WorldWideScience

Sample records for recoiling massive black

  1. The Final Merger of Massive Black Holes: Recoils, Gravitational Waves, and Electromagnetic Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of two massive black holes produces a powerful burst of gravitational radiation, emitting more energy than all the stars in the observable universe combined. The resulting gravitational waveforms will be easily detectable by the space-based LISA out to redshifts z greater than 10, revealing the masses and spins of the black holes to high precision. If the merging black holes have unequal masses, or asymmetric spins, the final black hole that forms can recoil with a velocity exceeding 1000 km/s. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new results that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, recoil velocities, and the possibility of accompanying electromagnetic outbursts.

  2. Recoiling supermassive black holes: a search in the nearby universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lena, D.; Robinson, A.; Axon, D. J.; Merritt, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, 84 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603 (United States); Marconi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Capetti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Batcheldor, D., E-mail: dxl1840@g.rit.edu [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The coalescence of a binary black hole can be accompanied by a large gravitational recoil due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. A recoiling supermassive black hole (SBH) can subsequently undergo long-lived oscillations in the potential well of its host galaxy, suggesting that offset SBHs may be common in the cores of massive ellipticals. We have analyzed Hubble Space Telescope archival images of 14 nearby core ellipticals, finding evidence for small (≲ 10 pc) displacements between the active galactic nucleus (AGN; the location of the SBH) and the center of the galaxy (the mean photocenter) in 10 of them. Excluding objects that may be affected by large-scale isophotal asymmetries, we consider six galaxies to have detected displacements, including M87, where a displacement was previously reported by Batcheldor et al. In individual objects, these displacements can be attributed to residual gravitational recoil oscillations following a major or minor merger within the last few gigayears. For plausible merger rates, however, there is a high probability of larger displacements than those observed, if SBH coalescence took place in these galaxies. Remarkably, the AGN-photocenter displacements are approximately aligned with the radio source axis in four of the six galaxies with displacements, including three of the four having relatively powerful kiloparsec-scale jets. This suggests intrinsic asymmetries in radio jet power as a possible displacement mechanism, although approximate alignments are also expected for gravitational recoil. Orbital motion in SBH binaries and interactions with massive perturbers can produce the observed displacement amplitudes but do not offer a ready explanation for the alignments.

  3. Black Hole Mergers and Recoils in Low-Mass Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecha, Laura; Kelley, Luke; Koss, Michael; Satyapal, Shobita

    2018-01-01

    Mergers between massive black holes (BHs) in the intermediate-mass range are one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs) detectable with LISA. These highly energetic GW events could be observed out to very high redshift, in the epoch where massive BH seeds are thought to form. Despite recent progress, however, much is still not known about the low-mass BH population even in the local Universe. The rates of BH binary formation, inspiral, and merger are also highly uncertain across the BH mass scale. To address these pressing issues in advance of LISA, cosmological hydrodynamics simulations and semi-analytic modeling are being used to model the formation and evolution of BH binaries, and the GW signals they produce. Efforts are also underway to understand the electromagnetic (EM) signatures of the BH binary population. These have proven largely elusive thus far, but an increasing population of BH pairs has been found, and advances in the coming years will provide important comparisons for models of GW sources. Moreover, asymmetry in the GW emission from BH mergers imparts a recoil kick to the merged BH, which in extreme cases can eject the BH from its host galaxy. This creates additional uncertainty in the BH merger rate, but the remnant recoiling BH could be observed as an offset quasar. Identifications of such objects would provide another EM signature of BH mergers that would help pave the way for LISA. We will review model predictions of the BH inspiral and merger rate across the mass scale. We will also describe how the EM signatures of active, merging BHs can be used to constrain theoretical merger rates. Finally, we will discuss the predicted observability of recoiling BHs and ongoing efforts to identify and confirm candidate recoils.

  4. Searching for the Recoiling Black Hole in BCG2261

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultekin, Kayhan

    2017-09-01

    We propose a 100 ksec observation of the core of BCG 2261 to test for the presence of a recoiling SMBH. Binary SMBHs are thought to scour out cores in the host galaxy before coalescence of the black holes, which can lead to large recoils. Despite the importance of the connection between binary BHs, strong gravity, and galaxy evolution, it has never been conclusively observed. Without confirmation, we don't know if binary SMBHs can create stellar cores achieve high recoil velocities. We can produce the first direct observational proof of a recoiling SMBH in BCG 2261, the strongest candidate to date to host a recoiling SMBH and an extreme stellar core. With a detection, we will finally have definitive observational evidence connecting core formation, gravitational waves, and binary BHs.

  5. Recoiling Black Holes: Electromagnetic Signatures, Candidates, and Astrophysical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Komossa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Supermassive black holes (SMBHs may not always reside right at the centers of their host galaxies. This is a prediction of numerical relativity simulations, which imply that the newly formed single SMBH, after binary coalescence in a galaxy merger, can receive kick velocities up to several 1000 km/s due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. Long-lived oscillations of the SMBHs in galaxy cores, and in rare cases even SMBH ejections from their host galaxies, are the consequence. Observationally, accreting recoiling SMBHs would appear as quasars spatially and/or kinematically offset from their host galaxies. The presence of the “kicks” has a wide range of astrophysical implications which only now are beginning to be explored, including consequences for black hole and galaxy assembly at the epoch of structure formation, black hole feeding, and unified models of active galactic nuclei (AGN. Here, we review the observational signatures of recoiling SMBHs and the properties of the first candidates which have emerged, including follow-up studies of the candidate recoiling SMBH of SDSSJ092712.65+294344.0.

  6. Recoiling supermassive black hole escape velocities from dark matter haloes

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    Choksi, Nick; Behroozi, Peter; Volonteri, Marta; Schneider, Raffaella; Ma, Chung-Pei; Silk, Joseph; Moster, Benjamin

    2017-12-01

    We simulate recoiling black hole trajectories from z = 20 to z = 0 in dark matter haloes, quantifying how parameter choices affect escape velocities. These choices include the strength of dynamical friction, the presence of stars and gas, the accelerating expansion of the Universe (Hubble acceleration), host halo accretion and motion, and seed black hole mass. Lambda cold dark matter halo accretion increases escape velocities by up to 0.6 dex and significantly shortens return time-scales compared to non-accreting cases. Other parameters change orbit damping rates but have subdominant effects on escape velocities; dynamical friction is weak at halo escape velocities, even for extreme parameter values. We present formulae for black hole escape velocities as a function of host halo mass and redshift. Finally, we discuss how these findings affect black hole mass assembly as well as minimum stellar and halo masses necessary to retain supermassive black holes.

  7. Black holes in massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Babichev, Eugeny

    2015-01-01

    We review the black hole solutions of the ghost-free massive gravity theory and its bimetric extension and outline the main results on the stability of these solutions against small perturbations. Massive (bi)-gravity accommodates exact black hole solutions, analogous to those of General Relativity. In addition to these solutions, hairy black holes -- solutions with no correspondent in General Relativity -- have been found numerically, whose existence is a natural consequence of the absence of the Birkhoff's theorem in these theories. The existence of extra propagating degrees of freedom, makes the stability properties of these black holes richer and more complex than those of General Relativity. In particular, the bi-Schwarzschild black hole exhibits an unstable spherically symmetric mode, while the bi-Kerr geometry is also generically unstable, both against the spherical mode and against superradiant instabilities. If astrophysical black holes are described by these solutions, the superradiant instability o...

  8. Massive Black Holes and Galaxies

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has been accumulating for several decades that many galaxies harbor central mass concentrations that may be in the form of black holes with masses between a few million to a few billion time the mass of the Sun. I will discuss measurements over the last two decades, employing adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy on large ground-based telescopes that prove the existence of such a massive black hole in the Center of our Milky Way, beyond any reasonable doubt. These data also provide key insights into its properties and environment. Most recently, a tidally disrupting cloud of gas has been discovered on an almost radial orbit that reached its peri-distance of ~2000 Schwarzschild radii in 2014, promising to be a valuable tool for exploring the innermost accretion zone. Future interferometric studies of the Galactic Center Black hole promise to be able to test gravity in its strong field limit.

  9. Massive Black Hole Binary Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merritt David

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Coalescence of binary supermassive black holes (SBHs would constitute the strongest sources of gravitational waves to be observed by LISA. While the formation of binary SBHs during galaxy mergers is almost inevitable, coalescence requires that the separation between binary components first drop by a few orders of magnitude, due presumably to interaction of the binary with stars and gas in a galactic nucleus. This article reviews the observational evidence for binary SBHs and discusses how they would evolve. No completely convincing case of a bound, binary SBH has yet been found, although a handful of systems (e.g. interacting galaxies; remnants of galaxy mergers are now believed to contain two SBHs at projected separations of <~ 1kpc. N-body studies of binary evolution in gas-free galaxies have reached large enough particle numbers to reproduce the slow, “diffusive” refilling of the binary’s loss cone that is believed to characterize binary evolution in real galactic nuclei. While some of the results of these simulations - e.g. the binary hardening rate and eccentricity evolution - are strongly N-dependent, others - e.g. the “damage” inflicted by the binary on the nucleus - are not. Luminous early-type galaxies often exhibit depleted cores with masses of ~ 1-2 times the mass of their nuclear SBHs, consistent with the predictions of the binary model. Studies of the interaction of massive binaries with gas are still in their infancy, although much progress is expected in the near future. Binary coalescence has a large influence on the spins of SBHs, even for mass ratios as extreme as 10:1, and evidence of spin-flips may have been observed.

  10. Black holes in massive conformal gravity

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    Myung, Yun Soo, E-mail: ysmyung@inje.ac.kr

    2014-03-07

    We analyze the classical stability of Schwarzschild black hole in massive conformal gravity which was recently proposed for another massive gravity model. This model in the Jordan frame is conformally equivalent to the Einstein–Weyl gravity in the Einstein frame. The coupled linearized Einstein equation is decomposed into the traceless and trace equation when one chooses 6m{sup 2}φ=δR. Solving the traceless equation exhibits unstable modes featuring the Gregory–Laflamme s-mode instability of five-dimensional black string, while we find no unstable modes when solving the trace equation. It is shown that the instability of the black hole in massive conformal gravity arises from the massiveness where the geometry of extra dimension trades for mass.

  11. BlackMax: A black-hole event generator with rotation, recoil, split branes, and brane tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, De-Chang; Starkman, Glenn; Stojkovic, Dejan; Issever, Cigdem; Rizvi, Eram; Tseng, Jeff

    2008-04-01

    We present a comprehensive black-hole event generator, BlackMax, which simulates the experimental signatures of microscopic and Planckian black-hole production and evolution at the LHC in the context of brane world models with low-scale quantum gravity. The generator is based on phenomenologically realistic models free of serious problems that plague low-scale gravity, thus offering more realistic predictions for hadron-hadron colliders. The generator includes all of the black-hole gray-body factors known to date and incorporates the effects of black-hole rotation, splitting between the fermions, nonzero brane tension, and black-hole recoil due to Hawking radiation (although not all simultaneously). The generator can be interfaced with Herwig and Pythia. The main code can be downloaded from http://www-pnp.physics.ox.ac.uk/~issever/BlackMax/blackmax.html.

  12. Constraints on the Nature of CID-42: Recoil Kick or Supermassive Black Hole Pair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecha, Laura; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The galaxy CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, is a highly unusual object. An apparent galaxy merger remnant, it displays signatures of both an inspiraling, kiloparsecscale active galactic nucleus (AGN) pair and of a recoiling AGN with a kick velocity approximately greater than 1300 km s(exp -1). Among recoiling AGN candidates, CID-42 alone has both spatial offsets (in optical and X-ray bands) and spectroscopic offsets. In order to constrain the relative likelihood of both scenarios, we develop models using hydrodynamic galaxy merger simulations coupled with radiative transfer calculations. Our gas-rich, major merger models are generally well matched to the galactic morphology and to the inferred stellar mass and star formation rate. We show that a recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) in CID-42 should be observable as an AGN at the time of observation. However, in order for the recoiling AGN to produce narrow-line emission, it must be observed shortly after the kick while it still inhabits a dense gaseous region, implying a large total kick velocity (vk approximately greater than 2000 km s(exp -1)). For the dual AGN scenario, an unusually large broad-line offset is required, and the best match to the observed morphology requires a galaxy that is less luminous than CID-42. Further, the lack of X-ray emission from one of the two optical nuclei is not easily attributed to an intrinsically quiescent SMBH or to a Compton-thick galactic environment. While the current data do not allow either the recoiling or the dual AGN scenario for CID-42 to be excluded, our models highlight the most relevant parameters for distinguishing these possibilities with future observations. In particular, high-quality, spatially-resolved spectra that can pinpoint the origin of the broad and narrow line features will be critical for determining the nature of this unique source.

  13. BPS black hole horizons from massive IIA

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    Guarino, Adolfo

    2017-08-01

    The maximal four-dimensional supergravity with a dyonic ISO(7) gauging that arises from the reduction of massive IIA on a six-sphere has recently been shown to accommodate static BPS black holes with hyperbolic horizons. When restricted to the N=2 subsector that retains one vector multiplet and the universal hypermultiplet, the attractor mechanism was shown to fix both the vector charges and the scalar fields at the horizon to a unique configuration in terms of the gauging parameters. In order to assess the (non-)uniqueness of BPS black hole horizons from massive IIA, we extend the study of the attractor mechanism to other N=2 subsectors including additional matter multiplets. We note that, while extending the hypermultiplet sector does not modify the set of solutions to the attractor equations, the inclusion of additional vector multiplets results in new hyperbolic/spherical horizon configurations containing free parameters. The model with three vector multiplets and the universal hypermultiplet, which is the massive IIA analogue of the STU-model from M-theory, may play a relevant role in massive IIA holography.

  14. Monsters on the move: Confirming gravitational wave recoiling supermassive black hole candidates

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    Robinson, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    There is compelling evidence that supermassive black holes (SMBH) reside at the centers of all large galaxies and are the gravitational 'engines' of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Mergers between galaxies are thought to have played a fundamental role in the growth and evolution of the largest galaxies in the nearby universe. Galaxy mergers lead to the formation of an SMBH binary, which eventually coalescences through the emission of gravitational waves and receives a recoil kick ( several 1000km/s). This recoil in turn causes the merged SMBH to oscillate ( 1Gyr) in the gravitational potential well of the host galaxy. During this time, the recoiling SMBH may be observed as a 'displaced' AGN. These events are a strong test of gravitational physics and the merger frequency of binary SMBH. Due to the long damping time of the post recoil oscillations, displacements 10-100pc may be expected even in nearby elliptical galaxies and can be measured as spatial offsets of AGN in high resolution optical or infrared images. In a preliminary study of 96 early type galaxies using archival HST/WFPC2 images we have identified 18 candidates that show a significant displacement between the SMBH (traced by the AGN) and the photocenter of the host galaxy, determined by isophotal analysis. However, it is necessary to confirm these displacements using IR images since diffuse galaxy scale and nuclear dust structures are common. Here we propose to obtain WFC3/IR F110W and F160W images of 6 of the 18 candidates for which no IR images are available in the HST archive. These observations will allow us to both confirm and improve the accuracy of the measured displacements.

  15. Massive Black Hole Implicated in Stellar Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Magellan telescopes suggest that a dense stellar remnant has been ripped apart by a black hole a thousand times as massive as the Sun. If confirmed, this discovery would be a cosmic double play: it would be strong evidence for an intermediate mass black hole, which has been a hotly debated topic, and would mark the first time such a black hole has been caught tearing a star apart. This scenario is based on Chandra observations, which revealed an unusually luminous source of X-rays in a dense cluster of old stars, and optical observations that showed a peculiar mix of elements associated with the X-ray emission. Taken together, a case can be made that the X-ray emission is produced by debris from a disrupted white dwarf star that is heated as it falls towards a massive black hole. The optical emission comes from debris further out that is illuminated by these X-rays. The intensity of the X-ray emission places the source in the "ultraluminous X-ray source" or ULX category, meaning that it is more luminous than any known stellar X-ray source, but less luminous than the bright X-ray sources (active galactic nuclei) associated with supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies. The nature of ULXs is a mystery, but one suggestion is that some ULXs are black holes with masses between about a hundred and several thousand times that of the Sun, a range intermediate between stellar-mass black holes and supermassive black holes located in the nuclei of galaxies. This ULX is in a globular cluster, a very old and crowded conglomeration of stars. Astronomers have suspected that globular clusters could contain intermediate-mass black holes, but conclusive evidence for this has been elusive. "Astronomers have made cases for stars being torn apart by supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies before, but this is the first good evidence for such an event in a globular cluster," said Jimmy Irwin of the University

  16. Recoiling black holes in static and evolving dark matter halo potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smole M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We follow trajectories of kicked black holes in static and evolving dark matter halo potential. We explore both NFW and Einasto dark matter density distributions. Considered dark matter halos represent hosts of massive spiral and elliptical field galaxies. We study critical amplitude of kick velocity necessary for complete black hole ejection at various redshifts and find that ~40% lower kick velocities can remove black holes from their host haloes at z = 7 compared to z = 1. The greatest difference between static and evolving potential occurs near the critical velocity for black hole ejection and at high redshifts. When NFW and Einasto density distributions are compared ~30% higher kick velocities are needed for complete removal of BHs from dark matter halo described by NFW profile. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176021: Visible and invisible matter in nearby galaxies: Theory and observations

  17. Recoiling Black Holes in Static and Evolving Dark Matter Halo Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smole, M.

    2015-12-01

    We follow trajectories of kicked black holes in static and evolving dark matter halo potential. We explore both NFW and Einasto dark matter density distributions. The considered dark matter halos represent hosts of massive spiral and elliptical field galaxies. We study the critical amplitude of kick velocity necessary for complete black hole ejection at various redshifts and find that ˜40 percent lower kick velocities can remove black holes from their host haloes at z=7 compared to z=1. The greatest difference between the static and evolving potential occurs near the critical velocity for black hole ejection and at high redshifts. When NFW and Einasto density distributions are compared ˜30 percent higher kick velocities are needed for complete removal of BHs from dark matter halo described by the NFW profile.

  18. Monsters on the move: A search for supermassive black holes undergoing gravitational wave recoil

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    Jadhav, Yashashree; Robinson, Andrew; Lena, Davide

    2018-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that supermassive black holes (SMBH) reside at the centers of all large galaxies and are the gravitational ‘engines’ of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Furthermore, galaxy mergers are thought to have played a fundamental role in the growth and evolution of the largest galaxies in the nearby universe. A galaxy merger is expected to lead to the formation of an SMBH binary, which itself eventually coalesces through the emission of gravitational waves. Such events fall outside the frequency range accessible to the LIGO/VIRGO gravitational wave detectors, but they can be detected via electromagnetic signatures. Numerical relativity simulations show that, depending on the initial spin-orbit configuration of the binary, the merged SMBH receives a gravitational recoil kick that may reach several 1000km/s. This recoil in turn causes the merged SMBH to oscillate for up to ~1 Gyr in the gravitational potential well of the galaxy. During this time, the recoiling SMBH may be observed as a ‘displaced’ AGN. Such events provide a strong test of gravitational physics and the formation and merger frequencies of binary SMBH. As a result of residual oscillations, displacements ~10 – 100pc may be expected even in nearby elliptical galaxies and can be measured as spatial offsets in high resolution optical or infrared images. We present the results of a preliminary study, in which isophotal analysis was conducted for a sample of 96 galaxies to obtain the photocenter of the galaxies using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archival optical or infrared WFC2/PC, ACS or NICMOS images. The position of the nuclear point source (AGN) was also measured to obtain a displacement vector. This initial sample reveals 18 candidates that show a significant displacement. Of these, 14 are hosted by core ellipticals, while the rest have a cuspy light profile. As galactic and nuclear dust structures may interfere with the isophotal analysis, we are currently obtaining new WFC

  19. Massive Black Hole Binaries: Dynamical Evolution and Observational Signatures

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    M. Dotti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the dynamical evolution of massive black hole pairs in mergers is crucial in the context of a hierarchical galaxy formation scenario. The timescales for the formation and the coalescence of black hole binaries are still poorly constrained, resulting in large uncertainties in the expected rate of massive black hole binaries detectable in the electromagnetic and gravitational wave spectra. Here, we review the current theoretical understanding of the black hole pairing in galaxy mergers, with a particular attention to recent developments and open issues. We conclude with a review of the expected observational signatures of massive binaries and of the candidates discussed in literature to date.

  20. Phase transitions of black holes in massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Fernando, Sharmanthie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we have studied thermodynamics of a black hole in massive gravity in the canonical ensemble. The massive gravity theory in consideration here has a massive graviton due to Lorentz symmetry breaking. The black hole studied here has a scalar charge due to the massive graviton and is asymptotically anti-de Sitter. We have computed various thermodynamical quantities such as temperature, specific heat and free energy. Both the local and global stability of the black hole are studied by observing the behavior of the specific heat and the free energy. We have observed that there is a first order phase transition between small and large black hole for a certain range of the scalar charge. This phase transition is similar to the liquid/gas phase transition at constant temperature for a Van der Waals fluid. The coexistence curves for the small and large black hole branches are also discussed in detail.

  1. Massive Black Holes in Central Cluster Galaxies

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    Volonteri, Marta; Ciotti, Luca

    2013-05-01

    We explore how the co-evolution of massive black holes (MBHs) and galaxies is affected by environmental effects, addressing in particular MBHs hosted in the central cluster galaxies (we will refer to these galaxies in general as "CCGs"). Recently, the sample of MBHs in CCGs with dynamically measured masses has increased, and it has been suggested that these MBH masses (M BH) deviate from the expected correlations with velocity dispersion (σ) and mass of the bulge (M bulge) of the host galaxy: MBHs in CCGs appear to be "overmassive." This discrepancy is more pronounced when considering the M BH-σ relation than the M BH-M bulge one. We show that this behavior stems from a combination of two natural factors: (1) CCGs experience more mergers involving spheroidal galaxies and their MBHs and (2) such mergers are preferentially gas poor. We use a combination of analytical and semi-analytical models to investigate the MBH-galaxy co-evolution in different environments and find that the combination of these two factors is in accordance with the trends observed in current data sets.

  2. MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN CENTRAL CLUSTER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volonteri, Marta [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis Bd. Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Ciotti, Luca [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    We explore how the co-evolution of massive black holes (MBHs) and galaxies is affected by environmental effects, addressing in particular MBHs hosted in the central cluster galaxies (we will refer to these galaxies in general as ''CCGs''). Recently, the sample of MBHs in CCGs with dynamically measured masses has increased, and it has been suggested that these MBH masses (M{sub BH}) deviate from the expected correlations with velocity dispersion ({sigma}) and mass of the bulge (M{sub bulge}) of the host galaxy: MBHs in CCGs appear to be ''overmassive''. This discrepancy is more pronounced when considering the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation than the M{sub BH}-M{sub bulge} one. We show that this behavior stems from a combination of two natural factors: (1) CCGs experience more mergers involving spheroidal galaxies and their MBHs and (2) such mergers are preferentially gas poor. We use a combination of analytical and semi-analytical models to investigate the MBH-galaxy co-evolution in different environments and find that the combination of these two factors is in accordance with the trends observed in current data sets.

  3. Simulations of recoiling black holes: adaptive mesh refinement and radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliani, Zakaria; Mizuno, Yosuke; Olivares, Hector; Porth, Oliver; Rezzolla, Luciano; Younsi, Ziri

    2017-02-01

    Context. In many astrophysical phenomena, and especially in those that involve the high-energy regimes that always accompany the astronomical phenomenology of black holes and neutron stars, physical conditions that are achieved are extreme in terms of speeds, temperatures, and gravitational fields. In such relativistic regimes, numerical calculations are the only tool to accurately model the dynamics of the flows and the transport of radiation in the accreting matter. Aims: We here continue our effort of modelling the behaviour of matter when it orbits or is accreted onto a generic black hole by developing a new numerical code that employs advanced techniques geared towards solving the equations of general-relativistic hydrodynamics. Methods: More specifically, the new code employs a number of high-resolution shock-capturing Riemann solvers and reconstruction algorithms, exploiting the enhanced accuracy and the reduced computational cost of adaptive mesh-refinement (AMR) techniques. In addition, the code makes use of sophisticated ray-tracing libraries that, coupled with general-relativistic radiation-transfer calculations, allow us to accurately compute the electromagnetic emissions from such accretion flows. Results: We validate the new code by presenting an extensive series of stationary accretion flows either in spherical or axial symmetry that are performed either in two or three spatial dimensions. In addition, we consider the highly nonlinear scenario of a recoiling black hole produced in the merger of a supermassive black-hole binary interacting with the surrounding circumbinary disc. In this way, we can present for the first time ray-traced images of the shocked fluid and the light curve resulting from consistent general-relativistic radiation-transport calculations from this process. Conclusions: The work presented here lays the ground for the development of a generic computational infrastructure employing AMR techniques to accurately and self

  4. The host galaxy of the gravitational wave recoiling black hole candidate 3C186

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    Chiaberge, Marco

    2017-08-01

    We discovered a gravitational wave (GW) recoiling black hole (BH) candidate in our HST WFC3 snapshot images of the radio-loud QSO 3C186. These events are expected to happen as a result of BH-BH mergers. This extremely energetic phenomenon leads to the production of an intense field of GWs, which in most cases are emitted anisotropically. As a result, the merged black hole may receive a kick and be displaced from the center of the host galaxy with velocities that can be as high as 4000 km/s. Depending on the relative orientation of the kick with respect to the line-of-sight, if the BH is active we expect to observe an offset QSO. Furthermore, the broad lines may be offset with respect to the narrow lines, which are emitted in the frame of the host. 3C186 shows all of the predicted observational features of a such an event. Spectra show offsets between narrow and broad emission lines of 2100km/s, and our HST image clearly shows that the QSO is offset by 1.3 with respect to the isophotal center of the host galaxy. Scenarios alternative to the GW kick as the origin for the observed features are unlikely, but still viable. Only HST allows us to obtain spatially resolved information, high sensitivity and stable PSF to better investigate the host galaxy properties. We will use ACS and WFC3 to obtain deep images and study the morphology of the host galaxy. We will unambiguously establish whether the host galaxy of 3C186 underwent a major merger and we will be able to set accurate constraints on the age of the merger. The proposed observations will have a tremendous impact on our knowledge of supermassive BH mergers and the associated emission of gravitational waves.

  5. A Potential Recoiling Supermassive Black Hole, CXO J101527.2+625911

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.-C.; Yoon, Ilsang; Evans, A. S.; Stierwalt, S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Privon, G. C. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avda. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago, Codigo Postal: 8970117 (Chile); Harvey, D. [Laboratoire dAstrophysique, EPFL, Observatoire de Sauverny, Chemin des Maillettes, 51, Versoix CH-1290, Suisse (Switzerland); Kim, Ji Hoon, E-mail: dkim@nrao.edu [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    We have carried out a systematic search for recoiling supermassive black holes (rSMBH) using the Chandra Source and SDSS Cross-Match Catalog. From the survey, we have detected a potential rSMBH, CXO J101527.2+625911, at z = 0.3504. The source CXO J101527.2+625911 has a spatially offset (1.26 ± 0.05 kpc) active SMBH and kinematically offset broad emission lines (175 ± 25 km s{sup −1} relative to the systemic velocity). The observed spatial and velocity offsets suggest that this galaxy could be an rSMBH, but we have also considered the possibility of a dual SMBH scenario. The column density toward the galaxy center was found to be Compton thin, but no X-ray source was detected. The non-detection of the X-ray source in the nucleus suggests that either there is no obscured actively accreting SMBH or that there exists an SMBH, but it has a low accretion rate (i.e., a low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN)). The possibility of the LLAGN was investigated and found to be unlikely based on the H α luminosity, radio power, and kinematic arguments. This, along with the null detection of an X-ray source in the nucleus, supports our hypothesis that CXO J101527.2+625911 is an rSMBH. Our GALFIT analysis shows the host galaxy to be a bulge-dominated elliptical. The weak morphological disturbance and small spatial and velocity offsets suggest that CXO J101527.2+625911 could be in the final stage of a merging process and about to turn into a normal elliptical galaxy.

  6. Black hole conserved charges in Generalized Minimal Massive Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Setare

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we construct mass, angular momentum and entropy of black hole solution of Generalized Minimal Massive Gravity (GMMG in asymptotically Anti-de Sitter (AdS spacetimes. The Generalized Minimal Massive Gravity theory is realized by adding the CS deformation term, the higher derivative deformation term, and an extra term to pure Einstein gravity with a negative cosmological constant. We apply our result for conserved charge Qμ(ξ¯ to the rotating BTZ black hole solution of GMMG, and find energy, angular momentum and entropy. Then we show that our results for these quantities are consistent with the first law of black hole thermodynamics.

  7. Black-hole-regulated star formation in massive galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Navarro, Ignacio; Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Ruiz-Lara, Tomás; van de Ven, Glenn

    2018-01-01

    Supermassive black holes, with masses more than a million times that of the Sun, seem to inhabit the centres of all massive galaxies. Cosmologically motivated theories of galaxy formation require feedback from these supermassive black holes to regulate star formation. In the absence of such feedback, state-of-the-art numerical simulations fail to reproduce the number density and properties of massive galaxies in the local Universe. There is, however, no observational evidence of this strongly coupled coevolution between supermassive black holes and star formation, impeding our understanding of baryonic processes within galaxies. Here we report that the star formation histories of nearby massive galaxies, as measured from their integrated optical spectra, depend on the mass of the central supermassive black hole. Our results indicate that the black-hole mass scales with the gas cooling rate in the early Universe. The subsequent quenching of star formation takes place earlier and more efficiently in galaxies that host higher-mass central black holes. The observed relation between black-hole mass and star formation efficiency applies to all generations of stars formed throughout the life of a galaxy, revealing a continuous interplay between black-hole activity and baryon cooling.

  8. Black-hole-regulated star formation in massive galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Navarro, Ignacio; Brodie, Jean P; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Ruiz-Lara, Tomás; van de Ven, Glenn

    2018-01-18

    Supermassive black holes, with masses more than a million times that of the Sun, seem to inhabit the centres of all massive galaxies. Cosmologically motivated theories of galaxy formation require feedback from these supermassive black holes to regulate star formation. In the absence of such feedback, state-of-the-art numerical simulations fail to reproduce the number density and properties of massive galaxies in the local Universe. There is, however, no observational evidence of this strongly coupled coevolution between supermassive black holes and star formation, impeding our understanding of baryonic processes within galaxies. Here we report that the star formation histories of nearby massive galaxies, as measured from their integrated optical spectra, depend on the mass of the central supermassive black hole. Our results indicate that the black-hole mass scales with the gas cooling rate in the early Universe. The subsequent quenching of star formation takes place earlier and more efficiently in galaxies that host higher-mass central black holes. The observed relation between black-hole mass and star formation efficiency applies to all generations of stars formed throughout the life of a galaxy, revealing a continuous interplay between black-hole activity and baryon cooling.

  9. Massive black holes from dissipative dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Guido; Panci, Paolo; Lupi, Alessandro; Bovino, Stefano; Silk, Joe

    2018-01-01

    We show that a subdominant component of dissipative dark matter resembling the Standard Model can form many intermediate-mass black hole seeds during the first structure formation epoch. We also observe that, in the presence of this matter sector, the black holes will grow at a much faster rate with respect to the ordinary case. These facts can explain the observed abundance of supermassive black holes feeding high-redshift quasars. The scenario will have interesting observational consequences for dark substructures and gravitational wave production.

  10. The XMM-Newton spectrum of a candidate recoiling supermassive black hole: An elusive inverted P-Cygni profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Civano, F.; Marchesi, S.; Hickox, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03855 (United States); Comastri, A.; Cappelluti, N. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Costantini, E. [SRON, Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan, 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Elvis, M.; Fruscione, A. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mainieri, V. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Jahnke, K. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Komossa, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Piconcelli, E. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Vignali, C.; Brusa, M. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universitá degli Studi di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-11-20

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of new XMM-Newton data of the source CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, detected in the COSMOS survey at z = 0.359. Previous works suggested that CID-42 is a candidate recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) showing also an inverted P-Cygni profile in the X-ray spectra at ∼6 keV (rest) with an iron emission line plus a redshifted absorption line (detected at 3σ in previous XMM-Newton and Chandra observations). Detailed analysis of the absorption line suggested the presence of ionized material flowing into the black hole at high velocity. In the new long XMM-Newton observation, while the overall spectral shape remains constant, the continuum 2-10 keV flux decrease of ∼20% with respect to previous observation and the absorption line is undetected. The upper limit on the intensity of the absorption line is EW < 162 eV. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations show that the nondetection of the line is solely due to variation in the properties of the inflowing material, in agreement with the transient nature of these features, and that the intensity of the line is lower than the previously measured with a probability of 98.8%. In the scenario of CID-42 as a recoiling SMBH, the absorption line can be interpreted as being due to an inflow of gas with variable density that is located in the proximity of the SMBH and recoiling with it. New monitoring observations will be requested to further characterize this line.

  11. Are Nuclear Star Clusters the Precursors of Massive Black Holes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Neumayer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present new upper limits for black hole masses in extremely late type spiral galaxies. We confirm that this class of galaxies has black holes with masses less than 106M⊙, if any. We also derive new upper limits for nuclear star cluster masses in massive galaxies with previously determined black hole masses. We use the newly derived upper limits and a literature compilation to study the low mass end of the global-to-nucleus relations. We find the following. (1 The MBH-σ relation cannot flatten at low masses, but may steepen. (2 The MBH-Mbulge relation may well flatten in contrast. (3 The MBH-Sersic n relation is able to account for the large scatter in black hole masses in low-mass disk galaxies. Outliers in the MBH-Sersic n relation seem to be dwarf elliptical galaxies. When plotting MBH versus MNC we find three different regimes: (a nuclear cluster dominated nuclei, (b a transition region, and (c black hole-dominated nuclei. This is consistent with the picture, in which black holes form inside nuclear clusters with a very low-mass fraction. They subsequently grow much faster than the nuclear cluster, destroying it when the ratio MBH/MNC grows above 100. Nuclear star clusters may thus be the precursors of massive black holes in galaxy nuclei.

  12. Greybody factors for a black hole in massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ruifeng; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2015-10-01

    An exact solution was recently found in the massive gravity theory having the form of Schwarzschild-de Sitter (dS) black holes with some additional background fields. Hawking radiation will occur at the event and cosmological horizons having the blackbody spectrum, which will be modified by the geometry outside the black hole. In this paper, we study the greybody factors of a test scalar, considering its minimal coupling with the background geometry. The case of small black holes with a horizon radius much smaller than the cosmological dS radius is studied numerically. The case of near-extremal black holes with the horizon radius comparable to the cosmological dS radius is studied analytically. In addition, we considered the coupling of the test field with the background Stückelberg fields, which in turn leads to reductions in particle emission and some nontrivial features (resonances) in the greybody factors.

  13. Coexistent physics of massive black holes in the phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The coexistent physics of de Rham-Gabada-dze-Tolley (dRGT) massive black holes and holographic massive black holes is investigated in the extended phase space where the cosmological constant is viewed as pressure. Van der Waals like phase transitions are found for both of them. Coexistent curves of reduced pressure and reduced temperature are found to be different from that of RN-AdS black holes. Coexistent curves of reduced Gibbs free energy and reduced pressure show that Gibbs free energy in the canonical ensemble decreases monotonically with the increasing pressure. The concept number density is introduced to study the coexistent physics. It is uncovered that with the increasing pressure, the number densities of small black holes (SBHs) and large black holes (LBHs) change monotonically in the contrary directions till finally reaching the same value at the critical points of the phase transitions. In other words, with the increasing pressure the number density differences between SBHs and LBHs decrease mono...

  14. The formation and evolution of massive black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volonteri, M

    2012-08-03

    The past 10 years have witnessed a change of perspective in the way astrophysicists think about massive black holes (MBHs), which are now considered to have a major role in the evolution of galaxies. This appreciation was driven by the realization that black holes of millions of solar masses and above reside in the center of most galaxies, including the Milky Way. MBHs also powered active galactic nuclei known to exist just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. Here, I summarize the current ideas on the evolution of MBHs through cosmic history, from their formation about 13 billion years ago to their growth within their host galaxies.

  15. Probing Massive Black Hole Populations and Their Environments with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Michael; Larson, Shane

    2018-01-01

    With the adoption of the LISA Mission Proposal by the European Space Agency in response to its call for L3 mission concepts, gravitational wave measurements from space are on the horizon. With data from the Illustris large-scale cosmological simulation, we provide analysis of LISA detection rates accompanied by characterization of the merging Massive Black Holes (MBH) and their host galaxies. MBHs of total mass $\\sim10^6-10^9 M_\\odot$ are the main focus of this study. Using a precise treatment of the dynamical friction evolutionary process prior to gravitational wave emission, we evolve MBH simulation particle mergers from $\\sim$kpc scales until coalescence to achieve a merger distribution. Using the statistical basis of the Illustris output, we Monte-carlo synthesize many realizations of the merging massive black hole population across space and time. We use those realizations to build mock LISA detection catalogs to understand the impact of LISA mission configurations on our ability to probe massive black hole merger populations and their environments throughout the visible Universe.

  16. BlackMax: A black-hole event generator with rotation, recoil, split branes and brane tension

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, De-Chang; Starkman, Glenn; Stojkovic, Dejan; Issever, Cigdem; Rizvi, Eram; Tseng, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    We present a comprehensive black-hole event generator, BlackMax, which simulates the experimental signatures of microscopic and Planckian black-hole production and evolution at the LHC in the context of brane world models with low-scale quantum gravity. The generator is based on phenomenologically realistic models free of serious problems that plague low-scale gravity, thus offering more realistic predictions for hadron-hadron colliders. The generator includes all of the black-hole graybody f...

  17. Manual of BlackMax, a black-hole event generator with rotation, recoil, split branes, and brane tension

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, De-Chang; Issever, Cigdem; Rizvi, Eram; Starkman, Glenn; Stojkovic, Dejan; Tseng, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This is the users manual of the black-hole event generator BlackMax, which simulates the experimental signatures of microscopic and Planckian black-hole production and evolution at proton-proton, proton-antiproton and electron-positron colliders in the context of brane world models with low-scale quantum gravity. The generator is based on phenomenologically realistic models free of serious problems that plague low-scale gravity. It includes all of the black-hole gray-body factors known to dat...

  18. Periodic self-lensing from accreting massive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Daniel J.; Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2018-03-01

    Nearly 150 massive black hole binary (MBHB) candidates at sub-pc orbital separations have been reported in recent literature. Nevertheless, the definitive detection of even a single such object remains elusive. If at least one of the black holes is accreting, the light emitted from its accretion disc will be lensed by the other black hole for binary orbital inclinations near to the line of sight. This binary self-lensing could provide a unique signature of compact MBHB systems. We show that, for MBHBs with masses in the range 106-1010 M⊙ and with orbital periods less than ˜10 yr, strong lensing events should occur in one to 10s of per cent of MBHB systems that are monitored for an entire orbit. Lensing events will last from days for the less massive, shorter period MBHBs to a year for the most massive ˜10 year orbital period MBHBs. At small inclinations of the binary orbit to the line of sight, lensing must occur and will be accompanied by periodicity due to the relativistic Doppler boost. Flares at the same phase as the otherwise average flux of the Doppler modulation would be a smoking gun signature of self-lensing and can be used to constrain binary parameters. For MBHBs with separation ≳100 Schwarzschild radii, we show that finite-sized source effects could serve as a probe of MBH accretion disc structure. Finally, we stress that our lensing probability estimate implies that ˜10 of the known MBHB candidates identified through quasar periodicity should exhibit strong lensing flares.

  19. Astrophysics of Super-Massive Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.

    2013-01-01

    We present here an overview of recent work in the subject of astrophysical manifestations of super-massive black hole (SMBH) mergers. This is a field that has been traditionally driven by theoretical work, but in recent years has also generated a great deal of interest and excitement in the observational astronomy community. In particular, the electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to SMBH mergers provide the means to detect and characterize these highly energetic events at cosmological distances, even in the absence of a space-based gravitational-wave observatory. In addition to providing a mechanism for observing SMBH mergers, EM counterparts also give important information about the environments in which these remarkable events take place, thus teaching us about the mechanisms through which galaxies form and evolve symbiotically with their central black holes.

  20. Charged black hole solutions in Gauss-Bonnet-massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendi, S.H. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM),P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panahiyan, S.; Panah, B. Eslam [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-21

    Motivated by high interest in the close relation between string theory and black hole solutions, in this paper, we take into account the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet Lagrangian in the context of massive gravity. We examine the possibility of black hole in this regard, and discuss the types of horizons. Next, we calculate conserved and thermodynamic quantities and check the validity of the first law of thermodynamics. In addition, we investigate the stability of these black holes in context of canonical ensemble. We show that number, type and place of phase transition points may be significantly affected by different parameters. Next, by considering cosmological constant as thermodynamical pressure, we will extend phase space and calculate critical values. Then, we construct thermodynamical spacetime by considering mass as thermodynamical potential. We study geometrical thermodynamics of these black holes in context of heat capacity and extended phase space. We show that studying heat capacity, geometrical thermodynamics and critical behavior in extended phase space lead to consistent results. Finally, we will employ a new method for obtaining critical values and show that the results of this method are consistent with those of other methods.

  1. Observational properties of massive black hole binary progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainich, R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Shenar, T.; Marchant, P.; Eldridge, J. J.; Sander, A. A. C.; Hamann, W.-R.; Langer, N.; Todt, H.

    2018-01-01

    Context. The first directly detected gravitational waves (GW 150914) were emitted by two coalescing black holes (BHs) with masses of ≈ 36 M⊙ and ≈ 29 M⊙. Several scenarios have been proposed to put this detection into an astrophysical context. The evolution of an isolated massive binary system is among commonly considered models. Aims: Various groups have performed detailed binary-evolution calculations that lead to BH merger events. However, the question remains open as to whether binary systems with the predicted properties really exist. The aim of this paper is to help observers to close this gap by providing spectral characteristics of massive binary BH progenitors during a phase where at least one of the companions is still non-degenerate. Methods: Stellar evolution models predict fundamental stellar parameters. Using these as input for our stellar atmosphere code (Potsdam Wolf-Rayet), we compute a set of models for selected evolutionary stages of massive merging BH progenitors at different metallicities. Results: The synthetic spectra obtained from our atmosphere calculations reveal that progenitors of massive BH merger events start their lives as O2-3V stars that evolve to early-type blue supergiants before they undergo core-collapse during the Wolf-Rayet phase. When the primary has collapsed, the remaining system will appear as a wind-fed high-mass X-ray binary. Based on our atmosphere models, we provide feedback parameters, broad band magnitudes, and spectral templates that should help to identify such binaries in the future. Conclusions: While the predicted parameter space for massive BH binary progenitors is partly realized in nature, none of the known massive binaries match our synthetic spectra of massive BH binary progenitors exactly. Comparisons of empirically determined mass-loss rates with those assumed by evolution calculations reveal significant differences. The consideration of the empirical mass-loss rates in evolution calculations will

  2. Fallback and Black Hole Production in Massive Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei-Qun; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Woosley, S.E.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Heger, A.; /UC, Santa Cruz /Los Alamos

    2007-01-08

    The compact remnants of core collapse supernovae--neutron stars and black holes--have properties that reflect both the structure of their stellar progenitors and the physics of the explosion. In particular, the masses of these remnants are sensitive to the density structure of the presupernova star and to the explosion energy. To a considerable extent, the final mass is determined by the ''fallback'', during the explosion, of matter that initially moves outwards, yet ultimately fails to escape. We consider here the simulated explosion of a large number of massive stars (10 to 100 M{sub {circle_dot}}) of Population I (solar metallicity) and III (zero metallicity), and find systematic differences in the remnant mass distributions. As pointed out by Chevalier (1989), supernovae in more compact progenitor stars have stronger reverse shocks and experience more fallback. For Population III stars above about 25 M{sub {circle_dot}} and explosion energies less than 1.5 x 10{sup 51} erg, black holes are a common outcome, with masses that increase monotonically with increasing main sequence mass up to a maximum hole mass of about 35 M{sub {circle_dot}}. If such stars produce primary nitrogen, however, their black holes are systematically smaller. For modern supernovae with nearly solar metallicity, black hole production is much less frequent and the typical masses, which depend sensitively on explosion energy, are smaller. We explore the neutron star initial mass function for both populations and, for reasonable assumptions about the initial mass cut of the explosion, find good agreement with the average of observed masses of neutron stars in binaries. We also find evidence for a bimodal distribution of neutron star masses with a spike around 1.2 M{sub {circle_dot}} (gravitational mass) and a broader distribution peaked around 1.4 M{sub {circle_dot}}.

  3. A Practical Guide to the Massive Black Hole Cosmic History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sesana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available I review our current understanding of massive black hole (MBH formation and evolution along the cosmic history. After a brief introductory overview of the relevance of MBHs in the hierarchical structure formation paradigm, I discuss the main viable channels for seed BH formation at high redshift and for their subsequent mass growth and spin evolution. The emerging hierarchical picture, where MBHs grow through merger triggered accretion episodes, acquiring their mass while shining as quasars, is overall robust, but too simplistic to explain the diversity observed in MBH phenomenology. I briefly discuss which future observations will help to shed light on the MBH cosmic history in the near future, paying particular attention to the upcoming gravitational wave window.

  4. HUBBLE UNCOVERS DUST DISK AROUND A MASSIVE BLACK HOLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Resembling a gigantic hubcap in space, a 3,700 light-year-diameter dust disk encircles a 300 million solar-mass black hole in the center of the elliptical galaxy NGC 7052. The disk, possibly a remnant of an ancient galaxy collision, will be swallowed up by the black hole in several billion years. Because the front end of the disk eclipses more stars than the back, it appears darker. Also, because dust absorbs blue light more effectively than red light, the disk is redder than the rest of the galaxy (this same phenomenon causes the Sun to appear red when it sets in a smoggy afternoon). This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, in visible light. Details as small as 50 light-years across can be seen. Hubble's Faint Object Spectrograph (replaced by the STIS spectrograph in 1997) was used to observe hydrogen and nitrogen emission lines from gas in the disk. Hubble measurements show that the disk rotates like an enormous carousel, 341,000 miles per hour (155 kilometers per second) at 186 light-years from the center. The rotation velocity provides a direct measure of the gravitational force acting on the gas by the black hole. Though 300 million times the mass of our Sun, the black hole is still only 0.05 per cent of the total mass of the NGC 7052 galaxy. Despite its size, the disk is 100 times less massive than the black hole. Still, it contains enough raw material to make three million sun-like stars. The bright spot in the center of the disk is the combined light of stars that have crowded around the black hole due to its strong gravitational pull. This stellar concentration matches theoretical models linking stellar density to a central black hole's mass. NGC 7052 is a strong source of radio emission and has two oppositely directed `jets' emanating from the nucleus. (The jets are streams of energetic electrons moving in a strong magnetic field and unleashing radio energy). Because the jets in NGC 7052 are not

  5. CMB bounds on disk-accreting massive primordial black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale D.; Calore, Francesca; Clesse, Sébastien; Kohri, Kazunori

    2017-10-01

    Stellar-mass primordial black holes (PBH) have been recently reconsidered as a dark matter (DM) candidate after the aLIGO discovery of several binary black hole (BH) mergers with masses of tens of M⊙ . Matter accretion on such massive objects leads to the emission of high-energy photons, capable of altering the ionization and thermal history of the universe. This, in turn, affects the statistical properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. Previous analyses have assumed spherical accretion. We argue that this approximation likely breaks down and that an accretion disk should form in the dark ages. Using the most up-to-date tools to compute the energy deposition in the medium, we derive constraints on the fraction of DM in PBH. Provided that disks form early on, even under conservative assumptions for accretion, these constraints exclude a monochromatic distribution of PBH with masses above ˜2 M⊙ as the dominant form of DM. The bound on the median PBH mass gets more stringent if a broad, log-normal mass function is considered. A deepened understanding of nonlinear clustering properties and BH accretion disk physics would permit an improved treatment and possibly lead to more stringent constraints.

  6. Radiation-driven Turbulent Accretion onto Massive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, KwangHo; Wise, John H.; Bogdanović, Tamara

    2017-09-01

    Accretion of gas and interaction of matter and radiation are at the heart of many questions pertaining to black hole (BH) growth and coevolution of massive BHs and their host galaxies. To answer them, it is critical to quantify how the ionizing radiation that emanates from the innermost regions of the BH accretion flow couples to the surrounding medium and how it regulates the BH fueling. In this work, we use high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with the code Enzo, equipped with adaptive ray-tracing module Moray, to investigate radiation-regulated BH accretion of cold gas. Our simulations reproduce findings from an earlier generation of 1D/2D simulations: the accretion-powered UV and X-ray radiation forms a highly ionized bubble, which leads to suppression of BH accretion rate characterized by quasi-periodic outbursts. A new feature revealed by the 3D simulations is the highly turbulent nature of the gas flow in vicinity of the ionization front. During quiescent periods between accretion outbursts, the ionized bubble shrinks in size and the gas density that precedes the ionization front increases. Consequently, the 3D simulations show oscillations in the accretion rate of only ˜2-3 orders of magnitude, significantly smaller than 1D/2D models. We calculate the energy budget of the gas flow and find that turbulence is the main contributor to the kinetic energy of the gas but corresponds to less than 10% of its thermal energy and thus does not contribute significantly to the pressure support of the gas.

  7. Gravitational Wave Astronomy Using Pulsars: Massive Black Hole Mergers and the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational Wave Astronomy Using Pulsars: Massive Black Hole Mergers & the Early Universe A White Paper for the Astronomy & Astrophysics Decadal...COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gravitational Wave Astronomy Using Pulsars: Massive Black Hole Mergers & the Early...in the pulsar timing band will tell us whether MBHs formed through accretion and/or merger events. 3. What is the structure of individual MBH binary

  8. Supersonic gas streams enhance the formation of massive black holes in the early universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki; Kuiper, Rolf

    2017-09-29

    The origin of super-massive black holes in the early universe remains poorly understood. Gravitational collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud is a promising initial process, but theoretical studies have difficulty growing the black hole fast enough. We report numerical simulations of early black hole formation starting from realistic cosmological conditions. Supersonic gas motions left over from the Big Bang prevent early gas cloud formation until rapid gas condensation is triggered in a protogalactic halo. A protostar is formed in the dense, turbulent gas cloud, and it grows by sporadic mass accretion until it acquires 34,000 solar masses. The massive star ends its life with a catastrophic collapse to leave a black hole-a promising seed for the formation of a monstrous black hole. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  9. Supersonic gas streams enhance the formation of massive black holes in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki; Kuiper, Rolf

    2017-09-01

    The origin of super-massive black holes in the early universe remains poorly understood. Gravitational collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud is a promising initial process, but theoretical studies have difficulty growing the black hole fast enough. We report numerical simulations of early black hole formation starting from realistic cosmological conditions. Supersonic gas motions left over from the Big Bang prevent early gas cloud formation until rapid gas condensation is triggered in a protogalactic halo. A protostar is formed in the dense, turbulent gas cloud, and it grows by sporadic mass accretion until it acquires 34,000 solar masses. The massive star ends its life with a catastrophic collapse to leave a black hole—a promising seed for the formation of a monstrous black hole.

  10. Dirac quasinormal modes of new type black holes in new massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, P.A. [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile); Vasquez, Yerko [Universidad de La Serena, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Serena (Chile)

    2014-07-15

    We study a new type of black holes in three-dimensional new massive gravity and we calculate analytically the quasinormal modes for fermionic perturbations for some special cases. Then we show that for these cases black holes of the new type are stable under fermionic field perturbations. (orig.)

  11. Strong gravitational lensing for black holes with scalar charge in massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruanjing; Jing, Jiliang; Chen, Songbai

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the strong gravitational lensing for black holes with scalar charge in massive gravity. We find that the scalar charge and the type of the black hole significantly affect the radius of the photon sphere, deflection angle, angular image position, angular image separation, relative magnifications, and time delay in strong gravitational lensing. Our results can be reduced to those of the Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström black holes in some special cases.

  12. P-V criticality in AdS black holes of massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Fernando, Sharmanthie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we have studied the extended phase space thermodynamics in the canonical ensemble of black holes in massive gravity in AdS space. The black holes considered here belong to a theory of massive gravity where the graviton gain a mass due to Lorenz symmetry breaking. We have computed various thermodynamical quantities such as temperature, pressure, Gibbs free energy and specific heat capacity. The local and the global thermodynamical stability of the black holes are studied in detail. For a specific value of the parameter in the theory, the black holes undergo a first order phase transition similar to the Van der Waals phase transitions between gas and liquid under constant temperature. This transition is between the small and the large black hole. The critical exponents are computed at the critical values and shown to be the same as for the Van der Waals critical exponents.

  13. Massive Black Holes from Dissipative Dark Matter arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, Guido; Lupi, Alessandro; Bovino, Stefano; Silk, Joseph

    We show that a subdominant component of dissipative dark matter resembling the Standard Model can form many intermediate-mass black hole seeds during the first structure formation epoch. We also observe that, in the presence of this matter sector, the black holes will grow at a much faster rate with respect to the ordinary case. These facts can explain the observed abundance of supermassive black holes feeding high-redshift quasars. The scenario will have interesting observational consequences for dark substructures and gravitational wave production.

  14. Lilienfeld Prize Talk: How do massive black holes grow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei evolve in symbiosis with their hosts. This paper will review how they grow, with particular emphasis on mergers, and on the complex phenomena associated with the tidal capture and disruption of stars.

  15. Massive antigravity field and incomplete black hole evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Corrado

    2008-04-01

    If gravity is a mixture of the ordinary attractive force carried by the massless graviton, and of a repulsive force carried by a particle with nonzero mass, an evaporating black hole might leave a stable remnant.

  16. A class of charged black hole solutions in massive (bi)gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babichev, Eugeny [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique (LPT), Univ. Paris-Sud,CNRS UMR 8627, F-91405 Orsay (France); Fabbri, Alessandro [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi,Piazza del Viminale 1, 00184 Roma (Italy); Laboratoire de Physique Théorique (LPT), Univ. Paris-Sud,CNRS UMR 8627, F-91405 Orsay (France); Dipartimento di Fisica dell’Università di Bologna,Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Departamento de Física Teórica and IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC,C. Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2014-07-02

    We present a new class of solutions describing charged black holes in massive (bi)gravity. For a generic choice of the parameters of the massive gravity action, the solution is the Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter metric written in the Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates for both metrics. We also study a special case of the parameters, for which the space of solutions contains an extra symmetry.

  17. Unveiling Gargantua: A new search strategy for the most massive central cluster black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockamp, M.; Baumgardt, H.; Britzen, S.; Zensus, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We aim to unveil the most massive central cluster black holes in the Universe. Methods: We present a new search strategy, which is based on a black hole mass gain sensitive calorimeter and which links the innermost stellar density profile of a galaxy to the adiabatic growth of its central supermassive black hole (SMBH). As a first step we convert observationally inferred feedback powers into SMBH growth rates using reasonable energy conversion efficiency parameters, ɛ. In the main part of this paper we use these black hole growth rates, sorted in logarithmically increasing steps encompassing our whole parameter space, to conduct N-body computations of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with the newly developed Muesli software. For the initial setup of galaxies, we use core-Sérsic models to account for SMBH scouring. Results: We find that adiabatically driven core regrowth is significant at the highest accretion rates. As a result, the most massive black holes should be located in BCGs with less pronounced cores when compared to the predictions of empirical scaling relations, which are usually calibrated in less extreme environments. For efficiency parameters ɛ< 0.1, BCGs in the most massive, relaxed, and X-ray luminous galaxy clusters might even develop steeply rising density cusps. Finally, we discuss several promising candidates for follow-up investigations, among them the nuclear black hole in the Phoenix cluster. Based on our results, its central black hole might have a mass of the order of 1011 M⊙.

  18. Superradiant instability of massive vector fields around spinning black holes in the relativistic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, William E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the superradiant instability of massive vector fields, i.e. Proca fields, around spinning black holes in the test field limit. This is motivated by the possibility that observations of astrophysical black holes can probe the existence of ultralight bosons subject to this mechanism. By making use of time-domain simulations, we characterize the growth rate, frequency, spatial distribution, and other properties of the unstable modes, including in the regime where the black hole is rapidly spinning and the Compton wavelength of the Proca field is comparable to the black hole radius. We find that relativistic effects in this regime increase the range of Proca masses that are unstable, as well as the maximum instability rate. We also study the gravitational waves that can be sourced by such an instability, finding that they can be significantly stronger than in the massive scalar field case.

  19. Phase Transitions of the BTZ Black Hole in New Massive Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Soo Myung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate thermodynamics of the BTZ black hole in new massive gravity explicitly. For m2l2>1/2 with m2 being the mass parameter of fourth-order terms and l2 AdS3 curvature radius, the Hawking-Page phase transition occurs between the BTZ black hole and AdS (thermal soliton. For m2l2<1/2, however, this transition unlikely occurs but a phase transition between the BTZ black hole and the massless BTZ black hole is possible to occur. We may call the latter the inverse Hawking-Page phase transition and this transition is favored in the new massive gravity.

  20. Analytical study of a Kerr-Sen black hole and a charged massive scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Canisius

    2017-11-01

    It is reported that Kerr-Newman and Kerr-Sen black holes are unstable to perturbations of charged massive scalar field. In this paper, we study analytically the complex frequencies which characterize charged massive scalar fields in a near-extremal Kerr-Sen black hole. For near-extremal Kerr-Sen black holes and for charged massive scalar fields in the eikonal large-mass M ≫μ regime, where M is the mass of the black hole, and μ is the mass of the charged scalar field, we have obtained a simple expression for the dimensionless ratio ωI/(ωR-ωc) , where ωI and ωR are, respectively, the imaginary and real parts of the frequency of the modes, and ωc is the critical frequency for the onset of super-radiance. We have also found our expression is consistent with the result of Hod [Phys. Rev. D 94, 044036 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.94.044036] for the case of a near-extremal Kerr-Newman black hole and the result of Zouros and Eardly [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 118, 139 (1979), 10.1016/0003-4916(79)90237-9] for the case of neutral scalar fields in the background of a near-extremal Kerr black hole.

  1. The passage of a star by a massive black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolthenius, R. A.; Katz, J. I.

    1982-01-01

    The gridless, smoothed particle hydrodynamic method of Lucy (1977) and Gingold and Monaghan (1977, 1980, a, b, 1981) is used to solve the three-dimensional problem posed by the effects on a 1.0 solar mass star of a 10,000 solar mass black hole's passage, in an initially parabolic orbit with a variety of pericenter distances. It is found that the tidal forces induce rotation and radial and nonradial pulsations in the star, and that the loss of orbital energy to these internal motions leads to the star's capture by the black hole. While the outer layers of the star are disrupted at small pericenter distances, the entire star is destroyed at even smaller distances. These results are applicable to X-ray sources, active galactic nuclei, and quasars

  2. Exact Schwarzschild-de Sitter black holes in a family of massive gravity models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, T.M.

    2011-01-01

    The Schwarzschild-de Sitter and Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter black hole metrics appear as exact solutions in the recently formulated massive gravity of de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley, where the mass term sets the curvature scale. They occur within a two-parameter family of de Rham, Gabadadze and

  3. Resonant relaxation near a massive black hole: the dependence on eccentricity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkan, M.A.; Hopman, C.

    2007-01-01

    The orbits of stars close to a massive black hole (MBH) are nearly Keplerian ellipses. Such orbits exert long-term torques on each other, which lead to an enhanced angular momentum relaxation known as resonant relaxation. Under certain conditions, this process can modify the angular momentum

  4. Massive Black Hole Mergers: Can We "See" what LISA will "Hear"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of massive black holes produces strong gravitational radiation that can be detected by the space-borne LISA. If the black hole merger takes place in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Modeling such electromagnetic counterparts of the final merger requires evolving the behavior of both gas and fields in the strong-field regions around the black holes. We will review current efforts to simulate these systems, and discuss possibilities for observing the electromagnetic signals they produce.

  5. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reines, Amy E; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Johnson, Kelsey E; Brogan, Crystal L

    2011-02-03

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first 'seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize 2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize 2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids.

  6. A class of black holes in dRGT massive gravity and their thermodynamical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Suchant G. [Jamia Millia Islamia, Centre of Theoretical Physics, New Delhi (India); University of Kwazulu-Natal, Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Private Bag 54001, Durban (South Africa); Tannukij, Lunchakorn [Mahidol University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Bangkok (Thailand); Wongjun, Pitayuth [Naresuan University, The Institute for Fundamental Study, Phitsanulok (Thailand); Ministry of Education, Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2016-03-15

    We present an exact spherical black hole solution in de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity for a generic choice of the parameters in the theory, and also discuss the thermodynamical and phase structure of the black hole in both the grand canonical and the canonical ensembles (for the charged case). It turns out that the dRGT black hole solution includes other known solutions to the Einstein field equations, such as the monopole-de Sitter-Schwarzschild solution with the coefficients of the third and fourth terms in the potential and the graviton mass in massive gravity naturally generates the cosmological constant and the global monopole term. Furthermore, we compute the mass, temperature and entropy of the dRGT black hole, and also perform thermodynamical stability analysis. It turns out that the presence of the graviton mass completely changes the black hole thermodynamics, and it can provide the Hawking-Page phase transition which also occurs for the charged black holes. Interestingly, the entropy of a black hole is barely affected and still obeys the standard area law. In particular, our results, in the limit m{sub g} → 0, reduced exactly to the results of general relativity. (orig.)

  7. Gravitational wave astronomy, relativity tests, and massive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Peter L.; Bender

    2010-01-01

    The gravitational wave detectors that are operating now are looking for several kinds of gravitational wave signals at frequencies of tens of Hertz to kilohertz. One of these is mergers of roughly 10 M⊙ BH binaries. Sometime between now and about 8 years from now, it is likely that signals of this kind will be observed. The result will be strong tests of the dynamical predictions of general relativity in the high field regime. However, observations at frequencies below 1 Hz will have to wait until the launch of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), hopefully only a few years later. LISA will have 3 main objectives, all involving massive BHs. The first is observations of mergers of pairs of intermediate mass (100 to 105 M⊙) and higher mass BHs at redshifts out to roughly z=10. This will provide new information on the initial formation and growth of BHs such as those found in most galaxies, and the relation between BH growth and the evolution of galactic structure. The second objective is observations of roughly 10 M⊙ BHs, neutron stars, and white dwarfs spiraling into much more massive BHs in galactic nuclei. Such events will provide detailed information on the populations of such compact objects in the regions around galactic centers. And the third objective is the use of the first two types of observations for testing general relativity even more strongly than ground based detectors will. As an example, an extreme mass ratio event such as a 10 M⊙ BH spiraling into a galactic center BH can give roughly 105 observable cycles during about the last year before merger, with a mean relative velocity of 1/3 to 1/2 the speed of light, and the frequencies of periapsis precession and Lense-Thirring precession will be high. The LISA Pathfinder mission to prepare for LISA is scheduled for launch in 2011.

  8. Ram pressure feeding super-massive black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Poggianti, Bianca M.; Jaffé, Yara L.; Moretti, Alessia; Gullieuszik, Marco; Radovich, Mario; Tonnesen, Stephanie; Fritz, Jacopo; Bettoni, Daniela; Vulcani, Benedetta; Fasano, Giovanni; Bellhouse, Callum; Hau, George; Omizzolo, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    When supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies accrete matter (usually gas), they give rise to highly energetic phenomena named Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). A number of physical processes have been proposed to account for the funneling of gas towards the galaxy centers to feed the AGN. There are also several physical processes that can strip gas from a galaxy, and one of them is ram pressure stripping in galaxy clusters due to the hot and dense gas filling the space between galaxies...

  9. Dusty Feedback from Massive Black Holes in Two Elliptical Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temi, P.; Brighenti, F.; Mathews, W. G.; Amblard, A.; Riguccini, L.

    2013-01-01

    Far-infrared dust emission from elliptical galaxies informs us about galaxy mergers, feedback energy outbursts from supermassive black holes and the age of galactic stars. We report on the role of AGN feedback observationally by looking for its signatures in elliptical galaxies at recent epochs in the nearby universe. We present Herschel observations of two elliptical galaxies with strong and spatially extended FIR emission from colder grains 5-10 kpc distant from the galaxy cores. Extended excess cold dust emission is interpreted as evidence of recent feedback-generated AGN energy outbursts in these galaxies, visible only in the FIR, from buoyant gaseous outflows from the galaxy cores.

  10. Wiggly tails: a gravitational wave signature of massive fields around black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Degollado, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Massive fields can exist in long-lived configurations around black holes. We examine how the gravitational wave signal of a perturbed black hole is affected by such `dirtiness' within linear theory. As a concrete example, we consider the gravitational radiation emitted by the infall of a massive scalar field into a Schwarzschild black hole. Whereas part of the scalar field is absorbed/scattered by the black hole and triggers gravitational wave emission, another part lingers in long-lived quasi-bound states. Solving numerically the Teukolsky master equation for gravitational perturbations coupled to the massive Klein-Gordon equation, we find a characteristic gravitational wave signal, composed by a quasi-normal ringing followed by a late time tail. In contrast to `clean' black holes, however, the late time tail contains small amplitude wiggles with the frequency of the dominating quasi-bound state. Additionally, an observer dependent beating pattern may also be seen. These features were already observed in ful...

  11. Massive vector particles tunneling from black holes influenced by the generalized uncertainty principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Qian Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study considers the generalized uncertainty principle, which incorporates the central idea of large extra dimensions, to investigate the processes involved when massive spin-1 particles tunnel from Reissner–Nordstrom and Kerr black holes under the effects of quantum gravity. For the black hole, the quantum gravity correction decelerates the increase in temperature. Up to O(1Mf2, the corrected temperatures are affected by the mass and angular momentum of the emitted vector bosons. In addition, the temperature of the Kerr black hole becomes uneven due to rotation. When the mass of the black hole approaches the order of the higher dimensional Planck mass Mf, it stops radiating and yields a black hole remnant.

  12. New perspective for black hole thermodynamics in Gauss-Bonnet-Born-Infeld massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hendi, Seyed Hossein; Mo, Jie-Xiong; Panahiyan, Shahram; Panah, Behzad Eslam

    2016-01-01

    Following earlier study regarding Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet-massive black holes in the presence of Born-Infeld nonlinear electromagnetic field [S. H. Hendi, B. Eslam Panah and S. Panahiyan, arXiv:1510.00108], we study thermodynamical structure and critical behavior of these black holes through different methods in this paper. Geometrical thermodynamics is employed to give a picture regarding phase transition of these black holes. Next, a new method is used to derive critical pressure and horizon radius of these black holes. In addition, Maxwell equal area law is employed to study the Van der Waals like behavior of these black holes. Moreover, the critical exponents are calculated and by using Ehrenfest equations, the type of the phase transitions are determined.

  13. Floating and sinking: the imprint of massive scalars around rotating black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Chakrabarti, Sayan; Pani, Paolo; Berti, Emanuele; Gualtieri, Leonardo

    2011-12-09

    We study the coupling of massive scalar fields to matter in orbit around rotating black holes. It is generally expected that orbiting bodies will lose energy in gravitational waves, slowly inspiraling into the black hole. Instead, we show that the coupling of the field to matter leads to a surprising effect: because of superradiance, matter can hover into "floating orbits" for which the net gravitational energy loss at infinity is entirely provided by the black hole's rotational energy. Orbiting bodies remain floating until they extract sufficient angular momentum from the black hole, or until perturbations or nonlinear effects disrupt the orbit. For slowly rotating and nonrotating black holes floating orbits are unlikely to exist, but resonances at orbital frequencies corresponding to quasibound states of the scalar field can speed up the inspiral, so that the orbiting body sinks. These effects could be a smoking gun of deviations from general relativity.

  14. Charged BTZ black holes in the context of massive gravity's rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendi, S. H.; Panahiyan, S.; Upadhyay, S.; Eslam Panah, B.

    2017-04-01

    Banados, Teitelboim, and Zanelli (BTZ) black holes are excellent laboratories for studying black hole thermodynamics, which is a bridge between classical general relativity and the quantum nature of gravitation. In addition, three-dimensional gravity could have equipped us for exploring some of the ideas behind the two-dimensional conformal field theory based on the AdS3/CFT2 . Considering the significant interest in these regards, we examine charged BTZ black holes. We consider the system contains massive gravity with energy dependent spacetime to enrich the results. In order to make high curvature (energy) BTZ black holes more realistic, we modify the theory by energy dependent constants. We investigate thermodynamic properties of the solutions by calculating heat capacity and free energy. We also analyze thermal stability and study the possibility of the Hawking-Page phase transition. At last, we study the geometrical thermodynamics of these black holes and compare the results of various approaches.

  15. New perspective for black hole thermodynamics in Gauss-Bonnet-Born-Infeld massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendi, Seyed Hossein [Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM),Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Li, Gu-Qiang; Mo, Jie-Xiong [Lingnan Normal University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Zhanjiang, Guangdong (China); Panahiyan, Shahram [Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahid Beheshti University, Physics Department, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panah, Behzad Eslam [Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Following an earlier study regarding Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet-massive black holes in the presence of a Born-Infeld nonlinear electromagnetic field (Hendi, arXiv:1510.00108, 2016), we study thermodynamical structure and critical behavior of these black holes through various methods in this paper. Geometrical thermodynamics is employed to give a picture regarding the phase transition of these black holes. Next, a new method is used to derive critical pressure and radius of the horizon of these black holes. In addition, Maxwell equal area law is employed to study the Van der Waals like behavior of these black holes. Moreover, the critical exponents are calculated and by using Ehrenfest equations, the type of phase transition is determined. (orig.)

  16. An over-massive black hole in the compact lenticular galaxy NGC 1277.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Remco C E; Gebhardt, Karl; Gültekin, Kayhan; van de Ven, Glenn; van der Wel, Arjen; Walsh, Jonelle L

    2012-11-29

    Most massive galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centres, and the masses of the black holes are believed to correlate with properties of the host-galaxy bulge component. Several explanations have been proposed for the existence of these locally established empirical relationships, including the non-causal, statistical process of galaxy-galaxy merging, direct feedback between the black hole and its host galaxy, and galaxy-galaxy merging and the subsequent violent relaxation and dissipation. The empirical scaling relations are therefore important for distinguishing between various theoretical models of galaxy evolution, and they furthermore form the basis for all black-hole mass measurements at large distances. Observations have shown that the mass of the black hole is typically 0.1 per cent of the mass of the stellar bulge of the galaxy. Until now, the galaxy with the largest known fraction of its mass in its central black hole (11 per cent) was the small galaxy NGC 4486B. Here we report observations of the stellar kinematics of NGC 1277, which is a compact, lenticular galaxy with a mass of 1.2 × 10(11) solar masses. From the data, we determine that the mass of the central black hole is 1.7 × 10(10) solar masses, or 59 per cent of its bulge mass. We also show observations of five other compact galaxies that have properties similar to NGC 1277 and therefore may also contain over-massive black holes. It is not yet known if these galaxies represent a tail of a distribution, or if disk-dominated galaxies fail to follow the usual black-hole mass scaling relations.

  17. Multimessenger Signatures of Massive Black Holes in Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellovary, Jillian; Cleary, Colleen; Tremmel, Michael; Munshi, Ferah

    2018-01-01

    Inspired by the recent discovery of several nearby dwarf galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei, we present results from a series of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations focusing on dwarf galaxies which host supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Cosmological simulations are a vital tool for predicting SMBH populations and merger events which will eventually be observed by LISA. Dwarf galaxies are the most numerous in the universe, so even though the occupation fraction of SMBHs in dwarfs is less than unity, their contribution to the gravitational wave background could be non-negligible. We find that electromagnetic signatures from SMBH accretion are not common among most SMBH-hosting dwarfs, but the gravitational wave signatures can be substantial. The most common mass ratio for SMBH mergers in low-mass galaxy environments is ~1:20, which is an unexplored region of gravitational waveform parameter space. We discuss the occupation fraction of SMBHs in low-mass galaxies as well as differences in field and satellite populations, providing clues to search for and characterize these elusive giants lurking in the dwarfs.

  18. Static spherically symmetric black holes of de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity in arbitrary dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Ghadir; Setare, Mohammad R.; Bakhtiarizadeh, Hamid R.

    2017-10-01

    This article is devoted to static spherically symmetric black hole solutions of dRGT (de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley) massive gravity in the presence of cosmological constant. The unitary and non-unitary gauges are used to find the solutions in three, four and five dimensions. We show that there are two general classes of solutions. In one of them, the effect of massive potential is appeared as the effective cosmological constant. By investigating these solutions in different dimensions, we find an expression for effective cosmological constant in arbitrary dimensions.

  19. Black hole radiation of massive spin-2 particles in (3+1) dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Sakalli, I

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of radiation of massive spin-2 boson (graviton with a nonzero mass) through the event horizon of a generic static and spherically symmetric black hole in (3+1) dimensions. To this end, we consider the problem in the framework of quantum tunneling phenomenon. We evaluate the tunneling rate of the massive gravitons by applying the semiclassical WKB approximation to the Fierz-Pauli equation. The temperature of the radiation is obtained with the aid of the Boltzmann expression. Our findings are in good agreement with the existing Hawking radiation studies in the current literature.

  20. Greybody factors of massive charged fermionic fields in a charged two-dimensional dilatonic black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becar, Ramon [Universidad Catolica de Temuco, Departamento de Ciencias Matematicas y Fisicas, Temuco (Chile); Gonzalez, P.A. [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile); Saavedra, Joel [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Vasquez, Yerko [Universidad de La Serena, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-02-01

    We study massive charged fermionic perturbations in the background of a charged two-dimensional dilatonic black hole, and we solve the Dirac equation analytically. Then we compute the reflection and transmission coefficients and the absorption cross section for massive charged fermionic fields, and we show that the absorption cross section vanishes at the low- and high-frequency limits. However, there is a range of frequencies where the absorption cross section is not null. Furthermore, we study the effect of the mass and electric charge of the fermionic field over the absorption cross section. (orig.)

  1. Rapid growth of black holes in massive star-forming galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, D M; Smail, I; Bauer, F E; Chapman, S C; Blain, A W; Brandt, W N; Ivison, R J

    2005-04-07

    The tight relationship between the masses of black holes and galaxy spheroids in nearby galaxies implies a causal connection between the growth of these two components. Optically luminous quasars host the most prodigious accreting black holes in the Universe, and can account for greater than or approximately equal to 30 per cent of the total cosmological black-hole growth. As typical quasars are not, however, undergoing intense star formation and already host massive black holes (> 10(8)M(o), where M(o) is the solar mass), there must have been an earlier pre-quasar phase when these black holes grew (mass range approximately (10(6)-10(8))M(o)). The likely signature of this earlier stage is simultaneous black-hole growth and star formation in distant (redshift z > 1; >8 billion light years away) luminous galaxies. Here we report ultra-deep X-ray observations of distant star-forming galaxies that are bright at submillimetre wavelengths. We find that the black holes in these galaxies are growing almost continuously throughout periods of intense star formation. This activity appears to be more tightly associated with these galaxies than any other coeval galaxy populations. We show that the black-hole growth from these galaxies is consistent with that expected for the pre-quasar phase.

  2. Massive Black Hole Mergers: Can we see what LISA will hear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries are formed when galaxies merge. The final stages of this coalescence produce strong gravitational wave signals that can be detected by the space-borne LISA. When the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Modeling such electromagnetic counterparts requires evolving the behavior of both gas and fields in the strong-field regions around the black holes. We have taken a first step towards this problem by mapping the flow of pressureless matter in the dynamic, 3-D general relativistic spacetime around the merging black holes. We report on the results of these initial simulations and discuss their likely importance for future hydrodynamical simulations.

  3. Analytical solutions in rotating linear dilaton black holes: Hawking radiation of charged massive scalar particles

    CERN Document Server

    Sakalli, I

    2016-01-01

    Hawking radiation of charged massive spin-0 particles are studied in the gravitational, electromagnetic, dilaton, and axion fields of rotating linear dilaton black holes. In this geometry, we separate the covariant Klein--Gordon equation into radial and angular parts and obtain the exact solutions of both the equations in terms of the confluent Heun functions. Using the radial solution, we analyze the behavior of the wave solutions near the event horizon of the rotating linear dilaton black hole and derive its Hawking radiation spectrum via the Damour--Ruffini--Sannan method.

  4. Slowly decaying resonances of massive scalar fields around Schwarzschild-de Sitter black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshmatov, Bobir; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2017-07-01

    We study in special limiting cases quasinormal modes of massive scalar fields in the Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole backgrounds. We determine the lower limit on the mass parameter of the scalar field that allows the waves with quasinormal frequencies to propagate to infinity, showing that it depends on the spacetime parameters only. Then we discuss in the large multipole number limit quasinormal modes, whose frequencies can be directly related to the unstable circular photon geodesics. In the large scalar mass approximation, we demonstrate the new interesting phenomenon of slowly decaying resonances, that are strongly related to the maximum of the effective potential of the massive scalar field, which is located at the static radius of the Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetimes, where the cosmic repulsion is just balanced by the black hole attraction.

  5. The effects of massive graviton on the equilibrium between the black hole and radiation gas in an isolated box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Pan, Feng; Wu, Xin-Meng

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that the black hole can have temperature and radiate the particles with black body spectrum, i.e. Hawking radiation. Therefore, if the black hole is surrounded by an isolated box, there is a thermal equilibrium between the black hole and radiation gas. A simple case considering the thermal equilibrium between the Schwarzschild black hole and radiation gas in an isolated box has been well investigated previously in detail, i.e. taking the conservation of energy and principle of maximal entropy for the isolated system into account. In this paper, following the above spirit, the effects of massive graviton on the thermal equilibrium will be investigated. For the gravity with massive graviton, we will use the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity which has been proven to be ghost free. Because the graviton mass depends on two parameters in the dRGT massive gravity, here we just investigate two simple cases related to the two parameters, respectively. Our results show that in the first case the massive graviton can suppress or increase the condensation of black hole in the radiation gas although the T-E diagram is similar as the Schwarzschild black hole case. For the second case, a new T-E diagram has been obtained. Moreover, an interesting and important prediction is that the condensation of black hole just increases from the zero radius of horizon in this case, which is very different from the Schwarzschild black hole case.

  6. The effects of massive graviton on the equilibrium between the black hole and radiation gas in an isolated box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Peng Hu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the black hole can have temperature and radiate the particles with black body spectrum, i.e. Hawking radiation. Therefore, if the black hole is surrounded by an isolated box, there is a thermal equilibrium between the black hole and radiation gas. A simple case considering the thermal equilibrium between the Schwarzschild black hole and radiation gas in an isolated box has been well investigated previously in detail, i.e. taking the conservation of energy and principle of maximal entropy for the isolated system into account. In this paper, following the above spirit, the effects of massive graviton on the thermal equilibrium will be investigated. For the gravity with massive graviton, we will use the de Rham–Gabadadze–Tolley (dRGT massive gravity which has been proven to be ghost free. Because the graviton mass depends on two parameters in the dRGT massive gravity, here we just investigate two simple cases related to the two parameters, respectively. Our results show that in the first case the massive graviton can suppress or increase the condensation of black hole in the radiation gas although the T–E diagram is similar as the Schwarzschild black hole case. For the second case, a new T–E diagram has been obtained. Moreover, an interesting and important prediction is that the condensation of black hole just increases from the zero radius of horizon in this case, which is very different from the Schwarzschild black hole case.

  7. Formation of massive black holes through runaway collisions in dense young star clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Simon F Portegies; Baumgardt, Holger; Hut, Piet; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L W

    2004-04-15

    A luminous X-ray source is associated with MGG 11--a cluster of young stars approximately 200 pc from the centre of the starburst galaxy M 82 (refs 1, 2). The properties of this source are best explained by invoking a black hole with a mass of at least 350 solar masses (350 M(o)), which is intermediate between stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. A nearby but somewhat more massive cluster (MGG 9) shows no evidence of such an intermediate-mass black hole, raising the issue of just what physical characteristics of the clusters can account for this difference. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution and motion of stars within the clusters, where stars are allowed to merge with each other. We find that for MGG 11 dynamical friction leads to the massive stars sinking rapidly to the centre of the cluster, where they participate in a runaway collision. This produces a star of 800-3,000 M(o) which ultimately collapses to a black hole of intermediate mass. No such runaway occurs in the cluster MGG 9, because the larger cluster radius leads to a mass segregation timescale a factor of five longer than for MGG 11.

  8. The Black Hole Safari: Big Game Hunting in 30+ Massive Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Nicholas J.; Ma, Chung-Pei; Janish, Ryan; Gebhardt, Karl; Lauer, Tod R.; Graham, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The current census of the most massive black holes in the local universe turns up an odd variety of galaxy hosts: central galaxies in rich clusters, second- or lower-ranked cluster members, and compact relics from the early universe. More extensive campaigns are required to explore the number density and environmental distribution of these monsters. Over the past three years we have collected a large set of stellar kinematic data with sufficient resolution to detect the gravitational signatures of supermassive black holes with MBH > 109 MSun. This Black Hole Safari targets enormous galaxies at the centers of nearby galaxy clusters, as well as their similarly luminous counterparts in weaker galaxy groups. To date we have observed more than 30 early-type galaxies with integral-field spectrographs on the Keck, Gemini North, and Gemini South telescopes. Here I present preliminary stellar kinematics from 10 objects.

  9. Rapid formation of massive black holes in close proximity to embryonic protogalaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, John A.; Visbal, Eli; Wise, John H.; Haiman, Zoltán; Johansson, Peter H.; Bryan, Greg L.

    2017-03-01

    The appearance of supermassive black holes at very early times1-3 in the Universe is a challenge to our understanding of star and black hole formation. The direct-collapse4,5 black hole scenario provides a potential solution. A prerequisite for forming a direct-collapse black hole is that the formation of (much less massive) population III stars be avoided6,7; this can be achieved by destroying H2 by means of Lyman-Werner radiation (photons of energy around 12.6 eV). Here we show that two conditions must be met in the protogalaxy that will host the direct-collapse black hole. First, prior star formation must be delayed; this can be achieved with a background Lyman-Werner flux of JBG ≳ 100J21 (J21 is the intensity of background radiation in units of 10-21 erg cm-2 s-1 Hz-1 sr-1). Second, an intense burst of Lyman-Werner radiation from a neighbouring star-bursting protogalaxy is required, just before the gas cloud undergoes gravitational collapse, to suppress star formation completely. Using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations that include full radiative transfer, we find that these two conditions inevitably move the host protogalaxy onto the isothermal atomic cooling track, without the deleterious effects of either photo-evaporating the gas or polluting it with heavy elements. These atomically cooled, massive protogalaxies are expected ultimately to form a direct-collapse black hole of mass 104-105M⊙.

  10. Quasinormal modes and thermodynamics of linearly charged BTZ black holes in massive gravity in (anti) de Sitter space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasia, P.; Kuriakose, V.C. [Cochin University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Kochi (India)

    2017-01-15

    In this work we study the Quasi-Normal Modes (QNMs) under massless scalar perturbations and the thermodynamics of linearly charged BTZ black holes in massive gravity in the (Anti)de Sitter ((A)dS) space-time. It is found that the behavior of QNMs changes with the massive parameter of the graviton and also with the charge of the black hole. The thermodynamics of such black holes in the (A)dS space-time is also analyzed in detail. The behavior of specific heat with temperature for such black holes gives an indication of a phase transition that depends on the massive parameter of the graviton and also on the charge of the black hole. (orig.)

  11. Stellar winds near massive black holes - the case of the S-stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lützgendorf, N.; Helm, E. van der; Pelupessy, F. I.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2016-03-01

    The Galactic Centre provides a unique laboratory to study the interaction of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) with its gaseous and stellar environment. Simulations to determine the accretion of stellar winds from the surrounding O-stars on to the black hole have been performed earlier, but in those the presence of the S-star system was ignored. The S-stars are a group of young massive B-stars in relatively close orbits around the black hole. Here, we simulate those stars in order to study their contribution to the accretion rate, without taking the more distant and massive O-stars into account. We use the Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment to combine gravitational physics, stellar evolution and hydrodynamics in a single simulation of the S-stars orbiting the SMBH, and use this framework to determine the amount of gas that is accreted on to the black hole. We find that the accretion rate is sensitive to the wind properties of the S-stars (rate of mass-loss and terminal velocity). Our simulations are consistent with the observed accretion rate of the black hole only if the stars exhibit high wind mass-loss rates that are comparable with those of evolved 7-10 Myr old stars with masses of M = 19-25 M⊙. This is in contrast with observations that have shown that these stars are rather young, main-sequence B-stars. We therefore conclude that the S-stars cannot account for the accretion rate alone.

  12. Super massive black hole in galactic nuclei with tidal disruption of stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shiyan; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, 100012 Beijing (China)

    2014-09-10

    Tidal disruption of stars by super massive central black holes from dense star clusters is modeled by high-accuracy direct N-body simulation. The time evolution of the stellar tidal disruption rate, the effect of tidal disruption on the stellar density profile, and, for the first time, the detailed origin of tidally disrupted stars are carefully examined and compared with classic papers in the field. Up to 128k particles are used in simulation to model the star cluster around a super massive black hole, and we use the particle number and the tidal radius of the black hole as free parameters for a scaling analysis. The transition from full to empty loss-cone is analyzed in our data, and the tidal disruption rate scales with the particle number, N, in the expected way for both cases. For the first time in numerical simulations (under certain conditions) we can support the concept of a critical radius of Frank and Rees, which claims that most stars are tidally accreted on highly eccentric orbits originating from regions far outside the tidal radius. Due to the consumption of stars moving on radial orbits, a velocity anisotropy is found inside the cluster. Finally we estimate the real galactic center based on our simulation results and the scaling analysis.

  13. Massive black hole and gas dynamics in galaxy nuclei mergers - I. Numerical implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Alessandro; Haardt, Francesco; Dotti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Numerical effects are known to plague adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) codes when treating massive particles, e.g. representing massive black holes (MBHs). In an evolving background, they can experience strong, spurious perturbations and then follow unphysical orbits. We study by means of numerical simulations the dynamical evolution of a pair MBHs in the rapidly and violently evolving gaseous and stellar background that follows a galaxy major merger. We confirm that spurious numerical effects alter the MBH orbits in AMR simulations, and show that numerical issues are ultimately due to a drop in the spatial resolution during the simulation, drastically reducing the accuracy in the gravitational force computation. We therefore propose a new refinement criterion suited for massive particles, able to solve in a fast and precise way for their orbits in highly dynamical backgrounds. The new refinement criterion we designed enforces the region around each massive particle to remain at the maximum resolution allowed, independently upon the local gas density. Such maximally resolved regions then follow the MBHs along their orbits, and effectively avoids all spurious effects caused by resolution changes. Our suite of high-resolution, AMR hydrodynamic simulations, including different prescriptions for the sub-grid gas physics, shows that the new refinement implementation has the advantage of not altering the physical evolution of the MBHs, accounting for all the non-trivial physical processes taking place in violent dynamical scenarios, such as the final stages of a galaxy major merger.

  14. Einstein-Born-Infeld-massive gravity: adS-black hole solutions and their thermodynamical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendi, S.H. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM),P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panah, B. Eslam; Panahiyan, S. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University,Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-23

    In this paper, we study massive gravity in the presence of Born-Infeld nonlinear electrodynamics. First, we obtain metric function related to this gravity and investigate the geometry of the solutions and find that there is an essential singularity at the origin (r=0). It will be shown that due to contribution of the massive part, the number, type and place of horizons may be changed. Next, we calculate the conserved and thermodynamic quantities and check the validation of the first law of thermodynamics. We also investigate thermal stability of these black holes in context of canonical ensemble. It will be shown that number, type and place of phase transition points are functions of different parameters which lead to dependency of stability conditions to these parameters. Also, it will be shown how the behavior of temperature is modified due to extension of massive gravity and strong nonlinearity parameter. Next, critical behavior of the system in extended phase space by considering cosmological constant as pressure is investigated. A study regarding neutral Einstein-massive gravity in context of extended phase space is done. Geometrical approach is employed to study the thermodynamical behavior of the system in context of heat capacity and extended phase space. It will be shown that GTs, heat capacity and extended phase space have consistent results. Finally, critical behavior of the system is investigated through use of another method. It will be pointed out that the results of this method is in agreement with other methods and follow the concepts of ordinary thermodynamics.

  15. Holographic microstate counting for AdS4 black holes in massive IIA supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Morteza; Hristov, Kiril; Passias, Achilleas

    2017-10-01

    We derive the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy for a class of BPS black holes in the massive type IIA supergravity background AdS4 × S 6 from a microscopic counting of supersymmetric ground states in a holographically dual field theory. The counting is performed by evaluating the topologically twisted index of three-dimensional N=2 Chern-Simons-matter gauge theories in the large N limit. The I-extremization principle is shown to match the attractor mechanism for the near-horizon geometries constructed in the four-dimensional dyonic N=2 gauged supergravity, that arises as a consistent truncation of massive type IIA supergravity on S 6. In particular, our results prove that the imaginary part of the three-dimensional partition functions plays a crucial rôle in holography.

  16. Reentrant phase transitions of higher-dimensional AdS black holes in dRGT massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, De-Cheng; Yue, Ruihong; Zhang, Ming

    2017-04-01

    We study the P- V criticality and phase transition in the extended phase space of anti-de Sitter (AdS) black holes in higher-dimensional de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity, treating the cosmological constant as pressure and the corresponding conjugate quantity is interpreted as thermodynamic volume. Besides the usual small/large black hole phase transitions, the interesting thermodynamic phenomena of reentrant phase transitions (RPTs) are observed for black holes in all d≥6-dimensional spacetime when the coupling coefficients c_i m^2 of massive potential satisfy some certain conditions.

  17. Reentrant phase transitions of higher-dimensional AdS black holes in dRGT massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, De-Cheng; Yue, Ruihong [Yangzhou University, College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangzhou (China); Zhang, Ming [Xi' an Aeronautical University, Faculty of Science, Xi' an (China)

    2017-04-15

    We study the P-V criticality and phase transition in the extended phase space of anti-de Sitter (AdS) black holes in higher-dimensional de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity, treating the cosmological constant as pressure and the corresponding conjugate quantity is interpreted as thermodynamic volume. Besides the usual small/large black hole phase transitions, the interesting thermodynamic phenomena of reentrant phase transitions (RPTs) are observed for black holes in all d ≥ 6-dimensional spacetime when the coupling coefficients c{sub i}m{sup 2} of massive potential satisfy some certain conditions. (orig.)

  18. Impact of LISA's Low Frequency Sensitivity on Observations of Massive Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J.; Centrella, J.

    2005-01-01

    LISA will be able to detect gravitational waves from inspiralling massive black hole (MBH) binaries out to redshifts z > 10. If the binary masses and luminosity distances can be extracted from the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) data stream, this information can be used to reveal the merger history of MBH binaries and their host galaxies in the evolving universe. Since this parameter extraction generally requires that LISA observe the inspiral for a significant fraction of its yearly orbit, carrying out this program requires adequate sensitivity at low frequencies, f low frequency sensitivities, we examine LISA's potential for characterizing MBH binary coalescences at redshifts z > 1.

  19. No tension between assembly models of super massive black hole binaries and pulsar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Hannah; Chen, Siyuan; Del Pozzo, Walter; Sesana, Alberto; Vecchio, Alberto

    2018-02-08

    Pulsar timing arrays are presently the only means to search for the gravitational wave stochastic background from super massive black hole binary populations, considered to be within the grasp of current or near-future observations. The stringent upper limit from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array has been interpreted as excluding (>90% confidence) the current paradigm of binary assembly through galaxy mergers and hardening via stellar interaction, suggesting evolution is accelerated or stalled. Using Bayesian hierarchical modelling we consider implications of this upper limit for a range of astrophysical scenarios, without invoking stalling, nor more exotic physical processes. All scenarios are fully consistent with the upper limit, but (weak) bounds on population parameters can be inferred. Recent upward revisions of the black hole-galaxy bulge mass relation are disfavoured at 1.6σ against lighter models. Once sensitivity improves by an order of magnitude, a non-detection will disfavour the most optimistic scenarios at 3.9σ.

  20. Topological charged black holes in massive gravity's rainbow and their thermodynamical analysis through various approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Hendi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Violation of Lorentz invariancy in the high energy quantum gravity motivates one to consider an energy dependent spacetime with massive deformation of standard general relativity. In this paper, we take into account an energy dependent metric in the context of a massive gravity model to obtain exact solutions. We investigate the geometry of black hole solutions and also calculate the conserved and thermodynamic quantities, which are fully reproduced by the analysis performed with the standard techniques. After examining the validity of the first law of thermodynamics, we conduct a study regarding the effects of different parameters on thermal stability of the solutions. In addition, we employ the relation between cosmological constant and thermodynamical pressure to study the possibility of phase transition. Interestingly, we will show that for the specific configuration considered in this paper, van der Waals like behavior is observed for different topology. In other words, for flat and hyperbolic horizons, similar to spherical horizon, a second order phase transition and van der Waals like behavior are observed. Furthermore, we use geometrical method to construct phase space and study phase transition and bound points for these black holes. Finally, we obtain critical values in extended phase space through the use of a new method.

  1. Self-accelerating cosmologies and hairy black holes in ghost-free bigravity and massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2013-09-01

    We present a survey of the known cosmological and black hole solutions in ghost-free bigravity and massive gravity theories. These can be divided into three classes. First, there are solutions with proportional metrics, which are the same as in General Relativity with a cosmological term, which can be positive, negative or zero. Secondly, for spherically symmetric systems, there are solutions with non-bidiagonal metrics. The g-metric fulfils Einstein equations with a positive cosmological term and a matter source, while the f-metric is anti-de Sitter. The third class contains solutions with bidiagonal metrics, and these can be quite complex. The time-dependent solutions describe homogeneous (isotropic or anisotropic) cosmologies which show a late-time self-acceleration or other types of behavior. The static solutions describe black holes with a massive graviton hair, and also globally regular lumps of energy. None of these are asymptotically flat. Including a matter source gives rise to asymptotically flat solutions which exhibit the Vainshtein mechanism of recovery of General Relativity in a finite region.

  2. Topological charged black holes in massive gravity's rainbow and their thermodynamical analysis through various approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendi, S. H.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.

    2017-06-01

    Violation of Lorentz invariancy in the high energy quantum gravity motivates one to consider an energy dependent spacetime with massive deformation of standard general relativity. In this paper, we take into account an energy dependent metric in the context of a massive gravity model to obtain exact solutions. We investigate the geometry of black hole solutions and also calculate the conserved and thermodynamic quantities, which are fully reproduced by the analysis performed with the standard techniques. After examining the validity of the first law of thermodynamics, we conduct a study regarding the effects of different parameters on thermal stability of the solutions. In addition, we employ the relation between cosmological constant and thermodynamical pressure to study the possibility of phase transition. Interestingly, we will show that for the specific configuration considered in this paper, van der Waals like behavior is observed for different topology. In other words, for flat and hyperbolic horizons, similar to spherical horizon, a second order phase transition and van der Waals like behavior are observed. Furthermore, we use geometrical method to construct phase space and study phase transition and bound points for these black holes. Finally, we obtain critical values in extended phase space through the use of a new method.

  3. A Very Massive Stellar Black Hole in the Milky Way Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    VLT ISAAC Uncovers an Enigmatic Microquasar Summary One of the most enigmatic stellar systems in our Milky Way Galaxy has been shown to harbour a very massive black hole. With 14 times more mass than the Sun [1], this is the heaviest known stellar black hole in the Galaxy. Using the ISAAC instrument on the VLT 8.2-m ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory , an international team of astronomers [2] peered into a remote area of the Milky Way to probe the binary system GRS 1915+105 , located almost 40,000 light-years away. They were able to identify the low-mass star that feeds the black hole by means of a steady flow of stellar material. A detailed follow-up study revealed how this star revolves around its hungry companion. The analysis of the orbital motion then made it possible to estimate the mass of the black hole. The observation of the heavy black hole in GRS 1915+105 is opening up fundamental questions about how massive stellar black holes form, and whether or not such objects rotate around their own axes. PR Photo 31a/01 : Schematic drawing of the GRS 1915+105 binary system . PR Photo 31b/01 : ISAAC spectrum of the companion star . PR Photo 31c/01 : The velocity curve from which the mass of the black hole was derived . Miniature Quasars in our Galaxy ESO PR Photo 31a/01 ESO PR Photo 31a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 399 pix - 44k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 797 pix - 192k] Caption : PR Photo 31a/01 shows an artist's impression of the binary stellar system GRS 1915+105 in which a heavy black hole is present. The distance between the donor star and the accreting black hole is about half the distance between the Earth and the Sun. The drawing illustrates how the donor star feeds the black hole via an accretion disk , and also the emergence of jets perpendicular to the disk. In the lower panel the blue colour denotes matter that spirals in the accretion disk, while in the orange region matter is freely falling radially into the black hole. Technical information

  4. Recoil polarization measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinkmann Kai-Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Building on experience with silicon detectors operated in the photon beamline environment, first possible layouts of Si detector telescopes for recoil protons were developed. Various geometries, e.g. Archimedean spiral design of annular sensors, sector shapes and rectangular sensors were studied and have been used during test measurements. A prototype for the recoil polarimeter was built and subjected to performance tests in protonproton scattering at the COSY-accelerator in Jülich.

  5. Near horizon symmetries of the non-extremal black hole solutions of Generalized Minimal Massive Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Setare

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the Generalized Minimal Massive Gravity (GMMG model in the first order formalism. We show that all the solutions of the Einstein gravity with negative cosmological constants solve the equations of motion of considered model. Then we find an expression for the off-shell conserved charges of this model. By considering the near horizon geometry of a three dimensional black hole in the Gaussian null coordinates, we find near horizon conserved charges and their algebra. The obtained algebra is centrally extended. By writing the algebra of conserved charges in terms of Fourier modes and considering the BTZ black hole solution as an example, one can see that the charge associated with rotations along Y0 coincides exactly with the angular momentum, and the charge associated with time translations T0 is the product of the black hole entropy and its temperature. As we expect, in the limit when the GMMG tends to the Einstein gravity, all the results we obtain in this paper reduce to the results of the paper [1].

  6. Super-Eddington accreting massive black holes as long-lived cosmological standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Min; Du, Pu; Valls-Gabaud, David; Hu, Chen; Netzer, Hagai

    2013-02-22

    Super-Eddington accreting massive black holes (SEAMBHs) reach saturated luminosities above a certain accretion rate due to photon trapping and advection in slim accretion disks. We show that these SEAMBHs could provide a new tool for estimating cosmological distances if they are properly identified by hard x-ray observations, in particular by the slope of their 2-10 keV continuum. To verify this idea we obtained black hole mass estimates and x-ray data for a sample of 60 narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies that we consider to be the most promising SEAMBH candidates. We demonstrate that the distances derived by the new method for the objects in the sample get closer to the standard luminosity distances as the hard x-ray continuum gets steeper. The results allow us to analyze the requirements for using the method in future samples of active black holes and to demonstrate that the expected uncertainty, given large enough samples, can make them into a useful, new cosmological ruler.

  7. Dynamics of massive black holes as a possible candidate of Galactic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guohong; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    If the dark halo of the Galaxy is comprised of massive black holes (MBHs), then those within approximately 1 kpc will spiral to the center, where they will interact with one another, forming binaries which contract, owing to further dynamical friction, and then possibly merge to become more massive objects by emission of gravitational radiation. If successive mergers would invariably lead, as has been proposed by various authors, to the formation of a very massive nucleus of 10(exp 8) solar mass, then the idea of MBHs as a dark matter candidate could be excluded on observational grounds, since the observed limit (or value) for a Galactic central black hole is approximately 10(exp 6.5) solar mass. But, if successive mergers are delayed or prevented by other processes, such as the gravitational slingshot or rocket effect of gravitational radiation, then a large mass accumulation will not occur. In order to resolve this issue, we perform detailed N-body simulations using a modfied Aarseth code to explore the dynamical behavior of the MBHs, and we find that for a 'best estimate' model of the Galaxy a runaway does not occur. The code treates the MBHs as subject to the primary gravitational forces of one another and to the smooth stellar distribution, as well as the secondary perturbations in their orbits due to another and to the smooth stellar distribution, as well as the secondary perturbations in their orbits due to dynamical friction and gravitational radiation. Instead of a runaway, three-body interactions between hard binaries and single MBHs eject massive objects before accumulation of more than a few units, so that typically the center will contain zero, one, or two MBHs. We study how the situation depends in detail on the mass per MBH, the rotation of the halo, the mass distribution within the Galaxy, and other parameters. A runaway will most sensitively depend on the ratio of initial (spheroid/halo) central mass densities and secondarily on the typical values

  8. Formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei: runaway tidal encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nicholas C.; Küpper, Andreas H. W.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) and supermassive black holes (SMBHs) both inhabit galactic nuclei, coexisting in a range of bulge masses, but excluding each other in the largest or smallest galaxies. We propose that the transformation of NSCs into SMBHs occurs via runaway tidal captures, once NSCs exceed a certain critical central density and velocity dispersion. The bottleneck in this process is growing the first e-fold in black hole mass. The growth of a stellar mass black hole past this bottleneck occurs as tidally captured stars are consumed in repeated episodes of mass transfer at pericentre. Tidal captures may deactivate as a growth channel once the black hole mass ≳102-3 M⊙, but tidal disruption events will continue and can grow the seed SMBH to larger sizes. The runaway slows (becomes subexponential) once the seed SMBH consumes the core of its host NSC. While most of the cosmic mass density in SMBHs is ultimately produced by episodic gaseous accretion in very massive galaxies, the smallest SMBHs have probably grown from strong tidal encounters with NSC stars. SMBH seeds that grow for a time t entirely through this channel will follow simple power-law relations with the velocity dispersion, σ, of their host galaxy. In the simplest regime, it is M_\\bullet ˜ σ ^{3/2}√{M_\\star t / G} ˜ 106 M_{⊙} (σ / 50 {km s}^{-1})^{3/2}(t/10^{10} yr)^{1/2}, but the exponents and pre-factor can differ slightly depending on the details of loss cone refilling. Current tidal disruption event rates predicted from this mechanism are consistent with observations.

  9. P -V criticality of first-order entropy corrected AdS black holes in massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, S.; Pourhassan, B.; Farahani, H.

    2017-05-01

    We consider a massive gravity black hole in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter space and study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of the black hole. We consider thermal fluctuations as logarithmic correction terms in the entropy. We analyze the effect of logarithmic correction on thermodynamics potentials like Helmholtz and Gibbs which are found decreasing functions. We study critical points and stability and find that the presence of logarithmic correction is necessary to have stable phase and critical point.

  10. Massive Primordial Black Holes as Dark Matter and their detection with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Bellido, Juan

    2017-05-01

    Massive Primordial Black Holes (MPBH) can be formed after inflation due to broad peaks in the primordial curvature power spectrum that collapse gravitationally during the radiation era, to form clusters of black holes that merge and increase in mass after recombination, generating today a broad mass-spectrum of black holes with masses ranging from 0.01 to 105 M⊙ . These MPBH could act as seeds for galaxies and quick-start structure formation, initiating reionization, forming galaxies at redshift z > 10 and clusters at z > 1. They may also be the seeds on which SMBH and IMBH form, by accreting gas onto them and forming the centers of galaxies and quasars at high redshift. They form at rest with zero spin and have negligible cross-section with ordinary matter. If there are enough of these MPBH, they could constitute the bulk of the Dark Matter today. Such PBH could be responsible for the observed fluctuations in the CIB and X-ray backgrounds. MPBH could be directly detected by the gravitational waves emitted when they merge to form more massive black holes, as recently reported by LIGO. Their continuous merging since recombination could have generated a stochastic background of gravitational waves that could eventually be detected by LISA and PTA. MPBH may actually be responsible for the unidentified point sources seen by Fermi, Magic and Chandra. Furthermore, the ejection of stars from shallow potential wells like those of Dwarf Spheroidals (DSph), via the gravitational slingshot effect, could be due to MPBH, thus alleviating the substructure and too-big-to-fail problems of standard collisionless CDM. Their mass distribution peaks at a few tens of M⊙ today, and could therefore be detected also with long-duration microlensing events, as well as by the anomalous motion of stars in the field of GAIA. Their presence as CDM in the Universe could be seen in the time-dilation of strong-lensing images of quasars. The hierarchical large scale structure behaviour of MPBH

  11. Massively Parallel Computing and the Search for Jets and Black Holes at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, V.; Lujan, P.

    2014-01-01

    Massively parallel computing at the LHC could be the next leap necessary to reach an era of new discoveries at the LHC after the Higgs-like discovery. Scientific computing is a critical component of the LHC experiment, including operation, trigger, LHC computing GRID, simulation, and analysis. One way to improve the physics reach of the LHC is to take advantage of the flexibility of the trigger system by integrating Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) or Many Integrated Core (MIC) processors into its server farm. This cutting edge technology provides not only the means to accelerate existing algorithms, but also the opportunity to develop new algorithms that select events that could have previously evaded detection. In this article we describe new algorithms to select prompt or non-prompt jet and black hole--like objects in the silicon tracker.

  12. Measuring Parameters of Massive Black Hole Binaries with Partially-Aligned Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ryan N.; Hughes, Scott A.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2010-01-01

    It is important to understand how well the gravitational-wave observatory LISA can measure parameters of massive black hole binaries. It has been shown that including spin precession in the waveform breaks degeneracies and produces smaller expected parameter errors than a simpler, precession-free analysis. However, recent work has shown that gas in binaries can partially align the spins with the orbital angular momentum, thus reducing the precession effect. We show how this degrades the earlier results, producing more pessimistic errors in gaseous mergers. However, we then add higher harmonics to the signal model; these also break degeneracies, but they are not affected by the presence of gas. The harmonics often restore the errors in partially-aligned binaries to the same as, or better than/ those that are obtained for fully precessing binaries with no harmonics. Finally, we investigate what LISA measurements of spin alignment can tell us about the nature of gas around a binary,

  13. A possible relativistic jetted outburst from a massive black hole fed by a tidally disrupted star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Joshua S; Giannios, Dimitrios; Metzger, Brian D; Cenko, S Bradley; Perley, Daniel A; Butler, Nathaniel R; Tanvir, Nial R; Levan, Andrew J; O'Brien, Paul T; Strubbe, Linda E; De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Lee, William H; Nayakshin, Sergei; Quataert, Eliot; King, Andrew R; Cucchiara, Antonino; Guillochon, James; Bower, Geoffrey C; Fruchter, Andrew S; Morgan, Adam N; van der Horst, Alexander J

    2011-07-08

    Gas accretion onto some massive black holes (MBHs) at the centers of galaxies actively powers luminous emission, but most MBHs are considered dormant. Occasionally, a star passing too near an MBH is torn apart by gravitational forces, leading to a bright tidal disruption flare (TDF). Although the high-energy transient Sw 1644+57 initially displayed none of the theoretically anticipated (nor previously observed) TDF characteristics, we show that observations suggest a sudden accretion event onto a central MBH of mass about 10(6) to 10(7) solar masses. There is evidence for a mildly relativistic outflow, jet collimation, and a spectrum characterized by synchrotron and inverse Compton processes; this leads to a natural analogy of Sw 1644+57 to a temporary smaller-scale blazar.

  14. Probabilistic eccentricity bifurcation for stars around shrinking massive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Mao; Seto, Naoki

    2017-12-01

    Based on the secular theory, we discuss the orbital evolution of stars in a nuclear star cluster to which a secondary massive black hole is infalling with vanishing eccentricity. We find that the eccentricities of the stars could show sharp transitions, depending strongly on their initial conditions. By examining the phase-space structure of an associated Hamiltonian, we show that these characteristic behaviours are partly due to a probabilistic bifurcation at a separatrix crossing, resulting from the retrograde apsidal precession by the cluster potential. We also show that separatrix crossings are closely related to realization of a large eccentricity and could be important for astrophysical phenomena such as tidal disruption events or gravitational wave emissions.

  15. Story of the discovery of a massive black hole in NGC 4258

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, M.

    In 1992, Nakai found higher velocity components of water maser in NGC 4258 in using Nobeyama 45-m telescope. This was somewhat by chance but greatly indebted to the idea and efforts of Japanese radio astronomical predecessors: the wide-band spectrometers (AOS) and HEMT receiver equipped at Nobeyama 45-m telescope made the discovery possible. KNIFE (Kashima-Nobeyama Interferometer) and new compact correlator named NAOCO made quick confirmation that the line is not artificial signal but real astronomical maser emission from the center of NGC 4258. VLBA in US was timely completed its construction and just in operation in 1994. From the minute observation of NGC 4258 we found the evidence of massive black hole at the center of the galaxy.

  16. Response of the Black Sea methane budget to massive short-term submarine inputs of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmale, O.; Haeckel, M.; McGinnis, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    A steady state box model was developed to estimate the methane input into the Black Sea water column at various water depths. Our model results reveal a total input of methane of 4.7 Tg yr(-1). The model predicts that the input of methane is largest at water depths between 600 and 700 m (7......% of the total input), suggesting that the dissociation of methane gas hydrates at water depths equivalent to their upper stability limit may represent an important source of methane into the water column. In addition we discuss the effects of massive short-term methane inputs (e. g. through eruptions of deep......-water mud volcanoes or submarine landslides at intermediate water depths) on the water column methane distribution and the resulting methane emission to the atmosphere. Our non-steady state simulations predict that these inputs will be effectively buffered by intense microbial methane consumption...

  17. Collisions of massive particles, timelike thin shells and formation of black holes in three dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Jonathan [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and the International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Physique Théorique et Mathématique, Université Libre de Bruxelles,Campus Plaine C.P. 231, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2016-12-13

    We study collisions of massive pointlike particles in three dimensional anti-de Sitter space, generalizing the work on massless particles in http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0264-9381/33/14/145009. We show how to construct exact solutions corresponding to the formation of either a black hole or a conical singularity from the collision of an arbitrary number of massive particles that fall in radially and collide at the origin of AdS. No restrictions on the masses or the angular and radial positions from where the particles are released, are imposed. We also consider the limit of an infinite number of particles, obtaining novel timelike thin shell spacetimes. These thin shells have an arbitrary mass distribution as well as a non-trivial embedding where the radial location of the shell depends on the angular coordinate, and we analyze these shells using the junction formalism of general relativity. We also consider the massless limit and find consistency with earlier results, as well as comment on the stress-energy tensor modes of the dual CFT.

  18. Signature of a Newborn Black Hole from the Collapse of a Supra-massive Millisecond Magnetar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Xie, Wei; Lei, Wei-Hua; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Lü, Hou-Jun; Liang, En-Wei; Gao, He; Wang, Ding-Xiong

    2017-11-01

    An X-ray plateau followed by a steep decay (“internal plateau”) has been observed in both long and short gamma-ray burst (GRBs), implying that a millisecond magnetar operates in some GRBs. The sharp decay at the end of the plateau, marking the abrupt cessation of the magnetar’s central engine, has been considered the collapse of a supra-massive magnetar into a black hole (BH) when it spins down. If this “internal plateau” is indeed evidence of a magnetar central engine, the natural expectation in some candidates would be a signature from the newborn BH. In this work, we find that GRB 070110 is a particular case which shows a small X-ray bump following its “internal plateau.” We interpret the plateau as a spin-down supra-massive magnetar and the X-ray bump as fallback BH accretion. This indicates that a newborn BH is likely active in some GRBs. Therefore, GRB 070110-like events may provide further support to the magnetar central engine model and enable us to investigate the properties of the magnetar as well as the newborn BH.

  19. The HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Belostotski, S. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Insitute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)] [and others; Collaboration: HERMES Recoil Detector Group

    2013-02-15

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  20. The HERMES recoil detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Belostotski, S.; Borisenko, A.; Bowles, J.; Brodski, I.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capitani, G. P.; Carassiti, V.; Ciullo, G.; Clarkson, A.; Contalbrigo, M.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Guler, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Hartig, M.; Hill, G.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Jo, H. S.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Kisselev, A.; Krause, B.; Krauss, B.; Lagamba, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, S.; Lu, X.-G.; Lumsden, S.; Mahon, D.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nowak, W.-D.; Naryshkin, Y.; Osborne, A.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrov, A.; Pickert, N.; Prahl, V.; Protopopescu, D.; Reinecke, M.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rubacek, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schnell, G.; Seitz, B.; Shearer, C.; Shutov, V.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varanda, M.; Veretennikov, D.; Vilardi, I.; Vikhrov, V.; Vogel, C.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yu, W.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.

    2013-05-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with a field strength of 1T. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  1. Response of the Black Sea methane budget to massive short-term submarine inputs of methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Schmale

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A steady state box model was developed to estimate the methane input into the Black Sea water column at various water depths. Our model results reveal a total input of methane of 4.7 Tg yr−1. The model predicts that the input of methane is largest at water depths between 600 and 700 m (7% of the total input, suggesting that the dissociation of methane gas hydrates at water depths equivalent to their upper stability limit may represent an important source of methane into the water column. In addition we discuss the effects of massive short-term methane inputs (e.g. through eruptions of deep-water mud volcanoes or submarine landslides at intermediate water depths on the water column methane distribution and the resulting methane emission to the atmosphere. Our non-steady state simulations predict that these inputs will be effectively buffered by intense microbial methane consumption and that the upward flux of methane is strongly hampered by the pronounced density stratification of the Black Sea water column. For instance, an assumed input of methane of 179 Tg CH4 d−1 (equivalent to the amount of methane released by 1000 mud volcano eruptions at a water depth of 700 m will only marginally influence the sea/air methane flux increasing it by only 3%.

  2. Measuring Parameters of Massive Black Hole Binaries with Partially Aligned Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ryan N.; Hughes, Scott A.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    The future space-based gravitational wave detector LISA will be able to measure parameters of coalescing massive black hole binaries, often to extremely high accuracy. Previous work has demonstrated that the black hole spins can have a strong impact on the accuracy of parameter measurement. Relativistic spin-induced precession modulates the waveform in a manner which can break degeneracies between parameters, in principle significantly improving how well they are measured. Recent studies have indicated, however, that spin precession may be weak for an important subset of astrophysical binary black holes: those in which the spins are aligned due to interactions with gas. In this paper, we examine how well a binary's parameters can be measured when its spins are partially aligned and compare results using waveforms that include higher post-Newtonian harmonics to those that are truncated at leading quadrupole order. We find that the weakened precession can substantially degrade parameter estimation, particularly for the "extrinsic" parameters sky position and distance. Absent higher harmonics, LISA typically localizes the sky position of a nearly aligned binary about an order of magnitude less accurately than one for which the spin orientations are random. Our knowledge of a source's sky position will thus be worst for the gas-rich systems which are most likely to produce electromagnetic counterparts. Fortunately, higher harmonics of the waveform can make up for this degradation. By including harmonics beyond the quadrupole in our waveform model, we find that the accuracy with which most of the binary's parameters are measured can be substantially improved. In some cases, the improvement is such that they are measured almost as well as when the binary spins are randomly aligned.

  3. Reentrant Phase Transitions and Triple Points of Topological AdS Black Holes in Born-Infeld-Massive Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by recent developments of black hole thermodynamics in de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley (dRGT massive gravity, we study the critical behaviors of topological Anti-de Sitter (AdS black holes in the presence of Born-Infeld nonlinear electrodynamics. Here the cosmological constant appears as a dynamical pressure of the system and its corresponding conjugate quantity is interpreted as thermodynamic volume. This shows that, besides the Van der Waals-like SBH/LBH phase transitions, the so-called reentrant phase transition (RPT appears in four-dimensional space-time when the coupling coefficients cim2 of massive potential and Born-Infeld parameter b satisfy some certain conditions. In addition, we also find the triple critical points and the small/intermediate/large black hole phase transitions for d=5.

  4. The role of gas in the merging of massive black holes in galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, Andres

    A long-standing problem in astrophysics is whether galaxy mergers necessarily lead to massive black hole mergers in their centers. Over the past 20 years this problem has been studied in context of the long-term evolution of a black hole binary at the center of a dense stellar system. However, the fate of a binary in the stellar system is unclear and the coalescence possibly stalls unless some additional mechanism is able to extract angular momentum from the binary. The possible additional mechanism is very likely to be gas dynamical in origin, because observational and theoretical work both indicate that large amounts of gas can be present in the central regions of merging galaxies. Using high-resolution SPH numerical simulations, we investigate the effects of gas on the inspiral and merger of a massive black hole binary. We run a variety of models, ranging from simulations with a relatively smooth gas and nearly spherical cloud to cases in which the gas is in a disk and has a more clumpy spatial distribution. We find that in the early evolution of the system the binary separation diminishes due to gravitational drag, and in the later stages the medium responds by forming an ellipsoidal density enhancement whose axis lags behind the binary axis; this offset produces a torque on the binary that causes continuing loss of angular momentum and is able to reduce the separation to distances where gravitational radiation is efficient. Between these two regimes, we find a transition regime in which the evolution is temporarily slowed down when neither of these mechanisms is fully effective. In the variety of simulations that we perform, we find that a MBH binary will merge within few times 10 7 yrs after the galaxies merge. For MBHs that satisfy the observed' m - s c ' relation, we predict that in a merger of galaxies that have at least 1% of their total mass in gas, the MBHs will coalesce soon after the galaxies merge. We also predict that if the MBHs depart considerably

  5. Dusty Gas Accretion onto Massive Black Holes and Infrared Diagnosis of the Eddington Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Ricotti, Massimo; Park, KwangHo; Sugimura, Kazuyuki

    2017-09-01

    Evidence for dust around supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the early universe is strongly suggested by recent observations. However, the accretion mechanism of SMBHs in dusty gas is not well understood yet. We investigate the growth of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) of ˜ {10}4{--}{10}6 {M}⊙ in dusty clouds by using one-dimensional radiative-hydrodynamics simulations. We find that the accretion of dusty gas onto IMBHs proceeds gently with small fluctuations of the accretion rate, whereas that of pristine gas causes more violent periodic bursts. At dust-to-gas mass ratios similar to the solar neighborhood, the time-averaged luminosity becomes smaller than that for primordial gas by one order of magnitude and the time-averaged Eddington ratio ranges from ˜ {10}-4 to ˜ {10}-2 in clouds with initial gas densities of {n}{{H}}=10{--}1000 {{cm}}-3. Our calculations show that the effect of dust opacity alone is secondary compared to the radiation pressure on dust in regulating the BH growth. We also derive spectral energy distributions at IR bands by calculating dust thermal emission and show that the flux ratio between λ ≲ 20 μ {{m}} and ≳ 100 μ {{m}} is closely related to the Eddington ratio. Thermal emission from hot dust near the BH dominates only during the phase of high accretion, producing higher flux density at ≲ 20 μ {{m}}. Therefore, we suggest that a combination of mid-IR observations by the James Webb Space Telescope and far-IR observations by ALMA or Spitzer can be used to estimate the Eddington ratio of massive BHs. We also extend our simple modeling to SMBHs of {10}8{--}{10}9 {M}⊙ and show that ALMA can detect SMBHs of ˜ {10}9 {M}⊙ at z≳ 5.

  6. Probing the assembly history and dynamical evolution of massive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyuan; Middleton, Hannah; Sesana, Alberto; Del Pozzo, Walter; Vecchio, Alberto

    2017-06-01

    We consider the inverse problem in pulsar timing array (PTA) analysis, investigating what astrophysical information about the underlying massive black hole binary (MBHB) population can be recovered from the detection of a stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB). We employ a physically motivated model that connects the GWB spectrum to a series of parameters describing the underlying redshift evolution of the MBHB mass function and to the typical eccentricity they acquire while interacting with the dense environment of post-merger galactic nuclei. This allows the folding in of information about the spectral shape of the GWB into the analysis. The priors on the model parameters are assumed to be uninformative and consistent with the current lack of secure observations of sub-parsec MBHBs. We explore the implications of current upper limits and of future detections with a variety of PTA configurations. We confirm our previous finding that current upper limits can only place an upper bound on the overall MBHB merger rate. Depending on the properties of the array, future detections can also constrain several MBHB population models at different degrees of fidelity. In particular, a simultaneous detection of a steepening of the spectrum at high frequency and a bending at low frequency will place strong constraints on both the MBHB mass function and on the typical eccentricity of inspiralling MBHBs, providing insights into MBHB astrophysics unlikely to be achievable by any other means.

  7. On the mean radiative efficiency of accreting massive black holes in AGNs and QSOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, XiaoXia; Lu, YouJun

    2017-10-01

    Radiative efficiency is an important physical parameter that describes the fraction of accretion material converted to radiative energy for accretion onto massive black holes (MBHs). With the simplest Sołtan argument, the radiative efficiency of MBHs can be estimated by matching the mass density of MBHs in the local universe to the accreted mass density by MBHs during AGN/QSO phases. In this paper, we estimate the local MBH mass density through a combination of various determinations of the correlations between the masses of MBHs and the properties of MBH host galaxies, with the distribution functions of those galaxy properties. We also estimate the total energy density radiated by AGNs and QSOs by using various AGN/QSO X-ray luminosity functions in the literature. We then obtain several hundred estimates of the mean radiative efficiency of AGNs/QSOs. Under the assumption that those estimates are independent of each other and free of systematic effects, we apply the median statistics as described by Gott et al. and find the mean radiative efficiency of AGNs/QSOs is ɛ = 0.105 -0.008 +0.006 , which is consistent with the canonical value 0.1. Considering that about 20% Compton-thick objects may be missed from current available X-ray surveys, the true mean radiative efficiency may be actually 0.12.

  8. The 164-d period in SS433 as precessional motion - The massive black hole and pulsar models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaham, J.

    1980-01-01

    The geometries predicted by black hole ring and neutron star precession models for SS 433 are examined in relation to the recently observed 164-d periodicity in wavelength shifts from this object. In the first model, a Keplerian ring of matter exists surrounding a black hole of approximately 1,000,000 solar masses and radiates predominantly from its nodes, which are the ring sections closest to the black hole accretion disk and precess around the rotation axis of the hole with a period of approximately 160 days due to the Lense-Thirring effect. The free precession of a rapidly rotating neutron star emitting a double jet of matter can also bring about the observed wavelength variation. It should be possible to decide between the models by determining the change with time of the precession period, as the massive black hole model predicts its decrease and the rapidly rotating pulsar model predicts its increase.

  9. Late time cosmology with LISA: Probing the cosmic expansion with massive black hole binary mergers as standard sirens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanini, Nicola

    2017-05-01

    This paper summarises the potential of the LISA mission to constrain the expansion history of the universe using massive black hole binary mergers as gravitational wave standard sirens. After briefly reviewing the concept of standard siren, the analysis and methodologies of Ref [1] are briefly outlined to show how LISA can be used as a cosmological probe, while a selection of results taken from Refs. [1, 2] is presented in order to estimate the power of LISA in constraining cosmological parameters.

  10. The origin of the most massive black holes at high-z: BlueTides and the next quasar frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Feng, Yu; Waters, Dacen; Wilkins, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    The growth of the most massive black holes in the early Universe, consistent with the detection of highly luminous quasars at z > 6 implies sustained, critical accretion of material to grow and power them. Given a black hole (BH) seed scenario, it is still uncertain which conditions in the early Universe allow the fastest BH growth. Large-scale hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of structure formation allow us to explore the conditions conducive to the growth of the earliest supermassive BHs. We use the cosmological hydrodynamic simulation BlueTides, which incorporates a variety of baryon physics in a (400 h-1Mpc)3 volume with 0.7 trillion particles to follow the earliest phases of BH critical growth. At z = 8 the most massive BHs (a handful) approach masses of 108 M_{⊙} with the most massive (with M_BH = 4 × 10^8 M_{⊙}) being found in an extremely compact (compared to present day) spheroid-dominated host galaxy. Examining the large-scale environment of hosts, we find that the initial tidal field is more important than overdensity in setting the conditions for early BH growth. In regions of low tidal fields gas accretes 'cold' on to the BH and falls along thin, radial filaments straight into the centre forming the most compact galaxies and most massive BHs at the earliest times. Regions of high tidal fields instead induce larger coherent angular momenta and influence the formation of the first population of massive compact discs. The extreme early growth depends on the early interplay of high gas densities and the tidal field that shapes the mode of accretion. Mergers may play a minor role in the formation of the first generation, rare massive BHs.

  11. Lighthouse in the dust: infrared echoes of periodic emission from massive black hole binaries★

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Daniel J.; Haiman, Zoltán

    2017-09-01

    The optical and UV emission from sub-parsec massive black hole binaries (MBHBs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is believed to vary periodically, on time-scales comparable to the binary's orbital time. If driven by accretion rate fluctuations, the variability could be isotropic. If dominated by relativistic Doppler modulation, the variability should instead be anisotropic, resembling a rotating forward-beamed lighthouse. We consider the infrared (IR) reverberation of either type of periodic emission by pc-scale circumbinary dust tori. We predict the phase and amplitude of IR variability as a function of the ratio of dust light crossing time to the source variability period, and of the torus inclination and opening angle. We enumerate several differences between the isotropic and anisotropic cases. Interestingly, for a nearly face-on binary with an inclined dust torus, the Doppler boost can produce IR variability without any observable optical/UV variability. Such orphan-IR variability would have been missed in optical searches for periodic AGNs. We apply our models to time-domain WISE IR data from the MBHB candidate PG 1302-102 and find consistency with dust reverberation by both isotropically emitting and Doppler-boosted sources in the shorter wavelength W1-W2 (2.8 → 5.3 μm) bands. We constrain the dust torus to be thin (aspect ratio ˜ 0.1), with an inner radius at 1-5 pc. More generally, our dust-echo models will aid in identifying new MBHB candidates, determining their nature and constraining the physical properties of MBHBs and their dust tori.

  12. Slowly decaying resonances of charged massive scalar fields in the Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Hod

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We determine the characteristic timescales associated with the linearized relaxation dynamics of the composed Reissner–Nordström-black-hole-charged-massive-scalar-field system. To that end, the quasinormal resonant frequencies {ωn(μ,q,M,Q}n=0n=∞ which characterize the dynamics of a charged scalar field of mass μ and charge coupling constant q in the charged Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime of mass M and electric charge Q are determined analytically in the eikonal regime 1≪Mμblack-hole electric charge Q/M, the imaginary part of the resonant oscillation frequency is a monotonically decreasing function of the dimensionless ratio μ/q. In particular, it is shown that the quasinormal resonance spectrum is characterized by the asymptotic behavior ℑω→0 in the limiting case Mμ→qQ. This intriguing finding implies that the composed Reissner–Nordström-black-hole-charged-massive-scalar-field system is characterized by extremely long relaxation times τrelax≡1/ℑω→∞ in the Mμ/qQ→1− limit.

  13. The MEGaN project - I. Missing formation of massive nuclear clusters and tidal disruption events by star clusters-massive black hole interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca-Sedda, M.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the evolution of a massive galactic nucleus hosting a supermassive black hole (SMBH) with mass MSMBH = 108 M ⊙ surrounded by a population of 42 heavy star clusters (globular clusters, GCs). Using direct N-body modelling, we show here that the assembly of a nuclear star cluster (NSC) through GC orbital decay and merger is efficiently inhibited by the tidal forces exerted from the SMBH. The GC mass-loss induced by tidal forces causes a significant modification of their mass function, leading to a population of low-mass (simulation produced a huge amount of data, which we used to investigate whether the GC debris deposited around the SMBH can enhance the rate of tidal disruption events (TDEs) in our galaxy inner density distribution. Our results suggest that the GC disruption leads to a TDE rate of ˜2 × 10-4 yr-1, about an order of magnitude larger than observed in galactic nuclei with similar density profiles and central SMBH. Our results suggest that the GC disruption shapes the SMBH neighbourhoods, leading to a TDE rate of ˜2 × 10-4 yr-1, a value slightly larger than what expected in previous theoretical modelling of galaxies with similar density profiles and central SMBHs. The simulation presented here is the first of its kind, representing a massive galactic nucleus and its star cluster population on scales ˜100 pc.

  14. Co-evolution of Massive Black Holes and Their Host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. M.

    2010-07-01

    A scenario of co-evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxies has been clearly conducted by the important evidence from observational results of quasar host galaxies and the relation between spheroid and SMBH mass. There are a plenty of unresolved problems and questions, some being basic, to be addressed in this scenario. The main goal of the present thesis is focusing on the mysterious scenario including growth of primordial black holes, cosmological evolution of spins and duty cycle of SMBHs, and interaction between the SMBH activity and star formation in galaxies from low to high redshifts. We review the main progress of this field over the past decade since the discovery of Magorrian relation and present comments on some questions in light of our view of points. The key questions to be addressed in this thesis work are: (1) how does the fast growth of primordial black holes influence their evolution? (2) what is the equation to describe the co-evolution of SMBHs and galaxies? (3) what is the mechanism to control the co-evolution? (4) how to transport the fueling gas from kpc scale to the center? It has been suggested that fast growth of primordial black holes via super-Eddington accretion is a promising way to form SMBHs in high redshift universe. Neutrino cooling has been employed and expedites the growth. We consider the Compton heating of the surroundings of the primordial black holes. We find that the realistic accretion rate is only a few percent of the Eddington rate, and the accretion is episodic. It implies that the fast growth via super-Eddington is not feasible. These conclusions have been confirmed by the detailed numerical simulations of Milosavljevic et al. (2008). The difficulties of the fast growth via accretion of baryon particles make the formation of SMBHs elusive in high redshift universe. We developed a new formulation to calculate the duty cycle of SMBHs based on the Soltan argument. We show it can be expressed by the mass

  15. The effect of the GUP on massive vector and scalar particles tunneling from a warped DGP gravity black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Övgün, A.; Jusufi, Kimet

    2017-07-01

    This paper discusses the effects of the mass and angular momentum of massive vector and scalar particles on the Hawking temperature manifested under the effects of the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP). In particular, we calculate the Hawking temperature of a black hole in a warped DGP gravity model in the framework of the quantum tunneling method. We use the modified Proca and Klein-Gordon equations previously determined from the GUP Lagrangian in the spacetime background of a warped Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) metric, with the help of Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) and semiclassical (WKB) approximation methods. We find that as a special case of a warped DGP black hole solution, the Hawking temperature of a Schwarzschild-de Sitter (SdS) black hole can be determined. Furthermore, the Hawking temperature is influenced by the mass and the angular momentum of vector and scalar particles and depends on which of those types of particles is being emitted by the black hole. We conclude that the nonthermal nature of the Hawking spectrum leads to Planck-scale nonthermal correlations, shedding light on the information paradox in black hole evaporation.

  16. The nightmare scenario: measuring the stochastic gravitational wave background from stalling massive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorkin, Irina; Barausse, Enrico

    2017-10-01

    Massive black hole binaries, formed when galaxies merge, are among the primary sources of gravitational waves targeted by ongoing pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments and the upcoming space-based Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) interferometer. However, their formation and merger rates are still highly uncertain. Recent upper limits on the stochastic gravitational wave background obtained by PTAs are starting to be in marginal tension with theoretical models for the pairing and orbital evolution of these systems. This tension can be resolved by assuming that these binaries are more eccentric or interact more strongly with the environment (gas and stars) than expected, or by accounting for possible selection biases in the construction of the theoretical models. However, another (pessimistic) possibility is that these binaries do not merge at all, but stall at large (˜pc) separations. We explore this extreme scenario by using a semi-analytic galaxy formation model including massive black holes (isolated and in binaries), and show that future generations of PTAs will detect the stochastic gravitational wave background from the massive black hole binary population within 10-15 yr of observations, even in the `nightmare scenario' in which all binaries stall at the hardening radius. Moreover, we argue that this scenario is too pessimistic, because our model predicts the existence of a subpopulation of binaries with small mass ratios (q ≲ 10-3) that should merge within a Hubble time simply as a result of gravitational wave emission. This subpopulation will be observable with large signal-to-noise ratios by future PTAs thanks to next-generation radio telescopes such as Square Kilometre Array or Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, and possibly by LISA.

  17. The unusual lensing BCG in Abell 1201: A steep IMF gradient, or an ultra-massive central black hole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Russell

    2016-10-01

    Abell 1201 is a cluster of galaxies at z=0.17, with a brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) which acts as a gravitational lens to a background surce at z=0.45. The lensing configuration is unusual, with a single bright arc formed at small radius ( 5kpc), where the stars are expected to contribute substantially to the total lensing mass. Using VLT/MUSE data, we have recently discovered a faint counter-image to the main arc, located just 0.6 from the lens centre. This image is not predicted at all in lensing models which incorporate the mass contributions from stars (following the observed light profile) and dark matter. Modelling shows that the formation of the counter-image requires additional mass at small radius. Possible solutions include (a) imposing a gradient of the stellar-mass-to-light ratio, reflecting a heavier initial mass function (IMF) in the galaxy centre, or (b) adding a central black hole with mass above ten billion solar masses, comparable to the largest dynamical measurements. The first scenario would be relevant to ongoing controversies concering possible non-standard IMFs in massive elliptical galaxies. The second explanation would be the first lensing-based detection of a central black hole, with implications for the still sparsely-populated upper end of the black hole scaling relations.The two alternative models yield different predictions for the morphology of the counter-image. Our proposed WFC3/UVIS observations will establish whether the image is (a) a radial arc, supporting the IMF gradient interpretation, or (b) a compact counter-image, confirming the ultra-massive black hole scenario. HST resolution is essential for this measurement.

  18. Formation of the black-hole binary M33 X-7 through mass exchange in a tight massive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, Francesca; Glebbeek, Evert; Farr, Will M; Fragos, Tassos; Willems, Bart; Orosz, Jerome A; Liu, Jifeng; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2010-11-04

    The X-ray source M33 X-7 in the nearby galaxy Messier 33 is among the most massive X-ray binary stellar systems known, hosting a rapidly spinning, 15.65M(⊙) black hole orbiting an underluminous, 70M(⊙) main-sequence companion in a slightly eccentric 3.45-day orbit (M(⊙), solar mass). Although post-main-sequence mass transfer explains the masses and tight orbit, it leaves unexplained the observed X-ray luminosity, the star's underluminosity, the black hole's spin and the orbital eccentricity. A common envelope phase, or rotational mixing, could explain the orbit, but the former would lead to a merger and the latter to an overluminous companion. A merger would also ensue if mass transfer to the black hole were invoked for its spin-up. Here we report simulations of evolutionary tracks which reveal that if M33 X-7 started as a primary body of 85M(⊙)-99M(⊙) and a secondary body of 28M(⊙)-32M(⊙), in a 2.8-3.1-d orbit, its observed properties can be consistently explained. In this model, the main-sequence primary transfers part of its envelope to the secondary and loses the rest in a wind; it ends its life as a ∼16M(⊙) helium star with an iron-nickel core that collapses to a black hole (with or without an accompanying supernova). The release of binding energy, and possibly collapse asymmetries, 'kick' the nascent black hole into an eccentric orbit. Wind accretion explains the X-ray luminosity, and the black-hole spin can be natal.

  19. Quasi-bound state resonances of charged massive scalar fields in the near-extremal Reissner-Nordstroem black-hole spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Academic College, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2017-05-15

    The quasi-bound states of charged massive scalar fields in the near-extremal charged Reissner-Nordstroem black-hole spacetime are studied analytically. These discrete resonant modes of the composed black-hole-field system are characterized by the physically motivated boundary condition of ingoing waves at the black-hole horizon and exponentially decaying (bounded) radial eigenfunctions at spatial infinity. Solving the Klein-Gordon wave equation for the linearized scalar fields in the black-hole spacetime, we derive a remarkably compact analytical formula for the complex frequency spectrum which characterizes the quasi-bound state resonances of the composed Reissner-Nordstroem-black-hole-charged-massive-scalar-field system. (orig.)

  20. Topological charged black holes in massive gravity's rainbow and their thermodynamical analysis through various approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendi, S.H., E-mail: hendi@shirazu.ac.ir [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eslam Panah, B. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panahiyan, S. [Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-10

    Violation of Lorentz invariancy in the high energy quantum gravity motivates one to consider an energy dependent spacetime with massive deformation of standard general relativity. In this paper, we take into account an energy dependent metric in the context of a massive gravity model to obtain exact solutions. We investigate the geometry of black hole solutions and also calculate the conserved and thermodynamic quantities, which are fully reproduced by the analysis performed with the standard techniques. After examining the validity of the first law of thermodynamics, we conduct a study regarding the effects of different parameters on thermal stability of the solutions. In addition, we employ the relation between cosmological constant and thermodynamical pressure to study the possibility of phase transition. Interestingly, we will show that for the specific configuration considered in this paper, van der Waals like behavior is observed for different topology. In other words, for flat and hyperbolic horizons, similar to spherical horizon, a second order phase transition and van der Waals like behavior are observed. Furthermore, we use geometrical method to construct phase space and study phase transition and bound points for these black holes. Finally, we obtain critical values in extended phase space through the use of a new method.

  1. Early Growth and Efficient Accretion of Massive Black Holes at High Redshift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    and the lack of similarly large black-hole masses in the nearby Universe does not rule out their existence at high-z. However, AGN host galaxies do not typically appear fully formed or evolved at these early epochs. This supports scenarios in which black holes build up mass very fast in a radiatively...... inefficient (or obscured) phase relative to the stars in their galaxies. Additionally, upper envelopes of black-hole mass of approximately 10^{10} solar masses and bolometric luminosity of ~ 10^{48} erg/s are observed at all redshifts....

  2. Early formation of (super)massive black holes and gravitational waves from their coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2017-04-01

    Astronomical observations of last few years have presented a surprising evidence that the Universe at redshift of order 10 is densely populated by supermassive black holes (quasars), supernovae, and contains very large amount of dust. All these data are in conflict with the canonical theory of quasar and supernova formation. A model is discussed which in a simple and natural way solves all these problem. In addition it explains an existence of supermassive black holes in each large galaxy and even in small ones. An inverted picture of galaxy formation is suggested when primordial black holes serve as seeds of galaxy formation. Simultaneously the origin and properties of black hole binaries, sources of gravitational waves registered by LIGO are explained. As a by-product the model may lead to abundant cosmological antimatter even in the Galaxy.

  3. Relativistic boost as the cause of periodicity in a massive black-hole binary candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Daniel J; Haiman, Zoltán; Schiminovich, David

    2015-09-17

    Because most large galaxies contain a central black hole, and galaxies often merge, black-hole binaries are expected to be common in galactic nuclei. Although they cannot be imaged, periodicities in the light curves of quasars have been interpreted as evidence for binaries, most recently in PG 1302-102, which has a short rest-frame optical period of four years (ref. 6). If the orbital period of the black-hole binary matches this value, then for the range of estimated black-hole masses, the components would be separated by 0.007-0.017 parsecs, implying relativistic orbital speeds. There has been much debate over whether black-hole orbits could be smaller than one parsec (ref. 7). Here we report that the amplitude and the sinusoid-like shape of the variability of the light curve of PG 1302-102 can be fitted by relativistic Doppler boosting of emission from a compact, steadily accreting, unequal-mass binary. We predict that brightness variations in the ultraviolet light curve track those in the optical, but with a two to three times larger amplitude. This prediction is relatively insensitive to the details of the emission process, and is consistent with archival ultraviolet data. Follow-up ultraviolet and optical observations in the next few years can further test this prediction and confirm the existence of a binary black hole in the relativistic regime.

  4. The close environments of accreting massive black holes are shaped by radiative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Claudio; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Koss, Michael J; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Schawinski, Kevin; Oh, Kyuseok; Lamperti, Isabella; Mushotzky, Richard; Treister, Ezequiel; Ho, Luis C; Weigel, Anna; Bauer, Franz E; Paltani, Stephane; Fabian, Andrew C; Xie, Yanxia; Gehrels, Neil

    2017-09-27

    The majority of the accreting supermassive black holes in the Universe are obscured by large columns of gas and dust. The location and evolution of this obscuring material have been the subject of intense research in the past decades, and are still debated. A decrease in the covering factor of the circumnuclear material with increasing accretion rates has been found by studies across the electromagnetic spectrum. The origin of this trend may be driven by the increase in the inner radius of the obscuring material with incident luminosity, which arises from the sublimation of dust; by the gravitational potential of the black hole; by radiative feedback; or by the interplay between outflows and inflows. However, the lack of a large, unbiased and complete sample of accreting black holes, with reliable information on gas column density, luminosity and mass, has left the main physical mechanism that regulates obscuration unclear. Here we report a systematic multi-wavelength survey of hard-X-ray-selected black holes that reveals that radiative feedback on dusty gas is the main physical mechanism that regulates the distribution of the circumnuclear material. Our results imply that the bulk of the obscuring dust and gas is located within a few to tens of parsecs of the accreting supermassive black hole (within the sphere of influence of the black hole), and that it can be swept away even at low radiative output rates. The main physical driver of the differences between obscured and unobscured accreting black holes is therefore their mass-normalized accretion rate.

  5. Effects of turbulence and rotation on protostar formation as a precursor of massive black holes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Borm, C.; Bovino, S.; Latif, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The seeds of the first supermassive black holes may have resulted from the direct collapse of hot primordial gas in ≳104 K haloes, forming a supermassive or quasi-star as an intermediate stage. Aims. We explore the formation of a protostar resulting from the collapse of primordial gas in...

  6. Relativistic jet activity from the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, D N; Kennea, J A; Ghisellini, G; Mangano, V; Zhang, B; Page, K L; Eracleous, M; Romano, P; Sakamoto, T; Falcone, A D; Osborne, J P; Campana, S; Beardmore, A P; Breeveld, A A; Chester, M M; Corbet, R; Covino, S; Cummings, J R; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Esposito, P; Evans, P A; Fugazza, D; Gelbord, J M; Hiroi, K; Holland, S T; Huang, K Y; Im, M; Israel, G; Jeon, Y; Jeon, Y-B; Jun, H D; Kawai, N; Kim, J H; Krimm, H A; Marshall, F E; P Mészáros; Negoro, H; Omodei, N; Park, W-K; Perkins, J S; Sugizaki, M; Sung, H-I; Tagliaferri, G; Troja, E; Ueda, Y; Urata, Y; Usui, R; Antonelli, L A; Barthelmy, S D; Cusumano, G; Giommi, P; Melandri, A; Perri, M; Racusin, J L; Sbarufatti, B; Siegel, M H; Gehrels, N

    2011-08-24

    Supermassive black holes have powerful gravitational fields with strong gradients that can destroy stars that get too close, producing a bright flare in ultraviolet and X-ray spectral regions from stellar debris that forms an accretion disk around the black hole. The aftermath of this process may have been seen several times over the past two decades in the form of sparsely sampled, slowly fading emission from distant galaxies, but the onset of the stellar disruption event has not hitherto been observed. Here we report observations of a bright X-ray flare from the extragalactic transient Swift J164449.3+573451. This source increased in brightness in the X-ray band by a factor of at least 10,000 since 1990 and by a factor of at least 100 since early 2010. We conclude that we have captured the onset of relativistic jet activity from a supermassive black hole. A companion paper comes to similar conclusions on the basis of radio observations. This event is probably due to the tidal disruption of a star falling into a supermassive black hole, but the detailed behaviour differs from current theoretical models of such events.

  7. Effects of turbulence and rotation on protostar formation as a precursor of massive black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Borm, C.; Bovino, S.; Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Spaans, M.; Grassi, T.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The seeds of the first supermassive black holes may have resulted from the direct collapse of hot primordial gas in ≳104 K haloes, forming a supermassive or quasi-star as an intermediate stage. Aims: We explore the formation of a protostar resulting from the collapse of primordial gas in

  8. Stellar-mass black holes in young massive and open stellar clusters and their role in gravitational-wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2017-05-01

    Stellar-remnant black holes (BH) in dense stellar clusters have always drawn attention due to their potential in a number of phenomena, especially the dynamical formation of binary black holes (BBH), which potentially coalesce via gravitational-wave radiation. This study presents a preliminary set of evolutionary models of compact stellar clusters with initial masses ranging over 1.0 × 104-5.0 × 104 M⊙, and half-mass radius of 2 or 1 pc, which is typical for young massive and starburst clusters. They have metallicities between 0.05 Z⊙ and Z⊙. Including contemporary schemes for stellar wind and remnant formation, such model clusters are evolved, for the first time, using the state-of-the-art direct N-body evolution program nbody7, until their dissolution or at least for 10 Gyr. That way, a self-regulatory behaviour in the effects of dynamical interactions among the BHs is demonstrated. In contrast to earlier studies, the BBH coalescences obtained in these models show a prominence in triple-mediated coalescences while being bound to the clusters, compared to those occurring among the BBHs that are dynamically ejected from the clusters. A broader mass spectrum of the BHs and lower escape velocities of the clusters explored here might cause this difference, which is yet to be fully understood. Among the BBH coalescences obtained here, there are ones that resemble the detected GW151226, LVT151012 and GW150914 events and also ones that are even more massive. A preliminary estimate suggests few 10-100 s of BBH coalescences per year, originating due to dynamics in stellar clusters that can be detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) at its design sensitivity.

  9. Towards a Comprehensive Fueling-Controlled Theory on the Growth of Massive Black Holes And Host Spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escala, Andres; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-06-11

    We study the relation between nuclear massive black holes and their host spheroid gravitational potential. Using AMR numerical simulations, we analyze how gas is transported in the nuclear (central kpc) regions of galaxies. We study the gas fueling onto the inner accretion disk (sub-pc scale) and the star formation in a massive nuclear disk like those generally found in proto-spheroids (ULIRGs, SCUBA Galaxies). These sub-pc resolution simulation of gas fueling that is mainly depleted by star formation naturally satisfy the 'M{sub BH} - M{sub virial}' relation, with a scatter considerably less than the observed one. We found a generalized version of Kennicutt-Schmidt Law for starbursts is satisfied, in which the total gas depletion rate ({dot M}{sub gas} = {dot M}{sub BH} + {dot M}{sub SF}) is the one that scales as M{sub gas}/t{sub orbital}. We also found that the 'M{sub BH} - {sigma}' relation is a byproduct of the 'M{sub BH} - M{sub virial}' relation.

  10. Flows of X-ray gas reveal the disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jon M; Kaastra, Jelle S; Miller, M Coleman; Reynolds, Mark T; Brown, Gregory; Cenko, S Bradley; Drake, Jeremy J; Gezari, Suvi; Guillochon, James; Gultekin, Kayhan; Irwin, Jimmy; Levan, Andrew; Maitra, Dipankar; Maksym, W Peter; Mushotzky, Richard; O'Brien, Paul; Paerels, Frits; de Plaa, Jelle; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Strohmayer, Tod; Tanvir, Nial

    2015-10-22

    Tidal forces close to massive black holes can violently disrupt stars that make a close approach. These extreme events are discovered via bright X-ray and optical/ultraviolet flares in galactic centres. Prior studies based on modelling decaying flux trends have been able to estimate broad properties, such as the mass accretion rate. Here we report the detection of flows of hot, ionized gas in high-resolution X-ray spectra of a nearby tidal disruption event, ASASSN-14li in the galaxy PGC 043234. Variability within the absorption-dominated spectra indicates that the gas is relatively close to the black hole. Narrow linewidths indicate that the gas does not stretch over a large range of radii, giving a low volume filling factor. Modest outflow speeds of a few hundred kilometres per second are observed; these are below the escape speed from the radius set by variability. The gas flow is consistent with a rotating wind from the inner, super-Eddington region of a nascent accretion disk, or with a filament of disrupted stellar gas near to the apocentre of an elliptical orbit. Flows of this sort are predicted by fundamental analytical theory and more recent numerical simulations.

  11. Universality in the relaxation dynamics of the composed black-hole-charged-massive-scalar-field system: The role of quantum Schwinger discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Hod

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The quasinormal resonance spectrum {ωn(μ,q,M,Q}n=0n=∞ of charged massive scalar fields in the charged Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime is studied analytically in the large-coupling regime qQ≫Mμ (here {μ,q} are respectively the mass and charge coupling constant of the field, and {M,Q} are respectively the mass and electric charge of the black hole. This physical system provides a striking illustration for the validity of the universal relaxation bound τ×T≥ħ/π in black-hole physics (here τ≡1/ℑω0 is the characteristic relaxation time of the composed black-hole-scalar-field system, and T is the Bekenstein–Hawking temperature of the black hole. In particular, it is shown that the relaxation dynamics of charged massive scalar fields in the charged Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime may saturate this quantum time-times-temperature inequality. Interestingly, we prove that potential violations of the bound by light scalar fields are excluded by the Schwinger-type pair-production mechanism (a vacuum polarization effect, a quantum phenomenon which restricts the physical parameters of the composed black-hole-charged-field system to the regime qQ≪M2μ2/ħ.

  12. Hard X-ray Flares from Massive Black Holes and Proposed Surveys to EXIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.; EXIST Team

    2010-03-01

    Flaring and short timescale variability are signatures of accreting black holes, from stellar to supermassive scales. We present Swift/BAT results from our ongoing BAT Slew Survey (BATSS; Copete, Grindlay et al 2010) that point to a surprisingly bright and new signature of AGN variability (Copete and Grindlay 2010, in preparation). As exciting as this is, it also points to an even richer domain for studies of the variability and associated physics of AGN and their SMBHs and jets, all of which are needed to understand flaring that relate to mergers and tidal disruptions by SMBHs. I discuss other high energy surveys, either planned or proposed, and their efficacy at revealing the sources and mechanisms of SMBH variability. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) has been proposed to Astro2010 as a very sensitive full-sky imaging, 3hour cadence, hard X-ray (5-600 keV) survey with rapid soft X-ray (0.1 - 10 keV) and uv-optical-IR (0.3 - 2.3microns) high sensitivity imaging and spectroscopic followup. It would trigger on a vast variety of AGN flares, including a predicted rate of 10-30 Tidal Disruption Events (TDEs) per year from EXIST detection could alert a LISA detection. Of interest to this session on gravitational wave signatures of black holes is the large number of short GRBs that EXIST would detect and precisely locate as well as measure redshifts for, from the very sensitive on board cooled 1.1m IR telescope. Those within the 300 Mpc detection radius of Advanced LIGO would enable a gravitational wave detection of the merging neutron star pair, or neutron star - black hole binary, and resultant stellar mass BH formation, which are the likely cause of most short GRBs.

  13. On the effect of Lyman alpha trapping during the initial collapse of massive black hole seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Qi; Wise, John

    2017-01-01

    One viable seeding mechanism for supermassive black holes is the direct gaseous collapse route in pre-galactic dark matter halos, producing objects on the order of $10^4 - 10^6$ solar masses. These events occur when the gas is prevented from cooling below $10^4$ K that requires a metal-free and relatively H$_2$-free medium. The initial collapse cools through atomic hydrogen transitions, but the gas becomes optically thick to the cooling radiation at high densities. We explore the effects ofLy...

  14. Sonic Rarefaction Wave Low Recoil Gun

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kathe, E

    2002-01-01

    .... The sonic RArefaction waVE low recoil guN (RAVEN) is a novel invention to dramatically reduce the gas momentum contribution to recoil with absolutely no reduction in me ballistic efficiency of launch...

  15. Feedback by Massive Black Holes in Gas-rich Dwarf Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silk, Joseph [Institut d’Astrophysique, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis Blvd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/IRFU, CNRS, Univ Paris 7, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beecroft Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-10

    Could there be intermediate-mass black holes in essentially all old dwarf galaxies? I argue that current observations of active galactic nuclei in dwarfs allow such a radical hypothesis that provides early feedback during the epoch of galaxy formation and potentially provides a unifying explanation for many, if not all, of the dwarf galaxy anomalies, such as the abundance, core-cusp, “too-big-to-fail,” ultra-faint, and baryon-fraction issues. I describe the supporting arguments, which are largely circumstantial, and discuss a number of tests. There is no strong motivation for modifying the nature of cold dark matter in order to explain any of the dwarf galaxy “problems.”.

  16. VLBA 24 and 43 GHz observations of massive binary black hole candidate PKS 1155 + 251

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xiang; Yang, Jun; Mi, Ligong; Cui, Lang; An, Tao; Hong, Xiaoyu; Ho, Luis C.

    2017-10-01

    PKS 1155+251 is a radio-loud quasar source at z = 0.203. Observations using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at ∼2, 5, 8 and 15 GHz show that the structure of the radio source is quite complicated on parsec scales and that the outer hotspots are apparently undergoing a significant contraction. Because these results cannot be fully explained based on the compact symmetric object (CSO) scenario with a radio core located between the northern and southern complexes, we made observations with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 and 43 GHz to search for compact substructures and alternative interpretations. The results show that the radio core revealed in the previous VLBI observations remains compact with a flat spectrum in our sub-milli-arcsecond-resolution images; the northern lobe emission becomes faint at 24 GHz and is mostly resolving out at 43 GHz; the southern complex is more bright but has been resolved into the brightest southern-end (S1) and jet or tail alike components westwards. Explaining the southern components aligned westward with a standard CSO scenario alone remains a challenge. As for the flatter spectral index of the southern-end component S1 between 24 and 43 GHz in our observations and the significant 15 GHz VLBA flux variability of S1, an alternative scenario is that the southern complex may be powered by a secondary black hole residing at S1. But more sensitive and high-resolution VLBI monitoring is required to discriminate the CSO and the binary black hole scenarios.

  17. Revealing And Studying Super-massive Black Holes In The Universe With EXIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Ceca, Roberto; Tagliaferri, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Coppi, P.; De Rosa, A.; Foschini, L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Natalucci, L.; Panessa, F.; Pareschi, G.; Ubertini, P.; Tavecchio, F.

    2010-03-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) emit over the entire electromagnetic spectrum and are widely believed to be powered by accretion of matter onto a Supermassive (million to billion) Black Hole (SMBH). Besides being sites of "extreme" physics, AGN are likely leading actors in the formation and evolution of galaxies. Fully understanding the history of galaxy formation thus requires us to find when, where, and how SMBH grow and interact with their surroundings. With its large collection area, broad-band energy coverage from optical/NIR to soft/hard X-ray (˜ 0.1 to 600 keV), all-sky monitoring capability, and on-board follow-up, the proposed EXIST mission provides an unrivaled census of SMBH activity especially in the local (zEXIST's all-sky survey and monitoring capabilities and the factor 20 increase in hard X-ray sensitivity compared to current and prior X-ray missions. In particular, EXIST will enable major progress in understanding: i) when and where SMBH are active in the Universe (by revealing and measuring heavily obscured accretion including the one occurring in rare, local or luminous objects), ii) the physics of accretion around SMBH (by studying their broad-band X-ray spectra and variability), and iii) the link between accretion power and jet/outflow power (by using observations of blazars). Last but not least EXIST's ability to find powerful but very rare blazars enables it to probe the appearance of the very first SMBH in the Universe, allowing us to derive the black hole mass function of distant (z>4) radio loud AGN.

  18. Very massive stars, pair-instability supernovae and intermediate-mass black holes with the sevn code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Mario; Mapelli, Michela

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the link between massive (≳30 M⊙) stellar black holes (BHs) and their progenitor stars is a crucial step to interpret observations of gravitational-wave events. In this paper, we discuss the final fate of very massive stars (VMSs), with zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass >150 M⊙, accounting for pulsational pair-instability supernovae (PPISNe) and for pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). We describe an updated version of our population synthesis code sevn, in which we added stellar evolution tracks for VMSs with ZAMS mass up to 350 M⊙ and we included analytical prescriptions for PPISNe and PISNe. We use the new version of sevn to study the BH mass spectrum at different metallicity Z, ranging from Z = 2.0 × 10-4 to 2.0 × 10-2. The main effect of PPISNe and PISNe is to favour the formation of BHs in the mass range of the first gravitational-wave event (GW150914), while they prevent the formation of remnants with mass 60-120 M⊙. In particular, we find that PPISNe significantly enhance mass-loss of metal-poor (Z ≤ 2.0 × 10-3) stars with ZAMS mass 60 ≤ MZAMS/ M⊙ ≤ 125. In contrast, PISNe become effective only for moderately metal-poor (Z < 8.0 × 10-3) VMSs. VMSs with mZAMS ≳ 220 M⊙ and Z < 10-3 do not undergo PISNe and form intermediate-mass BHs (with mass ≳200 M⊙) via direct collapse.

  19. Universality in the relaxation dynamics of the composed black-hole-charged-massive-scalar-field system: The role of quantum Schwinger discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, Shahar

    2015-01-01

    The quasinormal resonance spectrum $\\{\\omega_n(\\mu,q,M,Q)\\}_{n=0}^{n=\\infty}$ of charged massive scalar fields in the charged Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black-hole spacetime is studied {\\it analytically} in the large-coupling regime $qQ\\gg M\\mu$ (here $\\{\\mu, q\\}$ are respectively the mass and charge coupling constant of the field, and $\\{M,Q\\}$ are respectively the mass and electric charge of the black hole). This physical system provides a striking illustration for the validity of the universal relaxation bound $\\tau \\times T \\geq \\hbar/\\pi$ in black-hole physics (here $\\tau\\equiv 1/\\Im\\omega_0$ is the characteristic relaxation time of the composed black-hole-scalar-field system, and $T$ is the Bekenstein-Hawking temperature of the black hole). In particular, it is shown that the relaxation dynamics of charged massive scalar fields in the charged Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black-hole spacetime may {\\it saturate} this quantum time-times-temperature inequality. Interestingly, we prove that potential violations of the bou...

  20. On the effect of Lyman α trapping during the initial collapse of massive black hole seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qi; Wise, John H.

    2017-12-01

    One viable seeding mechanism for supermassive black holes is the direct gaseous collapse route in pre-galactic dark matter haloes, producing objects on the order of 104-106 M⊙. These events occur when the gas is prevented from cooling below 104 K that requires a metal-free and relatively H2-free medium. The initial collapse cools through atomic hydrogen transitions, but the gas becomes optically thick to the cooling radiation at high densities. We explore the effects of Lyman α trapping in such a collapsing system with a suite of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations in uniform density and isotropic cases that are based from a cosmological simulation. Our method includes both non-coherent scattering and two-photon line cooling. We find that Lyman α radiation is marginally trapped in the parsec-scale gravitationally unstable central cloud, allowing the temperature to increase to 50 000 K at a number density of 3 × 104 cm-3 and increasing the Jeans mass by a factor of 5. The effective equation of state changes from isothermal at low densities to have an adiabatic index of 4/3 around the temperature maximum and then slowly retreats back to isothermal at higher densities. Our results suggest that Lyman α trapping delays the initial collapse by raising the Jeans mass. Afterward the high-density core cools back to 104 K that is surrounded by a warm envelope whose inward pressure may alter the fragmentation scales at high densities.

  1. Stellar dynamics around a massive black hole - I. Secular collisionless theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, S.; Touma, Jihad R.

    2016-06-01

    We present a theory in three parts, of the secular dynamics of a (Keplerian) stellar system of mass M orbiting a black hole of mass M• ≫ M. Here we describe the collisionless dynamics; Papers II and III are on the (collisional) theory of resonant relaxation. The mass ratio, ε = M/M• ≪ 1, is a natural small parameter implying a separation of time-scales between the short Kepler orbital periods and the longer orbital precessional periods. The collisionless Boltzmann equation (CBE) for the stellar distribution function (DF) is averaged over the fast Kepler orbital phase using the method of multiple scales. The orbit-averaged system is described by a secular DF, F, in a reduced phase space. F obeys a secular CBE that includes stellar self-gravity, general relativistic corrections up to 1.5 post-Newtonian order, and external sources varying over secular times. Secular dynamics, even with general time dependence, conserves the semimajor axis of every star. This additional integral of motion promotes extra regularity of the stellar orbits, and enables the construction of equilibria, F0, through a secular Jeans theorem. A linearized secular CBE determines the response and stability of F0. Spherical, non-rotating equilibria may support long-lived, warp-like distortions. We also prove that an axisymmetric, zero-thickness, flat disc is secularly stable to all in-plane perturbations, when its DF, F0, is a monotonic function of the angular momentum at fixed energy.

  2. Galaxy Formation with Self-Consistently Modeled Stars and Massive Black Holes. I: Feedback-Regulated Star Formation and Black Hole Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Wise, John H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; /Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-11-04

    There is mounting evidence for the coevolution of galaxies and their embedded massive black holes (MBHs) in a hierarchical structure formation paradigm. To tackle the nonlinear processes of galaxy-MBH interaction, we describe a self-consistent numerical framework which incorporates both galaxies and MBHs. The high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code Enzo is modified to model the formation and feedback of molecular clouds at their characteristic scale of 15.2 pc and the accretion of gas onto an MBH. Two major channels of MBH feedback, radiative feedback (X-ray photons followed through full three-dimensional adaptive ray tracing) and mechanical feedback (bipolar jets resolved in high-resolution AMR), are employed. We investigate the coevolution of a 9.2 x 10{sup 11} M {circle_dot} galactic halo and its 10{sup 5} {circle_dot} M embedded MBH at redshift 3 in a cosmological CDM simulation. The MBH feedback heats the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) up to 10{sup 6} K through photoionization and Compton heating and locally suppresses star formation in the galactic inner core. The feedback considerably changes the stellar distribution there. This new channel of feedback from a slowly growing MBH is particularly interesting because it is only locally dominant and does not require the heating of gas globally on the disk. The MBH also self-regulates its growth by keeping the surrounding ISM hot for an extended period of time.

  3. Narrowband HST images of M87: Evidence for a disk of ionized gas around a massive black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Holland C.; Harms, Richard J.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan I.; Hartig, George F.; Dressel, Linda L.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Margon, Bruce; Kochhar, Ajay K.

    1994-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (HST WFPC2) narrowband H-alpha + (N II) images of M87 which show a small disk of ionized gas with apparent spiral structure surrounding the nucleus of M87. The jet projects approximately 19.5 deg from the minor axis of the disk, which suggests that the jet is approximately normal to the disk. In a companion Letter, Harms et al. measure the radial velocities at r = +/- 0.25 sec along a line perpendicular to the jet, showing that one side of the disk is approaching at 500 +/- 50 km/s and the other side of the disk is receding at 500 +/- 50 km/s. Absorption associated with the disk and the sense of rotation imply that the apparent spiral arms trail the rotation. The observed radial velocites corrected for a 42 deg inclination of the disk imply rotation at +/- 750 km/s. Analysis of velocity measurements at four positions near the nucleus gives a total mass of approximately 2.4 +/- 0.7 x 10(exp 9) solar mass within 18 pc of the nucleus, and a mass-to-light ratio (M/L)(sub I) = 170. We conclude that there is a disk of ionized gas feeding a massive black hole in the center of M87.

  4. Path-integral derivation of black-hole radiance inside the de-Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley formulation of massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arraut, Ivan [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    If we apply the path-integral formulation in order to analyze the particle creation process of black holes inside the non-linear formulation of massive gravity, it is possible to demonstrate that the effect of the extra degrees of freedom is to deform the periodicity of the poles of the propagator in the complex t-plane. This might create the effect of extra particle creation process at scales where the extra degrees of freedom become relevant. For stationary solutions, depending on the values taken by the free parameters of the theory, the periodicity structure of the propagator reveal two effects. The first one is a shift on the positions of the pole of the propagator with respect to the GR case, affecting then the instant at which the particles are detected. The second one is the existence of branch points, affecting then the perception of particles. The branch point can be finite (including the zero order case) or infinite, depending on the free parameters of the theory. (orig.)

  5. Path-integral derivation of black-hole radiance inside the de-Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley formulation of massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraut, Ivan

    2017-08-01

    If we apply the path-integral formulation in order to analyze the particle creation process of black holes inside the non-linear formulation of massive gravity, it is possible to demonstrate that the effect of the extra degrees of freedom is to deform the periodicity of the poles of the propagator in the complex t-plane. This might create the effect of extra particle creation process at scales where the extra degrees of freedom become relevant. For stationary solutions, depending on the values taken by the free parameters of the theory, the periodicity structure of the propagator reveal two effects. The first one is a shift on the positions of the pole of the propagator with respect to the GR case, affecting then the instant at which the particles are detected. The second one is the existence of branch points, affecting then the perception of particles. The branch point can be finite (including the zero order case) or infinite, depending on the free parameters of the theory.

  6. Behavior of quasinormal modes and Van der Waals-like phase transition of charged AdS black holes in massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, De-Cheng; Liu, Yunqi; Yue, Ruihong

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we utilize the quasinormal modes (QNMs) of a massless scalar perturbation to probe the Van der Waals-like small and large black holes (SBH/LBH) phase transition of charged topological Anti-de Sitter (AdS) black holes in four-dimensional massive gravity. We find that the signature of this SBH/LBH phase transition is detected in the isobaric as well as in the isothermal process. This further supports the idea that the QNMs can be an efficient tool to investigate the thermodynamical phase transition.

  7. Behavior of quasinormal modes and Van der Waals-like phase transition of charged AdS black holes in massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, De-Cheng; Yue, Ruihong [Yangzhou University, Center for Gravitation and Cosmology, College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangzhou (China); Liu, Yunqi [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Physics, Wuhan (China)

    2017-06-15

    In this work, we utilize the quasinormal modes (QNMs) of a massless scalar perturbation to probe the Van der Waals-like small and large black holes (SBH/LBH) phase transition of charged topological Anti-de Sitter (AdS) black holes in four-dimensional massive gravity. We find that the signature of this SBH/LBH phase transition is detected in the isobaric as well as in the isothermal process. This further supports the idea that the QNMs can be an efficient tool to investigate the thermodynamical phase transition. (orig.)

  8. Milliarcsecond Imaging of the Radio Emission from the Quasar with the Most Massive Black Hole at Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Momjian, Emmanuel; Carilli, Chris L.; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Walter, Fabian; Strauss, Michael A.; Wang, Feige; Jiang, Linhua

    2017-02-01

    We report Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission of the z = 6.326 quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter J0100+2802). J0100+2802 is by far the most optically luminous and is a radio-quiet quasar with the most massive black hole known at z > 6. The VLBA observations have a synthesized beam size of 12.10 mas ×5.36 mas (FWHM), and detected the radio continuum emission from this object with a peak surface brightness of 64.6 ± 9.0 μJy beam-1 and a total flux density of 88 ± 19 μJy. The position of the radio peak is consistent with that from SDSS in the optical and Chandra in the X-ray. The radio source is marginally resolved by the VLBA observations. A 2D Gaussian fit to the image constrains the source size to (7.1 ± 3.5) mas × (3.1 ± 1.7) mas. This corresponds to a physical scale of (40 ± 20) pc × (18 ± 10) pc. We estimate the intrinsic brightness temperature of the VLBA source to be TB = (1.6 ± 1.2) × 107 K. This is significantly higher than the maximum value in normal star-forming galaxies, indicating an active galactic nucleus (AGN) origin for the radio continuum emission. However, it is also significantly lower than the brightness temperatures found in highest-redshift radio-loud quasars. J0100+2802 provides a unique example for studying the radio activity in optically luminous and radio-quiet AGNs in the early universe. Further observations at multiple radio frequencies will accurately measure the spectral index and address the dominant radiation mechanism of the radio emission.

  9. Milliarcsecond Imaging of the Radio Emission from the Quasar with the Most Massive Black Hole at Reionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ran; Wu, Xue-Bing; Jiang, Linhua [Kavli Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Momjian, Emmanuel; Carilli, Chris L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Königsstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Strauss, Michael A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wang, Feige [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2017-02-01

    We report Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission of the z = 6.326 quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter J0100+2802). J0100+2802 is by far the most optically luminous and is a radio-quiet quasar with the most massive black hole known at z > 6. The VLBA observations have a synthesized beam size of 12.10 mas ×5.36 mas (FWHM), and detected the radio continuum emission from this object with a peak surface brightness of 64.6 ± 9.0 μ Jy beam{sup −1} and a total flux density of 88 ± 19 μ Jy. The position of the radio peak is consistent with that from SDSS in the optical and Chandra in the X-ray. The radio source is marginally resolved by the VLBA observations. A 2D Gaussian fit to the image constrains the source size to (7.1 ± 3.5) mas × (3.1 ± 1.7) mas. This corresponds to a physical scale of (40 ± 20) pc × (18 ± 10) pc. We estimate the intrinsic brightness temperature of the VLBA source to be T {sub B} = (1.6 ± 1.2) × 10{sup 7} K. This is significantly higher than the maximum value in normal star-forming galaxies, indicating an active galactic nucleus (AGN) origin for the radio continuum emission. However, it is also significantly lower than the brightness temperatures found in highest-redshift radio-loud quasars. J0100+2802 provides a unique example for studying the radio activity in optically luminous and radio-quiet AGNs in the early universe. Further observations at multiple radio frequencies will accurately measure the spectral index and address the dominant radiation mechanism of the radio emission.

  10. Probing the Spinning of the Massive Black Hole in the Galactic Center via Pulsar Timing: A Full Relativistic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fupeng; Saha, Prasenjit

    2017-11-01

    Pulsars around the massive black hole (MBH) in the Galactic center (GC) are expected to be revealed by upcoming facilities (e.g., the Square Kilometer Array). Under a full relativistic framework with the pulsar approximated as a test particle, we investigate the constraints on the spinning of the MBH by monitoring the timing of surrounding pulsars. For GC pulsars orbiting closely around the MBH (e.g., ≲1000 au), we find that full relativistic treatment in modeling accurately their timing signals can be necessary, as the relativistic signals are orders of magnitude larger than the time-of-arrival measurement accuracies. Although usually there are near degeneracies among MBH spin parameters, the constraints on the spinning of the MBH are still very tight. By continuously monitoring a normal pulsar in orbits with a period of ∼2.6 yr and an eccentricity of 0.3–0.9 under a timing precision of 1–5 ms, within ∼8 yr the spin magnitude and the orientations of the GC MBH can be constrained with 2σ error of {10}-3{--}{10}-2 and {10}-1{--}{10}0, respectively. Even for pulsars in orbits similar to the detected star S2/S0-2 or S0-102, we find that the spinning of the MBH can still be constrained within 4–8 yr, with the most significant constraints provided near the pericenter passage. If the proper motion of the pulsars with astrometric accuracy of 10 μas can also be collected along with the timing measurement, then the position, velocity, mass, and distance to the solar system of the MBH can be constrained to ∼10 μas, ∼1 μas yr‑1, ∼ 10 {M}ȯ , and ∼1 pc, respectively.

  11. RELICS OF GALAXY MERGING: OBSERVATIONAL PREDICTIONS FOR A WANDERING MASSIVE BLACK HOLE AND ACCOMPANYING STAR CLUSTER IN THE HALO OF M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Toshihiro [Astronomy Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Saito, Yuriko [Department of Astronomical Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Miki, Yohei; Mori, Masao, E-mail: ts.kawaguti@nao.ac.jp [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Galaxies and massive black holes (BHs) presumably grow via galactic merging events and subsequent BH coalescence. As a case study, we investigate the merging event between the Andromeda galaxy (M31) and a satellite galaxy. We compute the expected observational appearance of the massive BH that was at the center of the satellite galaxy prior to the merger and is currently wandering in the M31 halo. We demonstrate that a radiatively inefficient accretion flow with a bolometric luminosity of a few tens of solar luminosities develops when Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion onto the BH is assumed. We compute the associated broadband spectrum and show that the radio band (observable with EVLA, ALMA, and the Square Kilometre Array) is the best frequency range in which to detect the emission. We also evaluate the mass and the luminosity of the stars bound by the wandering BH and find that such a star cluster is sufficiently luminous that it could correspond to one of the star clusters found by the PAndAS survey. The discovery of a relic massive BH wandering in a galactic halo will provide a direct means of investigating in detail the coevolution of galaxies and BHs. It also means a new population of BHs (off-center massive BHs) and offers targets for clean BH imaging that avoid strong interstellar scattering in the centers of galaxies.

  12. Nuclear recoil measurements with the ARIS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Alden; ARIS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    As direct dark matter searches become increasingly sensitive, it is important to fully characterize the target of the search. The goal of the Argon Recoil Ionization and Scintillation (ARIS) experiment is to quantify information related to the scintillation and ionization energy scale, quenching factor, ion recombination probability, and scintillation time response of nuclear recoils, as expected from WIMPs, in liquid argon. A time projection chamber with an active mass of 0.5 kg of liquid argon and capable of full 3D position reconstruction was exposed to an inverse kinematic neutron beam at the Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay in France. A scan of nuclear recoil energies was performed through coincidence with a set of neutron detectors to quantify properties of nuclear recoils in liquid argon at various electric fields. The difference in ionization and scintillation response with differing recoil track angle to the electric field was also studied. The preliminary results of the experiment will be presented.

  13. A Study of Nuclear Recoil Backgrounds in Dark Matter Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerdale, Shawn S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great success of the Standard Model of particle physics, a preponderance of astrophysical evidence suggests that it cannot explain most of the matter in the universe. This so-called dark matter has eluded direct detection, though many theoretical extensions to the Standard Model predict the existence of particles with a mass on the $1-1000$ GeV scale that interact only via the weak nuclear force. Particles in this class are referred to as Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), and their high masses and low scattering cross sections make them viable dark matter candidates. The rarity of WIMP-nucleus interactions makes them challenging to detect: any background can mask the signal they produce. Background rejection is therefore a major problem in dark matter detection. Many experiments greatly reduce their backgrounds by employing techniques to reject electron recoils. However, nuclear recoil backgrounds, which produce signals similar to what we expect from WIMPs, remain problematic. There are two primary sources of such backgrounds: surface backgrounds and neutron recoils. Surface backgrounds result from radioactivity on the inner surfaces of the detector sending recoiling nuclei into the detector. These backgrounds can be removed with fiducial cuts, at some cost to the experiment's exposure. In this dissertation we briefly discuss a novel technique for rejecting these events based on signals they make in the wavelength shifter coating on the inner surfaces of some detectors. Neutron recoils result from neutrons scattering from nuclei in the detector. These backgrounds may produce a signal identical to what we expect from WIMPs and are extensively discussed here. We additionally present a new tool for calculating ($\\alpha$, n)yields in various materials. We introduce the concept of a neutron veto system designed to shield against, measure, and provide an anti-coincidence veto signal for background neutrons. We discuss the research and

  14. Stellar-mass black holes in young massive and open stellar clusters and their role in gravitational-wave generation - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2018-01-01

    The study of stellar-remnant black holes (BH) in dense stellar clusters is now in the spotlight, especially due to their intrinsic ability to form binary black holes (BBH) through dynamical encounters, which potentially coalesce via gravitational-wave (GW) radiation. In this work, which is a continuation from a recent study (Paper I), additional models of compact stellar clusters with initial masses ≲ 105 M⊙ and also those with small fractions of primordial binaries (≲ 10 per cent) are evolved for long term, applying the direct N-body approach, assuming state-of-the-art stellar-wind and remnant-formation prescriptions. That way, a substantially broader range of computed models than that in Paper I is achieved. As in Paper I, the general-relativistic BBH mergers continue to be mostly mediated by triples that are bound to the clusters rather than happen among the ejected BBHs. In fact, the number of such in situ BBH mergers, per cluster, tends to increase significantly with the introduction of a small population of primordial binaries. Despite the presence of massive primordial binaries, the merging BBHs, especially the in situ ones, are found to be exclusively dynamically assembled and hence would be spin-orbit misaligned. The BBHs typically traverse through both the LISA's and the LIGO's detection bands, being audible to both instruments. The 'dynamical heating' of the BHs keeps the electron-capture-supernova (ECS) neutron stars (NS) from effectively mass segregating and participating in exchange interactions; the dynamically active BHs would also exchange into any NS binary within ≲1 Gyr. Such young massive and open clusters have the potential to contribute to the dynamical BBH merger detection rate to a similar extent as their more massive globular-cluster counterparts.

  15. SDSS J1056+5516: A Triple AGN or an SMBH Recoil Candidate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfountzou, E.; Santos Lleo, M.; Trichas, M.

    2017-12-01

    We report the discovery of a kiloparsec-scale triple supermassive black hole system at z = 0.256: SDSS J1056+5516, discovered by our systematic search for binary quasars. The system contains three strong emission-line nuclei, which are offset by black hole (SMBH) interacting system, a triple AGN, or a recoiling SMBH. Each of these scenarios is unique for our understanding of the hierarchical growth of galaxies, AGN triggering, and gravitational waves.

  16. Enhancing the rate of tidal disruptions of stars by a self-gravitating disc around a massive central black hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šubr L.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We further study the idea that a self-gravitating accretion disc around a supermassive black hole can increase the rate of gradual orbital decay of stellar trajectories (and hence tidal disruption events by setting some stars on eccentric trajectories. Cooperation between the gravitational field of the disc and the dissipative environment can provide a mechanism explaining the origin of stars that become bound tightly to the central black hole. We examine this process as a function of the black hole mass and conclude that it is most efficient for intermediate central masses of the order of ∼ 104Mʘ. Members of the cluster experience the stage of orbital decay via collisions with an accretion disc and by other dissipative processes, such as tidal effects, dynamical friction and the emission of gravitational waves. Our attention is concentrated on the region of gravitational dominance of the central body. Mutual interaction between stars and the surrounding environment establishes a non-spherical shape and anisotropy of the nuclear cluster. In some cases, the stellar sub-system acquires ring-type geometry. Stars of the nuclear cluster undergo a tidal disruption event as they plunge below the tidal radius of the supermassive black hole.

  17. Ultra-luminous X-ray sources and neutron-star-black-hole mergers from very massive close binaries at low metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Pablo; Langer, Norbert; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Tauris, Thomas M.; de Mink, Selma; Mandel, Ilya; Moriya, Takashi J.

    2017-08-01

    The detection of gravitational waves from the binary black hole (BH) merger GW150914 may enlighten our understanding of ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs), as BHs of masses >30 M⊙ can reach luminosities >4 × 1039 erg s-1 without exceeding their Eddington luminosities. It is then important to study variations of evolutionary channels for merging BHs, which might instead form accreting BHs and become ULXs. It was recently shown that very massive binaries with mass ratios close to unity and tight orbits can undergo efficient rotational mixing and evolve chemically homogeneously, resulting in a compact BH binary. We study similar systems by computing 120 000 detailed binary models with the MESA code covering a wide range of masses, orbital periods, mass ratios, and metallicities. For initial mass ratios q ≡ M2/M1 ≃ 0.1-0.4, primaries with masses above 40 M⊙ can evolve chemically homogeneously, remaining compact and forming a BH without experiencing Roche-lobe overflow. The secondary then expands and transfers mass to the BH, initiating a ULX phase. At a given metallicity this channel is expected to produce the most massive accreting stellar BHs and the brightest ULXs. We predict that 1 out of 104 massive stars evolves this way, and that in the local universe 0.13 ULXs per M⊙ yr-1 of star formation rate are observable, with a strong preference for low metallicities. An additional channel is still required to explain the less luminous ULXs and the full population of high-mass X-ray binaries. At metallicities log Z> -3, BH masses in ULXs are limited to 60 M⊙, due to the occurrence of pair-instability supernovae which leave no remnant, resulting in an X-ray luminosity cut-off for accreting BHs. At lower metallicities, very massive stars can avoid exploding as pair-instability supernovae and instead form BHs with masses above 130 M⊙, producing a gap in the ULX luminosity distribution. After the ULX phase, neutron star BH binaries that merge in less than a

  18. GALAXY EVOLUTION. An over-massive black hole in a typical star-forming galaxy, 2 billion years after the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Urry, C Megan; Civano, Francesca; Rosario, David J; Elvis, Martin; Schawinski, Kevin; Suh, Hyewon; Bongiorno, Angela; Simmons, Brooke D

    2015-07-10

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies are generally thought to coevolve, so that the SMBH achieves up to about 0.2 to 0.5% of the host galaxy mass in the present day. The radiation emitted from the growing SMBH is expected to affect star formation throughout the host galaxy. The relevance of this scenario at early cosmic epochs is not yet established. We present spectroscopic observations of a galaxy at redshift z = 3.328, which hosts an actively accreting, extremely massive BH, in its final stages of growth. The SMBH mass is roughly one-tenth the mass of the entire host galaxy, suggesting that it has grown much more efficiently than the host, contrary to models of synchronized coevolution. The host galaxy is forming stars at an intense rate, despite the presence of a SMBH-driven gas outflow. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Jet Physics of Accreting Super-Massive Black Holes in the Era of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo D'Ammando

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope with its main instrument on-board, the Large Area Telescope (LAT, opened a new era in the study of high-energy emission from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN. When combined with contemporaneous ground- and space-based observations, Fermi-LAT achieves its full capability to characterize the jet structure and the emission mechanisms at work in radio-loud AGN with different black hole mass and accretion rate, from flat spectrum radio quasars to narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1 galaxies. Here, I discuss important findings regarding the blazar population included in the third LAT catalog of AGN and the γ-ray emitting NLSy1. Moreover, the detection of blazars at redshift beyond three in γ rays allows us to constrain the growth and evolution of heavy black holes over cosmic time, suggesting that the radio-loud phase may be important for a fast black hole growth in the early Universe. Finally, results on extragalactic objects from the third catalog of hard LAT sources are presented.

  20. Low-energy electronic recoil in xenon detectors by solar neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Chi, Hsin-Chang; Liu, C.-P.; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2017-11-01

    Low-energy electronic recoil caused by solar neutrinos in multi-ton xenon detectors is an important subject not only because it is a source of the irreducible background for direct searches of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), but also because it provides a viable way to measure the solar pp and 7Be neutrinos at the precision level of current standard solar model predictions. In this work we perform ab initio many-body calculations for the structure, photoionization, and neutrino-ionization of xenon. It is found that the atomic binding effect yields a sizable suppression to the neutrino-electron scattering cross section at low recoil energies. Compared with the previous calculation based on the free electron picture, our calculated event rate of electronic recoil in the same detector configuration is reduced by about 23%. We present in this paper the electronic recoil rate spectrum in the energy window of 100 eV to 30 keV with the standard per ton per year normalization for xenon detectors, and discuss its implication for low energy solar neutrino detection as the signal and WIMP search as a source of background.

  1. Low-energy electronic recoil in xenon detectors by solar neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Liu, C -P; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy electronic recoil caused by solar neutrinos in multi-ton xenon detectors is an important subject not only because it is a source of the irreducible background for direct searches of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), but also because it provides a viable way to measure the solar $pp$ and $^{7}\\textrm{Be}$ neutrinos at the precision level of current standard solar model predictions. In this work we perform $\\textit{ab initio}$ many-body calculations for the structure, photoionization, and neutrino-ionization of xenon. It is found that the atomic binding effect yields a sizable suppression to the neutrino-electron scattering cross section at low recoil energies. Compared with the previous calculation based on the free electron picture, our calculated event rate of electronic recoil in the same detector configuration is reduced by about $25\\%$. We present in this paper the electronic recoil rate spectrum in the energy window of 100 eV - 30 keV with the standard per ton per year normalizatio...

  2. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallows, Scott Mathew [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for \\background- free" operation of CDMS II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space.

  3. Thermodynamic magnon recoil for domain wall motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, P.; Cao, Y.; Sinova, J.

    2015-01-01

    We predict a thermodynamic magnon recoil effect for domain wall motions in the presence of temperature gradients. All current thermodynamic theories assert that a magnetic domain wall must move toward the hotter side, based on equilibrium thermodynamic arguments. Microscopic calculations, on the

  4. The Pairing of Accreting Massive Black Holes in Multiphase Circumnuclear Disks: the Interplay Between Radiative Cooling, Star Formation, and Feedback Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Lima, Rafael; Mayer, Lucio; Capelo, Pedro R.; Bellovary, Jillian M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the orbital decay of a pair of massive black holes (BHs) with masses 5× {10}5 and 107 {M}⊙ , using hydrodynamical simulations of circumnuclear disks (CNDs) with the alternating presence of sub-grid physics, such as radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, BH accretion, and BH feedback. In the absence of such processes, the orbit of the secondary BH decays over timescales of ˜ 10 {Myr} to the center of the CND, where the primary BH resides. When strong dissipation operates in CNDs, fragmentation into massive objects the size of giant molecular clouds with densities in the range 104-107 amu cm-3 occurs, causing stochastic torques and hits that can eject the secondary BH from the midplane. Outside the plane, the low-density medium provides only weak drag, and the BH return is governed by inefficient dynamical friction. In rare cases, clump-BH interactions can lead to a faster decay. Feedback processes lead to outflows, but do not significantly change the overall density of the CND midplane. However, with a spherically distributed BH feedback, a hot bubble is generated behind the secondary, which almost shuts off dynamical friction. We dub this phenomenon “wake evacuation.” It leads to delays in the decay, possibly of ˜ 0.3 {Gyr}. We discuss the non-trivial implications on the discovery space of the eLISA telescope. Our results suggest that the largest uncertainty in predicting BH merger rates lies in the potentially wide variety of galaxy host systems, with different degrees of gas dissipation and heating, yielding decay timescales from ˜ 10 to ˜ 300 {Myr}.

  5. HST FOS spectroscopy of M87: Evidence for a disk of ionized gas around a massive black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Richard J.; Ford, Holland C.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan I.; Hartig, George F.; Dressel, Linda L.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Bohlin, Ralph; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Margon, Bruce; Kochhar, Ajay K.

    1994-01-01

    Using the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to observe the central region of M87, we have obtained spectra covering approximately 4600-6800 A at a spectral dispersion approximately 4.4 A per resolution element through the .26 sec diameter entrance aperture. One spectrum was obtained centered on the nucleus of M87 and two centered 0.25 sec off the nucleus at position angles of 21 deg and 201 deg, thus sampling the anticipated major axis of the disklike structure (described in a companion Letter) expected to lie approximately perpendicular to the axis of the M87 jet. Pointing errors for these observations are estimated to be less than 0.02 sec. Radial velocities of the ionized gas in the two positions 0.25 sec on either side of the nucleus are measured to be approx. equals +/- 500 km/s relative to the M87 systemic velocity. These observations plus emission-line spectra obtained at two additional locations near the nucleus show the ionized gas to be in Keplerian rotation about a mass M = (2.4 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp 9) solar mass within the inner 0.25 sec of M87. Our results provide strong evidence for the presence of a supermassive nuclear black hole in M87.

  6. A YOUNG MASSIVE STELLAR POPULATION AROUND THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE ESO 243-49 HLX-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, S. A. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Servillat, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-67, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pforr, J.; Maraston, C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Maccarone, T. J.; Knigge, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Godet, O.; Webb, N. A.; Barret, D.; Belmont, R. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Toulouse (France); Gosling, A. J. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Wiersema, K., E-mail: sean.farrell@sydney.edu.au [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, LE1 7RH Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    We present Hubble Space Telescope and simultaneous Swift X-ray Telescope observations of the strongest candidate intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) ESO 243-49 HLX-1. Fitting the spectral energy distribution from X-ray to near-infrared wavelengths showed that the broadband spectrum is not consistent with simple and irradiated disk models, but is well described by a model comprised of an irradiated accretion disk plus a {approx}10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} stellar population. The age of the population cannot be uniquely constrained, with both young and old stellar populations allowed. However, the old solution requires excessive disk reprocessing and an extremely small disk, so we favor the young solution ({approx}13 Myr). In addition, the presence of dust lanes and the lack of any nuclear activity from X-ray observations of the host galaxy suggest that a gas-rich minor merger may have taken place less than {approx}200 Myr ago. Such a merger event would explain the presence of the IMBH and the young stellar population.

  7. How Massive are the Heaviest Black Holes in X-ray Binaries? Exploring IC 10 X-1 and its Kind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Silas; Maccarone, Tom; Steiner, James F.; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Yang, Jun; Binder, Breanna A.; Cappallo, Rigel

    2016-01-01

    Black hole X-ray binaries represent a unique probe of stellar evolution and the most extreme physical conditions found in nature. The X-ray binary IC 10 X-1 occupies an important niche as a link between BH-XRBs and Ultra Luminous X-ray Sources (ULX) due to its intermediate luminosity (10^38 erg/s), and role as a central exemplar of the association of between low metallicity galaxies and maximum BH mass.The most secure and direct dynamical evidence for any BH mass comes from the radial velocity (RV) curve coupled with eclipse timing measurements. We phase-connected X-ray timing data accumulated over a decade with Chandra/XMM, with the optical RV curve, revealing a surprizing simultenaity of mid X-ray eclipse and the maximum blueshift velocity of He II emission lines. Our interpretation is that the optical emission lines originate in a shadowed sector of the WR star's stellar wind which escapes X-ray ionization by the compact object. The RV shifts are therefore a projection effect of the stellar wind, and unrelated to the system's mass function which becomes completely unknown. Chandra, XMM and NuStar datasets present a complex picture of radiative transfer through a photo-ionized wind. A search for the orbital period derivative (P-dot) by X-ray timing offers additonal insights, and we present a simulation for the feasibility of constraining P-dot via optical means.This is a substantial change to our understanding of IC 10 X-1, and with similar results reported for its "near twin" NGC 300 X-1, adds new a dimension to the facinating question of the maximum mass for stellar BHs.

  8. Search for the signatures of a new-born black hole from the collapse of a supra-massive millisecond magnetar in short GRB light curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Lei, W. H.; Zhang, B. B.; Chen, W.; Xiong, S. L.; Song, L. M.

    2018-03-01

    `Internal plateau' followed by a sharp decay is commonly seen in short gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves. The plateau component is usually interpreted as the dipole emission from a supra-massive magnetar, and the sharp decay may imply the collapse of the magnetar to a black hole (BH). Fall-back accretion on to the new-born BH could produce long-lasting activities via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. The magnetic flux accumulated near the BH would be confined by the accretion discs for a period of time. As the accretion rate decreases, the magnetic flux is strong enough to obstruct gas infall, leading to a magnetically arrested disc. Within this scenario, we show that the BZ process could produce two types of typical X-ray light curves: type I exhibits a long-lasting plateau, followed by a power-law (PL) decay with slopes ranging from 5/3 to 40/9; type II shows roughly a single PL decay with a slope of 5/3. The former requires low magnetic field strength, while the latter corresponds to relatively high values. We search for such signatures of the new-born BH from a sample of short GRBs with an internal plateau, and find two candidates: GRB 101219A and GRB 160821B, corresponding to type II and type I light curves, respectively. It is shown that our model can explain the data very well.

  9. The gravitational wave background from massive black hole binaries in Illustris: spectral features and time to detection with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Blecha, Laura; Hernquist, Lars; Sesana, Alberto; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2017-11-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) around the world are using the incredible consistency of millisecond pulsars to measure low-frequency gravitational waves from (super)massive black hole (MBH) binaries. We use comprehensive MBH merger models based on cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to predict the spectrum of the stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB). We use real time-of-arrival specifications from the European, NANOGrav, Parkes, and International PTA (IPTA) to calculate realistic times to detection of the GWB across a wide range of model parameters. In addition to exploring the parameter space of environmental hardening processes (in particular: stellar scattering efficiencies), we have expanded our models to include eccentric binary evolution which can have a strong effect on the GWB spectrum. Our models show that strong stellar scattering and high characteristic eccentricities enhance the GWB strain amplitude near the PTA-sensitive `sweet-spot' (near the frequency f = 1 yr-1), slightly improving detection prospects in these cases. While the GWB amplitude is degenerate between cosmological and environmental parameters, the location of a spectral turnover at low frequencies (f ≲ 0.1 yr-1) is strongly indicative of environmental coupling. At high frequencies (f ≳ 1 yr-1), the GWB spectral index can be used to infer the number density of sources and possibly their eccentricity distribution. Even with merger models that use pessimistic environmental and eccentricity parameters, if the current rate of PTA expansion continues, we find that the IPTA is highly likely to make a detection within about 10 yr.

  10. Recoil corrections in antikaon-deuteron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the non-relativistic effective field theory approach for K−d scattering, it is demonstrated that a systematic perturbative expansion of the recoil corrections in the parameter ξ = MK/mN is possible in spite of the fact that K−d scattering at low energies is inherently non-perturbative due to the large values of the K̄N scattering lengths. The first order correction to the K−d scattering length due to single insertion of the retardation term in the multiple-scattering series is calculated. The recoil effect turns out to be reasonably small even at the physical value of MK/mN ≃ 0:5.

  11. Elastic recoil detection analysis of ferroelectric films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, W.B.; Johnston, P.N.; Walker, S.R.; Bubb, I.F. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Scott, J.F. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    There has been considerable progress in developing SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub O.7}Sr{sub O.3}TiO{sub 3} (BST) ferroelectric films for use as nonvolatile memory chips and for capacitors in dynamic random access memories (DRAMs). Ferroelectric materials have a very large dielectric constant ( {approx} 1000), approximately one hundred times greater than that of silicon dioxide. Devices made from these materials have been known to experience breakdown after a repeated voltage pulsing. It has been suggested that this is related to stoichiometric changes within the material. To accurately characterise these materials Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) is being developed. This technique employs a high energy heavy ion beam to eject nuclei from the target and uses a time of flight and energy dispersive (ToF-E) detector telescope to detect these nuclei. The recoil nuclei carry both energy and mass information which enables the determination of separate energy spectra for individual elements or for small groups of elements In this work ERDA employing 77 MeV {sup 127}I ions has been used to analyse Strontium Bismuth Tantalate thin films at the heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Massive Gravity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP...

  13. Performance of the LNL recoil mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signorini, C. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Beghini, S. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Dal Bello, A. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Montagnoli, G. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Scarlassara, F. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Segato, G.F. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Soramel, F. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ., Padova (Italy) INFN, Padova (Italy)); Ackermann, D. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Corradi, L. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Facco, A. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Moreno, H. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Mueller, L. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Napoli, D.R. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Prete, G.F. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro

    1994-02-01

    The LNL recoil mass spectrometer, in operation for some years on line with the LNL XTU Tandem accelerator has been used primarily for the study of reaction products emitted at 0 to the beam direction. In agreement with the design goal this instrument has a good mass resolution, in the range of 1/300, even with large energy ([+-] 20%) and solid angle (> 7.5 msr) acceptances; the mass dynamic range is around [+-]6% of the central mass. The beam rejection factor at 0 ranges from 10[sup +6] to 10[sup +11] according to various experimental parameters. Advantages and limitations of the spectrometer are discussed. (orig.)

  14. The distribution at low hadronic recoil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diganta Das

    2017-10-05

    Oct 5, 2017 ... resonant mode ¯B → ¯K. ∗ll and as sensitive probe for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). We show .... The phase space allows the angles to be within the ranges. −1 < cosθK ≤ 1, −1 < cosθl ≤ 1, 0 < φ ≤ 2π. In the low recoil region of interest the angular coeffi- cients Ii(q2, p2,cosθK ) are given ...

  15. Detailed Characterization of Nuclear Recoil Pulse Shape Discrimination in the Darkside-50 Direct Dark Matter Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludert, Erin Edkins

    While evidence of non-baryonic dark matter has been accumulating for decades, its exact nature continues to remain a mystery. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are a well motivated candidate which appear in certain extensions of the Standard Model, independently of dark matter theory. If such particles exist, they should occasionally interact with particles of normal matter, producing a signal which may be detected. The DarkSide-50 direct dark matter experiment aims to detect the energy of recoiling argon atoms due to the elastic scattering of postulated WIMPs. In order to make such a discovery, a clear understanding of both the background and signal region is essential. This understanding requires a careful study of the detector's response to radioactive sources, which in turn requires such sources may be safely introduced into or near the detector volume and reliably removed. The CALibration Insertaion System (CALIS) was designed and built for this purpose in a joint effort between Fermi National Laboratory and the University of Hawaii. This work describes the design and testing of CALIS, its installation and commissioning at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and the multiple calibration campaigns which have successfully employed it. As nuclear recoils produced by WIMPs are indistinguishable from those produced by neutrons, radiogenic neutrons are both the most dangerous class of background and a vital calibration source for the study of the potential WIMP signal. Prior to the calibration of DarkSide-50 with radioactive neutron sources, the acceptance region was determined by the extrapolation of nuclear recoil data from a separate, dedicated experiment, ScENE, which measured the distribution of the pulse shape discrimination parameter, f 90, for nuclear recoils of known energies. This work demonstrates the validity of the extrapolation of ScENE values to DarkSide-50, by direct comparison of the f90 distribution of nuclear recoils from Sc

  16. Massive gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia de Rham

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware–Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  17. Nuclear targets, recoil ion catchers and reaction chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dionisio, JS; Vieu, C; Schuck, C; Collatz, R; Meunier, R; Ledu, D; Folger, H; Lafoux, A; Lagrange, JM; Pautrat, M; Waast, B; Phillips, WR; Blunt, D; Durell, JL; Varley, BJ; Dagnall, PG; Dorning, SJ; JONES, MA; Smith, AG; Bacelar, JCS; Rzaca-Urban, T; Amzal, N; Meliani, Z; Vanhorenbeeck, J; Passoja, A; Urban, W

    1998-01-01

    The main features of nuclear targets, recoil ion catchers and reaction chambers used in nuclear spectroscopic investigations involving in-beam multi-e-gamma spectrometers are discussed. The relative importance of the F-ray background due to the accelerated ion-target and the recoil-ion-target

  18. Comparison of the Recoil of Conventional and Electromagnetic Cannon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Schmidt

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The recoil from an electromagnetic (EM railgun is discussed and compared with that from conventional, propellant gas driven cannon. It is shown that, under similar launch conditions, the recoil of the EM gun is less than that of the powder gun; however, use of a muzzle brake on a powder gun can alter this relative behavior.

  19. Massive Branes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E. A.; Lozano, Y.; Ortín, Tomas

    1997-01-01

    Published in: Nucl. Phys. B 518 (1998) 363-423 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: We investigate the effective worldvolume theories of branes in a background given by (the bosonic sector of) 10-dimensional massive IIA supergravity (``massive branes'') and their M-theoretic

  20. Massive branes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E; Lozano, Y; Ortin, T

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the effective world-volume theories of branes in a background given by (the bosonic sector of) 10-dimensional massive IIA supergravity ("massive branes") and their M-theoretic origin. In the case of the solitonic 5-brane of type IIA superstring theory the construction of the

  1. Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  2. On Testing the Kerr Metric of the Massive Black Hole in the Galactic Center via Stellar Orbital Motion: Full General Relativistic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fupeng; Lu, Youjun; Yu, Qingjuan

    2015-08-01

    S-stars, discovered in the vicinity of the massive black hole (MBH) in the Galactic center (GC), are anticipated to provide unique dynamical constraints on the MBH spin and metric, in addition to the mass. In this paper, we develop a fast full general relativistic method to simultaneously constrain the MBH mass, spin, and spin direction by considering both the orbital motion of a star close to the GC MBH and the propagation of photons from the star to a distant observer. Based on the current observations and dynamical model predictions, we assume six example stars with different semimajor axes ({a}{orb}) and eccentricities ({e}{orb}) and numerically calculate their projected trajectories in the sky plane and redshift curves. Two of those stars are set to have orbital configurations similar to that of S0-2/S2 and S0-102. We find that the spin-induced effects on the projected trajectory and redshift curve of a given star, including the leading term by the Lense-Thirring precession and the frame dragging, and the high-order precession due to the quadruple moment, depend on both the absolute value and the direction of the spin. The maximum values of the spin-induced position displacement and the redshift differences of the star over a full orbit may differ by a factor of several to more than one order of magnitude for two cases with significantly different spin directions. The dependence patterns of the position displacements and redshift differences on the spin direction are different, and thus the position and the redshift data are complementary for constraining the MBH spin and its direction. Adopting the Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting technique, we illustrate that the spin of the GC MBH is likely to be well constrained by using the motion of S0-2/S2 over a period of ˜45 years if the spin is close to one and if the astrometric and spectroscopic precisions can be as high as ({σ }{{p}},{σ }Z)˜ (10 μ {as},1 {km} {{{s}}}-1), which is expected to be realized by

  3. A novel method for modeling the recoil in W boson events at hadron colliders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abazov, V.M.; et al., [Unknown; Ancu, L.S.; de Jong, S.J.; Filthaut, F.; Galea, C.F.; Hegeman, J.G.; Houben, P.; Meijer, M.M.; Svoisky, P.; van den Berg, P.J.; van Leeuwen, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method for modeling the hadronic recoil in W -> lv events produced at hadron colliders. The recoil is chosen from a library of recoils in Z -> ll data events and overlaid on a simulated W -> lv event. Implementation of this method requires that the data recoil library describe the

  4. Design of the SUPERB Recoil Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Zachary; Carpenter, Lisa; Amthor, Matt

    2013-10-01

    The reaccelerator ReA12 upgrade planned at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab (NSCL) at Michigan State University will produce higher energy rare isotope beams close to the neutron and proton drip lines. We present one option for the recoil separator which aims to take full advantage of the new capabilities of ReA12 in studying rare isotopes. The Separator for Unique Products of Experiments with Radioactive Beams (SUPERB), patterned after the second half of the Super Separator-Spectrometer (S3) currently under construction at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL). This design includes both electric and magnetic dipoles and this will allow physical separation by mass-to-charge ratio (m/q) with a maximum solid angle of 26 msr and a maximum magnetic rigidity of 1.44 Tm. This design also allows for flexibility of optical modes. Both large acceptance and unit magnification modes will be presented. Also, a fully magnetic configuration is considered that would eliminate the expected electric rigidity limit of 10 MV and increase the maximum magnetic rigidity to 1.92 Tm. We will present optical designs and simulations of SUBERB developed in the code COSY Infinity including a first order system and a higher order Monte Carlo calculation simulating 100Sn production. This research was funded by the NSF REU program, grant PHY-1165694 with additional support from the DoD ASSURE program.

  5. Sinus Histiocytosis with Massive Lymphadenopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-03-09

    Mar 9, 1974 ... REPORT OF TWO ADDITIONAL CASES WITH ULTRASTRUCTURAL. OBSERVATIONS c. C. SUNCLAIR~NUTH. L. B. KAHN. C. J. UYS. SUMMARY. Two cases of a recently described entity, 'sinus histio- cytosis with massive lymphadenopathy,' occurring in Black males, are reported. Prominent cervical ...

  6. Search for the admixture of heavy neutrinos in the recoil spectra of {sup 37}Ar decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindi, M.M.; Kozub, R.L.; Miocinovic, P. [Department of Physics, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee 38505 (United States); Avci, R.; Zhu, L. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States); Hussein, A.H. [Physics Program, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, V2N 4Z9 (CANADA)

    1998-10-01

    Neutrino-induced recoil spectra of {sup 37}Cl ions produced in the electron capture (EC) decay of {sup 37}Ar were measured and searched for the presence of massive neutrinos admixed to the dominant electron neutrino. Fractions of a monolayer of {sup 37}Ar were physisorbed on Au and on several underlayers of {sup 40}Ar adsorbed on both Au and graphite substrates cooled to {le}20 K under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Time-of-flight spectra of the recoiling ions were recorded in coincidence with x rays and Auger electrons emitted following the EC decay. By searching these spectra for peaks with energies between 7.6 eV and 3.6 eV upper limits were placed on the mixing probability of the electron neutrino with heavy neutrinos in the 370{endash}640 keV mass range. These limits vary from 1 to 4{percent}, at the 90{percent} confidence level. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Nuclear-Recoil Discrimination in Cryogenic Silicon Detectors for Use in Dark Matter Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Michael James

    There is abundant evidence which suggests that the majority (>90%) of the mass in the universe is in a dark, unknown form. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are a particularly well motivated class of candidate dark matter particles. It may be possible to detect WIMPs via elastic scattering from the nuclei in laboratory detectors. In addition to sophisticated shielding schemes, the detector will need an active background rejection capability. One attractive background rejection technique is the discrimination of nuclear recoils (signal) from electron-recoils (backgrounds) based on the simultaneous measurement of both phonons and ionization. A nuclear -recoil event partitions more of its energy into phonons, and less into ionization, than does an equal energy electron -recoil event. We have configured a double-sided Silicon Crystal Acoustic Detector (SiCAD) for simultaneous measurement of both phonons and ionization. This detector operates at ~370 mK and consists of a Ti Transition Edge Sensor (TES), which is the phonon detector, on one side, and a similar pattern of metal, acting as an electrode for the ionization measurement, on the other side of a 300 μm thick high-purity, monocrystalline Si wafer. We present the results of experiments which demonstrate the discrimination capability and position sensitivity of the detector for energy depositions above ~3 keV. The physics of charge measurement, necessary for the background rejection technique, in silicon at low temperature (T < 0.5 K) and low applied electric field (E = 0.1-100 V/cm) has been examined in a variety of high purity, p-type silicon samples with room temperature resistivity in the range 2-40 kOmega-cm. We present results which indicate that a significant fraction of the total charge loss (compared to full collection) at low field occurs in the initial charge cloud near the event location. Measurements of the lateral size, transverse to the applied electric field, of the initial electron

  8. Detailed Characterization of Nuclear Recoil Pulse Shape Discrimination in the DarkSide-50 Direct Dark Matter Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edkins, Erin Elisabeth [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-05-01

    While evidence of non-baryonic dark matter has been accumulating for decades, its exact nature continues to remain a mystery. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are a well motivated candidate which appear in certain extensions of the Standard Model, independently of dark matter theory. If such particles exist, they should occasionally interact with particles of normal matter, producing a signal which may be detected. The DarkSide-50 direct dark matter experiment aims to detect the energy of recoiling argon atoms due to the elastic scattering of postulated WIMPs. In order to make such a discovery, a clear understanding of both the background and signal region is essential. This understanding requires a careful study of the detector's response to radioactive sources, which in turn requires such sources may be safely introduced into or near the detector volume and reliably removed. The CALibration Insertaion System (CALIS) was designed and built for this purpose in a j oint effort between Fermi National Laboratory and the University of Hawaii. This work describes the design and testing of CALIS, its installation and commissioning at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and the multiple calibration campaigns which have successfully employed it. As nuclear recoils produced by WIMPs are indistinguishable from those produced by neutrons, radiogenic neutrons are both the most dangerous class of background and a vital calibration source for the study of the potential WIMP signal. Prior to the calibration of DarkSide-50 with radioactive neutron sources, the acceptance region was determined by the extrapolation of nuclear recoil data from a separate, dedicated experiment, ScENE, which measured the distribution of the pulse shape discrimination parameter, $f_{90}$, for nuclear recoils of known energies. This work demonstrates the validity of the extrapolation of ScENE values to DarkSide-50, by direct comparison of the $f_{90}$ distributio n of nuclear

  9. Discovery of a 7 mHz X-Ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillation from the Most Massive Stellar-Mass Black Hole IC 10 X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of an approx.. = 7 mHz X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the eclipsing, high-inclination black hole binary IC 10 X-1. The QPO is significant at >4.33 sigma confidence level and has a fractional amplitude (% rms) and a quality factor, Q is identical with nu/delta nu, of approx. = 11 and 4, respectively. The overall X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) power spectrum in the frequency range 0.0001-0.1 Hz can be described by a power-law with an index of approx. = -2, and a QPO at 7 mHz. At frequencies approx. > 0.02 Hz there is no evidence for significant variability. The fractional amplitude (rms) of the QPO is roughly energy-independent in the energy range of 0.3-1.5 keV. Above 1.5 keV the low signal-to-noise ratio of the data does not allow us to detect the QPO. By directly comparing these properties with the wide range of QPOs currently known from accreting black hole and neutron stars, we suggest that the 7 mHz QPO of IC 10 X-1 may be linked to one of the following three categories of QPOs: (1) the "heartbeat" mHz QPOs of the black hole sources GRS 1915+105 and IGR J17091-3624, or (2) the 0.6-2.4 Hz "dipper QPOs" of high-inclination neutron star systems, or (3) the mHz QPOs of Cygnus X-3.

  10. A mass hierarchy from recoiling D branes

    CERN Document Server

    Leontaris, G.K.

    2000-01-01

    Using conformal field theory methods we construct a metric that describes the distortion of space-time surrounding a D(irichlet)-brane (solitonic) defect after being struck by another D-brane. By viewing our four-dimensional universe as such a struck brane, embedded in a five-dimensional space-time, we argue on the appearance of a band of massive Kaluza-Klein excitations for the bulk graviton which is localized in a region of the fifth dimension determined by the inverse size of the band. The band incorporates the massless mode (ordinary graviton) and its thickness is determined essentially by the width of the Gaussian distribution describing the (target-space) quantum fluctuations of the intersecting-brane configuration.

  11. Recoil-alpha-fission and recoil-alpha-alpha-fission events observed in the reaction Ca-48 + Am-243

    CERN Document Server

    Forsberg, U; Andersson, L -L; Di Nitto, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Gates, J M; Golubev, P; Gregorich, K E; Gross, C J; Herzberg, R -D; Hessberger, F P; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kratz, J V; Rykaczewski, K; Sarmiento, L G; Schädel, M; Yakushev, A; Åberg, S; Ackermann, D; Block, M; Brand, H; Carlsson, B G; Cox, D; Derkx, X; Dobaczewski, J; Eberhardt, K; Even, J; Fahlander, C; Gerl, J; Jäger, E; Kindler, B; Krier, J; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Mistry, A; Mokry, C; Nazarewicz, W; Nitsche, H; Omtvedt, J P; Papadakis, P; Ragnarsson, I; Runke, J; Schaffner, H; Schausten, B; Shi, Y; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Torres, T; Traut, T; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Ward, A; Ward, D E; Wiehl, N

    2015-01-01

    Products of the fusion-evaporation reaction Ca-48 + Am-243 were studied with the TASISpec set-up at the gas-filled separator TASCA at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum f\\"ur Schwerionenforschung. Amongst the detected thirty correlated alpha-decay chains associated with the production of element Z=115, two recoil-alpha-fission and five recoil-alpha-alpha-fission events were observed. The latter are similar to four such events reported from experiments performed at the Dubna gas-filled separator. Contrary to their interpretation, we propose an alternative view, namely to assign eight of these eleven decay chains of recoil-alpha(-alpha)-fission type to start from the 3n-evaporation channel 115-288. The other three decay chains remain viable candidates for the 2n-evaporation channel 115-289.

  12. Recoil studies of photonuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, H

    2002-01-01

    A review is given on the recoil studies of photonuclear reactions on complex nuclei at intermediate energies. Recoils of 167 radionuclides formed in the photonuclear reactions of sup 2 sup 7 Al, sup n sup a sup t V, sup n sup a sup t Cu, sup 9 sup 3 Nb, sup n sup a sup t Ag, sup n sup a sup t Ta, and sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au, induced by bremsstrahlung of end-point energies (E sub 0) from 600 to 1100 MeV, have been investigated by the thick-target thick-catcher method. The recoil velocity from the first step and the mean kinetic energy of the residual nuclei in the second step were deduced based on the two-step vector velocity model and discussed by comparing with the reported results on proton-induced reactions. Recoils of sup 2 sup 4 Na produced from sup 2 sup 7 Al, sup n sup a sup t V, sup n sup a sup t Cu, sup n sup a sup t Ag, and sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au are of special interest from a viewpoint of a change in the production mechanism with respect to target mass. Reaction yields of 58 and 63 radionuclides produce...

  13. Elastic recoil detection (ERD) with extremely heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, J.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Currie, P.J. [Royal Tyrrell Museum, Drumheller, Alberta T0J 0Y0 (Canada); Davies, J.A. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Siegele, R. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Wallace, S.G. [Accelerator Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Zelenitsky, D. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    1996-06-01

    Extremely heavy-ion beams such as {sup 209}Bi in elastic recoil detection (ERD) make ERD a uniquely valuable technique for thin-film analysis of elements with mass {<=}100. We report ERD measurements of compositional analysis of dinosaur eggshells and bones. We also show the capability of the ERD technique on studies of thin-film, high-temperature superconductors. (orig.).

  14. Holographic complexity and action growth in massive gravities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen-Jian; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the growth rates of action for the anti-de Sitter black holes in massive-Einstein gravity models and obtain the universal behaviors of the growth rates of action (the rates of holographic complexity) within the "Wheeler-DeWitt" (WDW) patch at the late limit. Furthermore, we find that, for the static neutral cases, when the same mass of black holes is given, the computational speed of the neutral massive black hole is the same as its Einstein gravity counterpart, which is independent with the effect of the graviton mass terms; nevertheless, for the static charged cases, when the same mass and charge parameters of black holes are given, the growth rates of action for the massive charged black holes are always superior to the growth rates of action without graviton mass terms, which directly shows that the massive charged black holes as computers on the computational speeds are faster than their Einstein gravity counterparts.

  15. It Takes Two to Tango: a Panchromatic View of Merging Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civano, Francesca M.

    2011-05-01

    Double super-massive black holes (SMBHs) within a single galaxy are predicted by hierarchical models of structure formation. Finding these double BHs has been a frustrating search: At z˜2, they are hard to resolve, given that the required angular separation is beyond the capability of current ground and space-based observatories. Instead, at later epochs (z<0.7), where the angular separations are larger (˜0.5arcsec), they are easier to resolve, but the merger rate has dropped dramatically, so binary SMBHs should be scarce. As mergers proceed, these SMBH pairs will merge. The coalescence give rise to the strongest GW events in the universe. In some cases GW recoil, due to the asymmetric emission of GW, causes the newly merged single SMBH to gain a significant velocity (up to ˜ 1000km/s) with respect to the center of the galaxy. If the recoiling BH is active, it will retain its accretion disk and broad emission line region and will still be seen as an AGN for several years, by which time it may be displaced by several kiloparsecs from the former host nucleus. Deep imaging and spectroscopic searches have recently been initiated to study double SMBHs, or displaced single BH, at all wavelengths and at any separation. I will present multiwavelength results on double SMBHs and show how the high angular resolution of Chandra helps in the study of their activity. I will concentrate on the properties of CID-42 (z=0.359), a unique source in the COSMOS survey, the best recoiling BH candidate to date. CID-42 clearly shows both the presence of two compact sources, 2.5 kpc apart, embedded in the same galaxy in HST imaging, and a 1100km/s velocity offset between the narrow and broad components of Hbeta, in three optical spectra. Our new HRC/Chandra data are the key to understanding the nature of this intriguing source.

  16. Demonstration of nuclear recoil discrimination using recoil range in a mixed CaF 2 + liquid scintillator gel detector for dark matter searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, N. J. C.; Tovey, D. R.; Peak, C. D.; Roberts, J. W.

    1997-12-01

    We present first measurements on a prototype dark matter detector being developed to achieve event by event discrimination of nuclear recoils from electron recoils below 100 keV by utilising the difference in the recoil ranges of these particles. The detector consists of sub-micron scintillating grains of CaF 2 suspended in Dioxan gel scintillator with matched refractive index. We call this form of detector CASPAR (Cocktail of Alkali halide Scintillating PARticles). We present here results of monoenergetic neutron scattering tests on CASPAR and show how scintillation pulse shape analysis can be used as a powerful means of distinguishing Ca, F, C and H recoil events from electron recoils. > 90% discrimination of Ca and F recoils from electrons at 60 keV was observed for <5% loss of signal.

  17. The DarkSide-50 Experiment: Electron Recoil Calibrations and A Global Energy Variable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, Brianne Rae [Hawaii U.

    2017-01-01

    Over the course of decades, there has been mounting astronomical evidence for non-baryonic dark matter, yet its precise nature remains elusive. A favored candidate for dark matter is the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which arises naturally out of extensions to the Standard Model. WIMPs are expected to occasionally interact with particles of normal matter through nuclear recoils. DarkSide-50 aims to detect this type of particle through the use of a two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber. To make a claim of discovery, an accurate understanding of the background and WIMP search region is imperative. Knowledge of the backgrounds is done through extensive studies of DarkSide-50's response to electron and nuclear recoils. The CALibration Insertion System (CALIS) was designed and built for the purpose of introduc- ing radioactive sources into or near the detector in a joint eort between Fermi National Laboratory (FNAL) and the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. This work describes the testing, installation, and commissioning of CALIS at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. CALIS has been used in mul- tiple calibration campaigns with both neutron and sources. In this work, DarkSide-50's response to electron recoils, which are important for background estimations, was studied through the use of calibration sources by constructing a global energy variable which takes into account the anti- correlation between scintillation and ionization signals produced by interactions in the liquid argon. Accurately reconstructing the event energy correlates directly with quantitatively understanding the WIMP sensitivity in DarkSide-50. This work also validates the theoretically predicted decay spectrum of 39Ar against 39Ar decay data collected in the early days of DarkSide-50 while it was lled with atmospheric argon; a validation of this type is not readily found in the literature. Finally, we show how well the constructed energy variable can predict

  18. A recoil resilient lumen support, design, fabrication and mechanical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Arash; Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; Takahata, Kenichi; Al-Sarawi, Said; Abbott, Derek

    2013-06-01

    Stents are artificial implants that provide scaffolding to a cavity inside the body. This paper presents a new luminal device for reducing the mechanical failure of stents due to recoil, which is one of the most important issues in stenting. This device, which we call a recoil-resilient ring (RRR), is utilized standalone or potentially integrated with existing stents to address the problem of recoil. The proposed structure aims to minimize the need for high-pressure overexpansion that can induce intra-luminal trauma and excess growth of vascular tissue causing later restenosis. The RRR is an overlapped open ring with asymmetrical sawtooth structures that are intermeshed. These teeth can slide on top of each other, while the ring is radially expanded, but interlock step-by-step so as to keep the final expanded state against compressional forces that normally cause recoil. The RRRs thus deliver balloon expandability and, when integrated with a stent, bring both radial rigidity and longitudinal flexibility to the stent. The design of the RRR is investigated through finite element analysis (FEA), and then the devices are fabricated using micro-electro-discharge machining of 200-µm-thick Nitinol sheet. The standalone RRR is balloon expandable in vitro by 5-7 Atm in pressure, which is well within the recommended in vivo pressure ranges for stenting procedures. FEA compression tests indicate 13× less reduction of the cross-sectional area of the RRR compared with a typical stainless steel stent. These results also show perfect elastic recovery of the RRR after removal of the pressure compared to the remaining plastic deformations of the stainless steel stent. On the other hand, experimental loading tests show that the fabricated RRRs have 2.8× radial stiffness compared to a two-column section of a commercial stent while exhibiting comparable elastic recovery. Furthermore, testing of in vitro expansion in a mock artery tube shows around 2.9% recoil, approximately 5-11

  19. A Recoil Detector for electron scattering experiments with internal targets

    CERN Document Server

    Sambeek, M J M V; Blok, H P; Borrius, W C; Botto, T; Dodge, G E; Heimberg, P; Jansweijer, P; Kormanyos, C M; Lange, D J; Lienen, J V; Mul, F A; Steenbakkers, M F M; Steijger, J J M; Sturm, F C; Verkooijen, J C; Welling, J J; Zwanenburg, J

    1999-01-01

    A Recoil Detector has been constructed for electron-scattering experiments with gas targets internal to the Amsterdam Pulse Stretcher and storage ring (AmPS) at NIKHEF. The detector was designed to detect low-energy (1-20 MeV/nucleon) and low-mass (A <= 4) recoiling nuclei emerging from electron-induced reactions. It consists of four sensitive elements: a low-pressure two-step avalanche chamber, two layers of silicon strip detectors of 100 and 475 mu m thickness, and a scintillator. The signals from the separate detector elements are processed by custom-made analog and digital electronics. The detector was operated successfully at the AmPS electron scattering facility with a gaseous helium target of 10 sup 1 sup 5 atoms cm sup - sup 2 internal to the storage ring and beam currents of up to 200 mA. (author)

  20. First detection of radon progeny recoil tracks by MIMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffard, Q.; Santos, D.; Guillaudin, O.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, J.; Descombes, T.; Fourel, C.; Muraz, J.-F.; Lebreton, L.; Maire, D.; Colas, P.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Giomataris, I.; Busto, J.; Fouchez, D.; Brunner, J.; Tao, C.

    2017-06-01

    The MIMAC experiment is a μ-TPC project for directional dark matter search. Directional detection strategy is based on the measurement of the WIMP flux anisotropy due to the solar system motion with respect to the dark matter halo. The main purpose of MIMAC project is the measurement of nuclear recoil energy and 3D direction from the WIMP elastic scattering on target nuclei. Since June 2012 a bi-chamber prototype is operating at the Modane underground laboratory. In this paper, we report the first ionization energy and 3D track observations of NRs produced by the radon progeny. This measurement shows the capability of the MIMAC detector and opens the possibility to explore the low energy recoil directionality signature.

  1. Elastic recoil detection analysis of hydrogen in polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winzell, T.R.H.; Whitlow, H.J. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Bubb, I.F.; Short, R.; Johnston, P.N. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) of hydrogen in thick polymeric films has been performed using 2.5 MeV He{sup 2+} ions from the tandem accelerator at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. The technique enables the use of the same equipment as in Rutherford backscattering analysis, but instead of detecting the incident backscattered ion, the lighter recoiled ion is detected at a small forward angle. The purpose of this work is to investigate how selected polymers react when irradiated by helium ions. The polymers are to be evaluated for their suitability as reference standards for hydrogen depth profiling. Films investigated were Du Pont`s Kapton and Mylar, and polystyrene. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Dynamical Formation of Horizons in Recoiling D Branes

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Ellis, John

    2000-01-01

    A toy calculation of string/D-particle interactions within a world-sheet approach indicates that quantum recoil effects - reflecting the gravitational back-reaction on space-time foam due to the propagation of energetic particles - induces the appearance of a microscopic event horizon, or `bubble', inside which stable matter can exist. The scattering event causes this horizon to expand, but we expect quantum effects to cause it to contract again, in a `bounce' solution. Within such `bubbles', massless matter propagates with an effective velocity that is less than the velocity of light in vacuo, which may lead to observable violations of Lorentz symmetry that may be tested experimentally. The conformal invariance conditions in the interior geometry of the bubbles select preferentially three for the number of the spatial dimensions, corresponding to a consistent formulation of the interaction of D3 branes with recoiling D particles, which are allowed to fluctuate independently only on the D3-brane hypersurface.

  3. Black hole gravitohydromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Black hole gravitohydromagnetics (GHM) is developed from the rudiments to the frontiers of research in this book. GHM describes plasma interactions that combine the effects of gravity and a strong magnetic field, in the vicinity (ergosphere) of a rapidly rotating black hole. This topic was created in response to the astrophysical quest to understand the central engines of radio loud extragalactic radio sources. The theory describes a "torsional tug of war" between rotating ergospheric plasma and the distant asymptotic plasma that extracts the rotational inertia of the black hole. The recoil from the struggle between electromagnetic and gravitational forces near the event horizon is manifested as a powerful pair of magnetized particle beams (jets) that are ejected at nearly the speed of light. These bipolar jets feed large-scale magnetized plasmoids on scales as large as millions of light years (the radio lobes of extragalactic radio sources). This interaction can initiate jets that transport energy fluxes exc...

  4. Discrimination of nuclear recoils from alpha particles with superheated liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubin, F; Auger, M; Genest, M-H; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Faust, R; Leroy, C; Lessard, L; Martin, J-P; Morlat, T; Piro, M-C; Starinski, N; Zacek, V [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Beltran, B; Krauss, C B [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Behnke, E; Levine, I; Shepherd, T [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Indiana University South Bend, South Bend, IN 46634 (United States); Nadeau, P; Wichoski, U [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, P3E 2C6 (Canada)], E-mail: zacekv@lps.umontreal.ca (and others)

    2008-10-15

    The PICASSO collaboration observed for the first time a significant difference between the acoustic signals induced by neutrons and alpha particles in a detector based on superheated liquids. This new discovery offers the possibility of improved background suppression and could be especially useful for dark matter experiments. This new effect may be attributed to the formation of multiple bubbles on alpha tracks, compared to single nucleations created by neutron-induced recoils.

  5. A recoil mass separator for nuclear astrophysics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ishiyama, H; Yoshikawa, N; Jeong, S C; Wada, M; Ishida, Y; Tanaka, M H; Takaku, S; Fuchi, Y; Kawashima, H; Katayama, I; Nomura, T; Teranishi, T; Michimasa, M; Imai, N; Yanagisawa, Y; Kubono, S; Strasser, P; Kato, S

    2002-01-01

    A recoil mass separator was constructed for experiments of nuclear astrophysics using radioactive nuclear beams, and its performance was tested. The observed beam suppression factor around M approx 20 was 10 sup - sup 4 when the system was tuned for DELTA M=1 heavier ions than beam ions. With a charge state breeding technique, it became 10 sup - sup 8 when the system was tuned for DELTA q=+1 larger ions than beam ions.

  6. New developments of the recoil distance doppler-shift method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransen, Christoph; Blazhev, Andrey; Braunroth, Thomas; Dewald, Alfred; Goldkuhle, Alina; Jolie, Jan; Litzinger, Julia; Mueller-Gatermann, Claus; Woelk, Dorothea; Zell, Karl-Oskar [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The recoil distance Doppler-shift (RDDS) method is a very valuable technique for measuring lifetimes of excited nuclear states in the picosecond range to deduce absolute transition strengths between nuclear excitations independent on the reaction mechanism. Dedicated plunger devices were built by our group for measurements with this method for a broad range of beam energies ranging from few MeV/u up to relativistic energies of the order of 100 MeV/u. Those were designed to match the constraints defined by state-of-the art γ-ray spectrometers like AGATA, Galileo, Gammasphere. Here we give an overview about recent experiments of our group to determine transition strengths from level lifetimes in exotic nuclei where also recoil separators or mass spectrographs were used for an identification of the recoiling reaction products. The aim is to learn about phenomena like shape phase coexistence in exotic regions and the evolution of the shell structure far from the valley of stability. We also review new plunger devices that are developed by our group for future experimental campaigns with stable and radioactive beams in different energy regimes, e.g., a plunger for HIE-ISOLDE.

  7. The recoil proton polarization in. pi. p elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seftor, C.J.

    1988-09-01

    The polarization of the recoil proton for ..pi../sup +/p and ..pi../sup -/p elastic scattering has been measured for various angles at 547 MeV/c and 625 MeV/c by a collaboration involving The George Washington University; the University of California, Los Angeles; and Abilene Christian University. The experiment was performed at the P/sup 3/ East experimental area of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Beam intensities varied from 0.4 to 1.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup -/'s/sec and from 3.0 to 10.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup +/'s/sec. The beam spot size at the target was 1 cm in the horizontal direction by 2.5 cm in the vertical direction. A liquid-hydrogen target was used in a flask 5.7 cm in diameter and 10 cm high. The scattered pion and recoil proton were detected in coincidence using the Large Acceptance Spectrometer (LAS) to detect and momentum analyze the pions and the JANUS recoil proton polarimeter to detect and measure the polarization of the protons. Results from this experiment are compared with previous measurements of the polarization, with analyzing power data previously taken by this group, and to partial-wave analysis predictions. 12 refs., 53 figs., 18 tabs.

  8. A recoil detector of Koala experiment at HESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Huagen [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The concept of the luminosity detector for the PANDA experiment is based on measuring antiproton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region by 4 planes of HV-MAPS tracking detectors. The absolute precision is limited by the lack of existing data of the physics quantities σ{sub tot}, ρ and b describing the differential cross section as a function of squared 4-momentum transfer t in the relevant beam momentum region. Therefore, the so-called Koala experiment has been proposed to measure antiproton-proton elastic scattering. The goal of Koala experiment is to measure a wide range of t-distribution to determine the parameters σ{sub tot}, ρ and b. The idea is to measure the scattered beam antiprotons at forward angles by tracking detectors and the recoil target protons near 90 {sup circle} by energy detectors. In order to validate this method a recoil detector has been designed and built. Commissioning of the recoil detector by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering has been performed at COSY. Preliminary results of the commissioning are presented.

  9. 2MASS J00423991+3017515: An Interacting Oddball or a Recoiling AGN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, J. Drew; Blecha, Laura; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2017-06-01

    We present deep, multiband Hubble imaging and two epochs of optical spectroscopic monitoring of a peculiar nearby (z=0.14) AGN, 2MASS J00423991+3017515. The host galaxy containing the AGN is morphologically disturbed and interacting with an unmerged companion galaxy, suggesting it has had a rich merger history. The AGN itself is spatially displaced from the apparent center of its host galaxy and the symmetric broad Hα and Hβ lines are consistently blueshifted from the narrow line emission and host galaxy absorption by Δv = 1530 km/s. The investigation is ongoing, but we put forward two hypotheses to explain the odd features of this system. First, the abnormalities could be due to separate, independent causes. Projection effects from the interaction of the two galaxies could give the appearance of a spatial offset, while complex wind dynamics from the AGN accretion disk could give rise to the kinematic shift in the broad line emission. Second, this could be a recoiling AGN. This system fits the template of an accreting supermassive black hole (SMBH) that has recently received a “kick” from the asymmetric emission of gravitational waves (GWs) following the merger of two progenitor SMBHs. SMBH mergers are a likely end-product of hierarchical structure formation and are the supermassive cousins of the stellar-mass BH mergers observed with LIGO in the GW150914 and GW151226 events. However, a SMBH merger has yet to be unambigously detected. If confirmed as a recoiling AGN, 2MASS J00423991+3017515 will provide the first evidence of this growth pathway acting in the SMBH regime.

  10. A G/NARRLI Effort. Measuring the Ionization Yield of Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Tenzing Henry Yatish [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Liquid argon has long been used for particle detection due to its attractive drift properties, ample abundance, and reasonable density. The response of liquid argon to lowenergy O(102 -1044 eV) interactions is, however, largely unexplored. Weakly interacting massive particles such as neutrinos and hypothetical dark-matter particles (WIMPs) are predicted to coherently scatter on atomic nuclei, leaving only an isolated low-energy nuclear recoil as evidence. The response of liquid argon to low-energy nuclear recoils must be studied to determine the sensitivity of liquid argon based detectors to these unobserved interactions. Detectors sensitive to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering may be used to monitor nuclear reactors from a distance, to detect neutrinos from supernova, and to test the predicted behavior of neutrinos. Additionally, direct detection of hypothetical weakly interacting dark matter would be a large step toward understanding the substance that accounts for nearly 27% of the universe. In this dissertation I discuss a small dual-phase (liquid-gas) argon proportional scintillation counter built to study the low-energy regime and several novel calibration and characterization techniques developed to study the response of liquid argon to low-energy O(102 -104 eV) interactions.

  11. Low Energy Electron and Nuclear Recoil Thresholds in the DRIFT-II Negative Ion TPC for Dark Matter Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Burgos, S; Forbes, J; Ghag, C; Gold, M; Hagemann, C; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lawson, T B; Loomba, D; Majewski, P; Muna, D; Murphy, A St J; Paling, S M; Petkov, A; Plank, S J S; Robinson, M; Sanghi, N; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Turk, J; Tziaferi, E

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the ability to measure and discriminate particle events at the lowest possible energy is an essential requirement in developing new experiments to search for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. In this paper we detail an assessment of the potential sensitivity below 10 keV in the 1 m^3 DRIFT-II directionally sensitive, low pressure, negative ion time projection chamber (NITPC), based on event-by-event track reconstruction and calorimetry in the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) readout. By application of a digital smoothing polynomial it is shown that the detector is sensitive to sulfur and carbon recoils down to 3.5 and 2.2 keV respectively, and 1.2 keV for electron induced tracks. The energy sensitivity is demonstrated through the 5.9 keV gamma spectrum of 55Fe, where the energy resolution is sufficient to identify the escape peak. In addition to recoil direction reconstruction for WIMP searches this sensitivity suggests new prospects for applications also in KK axion s...

  12. Spin resonance strengths for radiative polarization and vertical momentum recoils using the spin response formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, S.R. [Convergent Computing Inc., P.O. Box 561, Shoreham, NY 11786 (United States)], E-mail: srmane@optonline.net

    2008-08-21

    The radiative polarization of electrons and positrons in storage rings includes spin resonances driven by vertical momentum recoils due to spin flip photon emissions. This is in addition to the spin resonances driven by longitudinal momentum recoils. The underlying physics for the vertical momentum recoils is similar to the perturbations induced by a radial field (rf) dipole spin flipper. This paper derives the spin resonance strengths driven by the vertical momentum recoils using known techniques for spin flippers, such as the spin response formalism.

  13. Microbeam recoil detection for hydration of minerals studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Exploration and Mining Div.; Chekhmir, A.; Green, T.H. [Macquarie Univ., North Ryde, NSW (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    The glancing angle geometry is chosen to enable application of the elastic recoil detection microanalysis on thick geological samples, for hydrogen content determination. Simultaneous PIXE measurements can be used to eliminate the problem of uncertainties in beam charge collection. The method is applied to determine the hydration characteristics of silicates, produced experimentally at high pressure and temperature simulating the lower crust and upper mantle conditions. Preliminary results show that the technique can be applied readily on a microscopic (<100 {mu}m) scale for determination of H at fraction of atomic percent level. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  14. More on massive 3D gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K.

    We explore the space of static solutions of the recently discovered three-dimensional "new massive gravity" (NMG), allowing for either sign of the Einstein-Hilbert term and a cosmological term parametrized by a dimensionless constant lambda. For lambda = -1 we find black hole solutions asymptotic

  15. A Measurement of the Recoil Polarization of Electroproduced Λ(1116)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAleer, Simeon B. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory was used to study the reaction e + p → e' + K+ + Λ(1116) for events where Λ(1116) subsequently decayed via the channel Λ(1116) → p + π-. Data were taken at incident electron beam energies of 2.5, 4.0, and 4.2 GeV during the 1999 E1C run period. They hyperon production spectra span the Q2 range from 0.5 to 2.8 GeV2 and nearly the entire range in the center of mass angles. The proton angular distribution in the Λ(1116) rest frame is used to deduce the recoil polarization of the hyperon, and the W and cos θ$K+\\atop{cm}$ dependence of the recoil polarization will be presented. The data show sizeable negative polarizations for the Λ(1116) as a function of both cos θ$K+\\atop{cm}$ and W.

  16. The WITCH experiment Acquiring the first recoil ion spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlov, V Yu; Coeck, S; Delahaye, P; Friedag, P; Herbane, M; Herlert, A; Kraev, I S; Tandecki, M; Van Gorp, S; Wauters, F; Weinheimer, Ch; Wenander, F; Zakoucky, D; Severijns, N

    2008-01-01

    The standard model of the electroweak interaction describes beta-decay in the well-known V-A form. Nevertheless, the most general Hamiltonian of a beta-decay includes also other possible interaction types, e.g. scalar (S) and tensor (T) contributions, which are not fully ruled out yet experimentally. The WITCH experiment aims to study a possible admixture of these exotic interaction types in nuclear beta-decay by a precise measurement of the shape of the recoil ion energy spectrum. The experimental set-up couples a double Penning trap system and a retardation spectrometer. The set-up is installed in ISOLDE/CERN and was recently shown to be fully operational. The current status of the experiment is presented together with the data acquired during the 2006 campaign, showing the first recoil ion energy spectrum obtained. The data taking procedure and corresponding data acquisition system are described in more detail. Several further technical improvements are briefly reviewed.

  17. Dynamical formation of horizons in recoiling D-branes

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V

    2000-01-01

    A toy calculation of string or D-particle interactions within a world-sheet approach indicates that quantum recoil effects-reflecting the gravitational back reaction on space-time foam due to the propagation of energetic particles-induces the appearance of a microscopic event horizon, or "bubble, " inside which stable matter can exist. The scattering event causes this horizon to expand, but we expect quantum effects to cause it to contract again, in a "bounce" solution. Within such "bubbles, " massless matter propagates with an effective velocity that is less than the velocity of light in vacuo, which may lead to observable violations of Lorentz symmetry that may be tested experimentally. The conformal invariance conditions in the interior geometry of the bubbles select preferentially 3 for the number of the spatial dimensions, corresponding to a consistent formulation of the interaction of D3-branes with recoiling D particles, which are allowed to fluctuate independently only on the D3-brane hypersurface. (2...

  18. Oscillation and recoil of single and consecutively printed droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Chhasatia, Viral; Sun, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Drops are often used as building blocks for line and pattern printing where their interactions play an important role in determining the morphology and properties of deposited functional materials. In this study, the impact, spreading and oscillation of single and consecutively printed drops on substrates of different wettabilities are examined using a high speed camera. The results show that, for a single droplet impacting at a low Weber number, both the inertia and surface tension play important roles in the initial spreading stage before the droplet starts to oscillate. On a substrate of higher wettability, drop oscillation is damped down faster due to stronger viscous dissipation resulted from a longer liquid oscillation path. It is also found that when a drop impacting on an evaporating sessile drop sitting on a hydrophobic substrate, recoil of the combined drop is observed, in contrast to no recoil for the impact of a single drop under the same condition. Furthermore, a single-degree-of-freedom vibration model for the height of oscillating single and combined drops on a hydrophobic substrate is established. The results show that as viscosity of liquid increases, damping of drop oscillation becomes faster, and the combined drop oscillates longer compared to a single drop.

  19. New massive gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    We present a brief review of New Massive Gravity, which is a unitary theory of massive gravitons in three dimensions obtained by considering a particular combination of the Einstein-Hilbert and curvature squared terms.

  20. A recoil detector for the Internal Target Facility of AmPS (NIKHEF).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sambeek, M.J.M.; Blok, H.P.

    1997-01-01

    A recoil detector has been built for internal target experiments with the Amsterdam Pulse Stretcher and storage ring, AmPS, of NIKHEF. The detector was designed to detect low-energy (1-20 MeV/nucleon) and low-mass (A ≤ 4) recoiling nuclei emerging from electron-induced reactions. The detector

  1. A recoil detector for the internal target facility of AmPS (NIKHEF).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sambeek, M.J.M.; Blok, H.P.; Dodge, G.E.; Heimberg, P.C.; Steenbakkers, M.F.M.

    1998-01-01

    A recoil detector has been built for internal target experiments with the Amsterdam Pulse Stretcher and storage ring, AmPS, of NIKHEF. The detector was designed to detect low-energy (1-20 MeV/nucleon) and low-mass (A ≤ 4) recoiling nuclei emerging from electron-induced reactions. The detector

  2. Calculations of Total and Differential Solid Angles for a Proton Recoil Solid State Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konijn, J.; Lauber, A.; Tollander, B.

    1963-08-15

    The solid angles have been computed for a proton recoil counter consisting of a circular hydrogenous foil viewed by an isotropic neutron point source at different distances from the target foil. Tables are given for the total subtended solid angle as well as the differential energy distribution function of the proton recoil spectrum. The influence of finite foil thickness has also been studied.

  3. Black holes with halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monten, Ruben; Toldo, Chiara

    2018-02-01

    We present new AdS4 black hole solutions in N =2 gauged supergravity coupled to vector and hypermultiplets. We focus on a particular consistent truncation of M-theory on the homogeneous Sasaki–Einstein seven-manifold M 111, characterized by the presence of one Betti vector multiplet. We numerically construct static and spherically symmetric black holes with electric and magnetic charges, corresponding to M2 and M5 branes wrapping non-contractible cycles of the internal manifold. The novel feature characterizing these nonzero temperature configurations is the presence of a massive vector field halo. Moreover, we verify the first law of black hole mechanics and we study the thermodynamics in the canonical ensemble. We analyze the behavior of the massive vector field condensate across the small-large black hole phase transition and we interpret the process in the dual field theory.

  4. Epidemiology of Massive Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmin, Märit; Chiesa, Flaminia; Vasan, Senthil K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is an increasing focus on massive transfusion, but there is a paucity of comprehensive descriptions of the massively transfused patients and their outcomes. The objective of this study is to describe the incidence rate of massive transfusion, patient characteristics, and the mort...

  5. In-beam spectroscopy using the JYFL gas-filled magnetic recoil separator RITU

    CERN Document Server

    Uusitalo, J; Greenlees, P T; Rahkila, P; Leino, M; Andreyev, A N; Butler, P A; Enqvist, T; Eskola, Kari J; Grahn, T; Herzberg, R D; Hessberger, F P; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Keenan, A; Kettunen, H; Kuusiniemi, P; Leppaenen, A P; Nieminen, P; Page, R; Pakarinen, J; Scholey, C

    2003-01-01

    The techniques of recoil-gating and recoil-decay tagging have been employed at Jyvaeskylae to perform in-beam gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy studies of heavy nuclei. The JUROSPHERE gamma-ray array and the SACRED electron spectrometer have been placed at the target position of the JYFL gas-filled recoil separator recoil ion transport unit (RITU). The RITU separator has been used to collect the recoils of interest and separate them from beam particles and fission products. At the focal plane a detector system consisting of time-of-flight and implantation detectors has been used for further event identification. The method and some highlights from the results in the lead region close to the proton drip line and in the transuranium region will be presented and discussed.

  6. Commissioning of the recoil silicon detector for the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickert, N.C.

    2008-02-15

    The reconstruction of the missing mass is limited by the position and momentum resolution of the HERMES spectrometer. In order to reach a higher accuracy in the measurements the backscattered nucleon must also be detected. A detector suited for this must give the possibility, to determine the momentum of the particles over a very large range: from minimally ionizing particles up to protons, which are stopped in the detector. The detector must also be able to discriminate hadrons and mesons as well as cover the complete spatial region around the target. In the winter 2005-2006 such a recoil detector was installed in the HERMES experiment. The detector sonsists of three partial detectors, a silicon counter within the scattering chamber, a sintillating-fiber detector and a photon detector. Before the installation of the detector the silicon modules were tested in a bench test and checked together with the other particle detectors in a test experiment. A large part of this dissertation is dedicated to the planning and performance of these tests as well to the evaluation of them. It could be show, that the modules worked accordly to their specifications, however because of unexpectedly high noise a signal correction became necessary. Different models for the correction were developed and tested in the framework of these thesis. In spite of the high noise cosmic muons could be detected and their energy deposition measured with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2:1. In the winter break 2005-2006 the recoil detector was installed into the HERMES experiment. First diagnosis and analysis software was developed. The silicon detector measured successfully energy depositions of minimally ionizing particles up to protons stopped in the sensor. Minimally ionizing particles could be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 5:1. By means of track information of the scintillating-fiber detector protons could be discriminated from pions and other mesons by the silicon detector. The HERMES

  7. Teleporting entanglement during black hole evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brustein, Ram [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University,Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Medved, A.J.M. [Department of Physics & Electronics, Rhodes University,Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); National Institute for Theoretical Physics (NITheP),Western Cape 7602 (South Africa)

    2016-10-06

    The unitary evaporation of a black hole (BH) in an initially pure state must lead to the eventual purification of the emitted radiation. It follows that the late radiation has to be entangled with the early radiation and, as a consequence, the entanglement among the Hawking pair partners has to decrease continuously from maximal to vanishing during the BH’s life span. Starting from the basic premise that both the horizon radius and the center of mass of a finite-mass BH are fluctuating quantum mechanically, we show how this process is realized. First, it is shown that the horizon fluctuations induce a small amount of variance in the total linear momentum of each created pair. This is in contrast to the case of an infinitely massive BH, for which the total momentum of the produced pair vanishes exactly on account of momentum conservation. This variance leads to a random recoil of the BH during each emission and, as a result, the center of mass of the BH undergoes a quantum random walk. Consequently, the uncertainty in its momentum grows as the square root of the number of emissions. We then show that this uncertainty controls the amount of deviation from maximal entanglement of the produced pairs and that this deviation is determined by the ratio of the cumulative number of emitted particles to the initial BH entropy. Thus, the interplay between the horizon and center-of-mass fluctuations provides a mechanism for teleporting entanglement from the pair partners to the BH and the emitted radiation.

  8. A Study of Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Huajie [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Robust results of WIMP direct detection experiments depend on rm understandings of nuclear recoils in the detector media. This thesis documents the most comprehensive study to date on nuclear recoils in liquid argon - a strong candidate for the next generation multi-ton scale WIMP detectors. This study investigates both the energy partition from nuclear recoil energy to secondary modes (scintillation and ionization) and the pulse shape characteristics of scintillation from nuclear recoils.

  9. Lifetimes in {sup 161}Lu measured with recoil distance method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.H.; Lewis, J.M.; Riedinger, L.L. [and others

    1993-04-01

    High spin states of {sup 161}Lu are populated using the {sup 120}Sn({sup 45}Sc,4n){sup 161}Lu reaction with a 205 MeV {sup 45}Sc beam provided by the Oak Ridge National Lab. A plunger was used to stop the recoils at various distances and the {gamma}-rays were detected by the compact array of 20 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors of 17, 30, 60, 85, 140, 210, and 320 micrometers. These data are being analyzed in order to extract lifetimes. High spin lifetimes in the {pi}h{sub 11/12}, 9/2[514] band of {sup 161}Lu were previously measured with DSAM technique. Large energy signature splitting was observed in the low spin portion of this band, which has been interpreted as the evidence for triaxiality and small quadrupole deformation. The authors measured lifetimes at low spin will be helpful for the verification of this prediction.

  10. Measurement of the neutron electric form factor via recoil polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Reichelt; R. Madey; A.Yu. Semenov; S. Taylor; A. Aghalarian; E. Crouse; G. MacLachlan; B. Plaster; S. Tajima; W. Tireman; C.Y. Yan; A. Ahmidouch; B.D. Anderson; R. Asaturian; O. Baker; A.R. Baldwin; H. Breuer; R. Carlini; E. Christy; S. Churchwell; L. Cole; S. Danagulian; D. Day; M. Elaasar; R. Ent; M. Farkhondeh; H. Fenker; J.M. Finn; L. Gan; K. Garrow; P. Gueye; C. Howell; B. Hu; M.K. Jones; J.J. Kelly; C. Keppel; M. Khandaker; W.Y. Kim; S. Kowalski; A. Lung; D. Mack; D.M. Manley; P. Markowitz; J. Mitchell; H. Mkrtchian; A.K. Opper; C. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; B. Raue; J. Reinhold; J. Roche; Y. Sato; W. Seo; N. Simicevic; G. Smith; S. Stepanian; V. Tadevosian; L. Tang; P. Ulmer; W. Vulcan; J.W. Watson; S. Wells; F. Wesselmann; S. Wood; C. Yan; S. Yang; L. Yuan; W.M. Zhang; H. Zhu; X. Zhu; H. Arenhovel

    2003-10-22

    The ratio G{sub c}{sup n}/G{sub m}{sup n} of the electric to the magnetic form factor of the neutron has been measured by analyzing the polarization of the recoiling neutron in quasi-elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from deuterium at the Q{sup 2} values of 0.45, 1.15, and 1.47 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The experiment has been performed in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. With G{sub m}{sup n} being known G can be deduced. The preliminary results show that the lowest Q{sup 2} points follow the Galster parameterization and that the 1.47 (GeV/c){sup 2} point rises above this parameterization.

  11. The ANTARES recoil time-of-flight spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.W.; Russell, G.J. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Australian National Tandem for Applied Research (ANTARES), is a 8MV FN tandem particle accelerator at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. Research on the accelerator is divided between two groups, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and lon Beam Analysis (IBA). The IBA group carries out a range of research projects from nuclear physics to materials characterisation. The major IBA project on the accelerator is a recoil time-of-flight spectrometer which consists of two electrostatic time pulse generators and an ion-implanted surface barrier detector. The spectrometer is ideally suited to the profiling of layered multi-element materials, and has been used to characterise materials such as metal-germanides, optoelectronics, superconductors and catalytic converters. This paper will describe the time-of-flight system as well as some recent materials characterisation results. 1 refs., 3 figs.

  12. A novel method for modeling the recoil in W boson events at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Abbott, B. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Abolins, M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Acharya, B.S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M. [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Adams, T. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Aguilo, E. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); York University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ahsan, M. [Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Alexeev, G.D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Alton, A. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Alverson, G. [Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Alves, G.A. [LAFEX, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Ancu, L.S. [Radboud University Nijmegen/NIKHEF, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Andeen, T.; Anzelc, M.S. [Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Aoki, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Arnoud, Y. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Arov, M. [Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Arthaud, M. [CEA, Irfu, SPP, Saclay (France)] (and others)

    2009-10-11

    We present a new method for modeling the hadronic recoil in W{yields}l{nu} events produced at hadron colliders. The recoil is chosen from a library of recoils in Z{yields}ll data events and overlaid on a simulated W{yields}l{nu} event. Implementation of this method requires that the data recoil library describe the properties of the measured recoil as a function of the true, rather than the measured, transverse momentum of the boson. We address this issue using a multidimensional Bayesian unfolding technique. We estimate the statistical and systematic uncertainties from this method for the W boson mass and width measurements assuming 1fb{sup -1} of data from the Fermilab Tevatron. The uncertainties are found to be small and comparable to those of a more traditional parameterized recoil model. For the high precision measurements that will be possible with data from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron and from the CERN LHC, the method presented in this paper may be advantageous, since it does not require an understanding of the measured recoil from first principles.

  13. Massive spin-2 theories

    CERN Document Server

    Folkerts, Sarah; Wintergerst, Nico

    2014-01-01

    We give an introduction to massive spin-2 theories (including massive gravity) and the problem of their non-linear completion. We review the Boulware-Deser ghost problem and two ways to circumvent classic no-go theorems. In turn, massive spin-2 theories are not uniquely defined. In the case of truncated theories, we show that the Boulware-Deser ghost may only be avoided if the derivative structure of the theory is not tuned to be Einsteinian.

  14. Status of a facility for measuring nuclear recoils by neutron scattering from cryogenic particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Putte, M. J. J.; Hoess, C.; Giles, T. J.; Angrave, L.; Booth, N. E.; Cooper, S.; Esposito, E.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Houwman, E. P.; Salmon, G. L.; Wänninger, S.

    1996-02-01

    We are setting up a dedicated neutron-scattering facility in order to study the response of cryogenic detectors to nuclear recoils in preparation for dark matter searches. The design and status of the facility are presented.

  15. Status of a facility for measuring nuclear recoils by neutron scattering from cryogenic particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Putte, M.J.J. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Hoess, C. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Giles, T.J. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Angrave, L. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Booth, N.E. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Cooper, S. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Esposito, E. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Gaitskell, R.J. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Houwman, E.P. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Salmon, G.L. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Waenninger, S. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-02-11

    We are setting up a dedicated neutron-scattering facility in order to study the response of cryogenic detectors to nuclear recoils in preparation for dark matter searches. The design and status of the facility are presented. (orig.).

  16. First Measurement of Beam-Recoil Observables Cx and Cz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Bradford; R.A. Schumacher; G. Adams; M.J. Amaryan; P. Ambrozewicz; E. Anciant; M. Anghinolfi; B. Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; G. Audit; H. Avakian; H. Bagdasaryan; N. Baillie; J.P. Ball; N.A. Baltzell; S. Barrow; V. Batourine; M. Battaglieri; K. Beard; I. Bedlinskiy; M. Bektasoglu; M. Bellis; N. Benmouna; B.L. Berman; N. Bianchi; A.S. Biselli; B.E. Bonner; S. Bouchigny; S. Boiarinov; D. Branford; W.J. Briscoe; W.K. Brooks; S. B¨ultmann; V.D. Burkert; C. Butuceanu; J.R. Calarco; S.L. Careccia; D.S. Carman; B. Carnahan; S. Chen; P.L. Cole; A. Coleman; P. Collins; P. Coltharp; D. Cords; † P. Corvisiero; D. Crabb; H. Crannell; V. Crede; J.P. Cummings; R. De Masi; E. De Sanctis; R. De Vita; P.V. Degtyarenko; H. Denizli; L. Dennis; A. Deur; K.V. Dharmawardane; R. Dickson; C. Djalali; G.E. Dodge; J. Donnelly; D. Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; M. Dugger; S. Dytman; O.P. Dzyubak; H. Egiyan; ; K.S. Egiyan; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; P. Eugenio; R. Fatemi; G. Fedotov; G. Feldman; R.J. Feuerbach; T.A. Forest; H. Funsten; M. Garcon; G. Gavalian; ; G.P. Gilfoyle; K.L. Giovanetti; F.X. Girod; J.T. Goetz; A. Gonenc; R.W. Gothe; K.A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; M. Guillo; N. Guler; L. Guo; V. Gyurjyan; C. Hadjidakis; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; R.S. Hakobyan; J. Hardie; D. Heddle; F.W. Hersman; K. Hicks; I. Hleiqawi; M. Holtrop; J. Hu; M. Huertas; C.E. Hyde-Wright; Y. Ilieva; D.G. Ireland; B.S. Ishkhanov; E.L. Isupov; M.M. Ito; D. Jenkins; H.S. Jo; K. Joo; H.G. Juengst; N. Kalantarians; J.D. Kellie; M. Khandaker; K.Y. Kim; K. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F.J. Klein; M. Klusman; M. Kossov; L.H. Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; J. Kuhn; S.E. Kuhn; S.V. Kuleshov; J. Lachniet; J.M. Laget; J. Langheinrich; D. Lawrence; A.C.S. Lima; K. Livingston; H.Y. Lu; K. Lukashin; M. MacCormick; J.J. Manak; C. Marchand; N. Markov; S. McAleer; B. McKinnon; J.W.C. McNabb; B.A. Mecking; M.D. Mestayer; C.A. Meyer; T. Mibe; K. Mikhailov; M. Mirazita; R. Miskimen; V. Mokeev; K. Moriya; S.A. Morrow; M. Moteabbed; V. Muccifora; J. Mueller; G.S. Mutchler; P. Nadel-Turonski; J. Napolitano; R. Nasseripour; N. Natasha; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; B.B. Niczyporuk; M.R. Niroula; R.A. Niyazov; M. Nozar; G.V. O’Rielly; M. Osipenko; A.I. Ostrovidov; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; C. Paterson; S.A. Philips; J. Pierce; N. Pivnyuk; D. Pocanic; O. Pogorelko; E. Polli; I. Popa; S. Pozdniakov; B.M. Preedom; J.W. Price; Y. Prok; D. Protopopescu; L.M. Qin; B.P. Quinn; B.A. Raue; G. Riccardi; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; B.G. Ritchie; F. Ronchetti; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; D. Rowntree; P.D. Rubin; F. Sabatie; J. Salamanca; C. Salgado; J.P. Santoro; ; V. Sapunenko; V.S. Serov; A. Shafi; Y.G. Sharabian; J. Shaw; N.V. Shvedunov; S. Simionatto; A.V. Skabelin; E.S. Smith; L.C. Smith; D.I. Sober; D. Sokhan; M. Spraker; A. Stavinsky; S.S. Stepanyan; S. Stepanyan; B.E. Stokes; P. Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; S. Strauch; M. Taiuti; S. Taylor; D.J. Tedeschi; U. Thoma; R. Thompson; A. Tkabladze; S. Tkachenko; L. Todor; C. Tur; M. Ungaro; M.F. Vineyard; A.V. Vlassov; K. Wang; D.P. Watts; L.B. Weinstein; H. Weller; D.P. Weygand; M. Williams; E. Wolin; M.H. Wood; A. Yegneswaran; J. Yun; L. Zana; J. Zhang; B. Zhao; and Z.W. Zhao

    2007-03-01

    Spin transfer from circularly polarized real photons to recoiling hyperons has been measured for the reactions $\\vec\\gamma + p \\to K^+ + \\vec\\Lambda$ and $\\vec\\gamma + p \\to K^+ + \\vec\\Sigma^0$. The data were obtained using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies $W$ between 1.6 and 2.53 GeV, and for $-0.85<\\cos\\theta_{K^+}^{c.m.}< +0.95$. For the $\\Lambda$, the polarization transfer coefficient along the photon momentum axis, $C_z$, was found to be near unity for a wide range of energy and kaon production angles. The associated transverse polarization coefficient, $C_x$, is smaller than $C_z$ by a roughly constant difference of unity. Most significantly, the {\\it total} $\\Lambda$ polarization vector, including the induced polarization $P$, has magnitude consistent with unity at all measured energies and production angles when the beam is fully polarized. For the $\\Sigma^0$ this simple phenomenology does not hold. All existing hadrodynamic models are in poor agreement with these results.

  17. Simplifying Massive Contour Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars; Deleuran, Lasse Kosetski; Mølhave, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours.......We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours....

  18. Multivariate techniques of analysis for ToF-E recoil spectrometry data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlow, H.J.; Bouanani, M.E.; Persson, L.; Hult, M.; Jonsson, P.; Johnston, P.N. [Lund Institute of Technology, Solvegatan, (Sweden), Department of Nuclear Physics; Andersson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Organic Chemistry; Ostling, M.; Zaring, C. [Royal institute of Technology, Electrum, Kista, (Sweden), Department of Electronics; Johnston, P.N.; Bubb, I.F.; Walker, B.R.; Stannard, W.B. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Multivariate statistical methods are being developed by the Australian -Swedish Recoil Spectrometry Collaboration for quantitative analysis of the wealth of information in Time of Flight (ToF) and energy dispersive Recoil Spectrometry. An overview is presented of progress made in the use of multivariate techniques for energy calibration, separation of mass-overlapped signals and simulation of ToF-E data. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Gravitational wave recoils in non-axisymmetric Robinson-Trautman spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranha, R.F.; Soares, I.D. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tonini, E.V. [Instituto Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    We examine the gravitational wave recoil and the associated kick velocities in non-axisymmetric Robinson-Trautman (RT) spacetimes. Characteristic initial data used for the dynamics correspond to non-head-on collisions of two black holes. We make a parameter study of the kick distributions for an extended range of the incidence angle ρ{sub 0} in the initial data. In the range examined 3 {sup circle} ≤ ρ{sub 0} ≤ 125 {sup circle} the kick distribution V{sub k} as a function of the symmetric mass η satisfies an empirically modified Fitchett law, with a parameter C that accounts for the nonzero net gravitational wave momentum flux in the equal-mass case. The law fits accurately the numerical data with a normalized rms error ≤0.3%. The maximum kick velocity is ≅190 km/s for ρ{sub 0} ≅55 {sup circle}. A recent modification of the Fitchett law motivated by the effective-one-body formalism (Nagar in Phys Rev D 88:121501R, 2013) is also examined and, with the needed introduction of C to account for non-head-on collisions, fits accurately the RT data with a normalized rms error ≤3 x 10{sup -5} %. We construct the surface V{sub k}(η, ρ{sub 0}) in the parameter space of RT initial data, which gives an overall view of the behavior of V{sub k} as the parameters change. The angular patterns of the gravitational waves emitted are analyzed and include the two polarization modes present in the radiative field of a non-head-on collision. (orig.)

  20. Black to Black

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Michael Alexander

    2012-01-01

    , menace, sensual spur, and associations with death along with an assertive presence is seen with black-clad pop performers. This becomes especially clear when comparing the distinctive stage-styles of Siouxsie Sioux (born 1957, UK) and Janelle Monáe (born 1985, USA). Siouxsie Sioux’s late 1970’s black......Pop musicians performing in black stage costume take advantage of cultural traditions relating to matters black. Stylistically, black is a paradoxical color: although a symbol of melancholy, pessimism, and renunciation, black also expresses minimalist modernity and signifies exclusivity (as...... is hinted by Rudyard Kipling’s illustration of ‘The [Black] Cat That Walked by Himself’ in his classic children’s tale). It was well understood by uniformed Anarchists, Fascists and the SS that there is an assertive presence connected with the black-clad figure. The paradox of black’s abstract elegance...

  1. Solid holography and massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberte, Lasma [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, 34151, Trieste (Italy); Baggioli, Matteo [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE),The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Physics, Institute for Condensed Matter Theory, University of Illinois,1110 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Khmelnitsky, Andrei [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, 34151, Trieste (Italy); Pujolàs, Oriol [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE),The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-02-17

    Momentum dissipation is an important ingredient in condensed matter physics that requires a translation breaking sector. In the bottom-up gauge/gravity duality, this implies that the gravity dual is massive. We start here a systematic analysis of holographic massive gravity (HMG) theories, which admit field theory dual interpretations and which, therefore, might store interesting condensed matter applications. We show that there are many phases of HMG that are fully consistent effective field theories and which have been left overlooked in the literature. The most important distinction between the different HMG phases is that they can be clearly separated into solids and fluids. This can be done both at the level of the unbroken spacetime symmetries as well as concerning the elastic properties of the dual materials. We extract the modulus of rigidity of the solid HMG black brane solutions and show how it relates to the graviton mass term. We also consider the implications of the different HMGs on the electric response. We show that the types of response that can be consistently described within this framework is much wider than what is captured by the narrow class of models mostly considered so far.

  2. Detection of exclusive reactions in the Hermes Recoil Fiber Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keri, Tibor

    2008-08-15

    the RD (Recoil Detector) with an unpolarized target at this position. This detector consists of the Silicon Strip Detector, the SFT (Scintillating Fiber Tracker), the Photon Detector and is surrounded by a 1T superconducting magnet. It provides several space points for tracking and thus momentum reconstruction. The energy deposition in the various detectors is used to achieve particle identification. The main part of the thesis work was the implementation of the SFT and the RD readout system. Before the installation of the RD a series of test runs were carried out to proof the concept of the detector, to measure the internal alignment and to prepare the installation. These test runs for the SFT are described and major results are shown. Furthermore a preliminary analysis of the latest data 06d/06d0 was carried out to show the performance of the installed Recoil Detector in combination with the HERMES forward spectrometer. (orig.)

  3. Epidemiology of massive transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmin, M A; Chiesa, F; Vasan, S K

    2015-01-01

    .4% among women transfused for obstetrical bleeding. Mortality increased gradually with age and among all patients massively transfused at age 80 years, only 26% were alive [TABLE PRESENTED] after 5 years. The relative mortality, early after transfusion, was high and decreased with time since transfusion...... transfusion due to obstetrical bleeding constituted 2.6%. Median age at massive transfusion was 67 years and two thirds of the patients were male. The median number of blood components transfused per massive transfusion episode was 22. RBCs formed the majority of blood components transfused. However...

  4. Recoil-range studies of heavy products of multinucleon transfer from /sup 18/O to /sup 245/Cm and /sup 249/Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, R.M.

    1982-09-01

    Recoil range distributions were measured for alpha and spontaneous fission activities made in the bombardment of /sup 245/Cm and /sup 249/Cf with /sup 18/O from 6.20 MeV/nucleon down to the interaction barrier. The shape of the distributions indicates tht transfers of up to four protons take place via a combination of quasi-elastic (QET) and deep inelastic (DIT) mechanisms, rather than complete fusion-de-excitation (CF) or massive transfer (MT). Angular distributions constructed from recoil range distributions, assuming QET/DIT, indicate that the QET component contributes more significantly to the heavy product residue cross section than the DIT, even though primary cross sections are expected to be higher for DIT than for QET. This may be explained qualitatively as a result of the high excitation energies associated with DIT; the very negative Q/sub gg/ of projectile stripping for these systems combined with the lower expected optimal Q/sub rxn/ of QET compared to DIT can give QET products comparatively low excitation.

  5. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, F.F. [Universidade Estadual do Piaui, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed. (orig.)

  6. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Xu, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Khoukaz, A.; Taeschner, A. [Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Klehr, F.; Wuestner, P. [Elektronik und Analytik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Zentralinstitut fuer Engineering, Juelich (Germany); Ritman, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to 90 {sup circle} are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment. (orig.)

  7. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90°

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Khoukaz, A.; Klehr, F.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Täschner, A.; Wuestner, P.; Xu, H.

    2014-10-01

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment.

  8. [Massive pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Olivier; Planquette, Benjamin; Wermert, Delphine; Marié, Elisabeth; Meyer, Guy

    2008-10-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism is defined by systemic hypotension or cardiogenic shock. Clinically stable patients with right ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography, elevated brain natriuretic peptide or troponin are usually considered as having sub-massive pulmonary embolism, but this definition is not universally accepted. The time-lag to confirm massive pulmonary embolism should be kept as short as possible and every effort should be done to rely on bedside tests and to avoid patient transfer to the radiology department. D-dimer tests are useless in this setting and the diagnosis is mainly based on clinical probability and bedside echocardiography. When clinical probability is high, right ventricular dilatation assessed by echocardiography allows confirming the diagnosis without additional testing. On the other hand a normal echocardiography does not allow excluding pulmonary embolism. In this setting, a spiral computed tomography is mandatory after the patient has been stabilized. Anticoagulant treatment should be started as soon as pulmonary embolism has been suspected. Supportive care includes oxygen, fluid loading and inotropes. There is little doubt that thrombolytic treatment is of value in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. Conversely, the use of thrombolytic therapy in patients with so-called sub-massive pulmonary embolism remains controversial. Current data do not confirm that thrombolytic therapy decreases mortality in those patients but cannot exclude a clinically significant benefit. A large randomised comparison of heparin and thrombolysis in patients with sub-massive pulmonary embolism is underway to answer this question. Surgical or catheter embolectomy is nowadays only rarely performed in patients with pulmonary embolism. This method can be undertaken in the few patients with persisting shock despite supportive care and who have an absolute contraindication for thrombolytic therapy. Before new data are available there is no special

  9. Testing the blazar sequence and black hole mass scaling with BL Lac objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotkin, R.M.; Markoff, S.; Anderson, S.F.; Kelly, B.C.; Körding, E.; Trager, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    Jets from accreting black holes appear remarkably similar over eight orders of magnitude in black hole mass, with more massive black holes generally launching more powerful jets. For example, there is an observed correlation, termed the fundamental plane of black hole accretion, between black hole

  10. Testing the blazar sequence and black hole mass scaling with BL Lac objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Markoff, Sera; Anderson, Scott F.; Kelly, Brandon C.; Körding, Elmar; Trager, Scott C.; Romero, Gustavo E.; Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Belloni, Tomaso

    Jets from accreting black holes appear remarkably similar over eight orders of magnitude in black hole mass, with more massive black holes generally launching more powerful jets. For example, there is an observed correlation, termed the fundamental plane of black hole accretion, between black hole

  11. Heavy ion recoil spectrometry of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, S.R.; Johnston, P.N.; Bubb, I.F. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Hult, M.; Whitlow, H.J. [Lund Institute of Technology, Solvegatan (Sweden). Department of Nuclear Physics; Zaring, C.; Oestling, M. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Solid State Electronics

    1993-12-31

    Mass and energy dispersive recoil spectrometry employing 77 MeV {sup 127}I ions from ANTARES (FN Tandem) facility at Lucas Heights has been used to examine the isotopic composition of samples of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} grown at the Australian National University by Electron Beam Evaporation (EBE). The recoiling target nuclei were analysed by a Time Of Flight and Energy (TOF-E) detector telescope composed of two timing pickoff detectors and a surface barrier (energy) detector. From the time of flight and energy, the ion mass can be determined and individual depth distributions for each element can be obtained. Recoil spectrometry has shown the presence of oxygen in the Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} layer and has enabled the separate determination of energy spectra for individual elements. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Nitrogen depletion of indium nitride films during Elastic Recoil Detection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Santosh K. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University College, University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy, Northcott Dr, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia)]. E-mail: s.shrestha@adfa.edu.au; Timmers, Heiko [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University College, University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy, Northcott Dr, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Butcher, K. Scott A. [Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Wintrebert-Fouquet, Marie [Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Chen, Patrick P.-T. [Department of Physics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2005-06-01

    Elastic Recoil Detection analysis of different types of indium nitride films has been performed using a 200 MeV Au beam. Recoil ions were detected with a gas ionisation detector featuring a large detection solid angle. Severe and non-linear nitrogen depletion has been observed, with films grown by RF-sputtering losing nitrogen more quickly than MBE-grown films. Assuming the formation of molecular nitrogen as the decisive step leading to nitrogen loss, the nitrogen depletion process has been modelled using the bulk molecular recombination model. The model allows accurate extrapolations of the original nitrogen content of the material. Since the other important elements can also be quantified, the stoichiometry of the film can thus reliably be obtained from Elastic Recoil Detection analysis. All the films analysed have been found to have excess nitrogen.

  13. Collisional entanglement fidelities in quantum plasmas including strong quantum recoil and oscillation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-10-01

    The quantum recoil and oscillation effects on the entanglement fidelity and the electron-exchange function for the electron-ion collision are investigated in a semiconductor plasma by using the partial wave analysis and effective interaction potential in strong quantum recoil regime. The magnitude of the electron-exchange function is found to increase as the collision energy increases, but it decreases with an increase in the exchange parameter. It is also found that the collisional entanglement fidelity in strong quantum recoil plasmas is enhanced by the quantum-mechanical and shielding effects. The collisional entanglement fidelity in a semiconductor plasma is also enhanced by the collective plasmon oscillation and electron-exchange effect. However, the electron-exchange effect on the fidelity ratio function is reduced as the plasmon energy increases. Moreover, the electron-exchange influence on the fidelity ratio function is found to increase as the Fermi energy in the semiconductor plasma increases.

  14. Massive binary evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2010-03-01

    Understanding the evolution of massive binaries is essential for understanding many observed classes of stellar systems, ranging from Algols to X-ray binaries, recycled pulsars, double-neutron-star systems and quite possibly gamma-ray burst sources. Here recent progress and some of the main remaining uncertainties are being reviewed, particularly emphasizing stellar mergers and their possible implications for supernovae like SN 1987A, Thorne-Żytkow objects and η Car-like eruptions. It is shown how binary evolution can affect both the envelope and the core structure of a massive star, explaining - at least in part - the observed diversity of core-collapse supernovae and potentially producing different kick distributions for systems in binaries. Various ideas linking gamma-ray bursts to massive binaries are also being discussed.

  15. How Massive Single Stars End Their Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Woosley, S. E.; Langer, N.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    How massive stars die-what sort of explosion and remnant each produces-depends chiefly on the masses of their helium cores and hydrogen envelopes at death. For single stars, stellar winds are the only means of mass loss, and these are a function of the metallicity of the star. We discuss how metallicity, and a simplified prescription for its effect on mass loss, affects the evolution and final fate of massive stars. We map, as a function of mass and metallicity, where black holes and neutron stars are likely to form and where different types of supernovae are produced. Integrating over an initial mass function, we derive the relative populations as a function of metallicity. Provided that single stars rotate rapidly enough at death, we speculate on stellar populations that might produce gamma-ray bursts and jet-driven supernovae.

  16. On recoil energy dependent void swelling in pure copper: Theoretical treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubov, S.I.; Singh, Bachu Narain; Trinkaus, H.

    2000-01-01

    in Part I of this paper (Singh, Eldrup, Horsewell, Ehrhart and Dworschak 2000). The present paper attempts to provide a theoretical framework within which theeffect of recoil energy on damage accumulation behaviour can be understood. The damage accumulation under Frenkel pair production (e.g. 2.5 Me...... such asone-dimensional diffusional transport and thermal stability are found to be the main reasons for the recoil energy dependent vacancy supersaturation. The vacancy supersaturation is the main driving force for the void nucleation and void swelling. In thecase of Frenkel pair production, the experimental...

  17. A new recoil distance technique using low energy coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rother, W., E-mail: wolfram.rother@googlemail.com [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Dewald, A.; Pascovici, G.; Fransen, C.; Friessner, G.; Hackstein, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Ilie, G. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Iwasaki, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Jolie, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Melon, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) I-50019 (Italy); Petkov, P. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); INRNE-BAS, Sofia (Bulgaria); Pfeiffer, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Pissulla, Th. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Bundesumweltministerium, Robert-Schuman-Platz 3, D - 53175 Bonn (Germany); Zell, K.-O. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Jakobsson, U.; Julin, R.; Jones, P.; Ketelhut, S.; Nieminen, P.; Peura, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); and others

    2011-10-21

    We report on the first experiment combining the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift technique and multistep Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics at beam energies of 3-10 A MeV. The setup involves a standard plunger device equipped with a degrader foil instead of the normally used stopper foil. An array of particle detectors is positioned at forward angles to detect target-like recoil nuclei which are used as a trigger to discriminate against excitations in the degrader foil. The method has been successfully applied to measure lifetimes in {sup 128}Xe and is suited to be a useful tool for experiments with radioactive ion beams.

  18. Radiation Recoil Effects on the Dynamical Evolution of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desiree

    The Yarkovsky effect is a radiation recoil force that results in a semimajor axis drift in the orbit that can cause Main Belt asteroids to be delivered to powerful resonances from which they could be transported to Earth-crossing orbits. This force depends on the spin state of the object, which is modified by the YORP effect, a variation of the Yarkovsky effect that results in a torque that changes the spin rate and the obliquity. Extensive analyses of the basic behavior of the YORP effect have been previously conducted in the context of the classical spin state evolution of rigid bodies (YORP cycle). However, the YORP effect has an extreme sensitivity to the topography of the asteroids and a minor change in the shape of an aggregate asteroid can stochastically change the YORP torques. Here we present the results of the first simulations that self-consistently model the YORP effect on the spin states of dynamically evolving aggregates. For these simulations we have developed several algorithms and combined them with two codes, TACO and pkdgrav. TACO is a thermophysical asteroid code that models the surface of an asteroid using a triangular facet representation and which can compute the YORP torques. The code pkdgrav is a cosmological N-body tree code modified to simulate the dynamical evolution of asteroids represented as aggregates of spheres using gravity and collisions. The continuous changes in the shape of an aggregate result in a different evolution of the YORP torques and therefore aggregates do not evolve through the YORP cycle as a rigid body would. Instead of having a spin evolution ruled by long periods of rotational acceleration and deceleration as predicted by the classical YORP cycle, the YORP effect is self-limiting and stochastic on aggregate asteroids. We provide a statistical description of the spin state evolution which lays out the foundation for new simulations of a coupled Yarkovsky/YORP evolution. Both self-limiting YORP and to a lesser

  19. Sinus Histiocytosis with Massive Lymphadenopathy | Sinclair-Smith ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cases of a recently described entity, 'sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy,' occurring in Black males, are reported. Prominent cervical adenopathy was the main presenting feature in both. Histologically, these nodes were characterised by pronounced proliferation of sinus histiocytes which showed ...

  20. Turning points of massive particles in Schwarzschild geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Polonyi, J.; Radosz, A.; Siwek, A.; Ostasiewicz, K.

    2009-01-01

    The stable geodesics in Schwarzschild geometry can not approach the center closer than the radius of the photon sphere, 3/2 times the Schwarzschild radius. In other words, massive particles moving along geodesics that cross the photon sphere do not escape, they fall into the black hole.

  1. Massive Stars as Progenitors of Supernovae and GRBs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langer, N.; van Marle, A.J.; Poelarends, A.J.T.; Yoon, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary fate of massive stars in our Milky Way is thought to be reasonably well understood: stars above ˜ 8 M_o produce neutron stars and supernovae, while those above ˜ 20...30 M_o are presumed to form black holes. At metallicities below that of the SMC, however, our knowledge becomes

  2. Lifshitz black holes in IIA supergravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barclay, Luke; Gregory, Ruth; Parameswaran, Susha; Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Zavala, Ivonne

    We compute string theoretic black hole solutions having Lifshitz asymptotics with a general dynamical exponent z > 1. We start by constructing solutions in a flux compactification of six dimensional supergravity, then uplift them to massive type HA supergravity. Alongside the Lifshitz black holes we

  3. In vivo assessment of stent recoil of biodegradable polymer-coated cobalt-chromium sirolimus-eluting coronary stent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Atul D; Thakkar, Ashok S

    2012-01-01

    Immediate and acute stent recoil has been observed following balloon deflation in normal and diseased coronary arteries, and the degree varies by stent design. A total of 19 patients, who underwent elective stent implantation for single de novo native coronary artery lesions, were enrolled: all patients treated with the biodegradable polymer-coated sirolimus-eluting cobalt-chromium coronary stent system (Supralimus-Core(®)). The immediate, acute and cumulative stent recoil was assessed by quantitative coronary angiography. The cumulative stent recoil was measured at 24 h of stent implantation. The absolute late loss due to recoil was found 0.08 ± 0.19 mm for Immediate Stent Recoil (ISR), 0.05 ± 0.21 mm for Acute Stent Recoil (ASR) and 0.11 ± 0.25 mm for Cumulative Stent Recoil (CSR) respectively. In vivo acute stent recoil of the Supralimus-Core(®) has higher radial strength compared to other available standard drug-eluting stents. Copyright © 2012 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Update on massive transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, H P; Shaz, B H

    2013-12-01

    Massive haemorrhage requires massive transfusion (MT) to maintain adequate circulation and haemostasis. For optimal management of massively bleeding patients, regardless of aetiology (trauma, obstetrical, surgical), effective preparation and communication between transfusion and other laboratory services and clinical teams are essential. A well-defined MT protocol is a valuable tool to delineate how blood products are ordered, prepared, and delivered; determine laboratory algorithms to use as transfusion guidelines; and outline duties and facilitate communication between involved personnel. In MT patients, it is crucial to practice damage control resuscitation and to administer blood products early in the resuscitation. Trauma patients are often admitted with early trauma-induced coagulopathy (ETIC), which is associated with mortality; the aetiology of ETIC is likely multifactorial. Current data support that trauma patients treated with higher ratios of plasma and platelet to red blood cell transfusions have improved outcomes, but further clinical investigation is needed. Additionally, tranexamic acid has been shown to decrease the mortality in trauma patients requiring MT. Greater use of cryoprecipitate or fibrinogen concentrate might be beneficial in MT patients from obstetrical causes. The risks and benefits for other therapies (prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII, or whole blood) are not clearly defined in MT patients. Throughout the resuscitation, the patient should be closely monitored and both metabolic and coagulation abnormalities corrected. Further studies are needed to clarify the optimal ratios of blood products, treatment based on underlying clinical disorder, use of alternative therapies, and integration of laboratory testing results in the management of massively bleeding patients.

  5. COLA with massive neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bill S.; Winther, Hans A.; Koyama, Kazuya

    2017-10-01

    The effect of massive neutrinos on the growth of cold dark matter perturbations acts as a scale-dependent Newton's constant and leads to scale-dependent growth factors just as we often find in models of gravity beyond General Relativity. We show how to compute growth factors for ΛCDM and general modified gravity cosmologies combined with massive neutrinos in Lagrangian perturbation theory for use in COLA and extensions thereof. We implement this together with the grid-based massive neutrino method of Brandbyge and Hannestad in MG-PICOLA and compare COLA simulations to full N-body simulations of ΛCDM and f(R) gravity with massive neutrinos. Our implementation is computationally cheap if the underlying cosmology already has scale-dependent growth factors and it is shown to be able to produce results that match N-body to percent level accuracy for both the total and CDM matter power-spectra up to klesssim 1 h/Mpc.

  6. Quantum mechanics of black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Edward

    2012-08-03

    The popular conception of black holes reflects the behavior of the massive black holes found by astronomers and described by classical general relativity. These objects swallow up whatever comes near and emit nothing. Physicists who have tried to understand the behavior of black holes from a quantum mechanical point of view, however, have arrived at quite a different picture. The difference is analogous to the difference between thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. The thermodynamic description is a good approximation for a macroscopic system, but statistical mechanics describes what one will see if one looks more closely.

  7. Superradiance by mini black holes with mirror

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Phil

    2011-01-01

    The superradiant scattering of massive scalar particles by a rotating mini black hole is investigated. Imposing the mirror boundary condition, the system becomes the so called black-hole bomb where the rotation energy of the black hole is transferred to the scattered particle exponentially with time. Bulk emissions as well as brane emissions are considered altogether. It is found that the largest effects are expected for the brane emission of lower angular modes with lighter mass and larger a...

  8. Detection of low momentum protons with the new HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilardi, Ignazio

    2008-10-15

    In this theis the recoil detector for the HERMES experiment at HERA is described. It consists of a silicon strip detector, a scintillating fiber tracker, and a photon detector for the {delta}{sup +} background rejection, all surrounded by a superconducting 1 Tesla solenoid. Results of cosmic ray tests are presented. (HSI)

  9. Measurement of light and charge yield of low-energy electronic recoils in liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzke, L. W.; Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; Plante, G.; Weber, M.

    2017-11-01

    The dependence of the light and charge yield of liquid xenon on the applied electric field and recoil energy is important for dark matter detectors using liquid xenon time projections chambers. Few measurements have been made of this field dependence at recoil energies less than 10 keV. In this paper, we present results of such measurements using a specialized detector. Recoil energies are determined via the Compton coincidence technique at four drift fields relevant for liquid xenon dark matter detectors: 0.19, 0.48, 1.02, and 2.32 kV /cm . Mean recoil energies down to 1 keV were measured with unprecedented precision. We find that the charge and light yield are anticorrelated above ˜3 keV and that the field dependence becomes negligible below ˜6 keV . However, below 3 keV, we find a charge yield significantly higher than expectation and a reconstructed energy deviating from linearity.

  10. WITCH: a recoil spectrometer for weak interaction and nuclear physics studies

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, M; Golovko, V.V.; Kozlov, V.Yu.; Kraev, I.S.; Lindroth, A.; Phalet, T.; Schuurmans, P.; Severijns, N.; Vereecke, B.; Versyck, S.; Beck, D.; Quint, W.; Ames, F.; Bollen, G.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental set-up is described for the precise measurement of the recoil energy spectrum of the daughter ions from nuclear beta decay. The experiment is called WITCH, short for Weak Interaction Trap for CHarged particles, and is set up at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The principle of the experiment and its realization are explained as well as the main physics goal. A cloud of radioactive ions stored in a Penning trap serves as the source for the WITCH experiment, leading to the minimization of scattering and energy loss of the decay products. The energy spectrum of the recoiling daughter ions from the $\\beta$--decays in this ion cloud will be measured with a retardation spectrometer. The principal aim of the WITCH experiment is to study the electroweak interaction by determining the beta--neutrino angular correlation in nuclear $\\beta$--decay from the shape of this recoil energy spectrum. This will be the first time that the recoil energy spectrum of the daughter ions from $\\beta$--decay can be measured ...

  11. Hybrid recoil mass analyzer at IUAC–First results using gas-filled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hybrid recoil mass analyzer (HYRA) is a unique, dual-mode spectrometer designed to carry out nuclear reaction and structure studies in heavy and medium-mass nuclei using gas-filled and vacuum modes, respectively and has the potential to address newer domains in nuclear physics accessible using high energy, ...

  12. Nuclear radiative recoil corrections to the hyperfine structure of S-states in muonic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustov, R. N.; Martynenko, A. P.; Martynenko, F. A.; Sorokin, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear radiative recoil corrections of order α( Zα)5 to the hyperfine splitting of S-states in muonic hydrogen are calculated on the basis of quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics. The calculation is performed in the infrared safe Fried-Yennie gauge. Modern experimental data on the proton form factors are used.

  13. Photon recoil momentum in a Bose–Einstein condensate of a dilute gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avetisyan, Yu. A.; Malyshev, V.A.; Trifonov, E. D.

    We develop a ‘minimal’ microscopic model to describe a two-pulse-Ramsey-interferometerbased scheme of measurement of the photon recoil momentum in a Bose–Einstein condensate of a dilute gas (Campbell et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 170403). We exploit the truncated coupled Maxwell–Schrödinger

  14. Controllability analysis and testing of a novel magnetorheological absorber for field gun recoil mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qing; Zheng, Jiajia; Li, Zhaochun; Hu, Ming; Wang, Jiong

    2016-11-01

    This paper aims to analyze the effects of combined working coils of magnetorheological (MR) absorber on the shock mitigation performance and verify the controllability of MR absorber as applied in the recoil system of a field gun. A physical scale model of the field gun is established and a long-stroke MR recoil absorber with four-stage parallel electromagnetic coils is designed to apply separate current to each stage and generate variable magnetic field distribution in the annular flow channel. Based on dynamic analysis and firing stability conditions of the field gun, ideal recoil force-stroke profiles of MR absorber at different limiting firing angles are obtained. The experimental studies are carried out on an impact test rig under different combinations of current loading: conventional unified control mode, separate control mode and timing control mode. The fullness degree index (FDI) is defined as the quantitative evaluation criterion of the controllability of MR absorber during the whole recoil motion. The results show that the force-stroke profile of the novel MR absorber can approach the ideal curve within 25 degrees of the limiting firing angle through judicious exploitation of the adjustable rheological properties of MR fluid.

  15. Superradiantly stable non-extremal Reissner-Nordstroem black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jia-Hui [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, Guangzhou (China); Mai, Zhan-Feng [Beijing Normal University, Department of Physics, Center for Advanced Quantum Studies, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    The superradiant stability is investigated for non-extremal Reissner-Nordstroem black holes. We use an algebraic method to demonstrate that all non-extremal Reissner-Nordstroem black holes are superradiantly stable against a charged massive scalar perturbation. This improves the results obtained before for non-extremal Reissner-Nordstroem black holes. (orig.)

  16. Exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production measured with the HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Benito, Roberto Francisco

    2010-12-15

    The Hermes experiment (HERa MEasurement of Spin) at Desy was designed to study the spin structure of the nucleon in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. The internal structure of the nucleon has been investigated in detail and it has been measured that the intrinsic quark spin contribution is only about 30% of the total spin of the nucleon. A formalism to describe the internal structure of the nucleon called Generalised Patron Distributions (GPDs) was developed recently to understand the fundamental structure of the nucleon. These GPDs can be accessed by the measurement of hard exclusive reactions and hard exclusive processes that can be understood in terms of GPDs. The accumulated Hermes data offer access to GPDs in different combinations of beam charge and beam and target helicity asymmetries. To improve exclusivity and to enhance the resolution of kinematic variables to study hard exclusive processes which provide access to the GPDs and hence to the orbital angular momentum of the quarks, in January 2006 a Recoil Detector was installed that surrounded the internal gas target of the Hermes experiment. The Hermes Recoil Detector consisted of three components: a silicon strip detector inside the vacuum, a scintillating fiber tracker and the photon detector. All three detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnet which provided a 1T longitudinal magnetic field. The Recoil Detector improves the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the momentum and track position of the recoiling particle as well as by rejecting non-exclusive background. This detector was an ideal novel tool to combine energy and position measurements for charged particles in a momentum range of 0.1 to 1.4 GeV/c. The Recoil Detector was fully commissioned and operating. Data was taken continuously until the final Hera shutdown in July of 2007. In this thesis we report on the performance of the Recoil Detector and more specifically about the scintillating fiber tracker

  17. Quantification of Left Ventricular Torsion and Diastolic Recoil Using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Myocardial Feature Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shazia T.; Kutty, Shelby; Steinmetz, Michael; Sohns, Jan M.; Fasshauer, Martin; Staab, Wieland; Unterberg-Buchwald, Christina; Bigalke, Boris; Lotz, Joachim; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Schuster, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Cardiovascular magnetic resonance feature tracking (CMR-FT) offers quantification of myocardial deformation from routine cine images. However, data using CMR-FT to quantify left ventricular (LV) torsion and diastolic recoil are not yet available. We therefore sought to evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of CMR-FT to quantify LV torsion and peak recoil rate using an optimal anatomical approach. Methods Short-axis cine stacks were acquired at rest and during dobutamine stimulation (10 and 20 µg·kg−1·min−1) in 10 healthy volunteers. Rotational displacement was analysed for all slices. A complete 3D-LV rotational model was developed using linear interpolation between adjacent slices. Torsion was defined as the difference between apical and basal rotation, divided by slice distance. Depending on the distance between the most apical (defined as 0% LV distance) and basal (defined as 100% LV distance) slices, four different models for the calculation of torsion were examined: Model-1 (25–75%), Model-2 (0–100%), Model-3 (25–100%) and Model-4 (0–75%). Analysis included subendocardial, subepicardial and global torsion and recoil rate (mean of subendocardial and subepicardial values). Results Quantification of torsion and recoil rate was feasible in all subjects. There was no significant difference between the different models at rest. However, only Model-1 (25–75%) discriminated between rest and stress (Global Torsion: 2.7±1.5°cm−1, 3.6±2.0°cm−1, 5.1±2.2°cm−1, p<0.01; Global Recoil Rate: −30.1±11.1°cm−1s−1,−46.9±15.0°cm−1s−1,−68.9±32.3°cm−1s−1, p<0.01; for rest, 10 and 20 µg·kg−1·min−1 of dobutamine, respectively). Reproducibility was sufficient for all parameters as determined by Bland-Altman analysis, intraclass correlation coefficients and coefficient of variation. Conclusions CMR-FT based derivation of myocardial torsion and recoil rate is feasible and reproducible at rest and with dobutamine

  18. Quantification of left ventricular torsion and diastolic recoil using cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes T Kowallick

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular magnetic resonance feature tracking (CMR-FT offers quantification of myocardial deformation from routine cine images. However, data using CMR-FT to quantify left ventricular (LV torsion and diastolic recoil are not yet available. We therefore sought to evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of CMR-FT to quantify LV torsion and peak recoil rate using an optimal anatomical approach.Short-axis cine stacks were acquired at rest and during dobutamine stimulation (10 and 20 µg · kg(-1 · min(-1 in 10 healthy volunteers. Rotational displacement was analysed for all slices. A complete 3D-LV rotational model was developed using linear interpolation between adjacent slices. Torsion was defined as the difference between apical and basal rotation, divided by slice distance. Depending on the distance between the most apical (defined as 0% LV distance and basal (defined as 100% LV distance slices, four different models for the calculation of torsion were examined: Model-1 (25-75%, Model-2 (0-100%, Model-3 (25-100% and Model-4 (0-75%. Analysis included subendocardial, subepicardial and global torsion and recoil rate (mean of subendocardial and subepicardial values.Quantification of torsion and recoil rate was feasible in all subjects. There was no significant difference between the different models at rest. However, only Model-1 (25-75% discriminated between rest and stress (Global Torsion: 2.7 ± 1.5° cm(-1, 3.6 ± 2.0° cm(-1, 5.1 ± 2.2° cm(-1, p<0.01; Global Recoil Rate: -30.1 ± 11.1° cm(-1 s(-1,-46.9 ± 15.0° cm(-1 s(-1,-68.9 ± 32.3° cm(-1 s(-1, p<0.01; for rest, 10 and 20 µg · kg(-1 · min(-1 of dobutamine, respectively. Reproducibility was sufficient for all parameters as determined by Bland-Altman analysis, intraclass correlation coefficients and coefficient of variation.CMR-FT based derivation of myocardial torsion and recoil rate is feasible and reproducible at rest and with dobutamine stress. Using an optimal

  19. Massive prepatellar bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Terry L; Simpson, Bonnie M; Burgess, Derrick; Wilson, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    An adult male with cerebral palsy was admitted to our institution with a massive prepatellar bursa. The condition resulted from the patient's use of crawling as a means of household ambulation. The bursa had become infected secondarily, prompting him to seek medical attention. The bursa was excised in its entirety, allowing for relief of his symptoms. The patient expired three years later from unrelated causes.

  20. Dual massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morand, Kevin, E-mail: Kevin.Morand@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson - CNRS, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Solodukhin, Sergey N., E-mail: Sergey.Solodukhin@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson - CNRS, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)

    2012-08-29

    The linearized massive gravity in three dimensions, over any maximally symmetric background, is known to be presented in a self-dual form as a first order equation which encodes not only the massive Klein-Gordon type field equation but also the supplementary transverse-traceless conditions. We generalize this construction to higher dimensions. The appropriate dual description in d dimensions, additionally to a (non-symmetric) tensor field h{sub {mu}{nu}}, involves an extra rank-(d-1) field equivalently represented by the torsion rank-3 tensor. The symmetry condition for h{sub {mu}{nu}} arises on-shell as a consequence of the field equations. The action principle of the dual theory is formulated. The focus has been made on four dimensions. Solving one of the fields in terms of the other and putting back in the action one obtains two other equivalent formulations of the theory in which the action is quadratic in derivatives. In one of these representations the theory is formulated entirely in terms of a rank-2 non-symmetric tensor h{sub {mu}{nu}}. This quadratic theory is not identical to the Fierz-Pauli theory and contains the coupling between the symmetric and antisymmetric parts of h{sub {mu}{nu}}. Nevertheless, the only singularity in the propagator is the same as in the Fierz-Pauli theory so that only the massive spin-2 particle is propagating. In the other representation, the theory is formulated in terms of the torsion rank-3 tensor only. We analyze the conditions which follow from the field equations and show that they restrict to 5 degrees of freedom thus producing an alternative description to the massive spin-2 particle. A generalization to higher dimensions is suggested.

  1. Minimal massive 3D gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Hohm, Olaf; Merbis, Wout; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    We present an alternative to topologically massive gravity (TMG) with the same 'minimal' bulk properties; i.e. a single local degree of freedom that is realized as a massive graviton in linearization about an anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacuum. However, in contrast to TMG, the new 'minimal massive gravity'

  2. Black holes and galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Propst, Raphael J

    2010-01-01

    Galaxies are the basic unit of cosmology. The study of galaxy formation is concerned with the processes that formed a heterogeneous universe from a homogeneous beginning. The physics of galaxy formation is complicated because it deals with the dynamics of stars, thermodynamics of gas and energy production of stars. A black hole is a massive object whose gravitational field is so intense that it prevents any form of matter or radiation to escape. It is hypothesized that the most massive galaxies in the universe- "elliptical galaxies"- grow simultaneously with the supermassive black holes at their centers, giving us much stronger evidence that black holes control galaxy formation. This book reviews new evidence in the field.

  3. Black Hole Kicks as New Gravitational Wave Observables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerosa, Davide; Moore, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Generic black hole binaries radiate gravitational waves anisotropically, imparting a recoil, or kick, velocity to the merger remnant. If a component of the kick along the line of sight is present, gravitational waves emitted during the final orbits and merger will be gradually Doppler shifted as the kick builds up. We develop a simple prescription to capture this effect in existing waveform models, showing that future gravitational wave experiments will be able to perform direct measurements, not only of the black hole kick velocity, but also of its accumulation profile. In particular, the eLISA space mission will measure supermassive black hole kick velocities as low as ∼500  km s^{-1}, which are expected to be a common outcome of black hole binary coalescence following galaxy mergers. Black hole kicks thus constitute a promising new observable in the growing field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  4. Black-hole kicks as new gravitational-wave observables

    CERN Document Server

    Gerosa, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Generic black-hole binaries radiate gravitational waves anisotropically, imparting a recoil, or kick velocity to the merger remnant. If a component of the kick along the line-of-sight is present, gravitational waves emitted during the final orbits and merger will be gradually Doppler-shifted as the kick builds up. We develop a simple prescription to capture this effect in existing waveform models, showing that future gravitational-wave experiments will be able to perform direct measurements, not only of the black-hole kick velocity, but also of its accumulation profile. In particular, the eLISA space mission will measure supermassive black-hole kick velocities as low as ~500 km/s, which are expected to be a common outcome of black-hole binary coalescence following galaxy mergers. Black-hole kicks thus constitute a promising new observable in the growing field of gravitational-wave astronomy.

  5. First detection and energy measurement of recoil ions following beta decay in a Penning trap with the WITCH experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, M; Kozlov, V Yu; Breitenfeld, M; Delahaye, P; Friedag, P; Herbane, M; Herlert, A; Kraev, I S; Mader, J; Tandecki, M; Van Gorp, S; Wauters, F; Weinheimer, Ch; Wenander, F; Severijns, N

    2011-01-01

    The WITCH experiment (Weak Interaction Trap for CHarged particles) will search for exotic interactions by investigating the beta-neutrino angular correlation via the measurement of the recoil energy spectrum after beta decay. As a first step the recoil ions from the beta-minus decay of 124In stored in a Penning trap have been detected. The evidence for the detection of recoil ions is shown and the properties of the ion cloud that forms the radioactive source for the experiment in the Penning trap are presented.

  6. Black Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks passed down a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  7. Black Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt

    1988-01-01

    Examines some aspects of the problem of alcoholism among Blacks, asserting that Black alcoholism can best be considered in an ecological, environmental, sociocultural, and public health context. Notes need for further research on alcoholism among Blacks and for action to reduce the problem of Black alcoholism. (NB)

  8. Renormalized vacuum polarization of rotating black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, Hugo R C

    2015-01-01

    Quantum field theory on rotating black hole spacetimes is plagued with technical difficulties. Here, we describe a general method to renormalize and compute the vacuum polarization of a quantum field in the Hartle-Hawking state on rotating black holes. We exemplify the technique with a massive scalar field on the warped AdS3 black hole solution to topologically massive gravity, a deformation of (2+1)-dimensional Einstein gravity. We use a "quasi-Euclidean" technique, which generalizes the Euclidean techniques used for static spacetimes, and we subtract the divergences by matching to a sum over mode solutions on Minkowski spacetime. This allows us, for the first time, to have a general method to compute the renormalized vacuum polarization (and, more importantly, the renormalized stress-energy tensor), for a given quantum state, on a rotating black hole, such as the physically relevant case of the Kerr black hole in four dimensions.

  9. Black Saturn

    OpenAIRE

    Elvang, Henriette; Figueras, Pau

    2007-01-01

    Using the inverse scattering method we construct an exact stationary asymptotically flat 4+1-dimensional vacuum solution describing Black Saturn: a spherical black hole surrounded by a black ring. Angular momentum keeps the configuration in equilibrium. Black saturn reveals a number of interesting gravitational phenomena: (1) The balanced solution exhibits 2-fold continuous non-uniqueness for fixed mass and angular momentum; (2) Remarkably, the 4+1d Schwarzschild black hole is not unique, sin...

  10. Massive fetomaternal hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rune; Berkowicz, Adela; Lousen, Thea

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clearance of D+ red blood cells (RBCs) from the circulation in D- individuals mediated by passively administered anti-D occurs by opsonization with the antibody and subsequent removal in the spleen. Few data exist on the kinetics of clearance of large volumes of D+ RBCs from...... the maternal circulation by anti-D in clinical cases of massive fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH). CASE REPORT: A 33-year-old D- woman delivered a D+ female infant by emergency cesarean section for suspected fetal anemia. A massive FMH, initially estimated to be approximately 142 mL of RBCs, was found. In addition...... had no detectable anti-D 6 months after delivery. RESULTS: No clearance of fetal cells was apparent after the insufficient dose of IM anti-D. The IV administration of anti-D caused accelerated clearance of D+ fetal RBCs with a t1/2 of 24.5 hours. D+ reticulocytes comprised 4.2 percent of all D+ cells...

  11. Phases of massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dubovsky, S L

    2004-01-01

    We systematically study the most general Lorentz-violating graviton mass invariant under three-dimensional Eucledian group using the explicitly covariant language. We find that at general values of mass parameters the massive graviton has six propagating degrees of freedom, and some of them are ghosts or lead to rapid classical instabilities. However, there is a number of different regions in the mass parameter space where massive gravity can be described by a consistent low-energy effective theory with cutoff $\\sim\\sqrt{mM_{Pl}}$ free of rapid instabilities and vDVZ discontinuity. Each of these regions is characterized by certain fine-tuning relations between mass parameters, generalizing the Fierz--Pauli condition. In some cases the required fine-tunings are consequences of the existence of the subgroups of the diffeomorphism group that are left unbroken by the graviton mass. We found two new cases, when the resulting theories have a property of UV insensitivity, i.e. remain well behaved after inclusion of ...

  12. Massively Parallel QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltz, R; Vranas, P; Blumrich, M; Chen, D; Gara, A; Giampap, M; Heidelberger, P; Salapura, V; Sexton, J; Bhanot, G

    2007-04-11

    The theory of the strong nuclear force, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), can be numerically simulated from first principles on massively-parallel supercomputers using the method of Lattice Gauge Theory. We describe the special programming requirements of lattice QCD (LQCD) as well as the optimal supercomputer hardware architectures that it suggests. We demonstrate these methods on the BlueGene massively-parallel supercomputer and argue that LQCD and the BlueGene architecture are a natural match. This can be traced to the simple fact that LQCD is a regular lattice discretization of space into lattice sites while the BlueGene supercomputer is a discretization of space into compute nodes, and that both are constrained by requirements of locality. This simple relation is both technologically important and theoretically intriguing. The main result of this paper is the speedup of LQCD using up to 131,072 CPUs on the largest BlueGene/L supercomputer. The speedup is perfect with sustained performance of about 20% of peak. This corresponds to a maximum of 70.5 sustained TFlop/s. At these speeds LQCD and BlueGene are poised to produce the next generation of strong interaction physics theoretical results.

  13. Zooming in on B → K*ll decays at low recoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brass, Simon [Universitaet Siegen, Theoretische Physik 1, Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultaet, Siegen (Germany); Hiller, Gudrun; Nisandzic, Ivan [Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Institut fuer Physik, Dortmund (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    We analyse B → K*ll decays in the region of low hadronic recoil, where an operator product expansion (OPE) in 1/m{sub b} applies. Using a local model for charm contributions based on e{sup +}e{sup -} → hadrons against the OPE provides a data-driven method to access the limitations to the OPE's accuracy related to binnings in the dilepton mass. Model-independent fits to B → K*μμ low recoil angular observables exhibit presently only small sensitivity to different charm models. They give similar results to the fits based on the OPE and are in agreement with the standard model, but leave also room for new physics. Measurements with resolution small enough to probe charm resonances would be desirable. (orig.)

  14. Coupling of the recoil mass spectrometer CAMEL to the {gamma}-ray spectrometer GASP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spolaore, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Ackermann, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Bednarczyk, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; De Angelis, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Napoli, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy). Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro; Rossi Alvarez, C. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Bazzacco, D. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Burch, R. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Mueller, L. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Segato, G.F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Scarlassara, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    1995-05-15

    A project has been realized to link the CAMEL recoil mass spectrometer to the GASP {gamma}-spectrometer in order to perform high resolution and efficiency {gamma}-recoil coincidence measurements. To preserve high flexibility and autonomy in the operation of the two complex apparatus a rough factor two of reduction in the overall heavy ion transmission was accepted in designing the optics of the particle transport from the GASP center to the CAMEL focal plane. The coupled configuration has been tested with the fusion reaction {sup 58}Ni (E=212 MeV)+{sup 64}Ni, obtaining a mass resolution of 1/300 and efficiency between similar 11% and similar 15% for different evaporation products. (orig.).

  15. Defect characterization of low-energy recoil events in silicon using classical molecular dynamics simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Otto, G; Gaertner, K

    2003-01-01

    We classify the defects generated by silicon recoils as a function of energy up to 200 eV, using classical molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of the geometry of each isolated defect. The majority of defects in this energy range are vacancies and interstitials, the latter mostly in split- configuration and less frequently in tetrahedral interstitial positions. Besides Frenkel pairs, bond defects and di-interstitials are found with significantly lower probability. The fraction of defects belonging to none of these types is less than 5% for recoil events below 200 eV, but rises sharply at higher energies and remains almost constant at a value of 40% between 300 and 500 eV. Moreover, we determine the projected range and the pair distance distribution of the defects. Throughout the paper we compare results obtained with the Tersoff and the Stillinger-Weber interatomic potential.

  16. Nuclear astrophysics and the Daresbury Recoil Separator at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.S.

    1997-12-01

    The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been installed for nuclear astrophysics research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. It will be used for direct measurements of capture reactions on radioactive ions which occur in stellar explosions such as novae, supernovae and X-ray bursts. These measurements will be made in inverse kinematics with radioactive heavy ion beams incident on hydrogen and helium targets, and the DRS will separate the capture reaction recoils from the intense flux of beam particles. Details of the new DRS experimental equipment and preliminary results from the first commissioning experiments with stable beams are described, along with the plans for the first measurements with radioactive beams. Other astrophysics research efforts at ORNL--in theoretical astrophysics, nuclear astrophysics data evaluation, heavy element nucleosynthesis, theoretical atomic astrophysics, and atomic astrophysics data--are also briefly described.

  17. Hawking–Page phase transition in new massive gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider Hawking–Page phase transition between the BTZ black hole with M≥0 and the thermal soliton with M=−1 in new massive gravity. By comparing the on-shell free energies, we can see that there exists a critical temperature. The thermal soliton is more probable than the black hole below the critical temperature while the black hole is more probable than the thermal soliton above the critical temperature. By consistently constructing the off-shell free energies taking into account the conical singularity, we show that there exist infinite non-equilibrium states connecting the BTZ black hole and the thermal soliton, so that they provide a picture of continuous evolution of the phase transition.

  18. Phase transition of holographic entanglement entropy in massive gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xiong Zeng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The phase structure of holographic entanglement entropy is studied in massive gravity for the quantum systems with finite and infinite volumes, which in the bulk is dual to calculating the minimal surface area for a black hole and black brane respectively. In the entanglement entropy–temperature plane, we find for both the black hole and black brane there is a Van der Waals-like phase transition as the case in thermal entropy–temperature plane. That is, there is a first order phase transition for the small charge and a second order phase transition at the critical charge. For the first order phase transition, the equal area law is checked and for the second order phase transition, the critical exponent of the heat capacity is obtained. All the results show that the phase structure of holographic entanglement entropy is the same as that of thermal entropy regardless of the volume of the spacetime on the boundary.

  19. What Can We Learn From Proton Recoils about Heavy-Ion SEE Sensitivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladbury, Raymond L.

    2016-01-01

    The fact that protons cause single-event effects (SEE) in most devices through production of light-ion recoils has led to attempts to bound heavy-ion SEE susceptibility through use of proton data. Although this may be a viable strategy for some devices and technologies, the data must be analyzed carefully and conservatively to avoid over-optimistic estimates of SEE performance. We examine the constraints that proton test data can impose on heavy-ion SEE susceptibility.

  20. Psychological responses to a marine disaster during a recoil phase: experiences from the Estonia shipwreck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiminen, T J; Tuominen, T

    1996-06-01

    The sinking of the car ferry, Estonia, was one of the world's most devastating marine disasters that has ever occurred in peace time. Altogether 138 passengers and crew members were rescued, and 38 of them were taken to the Turku University Central Hospital in Finland. The present article describes the various psychological reactions among the survivors during the first three days of the recoil phase.

  1. Angular dependence of recoil proton polarization in high-energy \\gamma d \\to p n

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, X; Benmokhtar, F; Camsonne, A; Chen, J P; Choi, S; Chudakov, E; Cusanno, F; De Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deur, A; Dutta, D; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gayou, O; Gilman, R; Glashauser, C; Hamilton, D; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holt, R J; Jones, M K; Kaufman, L J; Kinney, E R; Krämer, K; Lagamba, L; Lerose, J; Lhuillier, D; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; McCormick, K; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Monaghan, P; Nanda, S; Paschke, K D; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V; Qattan, I A; Ransome, R D; Reimer, P E; Reitz, B; Saha, A; Schulte, E C; Sheyor, R; Slifer, K J; Solvignon, P; Sulkosky, V; Urciuoli, G M; Voutier, E; Wang, K; Wijesooriya, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Zhu, L

    2007-01-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily.. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  2. EMMA, a Recoil Mass Spectrometer for TRIUMF's ISAC-II Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Barry; EMMA Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    EMMA is a recoil mass spectrometer for TRIUMF's ISAC-II facility in the final stages of installation and commissioning. In this talk I will briefly review the spectrometer's design capabilities, describe recent progress in its installation and commissioning, and discuss plans for its initial experimental program. This work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada. TRIUMF receives federal funds through a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  3. Investigation of a gas-catcher/ion guide system using alpha-decay recoil products

    CERN Document Server

    Peraejaervi, K; Rinta-Antila, S; Dendooven, P

    2002-01-01

    sup 2 sup 1 sup 9 Rn recoils from the alpha decay of sup 2 sup 2 sup 3 Ra have been used to study the efficiency and delay time distributions of a gas-catcher/ion guide system. Ions with charge states up to +4 were coming out of the gas cell. Combining efficiency and delay time measurements, ion survival times in plasma free conditions can be deduced.

  4. The HERMES recoil photon detector and the study of deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulse, Charlotte van

    2011-03-15

    The study of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) gives information about the contribution of the quark orbital angular momentum to the spin of the proton. DVCS has been studied at the HERMES experiment at DESY in Hamburg. Here 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons were scattered off a gaseous proton target. For the analysis of DVCS the recoiling proton could not be detected, but was reconstructed via its missing mass. This method suffers, however, from a 14% background contribution, mainly originating from associated DVCS. In this process the proton does not stay in its ground state but is excited to a {delta}{sup +} resonance. In order to reduce the background contribution down to less than 1%, a recoil detector was installed in the HERMES experiment beginning of 2006. This detector consists of three subcomponents, of which one is the photon detector. The main function of the photon detector is the detection of {delta}{sup +} decay photons. The photon detector was started up and commissioned for the analysis of (associated) DVCS. Subsequently DVCS and associated DVCS were analyzed using the recoil detector. (orig.)

  5. DVCS at HERMES. The recoil detector and transverse target spin asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, M.J.

    2008-02-15

    The HERMES experiment is a large forward angle spectrometer located at the HERA accelerator ring at DESY, Hamburg. One of the most exciting topics studied at HERMES is Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) which is the simplest interaction that provides a gateway for access to Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs). GPDs are a theoretical framework which can be used to calculate the total angular momentum of the quarks in the nucleon. As such, they provide one piece of the puzzle of nucleonic spin structure. In 2005, HERMES was upgraded in the target region with a Recoil Detector that allows it to make truly exclusive measurements of the DVCS interaction for the first time. The design and construction of the Recoil Detector is discussed herein, in addition to a complete analysis of the Transverse Target Spin Asymmetry (TTSA) in DVCS. Experimental facilities that enable measurement of this asymmetry are rare. The importance of the information on the TTSA from HERMES is made yet greater as the transversely polarised target that allows the asymmetry to be measured has been replaced by an unpolarised target. This was to allow the Recoil Detector to be installed. The final stage of this thesis shows a model-dependent method for constraining the angular momentum of the quarks in the nucleon and speculates as to the other pieces of the spin puzzle. (orig.)

  6. Measurement of the W boson mass and width using a novel recoil model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the W boson mass (MW) and decay width (ΓW) in 1 fb-1 of W → ev collider data at D0 using a novel method to model the hadronic recoil. The mass is extracted from fits to the transverse mass MT, pT(e), and ET distributions. The width is extracted from fits to the tail of the MT distribution. The electron energy measurement is simulated using a parameterized model, and the recoil is modeled using a new technique by which Z recoils are chosen from a data library to match the pT and direction of each generated W boson. We measure the the W boson mass to be MW = 80.4035 ± 0.024(stat) ± 0.039(syst) from the MT, MW = 80.4165 ± 0.027(stat) ± 0.038(syst) from the pT(e), and MW = 80.4025 ± 0.023(stat) ± 0.043(syst) from the ET distributions. ΓW is measured to be ΓW = 2.025 ± 0.038(stat) ± 0.061(syst) GeV.

  7. Role of the recoil effect in two-center interference in X-ray photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: ueda@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Liu, X.-J. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Pruemper, G. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Lischke, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Tanaka, T. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Hoshino, M. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Minkov, I. [School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kimberg, V. [School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Gel' mukhanov, F. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-10-26

    X-ray photoelectron spectra of the N{sub 2} molecule are studied both experimentally and theoretically in the extended energy region up to 1 keV. The ratio of the photoionization cross sections for the gerade and ungerade core levels displays a modulation in the high energy region caused by the two-center interference, as predicted by Cohen and Fano (CF) in 1966. The physical background of this CF effect is the same as in Young's double-slit experiment. We have found that the interference pattern deviates significantly from the CF prediction. The origin of such a breakdown of the CF formula is the scattering of the photoelectron inside the molecule and the momentum transfer from the emitted fast photoelectron to the nuclei. Usually the recoil effect is small. We show that the electron recoil strongly affects the two-center interference pattern. Both stationary and dynamical aspects of the recoil effect shed light on the role of the momentum exchange in the two-center interference.

  8. The Benefits of B ---> K* l+ l- Decays at Low Recoil

    CERN Document Server

    Bobeth, Christoph; van Dyk, Danny

    2010-01-01

    Using the heavy quark effective theory framework put forward by Grinstein and Pirjol we work out predictions for B -> K* l+ l-, l = (e, mu), decays for a softly recoiling K*, i.e., for large dilepton masses sqrt{q^2} of the order of the b-quark mass m_b. We work to lowest order in Lambda/Q, where Q = (m_b, sqrt{q^2}) and include the next-to-leading order corrections from the charm quark mass m_c and the strong coupling at O(m_c^2/Q^2, alpha_s). The leading Lambda/m_b corrections are parametrically suppressed. The improved Isgur-Wise form factor relations correlate the B -> K* l+ l- transversity amplitudes, which simplifies the description of the various decay observables and provides opportunities for the extraction of the electroweak short distance couplings. We propose new angular observables which have very small hadronic uncertainties. We exploit existing data on B -> K* l+ l- distributions and show that the low recoil region provides powerful additional information to the large recoil one. We find disjoi...

  9. Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis of optoelectronic and semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, N.; Cohen, D.D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Johnston, P.; Walker, S. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Whitlow, H.; Hult, M. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Oestling, M.; Zaring, C. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1993-12-31

    In recent years, the use of heavy ion time-of-flight elastic recoil spectrometry (HIERDA) has been applied to analyse multi-phase, thin layer devices used in optoelectronics, semiconductors and solar power generation. HIERDA gives simultaneously, mass resolved elemental concentration vs depth profiles of the matrix constituents, and is particularly suited to the determination of light elements in a heavy matrix. The beam/target interaction process is similar to RBS, but has the difference that the recoiling target atoms are detected instead of the scattered projectile. High energy, heavy ions beams bombard the sample, ejecting recoil atoms which are detected at a forward angle of 45 deg. A time-of-flight and total energy detection system enables the ejected particle`s mass to be identified, and allows energy spectra to be obtained and interpreted in an analogous way to RBS, but with the important difference that the elemental spectra are separated, and not superimposed on a background as in RBS. Some of the measurements made with a HIERDA system on the ANTARES Tandem Accelerator at ANSTO are described. 1 refs., 4 figs.

  10. First observation of the excited states in the doubly odd nucleus [sup 118]Cs identified through [gamma]-recoil coincidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarczyk, P. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)); De Angelis, G. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)); Spolaore, P. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)); Ackermann, D. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)); Rico, J. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)); Bazzacco, D. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN, Padua (Italy)); Lunardi, S. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN, Padua (Italy)); Mueller, L. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN, Padua (Italy)); Rossi Alvarez, C. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN, Padua (Italy)); Scarlassara, R. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN, Padua (Italy)); Segato, G.F. (Dipt. di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN, Padua (Italy)); Soramel, F. (Udine Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica)

    1993-10-01

    The previously unknown nucleus [sup 118]Cs has been identified through [gamma]-[gamma] and [gamma]-recoil coincidences using the GASP [gamma]-spectrometer and Recoil Mass Spectrometer. The level scheme constructed on the base of triple [gamma] coincidences shows a collective structure based on the [pi][sup -1] g[sub 9/2] x [nu] h[sub 11/2] configuration. (orig.)

  11. Collision of two rotating Hayward black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwak, Bogeun [Sejong University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    We investigate the spin interaction and the gravitational radiation thermally allowed in a head-on collision of two rotating Hayward black holes. The Hayward black hole is a regular black hole in a modified Einstein equation, and hence it can be an appropriate model to describe the extent to which the regularity effect in the near-horizon region affects the interaction and the radiation. If one black hole is assumed to be considerably smaller than the other, the potential of the spin interaction can be analytically obtained and is dependent on the alignment of angular momenta of the black holes. For the collision of massive black holes, the gravitational radiation is numerically obtained as the upper bound by using the laws of thermodynamics. The effect of the Hayward black hole tends to increase the radiation energy, but we can limit the effect by comparing the radiation energy with the gravitational waves GW150914 and GW151226. (orig.)

  12. Schwarzschild black holes can wear scalar wigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Juan; Bernal, Argelia; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Megevand, Miguel; Alcubierre, Miguel; Núñez, Darío; Sarbach, Olivier

    2012-08-24

    We study the evolution of a massive scalar field surrounding a Schwarzschild black hole and find configurations that can survive for arbitrarily long times, provided the black hole or the scalar field mass is small enough. In particular, both ultralight scalar field dark matter around supermassive black holes and axionlike scalar fields around primordial black holes can survive for cosmological times. Moreover, these results are quite generic in the sense that fairly arbitrary initial data evolve, at late times, as a combination of those long-lived configurations.

  13. The design of a cryogenic dark matter detector based on the detection of the recoil direction of target nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaitskell, R.J. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Angrave, L.C. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Booth, N.E. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Esposito, E. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Giles, T.J. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Hoess, C. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Houwman, E.P. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Salmon, G.L. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Van den Putte, M. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Waenninger, S. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-02-11

    We discuss the design of a cryogenic detector for a WIMP dark matter search based on single crystal absorbers and using Series Arrays of Superconducting Tunnel Junctions (SASTJs). The distribution of recoil vectors of target nuclei from WIMP interactions are affected by the motion of the laboratory through the dark matter halo. The angular distribution of recoil directions is skewed due to the motion of the solar system around the galaxy and is modulated by the diurnal and annual rotation of the earth. We discuss the kinematics of the recoil events and how a directional signal might be identified in our cryogenic detectors using the fast response of SASTJs to the ballistic phonons arising in the absorber from WIMP interactions. We consider how the anisotropy of a dark matter recoil distribution can be used to place statistical limits on its component relative to the isotropic background signal. We also consider how the dark matter limit is altered if only the axis of the nuclear recoil, rather than the full recoil direction is available. We also briefly consider the effect of phonon focusing within single crystal absorbers. Focusing will modulate strongly the signal detected by the SASTJs, on the crystal surface, as the position of the interaction within the crystal varies. A comparison is made between the behaviour of phonons in strongly focusing crystals, such as Nb, Si and LiF, and their near isotropic propagation in BaF{sub 2}. (orig.).

  14. Simplifying massive planar subdivisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars; Truelsen, Jakob; Yang, Jungwoo

    2014-01-01

    (SORT(N)) I/Os, where N is the size of the decomposition and SORT(N) is the number of I/Os need to sort in the standard external-memory model of computation. Previously, such an algorithm was only known for the special case of contour map simplification. Our algorithm is simple enough to be of practical......We present the first I/O- and practically-efficient algorithm for simplifying a planar subdivision, such that no point is moved more than a given distance εxy and such that neighbor relations between faces (homotopy) are preserved. Under some practically realistic assumptions, our algorithm uses...... interest. In fact, although more general, it is significantly simpler than the previous contour map simplification algorithm. We have implemented our algorithm and present results of experimenting with it on massive real-life data. The experiments confirm that the algorithm is efficient in practice...

  15. Massively parallel mathematical sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montry, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Sieve of Eratosthenes is a well-known algorithm for finding all prime numbers in a given subset of integers. A parallel version of the Sieve is described that produces computational speedups over 800 on a hypercube with 1,024 processing elements for problems of fixed size. Computational speedups as high as 980 are achieved when the problem size per processor is fixed. The method of parallelization generalizes to other sieves and will be efficient on any ensemble architecture. We investigate two highly parallel sieves using scattered decomposition and compare their performance on a hypercube multiprocessor. A comparison of different parallelization techniques for the sieve illustrates the trade-offs necessary in the design and implementation of massively parallel algorithms for large ensemble computers.

  16. Massively parallel multicanonical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jonathan; Zierenberg, Johannes; Weigel, Martin; Janke, Wolfhard

    2018-03-01

    Generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo simulations such as the multicanonical method and similar techniques are among the most efficient approaches for simulations of systems undergoing discontinuous phase transitions or with rugged free-energy landscapes. As Markov chain methods, they are inherently serial computationally. It was demonstrated recently, however, that a combination of independent simulations that communicate weight updates at variable intervals allows for the efficient utilization of parallel computational resources for multicanonical simulations. Implementing this approach for the many-thread architecture provided by current generations of graphics processing units (GPUs), we show how it can be efficiently employed with of the order of 104 parallel walkers and beyond, thus constituting a versatile tool for Monte Carlo simulations in the era of massively parallel computing. We provide the fully documented source code for the approach applied to the paradigmatic example of the two-dimensional Ising model as starting point and reference for practitioners in the field.

  17. Black Psyllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black psyllium is a weed that grows aggressively throughout the world. The plant was spread with the colonization of ... make medicine. Be careful not to confuse black psyllium with other forms of psyllium including blond psyllium. ...

  18. Black Tea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of black tea is LIKELY SAFE for most adults. Drinking too much black tea, such as more than ... reduce some of the heart health benefits of drinking tea. Milk might bind with the antioxidants in tea and ...

  19. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Aramaki, T.; Asai, M.; Baker, W.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Ghaith, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Mast, N.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Underwood, R.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2016-02-01

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg day, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. A fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded for WIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/c^2.

  20. Massive Gravity in Three Dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K.

    2009-01-01

    A particular higher-derivative extension of the Einstein-Hilbert action in three spacetime dimensions is shown to be equivalent at the linearized level to the (unitary) Pauli-Fierz action for a massive spin-2 field. A more general model, which also includes "topologically-massive" gravity as a

  1. The evolution of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses underlying theoretical studies of the evolution of massive model stars with and without mass loss are summarized. The evolutionary tracks followed by the models across theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams are compared with the observed distribution of B stars in an HR diagram. The pulsational properties of models of massive star are also described.

  2. A supersonic jet target for the cross section measurement of the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction with the recoil mass separator ERNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapagnani, D.; Buompane, R.; Di Leva, A.; Gialanella, L.; Busso, M.; De Cesare, M.; De Stefano, G.; Duarte, J. G.; Gasques, L. R.; Morales Gallegos, L.; Palmerini, S.; Romoli, M.; Tufariello, F.

    2017-09-01

    12C(α, γ)16O cross section plays a key-role in the stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis of massive stars. Hence, it must be determined with the precision of about 10% at the relevant Gamow energy of 300 keV. The ERNA (European Recoil mass separator for Nuclear Astrophysics) collaboration measured, for the first time, the total cross section of 12C(α, γ)16O by means of the direct detection of the 16O ions produced in the reaction down to an energy of Ecm = 1.9 MeV. To extend the measurement at lower energy, it is necessary to limit the extension of the He gas target. This can be achieved using a supersonic jet, where the oblique shock waves and expansion fans formed at its boundaries confine the gas, which can be efficiently collected using a catcher. A test version of such a system has been designed, constructed and experimentally characterized as a bench mark for a full numerical simulation using FV (Finite Volume) methods. The results of the commissioning of the jet test version and the design of the new system that will be used in combination with ERNA are presented and discussed.

  3. Order-of-Magnitude Estimate of Fast Neutron Recoil Rates in Proposed Neutrino Detector at SNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iverson, Erik B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Yuri Efremenko (UT-K) and Kate Scholberg (Duke) indicated, during discussions on 12 January 2006 with the SNS Neutronics Team, interest in a new type of neutrino detector to be placed within the proposed neutrino bunker at SNS, near beam-line 18, against the RTBT. The successful operation of this detector and its associated experiments would require fast-neutron recoil rates of approximately one event per day of operation or less. To this end, the author has attempted the following order-of-magnitude estimate of this recoil rate in order to judge whether or not a full calculation effort is needed or justified. For the purposes of this estimate, the author considers a one-dimensional slab geometry, in which fast and high-energy neutrons making up the general background in the target building are incident upon one side of an irbon slab. This iron slab represents the neutrino bunker walls. If we assume that a significant fraction of the dose rate throughout the target building is due to fast or high-energy neutrons, we can estimate the flux of such neutrons based upon existing shielding calculations performed for radiation protection purposes. In general, the dose rates within the target building are controlled to be less than 0.25 mrem per hour. A variety of calculations have indicated that these dose rates have significant fast and high-energy neutron components. Thus they can estimate the fast neutron flux incident on the neutrino bunker, and thereby the fast neutron flux inside that bunker. Finally, they can estimate the neutron recoil rate within a nominal detector volume. Such an estimate is outlined in Table 1.

  4. The Destructive Birth of Massive Stars and Massive Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Anna; Krumholz, Mark; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Massive stars play an essential role in the Universe. They are rare, yet the energy and momentum they inject into the interstellar medium with their intense radiation fields dwarfs the contribution by their vastly more numerous low-mass cousins. Previous theoretical and observational studies have concluded that the feedback associated with massive stars' radiation fields is the dominant mechanism regulating massive star and massive star cluster (MSC) formation. Therefore detailed simulation of the formation of massive stars and MSCs, which host hundreds to thousands of massive stars, requires an accurate treatment of radiation. For this purpose, we have developed a new, highly accurate hybrid radiation algorithm that properly treats the absorption of the direct radiation field from stars and the re-emission and processing by interstellar dust. We use our new tool to perform a suite of three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive stars and MSCs. For individual massive stellar systems, we simulate the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores with laminar and turbulent initial conditions and properly resolve regions where we expect instabilities to grow. We find that mass is channeled to the massive stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. For laminar initial conditions, proper treatment of the direct radiation field produces later onset of RT instability, but does not suppress it entirely provided the edges of the radiation-dominated bubbles are adequately resolved. RT instabilities arise immediately for turbulent pre-stellar cores because the initial turbulence seeds the instabilities. To model MSC formation, we simulate the collapse of a dense, turbulent, magnetized Mcl = 106 M⊙ molecular cloud. We find that the influence of the magnetic pressure and radiative feedback slows down star formation. Furthermore, we find that star formation is suppressed along dense filaments where the magnetic field is

  5. Spallation recoil II: Xenon evidence for young SiC grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, U.; Altmaier, M.; Herpers, U.; Kuhnhenn, J.; Merchel, S.; Michel, R.; Mohapatra, R. K.

    2005-11-01

    We have determined the recoil range of spallation xenon produced by irradiation of Ba glass targets with ˜1190 and ˜268 MeV protons, using a catcher technique, where spallation products are measured in target and catcher foils. The inferred range for 126Xe produced in silicon carbide is ˜0.19 μm, which implies retention of ˜70% for 126Xe produced in "typical" presolar silicon carbide grains of 1 μm size. Recoil loss of spallation xenon poses a significantly smaller problem than loss of the spallation neon from SiC grains. Ranges differ for the various Xe isotopes and scale approximately linearly as function of the mass difference between the target element, Ba, and the product. As a consequence, SiC grains of various sizes will have differences in spallation Xe composition. In an additional experiment at ˜66 MeV, where the recoil ranges of 22Na and 127Xe produced on Ba glass were determined using γ-spectrometry, we found no evidence for recoil ranges being systematically different at this lower energy. We have used the new data to put constraints on the possible presolar age of the SiC grains analyzed for Xe by Lewis et al. (1994). Uncertainties in the composition of the approximately normal Xe component in SiC (Xe-N) constitute the most serious problem in determining an age, surpassing remaining uncertainties in Xe retention and production rate. A possible interpretation is that spallation contributions are negligible and that trapped 124Xe/126Xe is ˜5% lower in Xe-N than in Q-Xe. But also for other reasonable assumptions for the 124Xe/126Xe ratio in Xe-N (e.g., as in Q-Xe), inferred exposure ages are considerably shorter than theoretically expected lifetimes for interstellar grains. A short presolar age is in line with observations by others (appearance, grain size distribution) that indicate little processing in the interstellar medium (ISM) of surviving (crystalline) SiC. This may be due to amorphization of SiC in the ISM on a much shorter time scale

  6. Broadband light generation at ~1300 nm through spectrally recoiled solitons and dispersive waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Peter Andreas; Frosz, Michael Henoch; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We experimentally study the generation of broadband light at ~1300 nm from an 810 nm Ti:sapphire femtosecond pump laser. We use two photonic crystal fibers with a second infrared zero-dispersion wavelength (λZ2) and compare the efficiency of two schemes: in one fiber λZ2=1400 nm and the light...... at 1300 nm is composed of spectrally recoiled solitons; in the other fiber λZ2=1200 nm and the light at 1300 nm is composed of dispersive waves....

  7. The alpha-recoil effects of uranium in the Oklo reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Z. Z.; Kuroda, P. K.

    1984-12-01

    A series of acid-leaching experiments have been carried out on a sample of uranium ore from reactor zone number 10 of the Oklo mines in Gabon. Anomalously high U-234/U-238 ratios were observed accompanied by modestly increased U-235/U-238 ratios in uranium fractions. These results, which can be interpreted as being due to the alpha-recoil effects of U-238 and Pu-239, provide a convenient way of calculating the conversion factor (the fraction of uranium atoms converted to plutonium) of the natural reactors from radiochemical data, obviating the necessity for mass-spectrometric measurements.

  8. A new look at an energetic (e,2e) reaction: Binary versus recoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kheifets, A S [Research School of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Naja, A; Casagrande, E M Staicu; Lahmam-Bennani, A, E-mail: A.Kheifets@anu.edu.a [Universite Paris-Sud 11, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2009-11-01

    We analyze the recoil-to-binary peak ratio in an energetic (e,2e) reaction on the valence ns sub-shell of noble gas atoms. Dramatic qualitative change in this ratio dependence on the ejected electron energy can be explained by variation of reflectivity of the short-range Hartree-Fock potential. The reflectivity increases profoundly from lighter (He) to heavier (Ne and Ar) noble gas atoms because of modification of the scattering phases due to occupation of the target p orbitals (Levinson theorem). This effect is further modified due to strong inter-shell correlations in Ar. These theoretical predictions are confirmed experimentally.

  9. Doppler- and recoil-free laser excitation of Rydberg states via three-photon transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Ryabtsev, I. I.; Beterov, I. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    Three-photon laser excitation of Rydberg states by three different laser beams can be arranged in a star-like geometry that simultaneously eliminates the recoil effect and Doppler broadening. Our analytical and numerical calculations for a particular laser excitation scheme 5S_{1/2}->5P_{3/2}->6S_{1/2}->nP in Rb atoms have shown that compared to the one- and two-photon laser excitation this approach provides much narrower line width and longer coherence time for both cold atom samples and hot...

  10. High-spin excitations in {sup 158,159,160}Hf from recoil-decay tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, K. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Cizewski, J. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Seweryniak, D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Amro, H. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Carpenter, M. P. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Davids, C. N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Fotiades, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Janssens, R. V. F. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Lauritsen, T. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Lister, C. J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] (and others)

    2000-09-01

    The 270-MeV {sup 58}Ni+{sup A}Pd reaction was used for the first recoil-decay tagging measurement with Gammasphere coupled to the Fragment Mass Analyzer at Argonne National Laboratory. Level structures of {sup 158}Hf and {sup 159}Hf are identified for the first time, and that of {sup 160}Hf is extended. The systematical behavior of the energy levels in neighboring isotones and isotopes, as well as the aligned angular momenta as a function of rotational frequency, are examined. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Fragmentation in massive star formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuther, Henrik; Schilke, Peter

    2004-02-20

    Studies of evolved massive stars indicate that they form in a clustered mode. During the earliest evolutionary stages, these regions are embedded within their natal cores. Here we present high-spatial-resolution interferometric dust continuum observations disentangling the cluster-like structure of a young massive star-forming region. The derived protocluster mass distribution is consistent with the stellar initial mass function. Thus, fragmentation of the initial massive cores may determine the initial mass function and the masses of the final stars. This implies that stars of all masses can form via accretion processes, and coalescence of intermediate-mass protostars appears not to be necessary.

  12. Coagulation management in massive bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffee, Matthew J; Deloughery, Thomas G; Thorborg, Per A

    2010-04-01

    To update readers on recent literature regarding treatment of coagulopathy for patients with life-threatening bleeding, highlighting emerging therapeutic options, controversial topics, and ongoing clinical trials. Massive transfusion protocols featuring immediate availability of blood products and multidisciplinary communication reduce mortality and conserve resources. There is a growing consensus that immediate administration of plasma and platelet units in a 1: 1: 1 ratio with red cell units reduces early mortality. Lyophilized and recombinant blood product components may have advantages over traditional blood products in certain clinical circumstances. Massive transfusion protocols standardize treatment of the coagulopathy of massive bleeding, leading to rapid restoration of hemostasis and decrease in early mortality.

  13. A not so massive cluster hosting a very massive star

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez Alegría, S.; Chené, A. -N.; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R.; Navarro, C.; Kuhn, M; Carballo-Bello, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first physical characterization of the young open cluster VVV CL041. We spectroscopically observed the cluster main-sequence stellar population and a very-massive star candidate: WR62-2. CMFGEN modeling to our near-infrared spectra indicates that WR62-2 is a very luminous (10$^{6.4\\pm0.2} L_{\\odot}$) and massive ($\\sim80 M_{\\odot}$) star.

  14. Thermodynamical aspect of black hole solutions in heteric string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fujisaki, H

    2003-01-01

    Thermodynamical properties of charged rotating dilatonic black holes are discussed on the basis of the general solution of Sen in the heterotic string theory compactified on a six dimensional torus. The most probable microcanonical configuration of black holes is then described in the single-massive-mode dominance scenario.

  15. Astronomy: Quasars signpost massive galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, Rychard

    2017-05-01

    The neighbourhoods of extremely bright astronomical objects called quasars in the early Universe have been incompletely probed. Observations suggest that these regions harbour some of the most massive known galaxies. See Letter p.457

  16. Coordination of massively concurrent activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Arbab (Farhad)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMassively parallel and distributed systems open new horizons for large applications and present new challenges for software technology. Many applications already take advantage of the increased raw computational power provided by such parallel systems to yield significantly shorter

  17. Black Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Khristin Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united.  The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape from poverty of enslavement and to establish a way of life through tradition. A way of personal freedoms was through getting a good education that lead to a better foundation and a better way of life.

  18. Entropy product of rotating black holes in three-dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavian Yekta, Davood

    2017-03-01

    It has been shown that the product of the entropies of the inner Cauchy and outer event horizon of the charged axisymmetric and stationary black holes is a universal formula, which is independent of the black hole's mass. In this paper, we investigate this universality for the two kinds of rotating black holes in the three-dimensional gravity models. In fact, we study the spacelike warped anti-de Sitter black hole in the new massive gravity and the Bañados, Teitelboim, and Zanelli black hole in the minimal massive gravity. We show that this rule is held in the first theory. By contrast, in the latter case which includes a holographic gravitational anomalous term, we obtain that the universality does not work and the product depends on the mass. As a complement to the above verification, we also study the thermodynamic properties of these black holes.

  19. Scintillation efficiency measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) below the DAMA/LIBRA energy threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jingke; Shields, Emily; Calaprice, Frank; Westerdale, Shawn; Froborg, Francis; Suerfu, Burkhant; Alexander, Thomas; Aprahamian, Ani; Back, Henning O.; Casarella, Clark; Fang, Xiao; Gupta, Yogesh K.; Ianni, Aldo; Lamere, Edward; Lippincott, W. Hugh; Liu, Qian; Lyons, Stephanie; Siegl, Kevin; Smith, Mallory; Tan, Wanpeng; Kolk, Bryant Vande

    2015-07-01

    The dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal depends on the NaI(Tl) scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils. Previous measurements for Na recoils have large discrepancies, especially in the DAMA/LIBRA modulation energy region. We report a quenching effect measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) from 3 to 52 keVnr, covering the whole DAMA/LIBRA energy region for dark matter-Na scattering interpretations. By using a low-energy, pulsed neutron beam, a double time-of-flight technique, and pulse-shape discrimination methods, we obtained the most accurate measurement of this kind for NaI(Tl) to date. The results differ significantly from the DAMA reported values at low energies but fall between the other previous measurements. We present the implications of the new quenching results for the dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal.

  20. Scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils in a CaF sub 2 (Eu) crystal for Dark Matter search

    CERN Document Server

    Hazama, R; Hayakawa, H; Matsuoka, K; Miyawaki, H; Morikubo, K; Suzuki, N; Kishimoto, T

    2002-01-01

    The scintillation efficiency (quenching factor) of fluorine and calcium nuclei recoiling in a CaF sub 2 (Eu) crystal was measured in an energy region relevant to Dark Matter searches. The recoiling nuclei were obtained via the sup 1 sup 9 F(n,n') and sup 4 sup 0 Ca(n,n') reactions, where the neutron beam was provided via the d(d,n) sup 3 He reaction. The quenching factor of F and Ca nuclei in the CaF sub 2 (Eu) crystal was found to be 11-20%, and 9-23% relative to the electron equivalent energy for 53-192 keV and 25-91 keV recoil energies, respectively, and the energy dependence was observed. The quenching factor we measured here is a little larger than that of previous studies, which may depend on the Eu doping concentration of the crystal.

  1. CDMS Detector Fabrication Improvements and Low Energy Nuclear Recoil Measurements in Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jastram, Andrew [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-12-01

    As the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) experiment is scaled up to tackle new dark matter parameter spaces (lower masses and cross-sections), detector production efficiency and repeatability becomes ever more important. A dedicated facility has been commissioned for SuperCDMS detector fabrication at Texas A&M University (TAMU). The fabrication process has been carefully tuned using this facility and its equipment. Production of successfully tested detectors has been demonstrated. Significant improvements in detector performance have been made using new fabrication methods, equipment, and tuning of process parameters. This work has demonstrated the capability for production of next generation CDMS SNOLAB detectors. Additionally, as the dark matter parameter space is probed further, careful calibrations of detector response to nuclear recoil interactions must be performed in order to extract useful information (in relation to dark matter particle characterzations) from experimental results. A neutron beam of tunable energy is used in conjunction with a commercial radiation detector to characterize ionization energy losses in germanium during nuclear recoil events. Data indicates agreement with values predicted by the Lindhard equation, providing a best-t k-value of 0.146.

  2. Scaling up precision in an Ytterbium BEC contrast interferometer for photon recoil and α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gochnauer, Daniel; McAlpine, Katherine; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2017-04-01

    Building on our earlier demonstration, we are now operating a second-generation Ytterbium (Yb) Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) contrast interferometer. The device is designed to measure h/m, where h is Planck's constant and m is the mass of a Yb atom, in order to determine the fine structure constant α. The use of the non-magnetic Yb atom and the symmetric geometry of the interferometer make the measurement immune to several error sources. The narrow momentum and position spread of a BEC help improve the coherence length and signal strength of our measurement. A key advantage of the contrast interferometer is that the total phase accumulation and therefore the measurement sensitivity scales quadratically with the momentum separation of the interfering states. We have demonstrated the laser pulse atom-optics required to increase the momentum splitting, including using Bloch oscillations to impart 200 photon recoils with .5% atom loss per recoil. We have implemented the first steps in applying these high momentum transfer techniques to our interferometer, and will report on our progress towards achieving quadratically increased precision. Funding: NSF.

  3. The HERMES recoil photon-detector and nuclear p{sub t}-Broadening at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haarlem, Y. van

    2007-09-15

    The first part of this work consists of hardware research and development done in order to construct and test a photon-detector as one of the three detectors of the HERMES recoil detector. The HERMES recoil detector consists of a target cell, a silicon-detector, a scintillating fiber tracker, and a photon-detector. All are inside a super-conducting magnet. The silicon detector uses energy deposition to determine the momentum of the particle because in its energy range the energy deposition is an unambiguous function of the momentum of the particle. The scintillating fiber tracker is located outside the beam-vacuum and is surrounded by the photon-detector. It consists of two barrels with layers of scintillating fibers. It detects particles by converting their energy deposition into light. It measures two space points of a charged particle and from the bending of the assigned track (in the magnetic field provided by the super-conducting magnet) a momentum measurement can be derived. The photon-detector is located between the scintillating fiber tracker and the magnet. It consists (from the inside out) of three layers of tungsten showering material followed by scintillating strips. The second part of this work is an analysis performed concerning the transverse momentum broadening of hadrons produced in deep-inelastic scattering on a nuclear target compared to a D target. (orig.)

  4. Occurrence and predictors of acute stent recoil-A comparison between the xience prime cobalt chromium stent and the promus premier platinum chromium stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bommel, Rutger J; Lemmert, Miguel E; van Mieghem, Nicolas M; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; van Domburg, Ron T; Daemen, Joost

    2017-05-13

    To compare the occurrence of acute stent recoil in two different stent types (platinum chromium and cobalt chromium) and identify the potential predictors of significant acute stent recoil. Acute stent recoil is frequently observed after percutaneous coronary intervention and has been associated with in-stent restenosis and in-stent thrombosis. Different stent designs may result in varying degrees of stent recoil. From a registry of "all-comers" treated with either the Xience Prime Cobalt Chromium or Promus Premier Platinum Chromium stent, a random sample of 100 patients was drawn. Acute stent recoil was defined as the minimal luminal diameter (MLD) of the last inflated balloon minus the MLD after, divided by the MLD of the last inflated balloon. Significant acute stent recoil was defined as recoil ≥10%. A total of 123 lesions (61 Xience Prime vs 62 Promus Premier) in 100 patients were analyzed. Acute stent recoil of 8.6 ± 4.9% was observed in the Xience Prime group versus 8.7 ± 4.2% in the Promus Premier group, P = 0.970. In a multivariate model for significant acute stent recoil, a stent/vessel ratio ≥1 (hazard ratio 4.64 [1.94-11.12], P = 0.001), a balloon/stent ratio >1 (hazard ratio 3.83 [1.12-13.14], P = 0.032) and direct stenting (hazard ratio 0.42 [0.18-0.96], P = 0.039) were identified as predictors. No significant differences were observed in the extent of acute stent recoil between the Xience Prime and the Promus Premier stent. A larger stent/vessel ratio, a larger balloon/stent ratio, and direct stenting were associated with significant acute stent recoil ≥10%. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Black Hole Complementarity and Violation of Causality

    OpenAIRE

    Rozenblit, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of a massive shell collapsing on a solid sphere shows that black hole complementarity (BHC) violates causality in its effort to save information conservation. In particular, this note describes a hypothetical contraption based on BHC that would allow the transfer of information from the future to the present.

  6. Sterile neutrinos and the rapid formation of supermassive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M. C.; Tupper, G. B.; Viollier, R. D.

    2008-11-01

    The most massive black holes, lurking at the centers of large galaxies, must have formed less than a billion years after the big bang, as they are visible today in the form of bright quasars at redshift z gtrsim 6[1]. Their early appearance is mysterious, because the radiation pressure, generated by infalling ionized baryonic matter, inhibits the rapid growth of these black holes from stellar-mass black holes [2]. Here we show that the supermassive black holes may, instead, form timeously through the accretion of degenerate sterile neutrino dark matter onto stellar-mass black holes [3].

  7. Dark matter spikes in the vicinity of Kerr black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Francesc; Medeiros da Rosa, Augusto; Will, Clifford M.

    2017-10-01

    The growth of a massive black hole will steepen the cold dark matter density at the center of a galaxy into a dense spike, enhancing the prospects for indirect detection. We study the impact of black hole spin on the density profile using the exact Kerr geometry of the black whole in a fully relativistic adiabatic growth framework. We find that, despite the transfer of angular momentum from the hole to the halo, rotation increases significantly the dark matter density close to the black hole. The gravitational effects are still dominated by the black hole within its influence radius, but the larger dark matter annihilation fluxes might be relevant for indirect detection estimates.

  8. Role of primordial black holes in the direct collapse scenario of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we explore the possibility of accreting primordial black holes as the source of heating for the collapsing gas in the context of the direct collapse black hole scenario for the formation of super-massive black holes (SMBHs) at high redshifts, z ∼ 6 – 7 . One of the essential requirements for the direct collapse model ...

  9. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  10. Preparing a dedicated set up for level lifetime measurements using the recoil Doppler shift technique with fast radioactive beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackstein, M.; Fransen, C.; Dewald, A.; Braun, N.; Braunroth, T.; Jolie, J.; Litzinger, J.; Moschner, K.; Reiter, P.; Pfeiffer, M.; Rother, W.; Taprogge, J.; Wendt, A.; Zell, K.O. [IKP, Univ. zu Koeln (Germany); Algora, A.; Doncel, M.; Gadea, A. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Valencia (Spain); Ameil, F.; Boutachkov, P.; Gerl, J.; Grebosz, J.; Guastalla, G.; Habermann, T.; Kurz, N.; Merchan, E.; Nociforo, C.; Pietri, S.; Quitana, B.; Wollersheim, H. [KP II, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Corsi, A.; Louchar, C.; Obertelli, A. [CEA Saclay (France); Reese, M. [IKP, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Petkov, P. [INRNE, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we report on the development of a new plunger device especially designed to meet the constraints found at the fragment recoil separator (FRS) at GSI (Darmstadt) in combination with PRESPEC. The aim is to measure level lifetimes in the pico-second range using the recoil distance Doppler shift (RDDS) method of states in exotic nuclei excited via Coulomb excitation or knock-out reactions with radioactive beams at relativistic energies. We also report on the first results obtained from a first commissioning run performed recently with a stable {sup 54}Cr beam.

  11. Progenitors of binary black hole mergers detected by LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnov, Konstantin; Kuranov, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Possible formation mechanisms of massive close binary black holes that can merge in the Hubble time to produce powerful gravitational wave bursts detected during advanced LIGO O1 science run are briefly discussed. The pathways include the evolution from field low-metallicity massive binaries, the dynamical formation in globular clusters and primordial black holes. Low effective black hole spins inferred for LIGO GW150914 and LTV151012 events are discussed. Population synthesis calculations of the expected spin and chirp mass distributions from the standard field massive binary formation channel are presented for different metallicities (from zero-metal Population III stars up to solar metal abundance). We conclude that that merging binary black holes can contain systems from different formation channels, discrimination between which can be made with increasing statistics of mass and spin measurements from ongoing and future gravitational wave observations.

  12. Black-hole Merger Simulations for LISA Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Baker, John G.; vanMeter, James R.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan M.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2009-01-01

    The strongest expected sources of gravitational waves in the LISA band are the mergers of massive black holes. LISA may observe these systems to high redshift, z>10, to uncover details of the origin of massive black holes, and of the relationship between black holes and their host structures, and structure formation itself. These signals arise from the final stage in the development of a massive black-hole binary emitting strong gravitational radiation that accelerates the system's inspiral toward merger. The strongest part of the signal, at the point of merger, carries much information about the system and provides a probe of extreme gravitational physics. Theoretical predictions for these merger signals rely on supercomputer simulations to solve Einstein's equations. We discuss recent numerical results and their impact on LISA science expectations.

  13. In vivo assessment of stent recoil of biodegradable polymer-coated cobalt–chromium sirolimus-eluting coronary stent system☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Atul D.; Thakkar, Ashok S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Immediate and acute stent recoil has been observed following balloon deflation in normal and diseased coronary arteries, and the degree varies by stent design. Methods A total of 19 patients, who underwent elective stent implantation for single de novo native coronary artery lesions, were enrolled: all patients treated with the biodegradable polymer-coated sirolimus-eluting cobalt–chromium coronary stent system (Supralimus-Core®). The immediate, acute and cumulative stent recoil was assessed by quantitative coronary angiography. The cumulative stent recoil was measured at 24 h of stent implantation. Results The absolute late loss due to recoil was found 0.08 ± 0.19 mm for Immediate Stent Recoil (ISR), 0.05 ± 0.21 mm for Acute Stent Recoil (ASR) and 0.11 ± 0.25 mm for Cumulative Stent Recoil (CSR) respectively. Conclusions In vivo acute stent recoil of the Supralimus-Core® has higher radial strength compared to other available standard drug-eluting stents. PMID:23253404

  14. Black holes in the early Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volonteri, Marta; Bellovary, Jillian

    2012-12-01

    The existence of massive black holes (MBHs) was postulated in the 1960s, when the first quasars were discovered. In the late 1990s their reality was proven beyond doubt in the Milky way and a handful nearby galaxies. Since then, enormous theoretical and observational efforts have been made to understand the astrophysics of MBHs. We have discovered that some of the most massive black holes known, weighing billions of solar masses, powered luminous quasars within the first billion years of the Universe. The first MBHs must therefore have formed around the time the first stars and galaxies formed. Dynamical evidence also indicates that black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses ordinarily dwell in the centers of today's galaxies. MBHs populate galaxy centers today, and shone as quasars in the past; the quiescent black holes that we detect now in nearby bulges are the dormant remnants of this fiery past. In this review we report on basic, but critical, questions regarding the cosmological significance of MBHs. What physical mechanisms led to the formation of the first MBHs? How massive were the initial MBH seeds? When and where did they form? How is the growth of black holes linked to that of their host galaxy? The answers to most of these questions are works in progress, in the spirit of these reports on progress in physics.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Black Hole Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avara, Mark J.

    Black holes embody one of the few, simple, solutions to the Einstein field equations that describe our modern understanding of gravitation. In isolation they are small, dark, and elusive. However, when a gas cloud or star wanders too close, they light up our universe in a way no other cosmic object can. The processes of magnetohydrodynamics which describe the accretion inflow and outflows of plasma around black holes are highly coupled and nonlinear and so require numerical experiments for elucidation. These processes are at the heart of astrophysics since black holes, once they somehow reach super-massive status, influence the evolution of the largest structures in the universe. It has been my goal, with the body of work comprising this thesis, to explore the ways in which the influence of black holes on their surroundings differs from the predictions of standard accretion models. I have especially focused on how magnetization of the greater black hole environment can impact accretion systems.

  16. Modeling Flows Around Merging Black Hole Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries are produced by the merger of galaxies. The final stages of the black hole coalescence produce strong gravitational radiation that can be detected by the space-borne LISA. In cases in which the black hole merger takes place in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Modeling such electromagnetic counterparts of the final merger requires evolving the behavior of both gas and fields in the strong-field regions around the black holes. We have taken a first step towards this problem by mapping the flow of pressureless matter in the dynamic, 3-D general relativistic spacetime around the merging black holes. We report on the results of these initial simulations and discuss their likely importance for future hydrodynamical simulations.

  17. Black Hole Safari: Tracking Populations and Hunting Big Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, N. J.

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the physical connection, or lack thereof, between the growth of galaxies and supermassive black holes is a key challenge in extragalactic astronomy. Dynamical studies of nearby galaxies are building a census of black hole masses across a broad range of galaxy types and uncovering statistical correlations between galaxy bulge properties and black hole masses. These local correlations provide a baseline for studying galaxies and black holes at higher redshifts. Recent measurements have probed the extremes of the supermassive black hole population and introduced surprises that challenge simple models of black hole and galaxy co-evolution. Future advances in the quality and quantity of dynamical black hole mass measurements will shed light upon the growth of massive galaxies and black holes in different cosmic environments.

  18. Condensate of massive graviton and dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Katsuki; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2018-01-01

    We study coherently oscillating massive gravitons in the ghost-free bigravity theory. This coherent field can be interpreted as a condensate of the massive gravitons. We first define the effective energy-momentum tensor of the coherent massive gravitons in a curved spacetime. We then study the background dynamics of the universe and the cosmic structure formation including the effects of the coherent massive gravitons. We find that the condensate of the massive graviton behaves as a dark matt...

  19. Massive gravitons in arbitrary spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuet, Charles; Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2017-12-01

    We present two different versions of the consistent theory of massive gravitons in arbitrary spacetimes which are simple enough for practical applications. The theory is described by a nonsymmetric rank-2 tensor whose equations of motion imply six algebraic and five differential constraints, reducing the number of independent components to five. The theory reproduces the standard description of massive gravitons in Einstein spaces. In generic spacetimes it does not show the massless limit and always propagates five degrees of freedom, even for the vanishing mass parameter. We illustrate these features by an explicit calculation for a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological background. We find that the gravitons are stable if they are sufficiently massive, hence they may be a part of dark matter at present. We also discuss other possible applications.

  20. Historically Black

    OpenAIRE

    Pennington, Whitney

    2012-01-01

    Historically Black is a short documentary that looks at recruitment of non-black students at Texas Southern University, one of the nation’s largest Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). By chronicling Texas Southern’s efforts to diversify and its impact on the campus community, the film explores the changing role of HBCUs in post-segregated America and addresses what this might mean for the future of these deep-rooted institutions. 

  1. Polymersomes as nano-carriers to retain harmful recoil nuclides in alpha radionuclide therapy. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thijssen, L.; Schaart, D.R.; Vries, D. de; Denkova, A.G. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors; Morgenstern, A.; Bruchertseifer, F. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Transuranium Elements

    2012-07-01

    Targeted alpha therapy has shown promising pre-clinical and clinical results in the fight against cancer. The use of in vivo generators, generating a highly cytotoxic cascade of alpha particles, is attracting increasing interest for clinical application. {sup 225}Ac is one of the nuclides that can serve as an in vivo generator. It is commercially available and provides four alpha particles with a total energy of 28 MeV per {sup 225}Ac decay. However, its alpha emitting daughter nuclides may escape from the target region due to recoil and cause unwanted toxicity in other parts of the body. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of designing spherical, block-copolymer based nano-carriers (polymersomes) to retain the recoiling daughter nuclides. A Monte Carlo code, called NANVES, has been developed to simulate the range distributions of recoil atoms in different materials and to determine the optimum nano-carriers design. Recoil ranges in planar polystyrene films were determined experimentally and compared to simulations of the experiment, indicating that NANVES may provide accurate results. Simulations of various nano-carriers designs indicate that double-layered polymersomes with a diameter of 800 nm are capable of completely retaining the first daughter nuclide {sup 221}Fr, while the escape fraction of the third radioactive daughter {sup 213}Bi is reduced to 20% and the percentage of alpha particles emitted from escaped daughter products outside the nano-carriers is less than 10%. (orig.)

  2. Cleaning Massive Sonar Point Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars Allan; Larsen, Kasper Green; Mølhave, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of automatically cleaning massive sonar data point clouds, that is, the problem of automatically removing noisy points that for example appear as a result of scans of (shoals of) fish, multiple reflections, scanner self-reflections, refraction in gas bubbles, and so on. We...... describe a new algorithm that avoids the problems of previous local-neighbourhood based algorithms. Our algorithm is theoretically I/O-efficient, that is, it is capable of efficiently processing massive sonar point clouds that do not fit in internal memory but must reside on disk. The algorithm is also...

  3. Recoil spectrometry of oil additive associated compositional changes in sliding metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Harry J.; Johansson, Erik; Ingemarsson, P. Anders; Hogmark, Sture

    1992-03-01

    Mass and energy dispersive recoil spectrometry has been employed to semi-quantitatively characterize changes in the tribo-surfaces of bearing steel subjected to lubricated sliding wear in two model oils containing zinc dialkydithiophosphate (ZDDP) and di- tert nonyl pentasulphide (TNPS), respectively. The results show that for the ZDDP additive a boundary lubricating film is formed where O, S, P and Zn are taken up from the oil. Seizure results in a similar element uptake pattern suggesting that the boundary lubrication film thickens on Seizure. The behaviour for the TNPS oil is quite different with only S being taken up during film formation. Seizure in this oil is associated with uptake of oxygen whilst S is depleted indicating that chemical processes may be an important element in the breakdown.

  4. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Magoon, J; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M; Ulreich, J; Ashabranner, R C; Bionta, R M; Carpenter, A C; Felker, B; Khater, H Y; LePape, S; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Rygg, J R; Yeoman, M F; Zacharias, R; Leeper, R J; Fletcher, K; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J; Paguio, R

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  5. Fabrication of 94Zr thin target for recoil distance doppler shift method of lifetime measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, C. K.; Rohilla, Aman; Abhilash, S. R.; Kabiraj, D.; Singh, R. P.; Mehta, D.; Chamoli, S. K.

    2014-11-01

    A thin isotopic 94Zr target of thickness 520 μg /cm2 has been prepared for recoil distance Doppler shift method (RDM) lifetime measurement by using an electron beam deposition method on tantalum backing of 3.5 mg/cm2 thickness at Inter University Accelerator Center (IUAC), New Delhi. To meet the special requirement of smoothness of surface for RDM lifetime measurement and also to protect the outer layer of 94Zr from peeling off, a very thin layer of gold has been evaporated on a 94Zr target on a specially designed substrate holder. In all, 143 mg of 99.6% enriched 94Zr target material was utilized for the fabrication of 94Zr targets. The target has been successfully used in a recent RDM lifetime measurement experiment at IUAC.

  6. Systematic investigation of background sources in neutron flux measurements with a proton-recoil silicon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, P., E-mail: marini@cenbg.in2p3.fr [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France); Mathieu, L. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France); Acosta, L. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, México D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Aïche, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France)

    2017-01-01

    Proton-recoil detectors (PRDs), based on the well known standard H(n,p) elastic scattering cross section, are the preferred instruments to perform precise quasi-absolute neutron flux measurements above 1 MeV. The limitations of using a single silicon detector as PRD at a continuous neutron beam facility are investigated, with the aim of extending such measurements to neutron energies below 1 MeV. This requires a systematic investigation of the background sources affecting the neutron flux measurement. Experiments have been carried out at the AIFIRA facility to identify these sources. A study on the role of the silicon detector thickness on the background is presented and an energy limit on the use of a single silicon detector to achieve a neutron flux precision better than 1% is given.

  7. Recoil polarization measurements in $\\pi^{0}$ electroproduction at the peak of the Delta (1232)

    CERN Document Server

    Sarty, A J

    2001-01-01

    This talk presents a status report, along with some preliminary/on line results, from the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) experiment E91011 which was performed in Hall A at JLab during the summer of 2000. The experiment measured angular distributions for the differential cross section and recoil proton polarizations in the reaction p(e, e'p) pi /sup 0/. Kinematics were chosen to be centered at a CMS energy of W=1232 MeV, and a squared four momentum transfer of Q/sup 2/=1.0 (GeV/c)/sup 2/. The primary objectives of the experiment are to isolate contributions from the resonant quadrupole N to Delta , multipole S/sub 1+/, and to clarify the role of other, small nonresonant multipole contributions to the reaction. Details of the experiment itself will be given, along with sample spectra illustrating the quality and coverage of the data obtained. (10 refs) .

  8. An energetic (e, 2e) reaction away from the Bethe ridge: recoil versus binary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kheifets, A S [Research School of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Naja, A; Casagrande, E M Staicu; Lahmam-Bennani, A, E-mail: A.Kheifets@anu.edu.a [Universite Paris-Sud 11, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2009-08-28

    We analyse the recoil-to-binary (RB) peak intensity ratio in an energetic (e, 2e) reaction performed on the valence ns sub-shell of noble gas atoms away from the Bethe ridge condition. A qualitative change in the RB ratio dependence on the ejected electron energy from He to Ar can be explained by the variation of reflectivity of the short-range Hartree-Fock potential. The reflectivity increases profoundly from lighter (He) to heavier (Ne and Ar) noble gas atoms because of modification of the scattering phases due to occupation of the target p orbitals (Levinson-Seaton theorem). This effect is further modified due to strong inter-shell correlations in Ar. These theoretical predictions are confirmed experimentally.

  9. Evaporation residue collection efficiencies and position spectra of the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator

    CERN Document Server

    Subotic, K M; Utyonkov, V K; Lobanov, Y V; Abdullin, F S; Polyakov, A N; Tsyganov, Yu S; Ivanov, O V

    2002-01-01

    The focal-plane position spectra and collection efficiencies of the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator at the U400 cyclotron used to separate evaporation residues of complete fusion reaction products are described. The separator consists of a 23 deg. -dipole magnet and a quadrupole doublet and is filled with hydrogen at a pressure of about 1 Torr. After passing through the time-of-flight system, the separated evaporation residues are collected in a 120 mm centre dot 40 mm position-sensitive semiconductor detector at the focal plane. Depending on the asymmetry of the projectile, target combinations, the measured collection efficiencies were 3-45%, with suppression factors exceeding 10 sup 1 sup 5 and 10 sup 4 for beam and target-like particles, respectively. The ANAMARI code that is used to determine the separator settings is described and its predictions for the evaporation residue position spectra and collection efficiencies are compared with experimental data.

  10. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2013-04-15

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  11. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianfu, E-mail: zhangjfu@gmail.com; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024 (China); Qiu, Suizheng, E-mail: szqiu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, Guoguang [Applied Institute of Nuclear Technology, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024 (China)

    2015-12-15

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10{sup −7} at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  12. Sub-GeV dark matter detection with electron recoils in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoto, G.; Luchetta, F.; Polosa, A. D.

    2018-01-01

    Directional detection of Dark Matter particles (DM) in the MeV mass range could be accomplished by studying electron recoils in large arrays of parallel carbon nanotubes. In a scattering process with a lattice electron, a DM particle might transfer sufficient energy to eject it from the nanotube surface. An external electric field is added to drive the electron from the open ends of the array to the detection region. The anisotropic response of this detection scheme, as a function of the orientation of the target with respect to the DM wind, is calculated, and it is concluded that no direct measurement of the electron ejection angle is needed to explore significant regions of the light DM exclusion plot. A compact sensor, in which the cathode element is substituted with a dense array of parallel carbon nanotubes, could serve as the basic detection unit.

  13. New design features of gas ionization detectors used for elastic recoil detection

    CERN Document Server

    Timmers, H; Ophel, T R

    2000-01-01

    Several alternative design features of large acceptance, gas ionization detectors have proven to be successful for application to elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). In particular, effects due to the distortion of the entrance field by a large area window have been eliminated in a simple fashion, to allow measurement of the initial rate of energy loss and to provide an energy- and species-independent cathode signal. No less importantly, use of a divided electrode in the anode plane has enabled a more straightforward means of determining the scattering angle that is required for kinematic corrections. An intermediate grid was found to provide a direct and true total energy signal, with only slightly diminished resolution compared with that of the summed total anode equivalent.

  14. Direct and Recoil-Induced Electron Emission from Ion-Bombarded Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmen, G.; Svensson, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    1979-01-01

    The kinetic emission of secondary electrons from ion-bombarded solid surfaces is split into two contributions, a direct one caused by ionizing collisions between the bombarding ion and target atoms, and an indirect one originating from ionizing collisions undergone by recoil atoms with other target...... atoms. The direct contribution, which has been treated by several authors in previous studies, shows a behavior that is determined primarily by the electronic stopping power of the bombarding ion, while the indirect contribution is nonproportionally related to the nuclear stopping power. This latter...... contribution is known to be quite important for heavy-ion bombardment at keV energies, and is shown to be of crucial importance for the understanding of the energy dependence of the electron yield in such cases. The model is shown to give consistent results for copper bombarded with electrons, protons...

  15. Synthesis of superheavy elements at the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voinov, A. A., E-mail: voinov@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Collaboration: JINR (Dubna), LLNL (Livermore), ORNL (Oak Ridge), University of Tennessee (Knoxville), Vanderbilt University (Nashville), Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad) Collaboration

    2016-12-15

    A survey of experiments at the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator (Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna) aimed at the detection and study of the “island of stability” of superheavy nuclei produced in complete fusion reactions of {sup 48}Ca ions and {sup 238}U–{sup 249}Cf target nuclei is given. The problems of synthesis of superheavy nuclei, methods for their identification, and investigation of their decay properties, including the results of recent experiments at other separators (SHIP, BGS, TASCA) and chemical setups, are discussed. The studied properties of the new nuclei, the isotopes of elements 112–118, as well as the properties of their decay products, indicate substantial growth of stability of the heaviest nuclei with increasing number of neutrons in the nucleus as the magic number of neutrons N = 184 is approached.

  16. Doppler- and recoil-free laser excitation of Rydberg states via three-photon transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabtsev, I. I.; Beterov, I. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A. [A. V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, Prospekt Lavrentyeva 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    Three-photon laser excitation of Rydberg states by three different laser beams can be arranged in a starlike geometry that simultaneously eliminates the recoil effect and Doppler broadening. Our analytical and numerical calculations for a particular laser excitation scheme 5S{sub 1/2}{yields}5P{sub 3/2}{yields}6S{sub 1/2}{yields}nP in Rb atoms have shown that, compared to the one- and two-photon laser excitation, this approach provides much narrower linewidth and longer coherence time for both cold atom samples and hot vapors, if the intermediate one-photon resonances of the three-photon transition are detuned by more than respective single-photon Doppler widths. This method can be used to improve fidelity of Rydberg quantum gates and precision of spectroscopic measurements in Rydberg atoms.

  17. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  18. The design of a proton recoil telescope for 14 MeV neutron spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, N P; Croft, S; Jarvis, O N; Sherwood, A C

    2002-01-01

    As part of the design effort for a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer for the Joint European Torus (JET), computer codes were developed to calculate the response of a proton recoil telescope comprising a proton radiator film mounted in front of a proton detector. The codes were used to optimise the geometrical configuration in terms of efficiency and resolution, bearing in mind the constraints imposed by the proposed application as a JET neutron diagnostic for the Deuterium-Tritium phase. A prototype instrument was built according to the optimised design, and tested with monoenergetic 14 MeV neutrons from the Harwell 500 keV Van de Graaff accelerator. The measured energy resolution and absolute efficiency were found to be in acceptable agreement with the calculations. Based on this work, a multi-radiator production version of the spectrometer has now been constructed and successfully deployed at JET.

  19. Spin-orbit force, recoil corrections, and possible BB¯* and DD¯* molecular states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Ma, Li; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the one-boson exchange model, we have calculated the effective potentials between two heavy mesons BB¯* and DD¯* from the t- and u-channel π-, η-, ρ-, ω-, and σ-meson exchanges with four kinds of quantum number: I=0, JPC=1++; I =0, JPC=1+-; I =1, JPC=1++; I =1, JPC=1+-. We keep the recoil corrections to the BB¯* and DD¯* systems up to O(1/M2). The spin-orbit force appears at O(/1M), which turns out to be important for the very loosely bound molecular states. Our numerical results show that the momentum-related corrections are unfavorable to the formation of the molecular states in the I =0, JPC=1++ and I =1, JPC=1+- channels in the DD¯* system.

  20. ASTROPHYSICS. Exclusion of leptophilic dark matter models using XENON100 electronic recoil data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-21

    Laboratory experiments searching for galactic dark matter particles scattering off nuclei have so far not been able to establish a discovery. We use data from the XENON100 experiment to search for dark matter interacting with electrons. With no evidence for a signal above the low background of our experiment, we exclude a variety of representative dark matter models that would induce electronic recoils. For axial-vector couplings to electrons, we exclude cross sections above 6 × 10(-35) cm(2) for particle masses of m(χ) = 2 GeV/c(2). Independent of the dark matter halo, we exclude leptophilic models as an explanation for the long-standing DAMA/LIBRA signal, such as couplings to electrons through axial-vector interactions at a 4.4σ confidence level, mirror dark matter at 3.6σ, and luminous dark matter at 4.6σ. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Black Cohosh

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of liver trouble, such as abdominal pain, dark urine, or jaundice, while taking black cohosh should ... hard-of-hearing callers): 1-866-464-3615 Web site: nccih.nih.gov E-mail: info@nccih. ...

  2. Recoil and conversion electron considerations of the {sup 166}Dy/{sup 166}Ho in vivo generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaart, J.R. [North-West Univ., Mmabatho (South Africa). CARST; Szuecs, Z. [Nesca (South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Ltd.), Pretoria (South Africa). Radiochemistry; Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary). Inst. of Nuclear Research; Takacs, S.; Jarvis, N. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary). Inst. of Nuclear Research; Jansen, D. [Nesca (South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Ltd.), Pretoria (South Africa). Radiochemistry

    2012-07-01

    The use of radionuclides as potential therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals is increasingly investigated. An important aspect is the delivery of the radionuclide to the target, i.e. the radionuclide is not lost from the chelating agent. For in vivo generators, it is not only the log K of complexation between the metal ion and the chelator that is important, but also whether the daughter radionuclide stays inside the chelator after decay of the parent radionuclide. In our previous work, we showed that the classical recoil effect is only applicable for decays with a Q value higher than 0.6 MeV (in the atomic mass range around 100). However, Zhernosekov et al. published a result for {sup 140}Nd/{sup 140}Pr (Q = 0.222 MeV) which indicated that > 95% of the daughter ({sup 140}Pr) was lost by a DOTA chelator upon decay of {sup 140}Nd. The authors ascribed this to the ''post-effect''. Their experiment was repeated with the {sup 166}Dy/{sup 166}Ho generator to ascertain whether our calculations were correct. It was found that 72% of the daughter ({sup 166}Ho) was liberated from the DOTA chelator, indicating that the 'post effect' does exist in contrast to our recoil calculations. Upon further investigation, we determined that one should not only consider recoil energy levels but also the mode of decay which was able to explain the partial recoil found for {sup 166}Dy/{sup 166}Ho. It is concluded for the {sup 166}Dy/{sup 166}Ho system that the low recoil energy of the daughter nucleus {sup 166}Ho is not a sufficient reason to rule out release of the nuclide from chelators. On the other hand, we found that the ratio of the {sup 166}Ho that gets released corresponds to the ratio of relaxation of Ho atoms via the Auger process. (orig.)

  3. Are LIGO's Black Holes Made From Smaller Black Holes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    The recent successes of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) has raised hopes that several long-standing questions in black-hole physics will soon be answerable. Besides revealing how the black-hole binary pairs are built, could detections with LIGO also reveal how the black holes themselves form?Isolation or HierarchyThe first detection of gravitational waves, GW150914, was surprising for a number of reasons. One unexpected result was the mass of the two black holes that LIGO saw merging: they were a whopping 29 and 36 solar masses.On the left of this schematic, two first-generation (direct-collapse) black holes form a merging binary. The right illustrates a second-generation hierarchical merger: each black hole in the final merging binary was formed by the merger of two smaller black holes. [Adapted fromGerosa et al., a simultaneously published paper that also explores the problem of hierarchical mergers and reaches similar conclusions]How do black holes of this size form? One possibility is that they form in isolation from the collapse of a single massive star. In an alternative model, they are created through the hierarchical merger of smaller black holes, gradually building up to the size we observed.A team of scientists led by Maya Fishbach (University of Chicago) suggests that we may soon be able to tell whether or not black holes observed by LIGO formed hierarchically. Fishbach and collaborators argue that hierarchical formation leaves a distinctive signature on the spins of the final black holes and that as soon as we have enough merger detections from LIGO, we can use spin measurements to statistically determine if LIGO black holes were formed hierarchically.Spins from Major MergersWhen two black holes merge, both their original spins and the angular momentum of the pair contribute to the spin of the final black hole that results. Fishbach and collaborators calculate the expected distribution of these final spins assuming that

  4. Chandra Takes on Heavy Jets and Massive Winds in 4U 1630-47

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, Joey

    2014-11-01

    Recently, Díaz Trigo et al. reported the discovery of relativistic baryons in a jet in XMM/ATCA observations of the 2012 outburst of the black hole 4U 1630-47. We present a search for a similarly massive jet earlier in the same outburst using high-resolution X-ray spectra from the Chandra HETGS. Despite a detection of radio emission with ATCA, we find no evidence of a heavy jet in the X-ray spectrum, with tight upper limits on the relativistic emission lines seen by Díaz Trigo eight months later. Instead, we find deep absorption lines from a massive, highly ionized disk wind, whose properties can be probed with detailed photoionization models. We explore several scenarios to explain the two modes of massive outflow in this remarkable black hole system.

  5. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome complicating massive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    shobha

    massive hemorrhage from an unusual presentation of ruptured ectopic pregnancy. Robert B. Sanda, Rafeeqa Aziz1, Abdulrazaque Bhutto2, Salah I. Seliem. Departments of Surgery, 1Obstetrics/Gynecology, 2Anaesthesiology, Hail General Hospital, Hail 81451, Saudi Arabia. Correspondence to: Dr. Robert Sanda FRCSI, ...

  6. Massive transfusion in traumatic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Jonathan; Wilcox, Susan R; Raja, Ali S

    2013-04-01

    Hemorrhage after trauma is a common cause of death in the United States and globally. The primary goals when managing traumatic shock are the restoration of oxygen delivery to end organs, maintenance of circulatory volume, and prevention of ongoing bleeding through source control and correction of coagulopathy. Achieving these goals may require massive transfusion of blood products. Although use of blood products may be lifesaving, dose-related adverse effects are well described. Complications of massive transfusion include interdependent derangements such as coagulopathy, hypothermia, acidosis, and electrolyte abnormalities, as well as infectious and immunomodulatory phenomena. This article explores the pathogenesis, implications, prevention, and treatment of these complications through the use of massive transfusion protocols. Particular attention is given to the optimal ratio of blood products transfused in large volume resuscitation and prevention of secondary coagulopathy. Observational data indicate that the development and use of a massive transfusion protocol may reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with large-volume resuscitation of patients with hemorrhagic shock. Such protocols should include a pre-defined ratio of packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, and platelets transfused; most commonly, the ratio used is 1:1:1. Additionally, such protocols should monitor for and correct hypothermia, hypofibrinogenemia, and electrolyte disturbances such as hypocalcemia and hyperkalemia. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Uveite Massive a Pseudo - Cristallin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chams

    1958-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a rare and curious case of massive uveitis with an exudative mass in the anterior chamber rather resembling the crystalline lens."nThey followed up the case clinically and took a series of photographs showing its rapid evolution. The exudative mass was atfor a dislocation of the lens in the anterior chamber

  8. Massive subcutaneous emphysema with pneumoscrotopenis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chest injury commonly leads to subcutaneous emphysema of the chest, neck and face. It is usually non-life threatening. Massive subcutaneous emphysema may occur and very rarely may spread to involve the scrotal sac and subcutaneous tissue planes of the penis to cause pneumoscrotopenis. This case report presents ...

  9. Massively parallel quantum computer simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, K.; Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.; Trieu, B.; Arnold, G.; Richter, M.; Lippert, Th.; Watanabe, H.; Ito, N.

    2007-01-01

    We describe portable software to simulate universal quantum computers on massive parallel Computers. We illustrate the use of the simulation software by running various quantum algorithms on different computer architectures, such as a IBM BlueGene/L, a IBM Regatta p690+, a Hitachi SR11000/J1, a Cray

  10. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome complicating massive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... slow but massive intra-abdominal bleeding caused by a ruptured ectopic pregnancy (REP) in an Arab woman. Due to the unusual nature of the presentation of the REP, the diagnosis proved elusive for over a week until the patient succumbed to hypovolemic shock after losing about 4.2 l inside the peritoneal space.

  11. Cosmological solutions with massive gravitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamseddine, Ali H. [Physics Department, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS-UMR 6083, Universite de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); LE STUDIUM, Loire Valley Institute for Advanced Studies, Tours and Orleans (France); I.H.E.S., F-91440 Bures-sur-Yvette (France); Volkov, Mikhail S., E-mail: volkov@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS-UMR 6083, Universite de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)

    2011-10-25

    We present solutions describing spatially closed, open, or flat cosmologies in the massive gravity theory within the recently proposed tetrad formulation. We find that the effect of the graviton mass is equivalent to introducing to the Einstein equations a matter source that can consist of several different matter types - a cosmological term, quintessence, gas of cosmic strings, and non-relativistic cold matter.

  12. Massively Parallel Dimension Independent Adaptive Metropolis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yuxin

    2015-05-14

    This work considers black-box Bayesian inference over high-dimensional parameter spaces. The well-known and widely respected adaptive Metropolis (AM) algorithm is extended herein to asymptotically scale uniformly with respect to the underlying parameter dimension, by respecting the variance, for Gaussian targets. The result- ing algorithm, referred to as the dimension-independent adaptive Metropolis (DIAM) algorithm, also shows improved performance with respect to adaptive Metropolis on non-Gaussian targets. This algorithm is further improved, and the possibility of probing high-dimensional targets is enabled, via GPU-accelerated numerical libraries and periodically synchronized concurrent chains (justified a posteriori). Asymptoti- cally in dimension, this massively parallel dimension-independent adaptive Metropolis (MPDIAM) GPU implementation exhibits a factor of four improvement versus the CPU-based Intel MKL version alone, which is itself already a factor of three improve- ment versus the serial version. The scaling to multiple CPUs and GPUs exhibits a form of strong scaling in terms of the time necessary to reach a certain convergence criterion, through a combination of longer time per sample batch (weak scaling) and yet fewer necessary samples to convergence. This is illustrated by e ciently sampling from several Gaussian and non-Gaussian targets for dimension d 1000.

  13. Massive neutral particles on heterotic string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Olivares, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The motion of massive particles in the background of a charged black hole in heterotic string theory, which is characterized by a parameter $\\alpha$, is studied in detail across this paper. Since it is possible to write this space-time in the Einstein frame, we perform a quantitative analysis of the time-like geodesics by means of the standard Lagrange procedure. Thus, we obtain and solve a set of differential equations and then we describe the orbits in terms of elliptic $\\wp$-Weierstra{\\ss} function. Also, by making an elementary derivation developed by Cornbleet (Am. J. Phys. \\textbf{61} 7, (1993) 650 - 651) we obtain the correction to the angle of advance of perihelion to first order in $\\alpha$, and thus, by comparing with Mercury's data we give an estimation for the value of this parameter, which yields to an {\\it heterotic solar charge} $Q_{\\odot}\\simeq 0.728\\,[\\textrm{Km}]= 0.493\\, M_{\\odot}$. Therefore, in addition with the study on null geodesics performed by Fernando (Phys. Rev. D {\\bf 85}, (2012) ...

  14. Canonical structure of BHT massive gravity in warped AdS3 sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Mahdavian Yekta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the asymptotic structure of the three dimensional Warped Anti-de Sitter (WAdS3 black holes in the Bergshoeff–Hohm–Townsend (BHT massive gravity using the canonical Hamiltonian formalism. We define the canonical asymptotic gauge generators, which produce the conserved charges and the asymptotic symmetry group for the WAdS3 black holes. The attained symmetry group is described by a semi-direct sum of a Virasoro and a Kač–Moody algebra. Using the Sugawara construction, we obtain a direct sum of two Virasoro algebras. We show that not only the asymptotic conserved charges satisfy the first law of black hole thermodynamics, but also they lead to the expected Smarr formula for the WAdS3 black holes. We also show that the black hole's entropy obeys the Cardy formula of the dual conformal field theory (CFT.

  15. Sarcoidosis Presenting as Massive Splenic Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishita Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. Granulomatous inflammation involving the spleen is common and associated with splenomegaly. However, massive splenomegaly is a rare occurrence. Infrequently massive splenomegaly can result in splenic infarction. Massive splenic infarction in sarcoidosis has, to our knowledge, not been previously reported. We present a case of a woman presenting with massive splenic infarction and sarcoidosis confirmed by granulomatous inflammation of the liver.

  16. Sarcoidosis presenting as massive splenic infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ishita; Ismajli, Mediola; Steuer, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. Granulomatous inflammation involving the spleen is common and associated with splenomegaly. However, massive splenomegaly is a rare occurrence. Infrequently massive splenomegaly can result in splenic infarction. Massive splenic infarction in sarcoidosis has, to our knowledge, not been previously reported. We present a case of a woman presenting with massive splenic infarction and sarcoidosis confirmed by granulomatous inflammation of the liver.

  17. Sarcoidosis Presenting as Massive Splenic Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Ishita Patel; Mediola Ismajli; Alan Steuer

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. Granulomatous inflammation involving the spleen is common and associated with splenomegaly. However, massive splenomegaly is a rare occurrence. Infrequently massive splenomegaly can result in splenic infarction. Massive splenic infarction in sarcoidosis has, to our knowledge, not been previously reported. We present a case of a woman presenting with massive splenic infarction and sarcoidosis confirmed by granulomatous in...

  18. Massive star clusters in galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William E

    2010-02-28

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GC research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  19. Magnetic Fields of Massive Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Lundin, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the subject of magnetic fields on stars, with a focus on hotter stars. Basic astrophysical concepts are explained, including: spectroscopy, stellar classification, general structure and evolution of stars. The Zeeman effect and how absorption line splitting  is used to detect and measure magnetic fields is explained. The properties of a prominent type of magnetic massive star, Ap-stars, are delved into. These stars have very stable, global, roughly dipolar mag...

  20. A new Recoil Proton Telescope for energy and fluence measurement of fast neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebreton, Lena; Bachaalany, Mario [IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons), Cadarache Bat.159, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Husson, Daniel; Higueret, Stephane [IPHC / RaMsEs (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien / Radioprotection et Mesures Environnementales), 23 rue du loess - BP28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 2, (France)

    2015-07-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High Energy Neutron metrology Applications), is being developed at the IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons) and aims at characterizing energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a Recoil Proton Telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5 to 20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50{sub m} thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for the proton tracking and a 3 mm thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. This first prototype used CMOS sensors called MIMOSTAR, initially developed for heavy ion physics. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of ten compared with conventional designs. The first prototype has already been done and was a successful study giving the results it offered in terms of energy and fluence measurements. For mono energetic beams going from 5 to 19 MeV, the telescope offered an energy resolution between 5 and 11% and fluence difference going from 5 to 7% compared to other home standards. A second and final prototype of the detector is being designed. It will hold upgraded CMOS sensors called FastPixN. These CMOS sensors are supposed to run 400 times faster than the older version and therefore give the telescope the ability to support neutron flux in the order of 107 to 108cm{sup 2}:s{sup 1}. The first prototypes results showed that a 50 m pixel size is enough for a precise scattering angle reconstruction. Simulations using MCNPX and GEANT4 are already in place for further improvements. A DeltaE diode will replace the third CMOS sensor and will be installed right before the silicon diode for a better recoil proton selection. The final prototype with

  1. Brane-world black holes with post-Newtonian parameter: astrophysical signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Roldão; Piloyan, Arpine

    2014-03-01

    The existence of the many unanswered questions in fundamental physics, in particular, in astrophysics allows for a great variety of theories to remain viable candidates for becoming the correct theory at energies not accessible in current experiments. One special class of these type of theories is the class of extra-dimensional brane-world models. Besides answering many fundamental problems, for instance, the hierarchy problem, they may produce testable predictions. In this work, we find and investigate brane-world induced black string horizon corrections, when the black hole solution has a post-Newtonian parameter. For suitable choices of such a parameter, the Hawking radiation on the brane is precluded, and the Hawking radiation in the bulk causes the black hole to slightly recoil into the bulk, which modifies the black hole apparent horizon. It has an impact on quasars luminosity and, therefore, might be detected and measured.

  2. X-ray Winds from Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jon M.

    2017-08-01

    Across the mass scale, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has transformed our view of accretion onto black holes. The ionized disk winds observed from stellar-mass black holes may sometimes eject more mass than is able to accrete onto the black hole. It is possible that these winds can probe the fundamental physics that drive disk accretion. The most powerful winds from accretion onto massive black holes may play a role in feedback, seeding host bulges with hot gas and halting star formation. The lessons and techniques emerging from these efforts can also reveal the accretion flow geometry in tidal disruption events (TDEs), an especially rich discovery space. This talk will review some recent progress enabled by high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy, and look at the potential of gratings spectrometers and microcalorimeters in the years ahead.

  3. Formation of Massive Stars: Theoretical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews theoretical considerations of the formation of massive stars. It addresses the questions that assuming a gravitationally unstable massive clump, how does enough material become concentrated into a sufficiently small volume within a sufficiently short time? and how does the forming massive star influence its immediate surroundings to limit its mass?

  4. Theoretical Considerations of Massive Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the formation of massive stars. The formation of massive stars is different in many ways from the formation of other stars. The presentation shows the math, and the mechanisms that must be possible for a massive star to form.

  5. Massive branes and creation of branes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E; Dorn, H; Lust, D; Weigt, G

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the effective worldvolume theories of p-branes and D-branes in a massive background given by (the bosonic sector of) 10-dimensional massive IIA supergravity ("massive branes"). As an application we discuss the consequences of our results for the anomalous creation of branes.

  6. Massive graviton on a spatial condensate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunshan Lin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the spatial gauge symmetries spontaneously breaking down in GR, and graviton becoming massive on this spatial condensate background. Such a model can be considered as a simplest example of massive gravity. We then apply our massive gravity theory to inflation, and find that the graviton mass removes the IR divergence of the inflationary loop diagram.

  7. First identification of excited states in 117Ba using the recoil-β -delayed proton tagging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, B.; Liu, Z.; Seweryniak, D.; Woods, P. J.; Wang, H. L.; Yang, J.; Liu, H. L.; Davids, C. N.; Carpenter, M. P.; Davinson, T.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Page, R. D.; Robinson, A. P.; Shergur, J.; Sinha, S.; Zhu, S.; Tang, X. D.; Wang, J. G.; Huang, T. H.; Zhang, W. Q.; Sun, M. D.; Liu, X. Y.; Lu, H. Y.

    2017-02-01

    Excited states have been observed for the first time in the neutron-deficient nucleus 117Ba using the recoil-decay tagging technique following the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reaction 64Zn(58Ni, 2p3n)117Ba. Prompt γ rays have been assigned to 117Ba through correlations with β -delayed protons following the decay of A =117 recoils. Through the analysis of the γ -γ coincidence relationships, a high-spin level scheme consisting of two bands has been established in 117Ba. Based on the systematics of the level spacings in the neighboring barium isotopes, the two bands are proposed to have ν h11 /2[532 ] 5 /2- and ν d5 /2[413 ] 5 /2+ configurations, respectively. The observed band-crossing properties are interpreted in the framework of cranked shell model.

  8. Development of a Position Sensitive Beta and Recoil Ion Detectors for the 6He β - ν Angular Correlation Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ran; Bagdasarova, Yelena; Garcia, Alejandro; Storm, Derek; Sternberg, Matthew; Swanson, Erik; Wauters, Frederik; Zumwalt, David; Bailey, Kevin; Leredde, Arnaud; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas; Fléchard, Xavier; Liennard, Etienne; Knecht, Andreas; Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    In order to measure the β - ν angular correlation coefficient a and put more stringent limits on exotic tensor type weak currents, we constructed a system which detects β particles in coincidence with recoil ions from the β-decay of laser trapped 6He atoms. The β particles are detected by a scintillator and a multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) with a capacitive charge division anode. The recoil ions are detected by a microchannel plate (MCP) with delay-line anodes. The coefficient a is extracted by fitting the coincidence data to GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulations, which are also used to study systematic uncertainties related to the detector system. A new method of calibrating the MWPC using a cathode focusing effect will be presented. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract nos. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  9. Determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method in combination with magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doncel, M. [Universidad de Salamanca, Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Salamanca (Spain); Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gadea, A. [CSIC-University of Valencia, Istituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Valiente-Dobon, J.J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Quintana, B. [Universidad de Salamanca, Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Salamanca (Spain); Modamio, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Mengoni, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Moeller, O.; Pietralla, N. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Dewald, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Koeln (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    The current work presents the determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method, in combination with spectrometers for ion identification, normalizing the intensity of the peaks by the ions detected in the spectrometer as a valid technique that produces results comparable to the ones obtained by the conventional shifted-to-unshifted peak ratio method. The technique has been validated using data measured with the γ-ray array AGATA, the PRISMA spectrometer and the Cologne plunger setup. In this paper a test performed with the AGATA-PRISMA setup at LNL and the advantages of this new approach with respect to the conventional Recoil Distance Doppler Shift Method are discussed. (orig.)

  10. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Hares, J. D.; Wink, C. W.

    2016-11-01

    A time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum is presented. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording. Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.

  11. And All the Rest (Primordial, Intermediate, and Orphan Black Holes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cole

    2004-05-01

    Black holes, though exotic and mathematically beautiful, are notoriously difficult to detect because they emit no light of their own and hence can be seen only by their influence on nearby stars and gas. It is therefore probable that the observed stellar-mass and supermassive black holes are only the tip of the iceberg. In addition to the expected undetectable population of solitary black holes, there may be new classes of black holes yet to be discovered. For example, there is growing evidence for an intermediate-mass category of black holes that are too massive to form from solitary stars in the current universe, yet are less massive than the black holes in the centers of galaxies and are not located in environments where growth from gas accretion is significant. An even more intriguing prospect is that in the very early universe a population of primordial black holes could have formed. Although there are currently only limits to such a population, if they formed prior to big bang nucleosynthesis then there is a slim but nonzero chance that primordial black holes are the primary components of dark matter, which would imply that black holes are the dominant form of matter in the universe. We will discuss these scenarios in the context of structure formation and stellar dynamics, and consider future electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations that could yield further insight.

  12. A symbiotic scenario for the rapid formation of supermassive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M. C.; Tupper, G. B.; Viollier, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    The most massive black holes, lurking at the centres of large galaxies, must have formed less than a billion years after the big bang, as they are visible today in the form of bright quasars at redshift larger than six. Their early appearance is mysterious, because the radiation pressure, generated by infalling ionized matter, inhibits the rapid growth of these black holes from stellar-mass black holes. It is shown that the supermassive black holes may form timeously through the accretion of predominantly degenerate sterile neutrino dark matter onto stellar-mass black holes. Our symbiotic scenario relies on the formation of, first, supermassive degenerate sterile neutrino balls through gravitational cooling and, then, stellar-mass black holes through supernova explosions of massive stars at the centre of the neutrino balls. The observed lower and upper limits of the supermassive black holes are explained by the corresponding mass limits of the preformed neutrino balls.

  13. All or nothing: On the small fluctuations of two-dimensional string theoretic black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Gerald [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Raiten, Eric [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    1992-10-01

    A comprehensive analysis of small fluctuations about two-dimensional string-theoretic and string-inspired black holes is presented. It is shown with specific examples that two-dimensional black holes behave in a radically different way from all known black holes in four dimensions. For both the SL(2,R)/U(1) black hole and the two-dimensional black hole coupled to a massive dilaton with constant field strength, it is shown that there are a {\\it continuous infinity} of solutions to the linearized equations of motion, which are such that it is impossible to ascertain the classical linear response. It is further shown that the two-dimensional black hole coupled to a massive, linear dilaton admits {\\it no small fluctuations at all}. We discuss possible implications of our results for the Callan-Giddings-Harvey-Strominger black hole.

  14. Fungal invasion of massive corals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Raghukumar, S.

    revealed a septate dark brown mycelial fungus on the surface and subsurface of the dead patches in five coral species. The fungus was isolated in culture and identified as Scolecobasidium sp. The fungus formed a distinct dense brown to black zone of 0...

  15. Genuine Tripartite Entanglement and Nonlocality in Bose-Einstein Condensates by Collective Atomic Recoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Adesso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We study a system represented by a Bose-Einstein condensate interacting with a cavity field in presence of a strong off-resonant pumping laser. This system can be described by a three-mode Gaussian state, where two are the atomic modes corresponding to atoms populating upper and lower momentum sidebands and the third mode describes the scattered cavity field light. We show that, as a consequence of the collective atomic recoil instability, these modes possess a genuine tripartite entanglement that increases unboundedly with the evolution time and is larger than the bipartite entanglement in any reduced two-mode bipartition. We further show that the state of the system exhibits genuine tripartite nonlocality, which can be revealed by a robust violation of the Svetlichny inequality when performing displaced parity measurements. Our exact results are obtained by exploiting the powerful machinery of phase-space informational measures for Gaussian states, which we briefly review in the opening sections of the paper.

  16. Complementarity and the Nature of Uncertainty Relations in Einstein–Bohr Recoiling Slit Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Tanimura

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A model of the Einstein–Bohr recoiling slit experiment is formulated in a fully quantum theoretical setting. In this model, the state and dynamics of a movable wall that has two slits in it, as well as the state of a particle incoming to the two slits, are described by quantum mechanics. Using this model, we analyzed complementarity between exhibiting an interference pattern and distinguishing the particle path. Comparing the Kennard–Robertson type and the Ozawa-type uncertainty relations, we conclude that the uncertainty relation involved in the double-slit experiment is not the Ozawa-type uncertainty relation but the Kennard-type uncertainty relation of the position and the momentum of the double-slit wall. A possible experiment to test the complementarity relation is suggested. It is also argued that various phenomena which occur at the interface of a quantum system and a classical system, including distinguishability, interference, decoherence, quantum eraser, and weak value, can be understood as aspects of entanglement. Quanta 2015; 4: 1–9.

  17. Observation of a resonance in $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays at low recoil

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    A broad peaking structure is observed in the dimuon spectrum of $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays in the kinematic region where the kaon has a low recoil against the dimuon system. The structure is consistent with interference between the $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay and a resonance and has a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations. The mean and width of the resonance are measured to be $4191^{+9}_{-8}\\mathrm{\\,Me\\kern -0.1em V/}c^2$ and $65^{+22}_{-16}\\mathrm{\\,Me\\kern -0.1em V/}c^2$, respectively, where the uncertainties include statistical and systematic contributions. These measurements are compatible with the properties of the $\\psi(4160)$ meson. First observations of both the decay $B^+ \\to \\psi(4160) K^+$ and the subsequent decay $\\psi(4160) \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ are reported. The resonant decay and the interference contribution make up 20% of the yield for dimuon masses above 3770  MeV/c2. This contribution is larger than theoretical estimates.

  18. Potku - New analysis software for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arstila, K.; Julin, J.; Laitinen, M. I.; Aalto, J.; Konu, T.; Kärkkäinen, S.; Rahkonen, S.; Raunio, M.; Itkonen, J.; Santanen, J.-P.; Tuovinen, T.; Sajavaara, T.

    2014-07-01

    Time-of-flight elastic recoil detection (ToF-ERD) analysis software has been developed. The software combines a Python-language graphical front-end with a C code computing back-end in a user-friendly way. The software uses a list of coincident time-of-flight-energy (ToF-E) events as an input. The ToF calibration can be determined with a simple graphical procedure. The graphical interface allows the user to select different elements and isotopes from a ToF-E histogram and to convert the selections to individual elemental energy and depth profiles. The resulting sample composition can be presented as relative or absolute concentrations by integrating the depth profiles over user-defined ranges. Beam induced composition changes can be studied by displaying the event-based data in fractions relative to the substrate reference data. Optional angular input data allows for kinematic correction of the depth profiles. This open source software is distributed under the GPL license for Linux, Mac, and Windows environments.

  19. Corrosion resistance enhancement of SAE 1020 steel after Chromium implantation by nitrogen ion recoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Francisco Gomes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available SAE 1020 construction steel is widely used as mortar reinforcement and small machine parts, but aside good surface properties as high ductility, hardness and wear resistance, its surface is prone to severe corrosion. As it is known, Chromium in amount over 12%-13% in the Fe alloys renders them resistance to several corrosive attacks. SAE 1020 samples were recovered with Chromium film and then bombarded either by nitrogen Ion Beam (IB or Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII to recoil implant Cr atoms in the Fe matrix. Samples treated by 100 keV N+ IB showed irregular, thin Cr profile, remaining a part of the film on the surface, to about 10 nm. Samples treated by 40 kV N PIII presented Cr layer of about 18% at., ranging to around 90 nm. Cr of the film was implanted in the Fe matrix in an almost flat profile. Results of corrosion test showed good performance of the PIII treated sample. The IB treated sample showed some enhancement over the non-treated reference and the only Cr film deposited sample showed no modification on the corrosion behavior as compared to the non-treated reference sample.

  20. Enhancement of surface properties of SAE 1020 by chromium plasma immersion recoil implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, M.; Mello, C. B.; Beloto, A. F.; Rossi, J. O.; Reuther, H.

    2007-04-01

    SAE 1020 steel is commonly used as concrete reinforcement and small machine parts, but despite its good mechanical properties, as ductility, hardness and wear resistance, it is susceptible to severe corrosion. It is well known that chromium content above 12% in Fe alloys increases their corrosion resistance. In order to obtain this improvement, we studied the introduction of chromium atoms into the matrix of SAE 1020 steel by recoil implantation process using a plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system. Potentiodynamic scans showed that the presence of Cr film leads to a gain in the corrosion potential, from -650 mV to -400 mV. After PIII treatment, the corrosion potential increased further to -340 mV, but the corrosion current density presented no significant change. Vickers microhardness tests showed surface hardness increase of up to about 27% for the treated samples. Auger electron spectroscopy showed that, for a 30 nm film, Cr was introduced for about 20 nm into the steel matrix. Tribology tests, of pin-on-disk type, showed that friction coefficient of treated samples was reduced by about 50% and a change in wear mechanism, from adhesive to abrasive mode, occurred.

  1. Compositional analysis of polycrystalline hafnium oxide thin films by heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, F.L. [Departamento de Electronica y Tecnologia de Computadoras, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Campus Universitario Muralla del Mar, E-30202 Cartagena (Spain)]. E-mail: Felix.Martinez@upct.es; Toledano, M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); San Andres, E. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Martil, I. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Diaz, G. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Bohne, W. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Roehrich, J. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Strub, E. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-10-25

    The composition of polycrystalline hafnium oxide thin films has been measured by heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis (HI-ERDA). The films were deposited by high-pressure reactive sputtering (HPRS) on silicon wafers using an oxygen plasma at pressures between 0.8 and 1.6 mbar and during deposition times between 0.5 and 3.0 h. Hydrogen was found to be the main impurity and its concentration increased with deposition pressure. The composition was always slightly oxygen-rich, which is attributed to the oxygen plasma. Additionally, an interfacial silicon oxide thin layer was detected and taken into account. The thickness of the hafnium oxide film was found to increase linearly with deposition time and to decrease exponentially with deposition pressure, whereas the thickness of the silicon oxide interfacial layer has a minimum as a function of pressure at around 1.2 mbar and increases slightly as a function of time. The measurements confirmed that this interfacial layer is formed mainly during the early stages of the deposition process.

  2. Vaidya spacetime in massive gravity's rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarzade, Yaghoub; Rudra, Prabir; Darabi, Farhad; Ali, Ahmed Farag; Faizal, Mir

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we will analyze the energy dependent deformation of massive gravity using the formalism of massive gravity's rainbow. So, we will use the Vainshtein mechanism and the dRGT mechanism for the energy dependent massive gravity, and thus analyze a ghost free theory of massive gravity's rainbow. We study the energy dependence of a time-dependent geometry, by analyzing the radiating Vaidya solution in this theory of massive gravity's rainbow. The energy dependent deformation of this Vaidya metric will be performed using suitable rainbow functions.

  3. Vaidya spacetime in massive gravity's rainbow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaghoub Heydarzade

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will analyze the energy dependent deformation of massive gravity using the formalism of massive gravity's rainbow. So, we will use the Vainshtein mechanism and the dRGT mechanism for the energy dependent massive gravity, and thus analyze a ghost free theory of massive gravity's rainbow. We study the energy dependence of a time-dependent geometry, by analyzing the radiating Vaidya solution in this theory of massive gravity's rainbow. The energy dependent deformation of this Vaidya metric will be performed using suitable rainbow functions.

  4. Quantum corrections to Schwarzschild black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier; El-Menoufi, Basem Kamal [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    Using effective field theory techniques, we compute quantum corrections to spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein's gravity and focus in particular on the Schwarzschild black hole. Quantum modifications are covariantly encoded in a non-local effective action. We work to quadratic order in curvatures simultaneously taking local and non-local corrections into account. Looking for solutions perturbatively close to that of classical general relativity, we find that an eternal Schwarzschild black hole remains a solution and receives no quantum corrections up to this order in the curvature expansion. In contrast, the field of a massive star receives corrections which are fully determined by the effective field theory. (orig.)

  5. Two ten-billion-solar-mass black holes at the centres of giant elliptical galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Nicholas J; Ma, Chung-Pei; Gebhardt, Karl; Wright, Shelley A; Murphy, Jeremy D; Lauer, Tod R; Graham, James R; Richstone, Douglas O

    2011-12-08

    Observational work conducted over the past few decades indicates that all massive galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centres. Although the luminosities and brightness fluctuations of quasars in the early Universe suggest that some were powered by black holes with masses greater than 10 billion solar masses, the remnants of these objects have not been found in the nearby Universe. The giant elliptical galaxy Messier 87 hosts the hitherto most massive known black hole, which has a mass of 6.3 billion solar masses. Here we report that NGC 3842, the brightest galaxy in a cluster at a distance from Earth of 98 megaparsecs, has a central black hole with a mass of 9.7 billion solar masses, and that a black hole of comparable or greater mass is present in NGC 4889, the brightest galaxy in the Coma cluster (at a distance of 103 megaparsecs). These two black holes are significantly more massive than predicted by linearly extrapolating the widely used correlations between black-hole mass and the stellar velocity dispersion or bulge luminosity of the host galaxy. Although these correlations remain useful for predicting black-hole masses in less massive elliptical galaxies, our measurements suggest that different evolutionary processes influence the growth of the largest galaxies and their black holes.

  6. The MASSIVE survey. I. A volume-limited integral-field spectroscopic study of the most massive early-type galaxies within 108 Mpc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chung-Pei [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); McConnell, Nicholas [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Janish, Ryan [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Blakeslee, John P. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Thomas, Jens, E-mail: cpma@berkeley.edu [Max Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2014-11-10

    Massive early-type galaxies represent the modern day remnants of the earliest major star formation episodes in the history of the universe. These galaxies are central to our understanding of the evolution of cosmic structure, stellar populations, and supermassive black holes, but the details of their complex formation histories remain uncertain. To address this situation, we have initiated the MASSIVE Survey, a volume-limited, multi-wavelength, integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) and photometric survey of the structure and dynamics of the ∼100 most massive early-type galaxies within a distance of 108 Mpc. This survey probes a stellar mass range M* ≳ 10{sup 11.5} M {sub ☉} and diverse galaxy environments that have not been systematically studied to date. Our wide-field IFS data cover about two effective radii of individual galaxies, and for a subset of them, we are acquiring additional IFS observations on sub-arcsecond scales with adaptive optics. We are also acquiring deep K-band imaging to trace the extended halos of the galaxies and measure accurate total magnitudes. Dynamical orbit modeling of the combined data will allow us to simultaneously determine the stellar, black hole, and dark matter halo masses. The primary goals of the project are to constrain the black hole scaling relations at high masses, investigate systematically the stellar initial mass function and dark matter distribution in massive galaxies, and probe the late-time assembly of ellipticals through stellar population and kinematical gradients. In this paper, we describe the MASSIVE sample selection, discuss the distinct demographics and structural and environmental properties of the selected galaxies, and provide an overview of our basic observational program, science goals and early survey results.

  7. First high-statistics and high-resolution recoil-ion data from the WITCH retardation spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, P.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Porobić, T.; Wursten, E.; Ban, G.; Beck, M.; Couratin, C.; Fabian, X.; Fléchard, X.; Friedag, P.; Glück, F.; Herlert, A.; Knecht, A.; Kozlov, V. Y.; Liénard, E.; Soti, G.; Tandecki, M.; Traykov, E.; Van Gorp, S.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Zákoucký, D.; Severijns, N.

    2016-07-01

    The first high-statistics and high-resolution data set for the integrated recoil-ion energy spectrum following the β^+ decay of 35Ar has been collected with the WITCH retardation spectrometer located at CERN-ISOLDE. Over 25 million recoil-ion events were recorded on a large-area multichannel plate (MCP) detector with a time-stamp precision of 2ns and position resolution of 0.1mm due to the newly upgraded data acquisition based on the LPC Caen FASTER protocol. The number of recoil ions was measured for more than 15 different settings of the retardation potential, complemented by dedicated background and half-life measurements. Previously unidentified systematic effects, including an energy-dependent efficiency of the main MCP and a radiation-induced time-dependent background, have been identified and incorporated into the analysis. However, further understanding and treatment of the radiation-induced background requires additional dedicated measurements and remains the current limiting factor in extracting a beta-neutrino angular correlation coefficient for 35Ar decay using the WITCH spectrometer.

  8. First high-statistics and high-resolution recoil-ion data from the WITCH retardation spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finlay, P.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Porobic, T.; Wursten, E.; Couratin, C.; Soti, G.; Severijns, N. [KU Leuven University, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, Leuven (Belgium); Ban, G.; Fabian, X.; Flechard, X.; Lienard, E. [Normandie Univ., ENSICAEN, UNICAEN, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC Caen, Caen (France); Beck, M.; Friedag, P.; Weinheimer, C. [Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Glueck, F.; Kozlov, V.Y. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Herlert, A. [FAIR, Darmstadt (Germany); Knecht, A. [KU Leuven University, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, Leuven (Belgium); CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Tandecki, M. [TRIUMF, Vancouver BC (Canada); Traykov, E. [CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, Caen (France); Van Gorp, S. [RIKEN, Atomic Physics Laboratory, Saitama (Japan); Zakoucky, D. [ASCR, Nuclear Physics Institute, Rez (Czech Republic)

    2016-07-15

    The first high-statistics and high-resolution data set for the integrated recoil-ion energy spectrum following the β{sup +} decay of {sup 35}Ar has been collected with the WITCH retardation spectrometer located at CERN-ISOLDE. Over 25 million recoil-ion events were recorded on a large-area multichannel plate (MCP) detector with a time-stamp precision of 2 ns and position resolution of 0.1 mm due to the newly upgraded data acquisition based on the LPC Caen FASTER protocol. The number of recoil ions was measured for more than 15 different settings of the retardation potential, complemented by dedicated background and half-life measurements. Previously unidentified systematic effects, including an energy-dependent efficiency of the main MCP and a radiation-induced time-dependent background, have been identified and incorporated into the analysis. However, further understanding and treatment of the radiation-induced background requires additional dedicated measurements and remains the current limiting factor in extracting a beta-neutrino angular correlation coefficient for {sup 35}Ar decay using the WITCH spectrometer. (orig.)

  9. Quantum black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Calmet, Xavier; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Written by foremost experts, this short book gives a clear description of the physics of quantum black holes. The reader will learn about quantum black holes in four and higher dimensions, primordial black holes, the production of black holes in high energy particle collisions, Hawking radiation, black holes in models of low scale quantum gravity and quantum gravitational aspects of black holes.

  10. STABLE ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY OF MASSIVE ICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurij K. Vasil’chuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarises stable-isotope research on massive ice in the Russian and North American Arctic, and includes the latest understanding of massive-ice formation. A new classification of massive-ice complexes is proposed, encompassing the range and variabilityof massive ice. It distinguishes two new categories of massive-ice complexes: homogeneousmassive-ice complexes have a similar structure, properties and genesis throughout, whereasheterogeneous massive-ice complexes vary spatially (in their structure and properties andgenetically within a locality and consist of two or more homogeneous massive-ice bodies.Analysis of pollen and spores in massive ice from Subarctic regions and from ice and snow cover of Arctic ice caps assists with interpretation of the origin of massive ice. Radiocarbon ages of massive ice and host sediments are considered together with isotope values of heavy oxygen and deuterium from massive ice plotted at a uniform scale in order to assist interpretation and correlation of the ice.

  11. Two new confirmed massive relic galaxies: red nuggets in the present-day Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Trujillo, Ignacio; Martín-Navarro, Ignacio; Vazdekis, Alexandre; Mezcua, Mar; Balcells, Marc; Domínguez, Lilian

    2017-05-01

    We confirm two new local massive relic galaxies, I.e. untouched survivors of the early Universe massive population: Mrk 1216 and PGC 032873. Both show early and peaked formation events within very short time-scales ( 2 massive population, setting them apart from the typical z ˜ 0 massive early-type galaxies. We find that there seems to exist a degree of relic that is related to how far into the path, to become one of these typical z ˜ 0 massive galaxies, the compact relic has moved. This path is partly dictated by the environment the galaxy lives in. For galaxies in rich environments, such as the previously reported relic galaxy NGC 1277, the most extreme properties (e.g. sizes, short formation time-scales, larger supermassive black holes) are expected, while lower density environments will have galaxies with delayed and/or extended star formations, slightly larger sizes and not that extreme black hole masses. The confirmation of three relic galaxies up to a distance of 106 Mpc, implies a lower limit in the number density of these red nuggets in the local Universe of 6 × 10-7 Mpc3, which is within the theoretical expectations.

  12. Remnant of binary black-hole mergers: New simulations and peak luminosity studies

    CERN Document Server

    Healy, James

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of 61 new simulations of nonprecessing spinning black hole binaries with mass ratios $q=m_1/m_2$ in the range $1\\leq q\\leq1/3$ and individual spins covering the parameter space $-0.85\\leq\\alpha_{1,2}\\leq0.85$. We additionally perform 10 new simulations of nonspinning black hole binaries with mass ratios covering the range $1/6\\leq q<1$. We follow the evolution for typically the last ten orbits before merger down to the formation of the final remnant black hole. This allows for assessment of the accuracy of our previous empirical formulae for relating the binary parameters to the remnant final black hole mass, spin and recoil. We use the new simulation to improve the fit to the above remnant formulae and add a formula for the peak luminosity of gravitational waves, produced around the merger of the two horizons into one. We find excellent agreement (typical errors $\\sim0.1-0.2\\%$) for the mass and spin, and $\\sim5\\%$ for the recoil and peak luminosity. These formulae have direct appli...

  13. Thermal BEC Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Casadio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We review some features of Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC models of black holes obtained by means of the horizon wave function formalism. We consider the Klein–Gordon equation for a toy graviton field coupled to a static matter current in a spherically-symmetric setup. The classical field reproduces the Newtonian potential generated by the matter source, while the corresponding quantum state is given by a coherent superposition of scalar modes with a continuous occupation number. An attractive self-interaction is needed for bound states to form, the case in which one finds that (approximately one mode is allowed, and the system of N bosons can be self-confined in a volume of the size of the Schwarzschild radius. The horizon wave function formalism is then used to show that the radius of such a system corresponds to a proper horizon. The uncertainty in the size of the horizon is related to the typical energy of Hawking modes: it decreases with the increasing of the black hole mass (larger number of gravitons, resulting in agreement with the semiclassical calculations and which does not hold for a single very massive particle. The spectrum of these systems has two components: a discrete ground state of energy m (the bosons forming the black hole and a continuous spectrum with energy ω > m (representing the Hawking radiation and modeled with a Planckian distribution at the expected Hawking temperature. Assuming the main effect of the internal scatterings is the Hawking radiation, the N-particle state can be collectively described by a single-particle wave-function given by a superposition of a total ground state with energy M = Nm and Entropy 2015, 17 6894 a Planckian distribution for E > M at the same Hawking temperature. This can be used to compute the partition function and to find the usual area law for the entropy, with a logarithmic correction related to the Hawking component. The backreaction of modes with ω > m is also shown to reduce

  14. Microlensing Signature of Binary Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Sahu, Kailash; Littenberg, Tyson

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the light curves of galactic bulge stars magnified via microlensing by stellar-mass binary black holes along the line-of-sight. We show the sensitivity to measuring various lens parameters for a range of survey cadences and photometric precision. Using public data from the OGLE collaboration, we identify two candidates for massive binary systems, and discuss implications for theories of star formation and binary evolution.

  15. Finding Free-Floating Black Holes using Astrometric Microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jessica R.; Ofek, Eran Oded; Sinukoff, Evan; Udalski, Andrzej; Kozlowski, Szymon

    2017-01-01

    Our Galaxy most likely hosts 10-100 million stellar mass black holes. The exact number and mass function of these black holes contains important information regarding our Galaxy's star formation history, stellar mass function, and the fate of very massive stars. However, isolated stellar black holes have yet to be detected. To date, stellar mass black holes have only been definitively detected in binary systems with accreting companions or merging to produce gravitational waves. In principle, the presence of isolated black holes can be inferred from astrometric and photometric signatures produced when they lens light from a background star. We attempt to detect the astrometric lensing signatures of several photometrically identified microlensing events, toward the Galactic Bulge. Long-duration events (t_Einstein > 100 days) were selected as the most likely black hole candidates and were observed using several years of laser-guided adaptive optics observations from the W. M. Keck telescopes. We present results from this search.

  16. Recoil effects on chemical G-values during ion irradiation of polystyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.B. (Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6376 (United States)); Lee, E.H. (Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6376 (United States)); Rao, G.R. (Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6376 (United States))

    1994-07-01

    Measurements of G-values (number of molecules emitted per 100 eV of absorbed radiation energy) have been made for helium and boron ion irradiations of polystyrene (PS) films of different thicknesses. These ions were chosen because the electronic linear energy transfer (LET) values for B[sup +] with energy near 200 keV is comparable to the corresponding LET for He[sup +] near 400 keV. In contrast, the nuclear of ''recoil'' LET of B[sup +] is several times larger than that of He[sup +] throughout the B[sup +] depth range. When the G-values for H[sub 2] and C[sub 2]H[sub 2] gas production were measured for these ions, three important findings were noted: (1) The G-values for H[sub 2] and C[sub 2]H[sub 2] showed only a slight increase and decrease respectively with increasing electronic LET. (2) The G(H[sub 2]) for B[sup +] irradiation was approximately 50% larger than that for He[sup +] irradiation. (3) The G(C[sub 2]H[sub 2]) was about a factor of five larger for the B[sup +] irradiation compared to the He[sup +]. In contrast to earlier speculation, no evidence was seen for an electronic LET threshold, above which the G-values rapidly increase. It appears that this anomaly was primarily due to changing the bombarding ion (increasing the atomic number) to reach a larger LET in the measurement. While G-value effects due to different ion-track energy densities are not yet resolved, our findings imply that most of the molecular gases formed from radiochemical reactions in polymers during typical ion irradiations are dependent not simply upon electronic energy, but upon a mechanism involving momentum transfer from the ion to the atomic nuclei of the target. ((orig.))

  17. General relativistic electromagnetic and massive vector field effects with gamma-ray burst production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Fabrizio; De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Amati, Lorenzo; Thidé, Bo

    2017-11-01

    We propose a new energy extraction mechanism from the rotational energy of a Kerr-Newman black hole by a gravitating massive photon field generated by electromagnetic and gravitational field coupling effects. Numerical studies show that this mechanism that depends on the black hole rotation parameter, a , shows a clear dependence on the black hole mass, M , and charge, Q , and can extract energies up to 1 054 erg for a black hole of the solar mass size. With this mechanism we can set a lower bound on the coupling ξ ˜10-38 between electromagnetic and gravitational fields that might be used to explain the hypothetical extremely high energy release, >1053 erg, suggested by the observations of some gamma-ray bursts in the controversial "energy crisis" problem if and when gamma-ray bursts seem not to show evidence for collimated emission.

  18. Cosmological New Massive Gravity and Galilean Conformal Algebra in 2 Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Setare

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the realization of 2-dimensional Galilean conformal algebra (GCA2 on the boundary of cosmological new massive gravity. At first, we consider the contracted BTZ black hole solution. We obtain entropy formula for the GCA2 in terms of contracted scaling dimension Δ and central charge C1. This entropy formula exactly matches with the nonrelativistic limit of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of BTZ black hole. Then, we extend our study to the contracted warped AdS3 black hole solution of CNMG. We obtain the entropy of dual GCA2 in terms of central charges and finite temperatures, T1, T2. Again, this expression coincides with the nonrelativistic limit of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula of warped AdS3 black hole.

  19. On the relation between the mass of Compact Massive Objects and their host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Tosta e Melo, I.

    2017-12-01

    Supermassive black holes and/or very dense stellar clusters are found in the central regions of galaxies. Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are present mainly in faint galaxies, while supermassive black holes are common in galaxies with masses ≥1010 M⊙. In the intermediate galactic mass range, both types of compact massive objects (CMOs) are found. Here, we present our collection of a huge set of NSC and massive black hole data that enlarges significantly already existing data bases useful to investigate for correlations of their absolute magnitudes, velocity dispersions and masses with structural parameters of their host galaxies. In particular, we directed our attention to some differences between the correlations of NSCs and massive black holes as subsets of CMOs with hosting galaxies. In this context, the mass-velocity dispersion relation plays a relevant role because it seems the one that shows a clearer difference between the supermassive black holes and NSCs. The MMBH-σ has a slope of 5.19 ± 0.28, while MNSC-σ has the much smaller slope of 1.84 ± 0.64. The slopes of the CMO mass-host galaxy B magnitude of the two types of CMOs are indistinguishable within the errors, while that of the NSC mass-host galaxy mass relation is significantly smaller than for supermassive black holes. Another important result is the clear depauperation of the NSC population in bright galaxy hosts, which reflects also in a clear flattening of the NSC mass versus host galaxy mass at high host masses.

  20. Interactions in Massive Colliding Wind Binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Corcoran

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available There are observational difficulties determining dynamical masses of binary star components in the upper HR diagram both due to the scarcity of massive binary systems and spectral and photometric contamination produced by the strong wind outflows in these systems. We discuss how variable X-ray emission in these systems produced by wind-wind collisions in massive binaries can be used to constrain the system parameters, with application to two important massive binaries, Eta Carinae and WR 140.

  1. Clustered Massive Star Formation in Molecular Clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Jonathan C.

    2005-01-01

    I review some important questions in the field of massive star formation: What are the initial conditions for proto star clusters and how do they arise? What are the initial conditions for individual massive star formation within star clusters? How do massive protostars accumulate their mass? I compare the Turbulent Core Model (McKee & Tan 2003) to several nearby regions, including Orion KL. Here I also discuss the origin of BN's high proper motion.

  2. Massive star population synthesis with binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Vanbeveren, D.; Mennekens, N.

    2015-01-01

    We first give a short historical overview with some key facts of massive star population synthesis with binaries. We then discuss binary population codes and focus on two ingredients which are important for massive star population synthesis and which may be different in different codes. Population simulations with binaries is the third part where we consider the initial massive binary frequency, the RSG/WR and WC/WN and SNII/SNIbc number ratio's, the probable initial rotational velocity distr...

  3. Massive stars in young VVV clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Alegría, S.; Borissova, J.; Chené, A.-N.

    2017-11-01

    The role of massive stars in the Galactic evolution is crucial. During their lifetime these stars change the kinematics around them through stellar winds, affect the formation of new stars, ionise and chemically enrich the media with the final supernova explosion. But the census of both massive stars and their host clusters is still poor. We expect that still ~100 of galactic massive stellar clusters remains unknown (Hanson & Popescu, 2008).

  4. NLO Antenna Subtraction with Massive Fermions

    OpenAIRE

    Ridder, A. Gehrmann-De; Ritzmann, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present an extension of the antenna subtraction formalism at NLO to include massive final state fermions. The basic ingredients to the subtraction terms, the NLO massive final-final antenna functions are derived and integrated over the corresponding factorised phase space. Those antenna functions account for all soft, collinear and quasi-collinear limits of the QCD matrix elements involving massive fermions in the final state.

  5. On the singularities of massive superstring amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O.

    1987-06-04

    Superstring one-loop amplitudes with massive external states are shown to be in general ill-defined due to internal on-shell propagators. However, we argue that since any massive string state (in the uncompactified theory) has a finite lifetime to decay into massless particles, such amplitudes are not terms in the perturbative expansion of physical S-matrix elements: These can be defined only with massless external states. Consistent massive amplitudes repuire an off-shell formalism.

  6. C++ and Massively Parallel Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Lickly

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to apply the software engineering advantages of object-oriented programming to the raw power of massively parallel architectures. To do this we have constructed a hierarchy of C++ classes to support the data-parallel paradigm. Feasibility studies and initial coding can be supported by any serial machine that has a C++ compiler. Parallel execution requires an extended Cfront, which understands the data-parallel classes and generates C* code. (C* is a data-parallel superset of ANSI C developed by Thinking Machines Corporation. This approach provides potential portability across parallel architectures and leverages the existing compiler technology for translating data-parallel programs onto both SIMD and MIMD hardware.

  7. Merlin - Massively parallel heterogeneous computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittie, Larry; Maples, Creve

    1989-01-01

    Hardware and software for Merlin, a new kind of massively parallel computing system, are described. Eight computers are linked as a 300-MIPS prototype to develop system software for a larger Merlin network with 16 to 64 nodes, totaling 600 to 3000 MIPS. These working prototypes help refine a mapped reflective memory technique that offers a new, very general way of linking many types of computer to form supercomputers. Processors share data selectively and rapidly on a word-by-word basis. Fast firmware virtual circuits are reconfigured to match topological needs of individual application programs. Merlin's low-latency memory-sharing interfaces solve many problems in the design of high-performance computing systems. The Merlin prototypes are intended to run parallel programs for scientific applications and to determine hardware and software needs for a future Teraflops Merlin network.

  8. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  9. Cosmological attractors in massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dubovsky, S; Tkachev, I I

    2005-01-01

    We study Lorentz-violating models of massive gravity which preserve rotations and are invariant under time-dependent shifts of the spatial coordinates. In the linear approximation the Newtonian potential in these models has an extra ``confining'' term proportional to the distance from the source. We argue that during cosmological expansion the Universe may be driven to an attractor point with larger symmetry which includes particular simultaneous dilatations of time and space coordinates. The confining term in the potential vanishes as one approaches the attractor. In the vicinity of the attractor the extra contribution is present in the Friedmann equation which, in a certain range of parameters, gives rise to the cosmic acceleration.

  10. Massive ossifying fibroma of mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishna, D; Shetty, Sujith; Ramya, S

    2014-01-01

    Ossifying fibroma is a benign bone neoplasm often considered to be a type of fibro-osseous lesion. Its origin is believed to be from periodontal membrane, and it shows more predilection toward females. Mandible is more commonly affected than maxilla. This bone tumor consists of highly cellular, fibrous tissue that contains varying amounts of calcified tissue-resembling bone, cementum, or both. Radiographically, the lesions are either completely radiolucent or mixed, depending on the amount of calcification, or are completely radiopaque and surrounded by a radiolucent rim. Ossifying fibroma requires radical surgery, because of the tendency for recurrence and possibility of malignant transformation. Here, we have presented a case of massive ossifying fibroma of mandible in an 80-year-old female.

  11. Particle Geochemistry of Hydrothermal Systems and Implications for Mining Seafloor Massive Sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartman, A.; Hein, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide deposits form due to high-temperature hydrothermal venting that occurs globally, in every ocean basin, along plate boundaries and intra-plate hotspots. At these sites, the rapid mixing of hot, metal- and sulfur-rich reduced fluids into cold, oxygenated ocean water results in abundant mineral precipitation. The mining of seafloor massive sulfides is likely to occur in the near future and will generate a new class of mainly inorganic particulates, different from those formed in hydrothermal `black smoke.' While the major components of both black smoke & SMS tailings are Cu, Fe and Zn sulfides, many other minerals, including those containing technology critical elements, especially tellurium, are present. A comparison of these two classes of particulates will be presented, including chemical composition and reactivity to oxidative dissolution.

  12. Hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic stability of black holes with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar (Chandra) was just eight years old when the first astrophysical jet was discovered in M87. Since then, jets have been uncovered with a wide variety of sources including accretion disks orbiting stellar and massive black holes, neutron stars, isolated pulsars, -ray bursts, ...

  13. Thermodynamics of higher dimensional black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accetta, F.S.; Gleiser, M.

    1986-05-01

    We discuss the thermodynamics of higher dimensional black holes with particular emphasis on a new class of spinning black holes which, due to the increased number of Casimir invariants, have additional spin degrees of freedom. In suitable limits, analytic solutions in arbitrary dimensions are presented for their temperature, entropy, and specific heat. In 5 + 1 and 9 + 1 dimensions, more general forms for these quantities are given. It is shown that the specific heat for a higher dimensional black hole is negative definite if it has only one non-zero spin parameter, regardless of the value of this parameter. We also consider equilibrium configurations with both massless particles and massive string modes. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Nonlinear interactions between black holes and Proca fields

    CERN Document Server

    Zilhão, Miguel; Cardoso, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Physics beyond the Standard Model is an important candidate for dark matter, and an interesting testing ground for strong-field gravity: the equivalence principle "forces" all forms of matter to fall in the same way, and it is therefore natural to look for imprints of these fields in regions with strong gravitational fields, such as compact stars or black holes. Here we study General Relativity minimally coupled to a massive vector field, and how black holes in this theory lose "hair". Our results indicate that black holes can sustain Proca field condensates for extremely long time-scales.

  15. An Accurate Census of the Stellar Masses of Massive Central Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, John; Lang, Dustin; Napier, Kevin; Stillman, Coley Michael; Poremba, Megan R.; Dey, Arjun; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli; Schlegel, David; Wechsler, Risa

    2018-01-01

    A significant fraction of the stellar mass in brightest cluster galaxies--as much as 50% or more--lies in the low surface brightness and hard-to-detect outer envelope of the galaxy. An accurate census of the integrated stellar masses of central galaxies critically impacts many outstanding problems in galaxy evolution, including measurements of the star formation efficiency in massive halos, the relative importance of supernova and black hole feedback, and the cosmic baryon fraction. We use deep optical and mid-infrared imaging of a sample of more than 35,000 central galaxies obtained as part of the Legacy Survey (http://legacysurvey.org) to measure their azimuthally averaged stellar mass profiles and integrated stellar masses. We compare our results with previous measurements of the massive end of the stellar mass function and the stellar mass-halo mass relation, and discuss the implications of our results for numerical simulations of star formation and feedback in massive galaxies.

  16. Multiple and double scattering contributions to depth resolution and low energy background in hydrogen elastic recoil detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1996-12-31

    The sensitivity of hydrogen elastic recoil detection ( ERD ) is usually limited by the low energy background in the ERD spectrum. A number of 4.5 MeV He{sup ++} hydrogen ERD spectra from different hydrogen implanted samples are compared. The samples are chosen with different atomic numbers from low Z (carbon) to high Z (tungsten carbide) to observe the effects of multiple scattering and double scattering within the sample material. The experimental depth resolution and levels of the low energy background in ERD spectra are compared with theoretical predictions from multiple and double scattering. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  17.  Ischemic Stroke Secondary to Aortic Dissection Following Rifle Butt Recoil Chest Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Valiath

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available  Ischemic stroke secondary to aortic dissection is not uncommon. We present a patient with left hemiplegia secondary to Stanford type A aortic dissection extending to the supra-aortic vessels, which was precipitated by rifle butt recoil chest injury. The diagnosis of aortic dissection was delayed due to various factors. Finally, the patient underwent successful Bentall procedure with complete resolution of symptoms. This case emphasizes the need for caution in the use of firearms for recreation and to take precautions in preventing such incidents. In addition, this case illustrates the need for prompt cardiovascular physical examination in patients presenting with stroke.

  18. The recoil correction and spin-orbit force for the possible B*Bbar* and D*Dbar* states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Ma, Li; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2015-10-01

    In the framework of the one-boson exchange model, we have calculated the effective potentials between two heavy mesons B*Bbar* and D*Dbar* from the t- and u-channel π-, η-, ρ-, ω- and σ-meson exchanges. We keep the recoil corrections to the B*Bbar* and D*Dbar* systems up to O (1/M2), which turns out to be important for the very loosely bound molecular states. Our numerical results show that the momentum-related corrections are favorable to the formation of the molecular states in the IG =1+, JPC =1+- in the B*Bbar* and D*Dbar* systems.

  19. Massive Star Burps, Then Explodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    Berkeley -- In a galaxy far, far away, a massive star suffered a nasty double whammy. On Oct. 20, 2004, Japanese amateur astronomer Koichi Itagaki saw the star let loose an outburst so bright that it was initially mistaken for a supernova. The star survived, but for only two years. On Oct. 11, 2006, professional and amateur astronomers witnessed the star actually blowing itself to smithereens as Supernova 2006jc. Swift UVOT Image Swift UVOT Image (Credit: NASA / Swift / S.Immler) "We have never observed a stellar outburst and then later seen the star explode," says University of California, Berkeley, astronomer Ryan Foley. His group studied the event with ground-based telescopes, including the 10-meter (32.8-foot) W. M. Keck telescopes in Hawaii. Narrow helium spectral lines showed that the supernova's blast wave ran into a slow-moving shell of material, presumably the progenitor's outer layers ejected just two years earlier. If the spectral lines had been caused by the supernova's fast-moving blast wave, the lines would have been much broader. artistic rendering This artistic rendering depicts two years in the life of a massive blue supergiant star, which burped and spewed a shell of gas, then, two years later, exploded. When the supernova slammed into the shell of gas, X-rays were produced. (Credit: NASA/Sonoma State Univ./A.Simonnet) Another group, led by Stefan Immler of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., monitored SN 2006jc with NASA's Swift satellite and Chandra X-ray Observatory. By observing how the supernova brightened in X-rays, a result of the blast wave slamming into the outburst ejecta, they could measure the amount of gas blown off in the 2004 outburst: about 0.01 solar mass, the equivalent of about 10 Jupiters. "The beautiful aspect of our SN 2006jc observations is that although they were obtained in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, in the optical and in X-rays, they lead to the same conclusions," says Immler. "This

  20. Massive Star Formation: Accreting from Companion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report the possible accretion from companion in the massive star forming region (G350.69–0.49). This region seems to be a binary system composed of a diffuse object (possible nebulae or UC HII region) and a Massive Young Stellar Object (MYSO) seen in Spitzer IRAC image. The diffuse object and MYSO are ...

  1. On "new massive" 4D gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Fernandez-Melgarejo, J. J.; Rosseel, Jan; Townsend, Paul K.

    We construct a four-dimensional (4D) gauge theory that propagates, unitarily, the five polarization modes of a massive spin-2 particle. These modes are described by a "dual" graviton gauge potential and the Lagrangian is 4th-order in derivatives. As the construction mimics that of 3D "new massive

  2. Massive rectal bleeding from colonic diverticulosis | Olokoba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This is to describe a case of colonic diverticulosis causing massive rectal bleeding in an elderly Nigerian man. Case report: We highlight a case of a 79 year old man who presented with massive rectal bleeding due to colonic diverticulosis from our centre. Colonoscopy identified multiple diverticula in the ...

  3. 10 billion years of massive Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, Edward Nairne Cunningham

    2009-01-01

    The most massive galaxies in the local universe are not forming new stars -- but we don’t know why. As a step towards figuring out why big galaxies stop forming stars, we set out to measure when they stop forming stars. By looking at the colors of massive galaxies have changed over 10 billion

  4. Modelling populations of rotationally mixed massive stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brott, I.

    2011-01-01

    Massive stars can be considered as cosmic engines. With their high luminosities, strong stellar winds and violent deaths they drive the evolution of galaxies through-out the history of the universe. Despite the importance of massive stars, their evolution is still poorly understood. Two major issues

  5. On the singularities of massive superstring amplitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foda, O.

    1987-01-01

    Superstring one-loop amplitudes with massive external states are shown to be in general ill-defined due to internal on-shell propagators. However, we argue that since any massive string state (in the uncompactified theory) has a finite lifetime to decay into massless particles, such amplitudes are

  6. 2.5PN kick from black-hole binaries in circular orbit: Nonspinning case

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Chandra Kant; Iyer, Bala R

    2013-01-01

    Using the Multipolar post-Minskowskian formalism, we compute the linear momentum flux from black-hole binaries in circular orbits and having no spins. The total linear momentum flux contains various types of instantaneous (which are functions of the retarded time) and hereditary (which depends on the dynamics of the binary in the past) terms both of which are analytically computed. In addition to the inspiral contribution, we use a simple model of plunge to compute the kick or recoil accumulated during this phase.

  7. XFEM for Thermal Crack of Massive Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal cracking of massive concrete structures occurs as a result of stresses caused by hydration in real environment conditions. The extended finite element method that combines thermal fields and creep is used in this study to analyze the thermal cracking of massive concrete structures. The temperature field is accurately simulated through an equivalent equation of heat conduction that considers the effect of a cooling pipe system. The time-dependent creep behavior of massive concrete is determined by the viscoelastic constitutive model with Prony series. Based on the degree of hydration, we consider the main properties related to cracking evolving with time. Numerical simulations of a real massive concrete structure are conducted. Results show that the developed method is efficient for numerical calculations of thermal cracks on massive concrete. Further analyses indicate that a cooling system and appropriate heat preservation measures can efficiently prevent the occurrence of thermal cracks.

  8. Causality in 3D massive gravity theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, José D.; Giribet, Gaston; Gómez, Carolina; Kilicarslan, Ercan; Leoni, Matías; Tekin, Bayram

    2017-05-01

    We study the constraints coming from the local causality requirement in various 2 +1 dimensional dynamical theories of gravity. In topologically massive gravity, with a single parity noninvariant massive degree of freedom, and in new massive gravity, with two massive spin-2 degrees of freedom, causality and unitarity are compatible with each other and both require the Newton's constant to be negative. In their extensions, such as the Born-Infeld gravity and the minimal massive gravity the situation is similar and quite different from their higher dimensional counterparts, such as quadratic (e.g., Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet) or cubic theories, where causality and unitarity are in conflict. We study the problem both in asymptotically flat and asymptotically anti-de Sitter spaces.

  9. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Massive Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmatova, Elena V; Moazzami, Kasra; Cocke, Thomas P; Elmann, Elie; Vaidya, Pranay; Ng, Arthur F; Satya, Kumar; Narayan, Rajeev L

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) has been suggested for cardiopulmonary support in patients with massive pulmonary embolism (PE) refractory to other treatment or as bridging to embolectomy. The survival benefit from ECMO in patients with massive PE remains unclear. Here, we describe 5 cases in which ECMO was used as cardiopulmonary support following massive near-fatal pulmonary embolism. The overall mortality in patients with massive PE that received ECMO support was 40%. Death occurred secondary to ECMO-related complication in one case and due to inability to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion despite ECMO support in the second case. ECMO can be considered as a treatment modality for patients with massive PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Black Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Vakili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year-old boy was born at term of healthy, non-consanguineous Iranian parents. His mother attended in the clinic with the history of sometimes discoloration of diapers after passing urine. She noticed that first at the age of one month with intensified in recent months. His Physical examination and growth parameters were normal. His mother denied taking any medication (sorbitol, nitrofurantoin, metronidazole, methocarbamol, sena and methyldopa (5. Qualitative urine examination showed dark black discoloration. By this history, alkaptonuria was the most clinical suspicious. A 24-hour-urine sample was collected and sent for quantitative measurements. The urine sample was highly positive for homogentisic acid and negative for porphyrin metabolites.

  11. Young and turbulent: the early life of massive galaxy progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Mayer, Lucio; Madau, Piero; Lupi, Alessandro; Dotti, Massimo; Haardt, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    We present results from the 'Ponos' simulation suite on the early evolution of a massive, Mvir(z = 0) = 1.2 × 1013 M⊙ galaxy. At z ≳ 6, before feedback from a central supermassive black hole becomes dominant, the main galaxy has a stellar mass ˜2 × 109 M⊙ and a star formation rate ˜20 M⊙ yr-1. The galaxy sits near the expected main sequence of star-forming galaxies at those redshifts, and resembles moderately star-forming systems observed at z > 5. The high specific star formation rate results in vigorous heating and stirring of the gas by supernovae feedback, and the galaxy develops a thick and turbulent disc, with gas velocity dispersion ˜40 km s-1, rotation to dispersion ratio ˜2, and with a significant amount of gas at ˜105 K. The Toomre parameter always exceeds the critical value for gravito-turbulence, Q ˜ 1.5-2, mainly due to the contribution of warm/hot gas inside the disc. Without feedback, a nearly gravito-turbulent regime establishes with similar gas velocity dispersion and lower Q. We propose that the 'hot and turbulent' disc regime seen in our simulations, unlike the 'cold and turbulent' gravito-turbulent regime of massive clumpy disc galaxies at z ˜ 1-2, is a fundamental characterization of the main-sequence galaxies at z ≳ 6, as they can sustain star formation rates comparable to those of low-mass starbursts at z = 0. This results in no sustained coherent gas inflows through the disc, and in fluctuating and anisotropic mass transport, possibly postponing the assembly of the bulge and causing the initial feeding of the central black hole to be highly intermittent.

  12. Surfing a Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Star Orbiting Massive Milky Way Centre Approaches to within 17 Light-Hours [1] Summary An international team of astronomers [2], lead by researchers at the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) , has directly observed an otherwise normal star orbiting the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. Ten years of painstaking measurements have been crowned by a series of unique images obtained by the Adaptive Optics (AO) NAOS-CONICA (NACO) instrument [3] on the 8.2-m VLT YEPUN telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. It turns out that earlier this year the star approached the central Black Hole to within 17 light-hours - only three times the distance between the Sun and planet Pluto - while travelling at no less than 5000 km/sec . Previous measurements of the velocities of stars near the center of the Milky Way and variable X-ray emission from this area have provided the strongest evidence so far of the existence of a central Black Hole in our home galaxy and, implicitly, that the dark mass concentrations seen in many nuclei of other galaxies probably are also supermassive black holes. However, it has not yet been possible to exclude several alternative configurations. In a break-through paper appearing in the research journal Nature on October 17th, 2002, the present team reports their exciting results, including high-resolution images that allow tracing two-thirds of the orbit of a star designated "S2" . It is currently the closest observable star to the compact radio source and massive black hole candidate "SgrA*" ("Sagittarius A") at the very center of the Milky Way. The orbital period is just over 15 years. The new measurements exclude with high confidence that the central dark mass consists of a cluster of unusual stars or elementary particles, and leave little doubt of the presence of a supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy in which we live . PR Photo 23a/02 : NACO image of the central region of the Milky Way

  13. Direct Localization for Massive MIMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Nil; Wymeersch, Henk; Larsson, Erik G.; Haimovich, Alexander M.; Coulon, Martial

    2017-05-01

    Large-scale MIMO systems are well known for their advantages in communications, but they also have the potential for providing very accurate localization thanks to their high angular resolution. A difficult problem arising indoors and outdoors is localizing users over multipath channels. Localization based on angle of arrival (AOA) generally involves a two-step procedure, where signals are first processed to obtain a user's AOA at different base stations, followed by triangulation to determine the user's position. In the presence of multipath, the performance of these methods is greatly degraded due to the inability to correctly detect and/or estimate the AOA of the line-of-sight (LOS) paths. To counter the limitations of this two-step procedure which is inherently sub-optimal, we propose a direct localization approach in which the position of a user is localized by jointly processing the observations obtained at distributed massive MIMO base stations. Our approach is based on a novel compressed sensing framework that exploits channel properties to distinguish LOS from non-LOS signal paths, and leads to improved performance results compared to previous existing methods.

  14. Black-hole bombs and photon-mass bounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Paolo; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Berti, Emanuele; Ishibashi, Akihiro

    2012-09-28

    Generic extensions of the standard model predict the existence of ultralight bosonic degrees of freedom. Several ongoing experiments are aimed at detecting these particles or constraining their mass range. Here we show that massive vector fields around rotating black holes can give rise to a strong superradiant instability, which extracts angular momentum from the hole. The observation of supermassive spinning black holes imposes limits on this mechanism. We show that current supermassive black-hole spin estimates provide the tightest upper limits on the mass of the photon (m(v) is black holes could further lower this bound to m(v) black holes in the slow-rotation regime, that we developed up to second order in rotation, and that can be extended to other spacetime metrics and other theories.

  15. Determination of the extraction efficiency for {sup 233}U source α-recoil ions from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wense, Lars v.d.; Seiferle, Benedict; Thirolf, Peter G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Laatiaoui, Mustapha [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Mainz, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Following the α decay of {sup 233}U, {sup 229}Th recoil ions are shown to be extracted in a significant amount from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell. The produced recoil ions and subsequent daughter nuclei are mass purified with the help of a customized quadrupole mass spectrometer. The combined extraction and mass purification efficiency for {sup 229}Th{sup 3+} is determined via MCP-based measurements and via the direct detection of the {sup 229}Th α decay. A large value of (10±2)% for the combined extraction and mass purification efficiency of {sup 229}Th{sup 3+} is obtained at a mass resolution of about 1u/e. In addition to {sup 229}Th, also other α-recoil ions of the {sup 233,} {sup 232}U decay chains are addressed. (orig.)

  16. Differential cross section and recoil polarization measurements for the gamma p to K+ Lambda reaction using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCracken, Michael E. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We present measurements of the differential cross section and Lambda recoil polarization for the gamma p to K+ Lambda reaction made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. These measurements cover the center-of-mass energy range from 1.62 to 2.84 GeV and a wide range of center-of-mass K+ production angles. Independent analyses were performed using the K+ p pi- and K+ p (missing pi -) final-state topologies; results from these analyses were found to exhibit good agreement. These differential cross section measurements show excellent agreement with previous CLAS and LEPS results and offer increased precision and a 300 MeV increase in energy coverage. The recoil polarization data agree well with previous results and offer a large increase in precision and a 500 MeV extension in energy range. The increased center-of-mass energy range that these data represent will allow for independent study of non-resonant K+ Lambda photoproduction mechanisms at all production angles.

  17. Force-time profile differences in the delivery of simulated toggle-recoil spinal manipulation by students, instructors, and field doctors of chiropractic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVocht, James W; Owens, Edward F; Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Strazewski, John; Bhogal, Ramneek; Xia, Ting

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the force-time profiles of toggle recoil using an instrumented simulator to objectively measure and evaluate students' skill to determine if they become quicker and use less force during the course of their training and to compare them to course instructors and to field doctors of chiropractic (DCs) who use this specific technique in their practices. A load cell was placed within a toggle recoil training device. The preload, speed, and magnitude of the toggle recoil thrusts were measured from 60 students, 2 instructors, and 77 DCs (ie, who use the toggle recoil technique in their regular practice). Student data were collected 3 times during their toggle course (after first exposure, at midterm, and at course end.) Thrusts showed a dual-peak force-time profile not previously described in other forms of spinal manipulation. There was a wide range of values for each quantity measured within and between all 3 subject groups. The median peak load for students decreased over the course of their class, but they became slower. Field doctors were faster than students or instructors and delivered higher peak loads. Toggle recoil thrusts into a dropping mechanism varied based upon subject and amount of time practicing the task. As students progressed through the class, speed reduced as they increased control to lower peak loads. In the group studies, field DCs applied higher forces and were faster than both students and instructors. There appears to be a unique 2-peak feature of the force-time plot that is unique to toggle recoil manipulation with a drop mechanism. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonsingular universe in massive gravity's rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendi, S. H.; Momennia, M.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the fundamental open questions in cosmology is whether we can regard the universe evolution without singularity like a Big Bang or a Big Rip. This challenging subject stimulates one to regard a nonsingular universe in the far past with an arbitrarily large vacuum energy. Considering the high energy regime in the cosmic history, it is believed that Einstein gravity should be corrected to an effective energy dependent theory which could be acquired by gravity's rainbow. On the other hand, employing massive gravity provided us with solutions to some of the long standing fundamental problems of cosmology such as cosmological constant problem and self acceleration of the universe. Considering these aspects of gravity's rainbow and massive gravity, in this paper, we initiate studying FRW cosmology in the massive gravity's rainbow formalism. At first, we show that although massive gravity modifies the FRW cosmology, but it does not itself remove the big bang singularity. Then, we generalize the massive gravity to the case of energy dependent spacetime and find that massive gravity's rainbow can remove the early universe singularity. We bring together all the essential conditions for having a nonsingular universe and the effects of both gravity's rainbow and massive gravity generalizations on such criteria are determined.

  19. Heaviest Stellar Black Hole Discovered in Nearby Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    Astronomers have located an exceptionally massive black hole in orbit around a huge companion star. This result has intriguing implications for the evolution and ultimate fate of massive stars. The black hole is part of a binary system in M33, a nearby galaxy about 3 million light years from Earth. By combining data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Gemini telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, the mass of the black hole, known as M33 X-7, was determined to be 15.7 times that of the Sun. This makes M33 X-7 the most massive stellar black hole known. A stellar black hole is formed from the collapse of the core of a massive star at the end of its life. Chandra X-ray Image of M33 X-7 Chandra X-ray Image of M33 X-7 "This discovery raises all sorts of questions about how such a big black hole could have been formed," said Jerome Orosz of San Diego State University, lead author of the paper appearing in the October 18th issue of the journal Nature. M33 X-7 orbits a companion star that eclipses the black hole every three and a half days. The companion star also has an unusually large mass, 70 times that of the Sun. This makes it the most massive companion star in a binary system containing a black hole. Hubble Optical Image of M33 X-7 Hubble Optical Image of M33 X-7 "This is a huge star that is partnered with a huge black hole," said coauthor Jeffrey McClintock of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "Eventually, the companion will also go supernova and then we'll have a pair of black holes." The properties of the M33 X-7 binary system - a massive black hole in a close orbit around a massive companion star - are difficult to explain using conventional models for the evolution of massive stars. The parent star for the black hole must have had a mass greater than the existing companion in order to have formed a black hole before the companion star. Gemini Optical Image of M33 X-7 Gemini Optical Image of M33 X-7 Such a massive star would

  20. Experimental Determination of the Angular Acceptance of the STrong Gradient Electromagnetic Online Recoil Separator for Capture Gamma Ray Experiment (St. George) and Observation of Quadrupole Field Reproducibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltman, William; Couder, Manoel; Morales, Luis; Gilardy, Gwen; Seymour, Chris; Moylan, Shane; St. George Team Team

    2017-09-01

    The STrong Gradient Electromagnetic Online Recoil separator for capture Gamma ray Experiment (St. George) is in the process of determining its experimental limits. Currently the focus is on determining the angular acceptance of particles entering the St. George beam line. The demonstration of the current experimental angular acceptance is discussed in addition to the necessary procedure to ensure that St. George's quadrupoles generate consistent magnetic fields. The group working with the St. George Recoil separator located in the Nuclear Science Lab at the University of Notre Dame, located in Notre Dame Indiana.