infancy. PMID:20926560

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus: a systematic scientometric analysis of the global publication output and the gender distribution of publishing authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Köster, Corinna; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Bauer, Jan; Ohlendorf, Daniela; Bundschuh, Matthias; Groneberg, David A

    2017-07-26

    Worldwide, the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) represents the predominant viral agent causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children. To conduct research and tackle existing healthcare disparities, RSV-related research activities around the globe need to be described. Hence, we assessed the associated scientific output (represented by research articles) by geographical, chronological and socioeconomic criteria and analysed the authors publishing in the field by gender. Also, the 15 most cited articles and the most prolific journals were identified for RSV research. Retrospective, descriptive study. The NewQIS (New Quality and Quantity Indices in Science) platform was employed to identify RSV-related articles published in the Web of Science until 2013. We performed a numerical analysis of all articles, and examined citation-based aspects (eg, citation rates); results were visualised by density equalising mapping tools. We identified 4600 RSV-related articles. The USA led the field; US-American authors published 2139 articles (46.5%% of all identified articles), which have been cited 83 000 times. When output was related to socioeconomic benchmarks such as gross domestic product or Research and Development expenditures, Guinea-Bissau, The Gambia and Chile were ranked in leading positions. A total of 614 articles on RSV (13.34% of all articles) were attributed to scientific collaborations. These were primarily established between high-income countries. The gender analysis indicated that male scientists dominated in all countries except Brazil. The majority of RSV-related research articles originated from high-income countries whereas developing nations showed only minimal publication productivity and were barely part of any collaborative networks. Hence, research capacity in these nations should be increased in order to assist in addressing inequities in resource allocation and the clinical burden of RSV in these countries. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization risk in the second year of life by specific congenital heart disease diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah; Fryzek, Jon; Jiang, Xiaohui; Bloomfield, Adam; Ambrose, Christopher S; Wong, Pierre C

    2017-01-01

    Children with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease (CHD) are at elevated risk of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease compared to their healthy peers. Previous studies have demonstrated lower RSV hospitalization risk among all children with CHD at 12-23 months of age versus 0-11 months of age. However, RSV hospitalization risk at 12-23 months of age by specific CHD diagnosis has not been characterized. Both case-control and cohort studies were conducted using data from the US National Inpatient Sample from 1997 to 2013 to characterize relative risk of RSV hospitalization among children 12-23 months of age with CHD. Related CHD diagnoses were combined for analysis. Hospitalizations for RSV and unspecified bronchiolitis were described by length of stay, mechanical ventilation use, mortality, and total charges. Over the 17-year period, 1,168,886 live birth hospitalizations with CHD were identified. Multiple specific CHD conditions had an elevated odds ratio or relative risk of RSV hospitalization. Mean total RSV hospitalization charges were significantly higher among children with CHD relative to those without CHD ($19,650 vs $7,939 in 2015 dollars) for this period. Compared to children without CHD, children with Ebstein's anomaly, transposition of the great arteries, aortic stenosis, heterotaxia, and aortic arch anomalies had 367-, 344-, 203-, 117- and 47-fold increased risk of inpatient RSV mortality, respectively. Unspecified bronchiolitis hospitalization odds and relative risk across CHD diagnoses were similar to those observed with RSV hospitalization; however, unspecified bronchiolitis hospitalizations were associated with shorter mean days of stay and less frequently associated with mechanical ventilation or mortality. Among children with more severe CHD diagnoses, RSV disease remains an important health risk through the second year of life. These data can help inform decisions regarding interventions to

  14. Effects of formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (FI-RSV in the perinatal lamb model of RSV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel J Derscheid

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most frequent cause of bronchiolitis in infants and children worldwide. There are currently no licensed vaccines or effective antivirals. The lack of a vaccine is partly due to increased caution following the aftermath of a failed clinical trial of a formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine (FI-RSV conducted in the 1960's that led to enhanced disease, necessitating hospitalization of 80% of vaccine recipients and resulting in two fatalities. Perinatal lamb lungs are similar in size, structure and physiology to those of human infants and are susceptible to human strains of RSV that induce similar lesions as those observed in infected human infants. We sought to determine if perinatal lambs immunized with FI-RSV would develop key features of vaccine-enhanced disease. This was tested in colostrum-deprived lambs immunized at 3-5 days of age with FI-RSV followed two weeks later by RSV infection. The FI-RSV-vaccinated lambs exhibited several key features of RSV vaccine-enhanced disease, including reduced RSV titers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung, and increased infiltration of peribronchiolar and perivascular lymphocytes compared to lambs either undergoing an acute RSV infection or naïve controls; all features of RSV vaccine-enhanced disease. These results represent a first step proof-of-principle demonstration that the lamb can develop altered responses to RSV following FI-RSV vaccination. The lamb model may be useful for future mechanistic studies as well as the assessment of RSV vaccines designed for infants.

  15. [Lower lymphocyte response in severe cases of acute bronchiolitis due to respiratory syncytial virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Fernández, José Miguel; Moreno-Pérez, David; Antúnez-Fernández, Cristina; Milano-Manso, Guillermo; Cordón-Martínez, Ana María; Urda-Cardona, Antonio

    2017-08-14

    Acute bronchiolitis (AB) of the infant has a serious outcome in 6-16% of the hospital admitted cases. Its pathogenesis and evolution is related to the response of the T lymphocytes. The objective of the present study is to determine if the lower systemic lymphocytic response is related to a worse outcome of AB in hospitalised infants. Retrospective observational-analytical study of cases-controls nested in a cohort of patients admitted due to RSV-AB between the period from October 2010 to March 2015. Those with a full blood count in the first 48hours of respiratory distress were included. Infants with underlying disease, bacterial superinfection, and premature infants <32 weeks of gestation were excluded. The main dichotomous variable was PICU admission. Other variables were: gender, age, post-menstrual age, gestational and post-natal tobacco exposure, admission month, type of lactation, and days of onset of respiratory distress. Lymphocyte counts were categorised by quartiles. Bivariate analysis was performed with the main variable and then by logistic regression to analyse confounding factors. The study included 252 infants, of whom 6.6% (17) required PICU admission. The difference in mean±SD of lymphocytes for patients admitted to and not admitted to PICU was 4,044±1755 and 5,035±1786, respectively (Student-t test, P<.05). An association was found between PICU admission and lymphocyte count <3700/ml (Chi-squared, P=.019; OR: 3.2) and it was found to be maintained in the logistic regression, regardless of age and all other studied factors (Wald 4.191 P=.041, OR: 3.8). A relationship was found between lymphocytosis <3700/ml in the first days of respiratory distress and a worse outcome in previously healthy infants <12 months and gestational age greater than 32 weeks with RSV-AB. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. Evaluation by Survival Analysis on Effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Treating Children with Respiratory Syncytial Viral Pneumonia of Phlegm-Heat Blocking Fei Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨燕; 汪受传; 白文静; 李瑞丽; 艾军

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To objectively evaluate the clinical effect of traditional Chinese medicine in treating children's respiratory syncytial viral pneumonia(RSVP) of phlegm-heat blocking Fei(肺) syndrome(PHBFS). Methods:A single-blinded multi-center,blocked,randomized and parallel-controlled method was adopted.The clinical study was carried out on 206 children with RSVP-PHBFS who were assigned to two groups,108 in the test group treated through intravenous dripping of Qingkailing Injection(清开灵注射液) in combination of...

  17. Long-Term Burden and Respiratory Effects of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Hospitalization in Preterm Infants-The SPRING Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Carbonell-Estrany

    Full Text Available The health status of premature infants born 321-350 weeks' gestational age (wGA hospitalized for RSV infection in the first year of life (cases; n = 125 was compared to that of premature infants not hospitalized for RSV (controls; n = 362 through 6 years. The primary endpoints were the percentage of children with wheezing between 2-6 years and lung function at 6 years of age. Secondary endpoints included quality of life, healthcare resource use, and allergic sensitization. A significantly higher proportion of cases than controls experienced recurrent wheezing through 6 years of age (46.7% vs. 27.4%; p = 0.001. The vast majority of lung function tests appeared normal at 6 years of age in both cohorts. In children with pulmonary function in the lower limit of normality (FEV1 Z-score [-2; -1], wheezing was increased, particularly for cases vs. controls (72.7% vs. 18.9%, p = 0.002. Multivariate analysis revealed the most important factor for wheezing was RSV hospitalization. Quality of life on the respiratory subscale of the TAPQOL was significantly lower (p = 0.001 and healthcare resource utilization was significantly higher (p<0.001 in cases than controls. This study confirms RSV disease is associated with wheezing in 32-35 wGA infants through 6 years of age.

  18. Excretion patterns of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus among young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Koch, A;

    2006-01-01

    in a three-week period. Sweat and blood samples were obtained at inclusion. The presence of RSV and hMPV RNA was detected using real-time RT-PCR. RESULTS: We detected RSV RNA in 28 saliva specimens, 5 stool samples, and 3 sweat samples. hMPV RNA was detected in one saliva specimen and two sweat samples. Four...... of the five children shedding RNA in faeces had diarrhoea and children shedding RNA in sweat were either less than five weeks of age or had a chronic lung disease. RSV and hMPV RNA was shed in nasal secretions for a median of 11.5 and 5.0 days respectively (p = 0.001). More than 75% of the family members...... of the infected children showed to have an upper respiratory tract infection when following up. CONCLUSION: Viral RNA was present in nasal secretions, saliva, sweat, and faeces, but whether or not the virions were infectious and constitute a potential mode of transmission remains to be shown in future studies....

  19. Defining the timing of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV outbreaks: an epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enders Martin

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seasonal RSV infections occur every year and affect particularly children under six months of age. Passive immunoprophylaxis with monoclonal antibody Palivizumab is recommended in the period with high risk of RSV infection. This study aims to define the period for the southern part of Germany (Stuttgart area. Methods Epidemiological analysis of the RSV situation in southern Germany from 1996 to 2004 and comparison of results with literature was made. The respiratory tract specimens were sent in for the detection of RSV mainly by paediatric clinics. Detection of RSV was carried out mainly by real-time RT-PCR or by ELISA "Pathfinder". RSV outbreaks were depicted as an absolute number and as a percentage of RSV diagnoses in a month. Onsets, offsets, peaks, duration and severity of RSV seasons were defined and analysed. Results An early season with strong RSV activity (early-high phase was followed by a weaker late season (late-low phase in a regular biennial rhythm. However, onsets, offsets and durations of outbreaks varied significantly from year to year. RSV epidemics in southern Germany were found to oscillate in an antiphase with RSV epidemics in Finland and Sweden. Conclusion The long-term regular biennial rhythm allows predicting whether the next outbreak will be late or early and whether RSV activity will be strong or weak. Not foreseeable, however, is the precise time of increase and decrease of RSV activity. Moreover, the regular seasonal pattern may be disrupted by irregular outbreaks. Thus, activity of RSV has to be monitored every year to define the period with high risk of infection.

  20. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Yan, Yan [Department of Otolaryngology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228 (Singapore); Ravi, Laxmi Iyer [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Wong, Puisan [Detection and Diagnostics Laboratory, DSO National Laboratories, 27 Medical Drive, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Huong, Tra Nguyen [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Li, Chunwei [Department of Otolaryngology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228 (Singapore); Tan, Boon Huan [Detection and Diagnostics Laboratory, DSO National Laboratories, 27 Medical Drive, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Wang, De Yun [Department of Otolaryngology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228 (Singapore); Sugrue, Richard J., E-mail: rjsugrue@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore)

    2015-10-15

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5 dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss. - Highlights: • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nasal ciliated epithelial cells. • Virus morphogenesis occurs within filamentous projections distinct from cilia. • The RSV N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time during infection. • Trafficking of the F protein into the cilia occurred early in infection. • Presence of the F protein in cilia correlated with impaired cilia function.

  1. Human respiratory syncytial virus and its vaccine development%人呼吸道合胞病毒及其疫苗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡兵; 方志正

    2013-01-01

    人呼吸道合胞病毒(respiratory syncytial virus,RSV)是引起婴幼儿支气管炎和肺炎的主要病原体.虽然已经过半个多世纪的研究,但至今仍没有安全有效的RSV疫苗上市.科研人员经过几十年的努力,对RSV的分子生物学、流行病学、致病机制等方面的研究已取得重大进展.此文就RSV的病毒学特征、流行病学和疫苗研发策略做一综述.%Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important pathogen responsible for bronchitis and pneumonia in young children.No safe and effective vaccines are available so far.Great progress has been made in molecular biology,epidemiology,and pathogenic mechanism of RSV during the past several decades.In this paper,virological and epidemiological characteristics,and vaccine development strategies of RSV are reviewed.

  2. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C. [Unidad de Microscopía Electrónica y Confocal, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Calder, Lesley J. [National Institute for Medical Research, MRC, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA (United Kingdom); Melero, José A., E-mail: jmelero@isciii.es [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  3. Risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus associated with acute lower respiratory infection in children under five years: Systematic review and meta–analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Shi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common pathogen identified in young children with acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI as well as an important cause of hospital admission. The high incidence of RSV infection and its potential severe outcome make it important to identify and prioritise children who are at higher risk of developing RSV–associated ALRI. We aimed to identify risk factors for RSV–associated ALRI in young children. We carried out a systematic literature review across 4 databases and obtained unpublished studies from RSV Global Epidemiology Network (RSV GEN collaborators. Quality of all eligible studies was assessed according to modified GRADE criteria. We conducted meta–analyses to estimate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI for individual risk factors. We identified 20 studies (3 were unpublished data with “good quality” that investigated 18 risk factors for RSV–associated ALRI in children younger than five years old. Among them, 8 risk factors were significantly associated with RSV–associated ALRI. The meta–estimates of their odds ratio (ORs with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI are prematurity 1.96 (95% CI 1.44–2.67, low birth weight 1.91 (95% CI 1.45–2.53, being male 1.23 (95% CI 1.13–1.33, having siblings 1.60 (95% CI 1.32–1.95, maternal smoking 1.36 (95% CI 1.24–1.50, history of atopy 1.47 (95% CI 1.16–1.87, no breastfeeding 2.24 (95% CI 1.56–3.20 and crowding 1.94 (95% CI 1.29–2.93. Although there were insufficient studies available to generate a meta–estimate for HIV, all articles (irrespective of quality scores reported significant associations between HIV and RSV–associated ALRI. This study presents a comprehensive report of the strength of association between various socio–demographic risk factors and RSV–associated ALRI in young children. Some of these amenable risk factors are similar to those that have been identified for (all cause ALRI and

  4. ROLE OF PREEXISTING VIRUS-SPECIFIC IgG IN PRIMARY DISEASE AND IN REINFECTION WITH RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Z. Krivitskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the study is evaluation of links between presence in blood of specific pre-existing IgG to respiratory-syncytial virus (RSV, clinical course of RSV infection and character specific to RSV humoral immune response in patients of different ages. The antibodies were detected by ELISA using whole RS virus or synthetic peptides corresponded to the selected determinants of the envelope RSV proteins. It was shown that RS specific maternal IgG antibodies passively transferred to babies in utero can circulate in the blood up to 10 months of life. The analysis of paired sera of 45 babies in the age of 1–10 months revealed firstly that presence of maternal IgG specific antibodies to the conservative B-cell immunogenic determinants of the F-protein (amino acids 221–232 and/or the G-protein (amino acids 152–164 and 184–198 is coupled with more high morbidity of primary RSV infection (89% versus 56%, p = 0.023, and also with more high frequency of complicated by bronchus obstruction course of the disease (81% versus 20%, р = 0.001 in compare with babies who were serologically negative to the maternal determinants specific antibodies. The correlation analysis has shown that the high presence of maternal determinant-specific IgG in the blood in babies till 10 months of life is associated in the case of primary infection with disbalance of humoral anti-viral immune response: intensive synthesis of serum RSV IgA. This is evidence of complicated course of infection with simultaneous suppression of response to RSV specific IgG. As opposed to the primary RSV infection in patients older than 3 years (n = 121 it was not detected links between anamnestic determinant-specific IgG synthesized by own immune system as the results of previous disease episodes and synthesis of anti-RSV IgG, IgM, IgE and IgA in RSV re-infections. In the contrast to babies in more older patients the feedback connection between level of pre-existing determinant

  5. The role of TLR4 and CD14 polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in greek infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutaki, M; Haidopoulou, K; Pappa, S; Tsakiridis, P; Frydas, E; Eboriadou, M; Hatzistylianou, M

    2014-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection vary from minimal disease to severe acute bronchiolitis. The structural complex of TLR4/CD14 participates in the virus recognition as a component of natural immune response. Genetic variations of TLR4/CD14 may explain great variations in disease severity. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of polymorphisms of TLR4, Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile and CD14, C-159T and C-550T in the development of RSV bronchiolitis. Our study included two groups of Greek infants and young children (A and B). Group A consisted of 50 infants ≤2 years of age hospitalised with bronchiolitis and group B of 99 previously healthy children aged 4-14 years (control group) with a free past medical history. RSV was identified by PCR of genetic material that was extracted from nasopharyngeal samples collected from all patients. Blood samples were used to extract DNA and by using the PCR-RFLP method we performed TLR4 and CD14 genotyping. We found no association between TLR4 polymorphisms (Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile) and the development of acute bronchiolitis. For CD14 polymorphisms, a positive association was found between the C-159T and the development of bronchiolitis (p=0.05) but not for the other loci. There were no differences detected in the frequencies of the four polymorphisms studied among infants with RSV and non-RSV bronchiolitis. It is concluded that protein CD14 may have a functional role in the viral conjunction to the structural complex TLR4/CD14. The association between the polymorphism C-159T and the manifestation of disease found in our study points out that the severity in the development of acute bronchiolitis is not specified exclusively by the pathogen, but the immune response of the host also plays a significant role. More extensive multicentric studies need to take place, in order to lead to safer conclusions.

  6. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Salomonsen Charlotte M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV has been shown to augment infection with P. aeruginosa in mice and to promote adhesion of P. aeruginosa to human respiratory cells. Findings We tested 50 lung specimens from mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia for bovine RSV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR and for human RSV by a commercial real-time PCR. RSV was not found. Conclusions This study indicates that human and bovine RSV is not a major co-factor for development of hemorrhagic pneumonia in Danish mink.

  7. Dual effects of respiratory syncytial virus infections on airway inflammation by regulation of Th17/Treg responses in ovalbumin-challenged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Kong, Lingwen; Luo, Qingli; Li, Bei; Wu, Jinfeng; Liu, Baojun; Wu, Xiao; Dong, Jingcheng

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the effects of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections on ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice via regulation of Th17/Treg cell responses. BALB/c mice were challenged with OVA, followed by RSV infections twice. In OVA-challenged mice, the secretion of Th2/Th17-type cytokines, airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation were significantly inhibited by initial RSV infection. Moreover, the in vivo findings demonstrated that initial RSV infection reversed the imbalance of Th17/Treg responses. In contrast, RSV re-infection strengthened Th2/Th17-type cytokine secretion, airway hyperresponsiveness, and inflammation, especially for lymphocyte infiltration in OVA-challenged mice. Meanwhile, RSV re-infection enhanced the imbalanced Th17/Treg responses. Upon all results reveal that RSV-induced respiratory infections may lead to dual effects pertaining to allergic airway inflammation by regulation of Th17/Treg responses.

  8. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection as a Precipitant of Thyroid Storm in a Previously Undiagnosed Case of Graves' Disease in a Prepubertal Girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlton RWilliam

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is less common in prepubertal than pubertal children, and initial presentation with thyroid storm is rare. We report an 11-year-old prepubertal Hispanic girl who presented with a one-day history of respiratory distress, fever, and dysphagia. She had exophthalmos, a diffuse bilateral goiter and was agitated, tachycardic, and hypertensive. Nasal swab was positive for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. She was diagnosed with thyroid storm and admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit. While infection is a known precipitant of thyroid storm and RSV is a common pediatric infection, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of RSV infection apparently precipitating thyroid storm in a prepubertal child.

  9. A new high-speed droplet-real-time polymerase chain reaction method can detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus in less than 10 min.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Masayuki; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Honda, Takayuki

    2014-03-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been widely used for diagnosis of infectious diseases of domestic animals. Rapid detection of respiratory pathogens of cattle is useful for making therapeutic decisions. Therefore, we developed a new genetic-based method called droplet-real-time PCR, which can detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) within 10 min. Our droplet-real-time PCR markedly reduced the reaction time of reverse transcription-PCR while maintaining the same sensitivity as conventional real-time PCR, and it can be used as a rapid assay for detection of BRSV. Furthermore, our method is potentially applicable for rapid diagnosis of almost all infectious diseases, including highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

  10. Diagnosis of enzootic pneumonia in Danish cattle: reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.;

    1999-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in lung tissue of naturally and experimentally infected cattle. Primers were selected from the gene coding the F fusion protein, which is relatively conserved...... among BRSV isolates. The RT-PCR assay was highly specific, it yielded positive reactions only when performed on BRSV-infected cell cultures or tissues. The detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was assessed as 5 TCID50. BRSV was detected in tissues of the respiratory tract and in the tracheobroncheal....... (7%), and Pasteurella haemolytica (7%) were the most common bacterial agents found in the lungs. BRSV was identified using a conventional antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 23 (17%) animals. The established BRSV-specific RT-PCR assay yielded positive results for the same 23 animals...

  11. Diagnosis of enzootic pneumonia in Danish cattle: reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    1999-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in lung tissue of naturally and experimentally infected cattle. Primers were selected from the gene coding the F fusion protein, which is relatively conserved...... among BRSV isolates. The RT-PCR assay was highly specific, it yielded positive reactions only when performed on BRSV-infected cell cultures or tissues. The detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was assessed as 5 TCID50. BRSV was detected in tissues of the respiratory tract and in the tracheobroncheal....... (7%), and Pasteurella haemolytica (7%) were the most common bacterial agents found in the lungs. BRSV was identified using a conventional antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 23 (17%) animals. The established BRSV-specific RT-PCR assay yielded positive results for the same 23 animals...

  12. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... address. Your information: Your recipient's information: Your personal message: Thank you! Your e-mail was sent. Save ... term pregnancies and healthy babies. If something goes wrong, we offer information and comfort to families. We ...

  13. Development of a multiplex RT-PCR for simultaneous diagnosis of human metapneumovirus (HMPV) and human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) from clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayakar, Seetha; Pillai, Heera R; Thulasi, Vineetha P; Nair, Radhakrishnan R

    2016-12-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) and human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) are ubiquitous respiratory viral pathogens. They belong to the family Paramyxoviridae (subfamily Pneumovirinae) and is responsible for acute respiratory tract infections in children, elderly and immunocompromised patients. We designed and tested a multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) as a cost-effective alternative to real-time PCR and cell culture based detection for HMPV and HRSV. The newly developed PCR was used to screen nasal/throat swab samples from 356 patients with suspected acute respiratory infection attending the Government Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. The method was compared with a commercially available kit employing real time PCR, for its sensitivity and specificity. 53 (14.9 %) samples were positive for at least one tested pathogen by mRT-PCR. All except one among the positive samples showed similar pathogen profile when tested using real time PCR. 8 (15.1 %) among these 53 were positive for HRSVA, 33 (62.3 %) positive for HRSVB and 12 (22.6 %) were positive for HMPV. 17 (32.7 %) samples showed co-infections in them. Sensitivity and specificity of the mRT-PCR was comparable to that of the commercial kit. Our findings indicate that this newly developed mRT-PCR can be used as a cost-effective alternative for laboratory diagnosis of HMPV/HRSV infection and will significantly reduce diagnostic costs for these viruses in clinical settings.

  14. Induction of IL-6 and CCL5 (RANTES in human respiratory epithelial (A549 cells by clinical isolates of respiratory syncytial virus is strain specific

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    Levitz Ruth

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the major respiratory pathogen of infants and young children. During each seasonal epidemic, multiple strains of both subgroup A and B viruses circulate in the community. Like other RNA viruses, RSV genome replication is prone to errors that results in a heterogeneous population of viral strains some of which may possess differences in virulence. We sought to determine whether clinical isolates of RSV differ in their capacity to induce inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and CCL5 (previously known as RANTES [regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted protein], which are known to be induced in vitro and in vivo in response to RSV, during infection of A549 cells. Results Screening of subgroup A and B isolates revealed heterogeneity among strains to induce IL-6 and CCL5. We chose two subgroup B strains, New Haven (NH1067 and NH1125, for further analysis because of their marked differences in cytokine inducing properties and because subgroup B strains, in general, are less genetically heterogeneous as compared to subgroup A strains. At 12 and 24 hours post infection RSV strains, NH1067 and NH1125 differed in their capacity to induce IL-6 by an order of magnitude or more. The concentrations of IL-6 and CCL5 were dependent on the dose of infectious virus and the concentration of these cytokines induced by NH1125 was greater than that of those induced by NH1067 when the multiplicity of infection of NH1067 used was as much as 10-fold higher than that of NH1125. The induction of IL-6 was dependent on viable virus as infection with UV-inactivated virus did not induce IL-6. The difference in IL-6 induction most likely could not be explained by differences in viral replication kinetics. The intracellular level of RSV RNA, as determined by quantitative RT-PCR, was indistinguishable between the 2 strains though the titer of progeny virus produced by NH1125 was greater than that produced by

  15. Identification of cellular proteins that interact with Newcastle Disease Virus and human Respiratory Syncytial Virus by a two-dimensional virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguera, Javier; Villar, Enrique; Muñoz-Barroso, Isabel

    2014-10-13

    Although it is well documented that the initial attachment receptors for Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) are sialic acid-containing molecules and glycosaminoglycans respectively, the exact nature of the receptors for both viruses remains to be deciphered. Moreover, additional molecules at the host cell surface might be involved in the entry mechanism. With the aim of identifying the cellular proteins that interact with NDV and RSV at the cell surface, we performed a virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA). Cell membrane lysates were separated by two dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and electrotransferred to PVDF membranes, after which they were probed with high viral concentrations. NDV interacted with a Protein Disulfide Isomerase from chicken fibroblasts. In the case of RSV, we detected 15 reactive spots, which were identified as six different proteins, of which nucleolin was outstanding. We discuss the possible role of PDI and nucleolin in NDV and RSV entry, respectively.

  16. Downregulation of IL7R, CCR7, and TLR4 in the cord blood of children with respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchley, Christopher S; Osterholt, Helene C D; Sonerud, Tonje; Fjærli, Hans O; Nakstad, Britt

    2013-11-01

    The association between gene expression at birth of 11 candidate genes with important innate and adaptive immune functions and later respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease was investigated. Cord blood was collected from 2108 newborns. Forty-seven were subsequently RSV positive. Gene expression analysis by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was compared to 17 controls. There was downregulation of interleukin 7 receptor (IL7R) (P = .0001) and chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) (P = .002), and in the severe disease subcategory, downregulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) (P = .003). IL7R and CCR7 facilitate communication between adaptive and innate immune systems. TLR4 activates the innate immune system on RSV exposure. Delayed innate and adaptive immune activation may predispose children to more severe RSV disease.

  17. 呼吸道合胞病毒F蛋白研究进展%The research pogress in fusion glycoprotein of human respiratory syncytial virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁媛

    2009-01-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (F) of human respiratory syncytial vires(RSV) is an important viral envelop protein which can induce protective immunity against RSV infection.The structural and functional characteristics of F protein play a central role in the understanding of infection and immunity,and in the development of vaccine.%人呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)融合蛋白(F蛋白)为病毒表面结构蛋白,可以刺激机体产生保护性抗体和细胞免疫反应.因此对F蛋白的深入研究将有助于了解病毒感染的机理,从而为研究RSV的免疫机理、研制特定部位的亚单位或多肽疫苗提供帮助.

  18. Soluble F proteins exacerbate pulmonary histopathology after vaccination upon respiratory syncytial virus challenge but not when presented on virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youri; Lee, Young-Tae; Ko, Eun-Ju; Kim, Ki-Hye; Hwang, Hye Suk; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Kang, Sang Moo

    2017-08-30

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) protein is suggested to be a protective vaccine target although its efficacy and safety concerns remain not well understood. We investigated immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety of F proteins in a soluble form or on virus-like particle (F-VLP). F VLP preferentially elicited IgG2a antibody and T helper type 1 (Th1) immune responses whereas F protein induced IgG1 isotype and Th2 responses. Despite lung viral clearance after prime or prime-boost and then RSV challenge, F protein immune mice displayed weight loss and lung histopathology and high mucus production and eosinophils. In contrast, prime or prime-boost vaccination of F VLP induced effective protection, prevented infiltration of eosinophils, and vaccine- enhanced disease after challenge. This study provides insight into developing an effective and safe RSV vaccine candidate.

  19. The acute phase response of haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA) in cattle undergoing experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Godson, D.L.; Toussaint, M.J.M.;

    2000-01-01

    respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), analysing the induction of the two most dominant bovine acute phase proteins haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA). Strong and reproducible acute phase responses were detected for both proteins, peaking at around 7-8 days after inoculation of BRSV, while no response...... was seen in mock-inoculated control animals. The serum concentrations reached for SAA and haptoglobin during the BRSV-induced acute phase response were generally the same or higher than previously reported for bacterial infections in calves. The magnitude and the duration of the haptoglobin response......The ability of a pure virus infection to induce an acute phase protein response is of interest as viral infections are normally considered to be less efficient in inducing an acute phase protein response than bacterial infections. This was studied in a bovine model for infection with bovine...

  20. 呼吸道合胞病毒感染的免疫应答效应%Immune response of respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方青

    2013-01-01

    人呼吸道合胞病毒(respiratory syncytial virus,RSV)是婴幼儿毛细支气管炎的主要病原体,RSV感染是导致儿童以及老年人和免疫缺陷的成年人患病和死亡的主要原因.近来,越来越多的研究发现天然免疫应答以及炎症的异常调节是导致病毒感染后出现病理学效应的重要原因.被动免疫抗体能对感染起一定的预防作用,但自然感染RSV诱发的抗体水平的保护作用较差.RSV感染后机体的免疫应答仍需进一步研究,以加速相关疫苗及毛细支气管炎新疗法的研发.%Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a main pathogen of bronchiolitis in infants,and RSV infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children,the elderly and immunocompromised adults.Recent studies increasingly emphasize the innate immune responses and the dysregulation of inflammation as key factors in causing pathological effects of infection.The passive antibody can protect against infection,but the antibody levels induced by natural RSV infection are poorly protective.Improved understanding of human immune response to RSV infection continues to be needed in order to accelerate the development of vaccines and new treatments for bronchiolitis.

  1. Enhanced immunogenicity of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) F subunit vaccine formulated with the adjuvant GLA-SE in cynomolgus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Kathryn; Aslam, Shahin; Shambaugh, Cindy; Lin, Rui; Heeke, Darren; Frantz, Chris; Zuo, Fengrong; Esser, Mark T; Paliard, Xavier; Lambert, Stacie L

    2015-08-26

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes significant disease in elderly adults, but an effective vaccine is not yet available. We have previously reported that vaccines consisting of engineered respiratory syncytial virus soluble fusion protein (RSV sF) adjuvanted with glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) in an oil-in-water emulsion (stable emulsion [SE]) induce RSV F-specific T and B cell responses in mice and rats that protect from viral challenge. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of GLA-SE adjuvanted RSV sF vs unadjuvanted RSV sF vaccines in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). RSV F-specific IgG, RSV neutralizing antibodies, and RSV F-specific T cell IFNγ ELISPOT responses induced by GLA-SE adjuvanted RSV sF peaked at week 6 at significantly higher levels than achieved by unadjuvanted RSV sF and remained detectable through week 24, demonstrating response longevity. Two weeks after a week 24 booster immunization, humoral and cellular responses reached levels similar to those seen at the earlier peak response. Importantly, the GLA-SE adjuvanted RSV sF vaccine induced cross-neutralizing antibodies to other RSV A and B strains as well as F-specific IgA and IgG memory B cells. GLA-SE adjuvanted RSV sF was also demonstrated to drive a Th1-biased response characterized by more IFNγ than IL-4. This study indicates that a GLA-SE adjuvanted RSV sF vaccine induces robust humoral and Th1-biased cellular immunity in non-human primates and may benefit human populations at risk for RSV disease.

  2. Opposing roles of membrane and soluble forms of the receptor for advanced glycation end products in primary respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Allison L; Sims, Gary P; Brewah, Yambasu A; Rebelatto, Marlon C; Kearley, Jennifer; Benjamin, Ebony; Keller, Ashley E; Brohawn, Philip; Herbst, Ronald; Coyle, Anthony J; Humbles, Alison A; Kolbeck, Roland

    2012-04-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a common respiratory pathogen in infants and the older population, causes pulmonary inflammation and airway occlusion that leads to impairment of lung function. Here, we have established a role for receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in RSV infection. RAGE-deficient (ager(-/-)) mice were protected from RSV-induced weight loss and inflammation. This protection correlated with an early increase in type I interferons, later decreases in proinflammatory cytokines, and a reduction in viral load. To assess the contribution of soluble RAGE (sRAGE) to RSV-induced disease, wild-type and ager(-/-) mice were given doses of sRAGE following RSV infection. Of interest, sRAGE treatment prevented RSV-induced weight loss and neutrophilic inflammation to a degree similar to that observed in ager(-/-) mice. Our work further elucidates the roles of RAGE in the pathogenesis of respiratory infections and highlights the opposing roles of membrane and sRAGE in modulating the host response to RSV infection.

  3. Induction, duration, and resolution of airway goblet cell hyperplasia in a murine model of atopic asthma: effect of concurrent infection with respiratory syncytial virus and response to dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, D I; Pedrick, M S; Savage, T J; Bright, H; Beesley, J E; Sanjar, S

    1998-07-01

    We recently described a murine model of atopic asthma in which a marked, extensive hyperplasia of airway goblet cells is induced by repeated challenge of ovalbumin (OA)-sensitized mice with intratracheally administered allergen (Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 1996;14:425-438). We report here the time course of the duration of this feature and of its spontaneous resolution in the absence of further allergen exposure. Induction of severe neutrophilic inflammation in the airways by repeated intratracheal administration of lipopolysaccharide failed to induce goblet cell hyperplasia (GCH) to as great a degree as that induced by allergen, suggesting that nonallergic inflammation is a relatively poor inducer of this phenotype change in mice. When a "subclinical" infection of the lungs with the human A2 strain of respiratory syncytial virus was superimposed on the model of atopic asthma, recruitment of monocytes and lymphocytes to the airways was enhanced and a discharge of goblet cell mucin contents was observed. This may partly explain the respiratory difficulty that typifies virally induced exacerbations of asthma in humans. Daily systemic treatment of sensitized mice with dexamethasone during the period of allergen challenge produced a dose-related suppression of developing GCH, while similar treatment during the period following the establishment of extensive hyperplasia induced an accelerated resolution toward a normal epithelial phenotype. These results confirm and extend the relevance of this model as a representation of the human disease.

  4. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuanhui [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); He, Jinsheng, E-mail: jshhe@bjtu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zheng, Xianxian [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wu, Qiang [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Yan [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Hong, Tao [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China)

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  5. Incidence and clinical characteristics of the infection by the Respiratory Syncytial Virus in children admitted in Santa Casa de São Paulo Hospital

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    Rogério Pecchini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the rate of infections due to RSV and other viruses in children. In addition we have analyzed demographic data and clinical characteristics of the RSV-positive patients comparing with patients infected by other respiratory viruses. We also described the seasonality of the RSV occurrence in a hospital in São Paulo. Children below 5 years old admitted in Santa Casa de S��o Paulo Hospital between February 2005 and September 2006 due to acute respiratory infections (ARI were included. A nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained with sterile No. 5 French feeding catheters as soon as possible (usually within 24 h. Specimens were kept refrigerated at 4ºC and transported to Adolfo Lutz Institute, where the indirect immunofluorescent assay was performed. Virus identified by these assay included RSV, Adenovirus, Influenza A and B virus and Parainfluenza 1, 2, and 3. Clinical data from each group was compared. Four hundred and fifty five cases were included in the study, with 30% positive for some type of virus. Viruses that were identified included Respiratory Syncytial Virus (73.03%, Influenza (8.42%, Parainfluenza (8.42% and Adenovirus (3.37%. We divided the subjects in 3 groups: Group 1 RSV-Positive, Group 2 Other Positive Viruses and Group 3 Negative for Respiratory Virus. Mean age (months was of 7.5 for RSV-positive children, 7.6 for other viruses, and 8 for negative for respiratory virus. The RSV-Positive Group was significantly younger than the Group Negative for Respiratory Virus (p<0.05. Signs of UAI were more present in the Positive RSV Group (p<0.05. General mortality was of 2.41%. There was a higher incidence of RSV between the months of March and August in the two years of the study. Our study indicates RSV as the most prevalent viral agent in children admitted due to (ARI, especially in infants below 3 months old. We have also found that infections due to RSV can occur in months others than the

  6. Incidence and clinical characteristics of the infection by the respiratory syncytial virus in children admitted in Santa Casa de São Paulo Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecchini, Rogério; Berezin, Eitan N; Felício, Maria C Calahani; Passos, Saulo D; Souza, Maria Cândido O de; Lima, Lourdes Rehder de Andrade Vaz de; Ueda, Mirthes; Matsumoto, Tokiko Kyomen; Durigon, Edison L

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the rate of infections due to RSV and other viruses in children. In addition we have analyzed demographic data and clinical characteristics of the RSV-positive patients comparing with patients infected by other respiratory viruses. We also described the seasonality of the RSV occurrence in a hospital in São Paulo. Children below 5 years old admitted in Santa Casa de São Paulo Hospital between February 2005 and September 2006 due to acute respiratory infections (ARI) were included. A nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained with sterile No. 5 French feeding catheters as soon as possible (usually within 24 h). Specimens were kept refrigerated at 4 degrees C and transported to Adolfo Lutz Institute, where the indirect immunofluorescent assay was performed. Virus identified by these assay included RSV, Adenovirus, Influenza A and B virus and Parainfluenza 1, 2, and 3. Clinical data from each group was compared. Four hundred and fifty five cases were included in the study, with 30% positive for some type of virus. Viruses that were identified included Respiratory Syncytial Virus (73.03%), Influenza (8.42%), Parainfluenza (8.42%) and Adenovirus (3.37%). We divided the subjects in 3 groups: Group 1 RSV-Positive, Group 2 Other Positive Viruses and Group 3 Negative for Respiratory Virus. Mean age (months) was of 7.5 for RSV-positive children, 7.6 for other viruses, and 8 for negative for respiratory virus. The RSV-Positive Group was significantly younger than the Group Negative for Respiratory Virus (p<0.05). Signs of UAI were more present in the Positive RSV Group (p<0.05). General mortality was of 2.41%. There was a higher incidence of RSV between the months of March and August in the two years of the study. Our study indicates RSV as the most prevalent viral agent in children admitted due to (ARI), especially in infants below 3 months old. We have also found that infections due to RSV can occur in months others than the classic

  7. Insurance Status and the Risk of Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease in United States Preterm Infants Born at 32-35 Weeks Gestational Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Jeremy A; Anderson, Evan J; Wu, Xionghua; Ambrose, Christopher S; Simões, Eric A F

    2016-09-01

    Background.  Database studies have identified that public health insurance status is associated with an increased risk of severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease in US infants. However, these studies did not adjust for the presence of other risk factors and did not evaluate the risk in preterm infants. Methods.  In this study, we evaluate the independent association between public insurance and severe RSV disease outcomes adjusting for other risk factors. The prospective, observational RSV Respiratory Events among Preterm Infants Outcomes and Risk Tracking (REPORT) study was conducted over 2 consecutive RSV seasons at 188 US clinical sites that enrolled preterm infants born at 32-35 wGA who had not received RSV immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab. Adjusted incidence rates per 100 infant-seasons of the RSV-associated endpoints of outpatient lower respiratory tract infection (LRI), emergency department (ED) visits, RSV hospitalizations (RSVHs), and intensive care unit admissions during peak RSV season (November-March) were compared for infants with private and public insurance. Results.  Of 1642 evaluable infants enrolled in the REPORT study, 50.1% had private insurance and 49.9% had public health insurance. Adjusted rates of RSV outpatient LRIs were similar; however, rates of ED visits (hazard ratio [HR], 2.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-3.45) were higher for subjects with public insurance, with a similar but nonsignificant trend observed for hospitalization (HR, 1.61; 95% CI, .93-2.78). Conclusions.  Socioeconomic status, as evaluated by public versus private healthcare insurance, is a significant independent risk factor for ED use in US preterm infants and may contribute to increased RSVHs in this population.

  8. A prospective, open-label, non-comparative study of palivizumab prophylaxis in children at high risk of serious respiratory syncytial virus disease in the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turti Tatyana V

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs in children globally. Predisposing conditions for the development of serious RSV disease include preterm infants and those with cardiopulmonary illness, including congenital heart disease (CHD and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD. No vaccine is currently approved for the prevention of RSV infection. It is recommended that children at high risk be prophylactically administered palivizumab, a monoclonal antibody that has been shown in a number of clinical studies to reduce hospitalization rates due to serious RSV infection. The objective of the current study was to determine the safety and effectiveness of palivizumab in preventing serious RSV disease in high-risk children in the Russian Federation. Children at high risk of serious RSV disease (ie, born at ≤35 wk gestational age and ≤6 mo of age, and/or aged ≤24 mo with BPD or hemodynamically significant CHD were enrolled. Subjects were to receive 3 to 5 monthly injections of palivizumab 15 mg/kg (depending on the month of the initial injection over the RSV season. The primary endpoint was RSV-related hospitalizations. Adverse events (AEs were reported through 100 days following the final injection. Results One hundred subjects received ≥1 injection of palivizumab; 94 completed their dosing schedule. There were no RSV hospitalizations or deaths. Six of 7 subjects hospitalized for respiratory/cardiac conditions had an RSV test, which was negative in all cases. Three non-serious AEs (acute intermittent rhinitis and rhinitis, 1 subject; atopic dermatitis, 1 subject were considered possibly related to palivizumab. All other AEs were mild or moderate and considered not related/probably not related to palivizumab. Conclusion Palivizumab was generally well tolerated and effectively prevented serious RSV infection in a mixed population of high-risk children in the Russian

  9. Insurance Status and the Risk of Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease in United States Preterm Infants Born at 32–35 Weeks Gestational Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Jeremy A.; Anderson, Evan J.; Wu, Xionghua; Ambrose, Christopher S.; Simões, Eric A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Database studies have identified that public health insurance status is associated with an increased risk of severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease in US infants. However, these studies did not adjust for the presence of other risk factors and did not evaluate the risk in preterm infants. Methods. In this study, we evaluate the independent association between public insurance and severe RSV disease outcomes adjusting for other risk factors. The prospective, observational RSV Respiratory Events among Preterm Infants Outcomes and Risk Tracking (REPORT) study was conducted over 2 consecutive RSV seasons at 188 US clinical sites that enrolled preterm infants born at 32–35 wGA who had not received RSV immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab. Adjusted incidence rates per 100 infant-seasons of the RSV-associated endpoints of outpatient lower respiratory tract infection (LRI), emergency department (ED) visits, RSV hospitalizations (RSVHs), and intensive care unit admissions during peak RSV season (November–March) were compared for infants with private and public insurance. Results. Of 1642 evaluable infants enrolled in the REPORT study, 50.1% had private insurance and 49.9% had public health insurance. Adjusted rates of RSV outpatient LRIs were similar; however, rates of ED visits (hazard ratio [HR], 2.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–3.45) were higher for subjects with public insurance, with a similar but nonsignificant trend observed for hospitalization (HR, 1.61; 95% CI, .93–2.78). Conclusions. Socioeconomic status, as evaluated by public versus private healthcare insurance, is a significant independent risk factor for ED use in US preterm infants and may contribute to increased RSVHs in this population. PMID:27704018

  10. TLR4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms: no impact on human immune responsiveness to LPS or respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée N Douville

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A broad variety of natural environmental stimuli, genotypic influences and timing all contribute to expression of protective versus maladaptive immune responses and the resulting clinical outcomes in humans. The role of commonly co-segregating Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile in this process remains highly controversial. Moreover, what differential impact these polymorphisms might have in at risk populations with respiratory dysfunction, such as current asthma or a history of infantile bronchiolitis, has never been examined. Here we determine the importance of these polymorphisms in modulating LPS and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV--driven cytokine responses. We focus on both healthy children and those with clinically relevant respiratory dysfunction. METHODOLOGY: To elucidate the impact of TLR4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile on cytokine production, we assessed multiple immune parameters in over 200 pediatric subjects aged 7-9. Genotyping was followed by quantification of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses by fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells upon acute exposure to LPS or RSV. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In contrast to early reports, neither SNP influenced immune responses evoked by LPS exposure or RSV infection, as measured by the intermediate phenotype of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses to these ubiquitous agents. There is no evidence of altered sensitivity in populations with "at risk" clinical phenotypes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Genomic medicine seeks to inform clinical practice. Determination of the TLR4 Asp299Gly/Thr399Ile haplotype is of no clinical benefit in predicting the nature or intensity of cytokine production in children whether currently healthy or among specific at-risk groups characterized by prior infantile broncholitis or current asthma.

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus hospitalizations in infants of 28 weeks gestational age and less in the palivizumab era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Resch

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Despite palivizumab prophylaxis the burden of RSV disease and all cause respiratory illness was still remarkable in this vulnerable preterm population and mainly limited to the first season.

  12. Association between Respiratory Syncytial Virus Activity and Pneumococcal Disease in Infants: A Time Series Analysis of US Hospitalization Data

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberger, Daniel M.; Klugman, Keith P.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Lone Simonsen; Cécile Viboud

    2015-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Respiratory infections—bacterial and viral infections of the lungs and the airways (the tubes that take oxygen-rich air to the lungs)—are major causes of illness and death in children worldwide. Pneumonia (infection of the lungs) alone is responsible for about 15% of all child deaths. The leading cause of bacterial pneumonia in children is Streptococcus pneumoniae, which is transmitted through contact with infected respiratory secretions. S. pneumoniae usually caus...

  13. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Jong Seok [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yu-Jin [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency, Gyeonggi-do, Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbukdo (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Minkyoung [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kang, Sang-Moo, E-mail: skang24@gsu.edu [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. - Highlights: • Combined RSV FFG VLP vaccine is effective in inducing F specific responses. • FFG VLP vaccine confers RSV neutralizing activity and viral control in cotton rats. • Cotton rats with RSV FFG VLP vaccination do not show vaccine-enhanced disease. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP vaccine induce F specific antibody secreting cell responses. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP do not induce lung cellular infiltrates and Th2 cytokine.

  14. Epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus in children in Cyprus during three consecutive winter seasons (2010-2013): age distribution, seasonality and association between prevalent genotypes and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotou, C; Richter, J; Koliou, M; Kalogirou, N; Georgiou, E; Christodoulou, C

    2014-11-01

    This study reports the epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in hospitalized children in Cyprus over three successive seasons (2010-2013) and the association between prevalent genotypes and disease severity. RSV infections had a circulation pattern from December to March. Most RSV-positive children (83%) were aged <2 years. Genotyping of RSV isolates showed that during the first winter season of the study (2010-2011), the only RSV genotype circulating was GA2 (RSV-A), followed by genotype BA (RSV-B) in the next winter season with only few sporadic cases of GA2. During the last winter season of the study (2012-2013) the newly emerged RSV genotype ON1 (RSV-A) was virtually the only circulating genotype. Children infected with genotype ON1 suffered a significantly milder illness compared to infections with genotypes GA2 and BA with a higher percentage of BA-infected children requiring oxygen. Our findings are in contrast to the majority of published reports that suggest RSV-A causes more severe illness than RSV-B. Therefore, further investigation of the association between RSV genotypes and disease severity is required, as it might affect treatment strategies in the future.

  15. A respiratory syncytial virus persistent-infected cell line system reveals the involvement of SOCS1 in the innate antiviral response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junwen; Zheng; Pu; Yang; Yan; Tang; Dongchi; Zhao

    2015-01-01

    HEp-2 cells persistently infected with respiratory syncytial virus(RSV) are a heterogeneous mixture of viral antigen-positive and-negative variants; however, the mechanism through which viral replication becomes latent remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the potential mechanism by which RSV escapes from innate immune surveillance. Persistent-infected RSV HEp-2 cells were isolated and cell clones were passaged. The RSV-persistent cells produced viruses at a lower titer, resisted wild-type RSV re-infection, and secreted high levels of interferon-β(IFN-β), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α(Mip-1α), interleukin-8(IL-8), and Rantes. Toll-like receptor 3(TLR3), retinoic acid inducible gene-I(RIG-I), and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1(SOCS1) levels were upregulated in these cells. The silencing of TLR3 m RNA decreased the expression of SOCS1 protein and the secretion of cytokines. RSV-persistent cells are in an inflammatory state; upregulation of SOCS1 is related to the TLR3 signaling pathway, which could be associated with the mechanism of viral persistence.

  16. Decrease in formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (FI-RSV enhanced disease with RSV G glycoprotein peptide immunization in BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrud U Rey

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a high priority target for vaccine development. One concern in RSV vaccine development is that a non-live virus vaccine would predispose for enhanced disease similar to that seen with the formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV vaccine. Since a mAb specific to RSV G protein can reduce pulmonary inflammation and eosinophilia seen after RSV infection of FI-RSV vaccinated mice, we hypothesized that RSV G peptides that induce antibodies with similar reactivity may limit enhanced disease after subunit or other non-live RSV vaccines. In support of this hypothesis, we show that FI-RSV vaccinated mice administered RSV G peptide vaccines had a significant reduction in enhanced disease after RSV challenge. These data support the importance of RSV G during infection to RSV disease pathogenesis and suggest that use of appropriately designed G peptide vaccines to reduce the risk of enhanced disease with non-live RSV vaccines merits further study.

  17. Effect of Brazilian Propolis on Exacerbation of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Mice Exposed to Tetrabromobisphenol A, a Brominated Flame Retardant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Tomomi; Toyama, Satomi; Hayashi, Yuya; Honda, Shiori; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Matsuoka, Sayuri; Hidaka, Muneaki; Tsutsumi, Shigetoshi; Yasukawa, Ken; Park, Yong Kun

    2013-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a brominated flame retardant, has been found to exacerbate pneumonia in respiratory syncytial virus- (RSV-) infected mice. We examined the effect of Brazilian propolis (AF-08) on the exacerbation of RSV infection by TBBPA exposure in mice. Mice were fed a powdered diet mixed with 1% TBBPA alone, 0.02% AF-08 alone, or 1% TBBPA and 0.02% AF-08 for four weeks and then intranasally infected with RSV. TBBPA exposure increased the pulmonary virus titer and level of IFN-γ, a representative marker of pneumonia due to RSV infection, in the lungs of infected mice without toxicity. AF-08 was significantly effective in reducing the virus titers and IFN-γ level increased by TBBPA exposure. Also, AF-08 significantly reduced proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6) levels in the lungs of RSV-infected mice with TBBPA exposure, but Th2 cytokine (IL-4 and IL-10) levels were not evidently increased. Neither TBBPA exposure nor AF-08 treatment affected the anti-RSV antibody production in RSV-infected mice. In flow cytometry analysis, AF-08 seemed to be effective in reducing the ratio of pulmonary CD8a+ cells in RSV-infected mice with TBBPA exposure. TBBPA and AF-08 did not exhibit anti-RSV activity in vitro. Thus, AF-08 probably ameliorated pneumonia exacerbated by TBBPA exposure in RSV-infected mice by limiting excess cellular immune responses. PMID:24250719

  18. Combination therapy using monoclonal antibodies against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) G glycoprotein protects from RSV disease in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caidi, Hayat; Harcourt, Jennifer L; Tripp, Ralph A; Anderson, Larry J; Haynes, Lia M

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic options to control respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are limited, thus development of new therapeutics is high priority. Previous studies with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) reactive to an epitope proximal to the central conserved region (CCR) of RSV G protein (mAb 131-2G) showed therapeutic efficacy for reducing pulmonary inflammation RSV infection in BALB/c mice. Here, we show a protective effect in RSV-infected mice therapeutically treated with a mAb (130-6D) reactive to an epitope within the CCR of G protein, while treatment with a mAb specific for a carboxyl G protein epitope had no effect. Combined treatment with mAbs 130-6D and 131-2G significantly decreased RSV-associated pulmonary inflammation compared to either antibody alone. The results suggest that anti-RSV G protein mAbs that react at or near the CCR and can block RSV G protein-mediated activities are effective at preventing RSV disease and may be an effective strategy for RSV therapeutic treatment.

  19. Prevalence of and risk factors for bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection in non-vaccinated dairy and dual-purpose cattle herds in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saa, Luis Rodrigo; Perea, Anselmo; Jara, Diego Vinicio; Arenas, Antonio José; Garcia-Bocanegra, Ignacio; Borge, Carmen; Carbonero, Alfonso

    2012-10-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors associated with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection in non-vaccinated dairy and dual-purpose cattle herds from Ecuador. A total of 2,367 serum samples from 346 herds were collected from June 2008 to February 2009. A questionnaire, which included variables related to cattle, health, management measures, and the environment, was filled out in each herd. Presence of antibodies against BRSV was analyzed using a commercial indirect ELISA test. A logistic regression model was used to determine risk factors associated with BRSV at herd level. The individual seroprevalence against BRSV in non-vaccinated herds in Ecuador was 80.48% [1,905/2,367; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 78.9-82.1]. The herd prevalence was 91.3% (316/346; 95% CI = 88.3-94.3), and the intra-herd prevalence ranged between 25% and 100% (mean, 90.47%). The logistic regression model showed that the existence of bordering cattle farms, the dual-purpose farms, and the altitude of the farm (more than 2,338 m above sea level) were risk factors associated with BRSV infection. This is the first study about BRSV prevalence in Ecuador. It shows the wide spread of the BRSV infection in the country. The risk factors found will help to design effective control strategies.

  20. [Development of new approaches to standartization of enzyme immunoassay test systems for detection of antibodies to respiratory syncytial virus using electron microscopy and monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivitskaia, V Z; Sirotkin, A K; Samoĭlovich, M P; Sominina, A A

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), strain Long, was purified through 20-60% sucrose gradient. The virions from different sucrose density zones were tested by ELISA for reactivity with monoclonal antibodies (MAB) to F- (MAB 9C5) and N- (MAB 8B10) proteins of RSV. Comparative study of the same patterns of RSV by electron microscopy after negative staining showed a close relationship between the virion morphology and MAB binding in ELISA. MAB 9C5 were highly reactive with the surface domains of both mature RSV virions and "empty" virion envelopes without formed inner nucleocapsid structures. MAB 8B10 reacted well only with mature virions with completely assembled nucleocapsids. These MAB failed to reorganize the N-protein epitope of immature and destroyed virions, which indicated a conformation dependence of the 8B10 binding site. For practical purposes, MAB tests can be used to determine the RSV patterns, which can be used in ELISA for serologic diagnosis of RSV infection. Testing with these MAB demonstrate the stability of RSV to extreme exposures (lyophilization, storage, heating), which is important for creation of sensitive ELISA test systems and their standardization.

  1. 人呼吸道合胞病毒的研究与防治进展%Advances in Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Research and Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭恺; 张玉彬

    2013-01-01

    人呼吸道合胞病毒是全世界婴幼儿下呼吸道感染最常见的病原体,导致每年超过300万人住院和20万以上的人死亡,给全球带来了非常严重的经济和社会负担.目前,尚不存在防治RSV的疫苗,也没有特异性强、安全性高的抗RSV药物.对HRSV的结构、流行病学特征以及疾病模型构建方面的研究进展进行综述,并对已有的检测和治疗方法进行总结,旨在为今后开发抗HRSV的药物提供全面的参考信息.%Human respiratory syncytial virus is the most common cause of infection in lower respiratory tract in infants and children around the world,which leads to more than 3 million inpatients and 200 thousand death and brings very serious economic and social burden.So far there are no vaccines or drugs with strong specificity and high safety that can prevent people from RSV infection.The research progress in the structure,epidemiological characteristics and disease modeling of HRSV was reviewed and the existing methods of detection and treatment HRSV were summarized in order to provide a comprehensive reference information for the future development of anti-HRSV drugs.

  2. WHO consultation on Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine Development Report from a World Health Organization Meeting held on 23-24 March 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modjarrad, Kayvon; Giersing, Birgitte; Kaslow, David C; Smith, Peter G; Moorthy, Vasee S

    2016-01-04

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a globally prevalent cause of lower respiratory infection in neonates and infants. Despite its disease burden, a safe and effective RSV vaccine has remained elusive. In recent years, improved understanding of RSV biology and innovations in immunogen design has resulted in the advancement of multiple vaccine candidates into the clinical development pipeline. Given the growing number of vaccines in clinical trials, the rapid pace at which they are being tested, and the likelihood that an RSV vaccine will reach the commercial market in the next 5-10 years, consensus and guidance on clinical development pathways and licensure routes are needed now, before large-scale efficacy trials commence. In pursuit of this aim, the World Health Organization convened the first RSV vaccine consultation in 15 years on the 23rd and 24th of March, 2015 in Geneva, Switzerland. The meeting's primary objective was to provide guidance on clinical endpoints and development pathways for vaccine trials with a focus on considerations of low- and middle-income countries. Meeting participants reached consensus on candidate case definitions for RSV disease, considerations for clinical efficacy endpoints, and the clinical development pathway for active and passive immunization trials in maternal and pediatric populations. The strategic focus of this meeting was on the development of high quality, safe and efficacious RSV preventive interventions for global use and included: (1) maternal/passive immunization to prevent RSV disease in infants less than 6 months; (2) pediatric immunization to prevent RSV disease in infants and young children once protection afforded by maternal immunization wanes.

  3. Contribution of Fcγ receptors to human respiratory syncytial virus pathogenesis and the impairment of T-cell activation by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Roberto S; Ramirez, Bruno A; Céspedes, Pablo F; Cautivo, Kelly M; Riquelme, Sebastián A; Prado, Carolina E; González, Pablo A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of infant hospitalization related to respiratory disease. Infection with hRSV produces abundant infiltration of immune cells into the airways, which combined with an exacerbated pro-inflammatory immune response can lead to significant damage to the lungs. Human RSV re-infection is extremely frequent, suggesting that this virus may have evolved molecular mechanisms that interfere with host adaptive immunity. Infection with hRSV can be reduced by administering a humanized neutralizing antibody against the virus fusion protein in high-risk infants. Although neutralizing antibodies against hRSV effectively block the infection of airway epithelial cells, here we show that both, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and lung DCs undergo infection with IgG-coated virus (hRSV-IC), albeit abortive. Yet, this is enough to negatively modulate DC function. We observed that such a process is mediated by Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) expressed on the surface of DCs. Remarkably, we also observed that in the absence of hRSV-specific antibodies FcγRIII knockout mice displayed significantly less cellular infiltration in the lungs after hRSV infection, compared with wild-type mice, suggesting a potentially harmful, IgG-independent role for this receptor in hRSV disease. Our findings support the notion that FcγRs can contribute significantly to the modulation of DC function by hRSV and hRSV-IC. Further, we provide evidence for an involvement of FcγRIII in the development of hRSV pathogenesis.

  4. Resveratrol inhibits the TRIF-dependent pathway by upregulating sterile alpha and armadillo motif protein, contributing to anti-inflammatory effects after respiratory syncytial virus infection.

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    Liu, Tiantian; Zang, Na; Zhou, Na; Li, Wei; Xie, Xiaohong; Deng, Yu; Ren, Luo; Long, Xiaoru; Li, Simin; Zhou, Lili; Zhao, Xiaodong; Tu, Wenwei; Wang, Lijia; Tan, Bin; Liu, Enmei

    2014-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of lower respiratory tract infection in young children and the leading cause of infant hospitalization worldwide. Uncontrolled response to RSV is mediated by a toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated immune response. Resveratrol possesses anti-RSV activity and is an inhibitor of the TRIF/TBK1/IRF-3 complex. We hypothesize that resveratrol inhibits the TRIF-dependent pathway through upregulation of SARM post-RSV infection. BALB/c mice were infected with RSV and were injected with resveratrol 1 h postinoculation. SARM short interfering RNA was administered to RSV-infected and resveratrol-treated mice. Lung function was measured by whole-body plethysmography, lung histopathology was examined, and lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were quantified. SARM and TRIF protein expression were detected in the lung by Western blot analyses. The expression of gamma interferon in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SARM expression was reduced and TRIF expression was increased after infection with RSV. Resveratrol increased SARM expression and decreased TRIF expression after RSV infection. SARM knockdown in resveratrol-treated mice enhanced gamma interferon production, RSV-induced airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Resveratrol decreased TRIF expression and prevented the RSV-mediated reduction of SARM expression. Resveratrol-mediated inhibition of the TRIF-dependent pathway may be dependent on SARM expression. Our study provides insights into the regulation of innate immunity in response to RSV infection. The results suggest that resveratrol-mediated alterations in SARM have therapeutic potential against RSV immunopathology caused by deregulation of the TLR-mediated immune response. Ultimately, improved insight into the complex interplay between TLR adaptor proteins and the occurrence of severe RSV infection might lead to novel

  5. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway, reactive oxygen species, potassium efflux activates NLRP3/ASC inflammasome during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

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    Jesus Segovia

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV constitute highly pathogenic virus that cause severe respiratory diseases in newborn, children, elderly and immuno-compromised individuals. Airway inflammation is a critical regulator of disease outcome in RSV infected hosts. Although "controlled" inflammation is required for virus clearance, aberrant and exaggerated inflammation during RSV infection results in development of inflammatory diseases like pneumonia and bronchiolitis. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β plays an important role in inflammation by orchestrating the pro-inflammatory response. IL-1β is synthesized as an immature pro-IL-1β form. It is cleaved by activated caspase-1 to yield mature IL-1β that is secreted extracellularly. Activation of caspase-1 is mediated by a multi-protein complex known as the inflammasome. Although RSV infection results in IL-1β release, the mechanism is unknown. Here in, we have characterized the mechanism of IL-1β secretion following RSV infection. Our study revealed that NLRP3/ASC inflammasome activation is crucial for IL-1β production during RSV infection. Further studies illustrated that prior to inflammasome formation; the "first signal" constitutes activation of toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB signaling is required for pro-IL-1β and NLRP3 gene expression during RSV infection. Following expression of these genes, two "second signals" are essential for triggering inflammasome activation. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and potassium (K(+ efflux due to stimulation of ATP-sensitive ion channel promote inflammasome activation following RSV infection. Thus, our studies have underscored the requirement of TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway (first signal and ROS/potassium efflux (second signal for NLRP3/ASC inflammasome formation, leading to caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1β release during RSV infection.

  6. One-step multiplex real time RT-PCR for the detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine parainfluenza virus 3

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    Thonur Leenadevi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of respiratory viruses in veterinary species has traditionally relied on virus detection by isolation or immunofluorescence and/or detection of circulating antibody using ELISA or serum neutralising antibody tests. Multiplex real time PCR is increasingly used to diagnose respiratory viruses in humans and has proved to be superior to traditional methods. Bovine respiratory disease (BRD is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in housed cattle and virus infections can play a major role. We describe here a one step multiplex reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (mRT-qPCR to detect the viruses commonly implicated in BRD. Results A mRT-qPCR assay was developed and optimised for the simultaneous detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine herpes virus type 1 (BoHV-1 and bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPI3 i & ii nucleic acids in clinical samples from cattle. The assay targets the highly conserved glycoprotein B gene of BoHV-1, nucleocapsid gene of BRSV and nucleoprotein gene of BPI3. This mRT-qPCR assay was assessed for sensitivity, specificity and repeatability using in vitro transcribed RNA and recent field isolates. For clinical validation, 541 samples from clinically affected animals were tested and mRT-qPCR result compared to those obtained by conventional testing using virus isolation (VI and/or indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT. Conclusions The mRT-qPCR assay was rapid, highly repeatable, specific and had a sensitivity of 97% in detecting 102 copies of BRSV, BoHV-1 and BPI3 i & ii. This is the first mRT-qPCR developed to detect the three primary viral agents of BRD and the first multiplex designed using locked nucleic acid (LNA, minor groove binding (MGB and TaqMan probes in one reaction mix. This test was more sensitive than both VI and IFAT and can replace the aforesaid methods for virus detection during outbreaks of BRD.

  7. Human respiratory syncytial virus in children with lower respiratory tract infections or influenza-like illness and its co-infection characteristics with viruses and atypical bacteria in Hangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinfen; Kou, Yu; Xia, Daozong; Li, Jun; Yang, Xuhui; Zhou, Yinyan; He, Xiaoyan

    2015-08-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important viral pathogen in children. However, its epidemic patterns and co-infection characteristics are not fully understood. We attempted to determine the level of genetic variation of RSV, and describe the prevalence and co-infection characteristics of RSV in Hangzhou during two epidemic seasons. Single respiratory samples from 1820 pediatric patients were screened for RSV and genotyped by RT-PCR and sequencing. In all RSV positive specimens, we screened for viruses and atypical bacteria. Demographic and clinical information was recorded and analyzed. A total of 34.5% and 3.8% of samples from acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI) and influenza-like illness (ILI) were positive for RSV, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 61.1% of the selected 167 RSV strains were NA1, 31.1% were BA, 3.6% were ON1, 2.4% were CB1, and 1.8% were NA3. A new genotype, BA11 was identified, which comprised 98.1% of BA strains in this study, while the rest were BA10. A total of 36.4% and 9.1% of RSV-positive children with ALRI and ILI respectively were found to be co-infected. Rhinovirus was the most common additional respiratory virus, followed by human metapneumovirus. Except for fever, no significant differences in other clinical presentation between the RSV mono-infection and co-infection groups were observed. The circulating RSV strains had high genetic variability with RSV-B showing a more local pattern. In ALRI cases, co-infection of RSV with other viruses or atypical bacteria has no significant effect on the clinical presentation except fever. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus: immunohistochemichal detection in mouse and bovine tissues using a Mab against human respiratory syncytial virus Vírus respiratório sincicial bovino: detecção por imunoistoquímica em tecidos de camundongos e bovinos usando AcM contra o vírus respiratório sincicial humano

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    R.S. Almeida

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An immunoistochemical (IHC test was developed to detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV in cell cultures and tissues of experimentally infected mice and calves, using a commercial monoclonal antibody (Mab against human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, as a less expensive alternative, instead of producing specific monoclonal antibodies to BRSV. Clinical samples from calves suffering respiratory disease were also submitted to this test. IHC detected BRSV antigens in mouse tracheas (3, 5 and 7 days post-infection and lungs (5 and 7 days post-infection, and in one of three lungs from experimentally infected calves. Lungs samples from two naturally infected calves were tested and resulted positive for BRSV by the IHC test. These results suggest that this test may be used in the future for diagnosis as well as a useful tool to assess the distribution of BRSV infections in Brazilian herds.Desenvolveu-se um teste de imunohistoquímica (IHQ para detecção do vírus respiratório sincicial bovino (BRSV multiplicado em cultivo celular e em tecidos de camundongos e bezerros infectados experimentalmente, utilizando um anticorpo monoclonal comercial contra o vírus respiratório sincicial humano (HRSV, como uma alternativa para eliminar os custos de produção de anticorpos monoclonais específicos para o BRSV. Amostras clínicas de bezerros com sintomatologia respiratória foram analisadas. A técnica mostrou-se eficiente na detecção de antígenos do BRSV em traquéias (3, 5 e 7 dias pós-infecção e pulmões (5 e 7 dias pós-infecção dos camundongos infectados e em uma das três amostras de pulmões dos bezerros infectados experimentalmente. Amostras de pulmões de dois animais com infecção natural foram positivas para BRSV. Conclui-se que o teste de IHQ pode ser usado no diagnóstico das infecções por BRSV e na avaliação da distribuição dessas infecções nos rebanhos bovinos brasileiros.

  9. Humane metapneumovirus (HMPV) associated pulmonary infections in immunocompromised adults—Initial CT findings, disease course and comparison to respiratory-syncytial-virus (RSV) induced pulmonary infections

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    Syha, R., E-mail: roland.syha@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str.3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Beck, R. [Institute of Medical Virology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Elfriede-Authorn-Str. 6, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Hetzel, J. [Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Otfried-Müller-Str. 10, 72070 Tübingen (Germany); Ketelsen, D.; Grosse, U.; Springer, F.; Horger, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str.3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Aim: To describe computed tomography (CT)-imaging findings in human metapneumovirus (HMPV)-related pulmonary infection as well as their temporal course and to analyze resemblances/differences to pulmonary infection induced by the closely related respiratory-syncytial-virus (RSV) in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: Chest-CT-scans of 10 HMPV PCR-positive patients experiencing pulmonary symptoms were evaluated retrospectively with respect to imaging findings and their distribution and results were then compared with data acquired in 13 patients with RSV pulmonary infection. Subsequently, we analyzed the course of chest-findings in HMPV patients. Results: In HMPV, 8/10 patients showed asymmetric pulmonary findings, whereas 13/13 patients with RSV-pneumonia presented more symmetrical bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Image analysis yielded in HMPV patients following results: ground-glass-opacity (GGO) (n = 6), parenchymal airspace consolidations (n = 5), ill-defined nodular-like centrilobular opacities (n = 9), bronchial wall thickening (n = 8). In comparison, results in RSV patients were: GGO (n = 10), parenchymal airspace consolidations (n = 9), ill-defined nodular-like centrilobular opacities (n = 10), bronchial wall thickening (n = 4). In the course of the disease, signs of acute HMPV interstitial pneumonia regressed transforming temporarily in part into findings compatible with bronchitis/bronchiolitis. Conclusions: Early chest-CT findings in patients with HMPV-related pulmonary symptoms are compatible with asymmetric acute interstitial pneumonia accompanied by signs of bronchitis; the former transforming with time into bronchitis and bronchiolitis before they resolve. On the contrary, RSV-induced pulmonary infection exhibits mainly symmetric acute interstitial pneumonia.

  10. Phosphorylation of the human respiratory syncytial virus P protein mediates M2-2 regulation of viral RNA synthesis, a process that involves two P proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Ana; Villanueva, Nieves

    2016-01-04

    The M2-2 protein regulates the balance between human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) transcription and replication. Here it is shown that M2-2 mediated transcriptional inhibition is managed through P protein phosphorylation. Transcription inhibition by M2-2 of the HRSV based minigenome pRSVluc, required P protein phosphorylation at serines (S) in positions 116, 117, 119 and increased inhibition is observed if S232 or S237 is also phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of these residues is required for viral particle egression from infected cells. Viral RNA synthesis complementation assays between P protein variants, suggest that two types of P proteins participate in the process as components of RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). Type I is only functional when, as a homotetramer, it is bound to N and L proteins through residues 203-241. Type II is functionally independent of these interactions and binds to N protein at a region outside residues 232-241. P protein type I phosphorylation at S116, S117 and S119, did not affect the activity of RdRp but this phosphorylation in type II avoids its interaction with N protein and impairs RdRp functionality for transcription and replication. Structural changes in the RdRp, mediated by phosphorylation turnover at the indicated residues, in the two types of P proteins, may result in a fine adjustment, late in the infectious cycle, of transcription, replication and progression in the morphogenetic process that ends in egression of the viral particles from infected cells.

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus-like nanoparticle vaccination induces long-term protection without pulmonary disease by modulating cytokines and T-cells partially through alveolar macrophages

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    Lee YT

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Young-Tae Lee,1,* Eun-Ju Ko,1,2,* Hye Suk Hwang,1,2 Jong Seok Lee,1,3 Ki-Hye Kim,1 Young-Man Kwon,1 Sang-Moo Kang1,2 1Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, 2Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The mechanisms of protection against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV are poorly understood. Virus-like nanoparticles expressing RSV glycoproteins (eg, a combination of fusion and glycoprotein virus-like nanoparticles [FG VLPs] have been suggested to be a promising RSV vaccine candidate. To understand the roles of alveolar macrophages (AMs in inducing long-term protection, mice that were 12 months earlier vaccinated with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV or FG VLPs were treated with clodronate liposome prior to RSV infection. FI-RSV immune mice with clodronate liposome treatment showed increases in eosinophils, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, interleukin (IL-4+ T-cell infiltration, proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and, in particular, mucus production upon RSV infection. In contrast to FI-RSV immune mice with severe pulmonary histopathology, FG VLP immune mice showed no overt sign of histopathology and significantly lower levels of eosinophils, T-cell infiltration, and inflammatory cytokines, but higher levels of interferon-γ, which are correlated with protection against RSV disease. FG VLP immune mice with depletion of AMs showed increases in inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as eosinophils. The results in this study suggest that FG nanoparticle vaccination induces long-term protection against RSV and that AMs play a role in the RSV protection by modulating eosinophilia, mucus production, inflammatory cytokines, and T-cell infiltration. Keywords: alveolar macrophage, nanoparticle vaccine, VLP, FI-RSV, RSV disease

  12. A high burden of respiratory syncytial virus associated pneumonia in children less than two years of age in a South East Asian refugee population.

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    Claudia Turner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pneumonia is a major cause of childhood mortality and morbidity approximately 1.6 million deaths and 150 million episodes occur annually in children <5 years. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV may be responsible for up to 25% of cases and 12% of deaths making it an important potential vaccine target, although data from South East Asia is scarce. METHODS: We followed a birth cohort of Burmese refugee children, born over a one year period, for two years. Pneumonia episodes were diagnosed using WHO criteria. A chest radiograph, nasopharyngeal aspirate and non-specific markers of infection were taken during each episode. RESULTS: The incidence of RSV-associated pneumonia was 0.24 (95% CI 0.22-0.26 episodes per child year. All children with pneumonia received antibiotic treatment, following WHO guidelines. The highest incidence was in the 2-12 month age group. The commonest diagnosis in a child with RSV-associated pneumonia was non-severe pneumonia (239/362:66.0%, however the incidence of RSV-associated severe or very severe pneumonia was 0.08 (95% CI 0.01-0.10 episodes per child year. Birth in the wet season increased the risk of severe disease in children who had their first episode of RSV-associated pneumonia aged 2-11 months (OR 28.7, 95% CI 6.6-125.0, p<0.001. RSV episodes were highly seasonal being responsible for 80.0% of all the pneumonia episodes occurring each October and November over the study period. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high incidence of RSV associated pneumonia in this refugee population. Interventions to prevent RSV infection have the potential to reduce the incidence of clinically diagnosed pneumonia and hence unnecessary antibiotic usage in this population.

  13. Characterization of the interaction between human respiratory syncytial virus and the cell cycle in continuous cell culture and primary human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weining; Munday, Diane C; Howell, Gareth; Platt, Gareth; Barr, John N; Hiscox, Julian A

    2011-10-01

    Viruses can modify conditions inside cells to make them more favorable for replication and progeny virus production. One way of doing this is through manipulation of the cell cycle, a process that describes the ordered growth and division of cells. Analysis of model cell lines, such as A549 cells and primary airway epithelial cells, infected with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) has shown alteration of the cell cycle during infection, although the signaling events were not clearly understood. In this study, targeted transcriptomic analysis of HRSV-infected primary airway epithelial cells revealed alterations in the abundances of many mRNAs encoding cell cycle-regulatory molecules, including decreases in the D-type cyclins and corresponding cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6 [CDK4/6]). These alterations were reflected in changes in protein abundance and/or relocalization in HRSV-infected cells; taken together, they were predicted to result in G(0)/G(1) phase arrest. In contrast, there was no change in the abundances of D-type cyclins in A549 cells infected with HRSV. However, the abundance of the G(1)/S phase progression inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1) was increased over that in mock-treated cells, and this, again, was predicted to result in G(0)/G(1) phase arrest. The G(0)/G(1) phase arrest in both HRSV-infected primary cells and A549 cells was confirmed using dual-label flow cytometry that accurately measured the different stages of the cell cycle. Comparison of progeny virus production in primary and A549 cells enriched in G(0)/G(1) using a specific CDK4/6 kinase inhibitor with asynchronously replicating cells indicated that this phase of the cell cycle was more efficient for virus production.

  14. Characterization of the Interaction between Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and the Cell Cycle in Continuous Cell Culture and Primary Human Airway Epithelial Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weining; Munday, Diane C.; Howell, Gareth; Platt, Gareth; Barr, John N.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2011-01-01

    Viruses can modify conditions inside cells to make them more favorable for replication and progeny virus production. One way of doing this is through manipulation of the cell cycle, a process that describes the ordered growth and division of cells. Analysis of model cell lines, such as A549 cells and primary airway epithelial cells, infected with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) has shown alteration of the cell cycle during infection, although the signaling events were not clearly understood. In this study, targeted transcriptomic analysis of HRSV-infected primary airway epithelial cells revealed alterations in the abundances of many mRNAs encoding cell cycle-regulatory molecules, including decreases in the D-type cyclins and corresponding cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6 [CDK4/6]). These alterations were reflected in changes in protein abundance and/or relocalization in HRSV-infected cells; taken together, they were predicted to result in G0/G1 phase arrest. In contrast, there was no change in the abundances of D-type cyclins in A549 cells infected with HRSV. However, the abundance of the G1/S phase progression inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 was increased over that in mock-treated cells, and this, again, was predicted to result in G0/G1 phase arrest. The G0/G1 phase arrest in both HRSV-infected primary cells and A549 cells was confirmed using dual-label flow cytometry that accurately measured the different stages of the cell cycle. Comparison of progeny virus production in primary and A549 cells enriched in G0/G1 using a specific CDK4/6 kinase inhibitor with asynchronously replicating cells indicated that this phase of the cell cycle was more efficient for virus production. PMID:21795354

  15. A novel respiratory syncytial virus (RSV F subunit vaccine adjuvanted with GLA-SE elicits robust protective TH1-type humoral and cellular immunity in rodent models.

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    Stacie L Lambert

    Full Text Available Illness associated with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV remains an unmet medical need in both full-term infants and older adults. The fusion glycoprotein (F of RSV, which plays a key role in RSV infection and is a target of neutralizing antibodies, is an attractive vaccine target for inducing RSV-specific immunity.BALB/c mice and cotton rats, two well-characterized rodent models of RSV infection, were used to evaluate the immunogenicity of intramuscularly administered RSV vaccine candidates consisting of purified soluble F (sF protein formulated with TLR4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA, stable emulsion (SE, GLA-SE, or alum adjuvants. Protection from RSV challenge, serum RSV neutralizing responses, and anti-F IgG responses were induced by all of the tested adjuvanted RSV sF vaccine formulations. However, only RSV sF + GLA-SE induced robust F-specific TH1-biased humoral and cellular responses. In mice, these F-specific cellular responses include both CD4 and CD8 T cells, with F-specific polyfunctional CD8 T cells that traffic to the mouse lung following RSV challenge. This RSV sF + GLA-SE vaccine formulation can also induce robust RSV neutralizing titers and prime IFNγ-producing T cell responses in Sprague Dawley rats.These studies indicate that a protein subunit vaccine consisting of RSV sF + GLA-SE can induce robust neutralizing antibody and T cell responses to RSV, enhancing viral clearance via a TH1 immune-mediated mechanism. This vaccine may benefit older populations at risk for RSV disease.

  16. Major Histocompatibility Complex-Dependent Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Repertoire and Functional Avidity Contribute to Strain-Specific Disease Susceptibility after Murine Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Birthe; Faller, Simone; Krempl, Christine D.; Ehl, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in mice is genetically determined. While RSV causes little pathology in C57BL/6 mice, pulmonary inflammation and weight loss occur in BALB/c mice. Using major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-congenic mice, we observed that the H-2d allele can partially transfer disease susceptibility to C57BL/6 mice. This was not explained by altered viral elimination or differences in the magnitude of the overall virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. However, H-2d mice showed a more focused response, with 70% of virus-specific CTL representing Vβ8.2+ CTL directed against the immunodominant epitope M2-1 82, while in H-2b mice only 20% of antiviral CTL were Vβ9+ CTL specific for the immunodominant epitope M187. The immunodominant H-2d-restricted CTL lysed target cells less efficiently than the immunodominant H-2b CTL, probably contributing to prolonged CTL stimulation and cytokine-mediated immunopathology. Accordingly, reduction of dominance of the M2-1 82-specific CTL population by introduction of an M187 response in the F1 generation of a C57BL/6N × C57BL/6-H-2d mating (C57BL/6-H-2dxb mice) attenuated disease. Moreover, disease in H-2d mice was less pronounced after infection with an RSV mutant failing to activate M2-1 82-specific CTL or after depletion of Vβ8.2+ cells. These data illustrate how the MHC-determined diversity and functional avidity of CTL responses contribute to disease susceptibility after viral infection. PMID:21795345

  17. Seasonality of Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Viruses and the Effect of Climate Factors in Subtropical–Tropical Asia Using Influenza-Like Illness Surveillance Data, 2010 –2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Alvin G.; Tamaki, Raita; Alday, Portia P.; Javier, Jenaline B.; Olveda, Remigio M.; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Tallo, Veronica L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The seasonality of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is well known, and many analyses have been conducted in temperate countries; however, this is still not well understood in tropical countries. Previous studies suggest that climate factors are involved in the seasonality of these viruses. However, the extent of the effect of each climate variable is yet to be defined. Materials and Methods We investigated the pattern of seasonality and the effect of climate variables on influenza and RSV at three sites of different latitudes: the Eastern Visayas region and Baguio City in the Philippines, and Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Wavelet analysis and the dynamic linear regression model were applied. Climate variables used in the analysis included mean temperature, relative and specific humidity, precipitation, and number of rainy days. The Akaike Information Criterion estimated in each model was used to test the improvement of fit in comparison with the baseline model. Results At all three study sites, annual seasonal peaks were observed in influenza A and RSV; peaks were unclear for influenza B. Ranges of climate variables at the two Philippine sites were narrower and mean variables were significantly different among the three sites. Whereas all climate variables except the number of rainy days improved model fit to the local trend model, their contributions were modest. Mean temperature and specific humidity were positively associated with influenza and RSV at the Philippine sites and negatively associated with influenza A in Okinawa. Precipitation also improved model fit for influenza and RSV at both Philippine sites, except for the influenza A model in the Eastern Visayas. Conclusions Annual seasonal peaks were observed for influenza A and RSV but were less clear for influenza B at all three study sites. Including additional data from subsequent more years would help to ascertain these findings. Annual amplitude and variation in climate

  18. Seasonality of Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Viruses and the Effect of Climate Factors in Subtropical-Tropical Asia Using Influenza-Like Illness Surveillance Data, 2010 -2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamigaki, Taro; Chaw, Liling; Tan, Alvin G; Tamaki, Raita; Alday, Portia P; Javier, Jenaline B; Olveda, Remigio M; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Tallo, Veronica L

    2016-01-01

    The seasonality of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is well known, and many analyses have been conducted in temperate countries; however, this is still not well understood in tropical countries. Previous studies suggest that climate factors are involved in the seasonality of these viruses. However, the extent of the effect of each climate variable is yet to be defined. We investigated the pattern of seasonality and the effect of climate variables on influenza and RSV at three sites of different latitudes: the Eastern Visayas region and Baguio City in the Philippines, and Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Wavelet analysis and the dynamic linear regression model were applied. Climate variables used in the analysis included mean temperature, relative and specific humidity, precipitation, and number of rainy days. The Akaike Information Criterion estimated in each model was used to test the improvement of fit in comparison with the baseline model. At all three study sites, annual seasonal peaks were observed in influenza A and RSV; peaks were unclear for influenza B. Ranges of climate variables at the two Philippine sites were narrower and mean variables were significantly different among the three sites. Whereas all climate variables except the number of rainy days improved model fit to the local trend model, their contributions were modest. Mean temperature and specific humidity were positively associated with influenza and RSV at the Philippine sites and negatively associated with influenza A in Okinawa. Precipitation also improved model fit for influenza and RSV at both Philippine sites, except for the influenza A model in the Eastern Visayas. Annual seasonal peaks were observed for influenza A and RSV but were less clear for influenza B at all three study sites. Including additional data from subsequent more years would help to ascertain these findings. Annual amplitude and variation in climate variables are more important than their absolute values for

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus genomic load and disease severity among children hospitalized with bronchiolitis: multicenter cohort studies in the United States and Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Jartti, Tuomas; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Laham, Federico R; Jewell, Alan M; Espinola, Janice A; Piedra, Pedro A; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-05-15

    We investigated whether children with a higher respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) genomic load are at a higher risk of more-severe bronchiolitis. Two multicenter prospective cohort studies in the United States and Finland used the same protocol to enroll children aged bronchiolitis and collect nasopharyngeal aspirates. By using real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, patients were classified into 3 genomic load status groups: low, intermediate, and high. Outcome measures were a length of hospital stay (LOS) of ≥3 days and intensive care use, defined as admission to the intensive care unit or use of mechanical ventilation. Of 2615 enrolled children, 1764 (67%) had RSV bronchiolitis. Children with a low genomic load had a higher unadjusted risk of having a length of stay of ≥3 days (52%), compared with children with intermediate and those with high genomic loads (42% and 51%, respectively). In a multivariable model, the risk of having a length of stay of ≥3 days remained significantly higher in the groups with intermediate (odds ratio [OR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-1.69) and high (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.29-1.94) genomic loads. Similarly, children with a high genomic load had a higher risk of intensive care use (20%, compared with 15% and 16% in the groups with low and intermediate genomic loads, respectively). In a multivariable model, the risk remained significantly higher in the group with a high genomic load (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.03-1.99). Children with a higher RSV genomic load had a higher risk for more-severe bronchiolitis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Diversity and Adaptation of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genotypes Circulating in Two Distinct Communities: Public Hospital and Day Care Center

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    Gustavo Rocha Garcia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available HRSV is one of the most important pathogens causing acute respiratory tract diseases as bronchiolitis and pneumonia among infants. HRSV was isolated from two distinct communities, a public day care center and a public hospital in São José do Rio Preto – SP, Brazil. We obtained partial sequences from G gene that were used on phylogenetic and selection pressure analysis. HRSV accounted for 29% of respiratory infections in hospitalized children and 7.7% in day care center children. On phylogenetic analysis of 60 HRSV strains, 48 (80% clustered within or adjacent to the GA1 genotype; GA5, NA1, NA2, BA-IV and SAB1 were also observed. SJRP GA1 strains presented variations among deduced amino acids composition and lost the potential O-glycosilation site at amino acid position 295, nevertheless this resulted in an insertion of two potential O-glycosilation sites at positions 296 and 297. Furthermore, a potential O-glycosilation site insertion, at position 293, was only observed for hospital strains. Using SLAC and MEME methods, only amino acid 274 was identified to be under positive selection. This is the first report on HRSV circulation and genotypes classification derived from a day care center community in Brazil.

  1. Genetics, recombination and clinical features of human rhinovirus species C (HRV-C infections; interactions of HRV-C with other respiratory viruses.

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    Anne Wisdom

    Full Text Available To estimate the frequency, molecular epidemiological and clinical associations of infection with the newly described species C variants of human rhinoviruses (HRV, 3243 diagnostic respiratory samples referred for diagnostic testing in Edinburgh were screened using a VP4-encoding region-based selective polymerase chain reaction (PCR for HRV-C along with parallel PCR testing for 13 other respiratory viruses. HRV-C was the third most frequently detected behind respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and adenovirus, with 141 infection episodes detected among 1885 subjects over 13 months (7.5%. Infections predominantly targeted the very young (median age 6-12 months; 80% of infections in those <2 years, occurred throughout the year but with peak incidence in early winter months. HRV-C was detected significantly more frequently among subjects with lower (LRT and upper respiratory tract (URT disease than controls without respiratory symptoms; HRV-C mono-infections were the second most frequently detected virus (behind RSV in both disease presentations (6.9% and 7.8% of all cases respectively. HRV variants were classified by VP4/VP2 sequencing into 39 genotypically defined types, increasing the current total worldwide to 60. Through sequence comparisons of the 5'untranslated region (5'UTR, the majority grouped with species A (n = 96; 68%, described as HRV-Ca, the remainder forming a phylogenetically distinct 5'UTR group (HRV-Cc. Multiple and bidirectional recombination events between HRV-Ca and HRV-Cc variants and with HRV species A represents the most parsimonious explanation for their interspersed phylogeny relationships in the VP4/VP2-encoding region. No difference in age distribution, seasonality or disease associations was identified between HRV-Ca and HRV-Cc variants. HRV-C-infected subjects showed markedly reduced detection frequencies of RSV and other respiratory viruses, providing evidence for a major interfering effect of HRV-C on susceptibility to

  2. Hibridación in situ del virus respiratorio syncytial bovino en pulmón de cordero a diferentes tiempos postinfección Bovine respiratory syncytial virus in-situ hybridization from sheep lungs at different times postinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. REDONDO

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió, mediante la técnica de hibridación in situ, la distribución del ARN viral del virus respiratorio Sincicial Bovino (VRSB en pulmón de corderos infectados en forma experimental, a diferentes tiempos postinoculación. La sonda usada para la hibridación in situ se preparó mediante transcripción reversa del ARN del VRSB, seguida de la amplificación mediante PCR de cADN. 25 corderos de raza Merino de ambos sexos y de un peso vivo de 55 (+/- 10 Kg, fueron inoculados por vía intratraqueal con 40 ml de solución salina que contenía 1.26 x 10(6 DIM50 por ml (cepa viral NMK7. Los corderos se sacrificaron los días 1, 3, 7, 11 y 15 postinoculación. Las células epiteliales bronquiales y bronquiolares resultaron positivas a los ácidos nucleicos de VRSB los días 1, 3, 7 y 11 postinoculación. A su vez, el epitelio alveolar contenía células positivas los días 1, 3, y 7 postinoculación. Se detectaron células que contenían el ARN viral en las luces bronquiales y bronquilares del día 1 al 11 postinoculación, y en el exudadado alveolar en los días 3 y 7 postinoculación. Se identificaron señales positivas de hibridación desde el día 3 al 11 postinoculación, tanto en las células intersticiales mononucleares como en el tejido linfoide asociado a los bronquios. Las señales de hibridación más intensas se detectaron a los días 3 y 7 postinoculación, lo que coincidió con las lesiones histopatológicas de mayor consideraciónWe studied the distribution of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV RNA in lungs of experimentally infected sheep by in situhybridization at different times postinfection. The probe used for in-situ hybridization was prepared by reverse transcription of BRSV RNA, followed by PCR amplification of the cDNA. Twenty five Merino sheeps of both sexes with a live weight of 55± 10 Kg, received a intratracheal inoculation of 40 ml saline solution containing 1.26 x 10(6 TCID50 BRSV (strain NMK7 per ml. Sheep

  3. Use of palivizumab and infection control measures to control an outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus in a neonatal intensive care unit confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, K

    2011-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a potentially life-threatening infection in premature infants. We report an outbreak involving four infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of our hospital that occurred in February 2010. RSV A infection was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Palivizumab was administered to all infants in the NICU. There were no additional symptomatic cases and repeat RSV surveillance confirmed that there was no further cross-transmission within the unit. The outbreak highlighted the infection control challenge of very high bed occupancy in the unit and the usefulness of molecular methods in facilitating detection and management.

  4. Advances in pharmacotherapy of respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus infections%呼吸道合胞病毒和鼻病毒呼吸道感染药物治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宇红; 申昆玲

    2004-01-01

    病毒性呼吸道感染是儿科的常见病、多发病。近年来,对呼吸道病毒感染的防治进行了大量的研究,在治疗呼吸道合胞病毒(Respiratory syncytial vims,RSV)和鼻病毒感染方面出现了一些新的研究成果,现综述如下。

  5. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of an Intramuscular Monoclonal Antibody (SB 209763) against Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) in Infants and Young Children at Risk for Severe RSV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, H. Cody; Groothuis, Jessie R.; Rodriguez, William J.; Welliver, Robert C.; Hogg, Geoff; Gray, Peter H.; Loh, Richard; Simoes, Eric A. F.; Sly, Peter; Miller, Ann K.; Nichols, Alice I.; Jorkasky, Diane K.; Everitt, Daniel E.; Thompson, Kathleen A.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of a humanized monoclonal antibody against a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein (SB 209763) to evaluate its safety, pharmacokinetics, and fusion inhibition and neutralization titers. Forty-three infants who were either delivered prematurely (≤35 weeks’ gestation) or exhibited bronchopulmonary dysplasia were administered either single or repeat (two doses, 8 weeks apart) intramuscular injections of SB 209763 at a concentration of 0.25, 1.25, 5.0, or 10.0 mg/kg or of a placebo. Four of 229 adverse events were considered related to the study drug, including purpura (n = 3) and thrombocytosis (n = 1). No subject developed a detectable level of anti-SB 209763 antibody. Approximately 1 week after administration of the second dose of SB 209763 at 10 mg/kg, the mean plasma concentration (n = 9) was 68.5 μg/ml. The terminal half-life (T1/2) determined by noncompartmental analysis ranged from 22 to 50 days. The population pharmacokinetics for SB 209763 following intramuscular administration was appropriately described by a one-compartment model with first-order input and elimination. Higher values for clearance and volume of distribution at steady state were observed for younger patients, with values decreasing to 0.143 (ml/h)/kg and 161 mL/kg, respectively, by a mean age of 298 days (∼10 months). The mean T1/2 of SB 209763 for the study population was 32.5 days. No other factor (dose, weight, gender, race, premature birth, or bronchopulmonary dysplasia) was observed to alter the population pharmacokinetics of SB 209763 in this study of infants and young children. The mean neutralization titer on day 6 was 286, and the mean fusion inhibition titer was 36. At least 57% of subjects dosed at 1.25 to 10.0 mg of SB 209763 per kg of body weight who were seronegative at baseline experienced a fourfold or greater increase in fusion inhibition titer. Nine RSV infections were documented

  6. Effects of human respiratory syncytial virus, metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus 3 and influenza virus on CD4+ T cell activation by dendritic cells.

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    Cyril Le Nouën

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, and to a lesser extent human metapneumovirus (HMPV and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3, re-infect symptomatically throughout life without antigenic change, suggestive of incomplete immunity. One causative factor is thought to be viral interference with dendritic cell (DC-mediated stimulation of CD4+ T cells. METHODOLOGY, PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We infected human monocyte-derived DC with purified HRSV, HMPV, HPIV3, or influenza A virus (IAV and compared their ability to induce activation and proliferation of autologous CD4+ T cells in vitro. IAV was included because symptomatic re-infection without antigenic change is less frequent, suggesting that immune protection is more complete and durable. We examined virus-specific memory responses and superantigen-induced responses by multiparameter flow cytometry. Live virus was more stimulatory than inactivated virus in inducing DC-mediated proliferation of virus-specific memory CD4+ T cells, suggesting a lack of strong suppression by live virus. There were trends of increasing proliferation in the order: HMPVrespiratory viruses are similar in their ability to induce DC to activate CD4+ T cells. Thus, the results do not support the common model in which viral suppression of CD4+ T cell activation and

  7. Characterization of Epitope-Specific Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Anti-RSV) Antibody Responses after Natural Infection and after Vaccination with Formalin-Inactivated RSV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, Ivy; Wicht, Oliver; Luytjes, Willem; Leenhouts, Kees; Rottier, Peter J M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Haijema, Bert Jan; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2016-07-01

    Antibodies against the fusion (F) protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) play an important role in the protective immune response to this important respiratory virus. Little is known, however, about antibody levels against multiple F-specific epitopes induced by infection or after vaccination against RSV, while this is important to guide the evaluation of (novel) vaccines. In this study, we analyzed antibody levels against RSV proteins and F-specific epitopes in human sera and in sera of vaccinated and experimentally infected cotton rats and the correlation thereof with virus neutralization. Analysis of human sera revealed substantial diversity in antibody levels against F-, G (attachment)-, and F-specific epitopes between individuals. The highest correlation with virus neutralization was observed for antibodies recognizing prefusion-specific antigenic site Ø. Nevertheless, our results indicate that high levels of antibodies targeting other parts of the F protein can also mediate a potent antiviral antibody response. In agreement, sera of experimentally infected cotton rats contained high neutralizing activity despite lacking antigenic site Ø-specific antibodies. Strikingly, vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) exclusively resulted in the induction of poorly neutralizing antibodies against postfusion-specific antigenic site I, although antigenic sites I, II, and IV were efficiently displayed in FI-RSV. The apparent immunodominance of antigenic site I in FI-RSV likely explains the low levels of neutralizing antibodies upon vaccination and challenge and may play a role in the vaccination-induced enhancement of disease observed with such preparations. RSV is an importance cause of hospitalization of infants. The development of a vaccine against RSV has been hampered by the disastrous results obtained with FI-RSV vaccine preparations in the 1960s that resulted in vaccination-induced enhancement of disease. To get a better understanding of the

  8. Trends in Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Bronchiolitis Hospitalization Rates in High-Risk Infants in a United States Nationally Representative Database, 1997-2012.

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    Abigail Doucette

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV causes significant pediatric morbidity and is the most common cause of bronchiolitis. Bronchiolitis hospitalizations declined among US infants from 2000‒2009; however, rates in infants at high risk for RSV have not been described. This study examined RSV and unspecified bronchiolitis (UB hospitalization rates from 1997‒2012 among US high-risk infants.The Kids' Inpatient Database (KID infant annual RSV (ICD-9 079.6, 466.11, 480.1 and UB (ICD-9 466.19, 466.1 hospitalization rates were estimated using weighted counts. Denominators were based on birth hospitalizations with conditions associated with high-risk for RSV: chronic perinatal respiratory disease (chronic lung disease [CLD]; congenital airway anomalies (CAA; congenital heart disease (CHD; Down syndrome (DS; and other genetic, metabolic, musculoskeletal, and immunodeficiency conditions. Preterm infants could not be identified. Hospitalizations were characterized by mechanical ventilation, inpatient mortality, length of stay, and total cost (2015$. Poisson and linear regression were used to test statistical significance of trends.RSV and UB hospitalization rates were substantially elevated for infants with higher-risk CHD, CLD, CAA and DS without CHD compared with all infants. RSV rates declined by 47.0% in CLD and 49.7% in higher-risk CHD infants; no other declines in high-risk groups were observed. UB rates increased in all high-risk groups except for a 22.5% decrease among higher-risk CHD. Among high-risk infants, mechanical ventilation increased through 2012 to 20.4% and 13.5% of RSV and UB hospitalizations; geometric mean cost increased to $31,742 and $25,962, respectively, and RSV mortality declined to 0.9%.Among high-risk infants between 1997 and 2012, RSV hospitalization rates declined among CLD and higher-risk CHD infants, coincident with widespread RSV immunoprophylaxis use in these populations. UB hospitalization rates increased in all high

  9. Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in infants and children: relationship with attendance at a paediatric emergency unit and characteristics of the circulating strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, R; Durando, P; Ansaldi, F; Sticchi, L; Banfi, F; Amicizia, D; Panatto, D; Esposito, S; Principi, N; Icardi, G; Crovari, P

    2007-09-01

    A study was carried out on 2,696 Italian children, aged 0-14 years. The goals were: (1) to define the age-related impact of acute respiratory infections (ARI), measured as the risk of attendance at the Paediatric Emergency Room, (2) to better define the importance and proportion of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections and (3) to acquire deeper knowledge of the influenza strains circulating in infants and children. A standardised emergency unit attendance risk (EUAR) was calculated, by age group for ARI. Specific EUARs were also calculated for the two pathogens. Pharyngeal swabs were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for influenza and RSVs. Isolation in Madine-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK) and Hep cells, haemagglutination inhibition (HI) testing and HA1 gene sequence analysis were performed for influenza viruses. Most of the patients enrolled were aged 0-5 years, 1,139 (84.6%) and 1,061 (78.5%) in the two seasons, respectively. The most represented age class was that of 1 year olds (331 cases in 2001-2002 and 301 in 2002-2003). The highest EUAR for ARI was in patients aged 0-3 years (16.8 and 12.9 during the two seasons). The same was observed on calculating this risk by specific pathogens: 17.4 and 5.5 for influenza and 13.0 and 12.7 for RSV. Virological analysis was performed on 2,696 samples, 595 of which proved positive (22%). The highest number of isolates (326) came from patients aged 1-3 years. RSVs were more often identified than influenza viruses in infants aged up to 1 year (32 vs. 20 isolates). Of 265 strains isolated in 2001-2002, 103 were RSVs (87 type A, 16 B) and 162 were influenza (90 type A, 72 B). HI showed that influenza B viruses were related to two lineages, B/Victoria/2/87 (32%) and B/Yamagata/16/88 (68%). Of 330 strains isolated in 2002-2003, 102 were RSVs (91 type A, 11 B) and 228 were influenza viruses (220 type A, 8 B). A/H3N2 strains belonged to two clusters, A/Panama/2007/99-like and A/Fujian/411/02-like

  10. Observation of high recombination occurrence of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus in field condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzo, Giovanni; Cecchinato, Mattia; Martini, Marco; Ceglie, Letizia; Gigli, Alessandra; Drigo, Michele

    2014-12-19

    Recombination in Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) is a well-documented phenomenon. A high recombination frequency has been reported in experimental conditions both in vitro and in vivo, and its role in driving viral evolution has been postulated by several authors. However field evidences are rare, mainly obtained from large-scale sampling and typically represented by single sequences rather than by groups of circulating "recombinant progenies". The present work was aimed to investigate the gray area between experimental studies and large-scale epidemiological investigations. The study was performed on ORF5, ORF7 and concatenated sequences obtained in our laboratory or available in GenBank collected between 2009 and 2012 in northern Italy. Six independent recombinant strains out of 66 concatenated sequences (∼9%) were found, demonstrating a high recombination frequency respect to previous field studies but comparable to in vitro experiments. In silico analysis let speculate that this new strain displayed physicochemical features diverse enough to potentially alter its immunological properties. Taken altogether, the results of our study support previous experimental evidences that depict PRRSV to be extremely prone to recombination. The limited temporal and geographical spread of recombinant strains however states in favor of a limited fitness of the recombinant progeny compared to parental strains and the marginal role of this phenomenon in PRRSV evolution.

  11. Attenuated human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV1) expressing the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion F glycoprotein from an added gene: effects of pre-fusion stabilization and packaging of RSV F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Liang, Bo; Ngwuta, Joan; Liu, Xueqiao; Surman, Sonja; Lingemann, Matthias; Kwong, Peter D; Graham, Barney S; Collins, Peter L; Munir, Shirin

    2017-08-23

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most prevalent worldwide cause of severe respiratory tract infection in infants and young children. Human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV1) also causes severe pediatric respiratory illness, especially croup. Both viruses lack vaccines. Here, we describe the preclinical development of a bivalent RSV/HPIV1 vaccine based on a recombinant HPIV1 vector, attenuated by a stabilized mutation, that expresses RSV F protein modified for increased stability in the pre-fusion (pre-F) conformation by previously-described disulfide bond (DS) and hydrophobic cavity-filling (Cav1) mutations. RSV F was expressed from the first or second gene position as the full-length protein or as a chimeric protein with its transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic tail (CT) domains substituted with those of HPIV1 F in an effort to direct packaging in the vector particles. All constructs were recovered by reverse genetics. The TMCT versions of RSV F were packaged in the rHPIV1 particles much more efficiently than their full-length counterparts. In hamsters, the presence of the RSV F gene, and in particular the TMCT versions, was attenuating and resulted in reduced immunogenicity. However, the vector expressing full-length RSV F from the pre-N position was immunogenic for RSV and HPIV1. It conferred complement-independent high-quality RSV-neutralizing antibodies at titers similar to those of wild type RSV and provided protection against RSV challenge. The vectors exhibited stable RSV F expression in vitro and in vivo In conclusion, an attenuated rHPIV1 vector expressing a pre-F-stabilized form of RSV F demonstrated promising immunogenicity and should be further developed as an intranasal pediatric vaccine.Importance. RSV and HPIV1 are major viral causes of acute pediatric respiratory illness for which no vaccines or suitable antiviral drugs are available. The RSV F glycoprotein is the major RSV neutralization antigen. We used a rHPIV1 vector, bearing a

  12. Prevalence and Incidence of Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Other Respiratory Viral Infections in Children Aged 6 Months to 10 Years With Influenza-like Illness Enrolled in a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Terry; Borja-Tabora, Charissa; Lopez, Pio; Weckx, Lily; Ulloa-Gutierrez, Rolando; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Kerdpanich, Angkool; Weber, Miguel Angel Rodriguez; Mascareñas de Los Santos, Abiel; Tinoco, Juan-Carlos; Safadi, Marco Aurelio P.; Seng, Lim Fong; Hernandez-de Mezerville, Marcela; Faingezicht, Idis; Cruz-Valdez, Aurelio; Feng, Yang; Li, Ping; Durviaux, Serge; Haars, Gerco; Roy-Ghanta, Sumita; Vaughn, David W.; Taylor, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Background. The high burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated morbidity and mortality makes vaccine development a priority. Methods. As part of an efficacy trial of pandemic influenza vaccines (NCT01051661), RSV epidemiology in healthy children aged 6 months to <10 years at first vaccination with influenza-like illness (ILI) was evaluated in Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand between February 2010 and August 2011. Active surveillance for ILI was conducted for approximately 1 year, with nasal and throat swabs analyzed by polymerase chain reaction. The prevalence and incidence of RSV among ILI episodes were calculated. Results. A total of 6266 children were included, of whom 2421 experienced 3717 ILI episodes with a respiratory sample available. RSV was detected for 359 ILI episodes, a prevalence of 9.7% (95% confidence interval: 8.7–10.7). The highest prevalence was in children aged 12–23 or 24–35 months in all countries except the Philippines, where it was in children aged 6–11 months. The incidence of RSV-associated ILI was 7.0 (6.3–7.7) per 100 person-years (PY). Eighty-eight ILI episodes resulted in hospitalization, of which 8 were associated with RSV (prevalence 9.1% [4.0–17.1]; incidence 0.2 [0.1–0.3] per 100 PY). The incidence of RSV-associated ILI resulting in medical attendance was 6.0 (5.4–6.7) per 100 PY. RSV B subtypes were observed more frequently than A subtypes. Conclusions. Active surveillance demonstrated the considerable burden of RSV-associated illness that would not be identified through hospital-based surveillance, with a substantial part of the burden occurring in older infants and children. PMID:25673560

  13. Relationship between the loss of neutralizing antibody binding and fusion activity of the F protein of human respiratory syncytial virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarisky Robert T

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To elucidate the relationship between resistance to HRSV neutralizing antibodies directed against the F protein and the fusion activity of the F protein, a recombinant approach was used to generate a panel of mutations in the major antigenic sites of the F protein. These mutant proteins were assayed for neutralizing mAb binding (ch101F, palivizumab, and MAb19, level of expression, post-translational processing, cell surface expression, and fusion activity. Functional analysis of the fusion activity of the panel of mutations revealed that the fusion activity of the F protein is tolerant to multiple changes in the site II and IV/V/VI region in contrast with the somewhat limited spectrum of changes in the F protein identified from the isolation of HRSV neutralizing antibody virus escape mutants. This finding suggests that aspects other than fusion activity may limit the spectrum of changes tolerated within the F protein that are selected for by neutralizing antibodies.

  14. Hospitalisations for respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in Akershus, Norway, 1993–2000: a population-based retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratlid Dag

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RSV is recognized as the most important cause of serious lower respiratory tract illness in infants and young children worldwide leading to hospitalisation in a great number of cases, especially in certain high-risk groups. The aims of the present study were to identify risk groups, outcome and incidences of hospitalisation for RSV bronchiolitis in Norwegian children under two years of age and to compare the results with other studies. Methods We performed a population-based retrospective survey for the period 1993–2000 in children under two years of age hospitalised for RSV bronchiolitis. Results 822 admissions from 764 patients were identified, 93% had one hospitalisation, while 7% had two or more hospitalisations. Mean annual hospitalisation incidences were 21.7 per 1.000 children under one year of age, 6.8 per 1.000 children at 1–2 years of age and 14.1 per 1.000 children under two years of age. 77 children (85 admissions belonged to one or more high-risk groups such as preterm birth, trisomy 21 and congenital heart disease. For preterm children under one year of age, at 1–2 years of age and under two years of age hospitalisation incidences per 1.000 children were 23.5, 8.7 and 16.2 respectively. The incidence for children under two years of age with trisomy 21 was 153.8 per 1.000 children. Conclusion While the overall hospitalisation incidences and outcome of RSV bronchiolitis were in agreement with other studies, hospitalisation incidences for preterm children were lower than in many other studies. Age on admission for preterm children, when corrected for prematurity, was comparable to low-risk children. Length of hospitalisation and morbidity was high in both preterm children, children with a congenital heart disease and in children with trisomy 21, the last group being at particular high risk for severe disease.

  15. Interleukin-8,RANTES gene polymorphism and respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis%白介素8、RANTES基因多态性与呼吸道合胞病毒毛细支气管炎

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田曼; 陈荣华

    2008-01-01

    呼吸道合胞病毒(respiratory syncytial virus,RSV)感染2岁以下几乎所有的儿童,但只有少数发展为比较严重的毛细支气管炎及毛细支气管炎后反复喘息.随着对其遗传学研究的不断深入,通过对RSV毛细支气管炎患儿基因型的分析,发现白介素8、RANTES存在基因多态性,且可能与RSV毛细支气管炎及毛细支气管炎后反复喘息的易感性相关.%Respiratory syncytial virus(RSV)infects nearly all children under two years old,but only minority of them developed serious bronchiolitis and subsequent wheezing.Whether there is a genetic component is not known.The common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region of interleukin-8(IL-8)and RANTES upstream of the transcription start site affect their mRNA levels and protein expressions.This review includes the new researches about the genetic association between the IL-8,RANTES gene polymorphism and RSV bronchiolitis and post-bronchiolitis wheezing.

  16. Systemic T-helper and T-regulatory cell type cytokine responses in rhinovirus vs. respiratory syncytial virus induced early wheezing: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuorinen Tytti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhinovirus (RV associated early wheezing has been recognized as an independent risk factor for asthma. The risk is more important than that associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV disease. No comparative data are available on the immune responses of these diseases. Objective To compare T-helper1 (Th1, Th2 and T-regulatory (Treg cell type cytokine responses between RV and RSV induced early wheezing. Methods Systemic Th1-type (interferon [IFN] -gamma, interleukin [IL] -2, IL-12, Th2-type (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and Treg-type (IL-10 cytokine responses were studied from acute and convalescence phase serum samples of sole RV (n = 23 and RSV affected hospitalized wheezing children (n = 27. The pre-defined inclusion criteria were age of 3-35 months and first or second wheezing episode. Analysis was adjusted for baseline differences. Asymptomatic children with comparable demographics (n = 11 served as controls for RV-group. Results RV-group was older and had more atopic characteristics than RSV-group. At acute phase, RV-group had higher (fold change IL-13 (39-fold, IL-12 (7.5-fold, IFN-gamma (6.0-fold and IL-5 (2.8-fold concentrations than RSV-group and higher IFN-gamma (27-fold, IL-2 (8.9-fold, IL-5 (5.6-fold and IL-10 (2.6-fold than the controls. 2-3 weeks later, RV-group had higher IFN-gamma (>100-fold, IL-13 (33-fold and IL-10 (6.5-fold concentrations than RSV-group and higher IFN-gamma (15-fold and IL-2 (9.4-fold than the controls. IL-10 levels were higher in acute phase compared to convalescence phase in both infections (p Conclusion Our results support a hypothesis that RV is likely to trigger wheezing mainly in children with a predisposition. IL-10 may have important regulatory function in acute viral wheeze.

  17. Narcissus tazetta lectin shows strong inhibitory effects against respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A (H1N1, H3N2, H5N1) and B viruses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Linda S M Ooi; Wing-Shan Ho; Karry L K Ngai; Li Tian; Paul K S Chan; Samuel S M Sun; Vincent E C Ooi

    2010-03-01

    Amannose-binding lectin (Narcissus tazetta lectin [NTL]) with potent antiviral activity was isolated and purified from the bulbs of the Chinese daffodil Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis, using ion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose, affinity chromatography on mannose–agarose and fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-gel filtration on Superose 12. The purified lectin was shown to have an apparent molecular mass of 26 kDa by gel filtration and 13 kDa by SDS–PAGE, indicating that it is probably a dimer with two identical subunits. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of NTL as determined by molecular cloning also reveals that NTL protein contains a mature polypeptide consisting of 105 amino acids and a C-terminal peptide extension. Three-dimensional modelling study demonstrated that the NTL primary polypeptide contains three subdomains, each with a conserved mannose-binding site. It shows a high homology of about 60%–80% similarity with the existing monocot mannose-binding lectins. NTL could significantly inhibit plaque formation by the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) with an IC50 of 2.30 g/ml and exhibit strong antiviral properties against influenza A (H1N1, H3N2, H5N1) and influenza B viruses with IC50 values ranging from 0.20 g/ml to 1.33 g/ml in a dose-dependent manner. It is worth noting that the modes of antiviral action of NTL against RSV and influenza A virus are significantly different. NTL is effective in the inhibition of RSV during the whole viral infection cycle, but the antiviral activity of NTL is mainly expressed at the early stage of the viral cycle of influenza A (H1N1) virus. NTL with a high selective index (SI=CC50/IC50 ≥ 141) resulting from its potent antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity demonstrates a potential for biotechnological development as an antiviral agent.

  18. Oncolytic targeting of androgen-sensitive prostate tumor by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV: consequences of deficient interferon-dependent antiviral defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbard Gene B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment utilizes viruses for selective infection and death of cancer cells without any adverse effect on normal cells. We previously reported that the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a novel oncolytic virus against androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. The present study extends the result to androgen-dependent prostate cancer, and explores the underlying mechanism that triggers RSV-induced oncolysis of prostate cancer cells. Methods The oncolytic effect of RSV on androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and on androgen-independent RM1 murine prostate cancer cells was studied in vitro in culture and in vivo in a xenograft or allograft tumor model. In vitro, cell viability, infectivity and apoptosis were monitored by MTT assay, viral plaque assay and annexin V staining, respectively. In vivo studies involved virus administration to prostate tumors grown in immune compromised nude mice and in syngeneic immune competent C57BL/6J mice. Anti-tumorogenic oncolytic activity was monitored by measuring tumor volume, imaging bioluminescent tumors in live animals and performing histopathological analysis and TUNEL assay with tumors Results We show that RSV imposes a potent oncolytic effect on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. RSV infectivity was markedly higher in LNCaP cells compared to the non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 human prostate cells. The enhanced viral burden led to LNCaP cell apoptosis and growth inhibition of LNCaP xenograft tumors in nude mice. A functional host immune response did not interfere with RSV-induced oncolysis, since growth of xenograft tumors in syngeneic C57BL/6J mice from murine RM1 cells was inhibited upon RSV administration. LNCaP cells failed to activate the type-I interferon (IFNα/β-induced transcription factor STAT-1, which is required for antiviral gene expression, although these cells could produce IFN in response to RSV infection. The

  19. Immune pathogenesy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with respiratory syncytial virus infection%呼吸道合胞病毒感染与慢性阻塞性肺疾病发病的免疫机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马冠华; 杨昆; 李敏

    2009-01-01

    慢性阻塞性肺疾病(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,COPD)是一种常见的呼吸系统疾病.随着近年来对病毒导致慢性阻塞性肺疾病急性加重(AECOPD)机制的深入研究以及呼吸道病毒检出率的提高,病毒感染在COPD发病机制中的作用受到了更多关注.呼吸道合胞病毒(respiratory syncytial vius,RSV)是常见的呼吸道病毒.有关RSV与宿主的免疫学的研究提示了COPD中RSV的易感性,可能成为某些COPD患者防治疾病发展的新方向.本文对病毒感染在AECOPD中的作用以及RSV感染与COPD发病机制的免疫研究进展现状作一综述.%Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD)is a kind of common disease in respiratory system.With the recent advances in virus-induced acute exacerbations and elevated detection rates of viruses,the etiological status of virus in COPD is getting more attention.Respiratory syncytial virus is a common respiratory virus,some researchers suggest susceptibility of RSV to COPD,which may suggest prospective prevention and therapy to certain kind of COPD patients.This article summarizes the function of virus infection in acute exacerbation COPD and makes a review of the update on the immune pathogenesy of COPD with RSV infection.

  20. Indirect ELISA with Recombinant GP5 for Detecting Antibodies to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Chen; Hong Tian; Jian-Hui He; Jin-Yin Wu; You-jun Shang; Xiang-tao Liu

    2011-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome is caused by the PRRS virus(PRRSV), which has six structural proteins(GP2, GP3, GP4, GP5, M and N). GP5 and N protein are important targets for serological detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA)and other methods. Toward this goal, we developed an indirect ELISA with recombinant GP5 antigens and this method was validated by comparison to the LSI PRRSV-Ab ELISA kit. The results indicated that the optimal concentration of coated recombinant antigen was 0.2 μg/well for a serum dilution of 1:40. The rate of agreement with the LSI PRRSV-Ab kit was 88.7%(266/300). These results support the potential use of recombinant GP5 as an antigen for indirect ELISA to detect PRRSV antibodies in pigs.

  1. Recombinant measles AIK-C vaccine strain expressing heterologous virus antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tetsuo; Sawada, Akihito; Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Ito, Takashi

    2016-01-04

    Further attenuated measles vaccines were developed more than 50 years ago and have been used throughout the world. Recombinant measles vaccine candidates have been developed and express several heterologous virus protective antigens. Immunogenicity and protective actions were confirmed using experimental animals: transgenic mice, cotton rats, and primates. The recent development of measles vaccine-based vectored vaccine candidates has been reviewed and some information on recombinant measles vaccines expressing respiratory syncytial virus proteins has been shown and discussed.

  2. Structure and functional dynamics characterization of the ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domain by combining molecular dynamics with excited normal modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Gabriela C; Silva, Ricardo H T; Scott, Luis P B; Araujo, Alexandre S; Souza, Fatima P; de Oliveira, Ronaldo Junio

    2016-12-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children and elderly people worldwide. Its genome encodes 11 proteins including SH protein, whose functions are not well known. Studies show that SH protein increases RSV virulence degree and permeability to small compounds, suggesting it is involved in the formation of ion channels. The knowledge of SH structure and function is fundamental for a better understanding of its infection mechanism. The aim of this study was to model, characterize, and analyze the structural behavior of SH protein in the phospholipids bilayer environment. Molecular modeling of SH pentameric structure was performed, followed by traditional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the protein immersed in the lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics with excited normal modes (MDeNM) was applied in the resulting system in order to investigate long time scale pore dynamics. MD simulations support that SH protein is stable in its pentameric form. Simulations also showed the presence of water molecules within the bilayer by density distribution, thus confirming that SH protein is a viroporin. This water transport was also observed in MDeNM studies with histidine residues of five chains (His22 and His51), playing a key role in pore permeability. The combination of traditional MD and MDeNM was a very efficient protocol to investigate functional conformational changes of transmembrane proteins that act as molecular channels. This protocol can support future investigations of drug candidates by acting on SH protein to inhibit viral infection. Graphical Abstract The ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domainᅟ.

  3. Evaluation of a novel web-based prior approval application for palivizumab prophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus in a state Medicaid program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundeen, Kristin; Pfeiffenberger, Trista; Jacobson Vann, Julie; O'Brien, Timothy; Sampson, Charlene; Wegner, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Recent disproportionate increases in use of specialty medications, such as palivizumab (Synagis), compared with steady utilization of traditional medication use, have prompted complex utilization management strategies that require frequent evaluation to facilitate cost-effectiveness while preserving patient access. Clinical criteria utilized by North Carolina (NC) Medicaid for use of palivizumab for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) prophylaxis are consistent with the most recent guidelines published in the Red Book: Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. Prior to the 2011-2012 RSV season, prior approval (PA) requests were submitted by facsimile using the NC Medicaid Synagis PA form. A web-based PA application, which includes automatic approval capability, monthly dose prompts to providers, and a standardized dose projection formula, was developed for the 2011-2012 RSV season. To evaluate the timeliness of palivizumab coverage determination, compliance with palivizumab prophylaxis regimen, and the accuracy of the dose projection formula achieved with this novel web-based PA application for palivizumab prophylaxis in NC Medicaid recipients. A historically controlled retrospective cohort study was conducted in which all palivizumab PA submissions and supporting documentation from the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 RSV seasons were retrospectively reviewed for date and time of original submission and final coverage determination. Submissions from the 2011-2012 season were also retrospectively reviewed for number of doses approved, number of doses administered, date of administration of each dose, and actual dosage administered. These data were used to evaluate compliance and the projected versus actual beneficiary weight and dose to assess the accuracy of the dose projection formula. Submissions lacking required information were excluded. Time from PA submission to coverage determination was compared between seasons using a 2-sample t-test. The proportion of

  4. Incidence and Clinical Features of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in a Population-Based Surveillance Site in the Nile Delta Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Naval Medical Research Unit 3, 1209 Payne Ave, Austin, TX 78757 (emily.rowlinson@gmail.com). The Journal of Infectious Diseases 2013;208(S3):S189–96...Damanhour by combining population-based surveillance data with healthcare utilization patterns. In addition to a sub- stantial burden of pediatric ...syncytial virus infection in tropical and developing countries. Trop Med Int Health 1998; 3:268–80. 2. Nair H, Nokes DJ, Gessner BD, et al. Global

  5. 特异性免疫在呼吸道合胞病毒疫苗增强疾病过程中的作用%The function of adaptive immunity in respiratory syncytial virus vaccine-ehanced disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡勇; 钱景

    2011-01-01

    呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)疫苗可诱发疫苗增强疾病,以肺组织广泛的炎细胞浸润和嗜酸性粒细胞增多为典型特征.探索RSV疫苗增强疾病的免疫机制,尤其是宿主体液和细胞免疫反应不平衡在疫苗增强疾病过程中的作用,有助于安全有效的RSV疫苗的研究.%Respiratory syncytial virus(RSV) vaccine induced vaccine-enhanced disease, was manifested typically as lung inflammatory cell infiltration and eosinophilia extensively. The study on the immune mechanism, especially the unbalance response of host humoral and cellular immunity, is helpful for the development of safe and effective vaccine for RSV.

  6. Discovery of β-D-2'-deoxy-2'-α-fluoro-4'-α-cyano-5-aza-7,9-dideaza adenosine as a potent nucleoside inhibitor of respiratory syncytial virus with excellent selectivity over mitochondrial RNA and DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michael O; Mackman, Richard; Byun, Daniel; Hui, Hon; Barauskas, Ona; Birkus, Gabriel; Chun, Byoung-Kwon; Doerffler, Edward; Feng, Joy; Karki, Kapil; Lee, Gary; Perron, Michel; Siegel, Dustin; Swaminathan, Swami; Lee, William

    2015-06-15

    Novel 4'-substituted β-d-2'-deoxy-2'-α-fluoro (2'd2'F) nucleoside inhibitors of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are reported. The introduction of 4'-substitution onto 2'd2'F nucleoside analogs resulted in compounds demonstrating potent cell based RSV inhibition, improved inhibition of the RSV polymerase by the nucleoside triphosphate metabolites, and enhanced selectivity over incorporation by mitochondrial RNA and DNA polymerases. Selectivity over the mitochondrial polymerases was found to be extremely sensitive to the specific 4'-substitution and not readily predictable. Combining the most potent and selective 4'-groups from N-nucleoside analogs onto a 2'd2'F C-nucleoside analog resulted in the identification of β-D-2'-deoxy-2'-α-fluoro-4'-α-cyano-5-aza-7,9-dideaza adenosine as a promising nucleoside lead for RSV.

  7. Respiratory mechanics in an infant with perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia treated with human recombinant enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Elena; Bober, Michael B; Davey, Lauren; Zamora, Arlene; Li Puma, Annelise B; Chidekel, Aaron; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2012-09-01

    Hypophosphatasia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficient activity of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP) and characterized by defective bone mineralization. In the perinatal lethal form, respiratory complications due to rachitic deformities of the thoracic cage and associated hypoplastic lungs are present. ENB-0040 is a bone-targeted human recombinant TNSALP fusion protein that aims to restore skeletal mineralization. The goal of this study was to characterize pulmonary and thoracic cage mechanics in an infant with the perinatal lethal form of hypophosphatasia under enzyme replacement therapy. Pulmonary function testing was performed on a preterm, 8-week-old patient with hypophosphatasia who was mechanically ventilated since birth because of severe chest wall insufficiency. The measurements consisted of respiratory impulse oscillation measurements (resistance and reactance), ventilatory mechanics (compliance and resistance), and thoracoabdominal motion (TAM) analysis. At baseline, chest wall compliance was 50% of normal, and the TAM indicated predominantly abdominal displacement. After 12 weeks of treatment, a consistent decrease in ventilator requirements and improvement in lung function and chest wall mechanics were observed and correlated with thoracic cage radiologic findings. Measurable changes in chest wall dynamics and respiratory mechanics using noninvasive technology were useful for respiratory management and therapeutic guidance of ENB-0040 treatment in this patient.

  8. 呼吸道合胞病毒毛细支气管炎患儿IL-17改变的意义%Changes of serum IL-17 level in infants with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王同友; 王红兵

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)感染毛细支气管炎患儿IL-17改变的意义.方法 采用ELISA方法检测30例RSV感染毛细支气管炎患儿(RSV毛支组)、30例非RSV感染支气管肺炎患儿(非RSV肺炎组)以及 25例健康对照儿(对照组)血清中IL-17浓度,并进行比较分析.结果 RSV毛支组患儿血清IL-17水平明显高于其他2组(P<0.01);非RSV肺炎组患儿血清IL-17水平高于对照组(P<0.01).结论 小儿呼吸道合胞病毒性毛细支气管炎的发生和发展与IL-17异常表达有关.%Objective To explore the change of interleukin 17 (IL -17) in infants with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and their clinical significance . Methods Serum IL — 17 of 30 respiratory syncytial virus ( RSV) bronchioli— tis infants, 30 pneumonia infants without RSV infection and 25 health controls were detected by using ELISA method. Results Level of serum IL -17 were obviously higher in RSV bronchiolitis infants than those in pneumonia infants with -out RSV infection and health controls (P <0.01). Level of serum IL — 17 of pneumonia infants without RSV was obvi — ously high compared with normal group (P <0.01). Conclusion IL -17 may play an important role in the pathogene-sis of RSV Bronchiolitis in infant.

  9. Neutrophil activation and protease imbalance in respiratory tract of infants with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis%呼吸道合胞病毒毛细支气管炎患儿中性粒细胞活化及蛋白酶平衡的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金玲; 陈志敏

    2009-01-01

    Objective To better understand the neutrophil activation and protease imbalance in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis. Methods Pediatric patients with RSV bronchiolitis were collected,11 with the Lowell scores ≥ 10 (severe group),and 19 with the Lowell scores 0.05).结论 呼吸道合胞病毒毛支气道局部存在大量中性粒细胞聚集活化和蛋白酶系统失衡,并可能在其发病中起重要作用.

  10. High frequency RNA recombination in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus occurs preferentially between parental sequences with high similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vugt, Joke .J.F.A.; Storgaard, Torben; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) exist, a North American type and a European type. The co-existence of both types in some countries, such as Denmark, Slovakia and Canada, creates a risk of inter-type recombination. To evaluate this risk, cell cultures were co......, but no recombination was detected between the European and North American types. Calculation of the maximum theoretical risk of European-American recombination, based on the sensitivity of the RT-PCR system, revealed that RNA recombination between the European and North American types of PRRSV is at least 10000 times...

  11. RNA recombination in Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus is restricted to parental sequences with high similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vugt, J.J.F.A. van; Storgaard, T.; Oleksiewicz, M. B.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) exist, a North American type and a European type. The co-existence of both types in some countries, such as Denmark, Slovakia and Canada, creates a risk of inter-type recombination. To evaluate this risk, cell cultures were co......, but no recombination was detected between the European and North American types. Calculation of the maximum theoretical risk of European–American recombination, based on the sensitivity of the RT–PCR system, revealed that RNA recombination between the European and North American types of PRRSV is at least 10000 times...

  12. Bronchiolitis, respiratory syncytial virus, and recurrent wheezing: what is the relationship? A bronquiolite pelo virus sincicial respiratório e o chiado recorrente: qual a relação?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia de Brito Fonseca

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Various follow-up studies of children hospitalized with bronchiolitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus have demonstrated that a significant proportion of infants (50% have recurrent wheezing during childhood. Nevertheless, the relationship between these two entities, if any, has not been established. In order to explain this observation, several hypotheses have been proposed. The first suggests that some children could have an individual predisposition to bronchiolitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus and recurrent wheezing. The virus could be a marker of this condition, and the individual predisposition could in turn be related to an individual hypersensitivity to common allergens (atopy, airway hyperreactivity, or to some disorder related to pulmonary anatomy or physiology that was present before the acute episode of bronchiolitis. Another hypothesis proposes that respiratory syncytial virus could be directly responsible for recurrent wheezing. During an episode of bronchiolitis, the damage in the airway mucosa caused by the vital inflammatory response to infection contributes to sensitivity to other allergens or exposes irritant receptors, resulting in recurrent wheezing. For this review, we analyzed the studies that discuss these hypotheses with the purpose of clarifying the mechanisms for the important issue of recurrent wheezing in childhood.Os diversos estudos de seguimento de crianças hospitalizadas por bronquiolite pelo virus sincicial respiratório demonstram, em média, 50% de chance de evoluir com novos episódios de chiado no peito. Apesar desta constatação, não foi estabelecida a relação entre a bronquiolite pelo virus sincicial respiratório e a recorrência dos episódios de chiado. A primeira hipótese é de que o indivíduo poderia ter uma predisposição para a repetição do quadro de chiado e também para a própria bronquiolite como manifestação da infecção pelo virus sincicial respiratório. O v

  13. RNA recombination in Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus is restricted to parental sequences with high similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vugt, J.J.F.A. van; Storgaard, T.; Oleksiewicz, M. B.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) exist, a North American type and a European type. The co-existence of both types in some countries, such as Denmark, Slovakia and Canada, creates a risk of inter-type recombination. To evaluate this risk, cell cultures were co...

  14. High frequency RNA recombination in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus occurs preferentially between parental sequences with high similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vugt, Joke .J.F.A.; Storgaard, Torben; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) exist, a North American type and a European type. The co-existence of both types in some countries, such as Denmark, Slovakia and Canada, creates a risk of inter-type recombination. To evaluate this risk, cell cultures were co...

  15. Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Nasopharyngeal Aspirate From Hospitalized Children With Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection With or Without Rhinovirus Bronchiolitis, and Use of the Cytokines as Predictors of Illness Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Patricia V.; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Gaggero, Aldo A.; Bono, M.R.; Zepeda, Guillermo; Rivas, Mabel; Uasapud, Paola; Pinto, Ricardo A.; Boza, M. Lina; Guerrero, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (HRV) respiratory infection in children induce production of inflammatory interleukins (ILs) in the respiratory epithelium. As IL(s) determine the severity of illness, the purpose of this study was to identify the pro-inflammatory IL(s) that could be predictor(s) of clinical severity. One hundred and fifteen patients <2 years old with bronchiolitis due to RSV and /or HRV and 38 controls were selected from a hospital and an outpatient clinic. Clinical data of all patients were recorded. Severity was defined by the number of days with oxygen need. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were collected to perform viral diagnosis by quantitative reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and to quantify ILs: TNF-α, IL-10, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-8, by flow cytometry. Simple and multiple regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used for statistical analysis. Of the patients selected 60 were single RSV, 28 RSV associated to HRV, and 27 single HRV. All patients (115) showed significantly higher IL levels when compared with controls. Levels of IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-8 detected in NPA from RSV single and associated to HRV were significantly higher than HRV infected and positively associated with days requiring O2. Levels of IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-8 detected in NPA from patients infected with RSV only or with both RSV and HRV are increased, and any of those 3 cytokines may have a predictive value for the number of days with need of supplemental oxygen. PMID:26426613

  16. 抗呼吸道合胞病毒Fab噬菌体抗体库的构建及初步筛选%Construction and preliminary panning of Fab phage display antibody library against respiratory syncytial virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪治华; 张国成; 李安茂; 周南; 陈一; 李小青; 苏字飞; 邓阳彬; 王治静

    2008-01-01

    Objective To construct a human phage display antibody library,which will help to develop new drugs and vaccines against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and solve many of the issues that have limited the progression and application of murine monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) in the clinic.This can provide a platform for human antibody preparation and diagnosis,prophylaxis and therapy of RSV infection in children.Methods Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 52 children with RSV infection,cDNA was synthesized from the total RNA of lymphocytes.The light and heavy chain Fd (VH-CH1)fragments of immunoglobulin gene were amplified by RT-PCR.The amplified products were cloned into phagemid vector pComb3x and the clone samples were electrotransformed into competent E.coli XL1-Blue.The transformed cells were then infected with M13K07 helper phage to yield recombinant phage antibody of Fabs.The plasmids extracted from amplified E.coil were digested with restriction endonucleases Sac 1,Xba I,Spe I and Xho I to monitor the insertion of the light or heavy chain Fd genes.RSV virions were utilized as antigens to screen Fab antibodies.Results By recombination of light and heavy chain genes,an immune Fab phage display antibody library against RSV containing 2.08×107 different clones was constructed,in which 70% clones had light chains and heavy chain Fd genes.The capacity of Fab phage antibody gene library was 1.46×107 and the titre of the original Fab antibody library was about 1.06 x 1012 pfu/mL The antibody library gained an enrichment in different degrees after the preliminary panning.Condusions Utilizing the technology of phage display,an immune Fab phage display antibody library against RSV was successfully constructed in this study,which laid a valuable experimental foundation for further study and created favorable conditions for preparing human McAbs. This may also contribute to the improvement in the diagnosis,therapy and prophylaxis of RSV infection in children

  17. B-cell depletion inhibits arthritis in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, but does not adversely affect humoral responses in a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunussi-Joannopoulos, Kyri; Hancock, Gerald E; Kunz, Arthur; Hegen, Martin; Zhou, Xiaochuan X; Sheppard, Barbara J; Lamothe, Jennifer; Li, Evelyn; Ma, Hak-Ling; Hamann, Philip R; Damle, Nitin K; Collins, Mary

    2005-10-01

    We report the development of a mouse B cell-depleting immunoconjugate (anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody [mAb] conjugated to calicheamicin) and its in vivo use to characterize the kinetics of CD22+ B-cell depletion and reconstitution in murine primary and secondary lymphoid tissues. The effect of B-cell depletion was further studied in a murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model and a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination model. Our results show that (1) the immunoconjugate has B-cell-specific in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity; (2) B-cell reconstitution starts in the bone marrow and spleen around day 30 after depletion and is completed in all tissues tested by day 50; (3) B-cell depletion inhibits the development of clinical and histologic arthritis in the CIA model; (4) depletion of type II collagen antibody levels is not necessary for clinical and histologic prevention of CIA; and (5) B-cell depletion does not adversely affect memory antibody responses after challenge nor clearance of infectious virus from lungs in the RSV vaccination model. These results demonstrate for the first time that only B-cell reduction but not type II collagen antibody levels correlate with the prevention of arthritis and represent key insights into the role of CD22-targeted B-cell depletion in mouse autoimmunity and vaccination models.

  18. The ectodomains but not the transmembrane domains of the fusion proteins of subtypes A and B avian pneumovirus are conserved to a similar extent as those of human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, C J; Britton, P; Cavanagh, D

    1998-06-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (F(B)) gene of five strains of the B subtype of avian pneumovirus (APV; turkey rhinotracheitis virus) has been sequenced. The length of the F(B) protein was 538 amino acids, identical to that of the F protein of subtype A virus, with which it had 74% and 83% overall nucleotide and deduced amino acid identities, respectively. The F(B) and F(A) ectodomains had 90% amino acid identity, very similar to the 91% identity between the ectodomains of the F proteins of subtype A and B human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV). As with HRSV, the F2 polypeptide was less conserved (83% identity) than F1 (94%). In contrast to the ectodomain, the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the two APV subtypes were much less conserved (30% and 48% identity, respectively) than those of HRSV (92% and 87%, respectively). Comparisons within all the genera of the Paramyxoviridae (Pneumovirus, Morbillivirus, Paramyxovirus and Rubullavirus) show that low amino acid identity between F protein transmembrane domains is a feature of different species of virus rather than of strain differences. This may indicate that the two subtypes of APV have evolved in different geographical regions and/or different avian species. This is the first report of an F gene sequence from a subtype B APV.

  19. Rewiring the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) transcription circuit: Engineering a recombination-resistant genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yount, Boyd; Roberts, Rhonda S.; Lindesmith, Lisa; Baric, Ralph S.

    2006-08-01

    Live virus vaccines provide significant protection against many detrimental human and animal diseases, but reversion to virulence by mutation and recombination has reduced appeal. Using severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus as a model, we engineered a different transcription regulatory circuit and isolated recombinant viruses. The transcription network allowed for efficient expression of the viral transcripts and proteins, and the recombinant viruses replicated to WT levels. Recombinant genomes were then constructed that contained mixtures of the WT and mutant regulatory circuits, reflecting recombinant viruses that might occur in nature. Although viable viruses could readily be isolated from WT and recombinant genomes containing homogeneous transcription circuits, chimeras that contained mixed regulatory networks were invariantly lethal, because viable chimeric viruses were not isolated. Mechanistically, mixed regulatory circuits promoted inefficient subgenomic transcription from inappropriate start sites, resulting in truncated ORFs and effectively minimize viral structural protein expression. Engineering regulatory transcription circuits of intercommunicating alleles successfully introduces genetic traps into a viral genome that are lethal in RNA recombinant progeny viruses. regulation | systems biology | vaccine design

  20. Risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus infection of lower respiratory tract in hospitalized infants%婴儿急性下呼吸道呼吸道合胞病毒感染的危险因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓波; 刘丽娟; 施鹏; 蒋高立; 贾品; 王传凯; 王立波; 钱莉玲

    2014-01-01

    染的风险大为增加.%Objective To investigate the clinical epidemiologic characteristics and analyze risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in hospitalized infants with acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI).Method ALRI infants admitted to Children's Hospital of Fudan University from March 1 st,2011 to February 29th,2012,were enrolled in this study.Patient information included demographic characteristics,feeding history,family status,clinical presentation,accessory examination,treatment and prognosis.According to the etiology of ALRI infants,we compared the seasonal distribution,demographic characteristics,household characteristics and underlying diseases between RSV-positive patients and RSV-negative patients.Univariate and multiple Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors that were associated with risk of RSV infection.Result Among 1 726 ALRI infants,there were 913 RSV-positive infants (52.9%).The occurrence of RSV infection had a seasonal variation,with a peak in winter (59.1%).The median (P25,P75) age of RSV infants was 64 (21-155) days.The gestational age (GA) and body weight (BW) was (37.5 ± 2.4) weeks and (3.07 ±0.66) kg,respectively.The male/female ratio among these was 1.9:1.RSV infection was more popular among infants in the families with smoking members,crowded living conditions,history of atopic mother.Differences of the proportion of patients with underlying disease between RSV-positive and negative groups were statistically significant (59.4% vs.54.2%,P < 0.05).Univariate logistic regression demonstrated that factors increasing the risk of RSV infection were:GA < 37weeks (OR =1.346,95% CI:1.037-1.748),birth weight < 2 500 g (OR =1.447,95 % CI:1.103-1.898),underlying diseases (OR =1.232,95 % CI:1.018-1.492),underlying CHD (OR =1.391,95% CI:1.120-1.728),environmental tobacco smoke exposure (OR =1.254,95% CI:1.035-1.519),mother with atopic diseases (OR =1.827,95% CI:1.296-2.573),crowded house with four or

  1. An experimental infection model for reproduction of calf pneumonia with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) based on one combined exposure of calves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Uttenthal, Åse; Viuff, B.

    2003-01-01

    temperature and 83% exhibited >5%, consolidation of the lung tissue. The disease closely resembled natural outbreaks of BRSV-related pneumonia, and detection of BRSV in nasal secretions and lung tissues confirmed the primary role of BRSV. Nine mock-inoculated control calves failed to develop respiratory...... experimental infection model for BRSV in 2-5-month-old, conventionally reared Jersey calves. Thirty-four colostrum-fed calves were inoculated once by aerosol and intratracheal injection with BRSV. Respiratory disease was recorded in 91% of the BRSV-inoculated calves, 72% had an accompanying rise in rectal...... disease. This model is a valuable tool for the study of the pathogenesis of BRSV and for vaccine efficacy studies....

  2. Assessment of genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms in RIG-I-like receptor and IL-4 signaling genes and severe respiratory syncytial virus infection in children: a candidate gene case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Marr

    Full Text Available The majority of cases of severe pediatric respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection occur in otherwise healthy infants who have no identifiable risk factors, suggesting that additional subclinical factors, such as population genetic variation, influence the course of RSV infection. The objective of this study was to test if common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes encoding for immune signalling components of the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR and IL-4-signalling pathways affect the outcome of RSV infection in early life. We genotyped 8 SNPs using allele-specific probes combined with real-time PCR. Each of the SNPs tested had previously been established to have a functional impact on immune responsiveness and two of the SNPs in the IL4 and IL4R genes had previously been associated with severe RSV bronchiolitis. Association with susceptibility to severe RSV infection was tested by statistically comparing genotype and allele frequencies in infants and young children hospitalized with severe RSV bronchiolitis (n = 140 with two control groups-children who tested positive for RSV but did not require hospitalization (n = 100, and a general population control group (n = 285. Our study was designed with sufficient power (>80% to detect clinically-relevant associations with effect sizes ≥1.5. However, we detected no statistically significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies of the investigated SNPs between the inpatient and control groups. To conclude, we could not replicate the previously reported association with SNPs in the IL4 and IL4R genes in our independent cohort, nor did we find that common SNPs in genes encoding for RLRs and the downstream adapter MAVS were associated with susceptibility to severe RSV infections. Despite the existing evidence demonstrating a functional immunological impact of these SNPs, our data suggest that the biological effect of each individual SNP is unlikely to affect clinical outcomes

  3. Construction of adenoviral vectors expressing F and G glycoproteins of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV Construção de vetores adenovirais expressando as glicoproteínas F e G de vírus respiratório sincicial humano (HRSV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ithana Monteiro Kosaka

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (HRSV was first characterized in 1957 and has since been recognized as the most common viral cause of severe respiratory tract infection in young infants worldwide. Despite many years of research there is still no effective treatment or any immediate prospect of a vaccine. The HRSV genome is composed of single stranded negative sense RNA and the virion consists of a nucleocapsid packaged within a lipid envelope. The envelope contains spike-like projections, each being a homo-oligomer of one of three transmembrane viral envelope proteins: the attachment protein G, the fusion protein F involved in viral penetration and the small hydrofobic protein SH. The aim of this work was to construct two recombinant replication-defective adenoviruses carrying separately F and G genes from HRSV. This system was chosen because adenovirus delivers genes into target cells with high efficiency in a variety of cell lines and can be used in vitro and in vivo. In order to obtain the recombinant viruses, we did RT-PCR of RNA extracted from the HRSV A2 strain, the genes F and G were cloned in to pAdeno-X vectors. pAdeno-F and pAdeno-G were transfected in HEK-293 cells for the production of recombinant viruses, that expressed efficiently these two proteins and provide us the means for doing functional assays and immunization tests.O Vírus Sincicial Respiratório Humano (HRSV foi isolado e caracterizado pela primeira vez em 1957 e é considerado como o patógeno viral mais freqüente do trato respiratório de bebês e crianças. Apesar de muitos anos de pesquisa, não há ainda um tratamento específico ou uma vacina licenciada. Seu genoma é composto por uma fita simples de RNA polaridade negativa e o vírion consiste em um nucleocapsídeo empacotado por um envelope lipídico. O envelope contém projeções, chamadas espículas, constituídas de homoligômeros de uma das 3 glicoproteínas de membrana: a proteína de ligação G

  4. LOCAL APPLICATION OF RECOMBINANT INTERFERON-ALFA2 FOR TREATMENT OF RECURRENT RESPIRATORY PAPILLOMATOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Plouzhnikov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP is the most frequently occurring tumour of the upper airways associated with a human papilloma virus (HPV. The aim of this study was to reveal some features of systemic and local immunity in RRP, to investigate clinical and immunological efficiency of local treatment with recombinant interferon-α (rIFNα, and to determine clinical and laboratory indications to it’s administration. The study included forty-one patients with confirmed RRP. Their examination included histological examination of papillomas, detection of HPV DNA in papilloma tissues using PCR technique, phenotyping of circulating lymphocytes (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD25+, HLA-DR+ by means of flow cytometry. The levels of IFNγ, TNFα, GM-CSF, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13 in laryngeal secretions were quantified by a multiplex immunoassay. In all cases, we revealed an initially decreased functional activity of Т-lymphocytes, as well as low contents of Т-killer and NK-cells. In laryngeal secretions, increased values of Th1-type-specific cytokines (IFNγ and TNFα were found. Besides that, high levels of local IL-4 were detected thus being typical to alternative Th2-type response. Single inhalations 1000 000 ME of «Interal» or «Roferon» preparations were administered daily (a total of 10-15 millions ME per therapeutic course. Thirteen patients received the treatment after surgery, as an adjuvant therapy, and eleven patients underwent monotherapy. Complete tumor regression of tumors following this monotherapy was observed in 45,5% of the patients, whereas partial regression was registered in 45%. The effect was mostly expressed in frequently recurring juvenile papillomatosis with aggressive course and histological pattern of actively proliferating papilloma. In the patients with complete tumor regression, high initial levels of TNFα and IL-4/IFNг ratios were revealed initially in laryngeal secretions. When rIFNб was

  5. DETECTION OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST BOVINE HERPES VIRUS 1, BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS AND BOVINE RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS IN EARLY AND ULTRA-EARLY WEANED BEEF CALVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Daniel Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in weaned calves. In Argentina, two weaning practices have been implemented. In the early weaning, the calf is removed from the cow at 60-70 days of age while in ultra-early weaning the calf is weaned at 30-45 days of age. The purposes of both systems is to improve cow body condition, calf performance, conception rates and forage availability for the cow. In this study we evaluated the antibody response against BVDV and BoHV1 in early and ultra-early weaned calves that had received a conventional vaccination schedule (first dose at weaning and a booster 21 days post-weaning. Passively acquired immunity may provide protection against disease caused by these viruses. The presence of antibodies against BRSV, a virus that was not present in the vaccines used, was also evaluated as an indirect indicator of viral circulation in the herd. At the time of vaccination, calves presented a wide range of maternally-derived antibody titers. Vaccination against BoHV-1 did not evoke seroconvertion and antibody titers continued to decay throughout the experience. After vaccination, seroconversion to BVDV could be detected in calves with low antibody titers, while higher antibody titers exerted an inhibitory effect of the active humoral response.

  6. Evaluation of an intranasal virosomal vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus in mice: effect of TLR2 and NOD2 ligands on induction of systemic and mucosal immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shafique

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: RSV infection remains a serious threat to newborns and the elderly. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent RSV infection. A mucosal RSV vaccine would be attractive as it could induce mucosal as well as systemic antibodies, capable of protecting both the upper and lower respiratory tract. Previously, we reported on a virosomal RSV vaccine for intramuscular injection with intrinsic adjuvant properties mediated by an incorporated lipophilic Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 ligand. However, it has not been investigated whether this virosomal RSV vaccine candidate would be suitable for use in mucosal immunization strategies and if additional incorporation of other innate receptor ligands, like NOD2-ligand, could further enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the vaccine. OBJECTIVE: To explore if intranasal (IN immunization with a virosomal RSV vaccine, supplemented with TLR2 and/or NOD2-ligands, is an effective strategy to induce RSV-specific immunity. METHODS: We produced RSV-virosomes carrying TLR2 (Pam3CSK4 and/or NOD2 (L18-MDP ligands. We tested the immunopotentiating properties of these virosomes in vitro, using TLR2- and/or NOD2-ligand-responsive murine and human cell lines, and in vivo by assessing induction of protective antibody and cellular responses upon IN immunization of BALB/c mice. RESULTS: Incorporation of Pam3CSK4 and/or L18-MDP potentiates the capacity of virosomes to activate (antigen-presenting cells in vitro, as demonstrated by NF-κB induction. In vivo, incorporation of Pam3CSK4 in virosomes boosted serum IgG antibody responses and mucosal antibody responses after IN immunization. While L18-MDP alone was ineffective, incorporation of L18-MDP in Pam3CSK4-carrying virosomes further boosted mucosal antibody responses. Finally, IN immunization with adjuvanted virosomes, particularly Pam3CSK4/L18-MDP-adjuvanted-virosomes, protected mice against infection with RSV, without priming for enhanced

  7. Recombinant human DNase in children with airway malacia and lower respiratory tract infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, R.; Jongste, J.C. de; Vaessen-Verberne, A.A.; Hop, W.C.J.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with airway malacia often have protracted courses of airway infections, because dynamic airway collapse during coughing results in impaired mucociliary clearance. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the mucolytic drug recombinant human deoxyribonuclease

  8. THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS (RSV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    countries and correlates closely with infant mortality rates.' ARI is an ... aetiology, epidemiology, risk factors, clinical features and outcomes of ARI. .... summary of the RSV/ ARI information they contain are shown in Table 1. ..... childhood pneumonia among the urban poor in Fortaleza, Brazil: a case-control study. Bull.

  9. Aptamers for respiratory syncytial virus detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Percze, K.; Szakacs, Z.; Scholz, E.; Andras, J.; Szeitner, Z.; Kieboom, C.H. van den; Ferwerda, G.; Jonge, M.I. de; Gyurcsanyi, R.E.; Meszaros, T.

    2017-01-01

    The identification of the infectious agents is pivotal for appropriate care of patients with viral diseases. Current viral diagnostics rely on selective detection of viral nucleic acid or protein components. In general, detection of proteins rather than nucleic acids is technically more suitable for

  10. Learn about Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American College of Chest Physicians. News & Events Blog: Yoga, Tai Chi and Your Lungs: The Benefits of ... number of items"); $("#local_list_xml").quickPagination(); }, error: function() { console.log("An error occurred while processing XML ...

  11. Clinical patterns and seasonal trends in respiratory syncytial virus hospitalizations in São Paulo, Brazil Padrões clínicos e sazonalidade das hospitalizações causadas pelo vírus respiratório sincicial em São Paul