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Sample records for recognition complex subunit

  1. Genetic interaction of an origin recognition complex subunit and the Polycomb group gene MEDEA during seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinge, Margaret A; Spillane, Charles; Köhler, Claudia; Gheyselinck, Jacqueline; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2004-04-01

    The eukaryotic origin recognition complex (ORC) is made up of six subunits and functions in nuclear DNA replication, chromatin structure, and gene silencing in both fungi and metazoans. We demonstrate that disruption of a plant ORC subunit homolog, AtORC2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), causes a zygotic lethal mutant phenotype (orc2). Seeds of orc2 abort early, typically producing embryos with up to eight cells. Nuclear division in the endosperm is arrested at an earlier developmental stage: only approximately four nuclei are detected in orc2 endosperm. The endosperm nuclei in orc2 are dramatically enlarged, a phenotype that is most similar to class B titan mutants, which include mutants in structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) cohesins. The highest levels of ORC2 gene expression were found in preglobular embryos, coinciding with the stage at which homozygous orc2 mutant seeds arrest. The homologs of the other five Arabidopsis ORC subunits are also expressed at this developmental stage. The orc2 mutant phenotype is partly suppressed by a mutation in the Polycomb group gene MEDEA. In double mutants between orc2 and medea (mea), orc2 homozygotes arrest later with a phenotype intermediate between those of mea and orc2 single mutants. Either alterations in chromatin structure or the release of cell cycle checkpoints by the mea mutation may allow more cell and nuclear divisions to occur in orc2 homozygous seeds.

  2. NMR analysis of G-protein betagamma subunit complexes reveals a dynamic G(alpha)-Gbetagamma subunit interface and multiple protein recognition modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrcka, Alan V; Kichik, Nessim; Tarragó, Teresa; Burroughs, Michael; Park, Min-Sun; Itoga, Nathan K; Stern, Harry A; Willardson, Barry M; Giralt, Ernest

    2010-01-12

    G-protein betagamma (Gbetagamma) subunits interact with a wide range of molecular partners including: G(alpha) subunits, effectors, peptides, and small molecule inhibitors. The molecular mechanisms underlying the ability to accommodate this wide range of structurally distinct binding partners are not well understood. To uncover the role of protein flexibility and alterations in protein conformation in molecular recognition by Gbetagamma, a method for site-specific (15)N-labeling of Gbeta-Trp residue backbone and indole amines in insect cells was developed. Transverse Relaxation Optimized Spectroscopy-Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Coherence Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (TROSY-HSQC NMR) analysis of (15)N-Trp Gbetagamma identified well-dispersed signals for the individual Trp residue side chain and amide positions. Surprisingly, a wide range of signal intensities was observed in the spectrum, likely representing a range of backbone and side chain mobilities. The signal for GbetaW99 indole was very intense, suggesting a high level of mobility on the protein surface and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that GbetaW99 is highly mobile on the nanosecond timescale in comparison with other Gbeta tryptophans. Binding of peptides and phosducin dramatically altered the mobility of GbetaW99 and GbetaW332 in the binding site and the chemical shifts at sites distant from the direct binding surface in distinct ways. In contrast, binding of G(alpha)(i1)-GDP to Gbetagamma had relatively little effect on the spectrum and, most surprisingly, did not significantly alter Trp mobility at the subunit interface. This suggests the inactive heterotrimer in solution adopts a conformation with an open subunit interface a large percentage of the time. Overall, these data show that Gbetagamma subunits explore a range of conformations that can be exploited during molecular recognition by diverse binding partners.

  3. Mutations in ORC1, encoding the largest subunit of the origin recognition complex, cause microcephalic primordial dwarfism resembling Meier-Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknell, Louise S; Walker, Sarah; Klingseisen, Anna; Stiff, Tom; Leitch, Andrea; Kerzendorfer, Claudia; Martin, Carol-Anne; Yeyati, Patricia; Al Sanna, Nouriya; Bober, Michael; Johnson, Diana; Wise, Carol; Jackson, Andrew P; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A

    2011-02-27

    Studies into disorders of extreme growth failure (for example, Seckel syndrome and Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II) have implicated fundamental cellular processes of DNA damage response signaling and centrosome function in the regulation of human growth. Here we report that mutations in ORC1, encoding a subunit of the origin recognition complex, cause microcephalic primordial dwarfism resembling Meier-Gorlin syndrome. We establish that these mutations disrupt known ORC1 functions including pre-replicative complex formation and origin activation. ORC1 deficiency perturbs S-phase entry and S-phase progression. Additionally, we show that Orc1 depletion in zebrafish is sufficient to markedly reduce body size during rapid embryonic growth. Our data suggest a model in which ORC1 mutations impair replication licensing, slowing cell cycle progression and consequently impeding growth during development, particularly at times of rapid proliferation. These findings establish a novel mechanism for the pathogenesis of microcephalic dwarfism and show a surprising but important developmental impact of impaired origin licensing.

  4. Data complexity in pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Kam Ho Tin

    2006-01-01

    Machines capable of automatic pattern recognition have many fascinating uses. Algorithms for supervised classification, where one infers a decision boundary from a set of training examples, are at the core of this capability. This book looks at data complexity and its role in shaping the theories and techniques in different disciplines

  5. Structure of the archaeal Cascade subunit Csa5: relating the small subunits of CRISPR effector complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeks, Judith; Graham, Shirley; Anderson, Linzi; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F; Naismith, James H

    2013-05-01

    The Cascade complex for CRISPR-mediated antiviral immunity uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target invading DNA species from mobile elements such as viruses, leading to their destruction. The core of the Cascade effector complex consists of the Cas5 and Cas7 subunits, which are widely conserved in prokaryotes. Cas7 binds crRNA and forms the helical backbone of Cascade. Many archaea encode a version of the Cascade complex (denoted Type I-A) that includes a Csa5 (or small) subunit, which interacts weakly with the core proteins. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Csa5 protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Csa5 comprises a conserved α-helical domain with a small insertion consisting of a weakly conserved β-strand domain. In the crystal, the Csa5 monomers have multimerized into infinite helical threads. At each interface is a strictly conserved intersubunit salt bridge, deletion of which disrupts multimerization. Structural analysis indicates a shared evolutionary history among the small subunits of the CRISPR effector complexes. The same α-helical domain is found in the C-terminal domain of Cse2 (from Type I-E Cascade), while the N-terminal domain of Cse2 is found in Cmr5 of the CMR (Type III-B) effector complex. As Cmr5 shares no match with Csa5, two possibilities present themselves: selective domain loss from an ancestral Cse2 to create two new subfamilies or domain fusion of two separate families to create a new Cse2 family. A definitive answer awaits structural studies of further small subunits from other CRISPR effector complexes.

  6. Prefoldin Subunits Are Protected from Ubiquitin-Proteasome System-mediated Degradation by Forming Complex with Other Constituent Subunits*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Makoto; Tashiro, Erika; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Suto, Hiroo; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The molecular chaperone prefoldin (PFD) is a complex comprised of six different subunits, PFD1-PFD6, and delivers newly synthesized unfolded proteins to cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT to facilitate the folding of proteins. PFD subunits also have functions different from the function of the PFD complex. We previously identified MM-1α/PFD5 as a novel c-Myc-binding protein and found that MM-1α suppresses transformation activity of c-Myc. However, it remains unclear how cells regulate protein levels of individual subunits and what mechanisms alter the ratio of their activities between subunits and their complex. In this study, we found that knockdown of one subunit decreased protein levels of other subunits and that transfection of five subunits other than MM-1α into cells increased the level of endogenous MM-1α. We also found that treatment of cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of transfected/overexpressed MM-1α but not that of endogenous MM-1α, indicating that overexpressed MM-1α, but not endogenous MM-1α, was degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Experiments using other PFD subunits showed that the UPS degraded a monomer of PFD subunits, though extents of degradation varied among subunits. Furthermore, the level of one subunit was increased after co-transfection with the respective subunit, indicating that there are specific combinations between subunits to be stabilized. These results suggest mutual regulation of protein levels among PFD subunits and show how individual subunits form the PFD complex without degradation. PMID:21478150

  7. The phosphorylation pattern of bovine heart complex I subunits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Signorile, Anna;

    2007-01-01

    The phosphoproteome of bovine heart complex I of the respiratory chain has been analysed with a procedure based on nondenaturing gel electrophoretic separation of complex I from small quantities of mitochondria samples, in-gel digestion, in combination with phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium...... dioxide and MS. The results, complemented by analyses of purified samples of complex I, showed phosphorylation of five subunits of the complex, 42 kDa (human gene NDUFA10), ESSS, B14.5a (human gene NDUFA7), B14.5b (human gene NDUFC2) and B16.6 (GRIM-19). MS also revealed the presence of phosphorylated...

  8. genetic overexpression of NR2B subunit enhances social recognition memory for different strains and species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A Jacobs

    Full Text Available The ability to learn and remember conspecifics is essential for the establishment and maintenance of social groups. Many animals, including humans, primates and rodents, depend on stable social relationships for survival. Social learning and social recognition have become emerging areas of interest for neuroscientists but are still not well understood. It has been established that several hormones play a role in the modulation of social recognition including estrogen, oxytocin and arginine vasopression. Relatively few studies have investigated how social recognition might be improved or enhanced. In this study, we investigate the role of the NMDA receptor in social recognition memory, specifically the consequences of altering the ratio of the NR2B:NR2A subunits in the forebrain regions in social behavior. We produced transgenic mice in which the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor was overexpressed postnatally in the excitatory neurons of the forebrain areas including the cortex, amygdala and hippocampus. We investigated the ability of both our transgenic animals and their wild-type littermate to learn and remember juvenile conspecifics using both 1-hr and 24-hr memory tests. Our experiments show that the wild-type animals and NR2B transgenic mice preformed similarly in the 1-hr test. However, transgenic mice showed better performances in 24-hr tests of recognizing animals of a different strain or animals of a different species. We conclude that NR2B overexpression in the forebrain enhances social recognition memory for different strains and animal species.

  9. Complex Wavelet Transform-Based Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex approximately analytic wavelets provide a local multiscale description of images with good directional selectivity and invariance to shifts and in-plane rotations. Similar to Gabor wavelets, they are insensitive to illumination variations and facial expression changes. The complex wavelet transform is, however, less redundant and computationally efficient. In this paper, we first construct complex approximately analytic wavelets in the single-tree context, which possess Gabor-like characteristics. We, then, investigate the recently developed dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT and the single-tree complex wavelet transform (ST-CWT for the face recognition problem. Extensive experiments are carried out on standard databases. The resulting complex wavelet-based feature vectors are as discriminating as the Gabor wavelet-derived features and at the same time are of lower dimension when compared with that of Gabor wavelets. In all experiments, on two well-known databases, namely, FERET and ORL databases, complex wavelets equaled or surpassed the performance of Gabor wavelets in recognition rate when equal number of orientations and scales is used. These findings indicate that complex wavelets can provide a successful alternative to Gabor wavelets for face recognition.

  10. Accessory subunits are integral for assembly and function of human mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, David A; Surgenor, Elliot E; Formosa, Luke E; Reljic, Boris; Frazier, Ann E; Dibley, Marris G; Osellame, Laura D; Stait, Tegan; Beilharz, Traude H; Thorburn, David R; Salim, Agus; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-10-06

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and is composed of 45 subunits in humans, making it one of the largest known multi-subunit membrane protein complexes. Complex I exists in supercomplex forms with respiratory chain complexes III and IV, which are together required for the generation of a transmembrane proton gradient used for the synthesis of ATP. Complex I is also a major source of damaging reactive oxygen species and its dysfunction is associated with mitochondrial disease, Parkinson's disease and ageing. Bacterial and human complex I share 14 core subunits that are essential for enzymatic function; however, the role and necessity of the remaining 31 human accessory subunits is unclear. The incorporation of accessory subunits into the complex increases the cellular energetic cost and has necessitated the involvement of numerous assembly factors for complex I biogenesis. Here we use gene editing to generate human knockout cell lines for each accessory subunit. We show that 25 subunits are strictly required for assembly of a functional complex and 1 subunit is essential for cell viability. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cell lines revealed that loss of each subunit affects the stability of other subunits residing in the same structural module. Analysis of proteomic changes after the loss of specific modules revealed that ATP5SL and DMAC1 are required for assembly of the distal portion of the complex I membrane arm. Our results demonstrate the broad importance of accessory subunits in the structure and function of human complex I. Coupling gene-editing technology with proteomics represents a powerful tool for dissecting large multi-subunit complexes and enables the study of complex dysfunction at a cellular level.

  11. Structural basis of H2A.Z recognition by SRCAP chromatin-remodeling subunit YL1.

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    Liang, Xiaoping; Shan, Shan; Pan, Lu; Zhao, Jicheng; Ranjan, Anand; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Zhuqiang; Huang, Yingzi; Feng, Hanqiao; Wei, Debbie; Huang, Li; Liu, Xuehui; Zhong, Qiang; Lou, Jizhong; Li, Guohong; Wu, Carl; Zhou, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Histone variant H2A.Z, a universal mark of dynamic nucleosomes flanking gene promoters and enhancers, is incorporated into chromatin by SRCAP (SWR1), an ATP-dependent, multicomponent chromatin-remodeling complex. The YL1 (Swc2) subunit of SRCAP (SWR1) plays an essential role in H2A.Z recognition, but how it achieves this has been unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the H2A.Z-binding domain of Drosophila melanogaster YL1 (dYL1-Z) in complex with an H2A.Z-H2B dimer at 1.9-Å resolution. The dYL1-Z domain adopts a new whip-like structure that wraps over H2A.Z-H2B, and preferential recognition is largely conferred by three residues in loop 2, the hyperacidic patch and the extended αC helix of H2A.Z. Importantly, this domain is essential for deposition of budding yeast H2A.Z in vivo and SRCAP (SWR1)-catalyzed histone H2A.Z replacement in vitro. Our studies distinguish YL1-Z from known H2A.Z chaperones and suggest a hierarchical mechanism based on increasing binding affinity facilitating H2A.Z transfer from SRCAP (SWR1) to the nucleosome.

  12. Functional architecture of the retromer cargo-recognition complex

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    Hierro, Aitor; Rojas, Adriana L.; Rojas, Raul; Murthy, Namita; Effantin, Grégory; Kajava, Andrey V.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Bonifacino, Juan S.; Hurley, James H.

    2008-01-01

    The retromer complex 1, 2 is required for the sorting of acid hydrolases to lysosomes 3-7, transcytosis of the polymeric Ig receptor 8, Wnt gradient formation 9, 10, iron transporter recycling 11, and processing of the amyloid precursor protein 12. Human retromer consists of two smaller complexes, the cargo recognition Vps26:Vps29:Vps35 heterotrimer, and a membrane-targeting heterodimer or homodimer of SNX1 and/or SNX2 13. The crystal structure of a Vps29:Vps35 subcomplex shows how the metallophosphoesterase-fold subunit Vps29 14, 15 acts as a scaffold for the C-terminal half of Vps35. Vps35 forms a horseshoe-shaped right-handed α-helical solenoid whose concave face completely covers the metal-binding site of Vps29 and whose convex face exposes a series of hydrophobic interhelical grooves. Electron microscopy shows that the intact Vps26:Vps29:Vps35 complex is a stick-shaped, somewhat flexible, structure, ∼ 21 nm long. A hybrid structural model derived from crystal structures, electron microscopy, interaction studies, and bioinformatics shows that the α-solenoid fold extends the full length of Vps35, and that Vps26 is bound at the opposite end from Vps29. This extended structure presents multiple binding sites for the SNX complex and receptor cargo, and appears capable of flexing to conform to curved vesicular membranes. PMID:17891154

  13. Recognition of Cognate Transfer RNA by the 30S Ribosomal Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogle, James M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; Clemons, William M.; Tarry, Michael J.; Carter, Andrew P.; Ramakrishnan, V. (MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology)

    2009-10-07

    Crystal structures of the 30S ribosomal subunit in complex with messenger RNA and cognate transfer RNA in the A site, both in the presence and absence of the antibiotic paromomycin, have been solved at between 3.1 and 3.3 angstroms resolution. Cognate transfer RNA (tRNA) binding induces global domain movements of the 30S subunit and changes in the conformation of the universally conserved and essential bases A1492, A1493, and G530 of 16S RNA. These bases interact intimately with the minor groove of the first two base pairs between the codon and anticodon, thus sensing Watson-Crick base-pairing geometry and discriminating against near-cognate tRNA. The third, or 'wobble,' position of the codon is free to accommodate certain noncanonical base pairs. By partially inducing these structural changes, paromomycin facilitates binding of near-cognate tRNAs.

  14. Proteomic investigations of complex I composition: How to define a subunit?

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    Etienne H Meyer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex I is present in almost all aerobic species. Being the largest complex of the respiratory chain, it has a central role in energizing biological membranes and is essential for many organisms. Bacterial complex I is composed of 14 subunits that are sufficient to achieve the respiratory functions. Eukaryotic enzymes contain orthologs of the 14 bacterial subunits and around 30 additional subunits. This complexity suggests either that complex I requires more stabilizing subunits in mitochondria or that it fulfills additional functions. In many organisms recent work on complex I concentrated on the determination of its exact composition. This review summarizes the work done to elucidate complex I composition in the model plant Arabidopsis and proposes a model for the organization of its 44 confirmed subunits. The comparison of the different studies investigating the composition of complex I across species identifies sample preparation for the proteomic analysis as critical to differentiate between true subunits, assembly factors or proteins associated with complex I. Coupling comparative proteomics with biochemical or genetic studies is thus required to define a subunit and its function within the complex.

  15. LEGO-NMR spectroscopy: a method to visualize individual subunits in large heteromeric complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mund, Markus; Overbeck, Jan H; Ullmann, Janina; Sprangers, Remco

    2013-10-18

    Seeing the big picture: Asymmetric macromolecular complexes that are NMR active in only a subset of their subunits can be prepared, thus decreasing NMR spectral complexity. For the hetero heptameric LSm1-7 and LSm2-8 rings NMR spectra of the individual subunits of the complete complex are obtained, showing a conserved RNA binding site. This LEGO-NMR technique makes large asymmetric complexes accessible to detailed NMR spectroscopic studies.

  16. Probing the proton channels in subunit N of Complex I from Escherichia coli through intra-subunit cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursun, Ablat; Zhu, Shaotong; Vik, Steven B

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory Complex I appears to have 4 sites for proton translocation, which are coupled to the oxidation of NADH and reduction of coenzyme Q. The proton pathways are thought to be made of offset half-channels that connect to the membrane surfaces, and are connected by a horizontal path through the center of the membrane. In this study of the enzyme from Escherichia coli, subunit N, containing one of the sites, was targeted. Pairs of cysteine residues were introduced into neighboring α-helices along the proposed proton pathways. In an effort to constrain conformational changes that might occur during proton translocation, we attempted to form disulfide bonds or methanethiosulfonate bridges between two engineered cysteine residues. Cysteine modification was inferred by the inability of PEG-maleimide to shift the electrophoretic mobility of subunit N, which will occur upon reaction with free sulfhydryl groups. After the cross-linking treatment, NADH oxidase and NADH-driven proton translocation were measured. Ten different pairs of cysteine residues showed evidence of cross-linking. The most significant loss of enzyme activity was seen for residues near the essential Lys 395. This residue is positioned between the proposed proton half-channel to the periplasm and the horizontal connection through subunit N, and is also near the essential Glu 144 of subunit M. The results suggest important conformational changes in this region for the delivery of protons to the periplasm, or for coupling the actions of subunit N to subunit M. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Complex Spectral Minutiae Representation For Fingerprint Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Haiyun; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2010-01-01

    The spectral minutiae representation is designed for combining fingerprint recognition with template protection. This puts several constraints to the fingerprint recognition system: first, no relative alignment of two fingerprints is allowed due to the encrypted storage; second, a fixed-length featu

  18. Substrate specificity of TOR complex 2 is determined by a ubiquitin-fold domain of the Sin1 subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatebe, Hisashi; Murayama, Shinichi; Yonekura, Toshiya; Hatano, Tomoyuki; Richter, David; Furuya, Tomomi; Kataoka, Saori; Furuita, Kyoko; Kojima, Chojiro; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase forms multi-subunit TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR complex 2 (TORC2), which exhibit distinct substrate specificities. Sin1 is one of the TORC2-specific subunit essential for phosphorylation and activation of certain AGC-family kinases. Here, we show that Sin1 is dispensable for the catalytic activity of TORC2, but its conserved region in the middle (Sin1CRIM) forms a discrete domain that specifically binds the TORC2 substrate kinases. Sin1CRIM fused to a different TORC2 subunit can recruit the TORC2 substrate Gad8 for phosphorylation even in the sin1 null mutant of fission yeast. The solution structure of Sin1CRIM shows a ubiquitin-like fold with a characteristic acidic loop, which is essential for interaction with the TORC2 substrates. The specific substrate-recognition function is conserved in human Sin1CRIM, which may represent a potential target for novel anticancer drugs that prevent activation of the mTORC2 substrates such as AKT. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19594.001 PMID:28264193

  19. Recognition Interactions of Metal-complexing Imprinted Polymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying LIU; Guo Sheng DING; Jun De WANG

    2005-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer, exhibiting considerable enantioselectivity for L-mandelic acid, was prepared using metal coordination-chelation interaction. By evaluating the recognition characteristics in the chromatographic mode, the recognition interactions were proposed: specific and nonspecific metal coordination-chelation interaction and hydrophobic interaction were responsible for substrate binding on metal-complexing imprinted polymer; while the selective recognition only came from specific metal coordination-chelation interaction and specific hydrophobic interaction.

  20. Structure of a C-terminal fragment of its Vps53 subunit suggests similarity of Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex to a family of tethering complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasan, Neil; Hutagalung, Alex; Novick, Peter; Reinisch, Karin M. (Yale); (UCLJ)

    2010-08-13

    The Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex is a membrane-tethering complex that functions in traffic from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. Here we present the structure of a C-terminal fragment of the Vps53 subunit, important for binding endosome-derived vesicles, at a resolution of 2.9 {angstrom}. We show that the C terminus consists of two {alpha}-helical bundles arranged in tandem, and we identify a highly conserved surface patch, which may play a role in vesicle recognition. Mutations of the surface result in defects in membrane traffic. The fold of the Vps53 C terminus is strongly reminiscent of proteins that belong to three other tethering complexes - Dsl1, conserved oligomeric Golgi, and the exocyst - thought to share a common evolutionary origin. Thus, the structure of the Vps53 C terminus suggests that GARP belongs to this family of complexes.

  1. Chaperonin Structure - The Large Multi-Subunit Protein Complex

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    Irena Roterman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multi sub-unit protein structure representing the chaperonins group is analyzed with respect to its hydrophobicity distribution. The proteins of this group assist protein folding supported by ATP. The specific axial symmetry GroEL structure (two rings of seven units stacked back to back - 524 aa each and the GroES (single ring of seven units - 97 aa each polypeptide chains are analyzed using the hydrophobicity distribution expressed as excess/deficiency all over the molecule to search for structure-to-function relationships. The empirically observed distribution of hydrophobic residues is confronted with the theoretical one representing the idealized hydrophobic core with hydrophilic residues exposure on the surface. The observed discrepancy between these two distributions seems to be aim-oriented, determining the structure-to-function relation. The hydrophobic force field structure generated by the chaperonin capsule is presented. Its possible influence on substrate folding is suggested.

  2. An approach for complex activity recognition by key frames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏利民; 时晓亭; 涂宏斌

    2015-01-01

    A new method for complex activity recognition in videos by key frames was presented. The progressive bisection strategy (PBS) was employed to divide the complex activity into a series of simple activities and the key frames representing the simple activities were extracted by the self-splitting competitive learning (SSCL) algorithm. A new similarity criterion of complex activities was defined. Besides the regular visual factor, the order factor and the interference factor measuring the timing matching relationship of the simple activities and the discontinuous matching relationship of the simple activities respectively were considered. On these bases, the complex human activity recognition could be achieved by calculating their similarities. The recognition error was reduced compared with other methods when ignoring the recognition of simple activities. The proposed method was tested and evaluated on the self-built broadcast gymnastic database and the dancing database. The experimental results prove the superior efficiency.

  3. The transcriptional coactivator SAYP is a trithorax group signature subunit of the PBAP chromatin remodeling complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E. Chalkley (Gillian); Y.M. Moshkin (Yuri); K. Langenberg (Karin); K. Bezstarosti (Karel); A. Blastyak (Andras); H. Gyurkovics (Henrik); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes (remodelers) perform critical functions in eukaryotic gene expression control. BAP and PBAP are the fly representatives of the two evolutionarily conserved major subclasses of SWI/SNF remodelers. Both complexes share seven core subunit

  4. Detailed analysis of the human mitochondrial contact site complex indicate a hierarchy of subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Christine; Dorsch, Eva; Fraunholz, Martin; Straub, Sebastian; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial inner membrane folds into cristae, which significantly increase its surface and are important for mitochondrial function. The stability of cristae depends on the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex. In human mitochondria, the inner membrane MICOS complex interacts with the outer membrane sorting and assembly machinery (SAM) complex, to form the mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging complex (MIB). We have created knockdown cell lines of most of the MICOS and MIB components and have used them to study the importance of the individual subunits for the cristae formation and complex stability. We show that the most important subunits of the MIB complex in human mitochondria are Mic60/Mitofilin, Mic19/CHCHD3 and an outer membrane component Sam50. We provide additional proof that ApoO indeed is a subunit of the MICOS and MIB complexes and propose the name Mic23 for this protein. According to our results, Mic25/CHCHD6, Mic27/ApoOL and Mic23/ApoO appear to be periphery subunits of the MICOS complex, because their depletion does not affect cristae morphology or stability of other components.

  5. Substrate recognition by complement convertases revealed in the C5-cobra venom factor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Nick Stub; Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Braren, Ingke

    2011-01-01

    Complement acts as a danger-sensing system in the innate immune system, and its activation initiates a strong inflammatory response and cleavage of the proteins C3 and C5 by proteolytic enzymes, the convertases. These contain a non-catalytic substrate contacting subunit (C3b or C4b) in complex...... for substrate recognition by the convertases is presented based on the C5-CVF and C3b-Bb-SCIN structures. Prior knowledge concerning interactions between the endogenous convertases and their substrates is rationalized by this model....

  6. Structural and Functional Characterization of Cargo-Binding Sites on the μ4-Subunit of Adaptor Protein Complex 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Breyan H.; Lin, Yimo; Corales, Esteban A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Mardones, Gonzalo A.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes facilitate protein trafficking by playing key roles in the selection of cargo molecules to be sorted in post-Golgi compartments. Four AP complexes (AP-1 to AP-4) contain a medium-sized subunit (μ1-μ4) that recognizes YXXØ-sequences (Ø is a bulky hydrophobic residue), which are sorting signals in transmembrane proteins. A conserved, canonical region in μ subunits mediates recognition of YXXØ-signals by means of a critical aspartic acid. Recently we found that a non-canonical YXXØ-signal on the cytosolic tail of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) binds to a distinct region of the μ4 subunit of the AP-4 complex. In this study we aimed to determine the functionality of both binding sites of μ4 on the recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP. We found that substitutions in either binding site abrogated the interaction with the APP-tail in yeast-two hybrid experiments. Further characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry showed instead loss of binding to the APP signal with only the substitution R283D at the non-canonical site, in contrast to a decrease in binding affinity with the substitution D190A at the canonical site. We solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the D190A mutant bound to this non-canonical YXXØ-signal. This structure showed no significant difference compared to that of wild-type μ4. Both differential scanning fluorimetry and limited proteolysis analyses demonstrated that the D190A substitution rendered μ4 less stable, suggesting an explanation for its lower binding affinity to the APP signal. Finally, in contrast to overexpression of the D190A mutant, and acting in a dominant-negative manner, overexpression of μ4 with either a F255A or a R283D substitution at the non-canonical site halted APP transport at the Golgi apparatus. Together, our analyses support that the functional recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP is limited to the non

  7. The TSC1-TSC2 complex consists of multiple TSC1 and TSC2 subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoogeveen-Westerveld Marianne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations to the TSC1 and TSC2 genes cause the disease tuberous sclerosis complex. The TSC1 and TSC2 gene products form a protein complex that integrates multiple metabolic signals to regulate the activity of the target of rapamycin (TOR complex 1 (TORC1 and thereby control cell growth. Here we investigate the quaternary structure of the TSC1-TSC2 complex by gel filtration and coimmunoprecipitation. Results TSC1 and TSC2 co-eluted in high molecular weight fractions by gel filtration. Coimmunoprecipitation of distinct tagged TSC1 and TSC2 isoforms demonstrated that TSC1-TSC2 complexes contain multiple TSC1 and TSC2 subunits. Conclusions TSC1 and TSC2 interact to form large complexes containing multiple TSC1 and TSC2 subunits.

  8. Multi—pose Color Face Recognition in a Complex Background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUChangren; WANGRunsheng

    2003-01-01

    Face recognition has wider application fields. In recurrent references, most of the algorithms that deal with the face recognition in the static images are with simple background, and only used for ID picture recogni-tion. It is necessary to study the whole process of multi-pose face recognition in a clutter background. In this pa-per an automatic multi-pose face recognition system with multi-feature is proposed. It consists of several steps: face detection, detection and location of the face organs, feature extraction for recognition, recognition decision. In face de-tection the combination of skin-color and multi-verification which consists of the analysis of the shape, local organ fea-tures and head model is applied to improve the perfor-mance. In detection and location of the face organ feature points, with the analysis of multiple features and their pro-jections, the combination of an iterative search with a con-fidence function and template matching at the candidate points is adopted to improve the performance of accuracy and speed. In feature extraction for recognition, geome-try normalization based on three-point afflne transform is adopted to conserve the information to a maximum con-tent before the feature extraction of principal component analysis (PCA). In recognition decision, a hierarchical face model with the division of the face poses is introduced to reduce its retrieval space and thus to cut its time consump-tion. In addition, a fusion decision is applied to improve the face recognition performance. Also, pose recognition result can be got simultaneously. The new approach is ap-plied to 420 color images which consist of multi-pose faces with two visible eyes in a complex background, and the results are satisfactory.

  9. Molecular architecture of the yeast Elongator complex reveals an unexpected asymmetric subunit arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiaputra, Dheva T; Cheng, Derrick Th; Lu, Shan; Hansen, Jesse M; Dalwadi, Udit; Lam, Cindy Hy; To, Jeffrey L; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yip, Calvin K

    2017-02-01

    Elongator is a ~850 kDa protein complex involved in multiple processes from transcription to tRNA modification. Conserved from yeast to humans, Elongator is assembled from two copies of six unique subunits (Elp1 to Elp6). Despite the wealth of structural data on the individual subunits, the overall architecture and subunit organization of the full Elongator and the molecular mechanisms of how it exerts its multiple activities remain unclear. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we revealed that yeast Elongator adopts a bilobal architecture and an unexpected asymmetric subunit arrangement resulting from the hexameric Elp456 subassembly anchored to one of the two Elp123 lobes that form the structural scaffold. By integrating the EM data with available subunit crystal structures and restraints generated from cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry, we constructed a multiscale molecular model that showed the two Elp3, the main catalytic subunit, are located in two distinct environments. This work provides the first structural insights into Elongator and a framework to understand the molecular basis of its multifunctionality.

  10. Significant prognostic values of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial complex I subunits in tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L D; Sun, H F; Bai, Y; Gao, S P; Jiang, H L; Jin, W

    2016-01-01

    In cancer biology, it remains still open question concerning the oncogenic versus oncosuppressor behavior of metabolic genes, which includes those encoding mitochondrial complex I (CI) subunits. The prognostic value of nuclear genome mRNAs expression of CI subunits is to be evaluated in the tumor patients. We used the Kaplan Meier plotter database, the cBio Cancer Genomics Portal, and the Oncomine in which gene expression data and survival information were from thousands of tumor patients to assess the relevance of nuclear genome mRNAs level of CI subunits to patients' survival, as well as their alterations in gene and expression level in tumors. We presented that the relative expression level of overwhelming majority of the nuclear genes of CI subunits with survival significance (overall survival, relapse free survival, progression free survival, distant metastasis free survival, post progression survival, and first progression), had consistent effects for patients in each type of four tumors separately, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, lung cancer, and gastric cancer. However, in gene level, frequent cumulative or individual alteration of these genes could not significantly affect patients' survival and the overexpression of the individual gene was not ubiquitous in tumors versus normal tissues. Given that reprogrammed energy metabolism was viewed as an emerging hallmark of tumor, thus tumor patients' survival might potentially to be evaluated by certain threshold for overall expression of CI subunits. Comprehensive understanding of the nuclear genome encoded CI subunits may have guiding significance for the diagnosis and prognosis in tumor patients.

  11. The transcriptional coactivator SAYP is a trithorax group signature subunit of the PBAP chromatin remodeling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, Gillian E; Moshkin, Yuri M; Langenberg, Karin; Bezstarosti, Karel; Blastyak, Andras; Gyurkovics, Henrik; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2008-05-01

    SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes (remodelers) perform critical functions in eukaryotic gene expression control. BAP and PBAP are the fly representatives of the two evolutionarily conserved major subclasses of SWI/SNF remodelers. Both complexes share seven core subunits, including the Brahma ATPase, but differ in a few signature subunits; POLYBROMO and BAP170 specify PBAP, whereas OSA defines BAP. Here, we show that the transcriptional coactivator and PHD finger protein SAYP is a novel PBAP subunit. Biochemical analysis established that SAYP is tightly associated with PBAP but absent from BAP. SAYP, POLYBROMO, and BAP170 display an intimately overlapping distribution on larval salivary gland polytene chromosomes. Genome-wide expression analysis revealed that SAYP is critical for PBAP-dependent transcription. SAYP is required for normal development and interacts genetically with core- and PBAP-selective subunits. Genetic analysis suggested that, like BAP, PBAP also counteracts Polycomb silencing. SAYP appears to be a key architectural component required for the integrity and association of the PBAP-specific module. We conclude that SAYP is a signature subunit that plays a major role in the functional specificity of the PBAP holoenzyme.

  12. Structures of the m(6)A Methyltransferase Complex: Two Subunits with Distinct but Coordinated Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Katherine I; Pan, Tao

    2016-07-21

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Wang et al. (2016a) report crystal structures of the core of the METTL3/METTL14 m(6)A methyltransferase complex and propose how the two subunits interact and cooperate to bind and methylate RNA.

  13. Tracing human mitochondrial complex I assembly by use of GFP-tagged subunits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieteren, C.E.J.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Disturbances in the assembly of mitochondrial complex I (CI) are a frequent cause of mitochondrial disorders. Several lines of evidence hint at a semi-sequential assembly pathway, in which the 45 individual subunits that form the holoenzyme are pieced together by means of smaller intermediates. To u

  14. Identification and evolutionary analysis of tissue-specific isoforms of mitochondrial complex I subunit NDUFV3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Huynen, Martijn A; Arnold, Susanne

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is the largest respiratory chain complex. Despite the enormous progress made studying its structure and function in recent years, potential regulatory roles of its accessory subunits remained largely unresolved. Complex I gene NDUFV3, which occurs in metazoa, contains an extra exon that is only present in vertebrates and thereby evolutionary even younger than the rest of the gene. Alternative splicing of this extra exon gives rise to a short NDUFV3-S and a long NDUFV3-L protein isoform. Complexome profiling revealed that the two NDUFV3 isoforms are constituents of the multi-subunit complex I. Further mass spectrometric analyses of complex I from different murine and bovine tissues showed a tissue-specific expression pattern of NDUFV3-S and NDUFV3-L. Hence, NDUFV3-S was identified as the only isoform in heart and skeletal muscle, whereas in liver, brain, and lung NDUFV3-L was expressed as the dominant isoform, together with NDUFV3-S present in all tissues analyzed. Thus, we identified NDUFV3 as the first out of 30 accessory subunits of complex I present in vertebrate- and tissue-specific isoforms. Interestingly, the tissue-specific expression pattern of NDUFV3-S and NDUFV3-L isoforms was paralleled by changes in kinetic parameters, especially the substrate affinity of complex I. This may indicate a regulatory role of the NDUFV3 isoforms in different vertebrate tissues.

  15. Structural Characterization of Tip20p and Dsl1p, Subunits of the Dsl1p Vesicle Tethering Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, A.; Ren, Y; Jeffrey, P; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    Multisubunit tethering complexes are essential for intracellular trafficking and have been proposed to mediate the initial interaction between vesicles and the membranes with which they fuse. Here we report initial structural characterization of the Dsl1p complex, whose three subunits are essential for trafficking from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Crystal structures reveal that two of the three subunits, Tip20p and Dsl1p, resemble known subunits of the exocyst complex, establishing a structural connection among several multisubunit tethering complexes and implying that many of their subunits are derived from a common progenitor. We show, moreover, that Tip20p and Dsl1p interact directly via N-terminal alpha-helices. Finally, we establish that different Dsl1p complex subunits bind independently to different ER SNARE proteins. Our results map out two alternative protein-interaction networks capable of tethering COPI-coated vesicles, via the Dsl1p complex, to ER membranes.

  16. Complex human activities recognition using interval temporal syntactic model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏利民; 韩芬; 王军

    2016-01-01

    A novel method based on interval temporal syntactic model was proposed to recognize human activities in video flow. The method is composed of two parts: feature extract and activities recognition. Trajectory shape descriptor, speeded up robust features (SURF) and histograms of optical flow (HOF) were proposed to represent human activities, which provide more exhaustive information to describe human activities on shape, structure and motion. In the process of recognition, a probabilistic latent semantic analysis model (PLSA) was used to recognize sample activities at the first step. Then, an interval temporal syntactic model, which combines the syntactic model with the interval algebra to model the temporal dependencies of activities explicitly, was introduced to recognize the complex activities with a time relationship. Experiments results show the effectiveness of the proposed method in comparison with other state-of-the-art methods on the public databases for the recognition of complex activities.

  17. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawe, G Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C; Bowie, Derek

    2016-03-16

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits.

  18. Comparison of label-free quantification methods for the determination of protein complexes subunits stoichiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Fabre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein complexes are the main molecular machines that support all major cellular pathways and their in-depth characterization are essential to understand their functions. Determining the stoichiometry of the different subunits of a protein complex still remains challenging. Recently, many label-free quantitative proteomic approaches have been developed to study the composition of protein complexes. It is therefore of great interest to evaluate these different methods in a stoichiometry oriented objective. Here we compare the ability of four absolute quantitative label-free methods currently used in proteomic studies to determine the stoichiometry of a well-characterized protein complex, the 26S proteasome.

  19. Skills Recognition and Validation--Complexity and Tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    This article seeks to identify and examine the reasons for the complexity and tensions underlying the skills recognition, accreditation and certification scheme (SRAC) that has been in place in Portugal since 2001. Empirical data were collected through semi-directive interviews with staff in three Centros Novas Oportunidades [CNOs] [New…

  20. The Complexity of Recognition of Linguistically Adequate Dependency Grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Neuhaus, P; Neuhaus, Peter; Broeker, Norbert

    1997-01-01

    Results of computational complexity exist for a wide range of phrase structure-based grammar formalisms, while there is an apparent lack of such results for dependency-based formalisms. We here adapt a result on the complexity of ID/LP-grammars to the dependency framework. Contrary to previous studies on heavily restricted dependency grammars, we prove that recognition (and thus, parsing) of linguistically adequate dependency grammars is NP-complete.

  1. Subunit NDUFV3 is present in two distinct isoforms in mammalian complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Hannah R; Mohammed, Khairunnisa; Harbour, Michael E; Hirst, Judy

    2017-03-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the first enzyme of the electron transport chain in mammalian mitochondria. Extensive proteomic and structural analyses of complex I from Bos taurus heart mitochondria have shown it comprises 45 subunits encoded on both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes; 44 of them are different and one is present in two copies. The bovine heart enzyme has provided a model for studying the composition of complex I in other mammalian species, including humans, but the possibility of additional subunits or isoforms in other species or tissues has not been explored. Here, we describe characterization of the complexes I purified from five rat tissues and from a rat hepatoma cell line. We identify a~50kDa isoform of subunit NDUFV3, for which the canonical isoform is only ~10kDa in size. We combine LC-MS and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry data from two different purification methods (chromatography and immuno-purification) with information from blue native PAGE analyses to show the long isoform is present in the mature complex, but at substoichiometric levels. It is also present in complex I in cultured human cells. We describe evidence that the long isoform is more abundant in both the mitochondria and purified complexes from brain (relative to in heart, liver, kidney and skeletal muscle) and more abundant still in complex I in cultured cells. We propose that the long 50kDa isoform competes with its canonical 10kDa counterpart for a common binding site on the flavoprotein domain of complex I.

  2. Deep Fusion of Multiple Semantic Cues for Complex Event Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xishan; Zhang, Hanwang; Zhang, Yongdong; Yang, Yang; Wang, Meng; Luan, Huanbo; Li, Jintao; Chua, Tat-Seng

    2016-03-01

    We present a deep learning strategy to fuse multiple semantic cues for complex event recognition. In particular, we tackle the recognition task by answering how to jointly analyze human actions (who is doing what), objects (what), and scenes (where). First, each type of semantic features (e.g., human action trajectories) is fed into a corresponding multi-layer feature abstraction pathway, followed by a fusion layer connecting all the different pathways. Second, the correlations of how the semantic cues interacting with each other are learned in an unsupervised cross-modality autoencoder fashion. Finally, by fine-tuning a large-margin objective deployed on this deep architecture, we are able to answer the question on how the semantic cues of who, what, and where compose a complex event. As compared with the traditional feature fusion methods (e.g., various early or late strategies), our method jointly learns the essential higher level features that are most effective for fusion and recognition. We perform extensive experiments on two real-world complex event video benchmarks, MED'11 and CCV, and demonstrate that our method outperforms the best published results by 21% and 11%, respectively, on an event recognition task.

  3. Hetero subunit interaction and RNA recognition of yeast tRNA (m7G46) methyltransferase synthesized in a wheat germ cell-free translation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneyoshi, Yuki; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Tomikawa, Chie; Toyooka, Takashi; Ochi, Anna; Masaoka, Takashi; Endo, Yaeta; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    Yeast tRNA (m(7)G46) methyltransferase contains two protein subunits (Trm8 and Trm82). The enzyme catalyzes a methyl-transfer from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N(7) atom of guanine at position 46 in tRNA. We deviced synthesis of active Trm8-Trm82 heterodimer in a wheat germ cell-free translation system. When Trm8 or Trm82 mRNA were used for a synthesis, Trm8 or Trm82 protein could be synthesized. Upon mixing the synthesized Trm8 and Trm82 proteins, no active Trm8-Trm82 heterodimer was produced. Active Trm8-Trm82 heterodimer was only synthesized under conditions, in which both Trm8 and Trm82 mRNAs were co-translated. To address the RNA recognition mechanism of the Trm8-Trm82 complex, we investigated methyl acceptance activities of eight truncated yeast tRNA(Phe) transcripts. In this meeting, we demonstrate that yeast Trm8-Trm82 has stricter recognition requirements for the tRNA molecule as compared to the bacterial enzyme, TrmB.

  4. RNA-guided complex from a bacterial immune system enhances target recognition through seed sequence interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenheft, Blake; van Duijn, Esther; Bultema, Jelle B.; Waghmare, Sakharam P.; Zhou, Kaihong; Barendregt, Arjan; Westphal, Wiebke; Heck, Albert J. R.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Dickman, Mark J.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Prokaryotes have evolved multiple versions of an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that targets foreign nucleic acids. In each case, transcripts derived from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) are thought to selectively target invading phage and plasmids in a sequence-specific process involving a variable cassette of CRISPR-associated (cas) genes. The CRISPR locus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA14) includes four cas genes that are unique to and conserved in microorganisms harboring the Csy-type (CRISPR system yersinia) immune system. Here we show that the Csy proteins (Csy1–4) assemble into a 350 kDa ribonucleoprotein complex that facilitates target recognition by enhancing sequence-specific hybridization between the CRISPR RNA and complementary target sequences. Target recognition is enthalpically driven and localized to a “seed sequence” at the 5′ end of the CRISPR RNA spacer. Structural analysis of the complex by small-angle X-ray scattering and single particle electron microscopy reveals a crescent-shaped particle that bears striking resemblance to the architecture of a large CRISPR-associated complex from Escherichia coli, termed Cascade. Although similarity between these two complexes is not evident at the sequence level, their unequal subunit stoichiometry and quaternary architecture reveal conserved structural features that may be common among diverse CRISPR-mediated defense systems. PMID:21536913

  5. Core promoter recognition complex changes accompany liver development

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Alessio, Joseph A.; Ng, Raymond; Willenbring, Holger; Tjian, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of several key developmental transitions have brought into question the long held view of the basal transcriptional apparatus as ubiquitous and invariant. In an effort to better understand the role of core promoter recognition and coactivator complex switching in cellular differentiation, we have examined changes in transcription factor IID (TFIID) and cofactor required for Sp1 activation/Mediator during mouse liver development. Here we show that the differentiation of fetal liver progenitors to adult hepatocytes involves a wholesale depletion of canonical cofactor required for Sp1 activation/Mediator and TFIID complexes at both the RNA and protein level, and that this alteration likely involves silencing of transcription factor promoters as well as protein degradation. It will be intriguing for future studies to determine if a novel and as yet unknown core promoter recognition complex takes the place of TFIID in adult hepatocytes and to uncover the mechanisms that down-regulate TFIID during this critical developmental transition. PMID:21368148

  6. Definition of the nuclear encoded protein composition of bovine heart mitochondrial complex I. Identification of two new subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Joe; Shannon, Richard J; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E; Hirst, Judy

    2002-12-27

    Mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) from bovine heart is a complicated multisubunit, membrane-bound assembly. Seven subunits are encoded by mitochondrial DNA, and the sequences of 36 nuclear encoded subunits have been described. The subunits of complex I and two subcomplexes (Ialpha and Ibeta) were resolved on one- and two-dimensional gels and by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed two previously unknown subunits in complex I, named B14.7 and ESSS, one in each subcomplex. Coding sequences for each protein were identified in data bases and were confirmed by cDNA cloning and sequencing. Subunit B14.7 has an acetylated N terminus, no presequence, and contains four potential transmembrane helices. It is homologous to subunit 21.3b from complex I in Neurospora crassa and is related to Tim17, Tim22, and Tim23, which are involved in protein translocation across the inner membrane. Subunit ESSS has a cleaved mitochondrial import sequence and one potential transmembrane helix. A total of 45 different subunits of bovine complex I have now been characterized.

  7. Elg1, the major subunit of an alternative RFC complex, interacts with SUMO-processing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, Oren; Amishay, Rona; Liefshitz, Batia; Zipin-Roitman, Adi; Kupiec, Martin

    2011-09-01

    PCNA is a homotrimeric ring with important roles in DNA replication and repair. PCNA is loaded and unloaded by the RFC complex, which is composed of five subunits (Rfc1-5). Three additional complexes that share with RFC the small subunits (Rfc2-5) and contain alternative large subunits were found in yeast and other eukaryotes. We have recently reported that one of these, the Elg1-RFC complex, interacts with SUMOylated PCNA and may play a role in its unloading during DNA repair. Here we report that a yeast-two-hybrid screen with the N terminus of Elg1(which interacts with SUMOylated PCNA) uncovered interactions with proteins that belong to the SUMO pathway, including Slx5 and Slx8, which form an E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates SUMOylated proteins. Mutations in SLX5 result in a genomic instability phenotype similar to that of elg1 mutants. The physical interaction between the N terminus of Elg1 and Slx5 is mediated by poly-SUMO chains but not by PCNA modifications, and requires Siz2, but not Siz1, activity. Thus our results highlight the many important roles played by Elg1, some of which are PCNA-dependent and some PCNA-independent.

  8. Conservation of the TRAPPII-specific subunits of a Ypt/Rab exchanger complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Eunice

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ypt/Rab GTPases and their GEF activators regulate intra-cellular trafficking in all eukaryotic cells. In S. cerivisiae, the modular TRAPP complex acts as a GEF for the Golgi gatekeepers: Ypt1 and the functional pair Ypt31/32. While TRAPPI, which acts in early Golgi, is conserved from fungi to animals, not much is known about TRAPPII, which acts in late Golgi and consists of TRAPPI plus three additional subunits. Results Here, we show a phylogenetic analysis of the three TRAPPII-specific subunits. One copy of each of the two essential subunits, Trs120 and Trs130, is present in almost every fully sequenced eukaryotic genome. Moreover, the primary, as well as the predicted secondary, structure of the Trs120- and Trs130-related sequences are conserved from fungi to animals. The mammalian orthologs of Trs120 and Trs130, NIBP and TMEM1, respectively, are candidates for human disorders. Currently, NIBP is implicated in signaling, and TMEM1 is suggested to have trans-membrane domains (TMDs and to function as a membrane channel. However, we show here that the yeast Trs130 does not function as a trans-membrane protein, and the human TMEM1 does not contain putative TMDs. The non-essential subunit, Trs65, is conserved only among many fungi and some unicellular eukaryotes. Multiple alignment analysis of each TRAPPII-specific subunit revealed conserved domains that include highly conserved amino acids. Conclusion We suggest that the function of both NIBP and TMEM1 in the regulation of intra-cellular trafficking is conserved from yeast to man. The conserved domains and amino acids discovered here can be used for functional analysis that should help to resolve the differences in the assigned functions of these proteins in fungi and animals.

  9. Core promoter recognition complex changes accompany liver development

    OpenAIRE

    D’Alessio, Joseph A.; Ng, Raymond; Willenbring, Holger; Tjian, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of several key developmental transitions have brought into question the long held view of the basal transcriptional apparatus as ubiquitous and invariant. In an effort to better understand the role of core promoter recognition and coactivator complex switching in cellular differentiation, we have examined changes in transcription factor IID (TFIID) and cofactor required for Sp1 activation/Mediator during mouse liver development. Here we show that the differentiation of fetal li...

  10. Structure of the Cmr2 Subunit of the CRISPR-Cas RNA Silencing Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocozaki, Alexis I.; Ramia, Nancy F.; Shao, Yaming; Hale, Caryn R.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong (FSU); (Georgia)

    2012-08-10

    Cmr2 is the largest and an essential subunit of a CRISPR RNA-Cas protein complex (the Cmr complex) that cleaves foreign RNA to protect prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. Cmr2 is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the effector complex because of its N-terminal HD nuclease domain. Here, however, we report that the HD domain of Cmr2 is not required for cleavage by the complex in vitro. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr2 (lacking the HD domain) reveals two adenylyl cyclase-like and two {alpha}-helical domains. The adenylyl cyclase-like domains are arranged as in homodimeric adenylyl cyclases and bind ADP and divalent metals. However, mutagenesis studies show that the metal- and ADP-coordinating residues of Cmr2 are also not critical for cleavage by the complex. Our findings suggest that another component provides the catalytic function and that the essential role by Cmr2 does not require the identified ADP- or metal-binding or HD domains in vitro.

  11. Accessory subunit NUYM (NDUFS4) is required for stability of the electron input module and activity of mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlhöfer, Flora; Kmita, Katarzyna; Wittig, Ilka; Zwicker, Klaus; Zickermann, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is an intricate 1MDa membrane protein complex with a central role in aerobic energy metabolism. The minimal form of complex I consists of fourteen central subunits that are conserved from bacteria to man. In addition, eukaryotic complex I comprises some 30 accessory subunits of largely unknown function. The gene for the accessory NDUFS4 subunit of human complex I is a hot spot for fatal pathogenic mutations in humans. We have deleted the gene for the orthologous NUYM subunit in the aerobic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, an established model system to study eukaryotic complex I and complex I linked diseases. We observed assembly of complex I which lacked only subunit NUYM and retained weak interaction with assembly factor N7BML (human NDUFAF2). Absence of NUYM caused distortion of iron sulfur clusters of the electron input domain leading to decreased complex I activity and increased release of reactive oxygen species. We conclude that NUYM has an important stabilizing function for the electron input module of complex I and is essential for proper complex I function.

  12. The Complexity of Recognition in the Single-Layered PLN Network with Feedback Connections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    Regarding a single-layered PLN network with feedback connections as an associative memory network,the complexity of recognitions is discussed.We have the main result:if the size of the network N is m,then the complexity of recognition is an exponential function of m.The necessary condition under which the complexity of recognition is polynomial is given.

  13. A Unified Approach to the Recognition of Complex Actions from Sequences of Zone-Crossings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanromà, G.; Patino, L.; Burghouts, G.J.; Schutte, K.; Ferryman, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for the recognition of complex actions. Our method combines automatic learning of simple actions and manual definition of complex actions in a single grammar. Contrary to the general trend in complex action recognition, that consists in dividing recognition into two stages, our m

  14. Radar Emitter Signal Recognition Based on Complexity Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张葛祥; 金炜东; 胡来招

    2004-01-01

    Intra-pulse characteristics of different radar emitter signals reflect on signal waveform by way of changing frequency, phase and amplitude. A novel approach was proposed to extract complexity features of radar emitter signals in a wide range of signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR), and radial basis probability neural network (RBPNN) was used to recognize different radar emitter signals. Complexity features, including Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) and correlation dimension (CD), can measure the complexity and irregularity of signals, which mirrors the intra-pulse modulation laws of radar emitter signals. In an experiment, LZC and CD features of 10 typical radar emitter signals were extracted and RBPNN was applied to identify the 10 radar emitter signals. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is effective and has good application values because average accurate recognition rate is high when SNR varies in a wide range.

  15. The structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex reveals a novel helical scaffold bridging binding pockets on separate subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrette-Ng, Isabelle H.; Wu, Sau-Ching; Tjia, Wai-Mui; Wong, Sui-Lam; Ng, Kenneth K. S., E-mail: ngk@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2013-05-01

    The structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex reveals a novel mode of peptide recognition in which a single peptide binds simultaneously to biotin-binding pockets from adjacent subunits of streptavidin. The molecular details of peptide recognition suggest how the SBP-Tag can be further modified to become an even more useful tag for a wider range of biotechnological applications. The 38-residue SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin more tightly (K{sub d} ≃ 2.5–4.9 nM) than most if not all other known peptide sequences. Crystallographic analysis at 1.75 Å resolution shows that the SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin in an unprecedented manner by simultaneously interacting with biotin-binding pockets from two separate subunits. An N-terminal HVV peptide sequence (residues 12–14) and a C-terminal HPQ sequence (residues 31–33) form the bulk of the direct interactions between the SBP-Tag and the two biotin-binding pockets. Surprisingly, most of the peptide spanning these two sites (residues 17–28) adopts a regular α-helical structure that projects three leucine side chains into a groove formed at the interface between two streptavidin protomers. The crystal structure shows that residues 1–10 and 35–38 of the original SBP-Tag identified through in vitro selection and deletion analysis do not appear to contact streptavidin and thus may not be important for binding. A 25-residue peptide comprising residues 11–34 (SBP-Tag2) was synthesized and shown using surface plasmon resonance to bind streptavidin with very similar affinity and kinetics when compared with the SBP-Tag. The SBP-Tag2 was also added to the C-terminus of β-lactamase and was shown to be just as effective as the full-length SBP-Tag in affinity purification. These results validate the molecular structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex and establish a minimal bivalent streptavidin-binding tag from which further rational design and optimization can proceed.

  16. Accessory NUMM (NDUFS6) subunit harbors a Zn-binding site and is essential for biogenesis of mitochondrial complex I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmita, Katarzyna; Wirth, Christophe; Warnau, Judith; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Hunte, Carola; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.; Zwicker, Klaus; Brandt, Ulrich; Zickermann, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (respiratory complex I) comprises more than 40 polypeptides and contains eight canonical FeS clusters. The integration of subunits and insertion of cofactors into the nascent complex is a complicated multistep process that is aided by assembly factors. We show that the accessory NUMM subunit of complex I (human NDUFS6) harbors a Zn-binding site and resolve its position by X-ray crystallography. Chromosomal deletion of the NUMM gene or mutation of Zn-binding residues blocked a late step of complex I assembly. An accumulating assembly intermediate lacked accessory subunit N7BM (NDUFA12), whereas a paralog of this subunit, the assembly factor N7BML (NDUFAF2), was found firmly bound instead. EPR spectroscopic analysis and metal content determination after chromatographic purification of the assembly intermediate showed that NUMM is required for insertion or stabilization of FeS cluster N4. PMID:25902503

  17. Mutation in mitochondrial complex IV subunit COX5A causes pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, and failure to thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertling, Fabian; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Sánchez-Caballero, Laura; Al-Senaidi, Khalfan; Joshi, Niranjan P; Venselaar, Hanka; van den Brand, Mariël Am; Nijtmans, Leo Gj; Rodenburg, Richard Jt

    2017-03-01

    COX5A is a nuclear-encoded subunit of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase). We present patients with a homozygous pathogenic variant in the COX5A gene. Clinical details of two affected siblings suffering from early-onset pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, failure to thrive, and isolated complex IV deficiency are presented. We show that the variant lies within the evolutionarily conserved COX5A/COX4 interface domain, suggesting that it alters the interaction between these two subunits during complex IV biogenesis. In patient skin fibroblasts, the enzymatic activity and protein levels of complex IV and several of its subunits are reduced. Lentiviral complementation rescues complex IV deficiency. The monomeric COX1 assembly intermediate accumulates demonstrating a function of COX5A in complex IV biogenesis. A potential therapeutic lead is demonstrated by showing that copper supplementation leads to partial rescue of complex IV deficiency in patient fibroblasts.

  18. An ER-resident membrane protein complex regulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit composition at the synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almedom, Ruta B; Liewald, Jana F; Hernando, Guillermina; Schultheis, Christian; Rayes, Diego; Pan, Jie; Schedletzky, Thorsten; Hutter, Harald; Bouzat, Cecilia; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are homo- or heteropentameric ligand-gated ion channels mediating excitatory neurotransmission and muscle activation. Regulation of nAChR subunit assembly and transfer of correctly assembled pentamers to the cell surface is only partially understood. Here, we characterize an ER transmembrane (TM) protein complex that influences nAChR cell-surface expression and functional properties in Caenorhabditis elegans muscle. Loss of either type I TM protein, NRA-2 or NRA-4 (nicotinic receptor associated), affects two different types of muscle nAChRs and causes in vivo resistance to cholinergic agonists. Sensitivity to subtype-specific agonists of these nAChRs is altered differently, as demonstrated by whole-cell voltage-clamp of dissected adult muscle, when applying exogenous agonists or after photo-evoked, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) mediated acetylcholine (ACh) release, as well as in single-channel recordings in cultured embryonic muscle. These data suggest that nAChRs desensitize faster in nra-2 mutants. Cell-surface expression of different subunits of the ‘levamisole-sensitive' nAChR (L-AChR) is differentially affected in the absence of NRA-2 or NRA-4, suggesting that they control nAChR subunit composition or allow only certain receptor assemblies to leave the ER. PMID:19609303

  19. Structure of the active form of human origin recognition complex and its ATPase motor module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocilj, Ante; On, Kin Fan; Yuan, Zuanning; Sun, Jingchuan; Elkayam, Elad; Li, Huilin; Stillman, Bruce; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2017-01-23

    Binding of the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) to origins of replication marks the first step in the initiation of replication of the genome in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the structure of the active form of human ORC determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. The complex is composed of an ORC1/4/5 motor module lobe in an organization reminiscent of the DNA polymerase clamp loader complexes. A second lobe contains the ORC2/3 subunits. The complex is organized as a double-layered shallow corkscrew, with the AAA+ and AAA+-like domains forming one layer, and the winged-helix domains (WHDs) forming a top layer. CDC6 fits easily between ORC1 and ORC2, completing the ring and the DNA-binding channel, forming an additional ATP hydrolysis site. Analysis of the ATPase activity of the complex provides a basis for understanding ORC activity as well as molecular defects observed in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome mutations.

  20. Structure of the active form of human origin recognition complex and its ATPase motor module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocilj, Ante; On, Kin Fan; Yuan, Zuanning; Sun, Jingchuan; Elkayam, Elad; Li, Huilin; Stillman, Bruce; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2017-01-01

    Binding of the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) to origins of replication marks the first step in the initiation of replication of the genome in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the structure of the active form of human ORC determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. The complex is composed of an ORC1/4/5 motor module lobe in an organization reminiscent of the DNA polymerase clamp loader complexes. A second lobe contains the ORC2/3 subunits. The complex is organized as a double-layered shallow corkscrew, with the AAA+ and AAA+-like domains forming one layer, and the winged-helix domains (WHDs) forming a top layer. CDC6 fits easily between ORC1 and ORC2, completing the ring and the DNA-binding channel, forming an additional ATP hydrolysis site. Analysis of the ATPase activity of the complex provides a basis for understanding ORC activity as well as molecular defects observed in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20818.001 PMID:28112645

  1. The acid-labile subunit of the ternary insulin-like growth factor complex in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Juul, A; Becker, U;

    2000-01-01

    In the circulation, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is bound in a trimeric complex of 150 kDa with IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and the acid-labile subunit (ALS). Whereas circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 are reported to be low in patients with chronic liver failure, the level of ALS has...... not been described in relation to hepatic dysfunction. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure circulating and hepatic venous concentrations of ALS in relation to hepatic function and the IGF axis....

  2. Losses, Expansions, and Novel Subunit Discovery of Adaptor Protein Complexes in Haptophyte Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Laura J Y; Klute, Mary J; Herman, Emily K; Read, Betsy; Dacks, Joel B

    2015-11-01

    The phylum Haptophyta (Diaphoratickes) contains marine algae that perform biomineralization, extruding large, distinctive calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths) that completely cover the cell. Coccolith production is an important part of global carbon cycling; however, the membrane trafficking pathway by which they are secreted has not yet been elucidated. In most eukaryotes, post-Golgi membrane trafficking involves five heterotetrameric adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which impart cargo selection specificity. To better understand coccolith secretion, we performed comparative genomic, phylogenetic, and transcriptomic analyses of the AP complexes in Emiliania huxleyi strains 92A, Van556, EH2, and CCMP1516, and related haptophytes Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Isochrysis galbana; the latter has lost the ability to biomineralize. We show that haptophytes have a modified membrane trafficking system (MTS), as we found both AP subunit losses and duplications. Additionally, we identified a single conserved subunit of the AP-related TSET complex, whose expression suggests a functional role in membrane trafficking. Finally, we detected novel alpha adaptin ear and gamma adaptin ear proteins, the first of their kind to be described outside of opisthokonts. These novel ear proteins and the sculpting of the MTS may support the capacity for biomineralization in haptophytes, enhancing their ability to perform this highly specialized form of secretion.

  3. Novel TPR-containing subunit of TOM complex functions as cytosolic receptor for Entamoeba mitosomal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makiuchi, Takashi; Mi-ichi, Fumika; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Under anaerobic environments, the mitochondria have undergone remarkable reduction and transformation into highly reduced structures, referred as mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs), which include mitosomes and hydrogenosomes. In agreement with the concept of reductive evolution, mitosomes of Entamoeba histolytica lack most of the components of the TOM (translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane) complex, which is required for the targeting and membrane translocation of preproteins into the canonical aerobic mitochondria. Here we showed, in E. histolytica mitosomes, the presence of a 600-kDa TOM complex composed of Tom40, a conserved pore-forming subunit, and Tom60, a novel lineage-specific receptor protein. Tom60, containing multiple tetratricopeptide repeats, is localized to the mitosomal outer membrane and the cytosol, and serves as a receptor of both mitosomal matrix and membrane preproteins. Our data indicate that Entamoeba has invented a novel lineage-specific shuttle receptor of the TOM complex as a consequence of adaptation to an anaerobic environment.

  4. Congenital deficiency of two polypeptide subunits of the iron-protein fragment of mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Cleeter, M W; Ragan, C I; Batshaw, M L; Lehninger, A L

    1987-02-01

    Recently, we described a patient with severe lactic acidosis due to congenital complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) deficiency. We now report further enzymatic and immunological characterizations. Both NADH and ferricyanide titrations of complex I activity (measured as NADH-ferricyanide reductase) were distinctly altered in the mitochondria from the patient's tissues. In addition, antisera against complex I immunoprecipitated NADH-ferricyanide reductase from the control but not the patient's mitochondria. However, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of complex I polypeptides demonstrated that the majority of the 25 polypeptides comprising complex I were present in the affected mitochondria. A more detailed analysis using subunit selective antisera against the main polypeptides of the iron-protein fragments of complex I revealed a selective absence of the 75- and 13-kD polypeptides. These findings suggest that the underlying basis for this patient's disease was a congenital deficiency of at least two polypeptides comprising the iron-protein fragment of complex I, which resulted in the inability to correctly assemble a functional enzyme complex.

  5. Automated recognition and post-coordination of complex clinical terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Philip; Roudsari, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    One of the key tasks in integrating guideline-based decision support systems with the electronic patient record is the mapping of clinical terms contained in both guidelines and patient notes to a common, controlled terminology. However, a vocabulary of pre-coordinated terms cannot cover every possible variation - clinical terms are often highly compositional and complex. We present a rule-based approach for automated recognition and post-coordination of clinical terms using minimal, morpheme-based thesauri, neoclassical combining forms and part-of-speech analysis. The process integrates MetaMap with the open-source GATE framework.

  6. Shared Subunits of Tetrahymena Telomerase Holoenzyme and Replication Protein A Have Different Functions in Different Cellular Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Heather E; Chan, Henry; Feigon, Juli; Collins, Kathleen

    2017-01-06

    In most eukaryotes, telomere maintenance relies on telomeric repeat synthesis by a reverse transcriptase named telomerase. To synthesize telomeric repeats, the catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) uses the RNA subunit (TER) as a template. In the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, the telomerase holoenzyme consists of TER, TERT, and eight additional proteins, including the telomeric repeat single-stranded DNA-binding protein Teb1 and its heterotrimer partners Teb2 and Teb3. Teb1 is paralogous to the large subunit of the general single-stranded DNA binding heterotrimer replication protein A (RPA). Little is known about the function of Teb2 and Teb3, which are structurally homologous to the RPA middle and small subunits, respectively. Here, epitope-tagging Teb2 and Teb3 expressed at their endogenous gene loci enabled affinity purifications that revealed that, unlike other Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme subunits, Teb2 and Teb3 are not telomerase-specific. Teb2 and Teb3 assembled into other heterotrimer complexes, which when recombinantly expressed had the general single-stranded DNA binding activity of RPA complexes, unlike the telomere-specific DNA binding of Teb1 or the TEB heterotrimer of Teb1, Teb2, and Teb3. TEB had no more DNA binding affinity than Teb1 alone. In contrast, heterotrimers reconstituted with Teb2 and Teb3 and two other Tetrahymena RPA large subunit paralogs had higher DNA binding affinity than their large subunit alone. Teb1 and TEB, but not RPA, increased telomerase processivity. We conclude that in the telomerase holoenzyme, instead of binding DNA, Teb2 and Teb3 are Teb1 assembly factors. These findings demonstrate that Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme and RPA complexes share subunits and that RPA subunits have distinct functions in different heterotrimer assemblies. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. A formalism for scattering of complex composite structures. I. Applications to branched structures of asymmetric sub-units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2012-03-14

    We present a formalism for the scattering of an arbitrary linear or acyclic branched structure build by joining mutually non-interacting arbitrary functional sub-units. The formalism consists of three equations expressing the structural scattering in terms of three equations expressing the sub-unit scattering. The structural scattering expressions allow composite structures to be used as sub-units within the formalism itself. This allows the scattering expressions for complex hierarchical structures to be derived with great ease. The formalism is generic in the sense that the scattering due to structural connectivity is completely decoupled from internal structure of the sub-units. This allows sub-units to be replaced by more complex structures. We illustrate the physical interpretation of the formalism diagrammatically. By applying a self-consistency requirement, we derive the pair distributions of an ideal flexible polymer sub-unit. We illustrate the formalism by deriving generic scattering expressions for branched structures such as stars, pom-poms, bottle-brushes, and dendrimers build out of asymmetric two-functional sub-units.

  8. Mediator complex subunit 12 exon 2 mutation analysis in different subtypes of smooth muscle tumors confirms genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, Marieke A; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Szuhai, Károly; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2013-08-01

    Recently, heterozygous mutations in exon 2 of the mediator complex subunit 12 gene have been described in 50% to 70% of uterine leiomyomas; the recurrent nature of these mutations suggests an important role in their pathogenesis. Mediator complex subunit 12 is involved in regulation of transcription and Wnt signaling. So far, little is known about the pathogenesis of the different subtypes of extrauterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. We performed mutation analysis of mediator complex subunit 12 and immunohistochemistry for β-catenin, using 69 tumors of 64 patients including 19 uterine leiomyomas, 6 abdominal leiomyomas, 9 angioleiomyomas, 5 piloleiomyomas, and 7 uterine and 23 soft tissue leiomyosarcomas. In line with previous observations, 58% of uterine leiomyomas carried a mediator complex subunit 12 mutation. However, all other extrauterine leiomyomas were negative with the exception of 1 abdominal leiomyoma with a likely primary uterine origin. Of the 30 leiomyosarcomas, only 1 uterine tumor harbored a mutation. A new observation is the identification of 3 tumors with a homozygous mutation; a monosomy X or interstitial deletion was excluded. β-Catenin immunohistochemistry showed nuclear positivity in only 55% of the mediator complex subunit 12-mutated uterine leiomyomas, suggesting the involvement of pathways other than canonical Wnt signaling in tumorigenesis. Interestingly, 80% of mediator complex subunit 12 wild-type sporadic piloleiomyomas displayed nuclear β-catenin positivity, indicating its involvement in this leiomyoma subtype. The lack of mediator complex subunit 12 mutations in extrauterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas indicates that these tumors arise through a different pathway, emphasizing the genetic heterogeneity of smooth muscle tumors.

  9. Diversity and Complexity in DNA Recognition by Transcription Factors**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badis, Gwenael; Berger, Michael F.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Gehrke, Andrew R.; Jaeger, Savina A.; Chan, Esther T.; Metzler, Genita; Vedenko, Anastasia; Chen, Xiaoyu; Kuznetsov, Hanna; Wang, Chi-Fong; Coburn, David; Newburger, Daniel E.; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence preferences of DNA-binding proteins are a primary mechanism by which cells interpret the genome. Despite these proteins’ central importance in physiology, development, and evolution, comprehensive DNA-binding specificities have been determined experimentally for few proteins. Here, we used microarrays containing all 10-base-pair sequences to examine the binding specificities of 104 distinct mouse DNA-binding proteins representing 22 structural classes. Our results reveal a complex landscape of binding, with virtually every protein analyzed possessing unique preferences. Roughly half of the proteins each recognized multiple distinctly different sequence motifs, challenging our molecular understanding of how proteins interact with their DNA binding sites. This complexity in DNA recognition may be important in gene regulation and in evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. PMID:19443739

  10. Binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes for amyloid fibrils recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanczyc, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.hanczyc@chalmers.se

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Interactions of binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes with amyloid fibrils. • Dimer ruthenium(II) compounds are sensitive amyloid fibrils biomarkers. • Recognition of amyloid-chromophore adducts by two-photon excited emission. - Abstract: Metal–organic compounds represent a unique class of biomarkers with promising photophysical properties useful for imaging. Here interactions of insulin fibrils with two binuclear complexes [μ-(11,11′-bidppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (1) and [μ-C4(cpdppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (2) are studied by linear dichroism (LD) and fluorescence. These ruthenium(II) compounds could provide a new generation of amyloid binding chromophores with long lived lifetimes, good luminescence quantum yields for the bound molecules and photo-stability useful in multiphoton luminescence imaging.

  11. Cloning and sequence analysis of the gene encoding 19-kD subunit of Complex I from Dunaliella salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Qiao, Dai Rong; Zheng, Hong Bo; Dai, Xu Lan; Bai, Lin Han; Zeng, Jing; Cao, Yi

    2008-09-01

    NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I ) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain catalyzes the transfer of electrons from NADH to ubiquinone coupled to proton translocation across the membrane. The cDNA sequence of Dunaliella salina mitochondrial NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase 19-kD subunit contains a 682-bp ORF encoding a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 19 kD. The sequence has been submitted to the GenBank database under Accession No. EF566890 (cDNA sequences) and EF566891 (genomic sequence). The deduced amino-acid sequence is 74% identical to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase 18-kD subunit. The 19-kD subunit mRNA expression was observed in oxygen deficiency, salt treatment, and rotenone treatment with lower levels. It demonstrate that the 19-kD subunit of Complex I from Dunaliella salina is regulated by these stresses.

  12. The crystal structure of the complex of Zea mays alpha subunit with a fragment of human beta subunit provides the clue to the architecture of protein kinase CK2 holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battistutta, R; Sarno, S; De Moliner, E

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of a complex between the catalytic alpha subunit of Zea mays CK2 and a 23-mer peptide corresponding the C-terminal sequence 181-203 of the human CK2 regulatory beta subunit has been determined at 3.16-A resolution. The complex, composed of two alpha chains and two peptides...

  13. Differential association of protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welting, Tim J M; Kikkert, Bastiaan J; van Venrooij, Walther J; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2006-07-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in nucleolar and mitochondrial RNA processing events. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein particle, which is structurally related to RNase P, an endoribonuclease involved in pre-tRNA processing. Most of the protein components of RNase MRP have been reported to be associated with RNase P as well. In this study we determined the association of these protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P particles by glycerol gradient sedimentation and coimmunoprecipitation. In agreement with previous studies, RNase MRP sedimented at 12S and 60-80S. In contrast, only a single major peak was observed for RNase P at 12S. The analysis of individual protein subunits revealed that hPop4 (also known as Rpp29), Rpp21, Rpp20, and Rpp25 only sedimented in 12S fractions, whereas hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 were also found in 60-80S fractions. In agreement with their cosedimentation with RNase P RNA in the 12S peak, coimmunoprecipitation with VSV-epitope-tagged protein subunits revealed that hPop4, Rpp21, and in addition Rpp14 preferentially associate with RNase P. These data show that hPop4, Rpp21, and Rpp14 may not be associated with RNase MRP. Furthermore, Rpp20 and Rpp25 appear to be associated with only a subset of RNase MRP particles, in contrast to hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 (and possibly also hPop5), which are probably associated with all RNase MRP complexes. Our data are consistent with a transient association of Rpp20 and Rpp25 with RNase MRP, which may be inversely correlated to its involvement in pre-rRNA processing.

  14. Complex control of GABA(A receptor subunit mRNA expression: variation, covariation, and genetic regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K Mulligan

    Full Text Available GABA type-A receptors are essential for fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are critical in brain function. Surprisingly, expression of receptor subunits is highly variable among individuals, but the cause and impact of this fluctuation remains unknown. We have studied sources of variation for all 19 receptor subunits using massive expression data sets collected across multiple brain regions and platforms in mice and humans. Expression of Gabra1, Gabra2, Gabrb2, Gabrb3, and Gabrg2 is highly variable and heritable among the large cohort of BXD strains derived from crosses of fully sequenced parents--C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. Genetic control of these subunits is complex and highly dependent on tissue and mRNA region. Remarkably, this high variation is generally not linked to phenotypic differences. The single exception is Gabrb3, a locus that is linked to anxiety. We identified upstream genetic loci that influence subunit expression, including three unlinked regions of chromosome 5 that modulate the expression of nine subunits in hippocampus, and that are also associated with multiple phenotypes. Candidate genes within these loci include, Naaa, Nos1, and Zkscan1. We confirmed a high level of coexpression for subunits comprising the major channel--Gabra1, Gabrb2, and Gabrg2--and identified conserved members of this expression network in mice and humans. Gucy1a3, Gucy1b3, and Lis1 are novel and conserved associates of multiple subunits that are involved in inhibitory signaling. Finally, proximal and distal regions of the 3' UTRs of single subunits have remarkably independent expression patterns in both species. However, corresponding regions of different subunits often show congruent genetic control and coexpression (proximal-to-proximal or distal-to-distal, even in the absence of sequence homology. Our findings identify novel sources of variation that modulate subunit expression and highlight the extraordinary capacity of biological networks to buffer

  15. Molecular characterization and mutational analysis of the human B17 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeitink, J; Loeffen, J; Smeets, R; Triepels, R; Ruitenbeek, W; Trijbels, F; van den Heuvel, L

    1998-08-01

    Bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex 1) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain consists of about 36 nuclear-encoded subunits. We review the current knowledge of the 15 human complex I subunits cloned so far, and report the 598-bp cDNA sequence, the chromosomal localization and the tissue expression of an additional subunit, the B17 subunit. The cDNA open reading frame of B17 comprises 387 bp and encodes a protein of 128 amino acids (calculated Mr 15.5 kDa). There is 82.7% and 78.1% homology, respectively, at the cDNA and amino acid level with the bovine counterpart. The gene of the B17 subunit has been mapped to chromosome 2. Multiple-tissue dot-blots showed ubiquitous expression of the mRNA with relatively higher expression in tissues known for their high energy demand. Of these, kidney showed the highest expression. Mutational analysis of the subunit revealed no mutations or polymorphisms in 20 patients with isolated enzymatic complex I deficiency in cultured skin fibroblasts.

  16. Structure determination of an 11-subunit exosome in complex with RNA by molecular replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Debora Lika, E-mail: dmakino@biochem.mpg.de; Conti, Elena [Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The crystallographic steps towards the structure determination of a complete eukaryotic exosome complex bound to RNA are presented. Phasing of this 11-protein subunit complex was carried out via molecular replacement. The RNA exosome is an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex involved in the 3′ degradation of a variety of RNA transcripts. In the nucleus, the exosome participates in the maturation of structured RNAs, in the surveillance of pre-mRNAs and in the decay of a variety of noncoding transcripts. In the cytoplasm, the exosome degrades mRNAs in constitutive and regulated turnover pathways. Several structures of subcomplexes of eukaryotic exosomes or related prokaryotic exosome-like complexes are known, but how the complete assembly is organized to fulfil processive RNA degradation has been unclear. An atomic snapshot of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae 420 kDa exosome complex bound to an RNA substrate in the pre-cleavage state of a hydrolytic reaction has been determined. Here, the crystallographic steps towards the structural elucidation, which was carried out by molecular replacement, are presented.

  17. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-05

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation.

  18. Crystal structure of truncated human coatomer protein complex subunit ζ1 (Copζ1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunev, Sergey; Semmelink, Marije F W; Xian, Jia Ling; Ma, Kai Yu; Leenders, Anna J A; Dömling, Alexander S S; Shtutman, Michael; Groves, Matthew R

    2017-01-01

    The majority of modern anticancer approaches target DNA/protein targets involved in tumour-cell proliferation. Such approaches have a major drawback, as nonproliferating cancer cells remain unaffected and may cause relapse or remission. Human coatomer protein complex I (COPI) subunit ζ (Copζ), a component of the coat protein involved in cell apoptosis and intracellular trafficking, has recently been proposed as a potential anticancer drug target. Previous studies have shown that two different isoforms of the Copζ subunit exist in mammalian cells. While normal cells express both Copζ1 and Copζ2 isoforms, various types of tumour cells display a loss of Copζ2 expression and rely solely on Copζ1 for growth and survival. Subsequent knockdown of Copζ1 results in specific inhibition of both proliferating and dormant tumour-cell populations, with no adverse growth effects on normal cells. Therefore, a Copζ1-targeting therapy was proposed to bypass the problem of dormant cancer cells that are resistant to conventional antiproliferative drugs, which is the major cause of tumour relapse. In order to aid in structure-based inhibitor design, a crystal structure is required. In this article, the recombinant expression, purification, crystallization and crystal structure of Copζ1, as well as the expression and purification of Copζ2, are reported.

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of multi-subunit tethering complexes demonstrates an ancient pan-eukaryotic complement and sculpting in Apicomplexa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Christen M; Klute, Mary J; Dacks, Joel B

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexa are obligate intracellular parasites that cause tremendous disease burden world-wide. They utilize a set of specialized secretory organelles in their invasive process that require delivery of components for their biogenesis and function, yet the precise mechanisms underpinning such processes remain unclear. One set of potentially important components is the multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs), factors increasingly implicated in all aspects of vesicle-target interactions. Prompted by the results of previous studies indicating a loss of membrane trafficking factors in Apicomplexa, we undertook a bioinformatic analysis of MTC conservation. Building on knowledge of the ancient presence of most MTC proteins, we demonstrate the near complete retention of MTCs in the newly available genomes for Guillardiatheta and Bigelowiellanatans. The latter is a key taxonomic sampling point as a basal sister taxa to the group including Apicomplexa. We also demonstrate an ancient origin of the CORVET complex subunits Vps8 and Vps3, as well as the TRAPPII subunit Tca17. Having established that the lineage leading to Apicomplexa did at one point possess the complete eukaryotic complement of MTC components, we undertook a deeper taxonomic investigation in twelve apicomplexan genomes. We observed excellent conservation of the VpsC core of the HOPS and CORVET complexes, as well as the core TRAPP subunits, but sparse conservation of TRAPPII, COG, Dsl1, and HOPS/CORVET-specific subunits. However, those subunits that we did identify appear to be expressed with similar patterns to the fully conserved MTC proteins, suggesting that they may function as minimal complexes or with analogous partners. Strikingly, we failed to identify any subunits of the exocyst complex in all twelve apicomplexan genomes, as well as the dinoflagellate Perkinsus marinus. Overall, we demonstrate reduction of MTCs in Apicomplexa and their ancestors, consistent with modification during, and possibly pre

  20. Comparative genomic analysis of multi-subunit tethering complexes demonstrates an ancient pan-eukaryotic complement and sculpting in Apicomplexa.

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    Christen M Klinger

    Full Text Available Apicomplexa are obligate intracellular parasites that cause tremendous disease burden world-wide. They utilize a set of specialized secretory organelles in their invasive process that require delivery of components for their biogenesis and function, yet the precise mechanisms underpinning such processes remain unclear. One set of potentially important components is the multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs, factors increasingly implicated in all aspects of vesicle-target interactions. Prompted by the results of previous studies indicating a loss of membrane trafficking factors in Apicomplexa, we undertook a bioinformatic analysis of MTC conservation. Building on knowledge of the ancient presence of most MTC proteins, we demonstrate the near complete retention of MTCs in the newly available genomes for Guillardiatheta and Bigelowiellanatans. The latter is a key taxonomic sampling point as a basal sister taxa to the group including Apicomplexa. We also demonstrate an ancient origin of the CORVET complex subunits Vps8 and Vps3, as well as the TRAPPII subunit Tca17. Having established that the lineage leading to Apicomplexa did at one point possess the complete eukaryotic complement of MTC components, we undertook a deeper taxonomic investigation in twelve apicomplexan genomes. We observed excellent conservation of the VpsC core of the HOPS and CORVET complexes, as well as the core TRAPP subunits, but sparse conservation of TRAPPII, COG, Dsl1, and HOPS/CORVET-specific subunits. However, those subunits that we did identify appear to be expressed with similar patterns to the fully conserved MTC proteins, suggesting that they may function as minimal complexes or with analogous partners. Strikingly, we failed to identify any subunits of the exocyst complex in all twelve apicomplexan genomes, as well as the dinoflagellate Perkinsus marinus. Overall, we demonstrate reduction of MTCs in Apicomplexa and their ancestors, consistent with modification during

  1. Shared protein complex subunits contribute to explaining disrupted co-occurrence.

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    Adrian Schneider

    Full Text Available The gene composition of present-day genomes has been shaped by a complicated evolutionary history, resulting in diverse distributions of genes across genomes. The pattern of presence and absence of a gene in different genomes is called its phylogenetic profile. It has been shown that proteins whose encoding genes have highly similar profiles tend to be functionally related: As these genes were gained and lost together, their encoded proteins can probably only perform their full function if both are present. However, a large proportion of genes encoding interacting proteins do not have matching profiles. In this study, we analysed one possible reason for this, namely that phylogenetic profiles can be affected by multi-functional proteins such as shared subunits of two or more protein complexes. We found that by considering triplets of proteins, of which one protein is multi-functional, a large fraction of disturbed co-occurrence patterns can be explained.

  2. Exposing the subunit diversity and modularity of protein complexes by structural mass spectrometry approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorev, Dror S; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Sharon, Michal

    2015-08-01

    Although the number of protein-encoding genes in the human genome is only about 20 000 not far from the amount found in the nematode worm genome, the number of proteins that are translated from these sequences is larger by several orders of magnitude. A number of mechanisms have evolved to enable this diversity. For example, genes can be alternatively spliced to create multiple transcripts; they may also be translated from different alternative initiation sites. After translation, hundreds of chemical modifications can be introduced in proteins, altering their chemical properties, folding, stability, and activity. The complexity is then further enhanced by the various combinations that are generated from the assembly of different subunit variants into protein complexes. This, in turn, confers structural and functional flexibility, and endows the cell with the ability to adapt to various environmental conditions. Therefore, exposing the variability of protein complexes is an important step toward understanding their biological functions. Revealing this enormous diversity, however, is not a simple task. In this review, we will focus on the array of MS-based strategies that are capable of performing this mission. We will also discuss the challenges that lie ahead, and the future directions toward which the field might be heading.

  3. The Use of Small-Angle Scattering for the Characterization of Multi Subunit Complexes.

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    Round, Adam

    2016-01-01

    As the continuing trend in structural biology is to probe ever more complex systems, new methodologies are being developed plus existing techniques are being expanded and adapted, to keep up with the demands of the research community. To investigate multi subunit complexes (protein-DNA, protein-RNA or protein-protein complexes) no one technique holds a monopoly, as each technique yields independent information inaccessible to the other methods, but can be used together in a complementary way. Additionally as large conformational changes are not unlikely, investigation of the dynamics of these systems under physiological conditions is needed to fully understand their function. Investigations under physiological conditions in solution are becoming more standardized and with more dedicated, automated beamlines available these experiments are easy to access by the general research community. As such the need for explanations of how to plan and undertake these experiments is needed. In this chapter we will cover the requirements of these experiments as well and how to plan undertake and analyze the results of such experiments.

  4. Crystal Structure of the Human Pol α B Subunit in Complex with the C-terminal Domain of the Catalytic Subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Yoshiaki; Gu, Jianyou; Baranovskiy, Andrey G; Babayeva, Nigar D; Pavlov, Youri I; Tahirov, Tahir H

    2015-06-05

    In eukaryotic DNA replication, short RNA-DNA hybrid primers synthesized by primase-DNA polymerase α (Prim-Pol α) are needed to start DNA replication by the replicative DNA polymerases, Pol δ and Pol ϵ. The C terminus of the Pol α catalytic subunit (p180C) in complex with the B subunit (p70) regulates the RNA priming and DNA polymerizing activities of Prim-Pol α. It tethers Pol α and primase, facilitating RNA primer handover from primase to Pol α. To understand these regulatory mechanisms and to reveal the details of human Pol α organization, we determined the crystal structure of p70 in complex with p180C. The structured portion of p70 includes a phosphodiesterase (PDE) domain and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) domain. The N-terminal domain and the linker connecting it to the PDE domain are disordered in the reported crystal structure. The p180C adopts an elongated asymmetric saddle shape, with a three-helix bundle in the middle and zinc-binding modules (Zn1 and Zn2) on each side. The extensive p180C-p70 interactions involve 20 hydrogen bonds and a number of hydrophobic interactions resulting in an extended buried surface of 4080 Å(2). Importantly, in the structure of the p180C-p70 complex with full-length p70, the residues from the N-terminal to the OB domain contribute to interactions with p180C. The comparative structural analysis revealed both the conserved features and the differences between the human and yeast Pol α complexes.

  5. An Fe-S cluster in the conserved Cys-rich region in the catalytic subunit of FAD-dependent dehydrogenase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Yoshimatsu, Keiichi; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Tsugawa, Wakako; Ferri, Stefano; Sode, Koji

    2016-12-01

    Several bacterial flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-harboring dehydrogenase complexes comprise three distinct subunits: a catalytic subunit with FAD, a cytochrome c subunit containing three hemes, and a small subunit. Owing to the cytochrome c subunit, these dehydrogenase complexes have the potential to transfer electrons directly to an electrode. Despite various electrochemical applications and engineering studies of FAD-dependent dehydrogenase complexes, the intra/inter-molecular electron transfer pathway has not yet been revealed. In this study, we focused on the conserved Cys-rich region in the catalytic subunits using the catalytic subunit of FAD dependent glucose dehydrogenase complex (FADGDH) as a model, and site-directed mutagenesis and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were performed. By co-expressing a hitch-hiker protein (γ-subunit) and a catalytic subunit (α-subunit), FADGDH γα complexes were prepared, and the properties of the catalytic subunit of both wild type and mutant FADGDHs were investigated. Substitution of the conserved Cys residues with Ser resulted in the loss of dye-mediated glucose dehydrogenase activity. ICP-AEM and EPR analyses of the wild-type FADGDH catalytic subunit revealed the presence of a 3Fe-4S-type iron-sulfur cluster, whereas none of the Ser-substituted mutants showed the EPR spectrum characteristic for this cluster. The results suggested that three Cys residues in the Cys-rich region constitute an iron-sulfur cluster that may play an important role in the electron transfer from FAD (intra-molecular) to the multi-heme cytochrome c subunit (inter-molecular) electron transfer pathway. These features appear to be conserved in the other three-subunit dehydrogenases having an FAD cofactor.

  6. Specificity of recognition of mRNA 5' cap by human nuclear cap-binding complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worch, Remigiusz; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Stepinski, Janusz; Mazza, Catherine; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Cusack, Stephen; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2005-09-01

    The heterodimeric nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) binds to the mono-methylated 5' cap of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcripts such as mRNA and U snRNA. The binding is important for nuclear maturation of mRNAs and possibly in the first round of translation and nonsense-mediated decay. It is also essential for nuclear export of U snRNAs in metazoans. We report characterization by fluorescence spectroscopy of the recognition of 5' capped RNA by human CBC. The association constants (K(as)) for 17 mono- and dinucleotide cap analogs as well as for the oligomer m7GpppA(m2') pU(m2')pA(m2') cover the range from 1.8 x 10(6) M(-1) to 2.3 x 10(8) M(-1). Higher affinity for CBC is observed for the dinucleotide compared with mononucleotide analogs, especially for those containing a purine nucleoside next to m7G. The mRNA tetramer associates with CBC as tightly as the dinucleotide analogs. Replacement of Tyr138 by alanine in the CBP20 subunit of CBC reduces the cap affinity except for the mononucleotide analogs, consistent with the crystallographic observation of the second base stacking on this residue. Our spectroscopic studies showed that contrary to the other known cap-binding proteins, the first two nucleotides of a capped-RNA are indispensable for its specific recognition by CBC. Differences in the cap binding of CBC compared with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) are analyzed and discussed regarding replacement of CBC by eIF4E.

  7. PetG and PetN, but not PetL, are essential subunits of the cytochrome b6f complex from Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Dirk; Volkmer, Thomas; Rögner, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The cytochrome b(6)f complex consists of four large core subunits and an additional four low molecular weight subunits, the function of which is elusive thus far. Here we sought to determine whether small subunits PetG, PetL, and PetN are essential for a cyanobacterial cytochrome b(6)f complex. We found that only PetL is dispensable, whereas PetG and PetN appear to be essential. Possible roles of the small cytochrome b(6)f complex subunits are discussed, and observations from our study are compared with previous findings.

  8. N-acetylation and phosphorylation of Sec complex subunits in the ER membrane

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    Soromani Christina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Covalent modifications of proteins provide a mechanism to control protein function. Here, we have investigated modifications of the heptameric Sec complex which is responsible for post-translational protein import into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. It consists of the Sec61 complex (Sec61p, Sbh1p, Sss1p which on its own mediates cotranslational protein import into the ER and the Sec63 complex (Sec63p, Sec62p, Sec71p, Sec72p. Little is known about the biogenesis and regulation of individual Sec complex subunits. Results We show that Sbh1p when it is part of the Sec61 complex is phosphorylated on T5 which is flanked by proline residues. The phosphorylation site is conserved in mammalian Sec61ß, but only partially in birds, and not in other vertebrates or unicellular eukaryotes, suggesting convergent evolution. Mutation of T5 to A did not affect the ability of mutant Sbh1p to complement the growth defect in a Δsbh1Δsbh2 strain, and did not result in a hypophosphorylated protein which shows that alternate sites can be used by the T5 kinase. A survey of yeast phosphoproteome data shows that Sbh1p can be phosphorylated on multiple sites which are organized in two patches, one at the N-terminus of its cytosolic domain, the other proximal to the transmembrane domain. Surprisingly, although N-acetylation has been shown to interfere with ER targeting, we found that both Sbh1p and Sec62p are cotranslationally N-acetylated by NatA, and N-acetyl-proteome data indicate that Sec61p is modified by the same enzyme. Mutation of the N-acetylation site, however, did not affect Sec62p function in posttranslational protein import into the ER. Disabling NatA resulted in growth retardation, but not in co- or posttranslational translocation defects or instability of Sec62p or Sbh1p. Conclusions We conclude that N-acetylation of transmembrane and tail-anchored proteins does not interfere with their ER-targeting, and that Sbh1p phosphorylation on T5

  9. The F(0F(1-ATP synthase complex contains novel subunits and is essential for procyclic Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Alena Zíková

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial F(0F(1 ATP synthase is an essential multi-subunit protein complex in the vast majority of eukaryotes but little is known about its composition and role in Trypanosoma brucei, an early diverged eukaryotic pathogen. We purified the F(0F(1 ATP synthase by a combination of affinity purification, immunoprecipitation and blue-native gel electrophoresis and characterized its composition and function. We identified 22 proteins of which five are related to F(1 subunits, three to F(0 subunits, and 14 which have no obvious homology to proteins outside the kinetoplastids. RNAi silencing of expression of the F(1 alpha subunit or either of the two novel proteins showed that they are each essential for the viability of procyclic (insect stage cells and are important for the structural integrity of the F(0F(1-ATP synthase complex. We also observed a dramatic decrease in ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation after silencing expression of each of these proteins while substrate phosphorylation was not severely affected. Our procyclic T. brucei cells were sensitive to the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin even in the presence of glucose contrary to earlier reports. Hence, the two novel proteins appear essential for the structural organization of the functional complex and regulation of mitochondrial energy generation in these organisms is more complicated than previously thought.

  10. The integrator complex subunit 6 (Ints6 confines the dorsal organizer in vertebrate embryogenesis.

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    Lee D Kapp

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Dorsoventral patterning of the embryonic axis relies upon the mutual antagonism of competing signaling pathways to establish a balance between ventralizing BMP signaling and dorsal cell fate specification mediated by the organizer. In zebrafish, the initial embryo-wide domain of BMP signaling is refined into a morphogenetic gradient following activation dorsally of a maternal Wnt pathway. The accumulation of β-catenin in nuclei on the dorsal side of the embryo then leads to repression of BMP signaling dorsally and the induction of dorsal cell fates mediated by Nodal and FGF signaling. A separate Wnt pathway operates zygotically via Wnt8a to limit dorsal cell fate specification and maintain the expression of ventralizing genes in ventrolateral domains. We have isolated a recessive dorsalizing maternal-effect mutation disrupting the gene encoding Integrator Complex Subunit 6 (Ints6. Due to widespread de-repression of dorsal organizer genes, embryos from mutant mothers fail to maintain expression of BMP ligands, fail to fully express vox and ved, two mediators of Wnt8a, display delayed cell movements during gastrulation, and severe dorsalization. Consistent with radial dorsalization, affected embryos display multiple independent axial domains along with ectopic dorsal forerunner cells. Limiting Nodal signaling or restoring BMP signaling restores wild-type patterning to affected embryos. Our results are consistent with a novel role for Ints6 in restricting the vertebrate organizer to a dorsal domain in embryonic patterning.

  11. The Integrator Complex Subunit 6 (Ints6) Confines the Dorsal Organizer in Vertebrate Embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Lee D.; Abrams, Elliott W.; Marlow, Florence L.; Mullins, Mary C.

    2013-01-01

    Dorsoventral patterning of the embryonic axis relies upon the mutual antagonism of competing signaling pathways to establish a balance between ventralizing BMP signaling and dorsal cell fate specification mediated by the organizer. In zebrafish, the initial embryo-wide domain of BMP signaling is refined into a morphogenetic gradient following activation dorsally of a maternal Wnt pathway. The accumulation of β-catenin in nuclei on the dorsal side of the embryo then leads to repression of BMP signaling dorsally and the induction of dorsal cell fates mediated by Nodal and FGF signaling. A separate Wnt pathway operates zygotically via Wnt8a to limit dorsal cell fate specification and maintain the expression of ventralizing genes in ventrolateral domains. We have isolated a recessive dorsalizing maternal-effect mutation disrupting the gene encoding Integrator Complex Subunit 6 (Ints6). Due to widespread de-repression of dorsal organizer genes, embryos from mutant mothers fail to maintain expression of BMP ligands, fail to fully express vox and ved, two mediators of Wnt8a, display delayed cell movements during gastrulation, and severe dorsalization. Consistent with radial dorsalization, affected embryos display multiple independent axial domains along with ectopic dorsal forerunner cells. Limiting Nodal signaling or restoring BMP signaling restores wild-type patterning to affected embryos. Our results are consistent with a novel role for Ints6 in restricting the vertebrate organizer to a dorsal domain in embryonic patterning. PMID:24204286

  12. Insights into subunit interactions in the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius archaellum cytoplasmic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ankan; Neiner, Tomasz; Tripp, Patrick; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2013-12-01

    Archaella are the archaeal motility structure that is the functional pendant of the bacterial flagellum but is assembled by a mechanism similar to that for type IV pili. Recently, it was shown by Banerjee et al. that FlaX, a crenarchaeal archaellum subunit from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, forms a ring-like oligomer, and it was proposed that this ring may act as a static platform for torque generation in archaellum rotation [Banerjee A et al. (2012) J Biol Chem 287, 43322-43330]. Moreover, the hexameric crystal structure of FlaI was solved, and its dual function in the assembly and the rotation of the archaellum was demonstrated [Reindl S et al. (2013) Mol Cell 49, 1069-1082]. In this study, we show by biochemical and biophysical techniques that FlaX from S. acidocaldarius acts as a cytoplasmic scaffold in archaellum assembly, as it interacts with FlaI as well as with the recA family protein FlaH, the only cytoplasmic components of the archaellum. Interaction studies using various truncated versions of FlaI demonstrated that its N- and C-termini interact with FlaX. Moreover, using microscale thermophoresis, we show that FlaI, FlaX and FlaH interact with high affinities in the nanomolar range. Therefore, we propose that these three proteins form the cytoplasmic motor complex of the archaellum.

  13. Purification and characterization of photosystem I complex from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by expressing histidine-tagged subunits.

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    Kubota, Hisako; Sakurai, Isamu; Katayama, Kenta; Mizusawa, Naoki; Ohashi, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Masami; Zhang, Pengpeng; Aro, Eva-Mari; Wada, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    We generated Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 strains, designated F-His and J-His, which express histidine-tagged PsaF and PsaJ subunits, respectively, for simple purification of the photosystem I (PSI) complex. Six histidine residues were genetically added to the C-terminus of the PsaF subunit in F-His cells and the N-terminus of the PsaJ subunit in J-His cells. The histidine residues introduced had no apparent effect on photoautotrophic growth of the cells or the activity of PSI and PSII in thylakoid membranes. PSI complexes could be simply purified from the F-His and J-His cells by Ni2+-affinity column chromatography. When thylakoid membranes corresponding to 20 mg chlorophyll were used, PSI complexes corresponding to about 7 mg chlorophyll could be purified in both strains. The purified PSI complexes could be separated into monomers and trimers by ultracentrifugation in glycerol density gradient and high activity was recorded for trimers isolated from the F-His and J-His strains. Blue-Native PAGE and SDS-PAGE analysis of monomers and trimers indicated the existence of two distinct monomers with different subunit compositions and no contamination of PSI with other complexes, such as PSII and Cyt b(6)f. Further analysis of proteins and lipids in the purified PSI indicated the presence of novel proteins in the monomers and about six lipid molecules per monomer unit in the trimers. These results demonstrate that active PSI complexes can be simply purified from the constructed strains and the strains are very useful tools for analysis of PSI.

  14. Novel RNA-binding properties of Pop3p support a role for eukaryotic RNase P protein subunits in substrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca, E M; True, H L; Celander, D W

    2001-11-09

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) catalyzes the 5'-end maturation of transfer RNA molecules. Recent evidence suggests that the eukaryotic protein subunits may provide substrate-binding functions (True, H. L., and Celander, D. W. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 7193-7196). We now report that Pop3p, an essential protein subunit of the holoenzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, displays novel RNA-binding properties. A recombinant form of Pop3p (H6Pop3p) displays a 3-fold greater affinity for binding pre-tRNA substrates relative to tRNA products. The recognition sequence for the H6Pop3p-substrate interaction in vitro was mapped to a 39-nucleotide long sequence that extends from position -21 to +18 surrounding the natural processing site in pre-tRNA substrates. H6Pop3p binds a variety of RNA molecules with high affinity (K(d) = 16-25 nm) and displays a preference for single-stranded RNAs. Removal or modification of basic C-terminal residues attenuates the RNA-binding properties displayed by the protein specifically for a pre-tRNA substrate. These studies support the model that eukaryotic RNase P proteins bind simultaneously to the RNA subunit and RNA substrate.

  15. Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex contains a C-terminal Ras-like domain that promotes association of Paf1 complex with chromatin

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    Amrich C. G.; Heroux A.; Davis, C. P.; Rogal, W. P.; Shirra, M. K.; Gardner, R. G.; Arndt, K. M.; VanDemark, A. P.

    2012-03-30

    The conserved Paf1 complex localizes to the coding regions of genes and facilitates multiple processes during transcription elongation, including the regulation of histone modifications. However, the mechanisms that govern Paf1 complex recruitment to active genes are undefined. Here we describe a previously unrecognized domain within the Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex, the Cdc73 C-domain, and demonstrate its importance for Paf1 complex occupancy on transcribed chromatin. Deletion of the C-domain causes phenotypes associated with elongation defects without an apparent loss of complex integrity. Simultaneous mutation of the C-domain and another subunit of the Paf1 complex, Rtf1, causes enhanced mutant phenotypes and loss of histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation. The crystal structure of the C-domain reveals unexpected similarity to the Ras family of small GTPases. Instead of a deep nucleotide-binding pocket, the C-domain contains a large but comparatively flat surface of highly conserved residues, devoid of ligand. Deletion of the C-domain results in reduced chromatin association for multiple Paf1 complex subunits. We conclude that the Cdc73 C-domain probably constitutes a protein interaction surface that functions with Rtf1 in coupling the Paf1 complex to the RNA polymerase II elongation machinery.

  16. Structurally related TPR subunits contribute differently to the function of the anaphase-promoting complex in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pál, Margit; Nagy, Olga; Ménesi, Dalma; Udvardy, Andor; Deák, Péter

    2007-09-15

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome or APC/C is a key regulator of chromosome segregation and mitotic exit in eukaryotes. It contains at least 11 subunits, most of which are evolutionarily conserved. The most abundant constituents of the vertebrate APC/C are the four structurally related tetratrico-peptide repeat (TPR) subunits, the functions of which are not yet precisely understood. Orthologues of three of the TPR subunits have been identified in Drosophila. We have shown previously that one of the TPR subunits of the Drosophila APC/C, Apc3 (also known as Cdc27 or Mákos), is essential for development, and perturbation of its function results in mitotic cyclin accumulation and metaphase-like arrest. In this study we demonstrate that the Drosophila APC/C associates with a new TPR protein, a genuine orthologue of the vertebrate Apc7 subunit that is not found in yeasts. In addition to this, transgenic flies knocked down for three of the TPR genes Apc6 (Cdc16), Apc7 and Apc8 (Cdc23), by RNA interference were established to investigate their function. Whole-body expression of subunit-specific dsRNA efficiently silences these genes resulting in only residual mRNA concentrations. Apc6/Cdc16 and Apc8/Cdc23 silencing induces developmental delay and causes different pupal lethality. Cytological examination showed that these animals had an elevated level of apoptosis, high mitotic index and delayed or blocked mitosis in a prometaphase-metaphase-like state with overcondensed chromosomes. The arrested neuroblasts contained elevated levels of cyclin B but, surprisingly, cyclin A appeared to be degraded normally. Contrary to the situation for the Apc6/Cdc16 and Apc8/Cdc23 genes, the apparent loss of Apc7 function does not lead to the above abnormalities. Instead, the Apc7 knocked down animals and null mutants are viable and fertile, although they display mild chromosome segregation defects and anaphase delay. Nevertheless, the Apc7 subunit shows synergistic genetic

  17. CD Spectroscopic Study on the Molecular Recognition of Chiral Salen-Metal Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛; 阮文娟; 南晶; 朱志昂

    2003-01-01

    The molecular recognition behavior of the chiral salen-metal complexes towards guest molecules, such as imidazole derivatives and amino-acid ester, was systematically investigated by means of circular dichroism (CD) spectra. The coordination numbers of the host-guest complexes as well as the recognition capability of the salen-metal complexes were explained by character and intensity analyses of the CD spectra.

  18. Structural insight into the recognition of the H3K4me3 mark by the TFIID subunit TAF3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ingen, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/297054651; van Schaik, F.M.A.; Wienk, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203884884; Ballering, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325784876; Rehmann, H.; Dechesne, A.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304841684; Kruijzer, J.A.W.; Liskamp, R.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069091315; Timmers, H.T.M.; Boelens, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070151407

    2008-01-01

    Trimethylation of lysine residue K4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3) strongly correlates with active promoters for RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes. Several reader proteins, including the basal transcription factor TFIID, for this nucleosomal mark have been identified. Its TAF3 subunit specifically binds

  19. Vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (Vkorc1 haplotype diversity in mouse priority strains

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    Kohn Michael H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms in the vitamin K-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 gene, Vkorc1, could affect blood coagulation and other vitamin K-dependent proteins, such as osteocalcin (bone Gla protein, BGP. Here we sequenced the Vkorc1 gene in 40 mouse priority strains. We analyzed Vkorc1 haplotypes with respect to prothrombin time (PT and bone mineral density and composition (BMD and BMC; phenotypes expected to be vitamin K-dependent and represented by data in the Mouse Phenome Database (MPD. Findings In the commonly used laboratory strains of Mus musculus domesticus we identified only four haplotypes differing in the intron or 5' region sequence of the Vkorc1. Six haplotypes differing by coding and non-coding polymorphisms were identified in the other subspecies of Mus. We detected no significant association of Vkorc1 haplotypes with PT, BMD and BMC within each subspecies of Mus. Vkorc1 haplotype sequences divergence between subspecies was associated with PT, BMD and BMC. Conclusion Phenotypic variation in PT, BMD and BMC within subspecies of Mus, while substantial, appears to be dominated by genetic variation in genes other than the Vkorc1. This was particularly evident for M. m. domesticus, where a single haplotype was observed in conjunction with virtually the entire range of PT, BMD and BMC values of all 5 subspecies of Mus included in this study. Differences in these phenotypes between subspecies also should not be attributed to Vkorc1 variants, but should be viewed as a result of genome wide genetic divergence.

  20. Mitochondrial proteome analysis reveals depression of the Ndufs3 subunit and activity of complex I in diabetic rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurino, Federica; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Trentadue, Raffaella; Papa, Sergio; Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio

    2012-04-18

    Type-1 diabetes resulting from defective insulin secretion and consequent hyperglycemia, is associated with "diabetic encephalopathy." This is characterized by brain neurophysiological and structural changes resulting in impairment of cognitive function. The present proteomic analysis of brain mitochondrial proteins from streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetic rats, shows a large decrement of the Ndufs3 protein subunit of complex I, decreased level of the mRNA and impaired catalytic activity of the complex in the diabetic rats as compared to controls. The severe depression of the expression and enzymatic activity of complex I can represent a critical contributing factor to the onset of the diabetic encephalopathy in type-1 diabetes.

  1. Expression and purification of the recombinant subunits of toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase and reconstitution of the active complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafaro, Valeria; Scognamiglio, Roberta; Viggiani, Ambra; Izzo, Viviana; Passaro, Irene; Notomista, Eugenio; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Amoresano, Angela; Casbarra, Annarita; Pucci, Piero; Di Donato, Alberto

    2002-11-01

    This paper describes the cloning of the genes coding for each component of the complex of toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1, their expression, purification and characterization. Moreover, the reconstitution of the active complex from the recombinant subunits has been obtained, and the functional role of each component in the electron transfer from the electron donor to molecular oxygen has been determined. The coexpression of subunits B, E and A leads to the formation of a subcomplex, named H, with a quaternary structure (BEA)2, endowed with hydroxylase activity. Tomo F component is an NADH oxidoreductase. The purified enzyme contains about 1 mol of FAD, 2 mol of iron, and 2 mol of acid labile sulfide per mol of protein, as expected for the presence of one [2Fe-2S] cluster, and exhibits a typical flavodoxin absorption spectrum. Interestingly, the sequence of the protein does not correspond to that previously predicted on the basis of DNA sequence. We have shown that this depends on minor errors in the gene sequence that we have corrected. C component is a Rieske-type ferredoxin, whose iron and acid labile sulfide content is in agreement with the presence of one [2Fe-2S] cluster. The cluster is very sensitive to oxygen damage. Mixtures of the subcomplex H and of the subunits F, C and D are able to oxidize p-cresol into 4-methylcathecol, thus demonstrating the full functionality of the recombinant subunits as purified. Finally, experimental evidence is reported which strongly support a model for the electron transfer. Subunit F is the first member of an electron transport chain which transfers electrons from NADH to C, which tunnels them to H subcomplex, and eventually to molecular oxygen.

  2. The C8ORF38 homologue Sicily is a cytosolic chaperone for a mitochondrial complex I subunit

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ke; Li, Zhihong; Jaiswal, Manish; Bayat, Vafa; Xiong, Bo; Sandoval, Hector; Charng, Wu-Lin; David, Gabriela; Haueter, Claire; Yamamoto, Shinya; Graham, Brett H.; Hugo J Bellen

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (CI) is an essential component in energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. Most CI subunits are encoded by nuclear genes, translated in the cytoplasm, and imported into mitochondria. Upon entry, they are embedded into the mitochondrial inner membrane. How these membrane-associated proteins cope with the hydrophilic cytoplasmic environment before import is unknown. In a forward genetic screen to identify genes that cause neurodegeneration, we identified sici...

  3. The crystal structure of the complex of Zea mays alpha subunit with a fragment of human beta subunit provides the clue to the architecture of protein kinase CK2 holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battistutta, R; Sarno, S; De Moliner, E

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of a complex between the catalytic alpha subunit of Zea mays CK2 and a 23-mer peptide corresponding the C-terminal sequence 181-203 of the human CK2 regulatory beta subunit has been determined at 3.16-A resolution. The complex, composed of two alpha chains and two peptides......, presents a molecular twofold axis, with each peptide interacting with both alpha chains. In the derived model of the holoenzyme, the regulatory subunits are positioned on the opposite side with respect to the opening of the catalytic sites, that remain accessible to substrates and cosubstrates. The beta...... subunit can influence the catalytic activity both directly and by promoting the formation of the alpha2 dimer, in which each alpha chain interacts with the active site of the other. Furthermore, the two active sites are so close in space that they can simultaneously bind and phosphorylate two...

  4. Antibody recognition of Shiga toxins (Stxs: computational identification of the epitopes of Stx2 subunit A to the antibodies 11E10 and S2C4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Jiao

    Full Text Available We have recently developed a new method to predict the epitopes of the antigens that are recognized by a specific antibody. In this work, we applied the method to identify the epitopes of the Shiga toxin (Stx2 subunit A that were bound by two specific antibodies 11E10 and S2C4. The predicted epitopes of Stx2 binding to the antibody 11E10 resembles the recognition surface constructed by the regions of Stx2 identified experimentally. For the S2C4, our results indicate that the antibody recognizes the Stx2 at two different regions on the protein surface. The first region (residues 246-254: ARSVRAVNE is similar to the recognition region of the 11E10, while the second region is formed by two epitopes. The second region is particularly significant because it includes the amino acid sequence region that is diverse between Stx2 and other Stx (residues 176-188: QREFRQALSETAPV. This new recognition region is believed to play an important role in the experimentally observed selectivity of S2C4 to the Stx2.

  5. The stimulating role of subunit F in ATPase activity inside the A1-complex of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1AO ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhirendra; Sielaff, Hendrik; Sundararaman, Lavanya; Bhushan, Shashi; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    A1AO ATP synthases couple ion-transport of the AO sector and ATP synthesis/hydrolysis of the A3B3-headpiece via their stalk subunits D and F. Here, we produced and purified stable A3B3D- and A3B3DF-complexes of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase as confirmed by electron microscopy. Enzymatic studies with these complexes showed that the M. mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase subunit F is an ATPase activating subunit. The maximum ATP hydrolysis rates (Vmax) of A3B3D and A3B3DF were determined by substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis experiments resulting in a Vmax of 7.9 s(-1) and 30.4 s(-1), respectively, while the KM is the same for both. Deletions of the N- or C-termini of subunit F abolished the effect of ATP hydrolysis activation. We generated subunit F mutant proteins with single amino acid substitutions and demonstrated that the subunit F residues S84 and R88 are important in stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Hybrid formation of the A3B3D-complex with subunit F of the related eukaryotic V-ATPase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae or subunit ε of the F-ATP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed that subunit F of the archaea and eukaryotic enzymes are important in ATP hydrolysis.

  6. A Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutation in a conserved C-terminal helix of Orc6 impedes origin recognition complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleichert, Franziska; Balasov, Maxim; Chesnokov, Igor; Nogales, Eva; Botchan, Michael R; Berger, James M

    2013-10-08

    In eukaryotes, DNA replication requires the origin recognition complex (ORC), a six-subunit assembly that promotes replisome formation on chromosomal origins. Despite extant homology between certain subunits, the degree of structural and organizational overlap between budding yeast and metazoan ORC has been unclear. Using 3D electron microscopy, we determined the subunit organization of metazoan ORC, revealing that it adopts a global architecture very similar to the budding yeast complex. Bioinformatic analysis extends this conservation to Orc6, a subunit of somewhat enigmatic function. Unexpectedly, a mutation in the Orc6 C-terminus linked to Meier-Gorlin syndrome, a dwarfism disorder, impedes proper recruitment of Orc6 into ORC; biochemical studies reveal that this region of Orc6 associates with a previously uncharacterized domain of Orc3 and is required for ORC function and MCM2-7 loading in vivo. Together, our results suggest that Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutations in Orc6 impair the formation of ORC hexamers, interfering with appropriate ORC functions. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00882.001.

  7. Cellular senescence regulated by SWI/SNF complex subunits through p53/p21 and p16/pRB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ling; Chen, Ying; Feng, Jianguo; Sun, Weichao; Li, Shun; Ou, Mengting; Tang, Liling

    2017-09-01

    SWI/SNF complex is an evolutionarily well-conserved chromatin-remodeling complex, which is implicated in the nucleosomes removing or sliding, impacting on the DNA repair, replication and genes expression regulation. The SWI/SNF complex consists up to 12 protein subunits. The catalytic subunits are BRG1 or BRM, which are exclusive ATPase subunits. BRG1 has been reported to play an important role in cellular senescence. However, The function of non-catalytic subunits involved in cellular senescence is rarely investigated. Therefore, we focused on the senescence regulation roles of SWI/SNF non-catalytic subunits in cellular senescent model induced by H2O2. H2O2 treatment was used to induce cellular senescence models in vitro. Screening the candidate subunits involved in this process by comparing the expression levels of SWI/SNF subunits with/without H2O2 treatment. Over-expression and knockdown the candidate subunits were utilized to investigate the functions and mechanism of the subunits involved in senescence regulation. The expressions of BAF57, BAF60a and SNF5 were changed significantly after H2O2 treatment. Overexpression of the three subunits separately induced cell growth arrest in both HaCaT and GLL19 cells, while knockdown of the subunits separately eased the senescence induced by H2O2 treatment. Results further showed that BAF57, BAF60a and SNF5 regulated cellular senescence via both p53/p21 and p16/pRB pathways, and the three subunits all had a directly interaction with p53. These results indicated that BAF57, BAF60a and SNF5 might act as novel pro-senescence factors in both normal and tumor human skin cells. Therefore, inhibiting expression of the three factors might delay the cellular senescence process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Spontaneous Object Recognition Memory in Aged Rats: Complexity versus Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamiz, Fernando; Gallo, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Previous work on the effect of aging on spontaneous object recognition (SOR) memory tasks in rats has yielded controversial results. Although the results at long-retention intervals are consistent, conflicting results have been reported at shorter delays. We have assessed the potential relevance of the type of object used in the performance of…

  9. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox state are unaltered in Trypanosoma cruzi isolates with compromised mitochondrial complex I subunit genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Julio César; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Mendonça, Marco Aurélio G; de Oliveira, Thays C; Gadelha, Fernanda R; Zingales, Bianca

    2009-06-01

    In trypanosomatids the involvement of mitochondrial complex I in NADH oxidation has long been debated. Here, we took advantage of natural Trypanosoma cruzi mutants which present conspicuous deletions in ND4, ND5 and ND7 genes coding for complex I subunits to further investigate its functionality. Mitochondrial bioenergetics of wild type and complex I mutants showed no significant differences in oxygen consumption or respiratory control ratios in the presence of NADH-linked substrates or FADH(2)-generating succinate. No correlation could be established between mitochondrial membrane potentials and ND deletions. Since release of reactive oxygen species occurs at complex I, we measured mitochondrial H(2)O(2) formation induced by different substrates. Significant differences not associated to ND deletions were observed among the parasite isolates, demonstrating that these mutations are not important for the control of oxidant production. Our data support the notion that complex I has a limited function in T. cruzi.

  10. Subcellular distribution of the V-ATPase complex in plant cells, and in vivo localisation of the 100 kDa subunit VHA-a within the complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluge Christoph

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vacuolar H+-ATPases are large protein complexes of more than 700 kDa that acidify endomembrane compartments and are part of the secretory system of eukaryotic cells. They are built from 14 different (VHA-subunits. The paper addresses the question of sub-cellular localisation and subunit composition of plant V-ATPase in vivo and in vitro mainly by using colocalization and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques (FRET. Focus is placed on the examination and function of the 95 kDa membrane spanning subunit VHA-a. Showing similarities to the already described Vph1 and Stv1 vacuolar ATPase subunits from yeast, VHA-a revealed a bipartite structure with (i a less conserved cytoplasmically orientated N-terminus and (ii a membrane-spanning C-terminus with a higher extent of conservation including all amino acids shown to be essential for proton translocation in the yeast. On the basis of sequence data VHA-a appears to be an essential structural and functional element of V-ATPase, although previously a sole function in assembly has been proposed. Results To elucidate the presence and function of VHA-a in the plant complex, three approaches were undertaken: (i co-immunoprecipitation with antibodies directed to epitopes in the N- and C-terminal part of VHA-a, respectively, (ii immunocytochemistry approach including co-localisation studies with known plant endomembrane markers, and (iii in vivo-FRET between subunits fused to variants of green fluorescence protein (CFP, YFP in transfected cells. Conclusions All three sets of results show that V-ATPase contains VHA-a protein that interacts in a specific manner with other subunits. The genomes of plants encode three genes of the 95 kDa subunit (VHA-a of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase. Immuno-localisation of VHA-a shows that the recognized subunit is exclusively located on the endoplasmic reticulum. This result is in agreement with the hypothesis that the different isoforms of VHA

  11. Recognition of complex human behaviours using 3D imaging for intelligent surveillance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bo; Lepley, Jason J.; Peall, Robert; Butler, Michael; Hagras, Hani

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a system that exploits 3-D imaging technology as an enabler for the robust recognition of the human form. We combine this with pose and feature recognition capabilities from which we can recognise high-level human behaviours. We propose a hierarchical methodology for the recognition of complex human behaviours, based on the identification of a set of atomic behaviours, individual and sequential poses (e.g. standing, sitting, walking, drinking and eating) that provides a framework from which we adopt time-based machine learning techniques to recognise complex behaviour patterns.

  12. A State Recognition Approach for Complex Equipment Based on a Fuzzy Probabilistic Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the traditional state recognition approaches for complex electromechanical equipment having had the disadvantages of excessive reliance on complete expert knowledge and insufficient training sets, real-time state identification system was always difficult to be established. The running efficiency cannot be guaranteed and the fault rate cannot be reduced fundamentally especially in some extreme working conditions. To solve these problems, an online state recognition method for complex equipment based on a fuzzy probabilistic neural network (FPNN was proposed in this paper. The fuzzy rule base for complex equipment was established and a multi-level state space model was constructed. Moreover, a probabilistic neural network (PNN was applied in state recognition, and the fuzzy functions and quantification matrix were presented. The flowchart of proposed approach was designed. Finally, a simulation example of shearer state recognition and the industrial application with an accuracy of 90.91% were provided and the proposed approach was feasible and efficient.

  13. Basic domains target protein subunits of the RNase MRP complex to the nucleolus independently of complex association.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenennaam, H. van; Heijden, A.G. van der; Janssen, R.J.T.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Pruijn, G.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The RNase MRP and RNase P ribonucleoprotein particles both function as endoribonucleases, have a similar RNA component, and share several protein subunits. RNase MRP has been implicated in pre-rRNA processing and mitochondrial DNA replication, whereas RNase P functions in pre-tRNA processing. Both R

  14. Dual functions of a small regulatory subunit in the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Phillips, Charles B; Ranaghan, Matthew; Tsai, Chen-Wei; Wu, Yujiao; Willliams, Carole; Miller, Christopher

    2016-04-21

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, a process crucial for bioenergetics and Ca(2+) signaling, is catalyzed by the mitochondrial calcium uniporter. The uniporter is a multi-subunit Ca(2+)-activated Ca(2+) channel, with the Ca(2+) pore formed by the MCU protein and Ca(2+)-dependent activation mediated by MICU subunits. Recently, a mitochondrial inner membrane protein EMRE was identified as a uniporter subunit absolutely required for Ca(2+) permeation. However, the molecular mechanism and regulatory purpose of EMRE remain largely unexplored. Here, we determine the transmembrane orientation of EMRE, and show that its known MCU-activating function is mediated by the interaction of transmembrane helices from both proteins. We also reveal a second function of EMRE: to maintain tight MICU regulation of the MCU pore, a role that requires EMRE to bind MICU1 using its conserved C-terminal polyaspartate tail. This dual functionality of EMRE ensures that all transport-competent uniporters are tightly regulated, responding appropriately to a dynamic intracellular Ca(2+) landscape.

  15. Substrate recognition by complement convertases revealed in the C5-cobra venom factor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Nick Stub; Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Braren, Ingke

    2011-01-01

    with a protease subunit (Bb or C2a). We determined the crystal structures of the C3b homologue cobra venom factor (CVF) in complex with C5, and in complex with C5 and the inhibitor SSL7 at 4.3 Å resolution. The structures reveal a parallel two-point attachment between C5 and CVF, where the presence of SSL7 only...

  16. Emotion recognition deficits among persons with schizophrenia: Beyond stimulus complexity level and presentation modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Daniel; Hasson-Ohayon, Ilanit; Laukka, Petri; Vishne, Tali; Dembinsky, Yael; Kravets, Shlomo

    2016-06-30

    Studies have shown that persons with schizophrenia have lower accuracy in emotion recognition compared to persons without schizophrenia. However, the impact of the complexity level of the stimuli or the modality of presentation has not been extensively addressed. Forty three persons with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 43 healthy controls, matched for age and gender, were administered tests assessing emotion recognition from stimuli with low and high levels of complexity presented via visual, auditory and semantic channels. For both groups, recognition rates were higher for high-complexity stimuli compared to low-complexity stimuli. Additionally, both groups obtained higher recognition rates for visual and semantic stimuli than for auditory stimuli, but persons with schizophrenia obtained lower accuracy than persons in the control group for all presentation modalities. Persons diagnosed with schizophrenia did not present a level of complexity specific deficit or modality-specific deficit compared to healthy controls. Results suggest that emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia are beyond level of complexity of stimuli and modality, and present a global difficulty in cognitive functioning.

  17. Functional characterization of the trans-membrane domain interactions of the Sec61 protein translocation complex beta-subunit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xueqiang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic cells co- and post-translational protein translocation is mediated by the trimeric Sec61 complex. Currently, the role of the Sec61 complex β-subunit in protein translocation is poorly understood. We have shown previously that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae the trans-membrane domain alone is sufficient for the function of the β-subunit Sbh1p in co-translational protein translocation. In addition, Sbh1p co-purifies not only with the protein translocation channel subunits Sec61p and Sss1p, but also with the reticulon family protein Rtn1p. Results We used random mutagenesis to generate novel Sbh1p mutants in order to functionally map the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain. These mutants were analyzed for their interactions with Sec61p and how they support co-translational protein translocation. The distribution of mutations identifies one side of the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain α-helix that is involved in interactions with Sec61p and that is important for Sbh1p function in protein translocation. At the same time, these mutations do not affect Sbh1p interaction with Rtn1p. Furthermore we show that Sbh1p is found in protein complexes containing not only Rtn1p, but also the two other reticulon-like proteins Rtn2p and Yop1p. Conclusion Our results identify functionally important amino acids in the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain. In addition, our results provide additional support for the involvement of Sec61β in processes unlinked to protein translocation.

  18. Elucidating the mechanisms of assembly and subunit interaction of the cellulose synthase complex of Arabidopsis secondary cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Ivan I; Pittman, Jon K; Turner, Simon R

    2009-02-06

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer in nature; however, questions relating to the biochemistry of its synthesis including the structure of the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) can only be answered by the purification of a fully functional complex. Despite its importance, this goal remains elusive. The work described here utilizes epitope tagging of cellulose synthase A (CESA) proteins that are known components of the CSC. To avoid problems associated with preferential purification of CESA monomers, we developed a strategy based on dual epitope tagging of the CESA7 protein to select for CESA multimers. With this approach, we used a two-step purification that preferentially selected for larger CESA oligomers. These preparations consisted solely of the three known secondary cell wall CESA proteins CESA4, CESA7, and CESA8. No additional CESA isoforms or other proteins were identified. The data are consistent with a model in which CESA protein homodimerization occurs prior to formation of larger CESA oligomers. This suggests that the three different CESA proteins undergo dimerization independently, but the presence of all three subunits is required for higher order oligomerization. Analysis of purified CESA complex and crude extracts suggests that disulfide bonds and noncovalent interactions contribute to the stability of the CESA subunit interactions. These results demonstrate that this approach will provide an excellent framework for future detailed analysis of the CSC.

  19. Dynamic Hand Gesture Recognition for Wearable Devices with Low Complexity Recurrent Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Sungho; Sung, Wonyong

    2016-01-01

    Gesture recognition is a very essential technology for many wearable devices. While previous algorithms are mostly based on statistical methods including the hidden Markov model, we develop two dynamic hand gesture recognition techniques using low complexity recurrent neural network (RNN) algorithms. One is based on video signal and employs a combined structure of a convolutional neural network (CNN) and an RNN. The other uses accelerometer data and only requires an RNN. Fixed-point optimizat...

  20. Mitochondrial hepato-encephalopathy due to deficiency of QIL1/MIC13 (C19orf70), a MICOS complex subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeharia, Avraham; Friedman, Jonathan R; Tobar, Ana; Saada, Ann; Konen, Osnat; Fellig, Yacov; Shaag, Avraham; Nunnari, Jodi; Elpeleg, Orly

    2016-12-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane possesses distinct subdomains including cristae, which are lamellar structures invaginated into the mitochondrial matrix and contain the respiratory complexes. Generation of inner membrane domains requires the complex interplay between the respiratory complexes, mitochondrial lipids and the recently identified mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) complex. Proper organization of the mitochondrial inner membrane has recently been shown to be important for respiratory function in yeast. Here we aimed at a molecular diagnosis in a brother and sister from a consanguineous family who presented with a neurodegenerative disorder accompanied by hyperlactatemia, 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, disturbed hepatocellular function with abnormal cristae morphology in liver and cerebellar and vermis atrophy, which suggest mitochondrial dysfunction. Using homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing the patients were found to be homozygous for the p.(Gly15Glufs*75) variant in the QIL1/MIC13 (C19orf70) gene. QIL1/MIC13 is a constituent of MICOS, a six subunit complex that helps to form and/or stabilize cristae junctions and determine the placement, distribution and number of cristae within mitochondria. In patient fibroblasts both MICOS subunits QIL1/MIC13 and MIC10 were absent whereas MIC60 was present in a comparable abundance to that of the control. We conclude that QIL1/MIC13 deficiency in human, is associated with disassembly of the MICOS complex, with the associated aberration of cristae morphology and mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction. 3-Methylglutaconic aciduria is associated with variants in genes encoding mitochondrial inner membrane organizing determinants, including TAZ, DNAJC19, SERAC1 and QIL1/MIC13.

  1. BRCC36, A Novel Subunit of a BRCA1 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex, Candidates for BRCA3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Lymphocytes isolated from FRAP blood samples were infected with Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV ) to establish the immortal lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs...BASC, a super complex of BRCA1-associated proteins involved in the recognition and repair of aberrant DNA structures . Genes Dev 2000;14:927–39. 27...inhibitor, puromycin (Sigma, St. Louis, MO; www.sigmaaldrich.com), was added to the EBV cells at the concentration of 200 mg/ml for 14 hr before total RNAs

  2. Mutation in mitochondrial complex I ND6 subunit is associated with defective response to hypoxia in human glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salloum Nicole

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia-tolerant human glioma cells reduce oxygen consumption rate in response to oxygen deficit, a defense mechanism that contributes to survival under moderately hypoxic conditions. In contrast, hypoxia-sensitive cells lack this ability. As it has been previously shown that hypoxia-tolerant (M006x, M006xLo, M059K and -sensitive (M010b glioma cells express differences in mitochondrial function, we investigated whether mitochondrial DNA-encoded mutations are associated with differences in the initial response to oxygen deficit. Results The mitochondrial genome was sequenced and 23 mtDNA alterations were identified, one of which was an unreported mutation (T-C transition in base pair 14634 in the hypoxia-sensitive cell line, M010b, that resulted in a single amino acid change in the gene encoding the ND6 subunit of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I. The T14634C mutation did not abrogate ND6 protein expression, however, M010b cells were more resistant to rotenone, an agent used to screen for Complex I mutations, and adriamycin, an agent activated by redox cycling. The specific function of mtDNA-encoded, membrane-embedded Complex I ND subunits is not known at present. Current models suggest that the transmembrane arm of Complex I may serve as a conformationally driven proton channel. As cellular respiration is regulated, in part, by proton flux, we used homology-based modeling and computational molecular biology to predict the 3D structure of the wild type and mutated ND6 proteins. These models predict that the T14634C mutation alters the structure and orientation of the trans-membrane helices of the ND6 protein. Conclusion Complex I ND subunits are mutational hot spots in tumor mtDNA. Genetic changes that alter Complex I structure and function may alter a cell's ability to respond to oxygen deficit and consolidate hypoxia rescue mechanisms, and may contribute to resistance to chemotherapeutic agents that require redox

  3. Essential Structural and Functional Roles of the Cmr4 Subunit in RNA Cleavage by the Cmr CRISPR-Cas Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy F. Ramia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cmr complex is the multisubunit effector complex of the type III-B clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas immune system. The Cmr complex recognizes a target RNA through base pairing with the integral CRISPR RNA (crRNA and cleaves the target at multiple regularly spaced locations within the complementary region. To understand the molecular basis of the function of this complex, we have assembled information from electron microscopic and X-ray crystallographic structural studies and mutagenesis of a complete Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr complex. Our findings reveal that four helically packed Cmr4 subunits, which make up the backbone of the Cmr complex, act as a platform to support crRNA binding and target RNA cleavage. Interestingly, we found a hook-like structural feature associated with Cmr4 that is likely the site of target RNA binding and cleavage. Our results also elucidate analogies in the mechanisms of crRNA and target molecule binding by the distinct Cmr type III-A and Cascade type I-E complexes.

  4. The Human Arp2/3 Complex Is Composed of Evolutionarily Conserved Subunits and Is Localized to Cellular Regions of Dynamic Actin Filament Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Welch, Matthew D.; Angela H. DePace; Verma, Suzie; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    The Arp2/3 protein complex has been implicated in the control of actin polymerization in cells. The human complex consists of seven subunits which include the actin related proteins Arp2 and Arp3, and five others referred to as p41-Arc, p34-Arc, p21-Arc, p20-Arc, and p16-Arc (Arp complex). We have determined the predicted amino acid sequence of all seven subunits. Each has homologues in diverse eukaryotes, implying that the structure and function of the complex has been conserved through evol...

  5. Ribosomal protein S3: a KH domain subunit in NF-kappaB complexes that mediates selective gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fengyi; Anderson, D Eric; Barnitz, Robert A; Snow, Andrew; Bidere, Nicolas; Zheng, Lixin; Hegde, Vijay; Lam, Lloyd T; Staudt, Louis M; Levens, David; Deutsch, Walter A; Lenardo, Michael J

    2007-11-30

    NF-kappaB is a DNA-binding protein complex that transduces a variety of activating signals from the cytoplasm to specific sets of target genes. To understand the preferential recruitment of NF-kappaB to specific gene regulatory sites, we used NF-kappaB p65 in a tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry proteomic screen. We identified ribosomal protein S3 (RPS3), a KH domain protein, as a non-Rel subunit of p65 homodimer and p65-p50 heterodimer DNA-binding complexes that synergistically enhances DNA binding. RPS3 knockdown impaired NF-kappaB-mediated transcription of selected p65 target genes but not nuclear shuttling or global protein translation. Rather, lymphocyte-activating stimuli caused nuclear translocation of RPS3, parallel to p65, to form part of NF-kappaB bound to specific regulatory sites in chromatin. Thus, RPS3 is an essential but previously unknown subunit of NF-kappaB involved in the regulation of key genes in rapid cellular activation responses. Our observations provide insight into how NF-kappaB selectively controls gene expression.

  6. Structural and biochemical characterization of human PR70 in isolation and in complex with the scaffolding subunit of protein phosphatase 2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Dovega

    Full Text Available Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a major Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. PP2A assembles into diverse trimeric holoenzymes, which consist of a scaffolding (A subunit, a catalytic (C subunit and various regulatory (B subunits. Here we report a 2.0 Å crystal structure of the free B''/PR70 subunit and a SAXS model of an A/PR70 complex. The crystal structure of B''/PR70 reveals a two domain elongated structure with two Ca2+ binding EF-hands. Furthermore, we have characterized the interaction of both binding partner and their calcium dependency using biophysical techniques. Ca2+ biophysical studies with Circular Dichroism showed that the two EF-hands display different affinities to Ca2+. In the absence of the catalytic C-subunit, the scaffolding A-subunit remains highly mobile and flexible even in the presence of the B''/PR70 subunit as judged by SAXS. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry studies and SAXS data support that PR70 and the A-subunit have high affinity to each other. This study provides additional knowledge about the structural basis for the function of B'' containing holoenzymes.

  7. Molecular Recognition by Q-BISDIEN and Its Dinuclear Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-30

    KR12 . The first binuclear (u-hydroxo) complex forms a malonato bridged species in contrast to the observations of the dicopper phosphate system...O-BISDIEN/Co(II) malonato adducts discussed in this section. A different p[H] profile is obtained for the O-BISDIEN, Co(ll)-malonate system when it...Figure 6, the dioxygen complexes are plainly obvious, especially the non-hydroxo-bridged Co 2 BdMal(0 2) 2 + , 6, where apparently the malonato bridge

  8. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskar,; Kumari, Neeti [Division of Biochemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace, PO Box 173, Lucknow (India); Goyal, Neena, E-mail: neenacdri@yahoo.com [Division of Biochemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace, PO Box 173, Lucknow (India)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1{gamma} gene from L. donovani. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCP1{gamma} is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1{gamma}), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1{gamma} of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1{gamma}), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1{gamma} revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1{gamma}. However, leishmanial TCP1{gamma} represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1{gamma} as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1{gamma} was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1{gamma} with actin suggests

  9. Synthesis and Anion Recognition of a Novel Heterocyclic Organotin Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xin ZHANG; Gui Zhi LI; Zhi Qiang LI

    2004-01-01

    A novel heterocyclic hexacoordinate organotin(IV) complex, bis(O-vanillin)-semi ethylenediamino dibenzyltin (VEDBT) was synthesized by the reaction of dibenzyltin dichloride with bis(O-vanillin)-semiethyenediamine, its structure has been characterized by spectral methods.The electrodes using VEDBT as a neutral carrier show high selectivity for salicylate anions.

  10. Does aging impair first impression accuracy? Differentiating emotion recognition from complex social inferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krendl, Anne C; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Young adults can be surprisingly accurate at making inferences about people from their faces. Although these first impressions have important consequences for both the perceiver and the target, it remains an open question whether first impression accuracy is preserved with age. Specifically, could age differences in impressions toward others stem from age-related deficits in accurately detecting complex social cues? Research on aging and impression formation suggests that young and older adults show relative consensus in their first impressions, but it is unknown whether they differ in accuracy. It has been widely shown that aging disrupts emotion recognition accuracy, and that these impairments may predict deficits in other social judgments, such as detecting deceit. However, it is unclear whether general impression formation accuracy (e.g., emotion recognition accuracy, detecting complex social cues) relies on similar or distinct mechanisms. It is important to examine this question to evaluate how, if at all, aging might affect overall accuracy. Here, we examined whether aging impaired first impression accuracy in predicting real-world outcomes and categorizing social group membership. Specifically, we studied whether emotion recognition accuracy and age-related cognitive decline (which has been implicated in exacerbating deficits in emotion recognition) predict first impression accuracy. Our results revealed that emotion recognition accuracy did not predict first impression accuracy, nor did age-related cognitive decline impair it. These findings suggest that domains of social perception outside of emotion recognition may rely on mechanisms that are relatively unimpaired by aging.

  11. The developmental and pathogenic roles of BAF57, a special subunit of the BAF chromatin-remodeling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomelí, Hilda; Castillo-Robles, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian SWI/SNF or BAF chromatin-remodeling complexes are polymorphic assemblies of homologous subunit families that remodel nucleosomes. BAF57 is a subunit of the BAF complexes; it is encoded only in higher eukaryotes and is present in all mammalian assemblies. Its main structural feature is a high-mobility group domain, the DNA-binding properties of which suggest that BAF57 may play topological roles as the BAF complex enters or exits the nucleosome. BAF57 displays specific interactions with a number of proteins outside the BAF complex. Through these interactions, it can accomplish specific functions. In the embryo, BAF57 is responsible for the silencing of the CD4 gene during T-cell differentiation, and during the repression of neuronal genes in non-neuronal cells, BAF57 interacts with the transcriptional corepressor, Co-REST, and facilitates repression. Extensive work has demonstrated a specific role of BAF57 in regulating the interactions between BAF and nuclear hormone receptors. Despite its involvement in oncogenic pathways, new generation sequencing studies do not support a prominent role for BAF57 in the initiation of cancer. On the other hand, evidence has emerged to support a role for BAF57 as a metastasis factor, a prognosis marker and a therapeutic target. In humans, BAF57 is associated with disease, as mutations in this gene predispose to important congenital disorders, including menigioma disease or the Coffin-Siris syndrome. In this article, we present an exhaustive analysis of the BAF57 molecular and biochemical properties, cellular functions, loss-of-function phenotypes in living organisms and pathological manifestations in cases of human mutations.

  12. Monopolin subunit Csm1 associates with MIND complex to establish monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores at meiosis I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sourav; Shenoy, Rajesh T; Dalgaard, Jacob Z; Newnham, Louise; Hoffmann, Eva; Millar, Jonathan B A; Arumugam, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Sexually reproducing organisms halve their cellular ploidy during gametogenesis by undergoing a specialized form of cell division known as meiosis. During meiosis, a single round of DNA replication is followed by two rounds of nuclear divisions (referred to as meiosis I and II). While sister kinetochores bind to microtubules emanating from opposite spindle poles during mitosis, they bind to microtubules originating from the same spindle pole during meiosis I. This phenomenon is referred to as mono-orientation and is essential for setting up the reductional mode of chromosome segregation during meiosis I. In budding yeast, mono-orientation depends on a four component protein complex referred to as monopolin which consists of two nucleolar proteins Csm1 and Lrs4, meiosis-specific protein Mam1 of unknown function and casein kinase Hrr25. Monopolin complex binds to kinetochores during meiosis I and prevents bipolar attachments. Although monopolin associates with kinetochores during meiosis I, its binding site(s) on the kinetochore is not known and its mechanism of action has not been established. By carrying out an imaging-based screen we have found that the MIND complex, a component of the central kinetochore, is required for monopolin association with kinetochores during meiosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that interaction of monopolin subunit Csm1 with the N-terminal domain of MIND complex subunit Dsn1, is essential for both the association of monopolin with kinetochores and for monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores during meiosis I. As such this provides the first functional evidence for a monopolin-binding site at the kinetochore.

  13. Visual recognition of complex medical lesions using 2D shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Artur; Gustavsson, Tomas; Mattsson, Ulf

    2000-06-01

    Different shape representation and classification methods for complex medical lesions were compared using oral lesions as a case study. The problem studied was the discrimination between potentially cancerous lesions, called leukoplakia, and other usually harmless lesions, called lichenoid reactions, which can appear in human oral cavities. The classification problem is difficult because these lesions vary in shape within classes and there are no easily recognizable characteristics. The representations evaluated were the centroidal profile function, the curvature function, and polar and complex coordinate functions. From these representations, translation, scale and rotation independent features were derived using Fourier transformations, auto-regressive modeling, and Zernike moments. A nonparametric kNN classifier with the leave-one-out cross-validation method was used as a classifier. An overall classification accuracy of about 84% was achieved using only the shape properties of the lesions, compared with a human visual classification rate of 65%. The best results were obtained using complex representation and Fourier/Zernike methods. In clinical practice, the preliminary diagnosis is based mainly on the visual inspection of the oral cavity, using both color, shape and texture as differentiating parameters. This study showed that machine analysis of shape could also play an important part in diagnosis and decisions regarding future treatment.

  14. An Organelle RNA Recognition Motif Protein Is Required for Photosystem II Subunit psbF Transcript Editing1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Meriah K.

    2017-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in ORGANELLE RNA RECOGNITION MOTIF PROTEIN6 (ORRM6) result in the near absence of RNA editing of psbF-C77 and the reduction in accD-C794 editing in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The orrm6 mutants have decreased levels of photosystem II (PSII) proteins, especially PsbF, lower PSII activity, pale green pigmentation, smaller leaf and plant sizes, and retarded growth. Stable expression of ORRM6 rescues the orrm6 editing defects and mutant phenotype. Unlike ORRM1, the other known ORRM plastid editing factor, ORRM6, does not contain RNA editing interacting protein/multiple organellar RNA editing factor (RIP/MORF) boxes, which are required for ORRM1 to interact with site-specific pentatricopeptide repeat protein editing factors. ORRM6 interacts with RIP1/MORF8, RIP2/MORF2, and RIP9/MORF9, known components of RNA editosomes. While some plastid RRM proteins are involved in other forms of RNA processing and translation, the primary function of ORRM6 is evidently to mediate psbF-C77 editing, like the essential site-specific pentatricopeptide repeat protein LOW PSII ACCUMULATION66. Stable expression in the orrm6 mutants of a nucleus-encoded, plastid-targeted PsbF protein from a psbF gene carrying a T at nucleotide 77 significantly increases leaf and plant sizes, chlorophyll content, and PSII activity. These transformants demonstrate that plastid RNA editing can be bypassed through the expression of nucleus-encoded, edited forms of plastid genes. PMID:28213559

  15. An Organelle RNA Recognition Motif Protein Is Required for Photosystem II Subunit psbF Transcript Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Justin B; Shi, Xiaowen; Kobylarz, Amy T; Lucas, Meriah K; Wessendorf, Ryan L; Hines, Kevin M; Bentolila, Stephane; Hanson, Maureen R; Lu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in ORGANELLE RNA RECOGNITION MOTIF PROTEIN6 (ORRM6) result in the near absence of RNA editing of psbF-C77 and the reduction in accD-C794 editing in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The orrm6 mutants have decreased levels of photosystem II (PSII) proteins, especially PsbF, lower PSII activity, pale green pigmentation, smaller leaf and plant sizes, and retarded growth. Stable expression of ORRM6 rescues the orrm6 editing defects and mutant phenotype. Unlike ORRM1, the other known ORRM plastid editing factor, ORRM6, does not contain RNA editing interacting protein/multiple organellar RNA editing factor (RIP/MORF) boxes, which are required for ORRM1 to interact with site-specific pentatricopeptide repeat protein editing factors. ORRM6 interacts with RIP1/MORF8, RIP2/MORF2, and RIP9/MORF9, known components of RNA editosomes. While some plastid RRM proteins are involved in other forms of RNA processing and translation, the primary function of ORRM6 is evidently to mediate psbF-C77 editing, like the essential site-specific pentatricopeptide repeat protein LOW PSII ACCUMULATION66. Stable expression in the orrm6 mutants of a nucleus-encoded, plastid-targeted PsbF protein from a psbF gene carrying a T at nucleotide 77 significantly increases leaf and plant sizes, chlorophyll content, and PSII activity. These transformants demonstrate that plastid RNA editing can be bypassed through the expression of nucleus-encoded, edited forms of plastid genes.

  16. Blockade of NMDA receptors 2A subunit in the dorsal striatum impairs the learning of a complex motor skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay-Clermont, Julie; Robitaille, Christine; Auberson, Yves P; Bureau, Geneviève; Cyr, Michel

    2011-10-01

    Accumulating evidence proposes that the striatum, known to control voluntary movement, may also play a role in learning and memory. Striatum learning is thought to require long-lasting reorganization of striatal circuits and changes in the strength of synaptic connections during the memorization of a complex motor task. Whether the ionotropic glutamate receptor N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR) contributes to the molecular mechanisms of these memory processes is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of striatal NMDAR and its subunit composition during the learning of the accelerating rotarod task in mice. To this end, we injected directly into the dorsal striatum of mice, via chronically implanted cannula, the NMDAR channel blocker MK-801 as well as the NR2A and NR2B subunit-selective antagonists NVP-AAM077 and Ro 25-6981, respectively, before rotarod training. There was no effect in the motor performances of mice treated with 1.0 μg/side of MK-801, 0.1 μg/side of NVP-AAM077, or 5 and 10 μg/side of Ro 25-6981. In contrast, injections of 2.5 and 5 μg/side of MK-801 or 0.5 and 1 μg/side of NVP-AAM077 impaired motor learning at Day 3 and 8. Interestingly, treatments with MK-801 and NVP-AAM077 did not alter the general motor capacities of mice as revealed by the stepping, wire suspension, and pole tests. Our study demonstrates that the NMDAR of the dorsal striatum contributes to motor learning, especially during the slow acquisition phase, and that NR2A subunits play a critical role in this process.

  17. Congenital deficiency of two polypeptide subunits of the iron-protein fragment of mitochondrial complex I.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreadith, R W; Cleeter, M. W.; Ragan, C I; Batshaw, M L; Lehninger, A L

    1987-01-01

    Recently, we described a patient with severe lactic acidosis due to congenital complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) deficiency. We now report further enzymatic and immunological characterizations. Both NADH and ferricyanide titrations of complex I activity (measured as NADH-ferricyanide reductase) were distinctly altered in the mitochondria from the patient's tissues. In addition, antisera against complex I immunoprecipitated NADH-ferricyanide reductase from the control but not the pati...

  18. Fuzzy nodes recognition based on spectral clustering in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yang; Cheng, Guangquan; Liu, Zhong; Xie, Fuli

    2017-01-01

    In complex networks, information regarding the nodes is usually incomplete because of the effects of interference, noise, and other factors. This results in parts of the network being blurred and some information having an unknown source. In this paper, a spectral clustering algorithm is used to identify fuzzy nodes and solve network reconstruction problems. By changing the fuzzy degree of placeholders, we achieve various degrees of credibility and accuracy for the restored network. Our approach is verified by experiments using open source datasets and simulated data.

  19. Recognition of DNA Termini by the C-Terminal Region of the Ku80 and the DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek S Woods

    Full Text Available DNA double strand breaks (DSBs can be generated by endogenous cellular processes or exogenous agents in mammalian cells. These breaks are highly variable with respect to DNA sequence and structure and all are recognized in some context by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. DNA-PK is a critical component necessary for the recognition and repair of DSBs via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ. Previously studies have shown that DNA-PK responds differentially to variations in DSB structure, but how DNA-PK senses differences in DNA substrate sequence and structure is unknown. Here we explore the enzymatic mechanisms by which DNA-PK is activated by various DNA substrates and provide evidence that the DNA-PK is differentially activated by DNA structural variations as a function of the C-terminal region of Ku80. Discrimination based on terminal DNA sequence variations, on the other hand, is independent of the Ku80 C-terminal interactions and likely results exclusively from DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit interactions with the DNA. We also show that sequence differences in DNA termini can drastically influence DNA repair through altered DNA-PK activation. These results indicate that even subtle differences in DNA substrates influence DNA-PK activation and ultimately the efficiency of DSB repair.

  20. The changing of the guard: the Pto/Prf receptor complex of tomato and pathogen recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoukakis, Vardis; Saur, Isabel M L; Conlan, Brendon; Rathjen, John P

    2014-08-01

    One important model for disease resistance is the Prf recognition complex of tomato, which responds to different bacterial effectors. Prf incorporates a protein kinase called Pto as its recognition domain that mimics effector virulence targets, and activates resistance after interaction with specific effectors. Recent findings show that this complex is oligomeric, and reveal how this impacts mechanism. Oligomerisation brings two or more kinases into proximity, where they can phosphorylate each other after effector perception. Effector attack on one kinase activates another in trans, constituting a molecular trap for the effector. Oligomerisation of plant resistance proteins may be a general concept that broadens pathogen recognition and restricts the ability of pathogens to evolve virulence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Subunit Composition and Substrate Specificity of a MOF-containing Histone Acetyltransferase Distinct from the Male-specific Lethal (MSL) Complex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji; Swanson, Selene K.; Cole, Michael D.; Choi, Seung Hyuk; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Conaway, Joan W.; Conaway, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Human MOF (MYST1), a member of the MYST (Moz-Ybf2/Sas3-Sas2-Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs), is the human ortholog of the Drosophila males absent on the first (MOF) protein. MOF is the catalytic subunit of the male-specific lethal (MSL) HAT complex, which plays a key role in dosage compensation in the fly and is responsible for a large fraction of histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16) acetylation in vivo. MOF was recently reported to be a component of a second HAT complex, designated the non-specific lethal (NSL) complex (Mendjan, S., Taipale, M., Kind, J., Holz, H., Gebhardt, P., Schelder, M., Vermeulen, M., Buscaino, A., Duncan, K., Mueller, J., Wilm, M., Stunnenberg, H. G., Saumweber, H., and Akhtar, A. (2006) Mol. Cell 21, 811–823). Here we report an analysis of the subunit composition and substrate specificity of the NSL complex. Proteomic analyses of complexes purified through multiple candidate subunits reveal that NSL is composed of nine subunits. Two of its subunits, WD repeat domain 5 (WDR5) and host cell factor 1 (HCF1), are shared with members of the MLL/SET family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase complexes, and a third subunit, MCRS1, is shared with the human INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex. In addition, we show that assembly of the MOF HAT into MSL or NSL complexes controls its substrate specificity. Although MSL-associated MOF acetylates nucleosomal histone H4 almost exclusively on lysine 16, NSL-associated MOF exhibits a relaxed specificity and also acetylates nucleosomal histone H4 on lysines 5 and 8. PMID:20018852

  2. Identification of a ubiquitin-protein ligase subunit within the CCR4-NOT transcription repressor complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albert, TK; Hanzawa, H; Legtenberg, YIA; de Ruwe, MJ; van den Heuvel, FAJ; Collart, MA; Boelens, R; Timmers, HTM

    2002-01-01

    The RING finger protein CNOT4 is a component of the CCR4-NOT complex. This complex is implicated in repression of RNA polymerase II transcription. Here we demonstrate that CNOT4 functions as a ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3). We show that the unique C4C4 RING domain of CNOT4 interacts with a subset of

  3. Chromatin-modifying complex component Nurf55/p55 associates with histones H3 and H4 and polycomb repressive complex 2 subunit Su(z)12 through partially overlapping binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Agnieszka J; Alfieri, Claudio; Stirnimann, Christian U; Rybin, Vladimir; Baudin, Florence; Ly-Hartig, Nga; Lindner, Doris; Müller, Christoph W

    2011-07-01

    Drosophila Nurf55 is a component of different chromatin-modifying complexes, including the PRC2 (Polycomb repressive complex 2). Based on the 1.75-Å crystal structure of Nurf55 bound to histone H4 helix 1, we analyzed interactions of Nurf55 (Nurf55 or p55 in fly and RbAp48/46 in human) with the N-terminal tail of histone H3, the first helix of histone H4, and an N-terminal fragment of the PRC2 subunit Su(z)12 using isothermal calorimetry and pulldown experiments. Site-directed mutagenesis identified the binding site of histone H3 at the top of the Nurf55 WD40 propeller. Unmodified or K9me3- or K27me3-containing H3 peptides were bound with similar affinities, whereas the affinity for K4me3-containing H3 peptides was reduced. Helix 1 of histone H4 and Su(z)12 bound to the edge of the β-propeller using overlapping binding sites. Our results show similarities in the recognition of histone H4 and Su(z)12 and identify Nurf55 as a versatile interactor that simultaneously contacts multiple partners.

  4. Mapping subunit contacts in the regulatory complex of the 26 S proteasome. S2 and S5b form a tetramer with ATPase subunits S4 and S7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbea, C; Taillandier, D; Rechsteiner, M

    2000-01-14

    The 19 S regulatory complex (RC) of the 26 S proteasome is composed of at least 18 different subunits, including six ATPases that form specific pairs S4-S7, S6-S8, and S6'-S10b in vitro. One of the largest regulatory complex subunits, S2, was translated in reticulocyte lysate containing [(35)S]methionine and used to probe membranes containing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separated RC subunits. S2 bound to two ATPases, S4 and S7. Association of S2 with regulatory complex subunits was also assayed by co-translation and sedimentation. S2 formed an immunoprecipitable heterotrimer upon co-translation with S4 and S7. The non-ATPase S5b also formed a ternary complex with S4 and S7 and the three proteins assembled into a tetramer with S2. Neither S2 nor S5b formed complexes with S6'-S10b dimers or with S6-S8 oligomers. The use of chimeric ATPases demonstrated that S2 binds the NH(2)-terminal region of S4 and the COOH-terminal two-thirds of S7. Conversely, S5b binds the COOH-terminal two-thirds of S4 and to S7's NH(2)-terminal region. The demonstrated association of S2 with ATPases in the mammalian 19 S regulatory complex is consistent with and extends the recent finding that the yeast RC is composed of two subcomplexes, the lid and the base (Glickman, M. H., Rubin, D. M., Coux, O., Wefes, I., Pfeifer, G., Cejka, Z., Baumeister, W., Fried, V. A., and Finley, D. (1998) Cell 94, 615-623).

  5. Levels of complexity in pathogen recognition by C-type lectins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambi, A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    In pathogen recognition by C-type lectins, several levels of complexity can be distinguished; these might modulate the immune response in different ways. Firstly, the pathogen-associated molecular pattern repertoire expressed at the microbial surface determines the interactions with specific recepto

  6. The origin recognition complex links replication, sister chromatid cohesion and transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suter, Bernhard; Tong, Amy; Chang, Michael; Yu, Lisa; Brown, Grant W; Boone, Charles; Rine, Jasper

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the origin recognition complex (ORC) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affect initiation of DNA replication and transcriptional repression at the silent mating-type loci. To explore the function of ORC in more detail, a screen for genetic interactions was undertaken using large

  7. HIC1 interacts with a specific subunit of SWI/SNF complexes, ARID1A/BAF250A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor [CNRS UMR 8161, Institut de Biologie de LILLE, Universite de Lille Nord de FRANCE, Institut PASTEUR de LILLE, IFR 142, 1 Rue Calmette, 59017 LILLE Cedex (France); Leprince, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.leprince@ibl.fr [CNRS UMR 8161, Institut de Biologie de LILLE, Universite de Lille Nord de FRANCE, Institut PASTEUR de LILLE, IFR 142, 1 Rue Calmette, 59017 LILLE Cedex (France)

    2009-08-07

    HIC1, a tumor suppressor gene epigenetically silenced in many human cancers encodes a transcriptional repressor involved in regulatory loops modulating p53-dependent and E2F1-dependent cell survival and stress responses. HIC1 is also implicated in growth control since it recruits BRG1, one of the two alternative ATPases (BRM or BRG1) of SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes to repress transcription of E2F1 in quiescent fibroblasts. Here, through yeast two-hybrid screening, we identify ARID1A/BAF250A, as a new HIC1 partner. ARID1A/BAF250A is one of the two mutually exclusive ARID1-containing subunits of SWI/SNF complexes which define subsets of complexes endowed with anti-proliferative properties. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in WI38 fibroblasts and in BRG1-/- SW13 cells showed that endogenous HIC1 and ARID1A proteins interact in a BRG1-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HIC1 does not interact with BRM. Finally, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-reChIP) experiments demonstrated that HIC1 represses E2F1 through the recruitment of anti-proliferative SWI/SNF complexes containing ARID1A.

  8. Molecular recognition using corona phase complexes made of synthetic polymers adsorbed on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingqing; Landry, Markita P; Barone, Paul W; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lin, Shangchao; Ulissi, Zachary W; Lin, Dahua; Mu, Bin; Boghossian, Ardemis A; Hilmer, Andrew J; Rwei, Alina; Hinckley, Allison C; Kruss, Sebastian; Shandell, Mia A; Nair, Nitish; Blake, Steven; Şen, Fatih; Şen, Selda; Croy, Robert G; Li, Deyu; Yum, Kyungsuk; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Jin, Hong; Heller, Daniel A; Essigmann, John M; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Understanding molecular recognition is of fundamental importance in applications such as therapeutics, chemical catalysis and sensor design. The most common recognition motifs involve biological macromolecules such as antibodies and aptamers. The key to biorecognition consists of a unique three-dimensional structure formed by a folded and constrained bioheteropolymer that creates a binding pocket, or an interface, able to recognize a specific molecule. Here, we show that synthetic heteropolymers, once constrained onto a single-walled carbon nanotube by chemical adsorption, also form a new corona phase that exhibits highly selective recognition for specific molecules. To prove the generality of this phenomenon, we report three examples of heteropolymer-nanotube recognition complexes for riboflavin, L-thyroxine and oestradiol. In each case, the recognition was predicted using a two-dimensional thermodynamic model of surface interactions in which the dissociation constants can be tuned by perturbing the chemical structure of the heteropolymer. Moreover, these complexes can be used as new types of spatiotemporal sensors based on modulation of the carbon nanotube photoemission in the near-infrared, as we show by tracking riboflavin diffusion in murine macrophages.

  9. The p25 Subunit of the Dynactin Complex is Required for Dynein-Early Endosome Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    dynein–early endosome interaction in the filamen- tous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. In filamentous fungi , dynein and its regulators are important for...backbone of the dynactin complex, and its loss leads to a disruption of the whole complex. In Drosoph- ila and in filamentous fungi such as N. crassa...how the motor is targeted to these cargoes is still a topic under investigation. In filamentous fungi and higher eukaryotic cells such as neurons

  10. The acid-labile subunit of the ternary insulin-like growth factor complex in cirrhosis: relation to liver dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Juul, A; Becker, U;

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In the circulation, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is bound in a trimeric complex of 150 kDa with IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and the acid-labile subunit (ALS). Whereas circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 are reported to be low in patients with chronic liver failure, the level...... of ALS has not been described in relation to hepatic dysfunction. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure circulating and hepatic venous concentrations of ALS in relation to hepatic function and the IGF axis. METHODS: Twenty-five patients with cirrhosis (Child class A/B/C:5/10/10) and 30...... controls with normal liver function were studied. During a haemodynamic investigation, blood samples were collected from the hepatic vein and femoral artery, and the plasma concentrations of ALS, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were determined. RESULTS: Hepatic venous and arterial concentrations of ALS were...

  11. The Eukaryotic Mismatch Recognition Complexes Track with the Replisome during DNA Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna E Haye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During replication, mismatch repair proteins recognize and repair mispaired bases that escape the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase. In this work, we tested the model that the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex tracks with the advancing replisome. Using yeast, we examined the dynamics during replication of the leading strand polymerase Polε using Pol2 and the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex using Msh2, the invariant protein involved in mismatch recognition. Specifically, we synchronized cells and processed samples using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with custom DNA tiling arrays (ChIP-chip. The Polε signal was not detectable in G1, but was observed at active origins and replicating DNA throughout S-phase. The Polε signal provided the resolution to track origin firing timing and efficiencies as well as replisome progression rates. By detecting Polε and Msh2 dynamics within the same strain, we established that the mismatch recognition complex binds origins and spreads to adjacent regions with the replisome. In mismatch repair defective PCNA mutants, we observed that Msh2 binds to regions of replicating DNA, but the distribution and dynamics are altered, suggesting that PCNA is not the sole determinant for the mismatch recognition complex association with replicating regions, but may influence the dynamics of movement. Using biochemical and genomic methods, we provide evidence that both MutS complexes are in the vicinity of the replisome to efficiently repair the entire spectrum of mutations during replication. Our data supports the model that the proximity of MutSα/β to the replisome for the efficient repair of the newly synthesized strand before chromatin reassembles.

  12. Artificial Neural Network for the Prediction of Tyrosine-Based Sorting Signal Recognition by Adaptor Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debarati Mukherjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sorting of transmembrane proteins to various intracellular compartments depends on specific signals present within their cytosolic domains. Among these sorting signals, the tyrosine-based motif (YXXØ is one of the best characterized and is recognized by μ-subunits of the four clathrin-associated adaptor complexes (AP-1 to AP-4. Despite their overlap in specificity, each μ-subunit has a distinct sequence preference dependent on the nature of the X-residues. Moreover, combinations of these residues exert cooperative or inhibitory effects towards interaction with the various APs. This complexity makes it impossible to predict a priori, the specificity of a given tyrosine-signal for a particular μ-subunit. Here, we describe the results obtained with a computational approach based on the Artificial Neural Network (ANN paradigm that addresses the issue of tyrosine-signal specificity, enabling the prediction of YXXØ-μ interactions with accuracies over 90%. Therefore, this approach constitutes a powerful tool to help predict mechanisms of intracellular protein sorting.

  13. Cryo-EM structure of the archaeal 50S ribosomal subunit in complex with initiation factor 6 and implications for ribosome evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greber, Basil J; Boehringer, Daniel; Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka

    2012-01-01

    Translation of mRNA into proteins by the ribosome is universally conserved in all cellular life. The composition and complexity of the translation machinery differ markedly between the three domains of life. Organisms from the domain Archaea show an intermediate level of complexity, sharing several...... additional components of the translation machinery with eukaryotes that are absent in bacteria. One of these translation factors is initiation factor 6 (IF6), which associates with the large ribosomal subunit. We have reconstructed the 50S ribosomal subunit from the archaeon Methanothermobacter...... thermautotrophicus in complex with archaeal IF6 at 6.6 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy (EM). The structure provides detailed architectural insights into the 50S ribosomal subunit from a methanogenic archaeon through identification of the rRNA expansion segments and ribosomal proteins that are shared...

  14. Characterization and alternative splicing of the complex I 19-kD subunit in Dunaliella salina: expression and mutual correlation of splice variants under diverse stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Jin, Nan; Xu, Hui; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Wei Hua; Li, Xin Ran; Qiao, Dai Rong; Cao, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Complex I is the first enzyme in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. It extracts energy from NADH, which is produced by the oxidation of sugars and fats, and traps the energy by virtue of a potential difference or voltage across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Herein, the genomic sequence and four splice variants encoding the complex I 19-kD subunit were isolated from Dunaliella salina. There were four transcripts coding for the complex I 19-kD subunit due to alternative splicing in algae, and the four transcripts were translated to two protein isoforms with varying C-terminals. We report the splicing pattern in the 3'-region of the D. salina 19-kD subunit, in which three of the exons (5, 6, and 7) could be alternatively spliced. Moreover, we found that four alternatively spliced variants were subject to coordinated transcription in response to different stresses by real-time quantitative PCR.

  15. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  16. A method of automatic recognition of airport in complex environment from remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiwei; Ni, Guoqiang; Guo, Pan; Chen, Xiaomei; Tang, Yi

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, a new method is proposed for airport recognition in complex environments. The algorithm takes all advantages of essential characteristics of the airport target. Structural characteristics of the airport are used to establish assumption process. Improved Hough transformation (HT) is used to check out those right straight-lines which stand for actual position and direction of runways. Morphological processing is used to remove road segments and isolated points. Finally, we combine these segments carefully to describe the whole airport area, and then our automatic recognition of airport target is realized.

  17. Binding energies of nucleobase complexes: Relevance to homology recognition of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Sergio Cruz; Prentiss, Mara; Fyta, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The binding energies of complexes of DNA nucleobase pairs are evaluated using quantum mechanical calculations at the level of dispersion corrected density functional theory. We begin with Watson-Crick base pairs of singlets, duplets, and triplets and calculate their binding energies. At a second step, mismatches are incorporated into the Watson-Crick complexes in order to evaluate the variation in the binding energy with respect to the canonical Watson-Crick pairs. A linear variation of this binding energy with the degree of mismatching is observed. The binding energies for the duplets and triplets containing mismatches are further compared to the energies of the respective singlets in order to assess the degree of collectivity in these complexes. This study also suggests that mismatches do not considerably affect the energetics of canonical base pairs. Our work is highly relevant to the recognition process in DNA promoted through the RecA protein and suggests a clear distinction between recognition in singlets, and recognition in duplets or triplets. Our work assesses the importance of collectivity in the homology recognition of DNA.

  18. A novel mtDNA mutation in the ND5 subunit of complex I in two MELAS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, P; Antozzi, C; Carrara, F; D'Incerti, L; Lamantea, E; Tiranti, V; Zeviani, M

    2001-01-01

    We identified a novel heteroplasmic mutation in the mitochodrial DNA gene encoding the ND5 subunit of complex I. This mutation (13514A-->G) hits the same codon affected by a previously reported mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes (MELAS)-associated mutation (13513G-->A), but the amino acid replacement is different (D393G vs D393N). The 13514A-->G mutation was found in two unrelated MELAS-like patients. However, in contrast to typical MELAS, lactic acidosis was absent or mild and the muscle biopsy was morphologically normal. Strongly positive correlation between the percentage of heteroplasmy and defective activity of complex I was found in cybrids. We found an additional 13513G-->A-positive case, affected by a progressive mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. Our results clearly demonstrate that the amino acid position D393 is crucial for the function of complex I. Search for D393 mutations should be part of the routine screening for mitochondrial disorders.

  19. Crystal structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane subunit reveals another twist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna; Gourdon, Pontus; Horsefield, Rob; Brive, Lars; Yamamoto, Natsuko; Mori, Hirotada; Snijder, Arjan; Neutze, Richard

    2007-12-01

    Bacterial drug resistance is a serious concern for human health. Multidrug efflux pumps export a broad variety of substrates out of the cell and thereby convey resistance to the host. In Escherichia coli, the AcrB:AcrA:TolC efflux complex forms a principal transporter for which structures of the individual component proteins have been determined in isolation. Here, we present the X-ray structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane protein, assigned by mass spectrometry as YajC. A specific rotation of the periplasmic porter domain of AcrB is also revealed, consistent with the hypothesized "twist-to-open" mechanism for TolC activation. Growth experiments with yajc-deleted E. coli reveal a modest increase in the organism's susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics, but this effect could not conclusively be attributed to the loss of interactions between YajC and AcrB.

  20. A heterotrimer model of the complete Microprocessor complex revealed by single-molecule subunit counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Kristina M; Sarkar, Susanta K; Mills, Maria; Delgado De la Herran, Hilda C; Neuman, Keir C; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-02-01

    During microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, the Microprocessor complex (MC), composed minimally of Drosha, an RNaseIII enzyme, and DGCR8, a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, cleaves the primary-miRNA (pri-miRNA) to release the pre-miRNA stem-loop structure. Size-exclusion chromatography of the MC, isolated from mammalian cells, suggested multiple copies of one or both proteins in the complex. However, the exact stoichiometry was unknown. Initial experiments suggested that DGCR8 bound pri-miRNA substrates specifically, and given that Drosha could not be bound or cross-linked to RNA, a sequential model for binding was established in which DGCR8 bound first and recruited Drosha. Therefore, many laboratories have studied DGCR8 binding to RNA in the absence of Drosha and have shown that deletion constructs of DGCR8 can multimerize in the presence of RNA. More recently, it was demonstrated that Drosha can bind pri-miRNA substrates in the absence of DGCR8, casting doubt on the sequential model of binding. In the same study, using a single-molecule photobleaching assay, fluorescent protein-tagged deletion constructs of DGCR8 and Drosha assembled into a heterotrimeric complex on RNA, comprising two DGCR8 molecules and one Drosha molecule. To determine the stoichiometry of Drosha and DGCR8 within the MC in the absence of added RNA, we also used a single-molecule photobleaching assay and confirmed the heterotrimeric model of the human MC. We demonstrate that a heterotrimeric complex is likely preformed in the absence of RNA and exists even when full-length proteins are expressed and purified from human cells, and when hAGT-derived tags are used rather than fluorescent proteins.

  1. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunit16 Is a Key Component of Basal Resistance against the Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Yao, Jin; Du, Xuezhu; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Mou, Zhonglin

    2015-09-01

    Although Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a devastating necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen in agriculture, the virulence mechanisms utilized by S. sclerotiorum and the host defense mechanisms against this pathogen have not been fully understood. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mediator complex subunit MED16 is a key component of basal resistance against S. sclerotiorum. Mutants of MED16 are markedly more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than mutants of 13 other Mediator subunits, and med16 has a much stronger effect on S. sclerotiorum-induced transcriptome changes compared with med8, a mutation not altering susceptibility to S. sclerotiorum. Interestingly, med16 is also more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum than coronatine-insensitive1-1 (coi1-1), which is the most susceptible mutant reported so far. Although the jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) defense pathway marker gene PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) cannot be induced in either med16 or coi1-1, basal transcript levels of PDF1.2 in med16 are significantly lower than in coi1-1. Furthermore, ET-induced suppression of JA-activated wound responses is compromised in med16, suggesting a role for MED16 in JA-ET cross talk. Additionally, MED16 is required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to PDF1.2 and OCTADECANOID-RESPONSIVE ARABIDOPSIS ETHYLENE/ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE FACTOR59 (ORA59), two target genes of both JA/ET-mediated and the transcription factor WRKY33-activated defense pathways. Finally, MED16 is physically associated with WRKY33 in yeast and in planta, and WRKY33-activated transcription of PDF1.2 and ORA59 as well as resistance to S. sclerotiorum depends on MED16. Taken together, these results indicate that MED16 regulates resistance to S. sclerotiorum by governing both JA/ET-mediated and WRKY33-activated defense signaling in Arabidopsis.

  2. Metal-organic complex-functionalized protein nanopore sensor for aromatic amino acids chiral recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanli; Niu, Aihua; Jian, Feifei; Wang, Ying; Yao, Fujun; Wei, Yongfeng; Tian, Lei; Kang, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-27

    Chiral recognition at single-molecule level for small active molecules is important, as exhibited by many nanostructures and molecular assemblies in biological systems, but it presents a significant challenge. We report a simple and rapid sensing strategy to discriminate all enantiomers of natural aromatic amino acids (AAA) using a metal-organic complex-functionalized protein nanopore, in which a chiral recognition element and a chiral recognition valve were equipped. A trifunctional molecule, heptakis-(6-deoxy-6-amino)-β-cyclodextrin (am7βCD), was non-covalently lodged within the nanopore of an α-hemolysin (αHL) mutant, (M113R)7-αHL. Copper(ii) ion reversibly bonds to the amino group of am7βCD to form an am7βCD-Cu(II) complex, which allowed chiral recognition for each enantiomer in the mixture of AAA by distinct current signals. The Cu(II) plugging valve plays a crucial rule that holds chiral molecules in the nanocavity for a sufficient registering time. Importantly, six enantiomers of all nature AAA could be simultaneously recognized at one time. Enantiomeric excess (ee) could also be accurately detected by this approach. It should be possible to generalize this approach for sensing of other chiral molecules.

  3. Mutations in Two Genes Encoding Different Subunits of a Receptor Signaling Complex Result in an Identical Disease Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloneva, Juha; Manninen, Tuula; Christman, Grant; Hovanes, Karine; Mandelin, Jami; Adolfsson, Rolf; Bianchin, Marino; Bird, Thomas; Miranda, Roxana; Salmaggi, Andrea; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Konttinen, Yrjö; Peltonen, Leena

    2002-01-01

    Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (PLOSL), also known as “Nasu-Hakola disease,” is a globally distributed recessively inherited disease leading to death during the 5th decade of life and is characterized by early-onset progressive dementia and bone cysts. Elsewhere, we have identified PLOSL mutations in TYROBP (DAP12), which codes for a membrane receptor component in natural-killer and myeloid cells, and also have identified genetic heterogeneity in PLOSL, with some patients carrying no mutations in TYROBP. Here we complete the molecular pathology of PLOSL by identifying TREM2 as the second PLOSL gene. TREM2 forms a receptor signaling complex with TYROBP and triggers activation of the immune responses in macrophages and dendritic cells. Patients with PLOSL have no defects in cell-mediated immunity, suggesting a remarkable capacity of the human immune system to compensate for the inactive TYROBP-mediated activation pathway. Our data imply that the TYROBP-mediated signaling pathway plays a significant role in human brain and bone tissue and provide an interesting example of how mutations in two different subunits of a multisubunit receptor complex result in an identical human disease phenotype. PMID:12080485

  4. Actin related protein complex subunit 1b controls sperm release, barrier integrity and cell division during adult rat spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita; Dumasia, Kushaan; Deshpande, Sharvari; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, N H

    2016-08-01

    Actin remodeling is a vital process for signaling, movement and survival in all cells. In the testes, extensive actin reorganization occurs at spermatid-Sertoli cell junctions during sperm release (spermiation) and at inter Sertoli cell junctions during restructuring of the blood testis barrier (BTB). During spermiation, tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs), rich in branched actin networks, ensure recycling of spermatid-Sertoli cell junctional molecules. Similar recycling occurs during BTB restructuring around the same time as spermiation occurs. Actin related protein 2/3 complex is an essential actin nucleation and branching protein. One of its subunits, Arpc1b, was earlier found to be down-regulated in an estrogen-induced rat model of spermiation failure. Also, Arpc1b was found to be estrogen responsive through estrogen receptor beta in seminiferous tubule culture. Here, knockdown of Arpc1b by siRNA in adult rat testis led to defects in spermiation caused by failure in TBC formation. Knockdown also compromised BTB integrity and caused polarity defects of mature spermatids. Apart from these effects pertaining to Sertoli cells, Arpc1b reduction perturbed ability of germ cells to enter G2/M phase thus hindering cell division. In summary, Arpc1b, an estrogen responsive gene, is a regulator of spermiation, mature spermatid polarity, BTB integrity and cell division during adult spermatogenesis.

  5. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry of charge-reduced protein complexes reveals general trends in the collisional ejection of compact subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornschein, Russell E; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2015-10-21

    Multiprotein complexes have been shown to play critical roles across a wide range of cellular functions, but most probes of protein quaternary structure are limited in their ability to analyze complex mixtures and polydisperse structures using small amounts of total protein. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry offers a solution to many of these challenges, but relies upon gas-phase measurements of intact multiprotein complexes, subcomplexes, and subunits that correlate well with solution structures. The greatest bottleneck in such workflows is the generation of representative subcomplexes and subunits. Collisional activation of complexes can act to produce product ions reflective of protein complex composition, but such product ions are typically challenging to interpret in terms of their relationship to solution structure due to their typically string-like conformations following activation and subsequent dissociation. Here, we used ion-ion chemistry to perform a broad survey of the gas-phase dissociation of charge-reduced protein complex ions, revealing general trends associated with the collisional ejection of compact, rather than unfolded, protein subunits. Furthermore, we also discover peptide and co-factor dissociation channels that dominate the product ion populations generated for such charge reduced complexes. We assess both sets of observations and discuss general principles that can be extended to the analysis of protein complex ions having unknown structures.

  6. Enhanced retinal modeling for face recognition and facial feature point detection under complex illumination conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Li, Zuoyong; Jiao, Liangbao; Lu, Hong; Cao, Xuehong

    2016-07-01

    We improved classic retinal modeling to alleviate the adverse effect of complex illumination on face recognition and extracted robust image features. Our improvements on classic retinal modeling included three aspects. First, a combined filtering scheme was applied to simulate functions of horizontal and amacrine cells for accurate local illumination estimation. Second, we developed an optimal threshold method for illumination classification. Finally, we proposed an adaptive factor acquisition model based on the arctangent function. Experimental results on the combined Yale B; the Carnegie Mellon University poses, illumination, and expression; and the Labeled Face Parts in the Wild databases show that the proposed method can effectively alleviate illumination difference of images under complex illumination conditions, which is helpful for improving the accuracy of face recognition and that of facial feature point detection.

  7. CIF-1, a Shared Subunit of the COP9/Signalosome and Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 3 Complexes, Regulates MEL-26 Levels in the Caenorhabditis elegans Embryo▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke-Glaser, Sarah; Roy, Marcia; Larsen, Brett; Le Bihan, Thierry; Metalnikov, Pavel; Tyers, Mike; Peter, Matthias; Pintard, Lionel

    2007-01-01

    The COP9/signalosome (CSN) is an evolutionarily conserved macromolecular complex that regulates the cullin-RING ligase (CRL) class of E3 ubiquitin ligases, primarily by removing the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 from the cullin subunit. In the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo, the CSN controls the degradation of the microtubule-severing protein MEI-1 through CUL-3 deneddylation. However, the molecular mechanisms of CSN function and its subunit composition remain to be elucidated. Here, using a proteomic approach, we have characterized the CSN and CUL-3 complexes from C. elegans embryos. We show that the CSN physically interacts with the CUL-3-based CRL and regulates its activity by counteracting the autocatalytic instability of the substrate-specific adaptor MEL-26. Importantly, we identified the uncharacterized protein K08F11.3/CIF-1 (for CSN-eukaryotic initiation factor 3 [eIF3]) as a stoichiometric and functionally important subunit of the CSN complex. CIF-1 appears to be the only ortholog of Csn7 encoded by the C. elegans genome, but it also exhibits extensive sequence similarity to eIF3m family members, which are required for the initiation of protein translation. Indeed, CIF-1 binds eIF-3.F and inactivation of cif-1 impairs translation in vivo. Taken together, our results indicate that CIF-1 is a shared subunit of the CSN and eIF3 complexes and may therefore link protein translation and degradation. PMID:17403899

  8. CIF-1, a shared subunit of the COP9/signalosome and eukaryotic initiation factor 3 complexes, regulates MEL-26 levels in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke-Glaser, Sarah; Roy, Marcia; Larsen, Brett; Le Bihan, Thierry; Metalnikov, Pavel; Tyers, Mike; Peter, Matthias; Pintard, Lionel

    2007-06-01

    The COP9/signalosome (CSN) is an evolutionarily conserved macromolecular complex that regulates the cullin-RING ligase (CRL) class of E3 ubiquitin ligases, primarily by removing the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 from the cullin subunit. In the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo, the CSN controls the degradation of the microtubule-severing protein MEI-1 through CUL-3 deneddylation. However, the molecular mechanisms of CSN function and its subunit composition remain to be elucidated. Here, using a proteomic approach, we have characterized the CSN and CUL-3 complexes from C. elegans embryos. We show that the CSN physically interacts with the CUL-3-based CRL and regulates its activity by counteracting the autocatalytic instability of the substrate-specific adaptor MEL-26. Importantly, we identified the uncharacterized protein K08F11.3/CIF-1 (for CSN-eukaryotic initiation factor 3 [eIF3]) as a stoichiometric and functionally important subunit of the CSN complex. CIF-1 appears to be the only ortholog of Csn7 encoded by the C. elegans genome, but it also exhibits extensive sequence similarity to eIF3m family members, which are required for the initiation of protein translation. Indeed, CIF-1 binds eIF-3.F and inactivation of cif-1 impairs translation in vivo. Taken together, our results indicate that CIF-1 is a shared subunit of the CSN and eIF3 complexes and may therefore link protein translation and degradation.

  9. Compound inheritance of a low-frequency regulatory SNP and a rare null mutation in exon-junction complex subunit RBM8A causes TAR syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, C.A.; Paul, D.S.; Schulze, H.; Freson, K.; Stephens, J.C.; Smethurst, P.A.; Jolley, J.D.; Cvejic, A.; Kostadima, M.; Bertone, P.; Breuning, M.H.; Debili, N.; Deloukas, P.; Favier, R.; Fiedler, J.; Hobbs, C.M.; Huang, N.; Hurles, M.E.; Kiddle, G.; Krapels, I.; Nurden, P.; Ruivenkamp, C.A.; Sambrook, J.G.; Smith, K.; Stemple, D.L.; Strauss, G.; Thys, C.; Geet, C. van; Newbury-Ecob, R.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Ghevaert, C.

    2012-01-01

    The exon-junction complex (EJC) performs essential RNA processing tasks. Here, we describe the first human disorder, thrombocytopenia with absent radii (TAR), caused by deficiency in one of the four EJC subunits. Compound inheritance of a rare null allele and one of two low-frequency SNPs in the reg

  10. Role of post-translational modifications at the β-subunit ectodomain in complex association with a promiscuous plant P4-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Sara; Marek, Magdalena; Axelsen, Kristian Buhl

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases of subfamily IV (P4-ATPases) constitute a major group of phospholipid flippases that form heteromeric complexes with members of the Cdc50 (cell division control 50) protein family. Some P4-ATPases interact specifically with only one β-subunit isoform, whereas others are promiscuous...

  11. Rapid Purification and Characterization of Mutant Origin Recognition Complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hironori eKawakami; Eiji eOhashi; Toshiki eTsurimoto; Tsutomu eKatayama

    2016-01-01

    Purification of the origin recognition complex (ORC) from wild-type budding yeast cells more than two decades ago opened up doors to analyze the initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication biochemically. Although revised methods to purify ORC from overproducing cells were reported later, purification of mutant proteins using these systems still depends on time-consuming processes including genetic manipulation to construct and amplify mutant baculoviruses or yeast strains as well as ...

  12. Uncovering the stoichiometry of Pyrococcus furiosus RNase P, a multi-subunit catalytic ribonucleoprotein complex, by surface-induced dissociation and ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Lai, Lien B; Lai, Stella M; Tanimoto, Akiko; Foster, Mark P; Wysocki, Vicki H; Gopalan, Venkat

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate that surface-induced dissociation (SID) coupled with ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a powerful tool for determining the stoichiometry of a multi-subunit ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex assembled in a solution containing Mg(2+). We investigated Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RNase P, an archaeal RNP that catalyzes tRNA 5' maturation. Previous step-wise, Mg(2+)-dependent reconstitutions of Pfu RNase P with its catalytic RNA subunit and two interacting protein cofactor pairs (RPP21⋅RPP29 and POP5⋅RPP30) revealed functional RNP intermediates en route to the RNase P enzyme, but provided no information on subunit stoichiometry. Our native MS studies with the proteins showed RPP21⋅RPP29 and (POP5⋅RPP30)2 complexes, but indicated a 1:1 composition for all subunits when either one or both protein complexes bind the cognate RNA. These results highlight the utility of SID and IM-MS in resolving conformational heterogeneity and yielding insights on RNP assembly.

  13. Improved crystallization of Escherichia coli ATP synthase catalytic complex (F1) by introducing a phosphomimetic mutation in subunit ε.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ankoor; Hutcheon, Marcus L; Duncan, Thomas M; Cingolani, Gino

    2012-10-01

    The bacterial ATP synthase (F(O)F(1)) of Escherichia coli has been the prominent model system for genetics, biochemical and more recently single-molecule studies on F-type ATP synthases. With 22 total polypeptide chains (total mass of ∼529 kDa), E. coli F(O)F(1) represents nature's smallest rotary motor, composed of a membrane-embedded proton transporter (F(O)) and a peripheral catalytic complex (F(1)). The ATPase activity of isolated F(1) is fully expressed by the α(3)β(3)γ 'core', whereas single δ and ε subunits are required for structural and functional coupling of E. coli F(1) to F(O). In contrast to mitochondrial F(1)-ATPases that have been determined to atomic resolution, the bacterial homologues have proven very difficult to crystallize. In this paper, we describe a biochemical strategy that led us to improve the crystallogenesis of the E. coli F(1)-ATPase catalytic core. Destabilizing the compact conformation of ε's C-terminal domain with a phosphomimetic mutation (εS65D) dramatically increased crystallization success and reproducibility, yielding crystals of E. coli F(1) that diffract to ∼3.15 Å resolution.

  14. hELP3 Subunit of the Elongator Complex Regulates the Transcription of HSP70 Gene in Human Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuju HAN; Xiaozhe HOU; Dongmei SU; Lina PAN; Jizhou DUAN; Liguo CUI; Baiqu HUANG; Jun LU

    2007-01-01

    The human Elongator complex is remarkably similar to its yeast counterpart in several aspects.In a previous study, we analyzed the functions of the human elongation protein 3 (hELP3) subunit of the human Elongator by using an in vivo yeast complementation system. However, direct evidence for hELP3 functions in regulating gene expression in human cells was not obtained. In this study, we used hELP3 antisense oligonucleotide inhibitors to knock down hELP3 gene expression to investigate its function in human 293T cells. The results showed that specific reduction of hELP3 mRNA and protein caused a significant suppression of HSP70-2 gene expression, and this was accompanied by histone H3 hypoacetylation and decreased RNA polymerase Ⅱ density at the HSP70-2 gene. Moreover, the data also showed that hELP3 exerted the transcriptional regulatory function directly through its presence on the HSP70-2 gene. Data presented in this report provide further insight and direct evidence of the functions of hELP3 in HSP70-2 gene transcriptional elongation in human cells.

  15. Translation initiation factor (iso) 4E interacts with BTF3, the beta subunit of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Miguel Angel

    2005-01-31

    A two-hybrid screen with the translation initiation factor, eIF(iso)4E from Arabidopsis, identified a clone encoding a lipoxygenase type 2 [Freire, M.A., et al., 2000. Plant lipoxygenase 2 is a translation initiation factor-4E-binding protein. Plant Molecular Biology 44, 129-140], and three cDNA clones encoding the homologue of the mammalian BTF3 factor, the beta subunit of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC). Here we report on the interaction between the translation initiation factor eIF(iso)4E and AtBTF3. AtBTF3 protein is able to interact with the wheat initiation factors eIF4E and eIF(iso)4E. AtBTF3 contains a sequence related to the prototypic motif found on most of the 4E-binding proteins, and competes with the translation initiation factor eIF(iso)4G for eIF4(iso)4E binding, in a two hybrid interference assay. These findings provide a molecular link between the translation initiation mechanism and the emergence of the nascent polypeptide chains.

  16. Recognition of amino acids and anions by a Zn(Ⅱ)-methylazacalix[4]pyridine complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    As a powerful macrocyclic host molecule with unique conformation and cavity structure that are fine-tuned by the bridging nitrogen atoms, methylazacalix[4]pyridine (MACP-4) has been shown to selectively recognize Zn2+ and form stable Zn(Ⅱ)-MACP-4 complexes both in solid state and solution with an association constant up to 5.97 (logKs). The molecular recognition of Zn(Ⅱ)-MACP-4 complexes towards various amino acids and anions with different geometry was investigated by using the spectral titration methods and X-ray analysis. The Zn(Ⅱ)-MACP-4 complex was found to recognize the 17 amino acids tested with the association constant up to 3.97 (logKs). On the other hand, the Zn(Ⅱ)-MACP-4 complex selectively interacted with anions and the maximum association constant of 3.9 (logKs) was obtained.

  17. Characterization of heterosubunit complexes formed by the R1 and R2 subunits of herpes simplex virus 1 and equine herpes virus 4 ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Conner, J

    2000-04-01

    We report on the separate PCR cloning and subsequent expression and purification of the large (R1) and small (R2) subunits from equine herpes virus type 4 (EHV-4) ribonucleotide reductase. The EHV-4 R1 and R2 subunits reconstituted an active enzyme and their abilities to complement the R1 and R2 subunits from the closely related herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ribonucleotide reductase, with the use of subunit interaction and enzyme activity assays, were analysed. Both EHV-4 R1/HSV-1 R2 and HSV-1 R1/EHV-4 R2 were able to assemble heterosubunit complexes but, surprisingly, neither of these complexes was fully active in enzyme activity assays; the EHV-4 R1/HSV-1 R2 and HSV-1 R1/EHV-4 R2 enzymes had 50% and 5% of their respective wild-type activities. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to alter two non-conserved residues located within the highly conserved and functionally important C-termini of the EHV-4 and HSV-1 R1 proteins. Mutation of Pro-737 to Lys and Lys-1084 to Pro in EHV-4 and HSV-1 R1 respectively had no effects on subunit assembly. Mutation of Pro-737 to Lys in EHV-4 R1 decreased enzyme activity by 50%; replacement of Lys-1084 by Pro in HSV-1 R1 had no effect on enzyme activity. Both alterations failed to restore full enzyme activities to the heterosubunit enzymes. Therefore probably neither of these amino acids has a direct role in catalysis. However, mutation of the highly conserved Tyr-1111 to Phe in HSV-1 R1 inactivated enzyme activity without affecting subunit interaction.

  18. Hybrid Genetic Algorithm Based Optimization of Coupled HMM for Complex Interacting Processes Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jianghua(刘江华); Chen Jiapin; Cheng Junshi

    2004-01-01

    Coupled Hidden Markov Model (CHMM) is the extension of traditional HMM, which is mainly used for complex interactive process modeling such as two-hand gestures. However, the problems of finding optimal model parameter are still of great interest to the researches in this area. This paper proposes a hybrid genetic algorithm (HGA) for the CHMM training. Chaos is used to initialize GA and used as mutation operator. Experiments on Chinese TaiChi gestures show that standard GA (SGA) based CHMM training is superior to Maximum Likelihood (ML) HMM training. HGA approach has the highest recognition rate of 98.0769%, then 96.1538% for SGA. The last one is ML method, only with a recognition rate of 69.2308%.

  19. P2-36: Spatial Frequency Characteristics of Chinese Character Recognition in Different Complexity Categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    On-Ting Lo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Human visual system is able to recognize objects in large complexity variation. Despite such capability, little is known about the effects of complexity on object recognition. Here we studied the spatial frequency (SF characteristics in identifying Chinese characters (CCs of different complexity levels. Method: Stimuli were 150 frequently used CCs categorized into 3 complexity groups. Each character was digitally band-passed by 11 cosine log filters (bandwidth = 2 octaves, center frequency = 1.27 to 12.8 cycles/character in 0.1 log step. We measured contrast sensitivity for recognizing CCs of sizes 0.5°, 1°, and 2°. Peak SF (cycles/deg and bandwidth (octaves were plotted against character size in nominal character frequency (cycles/deg. A CSF ideal observer model (Chung et al., 2002 Vision Research 42 2137–2152 was formulated to examine whether early CSF filtering followed by template matching could explain human performance. Results: Log-log slopes of peak SF vs. size functions were 0.60±0.04 (M±SD, 0.67±0.02, and 0.72±0.05 for the low, medium, and high complexity groups. Bandwidth of the tuning functions was approximately 2 octaves for all complexity groups. Preliminary results from the CSF ideal observer analysis showed shallower slopes for the peak SF vs. size functions, but a similar trend for the bandwidth data compared with human performance. Conclusions: Peak SF of the tuning function did not scale perfectly with character size (log-log slopes < 1. The SF characteristics of CC recognition exhibited size-dependence, which differed across complexity groups. The ideal observer model utilizing human CSF and character-identity information failed to explain our data.

  20. A Robust and Low-Complexity Gas Recognition Technique for On-Chip Tin-Oxide Gas Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Flitti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas recognition is a new emerging research area with many civil, military, and industrial applications. The success of any gas recognition system depends on its computational complexity and its robustness. In this work, we propose a new low-complexity recognition method which is tested and successfully validated for tin-oxide gas sensor array chip. The recognition system is based on a vector angle similarity measure between the query gas and the representatives of the different gas classes. The latter are obtained using a clustering algorithm based on the same measure within the training data set. Experimented results on our in-house gas sensors array show more than 98% of correct recognition. The robustness of the proposed method is tested by recognizing gas measurements with simulated drift. Less than 1% of performance degradation is noted at the worst case scenario which represents a significant improvement when compared to the current state-of-the-art.

  1. Mono-nuclear copper complexes mimicking the intermediates for the binuclear copper center of the subunit II of cytochrome oxidase: a peptide based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta Gupta, Dwaipayan; Usharani, Dandamudi; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2016-11-28

    Three stable copper complexes of peptides derived from the copper ion binding loop of the subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase have been prepared and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. These stable copper complexes of peptides were found to exhibit cysteine, histidine and/or methionine ligation, which has predominant σ-contribution in the Cys-Cu charge transfer. The copper(ii) peptide complexes showed type-2 EPR spectra, which is uncommon in copper-cysteinate complexes. UV-visible spectra, Raman and EPR results support a tetragonal structure of the coordination geometry around the copper ion. The copper complex of the 9-amino acid peptide suggested the formation of a 'red' copper center while the copper complexes of the 12- and 11-amino acid peptides showed the formation of a 'green' copper center. The results provide insights on the first stable models of the copper complexes formed in the peptide scaffold that mimic the mono-nuclear copper bound protein intermediates proposed during the formation of the binuclear Cu2S2 core of the enzyme. These three copper complexes of peptides derived from the metal ion binding loop of the CuA center of the subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase showed novel spectroscopic properties which have not so far been reported in any stable small complex.

  2. The role of the CNOT1 subunit of the CCR4-NOT complex in mRNA deadenylation and cell viability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kentaro Ito; Akinori Takahashi; Masahiro Morita; Toru Suzuki; Tadashi Yamamoto

    2011-01-01

    The human CCR4-NOT deadenylase complex consists of at least nine enzymatic and non-enzymatic subunits.Accumulating evidence suggests that the non-enzymatic subunits are involved in the regulation of mRNA deadenylation,although their precise roles remain to be established.In this study,we addressed the function of the CNOT1 subunit by depleting its expression in HeLa cells.Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the sub G1 fraction was increased in CNOT1-depleted cells.Virtually,the same level of the sub G1 fraction was seen when cells were treated with a mixture of siRNAs targeted against all enzymatic subunits,suggesting that CNOT1 depletion induces apoptosis by destroying the CCR4-NOT-associated deadenylase activity.Further analysis revealed that CNOT1 depletion leads to a reduction in the amount of other CCR4-NOT subunits.Importantly,the specific activity of the CNOT6L immunoprecipitates-associated deadenylase from CNOT1-depleted cells was less than that from control cells.The formation of P-bodies,where mRNA decay is reported to take place,was largely suppressed in CNOT1-depleted cells.Therefore,CNOT1 has an important role in exhibiting enzymatic activity of the CCR4-NOT complex,and thus is critical in control of mRNA deadenylation and mRNA decay.We further showed that CNOT1 depletion enhanced CHOP mRNA levels and activated caspase-4,which is associated with endoplasmic reticulum ER stress-induced apoptosie.Taken together,CNOT1 depletion structurally and functionally deteriorates the CCR4-NOT complex and induces stabilization of mRNAs,which results in the increment of translation causing ER stress-mediated apoptosie.We conclude that CNOT1 contributes to cell viability by securing the activity of the CCR4-NOT deadenylase.

  3. The complex I subunit NDUFA10 selectively rescues Drosophila pink1 mutants through a mechanism independent of mitophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Pogson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in PINK1, a mitochondrially targeted serine/threonine kinase, cause autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD. Substantial evidence indicates that PINK1 acts with another PD gene, parkin, to regulate mitochondrial morphology and mitophagy. However, loss of PINK1 also causes complex I (CI deficiency, and has recently been suggested to regulate CI through phosphorylation of NDUFA10/ND42 subunit. To further explore the mechanisms by which PINK1 and Parkin influence mitochondrial integrity, we conducted a screen in Drosophila cells for genes that either phenocopy or suppress mitochondrial hyperfusion caused by pink1 RNAi. Among the genes recovered from this screen was ND42. In Drosophila pink1 mutants, transgenic overexpression of ND42 or its co-chaperone sicily was sufficient to restore CI activity and partially rescue several phenotypes including flight and climbing deficits and mitochondrial disruption in flight muscles. Here, the restoration of CI activity and partial rescue of locomotion does not appear to have a specific requirement for phosphorylation of ND42 at Ser-250. In contrast to pink1 mutants, overexpression of ND42 or sicily failed to rescue any Drosophila parkin mutant phenotypes. We also find that knockdown of the human homologue, NDUFA10, only minimally affecting CCCP-induced mitophagy, and overexpression of NDUFA10 fails to restore Parkin mitochondrial-translocation upon PINK1 loss. These results indicate that the in vivo rescue is due to restoring CI activity rather than promoting mitophagy. Our findings support the emerging view that PINK1 plays a role in regulating CI activity separate from its role with Parkin in mitophagy.

  4. Hand region extraction and gesture recognition from video stream with complex background through entropy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JongShill; Lee, YoungJoo; Lee, EungHyuk; Hong, SeungHong

    2004-01-01

    Hand gesture recognition utilizing image processing relies upon recognition through markers or hand extraction by colors, and therefore is heavily restricted by the colors of clothes or skin. We propose a method to recognize band gestures extracted from images with a complex background for a more natural interface in HCI (human computer interaction). The proposed method obtains the image by subtracting one image from another sequential image, measures the entropy, separates hand region from images, tracks the hand region and recognizes hand gestures. Through entropy measurement, we have color information that has near distribution in complexion for regions that have big values and extracted hand region from input images. We could draw the hand region adaptively in variable lighting or individual differences because entropy offers color information as well as motion information at the same time. The detected contour using chain code for the hand region is extracted, and present centroidal profile method that is improved little more and recognized gesture of hand. In the experimental results for 6 kinds of hand gesture, it shows the recognition rate with more than 95% for person and 90-100% for each gesture at 5 frames/sec.

  5. Structural basis for recognition and remodeling of the TBP:DNA:NC2 complex by Mot1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butryn, Agata; Schuller, Jan M; Stoehr, Gabriele; Runge-Wollmann, Petra; Förster, Friedrich|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412516438; Auble, David T; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Swi2/Snf2 ATPases remodel substrates such as nucleosomes and transcription complexes to control a wide range of DNA-associated processes, but detailed structural information on the ATP-dependent remodeling reactions is largely absent. The single subunit remodeler Mot1 (modifier of transcription 1)

  6. Colorimetric and luminescent bifunctional iridium(III) complexes for the sensitive recognition of cyanide ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiudan; Wang, Huili; Li, Jing; Hu, Wenqin; Li, Mei-Jin

    2017-02-01

    Two new cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes [(ppy)2Irppz]Cl (1) and [(ppy)2Irbppz]Cl (2) (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, ppz = 4,7-phenanthrolino-5,6:5,6-pyrazine, bppz = 2.3-di-2-pyridylpyrazine), were designed and synthesized. The structure of [(ppy)2Irppz]Cl was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Their photophysical properties were also studied. This kind of complexes could coordinate with Cu2 +, the photoluminescence (PL) of the complex was quenched, and the color changed from orange-red to green. The forming M-Cu (M: complexes 1 and 2) ensemble could be further utilized as a colorimetric and emission "turn-on" bifunctional detection for CN-, especially for complex 1-Cu2 + showed a high sensitivity toward CN- with a limit of diction is 97 nM. Importantly, this kind of iridium(III) complexes shows a unique recognition of cyanide ions over other anions which makes it an eligible sensing probe for cyanide ions.

  7. NdhP is an exclusive subunit of large complex of NADPH dehydrogenase essential to stabilize the complex in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingsong; Gao, Fudan; Zhao, Jiaohong; Ogawa, Teruo; Wang, Quanxi; Ma, Weimin

    2014-07-04

    Two major complexes of NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) have been identified in cyanobacteria. A large complex (NDH-1L) contains NdhD1 and NdhF1, which are absent in a medium size complex (NDH-1M). They play important roles in respiration, cyclic electron transport around photosystem I, and CO2 acquisition. Two mutants sensitive to high light for growth and impaired in NDH-1-mediated cyclic electron transfer were isolated from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 transformed with a transposon-bearing library. Both mutants had a tag in sml0013 encoding NdhP, a single transmembrane small subunit of the NDH-1 complex. During prolonged incubation of the wild type thylakoid membrane with n-dodecyl β-d-maltoside (DM), about half of the NDH-1L was disassembled to NDH-1M and the rest decomposed completely without forming NDH-1M. In the ndhP deletion mutant (ΔndhP), disassembling of NDH-1L to NDH-1M occurred even on ice, and decomposition to a small piece occurred at room temperature much faster than in the wild type. Deletion of the C-terminal tail of NdhP gave the same result. The C terminus of NdhP was tagged by YFP-His6. Blue native gel electrophoresis of the DM-treated thylakoid membrane of this strain and Western analysis using the antibody against GFP revealed that NdhP-YFP-His6 was exclusively confined to NDH-1L. During prolonged incubation of the thylakoid membrane of the tagged strain with DM at room temperature, NDH-1L was partially disassembled to NDH-1M and the 160-kDa band containing NdhP-YFP-His6 and possibly NdhD1 and NdhF1. We therefore conclude that NdhP, especially its C-terminal tail, is essential to assemble NdhD1 and NdhF1 and stabilize the NDH-1L complex. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Individual phases of contextual fear conditioning differentially modulate dorsal and ventral hippocampal GluA1-3, GluN1-containing receptor complexes and subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sase, Sunetra; Sase, Ajinkya; Sialana, Fernando J; Gröger, Marion; Bennett, Keiryn L; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2015-12-01

    In contextual fear conditioning (CFC), the use of pharmacological and lesion approaches has helped to understand that there are differential roles for the dorsal hippocampus (DH) and the ventral hippocampus (VH) in the acquisition, consolidation and retrieval phases. Concomitant analysis of the DH and the VH in individual phases with respect to α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subtype N1 (GluN1)-containing complexes (RCC) and subunits has not been reported so far. Herein, CFC was performed in mice that were euthanized at different time points. DH and VH samples were taken for the determination of RCC and subunit levels using BN- and SDS-PAGE, respectively, with subsequent Western blotting. Evaluation of spine densities, morphology, and immunohistochemistry of GluA1 and GluA2 was performed. In the acquisition phase levels of GluA1-RCC and subunits in VH were increased. In the consolidation phase GluA1- and GluA2-RCC levels were increased in DH and VH, while both receptor subunit levels were increased in the VH only. In the retrieval phase GluA1-RCC, subunits thereof and GluA2-RCC were increased in DH and VH, whereas GluA2 subunits were increased in the VH only. GluN1-RCC levels were increased in acquisition and consolidation phase, while subunit levels in the acquisition phase were increased only in the DH. The immunohistochemical studies in the individual phases in subareas of hippocampus supported immunochemical changes of GluA1 and GluA2 RCC's. Dendritic spine densities and the prevalence of thin spines in the acquisition phase of VH and mushroom spines in the retrieval phase of the VH and DH were increased. The findings from the current study suggest different receptor and receptor complex patterns in the individual phases in CFC and in DH and VH. The results propose that different RCCs are formed in the individual phases and that VH and DH may be involved in CFC.

  9. Metal complexes of chiral pentaazacrowns as conformational templates for β-turn recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaka, Andrea J. H.; Ho, Chris M. W.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2002-08-01

    Examples of reverse turns as recognition motifs in biological systems can be found in high-resolution crystal structures of antibody-peptide complexes. Development of peptidomimetics is often based on replacing the amide backbone of peptides by sugar rings, steroids, benzodiazepines, or other hetero- and carbocycles. In this approach, the chemical scaffold of the peptide backbone can be replaced while retaining activity as long as the pharmacophoric groups of the peptide side chains stay in relatively the same place; in other words, similar functional groups must overlap in space for interaction with critical receptor sites. This study evaluates the potential of metal complexes of chiral pentaazacrowns (PAC) derived by reduction of cyclic pentapeptides as β-turn mimetics. Due to the limited flexibility of the pendant chiral side groups in these metal complexes, one can potentially elicit information about the receptor-bound conformation from their binding affinities. 11 PAC crystal structures with different substitution patterns complexed with 3 different metals (Mn, Fe, Cd) as a prototypical database of potential side-chain orientations. Complexation with different metals induces subtle differences in the conformations of a particular azacrown scaffold. The lack of parameterization of transition metals for force field calculations precludes a thorough theoretical study. Thus, this study utilizes a simple geometrical comparison between the experimental data for crystalline PAC complexes and the side-chain orientations seen in classic β-turns. The FOUNDATION program was used to overlap the Cα-Cβ vectors of the corresponding ideal β-turn side-chains to all possible leaving groups of the PAC complexes. When comparing the relative orientations of the chiral side chains, a strong overlap of the bonds (between about 0.1 Å to about 0.5 Å RMS for 3 residues and up to about 1 Å RMS for 4 residues) was observed for many of the molecules. Such metal complexes may lack

  10. Metal complexes of chiral pentaazacrowns as conformational templates for beta-turn recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaka, Andrea J H; Ho, Chris M W; Marshall, Garland R

    2002-01-01

    Examples of reverse turns as recognition motifs in biological systems can be found in high-resolution crystal structures of antibody-peptide complexes. Development of peptidomimetics is often based on replacing the amide backbone of peptides by sugar rings, steroids, benzodiazepines, or other hetero- and carbocycles. In this approach, the chemical scaffold of the peptide backbone can be replaced while retaining activity as long as the pharmacophoric groups of the peptide side chains stay in relatively the same place; in other words, similar functional groups must overlap in space for interaction with critical receptor sites. This study evaluates the potential of metal complexes of chiral pentaazacrowns (PAC) derived by reduction of cyclic pentapeptides as beta-turn mimetics. Due to the limited flexibility of the pendant chiral side groups in these metal complexes, one can potentially elicit information about the receptor-bound conformation from their binding affinities. 11 PAC crystal structures with different substitution patterns complexed with 3 different metals (Mn, Fe, Cd) as a prototypical database of potential side-chain orientations. Complexation with different metals induces subtle differences in the conformations of a particular azacrown scaffold. The lack of parameterization of transition metals for force field calculations precludes a thorough theoretical study. Thus, this study utilizes a simple geometrical comparison between the experimental data for crystalline PAC complexes and the side-chain orientations seen in classic beta-turns. The FOUNDATION program was used to overlap the Calpha-Cbeta vectors of the corresponding ideal beta-turn side-chains to all possible leaving groups of the PAC complexes. When comparing the relative orientations of the chiral side chains, a strong overlap of the bonds (between about 0.1 A to about 0.5 A RMS for 3 residues and up to about 1 A RMS for 4 residues) was observed for many of the molecules. Such metal complexes

  11. Enantiomeric self-recognition in homo- and heterodinuclear macrocyclic lanthanide(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisowski, Jerzy

    2011-06-20

    The controlled formation of lanthanide(III) dinuclear μ-hydroxo-bridged [Ln(2)L(2)(μ-OH)(2)X(2)](n+) complexes (where X = H(2)O, NO(3)(-), or Cl(-)) of the enantiopure chiral macrocycle L is reported. The (1)H and (13)C NMR resonances of these complexes have been assigned on the basis of COSY, NOESY, TOCSY, and HMQC spectra. The observed NOE connectivities confirm that the dimeric solid-state structure is retained in solution. The enantiomeric nature of the obtained chiral complexes and binding of hydroxide anions are reflected in their CD spectra. The formation of the dimeric complexes is accompanied by a complete enantiomeric self-recognition of the chiral macrocyclic units. The reaction of NaOH with a mixture of two different mononuclear lanthanide(III) complexes, [Ln(1)L](3+) and [Ln(2)L](3+), results in formation of the heterodinuclear [Ln(1)Ln(2)L(2)(μ-OH)(2)X(2)](n+) complexes as well as the corresponding homodinuclear complexes. The formation of the heterodinuclear complex is directly confirmed by the NOESY spectra of [EuLuL(2)(μ-OH)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](4+), which reveal close contacts between the macrocyclic unit containing the Eu(III) ion and the macrocyclic unit containing the Lu(III) ion. While the relative amounts of homo- and heterodinuclear complexes are statistical for the two lanthanide(III) ions of similar radii, a clear preference for the formation of heterodinuclear species is observed when the two mononuclear complexes contain lanthanide(III) ions of markedly different sizes, e.g., La(III) and Yb(III). The formation of heterodinuclear complexes is accompanied by the self-sorting of the chiral macrocyclic units based on their chirality. The reactions of NaOH with a pair of homochiral or racemic mononuclear complexes, [Ln(1)L(RRRR)](3+)/[Ln(2)L(RRRR)](3+), [Ln(1)L(SSSS)](3+)/[Ln(2)L(SSSS)](3+), or [Ln(1)L(rac)](3+)/[Ln(2)L(rac)](3+), results in mixtures of homochiral, homodinuclear and homochiral, heterodinuclear complexes. On the contrary, no

  12. Rapamycin sensitivity of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe tor2 mutant and organization of two highly phosphorylated TOR complexes by specific and common subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Hatanaka, Mitsuko; Nagao, Koji; Nakaseko, Yukinobu; Kanoh, Junko; Kokubu, Aya; Ebe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2007-12-01

    Nutrients are essential for cell growth and division. Screening of Schizosaccharomyces pombe temperature-sensitive strains led to the isolation of a nutrient-insensitive mutant, tor2-287. This mutant produces a nitrogen starvation-induced arrest phenotype in rich media, fails to recover from the arrest, and is hypersensitive to rapamycin. The L2048S substitution mutation in the catalytic domain in close proximity to the adenine base of ATP is unique as it is the sole known genetic cause of rapamycin hypersensitivity. Localization of Tor2 was speckled in the vegetative cytoplasm, and both speckled and membranous in the arrested cell cytoplasm. Using mass spectroscopic analysis, we identified six subunits (Tco89, Bit61, Toc1, Tel2, Tti1 and Cka1) that, in addition to the six previously identified subunits (Tor1, Tor2, Mip1/Raptor, Ste20/Rictor, Sin1/Avo1 and Wat1/Lst8), comprise the TOR complexes (TORCs). All of the subunits so far examined are multiply phosphorylated. Tel2 bound to Tti1 interacts with various phosphatidyl inositol kinase (PIK)-related kinases including Tra1, Tra2 and Rad3, as well as Tor1 and Tor2. Schizosaccharomyces pombe TORCs should thus be functionally redundant and might be broadly regulated through different subunits that are either common or specific to the two TORCs, or even common to various PIK-related kinases. Functional redundancy of the TORCs may explain the rapamycin hypersensitivity of tor2-287.

  13. Task Phase Recognition for Highly Mobile Workers in Large Building Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stisen, Allan; Mathisen, Andreas; Krogh, Søren

    2016-01-01

    available for sensing and recognizing the activities and task phases the workers currently perform as such technologies have to be easily deployable and maintainable at a large scale. The methods presented in this paper consist of features that utilize data from sensing systems which are common in large......Being aware of activities of co-workers is a basic and vital mechanism for efficient work in highly distributed work settings. Thus, automatic recognition of the task phases the mobile workers are currently (or have been) in has many applications, e.g., efficient coordination of tasks...... by visualizing coworkers’ task progress, automatic notifications based on context awareness, and record filing of task statuses and completions. This paper presents methods to sense and detect highly mobile workers’ tasks phases in large building complexes. Large building complexes restrict the technologies...

  14. Unique and Interactive Associations Between Maltreatment and Complex Emotion Recognition Deficits and Psychopathic Traits in an Undergraduate Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Rebecca; McCabe, Hannah K; Dotterer, Hailey L; Neumann, Craig S; Hyde, Luke W

    2017-09-13

    Psychopathy is defined by affective and interpersonal deficits, deviant lifestyle, and antisocial behaviors. Poor recognition of emotions and childhood maltreatment are two risk factors implicated in psychopathy. The current study examined whether childhood maltreatment and complex emotion recognition deficits showed unique and interactive associations with psychopathic traits among 261 undergraduate students. Results indicate that maltreatment was related to higher general psychopathy scores within a bifactor model comprising a general psychopathy factor and four specific factors tapping underlying dimensions of psychopathy (i.e., affective, interpersonal, lifestyle, and antisocial). A significant interaction emerged whereby maltreatment was related to higher antisocial factor scores among individuals showing poor recognition of positive emotions. In an intriguing interaction, more maltreatment was related to lower interpersonal factor scores among individuals with low/mean levels of neutral emotion recognition. The interaction of positive emotion recognition deficits and maltreatment highlights a potential intervention target among antisocial individuals who have experienced maltreatment.

  15. Assembly of the adenosine triphosphatase complex in Escherichia coli: assembly of F0 is dependent on the formation of specific F1 subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G B; Downie, J A; Langman, L; Senior, A E; Ash, G; Fayle, D R; Gibson, F

    1981-10-01

    A strain of Escherichia coli (AN1007) carrying the polar uncD436 allele which affects the operon coding for the F1-F0 adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) complex was isolated and characterized. The uncD436 allele affected the two genes most distal to the operon promoter, i.e., uncD and uncC. Although the genes coding for the F0 portion of the ATPase complex were not affected in strains carrying this mutant allele, the lack of reconstitution of washed membranes by normal F1 ATPase suggested that a functional F0 might not be formed. This conclusion was supported by the observation that the 18,000-molecular-weight F0 subunit, coded for by the uncF gene, was absent from the membranes. Plasmid pAN36 (uncD+C+), when inserted into a strain carrying the uncD436 allele, resulted in the incorporation of the 18,000-molecular-weight F0 subunit into the membrane. A further series of experiments with Mu-induced polarity mutants, with and without plasmid pAN36, showed that the formation of both the alpha- and beta-subunits of F1 ATPase was an essential prerequisite to the incorporation into the membrane of the 18,000-molecular-weight F0 subunit and to the formation of a functional F0. Examination of the polypeptide composition of membranes from various unc mutants allowed a sequence for the normal assembly of the F1-F0 ATPase complex to be proposed.

  16. Functional Characterization of the Subunits N, H, J, and O of the NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Complexes in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhihui; Mi, Hualing

    2016-06-01

    The cyanobacterial NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes play crucial roles in variety of bioenergetic reactions such as respiration, CO2 uptake, and cyclic electron transport around PSI. Recently, substantial progress has been made in identifying the composition of subunits of NDH-1 complexes. However, the localization and the physiological roles of several subunits in cyanobacteria are not fully understood. Here, by constructing fully segregated ndhN, ndhO, ndhH, and ndhJ null mutants in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, we found that deletion of ndhN, ndhH, or ndhJ but not ndhO severely impaired the accumulation of the hydrophilic subunits of the NDH-1 in the thylakoid membrane, resulting in disassembly of NDH-1MS, NDH-1MS', as well as NDH-1L, finally causing the severe growth suppression phenotype. In contrast, deletion of NdhO affected the growth at pH 6.5 in air. In the cytoplasm, either NdhH or NdhJ deleted mutant, but neither NdhN nor NdhO deleted mutant, failed to accumulate the NDH-1 assembly intermediate consisting of NdhH, NdhJ, NdhK, and NdhM. Based on these results, we suggest that NdhN, NdhH, and NdhJ are essential for the stability and the activities of NDH-1 complexes, while NdhO for NDH-1 functions under the condition of inorganic carbon limitation in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. We discuss the roles of these subunits and propose a new NDH-1 model. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Mouse hippocampal GABAB1 but not GABAB2 subunit-containing receptor complex levels are paralleling retrieval in the multiple-T-maze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil eKeihan Falsafi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors known to be involved in learning and memory. Although a role for GABAB receptors in cognitive processes is evident, there is no information on hippocampal GABAB receptor complexes in a multiple T maze (MTM task, a robust paradigm for evaluation of spatial learning.Trained or untrained (yoked control C57BL/6J male mice (n=10/group were subjected to the MTM task and sacrificed 6 hours following their performance. Hippocampi were taken, membrane proteins extracted and run on blue native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies against GABAB1, GABAB1a and GABAB2. Immunoprecipitation with subsequent mass spectrometric identification of co-precipitates was carried out to show if GABAB1 and GABAB2 as well as other interacting proteins co-precipitate. An antibody shift assay (ASA and a proximity ligation assay (PLA were also used to see if the two GABAB subunits are present in the receptor complex.Single bands were observed on Western blots, each representing GABAB1, GABAB1a or GABAB2 at an apparent molecular weight of approximately 100 kDa. Subsequently, densitometric analysis revealed that levels of GABAB1 and GABAB1a but not GABAB2- containing receptor complexes were significantly higher in trained than untrained groups. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric studies confirmed the presence of GABAB1, GABAB2, calcium calmodulin kinases I and II, GluA1 and GluA2 as constituents of the complex. ASA and PLA also showed the presence of the two subunits of GABAB receptor within the complex. It is shown that increased levels of GABAB1 subunit-containing complexes are paralleling performance in a land maze.

  18. Inhibiting sperm pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and its E3 subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase affects fertilization in Syrian hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana B Siva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: The importance of sperm capacitation for mammalian fertilization has been confirmed in the present study via sperm metabolism. Involvement of the metabolic enzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc and its E3 subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD in hamster in vitro fertilization (IVF via in vitro sperm capacitation is being proposed through regulation of sperm intracellular lactate, pH and calcium. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Capacitated hamster spermatozoa were allowed to fertilize hamster oocytes in vitro which were then assessed for fertilization, microscopically. PDHc/DLD was inhibited by the use of the specific DLD-inhibitor, MICA (5-methoxyindole-2-carboxylic acid. Oocytes fertilized with MICA-treated (MT [and thus PDHc/DLD-inhibited] spermatozoa showed defective fertilization where 2nd polar body release and pronuclei formation were not observed. Defective fertilization was attributable to capacitation failure owing to high lactate and low intracellular pH and calcium in MT-spermatozoa during capacitation. Moreover, this defect could be overcome by alkalinizing spermatozoa, before fertilization. Increasing intracellular calcium in spermatozoa pre-IVF and in defectively-fertilized oocytes, post-fertilization rescued the arrest seen, suggesting the role of intracellular calcium from either of the gametes in fertilization. Parallel experiments carried out with control spermatozoa capacitated in medium with low extracellular pH or high lactate substantiated the necessity of optimal sperm intracellular lactate levels, intracellular pH and calcium during sperm capacitation, for proper fertilization. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the importance of pyruvate/lactate metabolism in capacitating spermatozoa for successful fertilization, besides revealing for the first time the importance of sperm PDHc/ DLD in fertilization, via the modulation of sperm intracellular lactate, pH and calcium during capacitation. In

  19. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta (CCT-eta is a specific regulator of fibroblast motility and contractility.

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    Latha Satish

    Full Text Available Integumentary wounds in mammalian fetuses heal without scar; this scarless wound healing is intrinsic to fetal tissues and is notable for absence of the contraction seen in postnatal (adult wounds. The precise molecular signals determining the scarless phenotype remain unclear. We have previously reported that the eta subunit of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide (CCT-eta is specifically reduced in healing fetal wounds in a rabbit model. In this study, we examine the role of CCT-eta in fibroblast motility and contractility, properties essential to wound healing and scar formation. We demonstrate that CCT-eta (but not CCT-beta is underexpressed in fetal fibroblasts compared to adult fibroblasts. An in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that adult fibroblasts showed increased cell migration in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF stimulation, whereas fetal fibroblasts were unresponsive. Downregulation of CCT-eta in adult fibroblasts with short inhibitory RNA (siRNA reduced cellular motility, both basal and growth factor-induced; in contrast, siRNA against CCT-beta had no such effect. Adult fibroblasts were more inherently contractile than fetal fibroblasts by cellular traction force microscopy; this contractility was increased by treatment with EGF and PDGF. CCT-eta siRNA inhibited the PDGF-induction of adult fibroblast contractility, whereas CCT-beta siRNA had no such effect. In each of these instances, the effect of downregulating CCT-eta was to modulate the behavior of adult fibroblasts so as to more closely approximate the characteristics of fetal fibroblasts. We next examined the effect of CCT-eta modulation on alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA expression, a gene product well known to play a critical role in adult wound healing. Fetal fibroblasts were found to constitutively express less alpha-SMA than adult cells. Reduction of CCT-eta with siRNA had minimal effect on cellular

  20. Inhibiting Sperm Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex and Its E3 Subunit, Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Affects Fertilization in Syrian Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailasree, Purnima; Singh, Durgesh K.; Kameshwari, Duvurri B.; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The importance of sperm capacitation for mammalian fertilization has been confirmed in the present study via sperm metabolism. Involvement of the metabolic enzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and its E3 subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) in hamster in vitro fertilization (IVF) via in vitro sperm capacitation is being proposed through regulation of sperm intracellular lactate, pH and calcium. Methodology and Principal Findings Capacitated hamster spermatozoa were allowed to fertilize hamster oocytes in vitro which were then assessed for fertilization, microscopically. PDHc/DLD was inhibited by the use of the specific DLD-inhibitor, MICA (5-methoxyindole-2-carboxylic acid). Oocytes fertilized with MICA-treated (MT) [and thus PDHc/DLD-inhibited] spermatozoa showed defective fertilization where 2nd polar body release and pronuclei formation were not observed. Defective fertilization was attributable to capacitation failure owing to high lactate and low intracellular pH and calcium in MT-spermatozoa during capacitation. Moreover, this defect could be overcome by alkalinizing spermatozoa, before fertilization. Increasing intracellular calcium in spermatozoa pre-IVF and in defectively-fertilized oocytes, post-fertilization rescued the arrest seen, suggesting the role of intracellular calcium from either of the gametes in fertilization. Parallel experiments carried out with control spermatozoa capacitated in medium with low extracellular pH or high lactate substantiated the necessity of optimal sperm intracellular lactate levels, intracellular pH and calcium during sperm capacitation, for proper fertilization. Conclusions This study confirms the importance of pyruvate/lactate metabolism in capacitating spermatozoa for successful fertilization, besides revealing for the first time the importance of sperm PDHc/ DLD in fertilization, via the modulation of sperm intracellular lactate, pH and calcium during capacitation. In addition, the

  1. Orc1 Binding to Mitotic Chromosomes Precedes Spatial Patterning during G1 Phase and Assembly of the Origin Recognition Complex in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Nihan; Hossain, Manzar; Prasanth, Supriya G; Stillman, Bruce

    2015-05-08

    Replication of eukaryotic chromosomes occurs once every cell division cycle in normal cells and is a tightly controlled process that ensures complete genome duplication. The origin recognition complex (ORC) plays a key role during the initiation of DNA replication. In human cells, the level of Orc1, the largest subunit of ORC, is regulated during the cell division cycle, and thus ORC is a dynamic complex. Upon S phase entry, Orc1 is ubiquitinated and targeted for destruction, with subsequent dissociation of ORC from chromosomes. Time lapse and live cell images of human cells expressing fluorescently tagged Orc1 show that Orc1 re-localizes to condensing chromatin during early mitosis and then displays different nuclear localization patterns at different times during G1 phase, remaining associated with late replicating regions of the genome in late G1 phase. The initial binding of Orc1 to mitotic chromosomes requires C-terminal amino acid sequences that are similar to mitotic chromosome-binding sequences in the transcriptional pioneer protein FOXA1. Depletion of Orc1 causes concomitant loss of the mini-chromosome maintenance (Mcm2-7) helicase proteins on chromatin. The data suggest that Orc1 acts as a nucleating center for ORC assembly and then pre-replication complex assembly by binding to mitotic chromosomes, followed by gradual removal from chromatin during the G1 phase.

  2. The FgNot3 Subunit of the Ccr4-Not Complex Regulates Vegetative Growth, Sporulation, and Virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc-Cuong Bui

    Full Text Available The Ccr4-Not complex is evolutionarily conserved and important for multiple cellular functions in eukaryotic cells. In this study, the biological roles of the FgNot3 subunit of this complex were investigated in the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. Deletion of FgNOT3 resulted in retarded vegetative growth, retarded spore germination, swollen hyphae, and hyper-branching. The ΔFgnot3 mutants also showed impaired sexual and asexual sporulation, decreased virulence, and reduced expression of genes related to conidiogenesis. Fgnot3 deletion mutants were sensitive to thermal stress, whereas NOT3 orthologs in other model eukaryotes are known to be required for cell wall integrity. We found that FgNot3 functions as a negative regulator of the production of secondary metabolites, including trichothecenes and zearalenone. Further functional characterization of other components of the Not module of the Ccr4-Not complex demonstrated that the module is conserved. Each subunit primarily functions within the context of a complex and might have distinct roles outside of the complex in F. graminearum. This is the first study to functionally characterize the Not module in filamentous fungi and provides novel insights into signal transduction pathways in fungal development.

  3. α7 and β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits Form Heteromeric Receptor Complexes that Are Expressed in the Human Cortex and Display Distinct Pharmacological Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Zwart, Ruud; Ursu, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    AChRs in the human brain. We validated these results by demonstrating co-purification of β2 from wild-type, but not α7 or β2 knock-out mice. The pharmacology and kinetics of human α7β2 nAChRs differed significantly from that of α7 homomers in response to nAChR agonists when expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293...... cells. Notably, α7β2 heteromers expressed in HEK293 cells display markedly slower rise and decay phases. These results demonstrate that α7 subunits in the human brain form heteromeric complexes with β2 subunits, and that human α7β2 nAChR heteromers respond to nAChR agonists with a unique pharmacology...

  4. Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1 (DEAF1 interacts with the Ku70 subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex.

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    Philip J Jensik

    Full Text Available Deformed Epidermal Autoregulatory Factor 1 (DEAF1 is a transcription factor linked to suicide, cancer, autoimmune disorders and neural tube defects. To better understand the role of DEAF1 in protein interaction networks, a GST-DEAF1 fusion protein was used to isolate interacting proteins in mammalian cell lysates, and the XRCC6 (Ku70 and the XRCC5 (Ku80 subunits of DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK complex were identified by mass spectrometry, and the DNA-PK catalytic subunit was identified by immunoblotting. Interaction of DEAF1 with Ku70 and Ku80 was confirmed to occur within cells by co-immunoprecipitation of epitope-tagged proteins, and was mediated through interaction with the Ku70 subunit. Using in vitro GST-pulldowns, interaction between DEAF1 and the Ku70 subunit was mapped to the DEAF1 DNA binding domain and the C-terminal Bax-binding region of Ku70. In transfected cells, DEAF1 and Ku70 colocalized to the nucleus, but Ku70 could not relocalize a mutant cytoplasmic form of DEAF1 to the nucleus. Using an in vitro kinase assay, DEAF1 was phosphorylated by DNA-PK in a DNA-independent manner. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that DEAF1 or Ku70/Ku80 did not interfere with the DNA binding of each other, but DNA containing DEAF1 binding sites inhibited the DEAF1-Ku70 interaction. The data demonstrates that DEAF1 can interact with the DNA-PK complex through interactions of its DNA binding domain with the carboxy-terminal region of Ku70 that contains the Bax binding domain, and that DEAF1 is a potential substrate for DNA-PK.

  5. Robust Automatic Speech Recognition Features using Complex Wavelet Packet Transform Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjong Wan Sen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To improve the performance of phoneme based Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR in noisy environment; we developed a new technique that could add robustness to clean phonemes features. These robust features are obtained from Complex Wavelet Packet Transform (CWPT coefficients. Since the CWPT coefficients represent all different frequency bands of the input signal, decomposing the input signal into complete CWPT tree would also cover all frequencies involved in recognition process. For time overlapping signals with different frequency contents, e. g. phoneme signal with noises, its CWPT coefficients are the combination of CWPT coefficients of phoneme signal and CWPT coefficients of noises. The CWPT coefficients of phonemes signal would be changed according to frequency components contained in noises. Since the numbers of phonemes in every language are relatively small (limited and already well known, one could easily derive principal component vectors from clean training dataset using Principal Component Analysis (PCA. These principal component vectors could be used then to add robustness and minimize noises effects in testing phase. Simulation results, using Alpha Numeric 4 (AN4 from Carnegie Mellon University and NOISEX-92 examples from Rice University, showed that this new technique could be used as features extractor that improves the robustness of phoneme based ASR systems in various adverse noisy conditions and still preserves the performance in clean environments.

  6. Robust Automatic Speech Recognition Features using Complex Wavelet Packet Transform Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TjongWan Sen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve the performance of phoneme based Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR in noisy environment; we developed a new technique that could add robustness to clean phonemes features. These robust features are obtained from Complex Wavelet Packet Transform (CWPT coefficients. Since the CWPT coefficients represent all different frequency bands of the input signal, decomposing the input signal into complete CWPT tree would also cover all frequencies involved in recognition process. For time overlapping signals with different frequency contents, e. g. phoneme signal with noises, its CWPT coefficients are the combination of CWPT coefficients of phoneme signal and CWPT coefficients of noises. The CWPT coefficients of phonemes signal would be changed according to frequency components contained in noises. Since the numbers of phonemes in every language are relatively small (limited and already well known, one could easily derive principal component vectors from clean training dataset using Principal Component Analysis (PCA. These principal component vectors could be used then to add robustness and minimize noises effects in testing phase. Simulation results, using Alpha Numeric 4 (AN4 from Carnegie Mellon University and NOISEX-92 examples from Rice University, showed that this new technique could be used as features extractor that improves the robustness of phoneme based ASR systems in various adverse noisy conditions and still preserves the performance in clean environments.

  7. Tracking a Subset of Skeleton Joints: An Effective Approach towards Complex Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Latif Anjum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a robust algorithm for complex human activity recognition for natural human-robot interaction. The algorithm is based on tracking the position of selected joints in human skeleton. For any given activity, only a few skeleton joints are involved in performing the activity, so a subset of joints contributing the most towards the activity is selected. Our approach of tracking a subset of skeleton joints (instead of tracking the whole skeleton is computationally efficient and provides better recognition accuracy. We have developed both manual and automatic approaches for the selection of these joints. The position of the selected joints is tracked for the duration of the activity and is used to construct feature vectors for each activity. Once the feature vectors have been constructed, we use a Support Vector Machines (SVM multiclass classifier for training and testing the algorithm. The algorithm has been tested on a purposely built dataset of depth videos recorded using Kinect camera. The dataset consists of 250 videos of 10 different activities being performed by different users. Experimental results show classification accuracy of 83% when tracking all skeleton joints, 95% when using manual selection of subset joints, and 89% when using automatic selection of subset joints.

  8. Plant root exudates mediate neighbour recognition and trigger complex behavioural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semchenko, Marina; Saar, Sirgi; Lepik, Anu

    2014-11-01

    Some plant species are able to distinguish between neighbours of different genetic identity and attempt to pre-empt resources through root proliferation in the presence of unrelated competitors, but avoid competition with kin. However, studies on neighbour recognition have met with some scepticism because the mechanisms by which plants identify their neighbours have remained unclear. In order to test whether root exudates could mediate neighbour recognition in plants, we performed a glasshouse experiment in which plants of Deschampsia caespitosa were subjected to root exudates collected from potential neighbours of different genetic identities, including siblings and individuals belonging to the same or a different population or species. Our results show that root exudates can carry specific information about the genetic relatedness, population origin and species identity of neighbours, and trigger different responses at the whole root system level and at the level of individual roots in direct contact with locally applied exudates. Increased root density was mainly achieved through changes in morphology rather than biomass allocation, suggesting that plants are able to limit the energetic cost of selfish behaviour. This study reveals a new level of complexity in the ability of plants to interpret and react to their surroundings.

  9. Biosensor analysis of dynamics of interleukin 5 receptor subunit beta(c) interaction with IL5:IL5R(alpha) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scibek, Jeffery J; Evergren, Emma; Zahn, Stefan; Canziani, Gabriela A; Van Ryk, Donald; Chaiken, Irwin M

    2002-08-15

    To gain insight into IL5 receptor subunit recruitment mechanism, and in particular the experimentally elusive pathway for assembly of signaling subunit beta(c), we constructed a soluble beta(c) ectodomain (s(beta)(c)) and developed an optical biosensor assay to measure its binding kinetics. Functionally active s(beta)(c) was anchored via a C-terminal His tag to immobilized anti-His monoclonal antibodies on the sensor surface. Using this surface, we quantitated for the first time direct binding of s(beta)(c) to IL5R(alpha) complexed to either wild-type or single-chain IL5. Binding was much weaker if at all with either R(alpha) or IL5 alone. Kinetic evaluation revealed a moderate affinity (0.2-1 microM) and relatively fast off rate for the s(beta)(c) interaction with IL5:R(alpha) complexes. The data support a model in which beta(c) recruitment occurs with preformed IL5:R(alpha) complex. Dissociation kinetics analysis suggests that the IL5-alpha-beta(c) complex is relatively short-lived. Overall, this study solidifies a model of sequential recruitment of receptor subunits by IL5, provides a novel biosensor binding assay of beta(c) recruitment dynamics, and sets the stage for more advanced characterization of the roles of structural elements within R(alpha), beta(c), and cytokines of the IL5/IL3/GM-CSF family in receptor recruitment and activation.

  10. Pattern recognition in high-resolution electron microscopy of complex materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niermann, Tore; Thiel, Karsten; Seibt, Michael

    2006-12-01

    Structural features like defects or heterointerfaces in crystals or amorphous phases give rise to different local patterns in high-resolution electron micrographs or object wave functions. Pattern recognition techniques can be used to identify these typical patterns that constitute the image itself, as was already demonstrated for compositional changes in isostructural heterostructures, where the patterns within unit cells of the lattice were analyzed. To extend such analyses to more complex materials, we examined patterns in small circular areas centered on intensity maxima of the image. Nonsupervised clustering, namely, Ward's clustering method, was applied to these patterns. In two examples, a highly defective ZnMnTe layer on GaAs and a tunnel magneto resistance device, we demonstrate how typical patterns are identified by this method and how these results can be used for a further investigation of the microstructural properties of the sample.

  11. Effect of G-quadruplex polymorphism on the recognition of telomeric DNA by a metal complex.

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    Caterina Musetti

    Full Text Available The physiological role(s played by G-quadruplexes renders these 'non-canonical' DNA secondary structures interesting new targets for therapeutic intervention. In particular, the search for ligands for selective recognition and stabilization of G-quadruplex arrangements has led to a number of novel targeted agents. An interesting approach is represented by the use of metal-complexes, their binding to DNA being modulated by ligand and metal ion nature, and by complex stoichiometry. In this work we characterized thermodynamically and stereochemically the interactions of a Ni(II bis-phenanthroline derivative with telomeric G-quadruplex sequences using calorimetric, chiroptical and NMR techniques. We employed three strictly related sequences based on the human telomeric repeat, namely Tel22, Tel26 and wtTel26, which assume distinct conformations in potassium containing solutions. We were able to monitor specific enthalpy/entropy changes according to the structural features of the target telomeric sequence and to dissect the binding process into distinct events. Interestingly, temperature effects turned out to be prominent both in terms of binding stoichiometry and ΔH/ΔS contributions, while the final G-quadruplex-metal complex architecture tended to merge for the examined sequences. These results underline the critical choice of experimental conditions and DNA sequence for practical use of thermodynamic data in the rational development of effective G-quadruplex binders.

  12. Structural basis for the recognition of complex-type biantennary oligosaccharides by Pterocarpus angolensis lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buts, Lieven; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Imberty, Anne; Amiot, Nicolas; Boons, Geert-Jan; Beeckmans, Sonia; Versées, Wim; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy

    2006-06-01

    The crystal structure of Pterocarpus angolensis lectin is determined in its ligand-free state, in complex with the fucosylated biantennary complex type decasaccharide NA2F, and in complex with a series of smaller oligosaccharide constituents of NA2F. These results together with thermodynamic binding data indicate that the complete oligosaccharide binding site of the lectin consists of five subsites allowing the specific recognition of the pentasaccharide GlcNAc beta(1-2)Man alpha(1-3)[GlcNAc beta(1-2)Man alpha(1-6)]Man. The mannose on the 1-6 arm occupies the monosaccharide binding site while the GlcNAc residue on this arm occupies a subsite that is almost identical to that of concanavalin A (con A). The core mannose and the GlcNAc beta(1-2)Man moiety on the 1-3 arm on the other hand occupy a series of subsites distinct from those of con A.

  13. Colorimetric Humidity and Solvent Recognition Based on a Cation-Exchange Clay Mineral Incorporating Nickel(II)-Chelate Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Hitoshi; Mochida, Tomoyuki

    2015-12-01

    Solvatochromic nickel(II) complexes with diketonato and diamine ligands were incorporated into a saponite clay by ion exchange, and their colorimetric humidity- and solvent-recognition properties were investigated. These powders exhibit color change from red to blue-green depending on humidity, and the detection range can be controlled by modifying the metal complex. The humidity response takes advantage of the humidity-dependent water content in clay and the coordination of water molecules to the metal complex in equilibrium. The addition of organic solvents to the powders causes a color change to occur, varying from red to blue-green depending on the donor number of the solvent, thereby enabling solvent recognition. In the clay, the affinity of less sterically hindered complexes to water or solvent molecules is decreased compared with that in solution because the cationic complexes interact with the anionic layers in the clay. Incorporating diethylene glycol into the materials produced thermochromic powders.

  14. Role of the conserved arginine 274 and histidine 224 and 228 residues in the NuoCD subunit of complex I from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belevich, Galina; Euro, Liliya; Wikström, Mårten; Verkhovskaya, Marina

    2007-01-16

    The conserved arginine 274 and histidine 224 and 228 residues in subunit NuoCD of complex I from Escherichia coli were substituted for alanine. The wild-type and mutated NuoCD subunit was expressed on a plasmid in an E. coli strain bearing a nuoCD deletion. Complex I was fully expressed in the H224A and H228A mutants, whereas the R274A mutation yielded approximately 50% expression. Ubiquinone reductase activity of complex I was studied in membranes and with purified enzyme and was 50% and 30% of the wild-type activity in the H224A and H228A mutants, respectively. The activity of R274A was less than 5% of the wild type in membranes but 20% in purified complex I. Rolliniastatin inhibited quinone reductase activity in the mutants with similar affinity as in the wild type, indicating that the quinone-binding site was not significantly altered by the mutations. Ubiquinone-dependent superoxide production by complex I was similar to the wild type in the R274A mutant but slightly higher in the H224A and H228A mutants. The EPR spectra of purified complex I from the H224A and H228A mutants did not differ from the wild type. In contrast, the signals of the N2 cluster and another fast-relaxing [4Fe-4S] cluster, tentatively assigned as N6b, were drastically decreased in the NADH-reduced R274A mutant enzyme but reappeared on further reduction with dithionite. These findings show that the redox potential of the N2 and N6b centers is shifted to more negative values by the R274A mutation. Purified complex I was reconstituted into liposomes, and electric potential was generated across the membrane upon NADH addition in all three mutant enzymes, suggesting that none of the mutations directly affect the proton-pumping machinery.

  15. The human Arp2/3 complex is composed of evolutionarily conserved subunits and is localized to cellular regions of dynamic actin filament assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M D; DePace, A H; Verma, S; Iwamatsu, A; Mitchison, T J

    1997-07-28

    The Arp2/3 protein complex has been implicated in the control of actin polymerization in cells. The human complex consists of seven subunits which include the actin related proteins Arp2 and Arp3, and five others referred to as p41-Arc, p34-Arc, p21-Arc, p20-Arc, and p16-Arc (p omplex). We have determined the predicted amino acid sequence of all seven subunits. Each has homologues in diverse eukaryotes, implying that the structure and function of the complex has been conserved through evolution. Human Arp2 and Arp3 are very similar to family members from other species. p41-Arc is a new member of the Sop2 family of WD (tryptophan and aspartate) repeat-containing proteins and may be posttranslationally modified, suggesting that it may be involved in regulating the activity and/or localization of the complex. p34-Arc, p21-Arc, p20-Arc, and p16-Arc define novel protein families. We sought to evaluate the function of the Arp2/3 complex in cells by determining its intracellular distribution. Arp3, p34-Arc, and p21-Arc were localized to the lamellipodia of stationary and locomoting fibroblasts, as well to Listeria monocytogenes assembled actin tails. They were not detected in cellular bundles of actin filaments. Taken together with the ability of the Arp2/3 complex to induce actin polymerization, these observations suggest that the complex promotes actin assembly in lamellipodia and may participate in lamellipodial protrusion.

  16. Multiple Levels of Recognition in Ants: A Feature of Complex Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2008-01-01

    diverse. In ants, social interactions are regulated by at least three levels of recognition. Nestmate recognition occurs between colonies, is very effective, and involves fast processing. Within a colony, division of labor is enhanced by recognition of different classes of individuals. Ultimately...

  17. NdhO, a subunit of NADPH dehydrogenase, destabilizes medium size complex of the enzyme in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiaohong; Gao, Fudan; Zhang, Jingsong; Ogawa, Teruo; Ma, Weimin

    2014-09-26

    Two mutants that grew faster than the wild-type (WT) strain under high light conditions were isolated from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 transformed with a transposon-bearing library. Both mutants had a tag in ssl1690 encoding NdhO. Deletion of ndhO increased the activity of NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1)-dependent cyclic electron transport around photosystem I (NDH-CET), while overexpression decreased the activity. Although deletion and overexpression of ndhO did not have significant effects on the amount of other subunits such as NdhH, NdhI, NdhK, and NdhM in the cells, the amount of these subunits in the medium size NDH-1 (NDH-1M) complex was higher in the ndhO-deletion mutant and much lower in the overexpression strain than in the WT. NdhO strongly interacts with NdhI and NdhK but not with other subunits. NdhI interacts with NdhK and the interaction was blocked by NdhO. The blocking may destabilize the NDH-1M complex and repress the NDH-CET activity. When cells were transferred from growth light to high light, the amounts of NdhI and NdhK increased without significant change in the amount of NdhO, thus decreasing the relative amount of NdhO. This might have decreased the blocking, thereby stabilizing the NDH-1M complex and increasing the NDH-CET activity under high light conditions. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. α7 and β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits Form Heteromeric Receptor Complexes that Are Expressed in the Human Cortex and Display Distinct Pharmacological Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Skøtt Thomsen

    Full Text Available The existence of α7β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs has recently been demonstrated in both the rodent and human brain. Since α7-containing nAChRs are promising drug targets for schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, it is critical to determine whether α7β2 nAChRs are present in the human brain, in which brain areas, and whether they differ functionally from α7 nAChR homomers. We used α-bungarotoxin to affinity purify α7-containing nAChRs from surgically excised human temporal cortex, and found that α7 subunits co-purify with β2 subunits, indicating the presence of α7β2 nAChRs in the human brain. We validated these results by demonstrating co-purification of β2 from wild-type, but not α7 or β2 knock-out mice. The pharmacology and kinetics of human α7β2 nAChRs differed significantly from that of α7 homomers in response to nAChR agonists when expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells. Notably, α7β2 heteromers expressed in HEK293 cells display markedly slower rise and decay phases. These results demonstrate that α7 subunits in the human brain form heteromeric complexes with β2 subunits, and that human α7β2 nAChR heteromers respond to nAChR agonists with a unique pharmacology and kinetic profile. α7β2 nAChRs thus represent an alternative mechanism for the reported clinical efficacy of α7 nAChR ligands.

  19. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Rustin, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.rustin@inserm.fr [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. {yields} Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. {yields} Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  20. Population structure of the Monocelis lineata (Proseriata, Monocelididae species complex assessed by phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase subunit I (COI gene

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    Daria Sanna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocelis lineata consists of a complex of sibling species, widespread in the Mediterranean and Atlantic Ocean. Previous genetic analysis placed in evidence at least four sibling species. Nevertheless, this research was not conclusive enough to fully resolve the complex or to infer the phylogeny/phylogeography of the group. We designed specific primers aiming at obtaining partial sequences of the mtDNA gene Cytochrome c Oxidase subunit I (COI of M. lineata, and have identified 25 different haplotypes in 32 analyzed individuals. The dendrogram generated by Neighbor-Joining analysis confirmed the differentiation between Atlantic and Mediterranean siblings, as well as the occurrence of at least two Mediterranean sibling species. Thus validated, the method here presented appears as a valuable tool in population genetics and biodiversity surveys on the Monocelis lineata complex.

  1. Disease-associated mutations in the HSPD1 gene encoding the large subunit of the mitochondrial HSP60/HSP10 chaperonin complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bross

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 forms together with heat shock protein 10 (HSP10 double-barrel chaperonin complexes that are essential for folding to the native state of proteins in the mitochondrial matrix space. Two extremely rare monogenic disorders have been described that are caused by missense mutations in the HSPD1 gene that encodes the HSP60 subunit of the HSP60/HSP10 chaperonin complex. Investigations of the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders have revealed that different degrees of reduced HSP60 function produce distinct neurological phenotypes. While mutations with deleterious or strong dominant negative effects are not compatible with life, HSPD1 gene variations found in the human population impair HSP60 function and depending on the mechanism and degree of HSP60 dys- and malfunction cause different phenotypes. We here summarize the knowledge on the effects of disturbances of the function of the HSP60/HSP10 chaperonin complex by disease-associated mutations.

  2. t-Darpp stimulates protein kinase A activity by forming a complex with its RI regulatory subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, Dirk; Geng, Shuhui; Denny, Erin C; Momand, Jamil; Kane, Susan E

    2017-09-01

    t-Darpp is the truncated form of the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32kDa (Darpp-32) and has been demonstrated to confer resistance to trastuzumab, a Her2-targeted anticancer agent, via sustained signaling through the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway and activation of protein kinase A (PKA). The mechanism of t-Darpp-mediated PKA activation is poorly understood. In the PKA holoenzyme, when the catalytic subunits are bound to regulatory subunits RI or RII, kinase activity is inhibited. We investigated PKA activity and holoenzyme composition in cell lines overexpressing t-Darpp (SK.tDp) or a T39A phosphorylation mutant (SK.tDp(T39A)), as well as an empty vector control cell line (SK.empty). We also evaluated protein-protein interactions between t-Darpp and PKA catalytic (PKAc) or regulatory subunits RI and RII in those cell lines. SK.tDp cells had elevated PKA activity and showed diminished association of RI with PKAc, whereas SK.tDp(T39A) cells did not have these properties. Moreover, wild type t-Darpp associates with RI. Concurrent expression of Darpp-32 reversed t-Darrp's effects on PKA holoenzyme state, consistent with earlier observations that Darpp-32 reverses t-Darpp's activation of PKA. Together, t-Darpp phosphorylation at T39 seems to be crucial for t-Darpp-mediated PKA activation and this activation appears to occur through an association with RI and sequestering of RI away from PKAc. The t-Darpp-RI interaction could be a druggable target to reduce PKA activity in drug-resistant cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural hierarchy controlling dimerization and target DNA recognition in the AHR transcriptional complex

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    Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Lee, Woojong; Jiang, Li; Molugu, Kaivalya; Zheng, Aiping; Li, Yitong; Park, Sanghyun; Bradfield, Christopher A.; Xing, Yongna (UW)

    2017-04-10

    he aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) belongs to the PAS (PER-ARNT-SIM) family transcription factors and mediates broad responses to numerous environmental pollutants and cellular metabolites, modulating diverse biological processes from adaptive metabolism, acute toxicity, to normal physiology of vascular and immune systems. The AHR forms a transcriptionally active heterodimer with ARNT (AHR nuclear translocator), which recognizes the dioxin response element (DRE) in the promoter of downstream genes. We determined the crystal structure of the mammalian AHR–ARNT heterodimer in complex with the DRE, in which ARNT curls around AHR into a highly intertwined asymmetric architecture, with extensive heterodimerization interfaces and AHR interdomain interactions. Specific recognition of the DRE is determined locally by the DNA-binding residues, which discriminates it from the closely related hypoxia response element (HRE), and is globally affected by the dimerization interfaces and interdomain interactions. Changes at the interdomain interactions caused either AHR constitutive nuclear localization or failure to translocate to nucleus, underlying an allosteric structural pathway for mediating ligand-induced exposure of nuclear localization signal. These observations, together with the global higher flexibility of the AHR PAS-A and its loosely packed structural elements, suggest a dynamic structural hierarchy for complex scenarios of AHR activation induced by its diverse ligands.

  4. Genetic and molecular requirements for function of the Pto/Prf effector recognition complex in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmuth, Alexi; Rathjen, John P

    2007-09-01

    The Pto gene of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) confers specific recognition of the unrelated bacterial effector proteins AvrPto and AvrPtoB. Pto resides in a constitutive molecular complex with the nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeats protein Prf. Prf is absolutely required for specific recognition of both effectors. Here, using stable transgenic lines, we show that expression of Pto from its genomic promoter in susceptible tomatoes was sufficient to complement recognition of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) bacteria expressing either avrPto or avrPtoB. Pto kinase activity was absolutely required for specific immunity. Expression of the Pto N-myristoylation mutant, pto(G2A), conferred recognition of Pst (avrPtoB), but not Pst (avrPto), although bacterial growth in these lines was intermediate between resistant and susceptible lines. Overexpression of pto(G2A) complemented recognition of avrPto. Transgenic tomato plants overexpressing wild-type Pto exhibited constitutive growth phenotypes, but these were absent in lines overexpressing pto(G2A). Therefore, Pto myristoylation is a quantitative factor for effector recognition in tomato, but is absolutely required for overexpression phenotypes. Native expression of Pto in the heterologous species Nicotiana benthamiana did not confer resistance to P. syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) expressing avrPto or avrPtoB, but recognition of both effectors was complemented by Prf co-expression. Thus, specific resistance conferred solely by Pto in N. benthamiana is an artefact of overexpression. Finally, pto(G2A) did not confer recognition of either avrPto or avrPtoB in N. benthamiana, regardless of the presence of Prf. Thus, co-expression of Prf in N. benthamiana complements many but not all aspects of normal Pto function.

  5. Subunit analysis of bovine heart complex I by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemma-Gray, Patrizia; Valusová, Eva; Carroll, Christopher A; Weintraub, Susan T; Musatov, Andrej; Robinson, Neal C

    2008-11-15

    An effective method was developed for isolation and analysis of bovine heart complex I subunits. The method uses C18 reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and a water/acetonitrile gradient containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. Employing this system, 36 of the 45 complex I subunits elute in 28 distinct chromatographic peaks. The 9 subunits that do not elute are B14.7, MLRQ, and the 7 mitochondrial-encoded subunits. The method, with ultraviolet (UV) detection, is suitable for either analytical (250 microg protein) applications. Subunits eluting in each chromatographic peak were initially determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) with subsequent positive identification by reversed-phase HPLC-electrospray ionization (ESI)/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis of tryptic digests. In the latter case, subunits were identified with a 99% probability using Mascot for database searching and Scaffold for assessment of protein identification probabilities. The reversed-phase HPLC subunit analysis method represents a major improvement over previous separation methods with respect to resolution, simplicity, and ease of application.

  6. The role of a conserved tyrosine in the 49-kDa subunit of complex I for ubiquinone binding and reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocilescu, Maja A; Fendel, Uta; Zwicker, Klaus; Dröse, Stefan; Kerscher, Stefan; Brandt, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Iron-sulfur cluster N2 of complex I (proton pumping NADH:quinone oxidoreductase) is the immediate electron donor to ubiquinone. At a distance of only approximately 7A in the 49-kDa subunit, a highly conserved tyrosine is found at the bottom of the previously characterized quinone binding pocket. To get insight into the function of this residue, we have exchanged it for six different amino acids in complex I from Yarrowia lipolytica. Mitochondrial membranes from all six mutants contained fully assembled complex I that exhibited very low dNADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase activities with n-decylubiquinone. With the most conservative exchange Y144F, no alteration in the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of complex I was detectable. Remarkably, high dNADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase activities were observed with ubiquinones Q1 and Q2 that were coupled to proton pumping. Apparent Km values for Q1 and Q2 were markedly increased and we found pronounced resistance to the complex I inhibitors decyl-quinazoline-amine (DQA) and rotenone. We conclude that Y144 directly binds the head group of ubiquinone, most likely via a hydrogen bond between the aromatic hydroxyl and the ubiquinone carbonyl. This places the substrate in an ideal distance to its electron donor iron-sulfur cluster N2 for efficient electron transfer during the catalytic cycle of complex I.

  7. Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of the p24/p22 subunit, DNC-3, is essential for the formation of the dynactin complex by bridging DNC-1/p150Glued and DNC-2/dynamitin

    OpenAIRE

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Toya, Mika; Motegi, Fumio; Mana, Miyeko; Nakamura, Kuniaki; Sugimoto, Asako

    2010-01-01

    Dynactin is a multisubunit protein complex required for the activity of cytoplasmic dynein. In Caenorhabditis elegans, although 10 of the 11 dynactin subunits were identified based on the sequence similarities to their orthologs, the p24/p22 subunit has not been detected in the genome. Here, we demonstrate that DNC-3 (W10G11.20) is the functional counterpart of the p24/p22 subunit in C. elegans. RNAi phenotypes and subcellular localization of DNC-3 in early C. elegans embryos were nearly iden...

  8. SWR1 Chromatin-Remodeling Complex Subunits and H2A.Z Have Non-overlapping Functions in Immunity and Gene Regulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriri, Souha; Gangappa, Sreeramaiah N; Kumar, S Vinod

    2016-07-06

    Incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z into nucleosomes by the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex is a critical step in eukaryotic gene regulation. In Arabidopsis, SWR1c and H2A.Z have been shown to control gene expression underlying development and environmental responses. Although they have been implicated in defense, the specific roles of the complex subunits and H2A.Z in immunity are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the roles of the SWR1c subunits, PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING1 (PIE1), ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN6 (ARP6), and SWR1 COMPLEX 6 (SWC6), as well as H2A.Z, in defense and gene regulation. We found that SWR1c components play different roles in resistance to different pathogens. Loss of PIE1 and SWC6 function as well as depletion of H2A.Z led to reduced basal resistance, while loss of ARP6 fucntion resulted in enhanced resistance. We found that mutations in PIE1 and SWC6 resulted in impaired effector-triggered immunity. Mutation in SWR1c components and H2A.Z also resulted in compromised jasmonic acid/ethylene-mediated immunity. Genome-wide expression analyses similarly reveal distinct roles for H2A.Z and SWR1c components in gene regulation, and suggest a potential role for PIE1 in the regulation of the cross talk between defense signaling pathways. Our data show that although they are part of the same complex, Arabidopsis SWR1c components could have non-redundant functions in plant immunity and gene regulation.

  9. Chirality recognition in the glycidol···propylene oxide complex: a rotational spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Javix; Sunahori, Fumie X; Borho, Nicole; Xu, Yunjie

    2011-04-11

    Chirality recognition in the hydrogen-bonded glycidol···propylene oxide complex has been studied by using rotational spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. An extensive conformational search has been performed for this binary adduct at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory and a total of 28 homo- and heterochiral conformers were identified. The eight binary conformers, built of the two dominant glycidol monomeric conformers, g-G+ and g+G-, were predicted to be the most stable ones. Jet-cooled rotational spectra of six out of the eight conformers were observed and unambiguously assigned for the first time. The experimental stability ordering has been obtained and compared with the ab initio predictions. The relative stability of the two dominant glycidol monomeric conformers is reversed in some cases when binding to propylene oxide. The contributions of monomeric energy, deformation energy, and binary intermolecular interaction energy to the relative stability of the binary conformers are discussed.

  10. Expression-invariant face recognition using depth and intensity dual-tree complex wavelet transform features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Fazael; Raie, Abolghasem A.; Hajati, Farshid

    2015-03-01

    A new multimodal expression-invariant face recognition method is proposed by extracting features of rigid and semirigid regions of the face which are less affected by facial expressions. Dual-tree complex wavelet transform is applied in one decomposition level to extract the desired feature from range and intensity images by transforming the regions into eight subimages, consisting of six band-pass subimages to represent face details and two low-pass subimages to represent face approximates. The support vector machine has been used to classify both feature fusion and score fusion modes. To test the algorithm, BU-3DFE and FRGC v2.0 datasets have been selected. The BU-3DFE dataset was tested by low intensity versus high intensity and high intensity versus low intensity strategies using all expressions in both training and testing stages in different levels. Findings include the best rank-1 identification rate of 99.8% and verification rate of 100% at a 0.1% false acceptance rate. The FRGC v2.0 was tested by the neutral versus non-neutral strategy, which applies images without expression in training and with expression in the testing stage, thereby achieving the best rank-1 identification rate of 93.5% and verification rate of 97.4% at a 0.1% false acceptance rate.

  11. An amide based dipodal Zn{sup 2+} complex for multications recognition: Nanomolar detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegade, Umesh [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, Maharashtra (India); School of Environmental and Earth Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, Maharashtra (India); Sharma, Hemant; Singh, Narinder [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Ropar, Rupanagar, Punjab (India); Ingle, Sopan; Attarde, Sanjay [School of Environmental and Earth Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, Maharashtra (India); Kuwar, Anil, E-mail: kuwaras@gmail.com [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-05-01

    An imine-linked dipodal Zn{sup 2+} complex has been synthesized and elevated its binding affinity towards library of metal ions (Cr{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Bi{sup 3+}). The recognition properties of receptor 4 were performed in DMSO/H{sub 2}O (50:50; v/v) and showed quenching upon interaction with Fe{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} ions. A photoinduced electron transfer (PET) is potential mechanism behind quenching. The coordination of such cations with the receptor 4 at amide part of carbonyl oxygen hindered the PET process and accordingly Turn-OFF the fluorescence of the receptor 4. The photophysical properties (fluorescence and absorption spectra) and density functional theory (DFT) clearly explains the binding mode between the receptor 4 and the detected cations. The selectivity and sensitivity of the receptor 4 for Fe{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} ions were acceptable and achieving a detection limit at the nano-molar level. - Highlights: • Zinc chemosensor Schiff base complex bearing carbonyl moieties was constructed through the selective assembly of a chemosensor. • Fluorescence spectra and density functional theory (DFT) clearly explains the binding mode between the receptor 4 and cations. • The 1:1 stoichiometry of the host guest relationship was realized from the Job's plot. • The selectivity and sensitivity of the receptor 4 for Fe{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} ions were acceptable and achieving a detection limit at the nanomolar level.

  12. Mutual Interplay between the Human Cytomegalovirus Terminase Subunits pUL51, pUL56, and pUL89 Promotes Terminase Complex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuber, Sebastian; Wagner, Karen; Goldner, Thomas; Lischka, Peter; Steinbrueck, Lars; Messerle, Martin; Borst, Eva Maria

    2017-06-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome encapsidation requires several essential viral proteins, among them pUL56, pUL89, and the recently described pUL51, which constitute the viral terminase. To gain insight into terminase complex assembly, we investigated interactions between the individual subunits. For analysis in the viral context, HCMV bacterial artificial chromosomes carrying deletions in the open reading frames encoding the terminase proteins were used. These experiments were complemented by transient-transfection assays with plasmids expressing the terminase components. We found that if one terminase protein was missing, the levels of the other terminase proteins were markedly diminished, which could be overcome by proteasome inhibition or providing the missing subunit in trans These data imply that sequestration of the individual subunits within the terminase complex protects them from proteasomal turnover. The finding that efficient interactions among the terminase proteins occurred only when all three were present together is reminiscent of a folding-upon-binding principle leading to cooperative stability. Furthermore, whereas pUL56 was translocated into the nucleus on its own, correct nuclear localization of pUL51 and pUL89 again required all three terminase constituents. Altogether, these features point to a model of the HCMV terminase as a multiprotein complex in which the three players regulate each other concerning stability, subcellular localization, and assembly into the functional tripartite holoenzyme.IMPORTANCE HCMV is a major risk factor in immunocompromised individuals, and congenital CMV infection is the leading viral cause for long-term sequelae, including deafness and mental retardation. The current treatment of CMV disease is based on drugs sharing the same mechanism, namely, inhibiting viral DNA replication, and often results in adverse side effects and the appearance of resistant virus strains. Recently, the HCMV terminase has emerged as

  13. Pivotal Role for a Tail Subunit of the RNA Polymerase II Mediator Complex CgMed2 in Azole Tolerance and Adherence in Candida glabrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Sapan; Shivarathri, Raju; Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Ferrari, Sélène; Sanglard, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal therapy failure can be associated with increased resistance to the employed antifungal agents. Candida glabrata, the second most common cause of invasive candidiasis, is intrinsically less susceptible to the azole class of antifungals and accounts for 15% of all Candida bloodstream infections. Here, we show that C. glabrata MED2 (CgMED2), which codes for a tail subunit of the RNA polymerase II Mediator complex, is required for resistance to azole antifungal drugs in C. glabrata. An inability to transcriptionally activate genes encoding a zinc finger transcriptional factor, CgPdr1, and multidrug efflux pump, CgCdr1, primarily contributes to the elevated susceptibility of the Cgmed2Δ mutant toward azole antifungals. We also report for the first time that the Cgmed2Δ mutant exhibits sensitivity to caspofungin, a constitutively activated protein kinase C-mediated cell wall integrity pathway, and elevated adherence to epithelial cells. The increased adherence of the Cgmed2Δ mutant was attributed to the elevated expression of the EPA1 and EPA7 genes. Further, our data demonstrate that CgMED2 is required for intracellular proliferation in human macrophages and modulates survival in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Lastly, we show an essential requirement for CgMed2, along with the Mediator middle subunit CgNut1 and the Mediator cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin subunit CgSrb8, for the high-level fluconazole resistance conferred by the hyperactive allele of CgPdr1. Together, our findings underscore a pivotal role for CgMed2 in basal tolerance and acquired resistance to azole antifungals. PMID:25070095

  14. Roles of subunit NuoL in the proton pumping coupling mechanism of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Madhavan; Sakyiama, Joseph A; Elguindy, Mahmoud M; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory complex I has an L-shaped structure formed by the hydrophilic arm responsible for electron transfer and the membrane arm that contains protons pumping machinery. Here, to gain mechanistic insights into the role of subunit NuoL, we investigated the effects of Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter inhibitor 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA) on proton pumping activities of various isolated NuoL mutant complex I after reconstitution into Escherichia coli double knockout (DKO) membrane vesicles lacking complex I and the NADH dehydrogenase type 2. We found that Mg(2+) was critical for proton pumping activity of complex I. At 2 µM Zn(2+), proton pumping of the wild-type was selectively inhibited without affecting electron transfer; no inhibition in proton pumping of D178N and D400A was observed, suggesting the involvement of these residues in Zn(2+) binding. Fifteen micromolar of EIPA caused up to ∼40% decrease in the proton pumping activity of the wild-type, D303A and D400A/E, whereas no significant change was detected in D178N, indicating its possible involvement in the EIPA binding. Furthermore, when menaquinone-rich DKO membranes were used, the proton pumping efficiency in the wild-type was decreased significantly (∼50%) compared with NuoL mutants strongly suggesting that NuoL is involved in the high efficiency pumping mechanism in complex I.

  15. Structural complexity of chemical recognition cues affects the perception of group membership in the ants Linephithema humile and Aphaenogaster cockerelli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Michael J; Gordon, Deborah M

    2007-03-01

    Hydrocarbon profiles on the cuticle of social insects act as multi-component recognition cues used to identify membership in a species, a colony or, within colonies, cues about its reproductive status or task group. To examine the role of structural complexity in ant hydrocarbon recognition cues, we studied the species recognition response of two ant species, Linepithema humile and Aphaenogaster cockerelli, and the recognition of conspecifics by L. humile. The cuticular hydrocarbons of ants are composed of molecules of varying chain lengths from three structural classes, n-alkanes, methyl-branched alkanes and n-alkenes. We employed species recognition bioassays that measured the aggressive response of both species of ants to mixtures of hydrocarbon classes, single structural classes of hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, methyl-branched alkanes and n-alkenes), and controls. The results showed that a combination of at least two hydrocarbon structural classes was necessary to elicit an aggressive species recognition response. Moreover, no single class of hydrocarbons was more important than the others in eliciting a response. Similarly, in the recognition of conspecifics, Linepithema humile did not respond to a mixture of n-alkane cuticular hydrocarbons presented alone, but supplementation of nestmate hydrocarbon profiles with the n-alkanes did elicit high levels of aggression. Thus both L. humile and A. cockerelli required mixtures of hydrocarbons of different structural classes to recognize species and colony membership. It appears that information on species and colony membership is not in isolated components of the profile, but instead in the mixture of structural classes found in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles.

  16. Adenosine A2 receptor activation ameliorates mitochondrial oxidative stress upon reperfusion through the posttranslational modification of NDUFV2 subunit of complex I in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingman; Bian, Xiyun; Liu, Yuan; Hong, Lan; Teng, Tianming; Sun, Yuemin; Xu, Zhelong

    2017-02-20

    While it is well known that adenosine receptor activation protects the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury, the precise mitochondrial mechanism responsible for the action remains unknown. This study probed the mitochondrial events associated with the cardioprotective effect of 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido) adenosine (NECA), an adenosine A2 receptor agonist. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to 30min ischemia followed by 10min of reperfusion, whereas H9c2 cells experienced 20min ischemia and 10min reperfusion. NECA prevented mitochondrial structural damage, decreases in respiratory control ratio (RCR), and collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Both the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 and A2B receptor antagonist MRS1706 inhibited the action of NECA. NECA reduced mitochondrial proteins carbonylation, H2O2, and superoxide generation at reperfusion, but did not change superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. In support, the protective effects of NECA and Peg-SOD on ΔΨm upon reperfusion were additive, implying that NECA's protection is attributable to the reduced superoxide generation but not to the enhancement of the superoxide-scavenging capacity. NECA increased the mitochondrial Src tyrosine kinase activity and suppressed complex I activity at reperfusion in a Src-dependent manner. NECA also reduced mitochondrial superoxide through Src tyrosine kinase. Studies with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer (LC-MS) identified Tyr118 of the NDUFV2 subunit of complex 1 as a likely site of the tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, the complex I activity of cells transfected with the Y118F mutant was increased, suggesting that this site might be a negative regulator of complex I activity. In support, NECA failed to suppress complex I activity at reperfusion in cells transfected with the Y118F mutant of NDUFV2. In conclusion, NECA prevents mitochondrial oxidative stress by decreasing mitochondrial superoxide generation through inhibition of complex I

  17. An MHC-I cytoplasmic domain/HIV-1 Nef fusion protein binds directly to the mu subunit of the AP-1 endosomal coat complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I from the surface of infected cells by the Nef proteins of primate immunodeficiency viruses likely contributes to pathogenesis by providing evasion of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 Nef-induced down-regulation involves endosomal trafficking and a cooperative interaction between the cytoplasmic domain (CD of MHC-I, Nef, and the clathrin adaptor protein complex-1 (AP-1. The CD of MHC-I contains a key tyrosine within the sequence YSQA that is required for down-regulation by Nef, but this sequence does not conform to the canonical AP-binding tyrosine-based motif Yxxphi, which mediates binding to the medium (micro subunits of AP complexes. We previously proposed that Nef allows the MHC-I CD to bind the mu subunit of AP-1 (micro1 as if it contained a Yxxphimotif. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we show that a direct interaction between the MHC-I CD/Nef and micro1 plays a primary role in the down-regulation of MHC-I: GST pulldown assays using recombinant proteins indicated that most of the MHC-I CD and Nef residues that are required for the down-regulation in human cells contribute to direct interactions with a truncated version of micro1. Specifically, the tyrosine residue of the YSQA sequence in the MHC-I CD as well as Nef residues E62-65 and P78 each contributed to the interaction between MHC-I CD/Nef and micro1 in vitro, whereas Nef M20 had little to no role. Conversely, residues F172/D174 and V392/L395 of the binding pocket on micro1 for Yxxphi motifs were required for a robust interaction. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that the MHC-I cytoplasmic domain, Nef, and the C-terminal two thirds of the mu subunit of AP-1 are sufficient to constitute a biologically relevant interaction. The data also reveal an unexpected role for a hydrophobic pocket in micro1 for interaction with MHC-I CD/Nef.

  18. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex that cleaves the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) within the transmembrane region, following prior processing by {beta}-secretase, producing amyloid {beta}-peptides (A{beta}{sub 40} and A{beta}{sub 42}). Errant production of A{beta}-peptides that substantially increases A{beta}{sub 42} production has been associated with the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Biophysical and genetic studies indicate that presenilin-1 (Psn-1), which contains the proteolytic active site, and three other membrane proteins, nicastrin (Nct), APH-1, and PEN-2 are required to form the core of the active {gamma}-secretase complex. Here, we report the purification of the native {gamma}-secretase complexes from HeLa cell membranes and the identification of an additional {gamma}-secretase complex subunit, CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. The presence of this subunit as an integral part of the complex itself was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation studies of the purified protein from HeLa cells and solubilized complexes from other cell lines such as neural cell HCN-1A and HEK293. Depletion of CD147 by RNA interference was found to increase the production of A{beta} peptides without changing the expression level of the other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates while CD147 overexpression had no statistically significant effect on amyloid {beta}-peptide production, other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates, indicating that the presence of the CD147 subunit within the {gamma}-secretase complex directly down-modulates the production of A{beta}-peptides. {gamma}-secretase was first recognized through its role in the production of the A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex with unusual aspartyl protease activity that cleaves a variety of type I membrane proteins

  19. Replacement of glycine 232 by aspartic acid in the KdpA subunit broadens the ion specificity of the K(+)-translocating KdpFABC complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, M; Fendler, K; Bamberg, E; Gassel, M; Epstein, W; Altendorf, K; Dröse, S

    2000-01-01

    Replacement of glycine residue 232 with aspartate in the KdpA subunit of the K(+)-translocating KdpFABC complex of Escherichia coli leads to a transport complex that has reduced affinity for K(+) and has lost the ability to discriminate Rb(+) ions (, J. Biol. Chem. 270:6678-6685). This glycine residue is the first in a highly conserved GGG motif that was aligned with the GYG sequence of the selectivity filter (P- or H5-loop) of K(+) channels (, Nature. 371:119-122). Investigations with the purified and reconstituted KdpFABC complex using the potential sensitive fluorescent dye DiSC(3)(5) and the "caged-ATP/planar bilayer method" confirm the altered ion specificity observed in uptake measurements with whole cells. In the absence of cations a transient current was observed in the planar bilayer measurements, a phenomenon that was previously observed with the wild-type enzyme and with another kdpA mutant (A:Q116R) and most likely represents the movement of a protein-fixed charge during a conformational transition. After addition of K(+) or Rb(+), a stationary current could be observed, representing the continuous pumping activity of the KdpFABC complex. In addition, DiSC(3)(5) and planar bilayer measurements indicate that the A:G232D Kdp-ATPase also transports Na(+), Li(+), and H(+) with a reduced rate. Similarities to mutations in the GYG motif of K(+) channels are discussed. PMID:10920013

  20. Five phosphonate operon gene products as components of a multi-subunit complex of the carbon-phosphorus lyase pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochimsen, Bjarne; Lolle, Signe; McSorley, Fern R.

    2011-01-01

    by expression in E. coli and purification of Phn-polypeptides. PhnG, PhnH, PhnI, PhnJ, and PhnK copurify as a protein complex by ion-exchange, size-exclusion, and affinity chromatography. The five polypeptides also comigrate in native-PAGE. Cross-linking of the purified protein complex reveals a close proximity...... is suggested to be PhnG4H2I2J2K. Deletion of individual phn genes reveals that a strain harboring plasmid-borne phnGHIJ produces a protein complex consisting of PhnG, PhnH, PhnI, and PhnJ, whereas a strain harboring plasmid-borne phnGIJK produces a protein complex consisting of PhnG and PhnI. We conclude...

  1. Low-Complexity Hand Gesture Recognition System for Continuous Streams of Digits and Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poularakis, Stergios; Katsavounidis, Ioannis

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a complete gesture recognition framework based on maximum cosine similarity and fast nearest neighbor (NN) techniques, which offers high-recognition accuracy and great computational advantages for three fundamental problems of gesture recognition: 1) isolated recognition; 2) gesture verification; and 3) gesture spotting on continuous data streams. To support our arguments, we provide a thorough evaluation on three large publicly available databases, examining various scenarios, such as noisy environments, limited number of training examples, and time delay in system's response. Our experimental results suggest that this simple NN-based approach is quite accurate for trajectory classification of digits and letters and could become a promising approach for implementations on low-power embedded systems.

  2. Proteomic analysis of α4β1 integrin adhesion complexes reveals α-subunit-dependent protein recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Craig, Sue E; Knight, David; Humphries, Martin J

    2012-01-01

    Integrin adhesion receptors mediate cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions, which control cell morphology and migration, differentiation, and tissue integrity. Integrins recruit multimolecular adhesion complexes to their cytoplasmic domains, which provide structural and mechanosensitive signaling connections between the extracellular and intracellular milieux. The different functions of specific integrin heterodimers, such as α4β1 and α5β1, have been attributed to distinct signal transduction mechanisms that are initiated by selective recruitment of adhesion complex components to integrin cytoplasmic tails. Here, we report the isolation of ligand-induced adhesion complexes associated with wild-type α4β1 integrin, an activated α4β1 variant in the absence of the α cytoplasmic domain (X4C0), and a chimeric α4β1 variant with α5 leg and cytoplasmic domains (α4Pα5L), and the cataloguing of their proteomes by MS. Using hierarchical clustering and interaction network analyses, we detail the differential recruitment of proteins and highlight enrichment patterns of proteins to distinct adhesion complexes. We identify previously unreported components of integrin adhesion complexes and observe receptor-specific enrichment of molecules with previously reported links to cell migration and cell signaling processes. Furthermore, we demonstrate colocalization of MYO18A with active integrin in migrating cells. These datasets provide a resource for future studies of integrin receptor-specific signaling events. PMID:22623428

  3. The mate recognition protein gene mediates reproductive isolation and speciation in the Brachionus plicatilis cryptic species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribble Kristin E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemically mediated prezygotic barriers to reproduction likely play an important role in speciation. In facultatively sexual monogonont rotifers from the Brachionus plicatilis cryptic species complex, mate recognition of females by males is mediated by the Mate Recognition Protein (MRP, a globular glycoprotein on the surface of females, encoded by the mmr-b gene family. In this study, we sequenced mmr-b copies from 27 isolates representing 11 phylotypes of the B. plicatilis species complex, examined the mode of evolution and selection of mmr-b, and determined the relationship between mmr-b genetic distance and mate recognition among isolates. Results Isolates of the B. plicatilis species complex have 1–4 copies of mmr-b, each composed of 2–9 nearly identical tandem repeats. The repeats within a gene copy are generally more similar than are gene copies among phylotypes, suggesting concerted evolution. Compared to housekeeping genes from the same isolates, mmr-b has accumulated only half as many synonymous differences but twice as many non-synonymous differences. Most of the amino acid differences between repeats appear to occur on the outer face of the protein, and these often result in changes in predicted patterns of phosphorylation. However, we found no evidence of positive selection driving these differences. Isolates with the most divergent copies were unable to mate with other isolates and rarely self-crossed. Overall the degree of mate recognition was significantly correlated with the genetic distance of mmr-b. Conclusions Discrimination of compatible mates in the B. plicatilis species complex is determined by proteins encoded by closely related copies of a single gene, mmr-b. While concerted evolution of the tandem repeats in mmr-b may function to maintain identity, it can also lead to the rapid spread of a mutation through all copies in the genome and thus to reproductive isolation. The mmr-b gene is evolving

  4. Prf immune complexes of tomato are oligomeric and contain multiple Pto-like kinases that diversify effector recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Jose R; Balmuth, Alexi L; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Mucyn, Tatiana S; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Jones, Alexandra M E; Rathjen, John P

    2010-02-01

    Cytoplasmic recognition of pathogen virulence effectors by plant NB-LRR proteins leads to strong induction of defence responses termed effector triggered immunity (ETI). In tomato, a protein complex containing the NB-LRR protein Prf and the protein kinase Pto confers recognition of the Pseudomonas syringae effectors AvrPto and AvrPtoB. Although structurally unrelated, AvrPto and AvrPtoB interact with similar residues in the Pto catalytic cleft to activate ETI via an unknown mechanism. Here we show that the Prf complex is oligomeric, containing at least two molecules of Prf. Within the complex, Prf can associate with Pto or one of several Pto family members including Fen, Pth2, Pth3, or Pth5. The dimerization surface for Prf is the novel N-terminal domain, which also coordinates an intramolecular interaction with the remainder of the molecule, and binds Pto kinase or a family member. Thus, association of two Prf N-terminal domains brings the associated kinases into close promixity. Tomato lines containing Prf complexed with Pth proteins but not Pto possessed greater immunity against P. syringae than tomatoes lacking Prf. This demonstrates that incorporation of non-Pto kinases into the Prf complex extends the number of effector proteins that can be recognized.

  5. The "Reading the Mind in Films" Task [Child Version]: Complex Emotion and Mental State Recognition in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Ofer; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Golan, Yael

    2008-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties recognizing others' emotions. Research has mostly focused on "basic" emotion recognition, devoid of context. This study reports the results of a new task, assessing recognition of "complex" emotions and mental states in social contexts. An ASC group (n = 23) was compared to a general…

  6. Facial Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mihalache Sergiu; Stoica Mihaela-Zoica

    2014-01-01

    .... From birth, faces are important in the individual's social interaction. Face perceptions are very complex as the recognition of facial expressions involves extensive and diverse areas in the brain...

  7. Structural and functional characterization of a complex between the acidic transactivation domain of EBNA2 and the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe R Chabot

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV can lead to a number of human diseases including Hodgkin's and Burkitt's lymphomas. The development of these EBV-linked diseases is associated with the presence of nine viral latent proteins, including the nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2. The EBNA2 protein plays a crucial role in EBV infection through its ability to activate transcription of both host and viral genes. As part of this function, EBNA2 associates with several host transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the Tfb1/p62 (yeast/human subunit of the general transcription factor IIH (TFIIH and the histone acetyltransferase CBP(CREB-binding protein/p300, through interactions with its C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD. In this manuscript, we examine the interaction of the acidic TAD of EBNA2 (residues 431-487 with the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH and CBP/p300 using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC and transactivation studies in yeast. NMR studies show that the TAD of EBNA2 binds to the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of Tfb1 (Tfb1PH and that residues 448-471 (EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁ are necessary and sufficient for this interaction. NMR structural characterization of a Tfb1PH-EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁ complex demonstrates that the intrinsically disordered TAD of EBNA2 forms a 9-residue α-helix in complex with Tfb1PH. Within this helix, three hydrophobic amino acids (Trp458, Ile461 and Phe462 make a series of important interactions with Tfb1PH and their importance is validated in ITC and transactivation studies using mutants of EBNA2. In addition, NMR studies indicate that the same region of EBNA2 is also required for binding to the KIX domain of CBP/p300. This study provides an atomic level description of interactions involving the TAD of EBNA2 with target host proteins. In addition, comparison of the Tfb1PH-EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁ complex with structures of the TAD of p53 and VP16 bound

  8. Crystal Structures of RMI1 and RMI2, Two OB-Fold Regulatory Subunits of the BLM Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yuting; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Busygina, Valeria; Guo, Rong; Wan, Ke; Wang, Weidong; Sung, Patrick; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Lei, Ming (Yale-MED); (NIH); (Michigan-Med); (UCIN-MED)

    2010-11-05

    Mutations in BLM, a RecQ-like helicase, are linked to the autosomal recessive cancer-prone disorder Bloom's syndrome. BLM associates with topoisomerase (Topo) III{alpha}, RMI1, and RMI2 to form the BLM complex that is essential for genome stability. The RMI1-RMI2 heterodimer stimulates the dissolution of double Holliday junction into non-crossover recombinants mediated by BLM-Topo III{alpha} and is essential for stabilizing the BLM complex. However, the molecular basis of these functions of RMI1 and RMI2 remains unclear. Here we report the crystal structures of multiple domains of RMI1-RMI2, providing direct confirmation of the existence of three oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB)-folds in RMI1-RMI2. Our structural and biochemical analyses revealed an unexpected insertion motif in RMI1N-OB, which is important for stimulating the dHJ dissolution. We also revealed the structural basis of the interaction between RMI1C-OB and RMI2-OB and demonstrated the functional importance of the RMI1-RMI2 interaction in genome stability maintenance.

  9. Molecular basis for TANK recognition by TRAF1 revealed by the crystal structure of TRAF1/TANK complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Min; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Son, Young-Jin; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Hyun Ho

    2017-02-02

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1) is a multifunctional adaptor protein involved in important processes of cellular signaling, including innate immunity and apoptosis. TRAF family member-associated NF-kappaB activator (TANK) has been identified as a competitive intracellular inhibitor of TRAF2 function. Although TRAF recognition by various receptors has been studied extensively in the field of TRAF-mediated biology, molecular and functional details of TANK recognition and interaction with TRAF1 have not been studied. In this study, we report the crystal structure of the TRAF1/TANK peptide complex. Quantitative interaction experiments showed that TANK peptide interacts with both TRAF1 and TRAF2 with similar affinity in a micromolar range. Our structural study also reveals that TANK binds TRAF1 using a minor minimal consensus motif for TRAF binding, Px(Q/E)xT.

  10. CCR4-Not Complex Subunit Not2 Plays Critical Roles in Vegetative Growth, Conidiation and Virulence in Watermelon Fusarium Wilt Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Liu, Shixia; Shen, Zhihui; Wang, Yuyan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    CCR4-Not complex is a multifunctional regulator that plays important roles in multiple cellular processes in eukaryotes. In the present study, the biological function of FonNot2, a core subunit of the CCR4-Not complex, was explored in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon), the causal agent of watermelon wilt disease. FonNot2 was expressed at higher levels in conidia and germinating conidia and during infection in Fon-inoculated watermelon roots than in mycelia. Targeted disruption of FonNot2 resulted in retarded vegetative growth, reduced conidia production, abnormal conidial morphology, and reduced virulence on watermelon. Scanning electron microscopy observation of infection behaviors and qRT-PCR analysis of in planta fungal growth revealed that the ΔFonNot2 mutant was defective in the ability to penetrate watermelon roots and showed reduced fungal biomass in root and stem of the inoculated plants. Phenotypic and biochemical analyses indicated that the ΔFonNot2 mutant displayed hypersensitivity to cell wall perturbing agents (e.g., Congo Red and Calcofluor White) and oxidative stress (e.g., H2O2 and paraquat), decreased fusaric acid content, and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during spore germination. Our data demonstrate that FonNot2 plays critical roles in regulating vegetable growth, conidiogenesis and conidia morphology, and virulence on watermelon via modulating cell wall integrity, oxidative stress response, ROS production and FA biosynthesis through the regulation of transcription of genes involved in multiple pathways. PMID:27695445

  11. Structure of Ctk3, a subunit of the RNA polymerase II CTD kinase complex, reveals a noncanonical CTD-interacting domain fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Wolfgang; Mayer, Andreas; Sun, Mai; Remmert, Michael; Cheung, Alan C M; Niesser, Jürgen; Soeding, Johannes; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    CTDK-I is a yeast kinase complex that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to promote transcription elongation. CTDK-I contains the cyclin-dependent kinase Ctk1 (homologous to human CDK9/CDK12), the cyclin Ctk2 (human cyclin K), and the yeast-specific subunit Ctk3, which is required for CTDK-I stability and activity. Here we predict that Ctk3 consists of a N-terminal CTD-interacting domain (CID) and a C-terminal three-helix bundle domain. We determine the X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of the Ctk3 homologue Lsg1 from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight helices arranged into a right-handed superhelical fold that resembles the CID domain present in transcription termination factors Pcf11, Nrd1, and Rtt103. Ctk3 however shows different surface properties and no binding to CTD peptides. Together with the known structure of Ctk1 and Ctk2 homologues, our results lead to a molecular framework for analyzing the structure and function of the CTDK-I complex.

  12. Tracing the path of DNA substrates in active Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme complexes: mapping of DNA contact sites in the RNA subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, Svetlana; Kertesz Rosenfeld, Karin; Manor, Haim

    2012-08-01

    Telomerase, the enzyme that extends single-stranded telomeric DNA, consists of an RNA subunit (TER) including a short template sequence, a catalytic protein (TERT) and accessory proteins. We used site-specific UV cross-linking to map the binding sites for DNA primers in TER within active Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme complexes. The mapping was performed at single-nucleotide resolution by a novel technique based on RNase H digestion of RNA-DNA hybrids made with overlapping complementary oligodeoxynucleotides. These data allowed tracing of the DNA path through the telomerase complexes from the template to the TERT binding element (TBE) region of TER. TBE is known to bind TERT and to be involved in the template 5'-boundary definition. Based on these findings, we propose that upstream sequences of each growing telomeric DNA chain are involved in regulation of its growth arrest at the 5'-end of the RNA template. The upstream DNA-TBE interaction may also function as an anchor for the subsequent realignment of the 3'-end of the DNA with the 3'-end of the template to enable initiation of synthesis of a new telomeric repeat.

  13. The Core Subunit of A Chromatin-Remodeling Complex, ZmCHB101, Plays Essential Roles in Maize Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Lili; Wu, Rui; Meng, Xinchao; Zhang, Ai; Li, Ning; Xia, Qiong; Qi, Xin; Pang, Jinsong; Xu, Zheng-Yi; Liu, Bao

    2016-12-05

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play essential roles in the regulation of diverse biological processes by formulating a DNA template that is accessible to the general transcription apparatus. Although the function of chromatin remodelers in plant development has been studied in A. thaliana, how it affects growth and development of major crops (e.g., maize) remains uninvestigated. Combining genetic, genomic and bioinformatic analyses, we show here that the maize core subunit of chromatin remodeling complex, ZmCHB101, plays essential roles in growth and development of maize at both vegetative and reproductive stages. Independent ZmCHB101 RNA interference plant lines displayed abaxially curling leaf phenotype due to increase of bulliform cell numbers, and showed impaired development of tassel and cob. RNA-seq-based transcriptome profiling revealed that ZmCHB101 dictated transcriptional reprogramming of a significant set of genes involved in plant development, photosynthesis, metabolic regulation, stress response and gene expressional regulation. Intriguingly, we found that ZmCHB101 was required for maintaining normal nucleosome density and 45 S rDNA compaction. Our findings suggest that the SWI3 protein, ZmCHB101, plays pivotal roles in maize normal growth and development via regulation of chromatin structure.

  14. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Durmaz Incel, Ozlem; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such

  15. Sitting is the new smoking : online complex human activity recognition with smartphones and wearables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoaib, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Human activity recognition plays an important role in fitness tracking, health monitoring, context-aware feedback and self-management of smartphones and wearable devices. These devices are equipped with different sensors which can be used to recognize various human activities. A significant amount of

  16. The Location and Recognition of Chinese Vehicle License Plates under Complex Backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangmin Sun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the algorithms to locate license plate and recognize the characters on it. These algorithms have three advantages. First, they have strong robustness to against many noises and disturbances. Second, the methods can deal with license plates with different colors. Third, the recognition methods based on artificial neural network are suitable for Chinese characters.

  17. Orp1, a member of the Cdc18/Cdc6 family of S-phase regulators, is homologous to a component of the origin recognition complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi-Falconi, M; Kelly, T J

    1995-01-01

    cdc18+ of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a periodically expressed gene that is required for entry into S phase and for the coordination of S phase with mitosis. cdc18+ is related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene CDC6, which has also been implicated in the control of DNA replication. We have identified a new Sch. pombe gene, orp1+, that encodes an 80-kDa protein with amino acid sequence motifs conserved in the Cdc18 and Cdc6 proteins. Genetic analysis indicates that orp1+ is essential for viability. Germinating spores lacking the orp1+ gene are capable of undergoing one or more rounds of DNA replication but fail to progress further, arresting as long cells with a variety of deranged nuclear structures. Unlike cdc18+, orp1+ is expressed constitutively during the cell cycle. cdc18+, CDC6, and orp1+ belong to a family of related genes that also includes the gene ORC1, which encodes a subunit of the origin recognition complex (ORC) of S. cerevisiae. The products of this gene family share a 250-amino acid domain that is highly conserved in evolution and contains several characteristic motifs, including a consensus purine nucleotide-binding motif. Among the members of this gene family, orp1+ is most closely related to S. cerevisiae ORC1. Thus, the protein encoded by orp1+ may represent a component of an Sch. pombe ORC. The orp1+ gene is also closely related to an uncharacterized putative human homologue. It is likely that the members of the cdc18/CDC6 family play key roles in the regulation of DNA replication during the cell cycle of diverse species from archaebacteria to man. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8618924

  18. Characterization of Multi-subunit Protein Complexes of Human MxA Using Non-denaturing Polyacrylamide Gel-electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Patricia E; Pavlovic, Jovan

    2016-10-28

    The formation of oligomeric complexes is a crucial prerequisite for the proper structure and function of many proteins. The interferon-induced antiviral effector protein MxA exerts a broad antiviral activity against many viruses. MxA is a dynamin-like GTPase and has the capacity to form oligomeric structures of higher order. However, whether oligomerization of MxA is required for its antiviral activity is an issue of debate. We describe here a simple protocol to assess the oligomeric state of endogenously or ectopically expressed MxA in the cytoplasmic fraction of human cell lines by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in combination with Western blot analysis. A critical step of the protocol is the choice of detergents to prevent aggregation and/or precipitation of proteins particularly associated with cellular membranes such as MxA, without interfering with its enzymatic activity. Another crucial aspect of the protocol is the irreversible protection of the free thiol groups of cysteine residues by iodoacetamide to prevent artificial interactions of the protein. This protocol is suitable for a simple assessment of the oligomeric state of MxA and furthermore allows a direct correlation of the antiviral activity of MxA interface mutants with their respective oligomeric states.

  19. A mutation in VPS35, encoding a subunit of the retromer complex, causes late-onset Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimprich, Alexander; Benet-Pagès, Anna; Struhal, Walter; Graf, Elisabeth; Eck, Sebastian H; Offman, Marc N; Haubenberger, Dietrich; Spielberger, Sabine; Schulte, Eva C; Lichtner, Peter; Rossle, Shaila C; Klopp, Norman; Wolf, Elisabeth; Seppi, Klaus; Pirker, Walter; Presslauer, Stefan; Mollenhauer, Brit; Katzenschlager, Regina; Foki, Thomas; Hotzy, Christoph; Reinthaler, Eva; Harutyunyan, Ashot; Kralovics, Robert; Peters, Annette; Zimprich, Fritz; Brücke, Thomas; Poewe, Werner; Auff, Eduard; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Rost, Burkhard; Ransmayr, Gerhard; Winkelmann, Juliane; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M

    2011-07-15

    To identify rare causal variants in late-onset Parkinson disease (PD), we investigated an Austrian family with 16 affected individuals by exome sequencing. We found a missense mutation, c.1858G>A (p.Asp620Asn), in the VPS35 gene in all seven affected family members who are alive. By screening additional PD cases, we saw the same variant cosegregating with the disease in an autosomal-dominant mode with high but incomplete penetrance in two further families with five and ten affected members, respectively. The mean age of onset in the affected individuals was 53 years. Genotyping showed that the shared haplotype extends across 65 kilobases around VPS35. Screening the entire VPS35 coding sequence in an additional 860 cases and 1014 controls revealed six further nonsynonymous missense variants. Three were only present in cases, two were only present in controls, and one was present in cases and controls. The familial mutation p.Asp620Asn and a further variant, c.1570C>T (p.Arg524Trp), detected in a sporadic PD case were predicted to be damaging by sequence-based and molecular-dynamics analyses. VPS35 is a component of the retromer complex and mediates retrograde transport between endosomes and the trans-Golgi network, and it has recently been found to be involved in Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Interdependence of Pes1, Bop1, and WDR12 controls nucleolar localization and assembly of the PeBoW complex required for maturation of the 60S ribosomal subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmoser, Michaela; Hölzel, Michael; Grimm, Thomas; Malamoussi, Anastassia; Harasim, Thomas; Orban, Mathias; Pfisterer, Iris; Gruber-Eber, Anita; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Eick, Dirk

    2007-05-01

    The PeBoW complex is essential for cell proliferation and maturation of the large ribosomal subunit in mammalian cells. Here we examined the role of PeBoW-specific proteins Pes1, Bop1, and WDR12 in complex assembly and stability, nucleolar transport, and pre-ribosome association. Recombinant expression of the three subunits is sufficient for complex formation. The stability of all three subunits strongly increases upon incorporation into the complex. Only overexpression of Bop1 inhibits cell proliferation and rRNA processing, and its negative effects could be rescued by coexpression of WDR12, but not Pes1. Elevated levels of Bop1 induce Bop1/WDR12 and Bop1/Pes1 subcomplexes. Knockdown of Bop1 abolishes the copurification of Pes1 with WDR12, demonstrating Bop1 as the integral component of the complex. Overexpressed Bop1 substitutes for endogenous Bop1 in PeBoW complex assembly, leading to the instability of endogenous Bop1. Finally, indirect immunofluorescence, cell fractionation, and sucrose gradient centrifugation experiments indicate that transport of Bop1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleolus is Pes1 dependent, while Pes1 can migrate to the nucleolus and bind to preribosomal particles independently of Bop1. We conclude that the assembly and integrity of the PeBoW complex are highly sensitive to changes in Bop1 protein levels.

  1. Mutations in Subunits of the Activating Signal Cointegrator 1 Complex Are Associated with Prenatal Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Congenital Bone Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierim, Ellen; Hirata, Hiromi; Wolf, Nicole I.; Morales-Gonzalez, Susanne; Schottmann, Gudrun; Tanaka, Yu; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Orgeur, Mickael; Zerres, Klaus; Vogt, Stefanie; van Riesen, Anne; Gill, Esther; Seifert, Franziska; Zwirner, Angelika; Kirschner, Janbernd; Goebel, Hans Hilmar; Hübner, Christoph; Stricker, Sigmar; Meierhofer, David; Stenzel, Werner; Schuelke, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional signal cointegrators associate with transcription factors or nuclear receptors and coregulate tissue-specific gene transcription. We report on recessive loss-of-function mutations in two genes (TRIP4 and ASCC1) that encode subunits of the nuclear activating signal cointegrator 1 (ASC-1) complex. We used autozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to search for pathogenic mutations in four families. Affected individuals presented with prenatal-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), multiple congenital contractures (arthrogryposis multiplex congenita), respiratory distress, and congenital bone fractures. We identified homozygous and compound-heterozygous nonsense and frameshift TRIP4 and ASCC1 mutations that led to a truncation or the entire absence of the respective proteins and cosegregated with the disease phenotype. Trip4 and Ascc1 have identical expression patterns in 17.5-day-old mouse embryos with high expression levels in the spinal cord, brain, paraspinal ganglia, thyroid, and submandibular glands. Antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of either trip4 or ascc1 in zebrafish disrupted the highly patterned and coordinated process of α-motoneuron outgrowth and formation of myotomes and neuromuscular junctions and led to a swimming defect in the larvae. Immunoprecipitation of the ASC-1 complex consistently copurified cysteine and glycine rich protein 1 (CSRP1), a transcriptional cofactor, which is known to be involved in spinal cord regeneration upon injury in adult zebrafish. ASCC1 mutant fibroblasts downregulated genes associated with neurogenesis, neuronal migration, and pathfinding (SERPINF1, DAB1, SEMA3D, SEMA3A), as well as with bone development (TNFRSF11B, RASSF2, STC1). Our findings indicate that the dysfunction of a transcriptional coactivator complex can result in a clinical syndrome affecting the neuromuscular system. PMID:26924529

  2. New genes encoding subunits of a cytochrome bc1-analogous complex in the respiratory chain of the hyperthermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, A; Henninger, T; Schäfer, G; Schmidt, C L

    2003-04-01

    The soxL gene from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius (DSM 639) encodes a Rieske iron-sulfur protein. In this study we report the identification of two open reading frames in its downstream region. The first one, named soxN, codes for a membrane protein bearing a resemblance to the b-type cytochromes of the cytochrome bc1 and b6f complexes. The protein is predicted to contain at least 10 transmembrane helices and features the two conserved histidine pairs coordinating the heme groups of these cytochromes. The second open reading frame, named odsN, encodes a soluble protein of unknown function. The genomic region displays a complex transcription pattern. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed the presence of mono- and bi-cistronic transcripts as well as a tri-cistronic transcript of soxL and cbsAB, encoding the mono-heme cytochrome b558/566. Phylogenetic analyses of the genes of the soxLN pair and of other archaeal gene pairs encoding Rieske iron-sulfur proteins and b-type cytochromes revealed an identical branching patterns for both protein families, suggesting an evolutionary link of these genes provided by the functional interaction of the proteins. On the basis of the findings of this study and the previously studied properties of the soxL and cbsA proteins, we propose the occurrence of a novel cytochrome bc1-analogous complex in the membranes of Sulfolobus, consisting of the cytochrome b homolog soxN, the Rieske protein soxL, the high potential cytochrome cbsA, as well as the non-redox-active subunits cbsB and odsN.

  3. LHON/MELAS overlap mutation in ND1 subunit of mitochondrial complex I affects ubiquinone binding as revealed by modeling in Escherichia coli NDH-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pätsi, Jukka; Maliniemi, Pilvi; Pakanen, Salla; Hinttala, Reetta; Uusimaa, Johanna; Majamaa, Kari; Nyström, Thomas; Kervinen, Marko; Hassinen, Ilmo E

    2012-02-01

    Defects in complex I due to mutations in mitochondrial DNA are associated with clinical features ranging from single organ manifestation like Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) to multiorgan disorders like mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome. Specific mutations cause overlap syndromes combining several phenotypes, but the mechanisms of their biochemical effects are largely unknown. The m.3376G>A transition leading to p.E24K substitution in ND1 with LHON/MELAS phenotype was modeled here in a homologous position (NuoH-E36K) in the Escherichia coli enzyme and it almost totally abolished complex I activity. The more conservative mutation NuoH-E36Q resulted in higher apparent K(m) for ubiquinone and diminished inhibitor sensitivity. A NuoH homolog of the m.3865A>G transition, which has been found concomitantly in the overlap syndrome patient with the m.3376G>A, had only a minor effect. Consequences of a primary LHON-mutation m.3460G>A affecting the same extramembrane loop as the m.3376G>A substitution were also studied in the E. coli model and were found to be mild. The results indicate that the overlap syndrome-associated m.3376G>A transition in MTND1 is the pathogenic mutation and m.3865A>G transition has minor, if any, effect on presentation of the disease. The kinetic effects of the NuoH-E36Q mutation suggest its proximity to the putative ubiquinone binding domain in 49kD/PSST subunits. In all, m.3376G>A perturbs ubiquinone binding, a phenomenon found in LHON, and decreases the activity of fully assembled complex I as in MELAS.

  4. Electron microscopy of the complexes of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) and Rubisco subunit-binding protein from pea leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuprun, V.L.; Boekema, E.J.; Samsonidze, T.G.; Pushkin, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) subunit-binding protein and its interaction with pea leaf chloroplast Rubisco were studied by electron microscopy and image analysis. Electron-microscopic evidence for the association of Rubisco subunit-binding protein, consisting of 1

  5. Fingerprints of Learned Object Recognition Seen in the fMRI Activation Patterns of Lateral Occipital Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Zvi N; Zohary, Ehud

    2015-09-01

    One feature of visual processing in the ventral stream is that cortical responses gradually depart from the physical aspects of the visual stimulus and become correlated with perceptual experience. Thus, unlike early retinotopic areas, the responses in the object-related lateral occipital complex (LOC) are typically immune to parameter changes (e.g., contrast, location, etc.) when these do not affect recognition. Here, we use a complementary approach to highlight changes in brain activity following a shift in the perceptual state (in the absence of any alteration in the physical image). Specifically, we focus on LOC and early visual cortex (EVC) and compare their functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to degraded object images, before and after fast perceptual learning that renders initially unrecognized objects identifiable. Using 3 complementary analyses, we find that, in LOC, unlike EVC, learned recognition is associated with a change in the multivoxel response pattern to degraded object images, such that the response becomes significantly more correlated with that evoked by the intact version of the same image. This provides further evidence that the coding in LOC reflects the recognition of visual objects.

  6. Study on Mimetic Peroxidase and Molecular Recognition of Phenols With Inclusion Complex of *Ironporphyrin Immobilized by β-CD Polymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD) and its cross-linke d polymer (β-CDP) were known as the mimetic models.Metalloporphyrin had been widely used in the enzymatic method of analysis and molecular recognition. In present work, it was investigation that supramolecular recognition for halogenated phenols, three cresols,three nitrophenols and three aminophenols, served respectively as the substrate of the mimetic receptor,iron-5,10,15,20-tetrakis (sulforphenyl)-21H, 23H-porphine (FeTPPS) or FeTPPS-ββ-CDP. Supramolecular complex, FeTPPS-β-CDP with tunction of mult i-recognition and induced-fit, was a advanced kind of mimetic peroxidase; Methyl phenol or polyphenol was the substitute of chlorophenic acid, while aminophenols and other phenols were suggested not to be utilized to enzymatic assay of H2O2. Being a mimetic enzyme mimicking the space structure of overall proteinase, beaimed by immobilized mimetic enzyme with a large number of β-CD interior cavities, chlorophenol was identified optimal substrate in the system tested.

  7. Tight bounds for the space complexity of nonregular language recognition by real-time machines

    CERN Document Server

    Yakaryilmaz, Abuzer

    2011-01-01

    We examine the minimum amounts of useful memory for real-time, as opposed to one-way, computation using several different machine models. In most cases, we are able to show that the lower bounds established using arguments about one-way machines remain tight in the real-time case. It is shown that increasing the number of stacks of real-time pushdown automata can result in exponential improvement in the total amount of space usage for nonregular language recognition.

  8. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunit16 positively regulates salicylate-mediated systemic acquired resistance and jasmonate/ethylene-induced defense pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Mou, Zhonglin

    2012-10-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a long-lasting plant immunity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Biological induction of SAR requires the signal molecule salicylic acid (SA) and involves profound transcriptional changes that are largely controlled by the transcription coactivator nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1 (NPR1). However, it is unclear how SAR signals are transduced from the NPR1 signaling node to the general transcription machinery. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana Mediator subunit16 (MED16) is an essential positive regulator of SAR. Mutations in MED16 reduced NPR1 protein levels and completely compromised biological induction of SAR. These mutations also significantly suppressed SA-induced defense responses, altered the transcriptional changes induced by the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) DC3000/avrRpt2, and rendered plants susceptible to both Pst DC3000/avrRpt2 and Pst DC3000. In addition, mutations in MED16 blocked the induction of several jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-responsive genes and compromised resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola. The Mediator complex acts as a bridge between specific transcriptional activators and the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery; therefore, our data suggest that MED16 may be a signaling component in the gap between the NPR1 signaling node and the general transcription machinery and may relay signals from both the SA and the JA/ET pathways.

  9. The catalytic subunit of human protein kinase CK2 structurally deviates from its maize homologue in complex with the nucleotide competitive inhibitor emodin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Klopffleisch, Karsten; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    The Ser/Thr kinase CK2 (former name: casein kinase 2) is a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two catalytic chains (CK2alpha) attached to a dimer of noncatalytic subunits. Together with the cyclin-dependent kinases and the mitogen-activated protein kinases, CK2alpha belongs to the CMGC family...... and Applied Chemistry name: 1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthracene-9,10-dione) and compare it with a previously published complex structure of emodin and maize CK2alpha. With a resolution of 1.5 A, the human CK2alpha/emodin structure has a much better resolution than its maize counterpart (2.6 A). Even more...... in the ATP-binding loop, whereas human CK2alpha shows its largest adaptations in the hinge region connecting the two main domains of the protein kinase core. These observations emphasize the importance of local plasticity for ligand binding and demonstrate that two orthologues of an enzyme can behave quite...

  10. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta is a potential marker of joint contracture: an experimental study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ronghan; Wang, Zhe; Lu, Yunxiang; Huang, Junqi; Ren, Jianhua; Wang, Kun

    2015-11-01

    Joint contracture is a fibroproliferative disorder that restricts joint mobility, resulting in tissue degeneration and deformity. However, the etiology of joint contracture is still unknown. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta (CCT-eta) is reported to increase in fibrotic diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CCT-eta is implicated in joint contracture and to determine the role of CCT-eta in the progression of joint contracture by analyzing a rat model. We immobilized the left knee joint of rat by internal fixation for 8 weeks. The non-immobilized right leg served as a control. The range of motion (ROM) of the knee was investigated. Fibroblasts were obtained from the posterior joint capsule of the joints. The outcome was followed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), Western blot, fibroblast migration assay, and collagen assay. The effect of CCT-eta on the functions of fibroblasts was observed by utilizing a short inhibitory RNA (siRNA) targeting CCT-eta. The ROM of the immobilized joints was significantly limited compared to the contralateral joints (p contracture disease.

  11. Chaperonin-Containing t-Complex Protein-1 Subunit β as a Possible Biomarker for the Phase of Glomerular Hyperfiltration of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ze Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In cell model, we discovered the association between chaperonin-containing t-complex polypeptide 1 subunit β (TCP-1β and early diabetic nephropathy (DN. In this study, we further explored the relationships between TCP-1β and type 2 diabetic mellitus (DM. To mimic the clinical hyperfiltration state, a type 2 DM mice model was established by feeding a high-fat diet in combination with treatment of streptozotocin and nicotinamide. Blood and urine were collected to determine creatinine clearance (Ccr, and kidney tissues were harvested for evaluation of TCP-1β expression by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Meanwhile, clinical subjects of healthy controls and type 2 DM were recruited to strengthen the evidence with urine TCP-1β. Results showed that Ccr and the expression of TCP-1β in kidney were significantly higher one week after hyperglycemia development, suggesting that the hyperfiltration state was successfully established in the mice model. TCP-1β was expressed predominantly on renal tubules. By using the estimated glomerular filtration rate to index progression in clinical investigation, urine TCP-1β level was associated with the hyperfiltration phase in type 2 DM patients. Conclusively, we confirmed that TCP-1β is a possible biomarker for early nephropathy of type 2 DM, but further mechanistic study to elucidate its cause and pathway is needed.

  12. The NSL chromatin-modifying complex subunit KANSL2 regulates cancer stem-like properties in glioblastoma that contribute to tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreyra-Solari, Nazarena; Belforte, Fiorella S.; Canedo, Lucía; Videla-Richardson, Guillermo A.; Espinosa, Joaquín M.; Rossi, Mario; Serna, Eva; Riudavets, Miguel A.; Martinetto, Horacio; Sevlever, Gustavo; Perez-Castro, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    KANSL2 is an integral subunit of the Non-Specific Lethal (NSL) chromatin-modifying complex which contributes to epigenetic programs in embryonic stem cells. In this study, we report a role for KANSL2 in regulation of stemness in glioblastoma (GBM), which is characterized by heterogeneous tumor stem-like cells associated with therapy resistance and disease relapse. KANSL2 expression is upregulated in cancer cells, mainly at perivascular regions of tumors. RNAi-mediated silencing of KANSL2 in GBM cells impairs their tumorigenic capacity in mouse xenograft models. In clinical specimens, we found that expression levels of KANSL2 correlate with stemness markers in GBM stem-like cell populations. Mechanistic investigations showed that KANSL2 regulates cell self-renewal, which correlates with effects on expression of the stemness transcription factor POU5F1. RNAi-mediated silencing of POU5F1 reduced KANSL2 levels, linking these two genes to stemness control in GBM cells. Together, our findings indicate that KANSL2 acts to regulate the stem cell population in GBM, defining it as a candidate GBM biomarker for clinical use. PMID:27406830

  13. A new disease-related mutation for mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome affects the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lertrit, P.; Noer, A.S.; Kapsa, R.; Marzuki, S. (Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia)); Jean-Francois, M.J.B.; Thyagarajan, D.; Byrne, E. (St. Vincent' s Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia)); Dennett, X. (Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)); Lethlean, K. (Prince Henry Hospital, Sydney (Australia))

    1992-09-01

    The molecular lesions in two patients exhibiting classical clinical manifestations of MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes) syndrome have been investigated. A recently reported disease-related A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243 of the mtDNA, in the DHU loop of tRNA[sup Leu], was detected by restriction-enzyme analysis of the relevant PCR-amplified segment of the mtDNA of one patient but was not observed, by either restriction-enzyme analysis or nucleotide sequencing, in the other. To define the molecular lesion in the patient who does not have the A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243, the total mitochondrial genome of the patient has been sequenced. An A[yields]G base substitution at nt 11084, leading to a Thr-to-Ala amino acid replacement in the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I, is suggested to be a disease-related mutation. 49 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Chaperonin-containing t-complex protein-1 subunit β as a possible biomarker for the phase of glomerular hyperfiltration of diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chung-Ze; Chang, Li-Chien; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Hung, Yi-Jen; Pei, Dee; Chen, Jin-Shuen

    2015-01-01

    In cell model, we discovered the association between chaperonin-containing t-complex polypeptide 1 subunit β (TCP-1β) and early diabetic nephropathy (DN). In this study, we further explored the relationships between TCP-1β and type 2 diabetic mellitus (DM). To mimic the clinical hyperfiltration state, a type 2 DM mice model was established by feeding a high-fat diet in combination with treatment of streptozotocin and nicotinamide. Blood and urine were collected to determine creatinine clearance (C cr), and kidney tissues were harvested for evaluation of TCP-1β expression by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Meanwhile, clinical subjects of healthy controls and type 2 DM were recruited to strengthen the evidence with urine TCP-1β. Results showed that C cr and the expression of TCP-1β in kidney were significantly higher one week after hyperglycemia development, suggesting that the hyperfiltration state was successfully established in the mice model. TCP-1β was expressed predominantly on renal tubules. By using the estimated glomerular filtration rate to index progression in clinical investigation, urine TCP-1β level was associated with the hyperfiltration phase in type 2 DM patients. Conclusively, we confirmed that TCP-1β is a possible biomarker for early nephropathy of type 2 DM, but further mechanistic study to elucidate its cause and pathway is needed.

  15. Molecular architecture and dynamics of ASH1 mRNA recognition by its mRNA-transport complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Franziska Theresia; Schlundt, Andreas; Heym, Roland Gerhard; Jenner, Andreas; Niedner-Boblenz, Annika; Syed, Muhammad Ibrahim; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Stehle, Ralf; Janowski, Robert; Sattler, Michael; Jansen, Ralf-Peter; Niessing, Dierk

    2017-02-01

    mRNA localization is an essential mechanism of gene regulation and is required for processes such as stem-cell division, embryogenesis and neuronal plasticity. It is not known which features in the cis-acting mRNA localization elements (LEs) are specifically recognized by motor-containing transport complexes. To the best of our knowledge, no high-resolution structure is available for any LE in complex with its cognate protein complex. Using X-ray crystallography and complementary techniques, we carried out a detailed assessment of an LE of the ASH1 mRNA from yeast, its complex with its shuttling RNA-binding protein She2p, and its highly specific, cytoplasmic complex with She3p. Although the RNA alone formed a flexible stem loop, She2p binding induced marked conformational changes. However, only joining by the unstructured She3p resulted in specific RNA recognition. The notable RNA rearrangements and joint action of a globular and an unfolded RNA-binding protein offer unprecedented insights into the step-wise maturation of an mRNA-transport complex.

  16. Interleukin-2 carbohydrate recognition modulates CTLL-2 cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, K; Yamashita, K

    2001-03-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) specifically recognizes high-mannose type glycans with five or six mannosyl residues. To determine whether the carbohydrate recognition activity of IL-2 contributes to its physiological activity, the inhibitory effects of high-mannose type glycans on IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cell proliferation were investigated. Man(5)GlcNAc(2)Asn added to CTLL-2 cell cultures inhibited not only phosphorylation of tyrosine kinases but also IL-2-dependent cell proliferation. We found that a complex of IL-2, IL-2 receptor alpha, beta, gamma subunits, and tyrosine kinases was formed in rhIL-2-stimulated CTLL-2 cells. Among the components of this complex, only the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit was stained with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin which specifically recognizes high-mannose type glycans. This staining was diminished after digestion of the glycans with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H or D, suggesting that at least a N-glycan containing Man(5)GlcNAc(2) is linked to the extracellular portion of the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit. Our findings indicate that IL-2 binds the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit through Man(5)GlcNAc(2) and a specific peptide sequence on the surface of CTLL-2 cells. When IL-2 binds to the IL-2Ralpha subunit, this may trigger formation of the high affinity complex of IL-2-IL-2Ralpha, -beta, and -gamma subunits, leading to cellular signaling.

  17. The stoichiometry and biophysical properties of the Kv4 potassium channel complex with K+ channel-interacting protein (KChIP) subunits are variable, depending on the relative expression level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2014-06-20

    Kv4 is a voltage-gated K(+) channel, which underlies somatodendritic subthreshold A-type current (ISA) and cardiac transient outward K(+) (Ito) current. Various ion channel properties of Kv4 are known to be modulated by its auxiliary subunits, such as K(+) channel-interacting protein (KChIP) or dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein. KChIP is a cytoplasmic protein and increases the current amplitude, decelerates the inactivation, and accelerates the recovery from inactivation of Kv4. Crystal structure analysis demonstrated that Kv4 and KChIP form an octameric complex with four Kv4 subunits and four KChIP subunits. However, it remains unknown whether the Kv4·KChIP complex can have a different stoichiometry other than 4:4. In this study, we expressed Kv4.2 and KChIP4 with various ratios in Xenopus oocytes and observed that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 gradually changed with the increase in co-expressed KChIP4. The tandem repeat constructs of Kv4.2 and KChIP4 revealed that the 4:4 (Kv4.2/KChIP4) channel shows faster recovery than the 4:2 channel, suggesting that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 change, depending on the number of bound KChIP4s. Subunit counting by single-molecule imaging revealed that the bound number of KChIP4 in each Kv4.2·KChIP4 complex was dependent on the expression level of KChIP4. Taken together, we conclude that the stoichiometry of Kv4·KChIP complex is variable, and the biophysical properties of Kv4 change depending on the number of bound KChIP subunits.

  18. The Stoichiometry and Biophysical Properties of the Kv4 Potassium Channel Complex with K+ Channel-interacting Protein (KChIP) Subunits Are Variable, Depending on the Relative Expression Level*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Kv4 is a voltage-gated K+ channel, which underlies somatodendritic subthreshold A-type current (ISA) and cardiac transient outward K+ (Ito) current. Various ion channel properties of Kv4 are known to be modulated by its auxiliary subunits, such as K+ channel-interacting protein (KChIP) or dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein. KChIP is a cytoplasmic protein and increases the current amplitude, decelerates the inactivation, and accelerates the recovery from inactivation of Kv4. Crystal structure analysis demonstrated that Kv4 and KChIP form an octameric complex with four Kv4 subunits and four KChIP subunits. However, it remains unknown whether the Kv4·KChIP complex can have a different stoichiometry other than 4:4. In this study, we expressed Kv4.2 and KChIP4 with various ratios in Xenopus oocytes and observed that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 gradually changed with the increase in co-expressed KChIP4. The tandem repeat constructs of Kv4.2 and KChIP4 revealed that the 4:4 (Kv4.2/KChIP4) channel shows faster recovery than the 4:2 channel, suggesting that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 change, depending on the number of bound KChIP4s. Subunit counting by single-molecule imaging revealed that the bound number of KChIP4 in each Kv4.2·KChIP4 complex was dependent on the expression level of KChIP4. Taken together, we conclude that the stoichiometry of Kv4·KChIP complex is variable, and the biophysical properties of Kv4 change depending on the number of bound KChIP subunits. PMID:24811166

  19. Localization of eight additional genes in the human major histocompatibility complex, including the gene encoding the casein kinase II {beta} subunit (CSNK2B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertella, M.R.; Jones, H.; Thomson, W. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    A wide range of autoimmune and other diseases are known to be associated with the major histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility antigens in the class I and class II regions, but some appear to be more strongly associated with genes in the central 1100-kb class III region, making it important to characterize this region fully for the presence of novel genes. An {approximately}220-kb segment of DNA in the class III region separating the Hsp70 (HSPA1L) and BAT1 (D6S8IE) genes, which was previously known to contain 14 genes. Genomic DNA fragments spanning the gaps between the known genes were used as probes to isolate cDNAs corresponding to five new genes within this region. Evidence from Northern blot analysis and exon trapping experiments that suggested the presence of at least two more new genes was also obtained. Partial cDNA and complete exonic genomic sequencing of one of the new genes has identified it as the casein kinase II{beta} subunit (CSNK2B). Two of the other novel genes lie within a region syntenic to that implicated in susceptibility to experimental allergic orchitis in the mouse, an autoimmune disease of the testis, and represent additional candidates for the Orch-1 locus associated with this disease. In addition, characterization of the 13-kb intergenic gap separating the RD (D6545) and G11 (D6S60E) genes has revealed the presence of a gene encoding a 1246-amino-acid polypeptide that shows significant sequence similarity to the yeast anti-viral Ski2p gene product. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Responsive metal complexes: a click-based "allosteric scorpionate" complex permits the detection of a biological recognition event by EPR/ENDOR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanini, Emiliano; Rigby, Stephen E J; Motevalli, Majid; Todd, Matthew H; Watkinson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Chemical sensing is a mature field, and many effective sensors for small anions and cations have been devised. Metal complexes have been used widely for this purpose, but there are fewer reports of their use in the detection of organic and biological analytes. To date metal complexes have been used in sensing via the direct displacement of a pre-existing ligand by an analyte, or by an adventitious complementarity between the complex and analyte. These strategies do not permit a general approach to the sensing of biological molecules with metal complexes because of the demands to engineer molecular recognition into the complex architecture. We describe a fundamentally new approach to this field-the "allosteric scorpionate" metal complex. The binding partner of a biological analyte is attached to a scorpionate ligand on a metal complex, remote from the metal centre. Binding of the analyte causes a change in the primary coordination sphere at the metal, thereby revealing the presence of the biological molecule. We show that azamacrocyclic complexes with a triazole scorpion ligand may be easily assembled with the [3+2] Huisgens 'click' cycloaddition. We demonstrate the synthesis of a biotin-functionalised cyclam derivative using this methodology. This, and our previously communicated zinc sensor, are to the best of our knowledge the first examples of a triazole being employed as a scorpion ligand on an azamacrocycle. Coordination by the triazole to the metal is perturbed by the binding of avidin to the pendant ligand. This event can be sensitively detected with EPR spectroscopy, and the details of the coordination change probed with ENDOR spectroscopy, confirming the loss of the axial triazole nitrogen donor upon binding to avidin. This represents the first metal complex where remote, 'allosteric' coordination of an analyte has been shown to cause a change in the primary coordination sphere of the metal. Since the synthesis is modular and straightforward, other

  1. A Conserved Mode of Protein Recognition and Binding in a ParD−ParE Toxin−Antitoxin Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2010-05-06

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems form a ubiquitous class of prokaryotic proteins with functional roles in plasmid inheritance, environmental stress response, and cell development. ParDE family TA systems are broadly conserved on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes and have been well characterized as genetic elements that promote stable plasmid inheritance. We present a crystal structure of a chromosomally encoded ParD-ParE complex from Caulobacter crescentus at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This TA system forms an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetramer in the crystal and in solution. The toxin-antitoxin binding interface reveals extensive polar and hydrophobic contacts of ParD antitoxin helices with a conserved recognition and binding groove on the ParE toxin. A cross-species comparison of this complex structure with related toxin structures identified an antitoxin recognition and binding subdomain that is conserved between distantly related members of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily despite a low level of overall primary sequence identity. We further demonstrate that ParD antitoxin is dimeric, stably folded, and largely helical when not bound to ParE toxin. Thus, the paradigmatic model in which antitoxin undergoes a disorder-to-order transition upon toxin binding does not apply to this chromosomal ParD-ParE TA system.

  2. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-03-24

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available.

  3. The SocioBox: A novel paradigm to assess complex social recognition in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilja Krueger-Burg

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Impairments in social skills are central to mental disease, and developing tools for their assessment in mouse models is essential. Here we present the SocioBox, a new behavioral paradigm to measure social recognition memory. Using this paradigm, we show that male wildtype mice of different strains can readily identify an unfamiliar mouse among 5 newly acquainted animals. In contrast, female mice exhibit lower locomotor activity during social exploration in the SocioBox compared to males and do not seem to discriminate between acquainted and unfamiliar mice, likely reflecting inherent differences in gender-specific territorial tasks. In addition to a simple quantification of social interaction time of mice grounded on predefined spatial zones (zone-based method, we developed a set of unbiased, data-driven analysis tools based on heat map representations and characterized by greater sensitivity. First proof-of-principle that the SocioBox allows diagnosis of social recognition memory deficits is provided using male PSD-95 heterozygous knockout mice, a mouse model related to psychiatric pathophysiology.

  4. The selective recognition of mismatched d(GCGAGC)2 by the cobalt(III) complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Huili; YANG; Pin

    2005-01-01

    We studied the binding of [Co(phen)2(HPIP)]Cl3 to mismatched d(GCGAGC)2 containing two sheared G:A mispairs by NMR. The result shows that the complex was intercalated into G:A region from the minor groove and extended to the major groove, and could selectively recognize the mispairs. 31P NMR indicates that the complex binding induced the change of the phosphate backbone in the mismatched base pairs region.

  5. TDDFT study on recognition mechanism for the oxygen sensing of the cyclometalated platinum (II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Huan; Zhao, Zhengyan; Li, Guanglan; Gao, Liguo; Zhao, Ningjiu; Li, Peng; Jia, Yan; Zhou, Chenyang; Zhang, Mingzhen; Wang, Yong; Hao, Ce; Tang, Xiaoying

    2017-08-01

    The influence of oxygen molecule on the luminescent properties of a cyclometalated Pt(II) complex Lxp1, was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods. Analysis of frontier molecular orbitals and electronic configuration indicated that the highest-occupied molecular orbital of the Lxp1 has a significant mixture of metal Pt (d) as well as 2-phenylpyridine and acetyl acetone(π). The lowest-unoccupied orbital of the Lxp1 primarily locates on π* of 2-phenylpyridineligands. The emission mechanism of the cyclometalated Pt(II) complex Lxp1 is assigned to the mixing of ligand-to-metal charge transfer and ligand-to-ligand charge transfer. The emission mechanism of the Lxp1-O2 complex can be attributed to the charge transfer from the oxygen molecule to the luminescent material Lxp1. Our study showed that intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the Lxp1 and oxygen molecule was strengthened by the calculation of electronic excitation, leading to a luminescence-decreasing phenomenon. The calculation of the radiative and non-radiative decay rate constants of the Lxp1 and the Lxp1-O2 complex demonstrates that the phosphorescence from T1-S0 of the Lxp1 would alter to the internal conversion from T1-T0 of the Lxp1-O2 complex. This alteration further explains the luminescence quenching phenomenon of the cyclometalated Pt(II) complex Lxp1 after interacting with oxygen molecule.

  6. Role of the low-molecular-weight subunits PetL, PetG, and PetN in assembly, stability, and dimerization of the cytochrome b6f complex in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenkert, Serena; Legen, Julia; Takami, Tsuneaki; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Herrmann, Reinhold G; Meurer, Jörg

    2007-08-01

    The cytochrome b(6)f (Cyt b(6)f) complex in flowering plants contains nine conserved subunits, of which three, PetG, PetL, and PetN, are bitopic plastid-encoded low-molecular-weight proteins of largely unknown function. Homoplastomic knockout lines of the three genes have been generated in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'Petit Havana') to analyze and compare their roles in assembly and stability of the complex. Deletion of petG or petN caused a bleached phenotype and loss of photosynthetic electron transport and photoautotrophy. Levels of all subunits that constitute the Cyt b(6)f complex were faintly detectable, indicating that both proteins are essential for the stability of the membrane complex. In contrast, DeltapetL plants accumulate about 50% of other Cyt b(6)f subunits, appear green, and grow photoautotrophically. However, DeltapetL plants show increased light sensitivity as compared to wild type. Assembly studies revealed that PetL is primarily required for proper conformation of the Rieske protein, leading to stability and formation of dimeric Cyt b(6)f complexes. Unlike wild type, phosphorylation levels of the outer antenna of photosystem II (PSII) are significantly decreased under state II conditions, although the plastoquinone pool is largely reduced in DeltapetL, as revealed by measurements of PSI and PSII redox states. This confirms the sensory role of the Cyt b(6)f complex in activation of the corresponding kinase. The reduced light-harvesting complex II phosphorylation did not affect state transition and association of light-harvesting complex II to PSI under state II conditions. Ferredoxin-dependent plastoquinone reduction, which functions in cyclic electron transport around PSI in vivo, was not impaired in DeltapetL.

  7. Role of the Low-Molecular-Weight Subunits PetL, PetG, and PetN in Assembly, Stability, and Dimerization of the Cytochrome b6f Complex in Tobacco1[C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenkert, Serena; Legen, Julia; Takami, Tsuneaki; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Herrmann, Reinhold G.; Meurer, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The cytochrome b6f (Cyt b6f) complex in flowering plants contains nine conserved subunits, of which three, PetG, PetL, and PetN, are bitopic plastid-encoded low-molecular-weight proteins of largely unknown function. Homoplastomic knockout lines of the three genes have been generated in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum ‘Petit Havana’) to analyze and compare their roles in assembly and stability of the complex. Deletion of petG or petN caused a bleached phenotype and loss of photosynthetic electron transport and photoautotrophy. Levels of all subunits that constitute the Cyt b6f complex were faintly detectable, indicating that both proteins are essential for the stability of the membrane complex. In contrast, ΔpetL plants accumulate about 50% of other Cyt b6f subunits, appear green, and grow photoautotrophically. However, ΔpetL plants show increased light sensitivity as compared to wild type. Assembly studies revealed that PetL is primarily required for proper conformation of the Rieske protein, leading to stability and formation of dimeric Cyt b6f complexes. Unlike wild type, phosphorylation levels of the outer antenna of photosystem II (PSII) are significantly decreased under state II conditions, although the plastoquinone pool is largely reduced in ΔpetL, as revealed by measurements of PSI and PSII redox states. This confirms the sensory role of the Cyt b6f complex in activation of the corresponding kinase. The reduced light-harvesting complex II phosphorylation did not affect state transition and association of light-harvesting complex II to PSI under state II conditions. Ferredoxin-dependent plastoquinone reduction, which functions in cyclic electron transport around PSI in vivo, was not impaired in ΔpetL. PMID:17556510

  8. Hemagglutinin gene shuffling among Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D yields distinct sugar recognition of the botulinum toxin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Keita; Suzuki, Tomonori; Hayashi, Shintaro; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa

    2015-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum strains produce a large-sized toxin complex (TC) that is composed of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), non-toxic non-hemagglutinin and three different hemagglutinins (HA-70, HA-33 and HA-17). HA components enhance toxin delivery across the intestinal cell wall in a sugar chain-dependent manner. Here we characterized the sugar recognition of serotype D strain 1873 (D-1873) botulinum L-TC. Most L-TCs produced by serotype C and D strains bind to cells via interactions between HA-33 and cell surface sialo-oligosaccharides. However, like the previously reported L-TC produced by serotype C strain Yoichi (C-Yoichi), D-1873 L-TC binds only to cells that have been treated with neuraminidase, indicating that they recognize asialo-oligosaccharides. The D-1873 HA-33 amino acid sequence is similar to that of C-Yoichi, but had lower similarity to the majority of serotype C and D HA-33s. A comparison of TC component primary structures for 12 serotype C and D strains suggested that at least three types of HA-33 genes exist, and these are shuffled among the serotype C and D strains independently of BoNT serotype. This shuffling produces the distinct sugar recognition of serotype C and D botulinum TCs.

  9. Migration inhibitory factor (MIF) released by macrophages upon recognition of immune complexes is critical to inflammation in Arthus reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Claudia N; Arras, Rosa H; Magalhães, Elisabeth S; Alves, Letícia S; Lessa, Luiz Paulo; Silva, Maria Helena; Ejzemberg, Regina; Canetti, Cláudio; Bozza, Marcelo T

    2009-05-01

    Deposition of immune complexes (IC) triggers Fc gamma R-dependent inflammation, leading to tissue damage in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematous, immune glomerulonephritis, and several immune vasculitides. Evidences support a role for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in a number of inflammatory diseases, but the triggering of its secretion and its physiopathological role upon IC deposition remain elusive. Herein, we show that human macrophages secreted MIF after IC recognition, which in turn controlled the secretion of TNF. Macrophages from Mif-/- mice produced smaller amounts of TNF when stimulated with IgG-opsonized erythrocytes than wild-type (WT) cells. Using passive reverse Arthus reaction in the peritoneum and lungs as a model for IC-induced inflammation, we demonstrated that Mif-/- mice had a milder response, observed by reduced neutrophil recruitment, vascular leakage, and secretion of TNF, MIP-2, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine compared with WT controls. Adoptive transfer of alveolar macrophages from WT to Mif-/- mice rescued pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and TNF production upon passive reverse Arthus reaction. Our study indicates that Arthus inflammatory reaction is largely dependent on MIF and poses macrophages as a source of the MIF released upon IC recognition. These results give experimental support to the proposition that blockade of MIF might constitute an adjunctive, therapeutic approach to IC disease.

  10. Recognition and identification of bumblebee species in the Bombus lucorum-complex (Hymenoptera, Apidae – A review and outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silas Bossert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of cryptic species represents one of the major challenges in current taxonomy and affects our understanding of global diversity. In practice, the process from discovery to acceptance in the scientific community can take an extensive length of time. A prime example is the traditionally difficult taxonomy of the cryptic bumblebee species belonging to the Bombus lucorum-complex. The status of the three European species in the group – Bombus lucorum and the closely related Bombus cryptarum and Bombus magnus – has recently become widely accepted, primarily due to investigations of nucleotide sequences and marking pheromones. In contrast, doubts prevail concerning the validity of species identification based on morphology. As a consequence, our knowledge of the species is muddled in a mire of unreliable and confusing literature data from a large number of authors over the centuries. To clarify this issue, this paper provides a recapitulation of the historical literature and highlights the milestones in the process of species recognition. Further, the possibility of a morphologically based species identification is discussed in the context of new molecular data. Finally, this review outlines the current challenges and provides directions for future issues.

  11. Effects of X-ray radiation on complex visual discrimination learning and social recognition memory in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Davis

    Full Text Available The present report describes an animal model for examining the effects of radiation on a range of neurocognitive functions in rodents that are similar to a number of basic human cognitive functions. Fourteen male Long-Evans rats were trained to perform an automated intra-dimensional set shifting task that consisted of their learning a basic discrimination between two stimulus shapes followed by more complex discrimination stages (e.g., a discrimination reversal, a compound discrimination, a compound reversal, a new shape discrimination, and an intra-dimensional stimulus discrimination reversal. One group of rats was exposed to head-only X-ray radiation (2.3 Gy at a dose rate of 1.9 Gy/min, while a second group received a sham-radiation exposure using the same anesthesia protocol. The irradiated group responded less, had elevated numbers of omitted trials, increased errors, and greater response latencies compared to the sham-irradiated control group. Additionally, social odor recognition memory was tested after radiation exposure by assessing the degree to which rats explored wooden beads impregnated with either their own odors or with the odors of novel, unfamiliar rats; however, no significant effects of radiation on social odor recognition memory were observed. These data suggest that rodent tasks assessing higher-level human cognitive domains are useful in examining the effects of radiation on the CNS, and may be applicable in approximating CNS risks from radiation exposure in clinical populations receiving whole brain irradiation.

  12. Subunit orientation in the Escherichia coli enterobactin biosynthetic EntA-EntE complex revealed by a two-hybrid approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarian, Paknoosh; Pawelek, Peter D

    2016-08-01

    The siderophore enterobactin is synthesized by the enzymes EntA-F and EntH in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm. We previously reported in vitro evidence of an interaction between tetrameric EntA and monomeric EntE. Here we used bacterial adenylate cyclase two-hybrid (BACTH) assays to demonstrate that the E. coli EntA-EntE interaction occurs intracellularly. Furthermore, to obtain information on subunit orientation in the EntA-EntE complex, we fused BACTH reporter fragments T18 and T25 to EntA and EntE in both N-terminal and C-terminal orientations. To validate functionality of our fusion proteins, we performed Chrome Azurol S (CAS) assays using E. coli entE(-) and entA(-) knockout strains transformed with our BACTH constructs. We found that transformants expressing N-terminal and C-terminal T18/T25 fusions to EntE exhibited CAS signals, indicating that these constructs could rescue the entE(-) phenotype. While expression of EntA with N-terminal T18/T25 fusions exhibited CAS signals, C-terminal fusions did not, presumably due to disruption of the EntA tetramer in vivo. Bacterial growth assays supported our CAS findings. Co-transformation of functional T18/T25 fusions into cya(-)E. coli BTH101 cells resulted in positive BACTH signals only when T18/T25 fragments were fused to the N-termini of both EntA and EntE. Co-expression of N-terminally fused EntA with C-terminally fused EntE resulted in no detectable BACTH signal. Analysis of protein expression by Western blotting confirmed that the loss of BACTH signal was not due to impaired expression of fusion proteins. Based on our results, we propose that the N-termini of EntA and EntE are proximal in the intracellular complex, while the EntA N-terminus and EntE C-terminus are distal. A protein-protein docking simulation using SwarmDock was in agreement with our experimental observations.

  13. Crystal structure of the MazE/MazF complex: molecular bases of antidote-toxin recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Katsuhiko; Hanaoka, Fumio; Burley, Stephen K

    2003-04-01

    A structure of the Escherichia coli chromosomal MazE/MazF addiction module has been determined at 1.7 A resolution. Addiction modules consist of stable toxin and unstable antidote proteins that govern bacterial cell death. MazE (antidote) and MazF (toxin) form a linear heterohexamer composed of alternating toxin and antidote homodimers (MazF(2)-MazE(2)-MazF(2)). The MazE homodimer contains a beta barrel from which two extended C termini project, making interactions with flanking MazF homodimers that resemble the plasmid-encoded toxins CcdB and Kid. The MazE/MazF heterohexamer structure documents that the mechanism of antidote-toxin recognition is common to both chromosomal and plasmid-borne addiction modules, and provides general molecular insights into toxin function, antidote degradation in the absence of toxin, and promoter DNA binding by antidote/toxin complexes.

  14. Isolation and characterization of antigen-Ia complexes involved in T cell recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M

    1986-01-01

    Using equilibrium dialysis, it has been previously demonstrated that immunogenic peptides bind specifically to the Ia molecules serving as restriction elements in the immune response to these antigens. Using gel filtration to study the formation of ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-I-Ad complexes, it is he......Using equilibrium dialysis, it has been previously demonstrated that immunogenic peptides bind specifically to the Ia molecules serving as restriction elements in the immune response to these antigens. Using gel filtration to study the formation of ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-I-Ad complexes...... with glutaraldehyde revealed that the ovalbumin peptide was cross-linked solely to the alpha chain of I-Ad. Planar membranes containing I-Ad-OVA complexes stimulated a T cell response with 2 X 10(4) less antigen than required when uncomplexed antigen was used, thus demonstrating the biologic importance...

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of the p24/p22 subunit, DNC-3, is essential for the formation of the dynactin complex by bridging DNC-1/p150(Glued) and DNC-2/dynamitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Toya, Mika; Motegi, Fumio; Mana, Miyeko; Nakamura, Kuniaki; Sugimoto, Asako

    2010-11-01

    Dynactin is a multisubunit protein complex required for the activity of cytoplasmic dynein. In Caenorhabditis elegans, although 10 of the 11 dynactin subunits were identified based on the sequence similarities to their orthologs, the p24/p22 subunit has not been detected in the genome. Here, we demonstrate that DNC-3 (W10G11.20) is the functional counterpart of the p24/p22 subunit in C. elegans. RNAi phenotypes and subcellular localization of DNC-3 in early C. elegans embryos were nearly identical to those of the known dynactin components. All other dynactin subunits were co-immunoprecipitated with DNC-3, indicating that DNC-3 is a core component of dynactin. Furthermore, the overall secondary structure of DNC-3 resembles to those of the mammalian and yeast p24/p22. We found that DNC-3 is required for the localization of the DNC-1/p150(Glued) and DNC-2/dynamitin, the two components of the projection arm of dynactin, to the nuclear envelope of meiotic nuclei in the adult gonad. Moreover, DNC-3 physically interacted with DNC-1 and DNC-2 and significantly enhanced the binding ability between DNC-1 and DNC-2 in vitro. These results suggest that DNC-3 is essential for the formation of the projection arm subcomplex of dynactin.

  16. The Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor 6 (CPSF6) Subunit of the Capsid-recruited Pre-messenger RNA Cleavage Factor I (CFIm) Complex Mediates HIV-1 Integration into Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheedi, Sheeba; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Serrao, Erik; Sowd, Gregory A; Qian, Juan; Hao, Caili; Dasgupta, Twishasri; Engelman, Alan N; Skowronski, Jacek

    2016-05-27

    HIV-1 favors integration into active genes and gene-enriched regions of host cell chromosomes, thus maximizing the probability of provirus expression immediately after integration. This requires cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 6 (CPSF6), a cellular protein involved in pre-mRNA 3' end processing that binds HIV-1 capsid and connects HIV-1 preintegration complexes to intranuclear trafficking pathways that link integration to transcriptionally active chromatin. CPSF6 together with CPSF5 and CPSF7 are known subunits of the cleavage factor I (CFIm) 3' end processing complex; however, CPSF6 could participate in additional protein complexes. The molecular mechanisms underpinning the role of CPSF6 in HIV-1 infection remain to be defined. Here, we show that a majority of cellular CPSF6 is incorporated into the CFIm complex. HIV-1 capsid recruits CFIm in a CPSF6-dependent manner, which suggests that the CFIm complex mediates the known effects of CPSF6 in HIV-1 infection. To dissect the roles of CPSF6 and other CFIm complex subunits in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed virologic and integration site targeting properties of a CPSF6 variant with mutations that prevent its incorporation into CFIm We show, somewhat surprisingly, that CPSF6 incorporation into CFIm is not required for its ability to direct preferential HIV-1 integration into genes. The CPSF5 and CPSF7 subunits appear to have only a minor, if any, role in this process even though they appear to facilitate CPSF6 binding to capsid. Thus, CPSF6 alone controls the key molecular interactions that specify HIV-1 preintegration complex trafficking to active chromatin.

  17. Molecular recognition of DNA by ligands: roughness and complexity of the free energy profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenwei; Vargiu, Attilio Vittorio; Vargiu, Attlio Vittorio; Rohrdanz, Mary A; Carloni, Paolo; Clementi, Cecilia

    2013-10-14

    Understanding the molecular mechanism by which probes and chemotherapeutic agents bind to nucleic acids is a fundamental issue in modern drug design. From a computational perspective, valuable insights are gained by the estimation of free energy landscapes as a function of some collective variables (CVs), which are associated with the molecular recognition event. Unfortunately the choice of CVs is highly non-trivial because of DNA's high flexibility and the presence of multiple association-dissociation events at different locations and/or sliding within the grooves. Here we have applied a modified version of Locally-Scaled Diffusion Map (LSDMap), a nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique for decoupling multiple-timescale dynamics in macromolecular systems, to a metadynamics-based free energy landscape calculated using a set of intuitive CVs. We investigated the binding of the organic drug anthramycin to a DNA 14-mer duplex. By performing an extensive set of metadynamics simulations, we observed sliding of anthramycin along the full-length DNA minor groove, as well as several detachments from multiple sites, including the one identified by X-ray crystallography. As in the case of equilibrium processes, the LSDMap analysis is able to extract the most relevant collective motions, which are associated with the slow processes within the system, i.e., ligand diffusion along the minor groove and dissociation from it. Thus, LSDMap in combination with metadynamics (and possibly every equivalent method) emerges as a powerful method to describe the energetics of ligand binding to DNA without resorting to intuitive ad hoc reaction coordinates.

  18. lemmingA encodes the Apc11 subunit of the APC/C in Drosophila melanogaster that forms a ternary complex with the E2-C type ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, Vihar and Morula/Apc2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Olga

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation is a critical step in key cell cycle events, such as metaphase-anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C plays a pivotal role in these transitions by recognizing and marking regulatory proteins for proteasomal degradation. Its overall structure and function has been elucidated mostly in yeasts and mammalian cell lines. The APC/C is, however, a multisubunit assembly with at least 13 subunits and their function and interaction within the complex is still relatively uncharacterized, particularly in metazoan systems. Here, lemming (lmg mutants were used to study the APC/C subunit, Apc11, and its interaction partners in Drosophila melanogaster. Results The lmg gene was initially identified through a pharate adult lethal P element insertion mutation expressing developmental abnormalities and widespread apoptosis in larval imaginal discs and pupal abdominal histoblasts. Larval neuroblasts were observed to arrest mitosis in a metaphase-like state with highly condensed, scattered chromosomes and frequent polyploidy. These neuroblasts contain high levels of both cyclin A and cyclin B. The lmg gene was cloned by virtue of the lmg03424 P element insertion which is located in the 5' untranslated region. The lemming locus is transcribed to give a 2.0 kb mRNA that contains two ORFs, lmgA and lmgB. The lmgA ORF codes for a putative protein with more than 80% sequence homology to the APC11 subunit of the human APC/C. The 85 amino acid protein also contains a RING-finger motif characteristic of known APC11 subunits. The lmgA ORF alone was sufficient to rescue the lethal and mitotic phenotypes of the lmg138 null allele and to complement the temperature sensitive lethal phenotype of the APC11-myc9 budding yeast mutant. The LmgA protein interacts with Mr/Apc2, and they together form a binding site for Vihar, the E2-C type ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. Despite

  19. Recognition of the neurobiological insults imposed by complex trauma and the implications for psychotherapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Frank M; Hull, Alastair M

    2015-04-01

    Considerable research has been conducted on particular approaches to the psychotherapy of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the evidence indicates that modalities tested in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are far from 100% applicable and effective and the RCT model itself is inadequate for evaluating treatments of conditions with complex presentations and frequently multiple comorbidities. Evidence at levels 2 and 3 cannot be ignored. Expert-led interventions consistent with the emerging understanding of affective neuroscience are needed and not the unthinking application of a dominant therapeutic paradigm with evidence for PTSD but not complex PTSD. The over-optimistic claims for the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and misrepresentation of other approaches do not best serve a group of patients greatly in need of help; excluding individuals with such disorders as untreatable or treatment-resistant when viable alternatives exist is not acceptable.

  20. Recognition and sensing of low-epitope targets via ternary complexes with oligonucleotides and synthetic receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyung-Ae; Barbu, Mihaela; Halim, Marlin; Pallavi, Payal; Kim, Benjamin; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M.; Pecic, Stevan; Taylor, Steven; Worgall, Tilla S.; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2014-11-01

    Oligonucleotide-based receptors or aptamers can interact with small molecules, but the ability to achieve high-affinity and specificity of these interactions depends strongly on functional groups or epitopes displayed by the binding targets. Some classes of targets are particularly challenging: for example, monosaccharides have scarce functionalities and no aptamers have been reported to recognize, let alone distinguish from each other, glucose and other hexoses. Here we report aptamers that differentiate low-epitope targets such as glucose, fructose or galactose by forming ternary complexes with high-epitope organic receptors for monosaccharides. In a follow-up example, we expand this method to isolate high-affinity oligonucleotides against aromatic amino acids complexed in situ with a nonspecific organometallic receptor. The method is general and enables broad clinical use of aptamers for the detection of small molecules in mix-and-measure assays, as demonstrated by monitoring postprandial waves of phenylalanine in human subjects.

  1. A two-subunit bacterial sigma-factor activates transcription in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, Shawn R; Guariglia-Oropeza, Veronica; Gaballa, Ahmed; Helmann, John D

    2009-12-15

    The sigma-like factor YvrI and coregulator YvrHa activate transcription from a small set of conserved promoters in Bacillus subtilis. We report here that these two proteins independently contribute sigma-region 2 and sigma-region 4 functions to a holoenzyme-promoter DNA complex. YvrI binds RNA polymerase (RNAP) through a region 4 interaction with the beta-subunit flap domain and mediates specific promoter recognition but cannot initiate DNA melting at the -10 promoter element. Conversely, YvrHa possesses sequence similarity to a conserved core-binding motif in sigma-region 2 and binds to the N-terminal coiled-coil element in the RNAP beta'-subunit previously implicated in interaction with region 2 of sigma-factors. YvrHa plays an essential role in stabilizing the open complex and interacts specifically with the N-terminus of YvrI. Based on these results, we propose that YvrHa is situated in the transcription complex proximal to the -10 element of the promoter, whereas YvrI is responsible for -35 region recognition. This system presents an unusual example of a two-subunit bacterial sigma-factor.

  2. Recognition of the neurobiological insults imposed by complex trauma and the implications for psychotherapeutic interventions †

    OpenAIRE

    Corrigan, Frank M.; Hull, Alastair M

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has been conducted on particular approaches to the psychotherapy of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the evidence indicates that modalities tested in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are far from 100% applicable and effective and the RCT model itself is inadequate for evaluating treatments of conditions with complex presentations and frequently multiple comorbidities. Evidence at levels 2 and 3 cannot be ignored. Expert-led interventions consistent with...

  3. Structure of the PSD-95/MAP1A complex reveals a unique target recognition mode of the MAGUK GK domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yitian; Shang, Yuan; Zhang, Rongguang; Zhu, Jinwei

    2017-08-10

    The PSD-95 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are major synaptic scaffold proteins and play crucial roles in the dynamic regulation of dendritic remodelling, which is understood to be the foundation of synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. The guanylate kinase (GK) domain of MAGUK family proteins functions as a phosphor-peptide binding module. However, the GK domain of PSD-95 has been found to directly bind to a peptide sequence within the C-terminal region of neuronal-specific microtubule-associated protein 1A (MAP1A), although the detailed molecular mechanism governing this phosphorylation-independent interaction at the atomic level is missing. In the present study, we determine the crystal structure of PSD-95 GK in complex with the MAP1A peptide at 2.6-Å resolution. The complex structure reveals that, unlike a linear and elongated conformation in the phosphor-peptide/GK complexes, the MAP1A peptide adopts a unique conformation with a stretch of hydrophobic residues far from each other in the primary sequence clustering and interacting with the 'hydrophobic site' of PSD-95 GK and a highly conserved aspartic acid of MAP1A (D2117) mimicking the phosphor-serine/threonine in binding to the 'phosphor-site' of PSD-95 GK. We demonstrate that the MAP1A peptide may undergo a conformational transition upon binding to PSD-95 GK. Further structural comparison of known DLG GK-mediated complexes reveals the target recognition specificity and versatility of DLG GKs. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Ubiquitin dynamics in complexes reveal molecular recognition mechanisms beyond induced fit and conformational selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H Peters

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions play an important role in all biological processes. However, the principles underlying these interactions are only beginning to be understood. Ubiquitin is a small signalling protein that is covalently attached to different proteins to mark them for degradation, regulate transport and other functions. As such, it interacts with and is recognised by a multitude of other proteins. We have conducted molecular dynamics simulations of ubiquitin in complex with 11 different binding partners on a microsecond timescale and compared them with ensembles of unbound ubiquitin to investigate the principles of their interaction and determine the influence of complex formation on the dynamic properties of this protein. Along the main mode of fluctuation of ubiquitin, binding in most cases reduces the conformational space available to ubiquitin to a subspace of that covered by unbound ubiquitin. This behaviour can be well explained using the model of conformational selection. For lower amplitude collective modes, a spectrum of zero to almost complete coverage of bound by unbound ensembles was observed. The significant differences between bound and unbound structures are exclusively situated at the binding interface. Overall, the findings correspond neither to a complete conformational selection nor induced fit scenario. Instead, we introduce a model of conformational restriction, extension and shift, which describes the full range of observed effects.

  5. Bombyx mori and Aedes aegypti form multi-functional immune complexes that integrate pattern recognition, melanization, coagulants, and hemocyte recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dennis R.

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune system of insects responds to wounding and pathogens by mobilizing multiple pathways that provide both systemic and localized protection. Key localized responses in hemolymph include melanization, coagulation, and hemocyte encapsulation, which synergistically seal wounds and envelop and destroy pathogens. To be effective, these pathways require a targeted deposition of their components to provide protection without compromising the host. Extensive research has identified a large number of the effectors that comprise these responses, but questions remain regarding their post-translational processing, function, and targeting. Here, we used mass spectrometry to demonstrate the integration of pathogen recognition proteins, coagulants, and melanization components into stable, high-mass, multi-functional Immune Complexes (ICs) in Bombyx mori and Aedes aegypti. Essential proteins common to both include phenoloxidases, apolipophorins, serine protease homologs, and a serine protease that promotes hemocyte recruitment through cytokine activation. Pattern recognition proteins included C-type Lectins in B. mori, while A. aegypti contained a protein homologous to Plasmodium-resistant LRIM1 from Anopheles gambiae. We also found that the B. mori IC is stabilized by extensive transglutaminase-catalyzed cross-linking of multiple components. The melanization inhibitor Egf1.0, from the parasitoid wasp Microplitis demolitor, blocked inclusion of specific components into the IC and also inhibited transglutaminase activity. Our results show how coagulants, melanization components, and hemocytes can be recruited to a wound surface or pathogen, provide insight into the mechanism by which a parasitoid evades this immune response, and suggest that insects as diverse as Lepidoptera and Diptera utilize similar defensive mechanisms. PMID:28199361

  6. Bombyx mori and Aedes aegypti form multi-functional immune complexes that integrate pattern recognition, melanization, coagulants, and hemocyte recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dennis R; Clark, Kevin D

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune system of insects responds to wounding and pathogens by mobilizing multiple pathways that provide both systemic and localized protection. Key localized responses in hemolymph include melanization, coagulation, and hemocyte encapsulation, which synergistically seal wounds and envelop and destroy pathogens. To be effective, these pathways require a targeted deposition of their components to provide protection without compromising the host. Extensive research has identified a large number of the effectors that comprise these responses, but questions remain regarding their post-translational processing, function, and targeting. Here, we used mass spectrometry to demonstrate the integration of pathogen recognition proteins, coagulants, and melanization components into stable, high-mass, multi-functional Immune Complexes (ICs) in Bombyx mori and Aedes aegypti. Essential proteins common to both include phenoloxidases, apolipophorins, serine protease homologs, and a serine protease that promotes hemocyte recruitment through cytokine activation. Pattern recognition proteins included C-type Lectins in B. mori, while A. aegypti contained a protein homologous to Plasmodium-resistant LRIM1 from Anopheles gambiae. We also found that the B. mori IC is stabilized by extensive transglutaminase-catalyzed cross-linking of multiple components. The melanization inhibitor Egf1.0, from the parasitoid wasp Microplitis demolitor, blocked inclusion of specific components into the IC and also inhibited transglutaminase activity. Our results show how coagulants, melanization components, and hemocytes can be recruited to a wound surface or pathogen, provide insight into the mechanism by which a parasitoid evades this immune response, and suggest that insects as diverse as Lepidoptera and Diptera utilize similar defensive mechanisms.

  7. Proofreading exonuclease on a tether: the complex between the E. coli DNA polymerase III subunits α, ε, θ and β reveals a highly flexible arrangement of the proofreading domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Horan, Nicholas P.; Robinson, Andrew; Yagi, Hiromasa; Hill, Flynn R.; Jergic, Slobodan; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Loscha, Karin V.; Li, Nan; Tehei, Moeava; Oakley, Aaron J.; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas; Dixon, Nicholas E.

    2013-01-01

    A complex of the three (αεθ) core subunits and the β2 sliding clamp is responsible for DNA synthesis by Pol III, the Escherichia coli chromosomal DNA replicase. The 1.7 Å crystal structure of a complex between the PHP domain of α (polymerase) and the C-terminal segment of ε (proofreading exonuclease) subunits shows that ε is attached to α at a site far from the polymerase active site. Both α and ε contain clamp-binding motifs (CBMs) that interact simultaneously with β2 in the polymerization mode of DNA replication by Pol III. Strengthening of both CBMs enables isolation of stable αεθ:β2 complexes. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with reconstituted αεθ:β2 demonstrate retention of high mobility of a segment of 22 residues in the linker that connects the exonuclease domain of ε with its α-binding segment. In spite of this, small-angle X-ray scattering data show that the isolated complex with strengthened CBMs has a compact, but still flexible, structure. Photo-crosslinking with p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine incorporated at different sites in the α-PHP domain confirm the conformational variability of the tether. Structural models of the αεθ:β2 replicase complex with primer-template DNA combine all available structural data. PMID:23580545

  8. Low-Complexity Variable Frame Rate Analysis for Speech Recognition and Voice Activity Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Zheng-Hua; Lindberg, Børge

    2010-01-01

    present a low-complexity and effective frame selection approach based on a posteriori signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) weighted energy distance: The use of an energy distance, instead of e.g. a standard cepstral distance, makes the approach computationally efficient and enables fine granularity search......Frame based speech processing inherently assumes a stationary behavior of speech signals in a short period of time. Over a long time, the characteristics of the signals can change significantly and frames are not equally important, underscoring the need for frame selection. In this paper, we......, and the use of a posteriori SNR weighting emphasizes the reliable regions in noisy speech signals. It is experimentally found that the approach is able to assign a higher frame rate to fast changing events such as consonants, a lower frame rate to steady regions like vowels and no frames to silence, even...

  9. Adaptive fuzzy leader clustering of complex data sets in pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Scott C.; Pemmaraju, Surya; Mitra, Sunanda

    1992-01-01

    A modular, unsupervised neural network architecture for clustering and classification of complex data sets is presented. The adaptive fuzzy leader clustering (AFLC) architecture is a hybrid neural-fuzzy system that learns on-line in a stable and efficient manner. The initial classification is performed in two stages: a simple competitive stage and a distance metric comparison stage. The cluster prototypes are then incrementally updated by relocating the centroid positions from fuzzy C-means system equations for the centroids and the membership values. The AFLC algorithm is applied to the Anderson Iris data and laser-luminescent fingerprint image data. It is concluded that the AFLC algorithm successfully classifies features extracted from real data, discrete or continuous.

  10. Electrochemical chiral recognition by microparticle coatings of Pd complexes with bridging cyclometalated phosphines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, Antonio [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Valencia, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: antonio.domenech@uv.es; Koshevoy, Igor O.; Penno, Dirk; Ubeda, Maria Angeles [Departament de Quimica Inorganica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Valencia, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2008-03-10

    The palladium(II) dinuclear complex with bridging cyclometalated phosphines, {l_brace}Pd{sub 2}[{mu}-(C{sub 6}H{sub 4})PPh{sub 2}]{sub 2}({mu}-O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 2}{r_brace} (Pd{sub 2}L{sub 2}), having a paddlewheel structure, is reversibly oxidized in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} to a dinuclear palladium(III) analogue via two successive one-electron steps. Solid state voltammetry of Pd{sub 2}L{sub 2} in contact with aqueous electrolytes produce as one-electron oxidation with two competing mechanisms involving anion intercalation/anion binding between/to metal centres, chloride ions acting as inhibitors for the first pathway. R- and S-Pd{sub 2}L{sub 2} produces a significant stereoselective electrocatalytic activity with respect to the oxidation of L- and D-glutamic acid in alkaline media.

  11. Complexity and diversity of the NKR-P1:Clr (Klrb1:Clec2 recognition systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Kirkham

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The NKR-P1 receptors were identified as prototypical natural killer (NK cell surface antigens and later shown to be conserved from rodents to humans on NK cells and subsets of T cells. C-type lectin-like in nature, they were originally shown to be capable of activating NK cell function and to recognize ligands on tumour cells. However, certain family members have subsequently been shown to be capable of inhibiting NK cell activity, and to recognize proteins encoded by a family of genetically linked C-type lectin-related (Clr ligands. Some of these ligands are expressed by normal, healthy cells, and modulated during transformation, infection, and cellular stress, while other ligands are upregulated during the immune response and during pathological circumstances. Here, we discuss historical and recent developments in NKR-P1 biology that demonstrate this NK receptor-ligand system to be far more complex and diverse than originally anticipated.

  12. The Cambridge Mindreading Face-Voice Battery for Children (CAM-C): complex emotion recognition in children with and without autism spectrum conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Ofer; Sinai-Gavrilov, Yana; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Difficulties in recognizing emotions and mental states are central characteristics of autism spectrum conditions (ASC). However, emotion recognition (ER) studies have focused mostly on recognition of the six 'basic' emotions, usually using still pictures of faces. This study describes a new battery of tasks for testing recognition of nine complex emotions and mental states from video clips of faces and from voice recordings taken from the Mindreading DVD. This battery (the Cambridge Mindreading Face-Voice Battery for Children or CAM-C) was given to 30 high-functioning children with ASC, aged 8 to 11, and to 25 matched controls. The ASC group scored significantly lower than controls on complex ER from faces and voices. In particular, participants with ASC had difficulty with six out of nine complex emotions. Age was positively correlated with all task scores, and verbal IQ was correlated with scores in the voice task. CAM-C scores were negatively correlated with parent-reported level of autism spectrum symptoms. Children with ASC show deficits in recognition of complex emotions and mental states from both facial and vocal expressions. The CAM-C may be a useful test for endophenotypic studies of ASC and is one of the first to use dynamic stimuli as an assay to reveal the ER profile in ASC. It complements the adult version of the CAM Face-Voice Battery, thus providing opportunities for developmental assessment of social cognition in autism.

  13. Association with the origin recognition complex suggests a novel role for histone acetyltransferase Hat1p/Hat2p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenblatt Jack F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone modifications have been implicated in the regulation of transcription and, more recently, in DNA replication and repair. In yeast, a major conserved histone acetyltransferase, Hat1p, preferentially acetylates lysine residues 5 and 12 on histone H4. Results Here, we report that a nuclear sub-complex consisting of Hat1p and its partner Hat2p interacts physically and functionally with the origin recognition complex (ORC. While mutational inactivation of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT gene HAT1 alone does not compromise origin firing or initiation of DNA replication, a deletion in HAT1 (or HAT2 exacerbates the growth defects of conditional orc-ts mutants. Thus, the ORC-associated Hat1p-dependent histone acetyltransferase activity suggests a novel linkage between histone modification and DNA replication. Additional genetic and biochemical evidence points to the existence of partly overlapping histone H3 acetyltransferase activities in addition to Hat1p/Hat2p for proper DNA replication efficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrated a dynamic association of Hat1p with chromatin during S-phase that suggests a role of this enzyme at the replication fork. Conclusion We have found an intriguing new association of the Hat1p-dependent histone acetyltransferase in addition to its previously known role in nuclear chromatin assembly (Hat1p/Hat2p-Hif1p. The participation of a distinct Hat1p/Hat2p sub-complex suggests a linkage of histone H4 modification with ORC-dependent DNA replication.

  14. Cross-linking of rabbit skeletal muscle troponin subunits: labeling of cysteine-98 of troponin C with 4-maleimidobenzophenone and analysis of products formed in the binary complex with troponin T and the ternary complex with troponins I and T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszyk, J; Collins, J H; Leavis, P C; Tao, T

    1988-09-06

    The sulfhydryl-specific, heterobifunctional, photoactivatable cross-linker 4-maleimidobenzophenone (BPMal) was used to study the interaction of rabbit skeletal muscle troponin subunits TnC, TnT, and TnI. TnC was labeled at Cys-98 by the maleimide moiety of BPMal and then mixed with either TnT alone or TnI plus TnT, in the presence of Ca2+. Upon photolysis, TnI and/or TnT formed covalent cross-links with TnC. The cross-linked TnC-TnT heterodimer obtained from the binary complex was digested into progressively smaller cross-linked peptides that were purified by HPLC and then characterized by amino acid analysis and sequencing. An initial cross-linked CNBr fraction contained the expected peptide CB9 (residues 84-135) of TnC, plus CNBr peptides spanning residues 152-230 of TnT. Results from a peptic digest of the CNBr cross-linked fraction permitted the identification of residues 159-197 as the most highly cross-linked region in TnT. A final subtilisin digest yielded a heterogeneous cross-linked fraction, which suggested that an especially high degree of cross-links was formed in the vicinity of residues 175-178 (Met-Lys-Lys-Lys) of TnT. Although this region of TnT had previously been implicated in binding, we show here for the first time that it is close to Cys-98 of TnC. In an analogous study on the binary complex of TnC and TnI [Leszyk, J., Collins, J. H., Leavis, P. C., & Tao, T. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 7042-7047], we previously showed that Cys-98 of TnC was cross-linked mainly to CN4, the "inhibitory region", of TnI.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Effects of substitutions at position 180 in the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase 70 subunit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Olga N Koroleva; Stephen Jw Busby; Valeriy L Drutsa

    2011-03-01

    In order to investigate the role of His180 residue, located in the non-conserved region of the 70 subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, two mutant variants of the protein with substitutions for either alanine or glutamic acid were constructed and purified using the IMPACT system. The ability of mutant 70 subunits to interact with core RNA polymerase was investigated using native gel-electrophoresis. The properties of the corresponding reconstituted holoenzymes, as provided by gel shift analysis of their complexes with single- and double-stranded promoter-like DNA and by in vitro transcription experiments, allowed one to deduce that His180 influences several steps of transcription initiation, including core binding, promoter DNA recognition and open complex formation.

  16. The gene sml0013 of Synechocystis species strain PCC 6803 encodes for a novel subunit of the NAD(P)H oxidoreductase or complex I that is ubiquitously distributed among Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Doreen; Schubert, Hendrik; Georg, Jens; Hess, Wolfgang R; Hagemann, Martin

    2013-11-01

    The NAD(P)H oxidoreductase or complex I (NDH1) complex participates in many processes such as respiration, cyclic electron flow, and inorganic carbon concentration in the cyanobacterial cell. Despite immense progress in our understanding of the structure-function relation of the cyanobacterial NDH1 complex, the subunits catalyzing NAD(P)H docking and oxidation are still missing. The gene sml0013 of Synechocystis 6803 encodes for a small protein of unknown function for which homologs exist in all completely known cyanobacterial genomes. The protein exhibits weak similarities to the NDH-dependent flow6 (NDF6) protein, which was reported from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) chloroplasts as a NDH subunit. An sml0013 inactivation mutant of Synechocystis 6803 was generated and characterized. It showed only weak differences regarding growth and pigmentation in various culture conditions; most remarkably, it exhibited a glucose-sensitive phenotype in the light. The genome-wide expression pattern of the Δsml0013::Km mutant was almost identical to the wild type when grown under high CO2 conditions as well as after shifts to low CO2 conditions. However, measurements of the photosystem I redox kinetic in cells of the Δsml0013::Km mutant revealed differences, such as a decreased capability of cyclic electron flow as well as electron flow into respiration in comparison with the wild type. These results suggest that the Sml0013 protein (named NdhP) represents a novel subunit of the cyanobacterial NDH1 complex, mediating its coupling either to the respiratory or the photosynthetic electron flow.

  17. AFM imaging reveals the assembly of a P2X receptor complex containing P2X2, P2X4 and P2X6 subunits

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Seven P2X purinergic receptor subunits have been identified: P2X1-P2X7. All except P2X6 assemble as homotrimers, and six heteromeric receptors (P2X1/2, P2X1/4, P2X1/5, P2X2/3, P2X2/6 and P2X4/6) have been described. In addition, P2X4 homomers associate with P2X2 or P2X7 homomers as dimers of trimers. The various P2X receptors show individual functional properties, suggesting distinct physiological roles. The overlapping expression of P2X2, P2X4 and P2X6 subunits has been shown in different ce...

  18. Characterization of lysosomal membrane proteins of Dictyostelium discoideum. A complex population of acidic integral membrane glycoproteins, Rab GTP-binding proteins and vacuolar ATPase subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temesvari, L; Rodriguez-Paris, J; Bush, J; Steck, T L; Cardelli, J

    1994-10-14

    Highly purified lysosomes, prepared by magnetic fractionation of homogenates from Dictyostelium discoideum cells fed colloidal iron, were lysed under hypoosmotic conditions, and the membrane-associated proteins were subjected to gel electrophoresis. Thirteen major membrane polypeptides, ranging in molecular weight from 25,000 to 100,000 were identified. The isoelectric points of these proteins ranged from below 3.8 to greater than 7.0. Most of these proteins were stripped from membranes exposed to a chaotropic agent, 3,5-diodo-2-hydroxybenzoic acid lithium salt, and were therefore classified as peripheral membrane proteins. Twenty five glycoprotein species were detected by lectin blot analysis; 19 were classified as integral membrane proteins, and were, in general, larger than 45 kDa and negatively charged due in part to the presence of mannose 6-sulfate. Western blot analysis also demonstrated that a Rab 4-like GTPase, a Rab 7-like GTPase, and at least three subunits of the vacuolar ATPase were associated with the lysosomal membrane; the ATPase subunits appeared to be major proteins in lysosomal membranes. Finally, based on N-terminal sequence analysis of a major 41-kDa lysosome-associated membrane protein, we cloned a cDNA that encodes a protein (DVA41) highly homologous to a yeast and a bovine vacuolar ATPase subunit of approximately 41 kDa. The D. discoideum DVA41 gene was apparently a single copy gene, expressed at constant levels during growth and development.

  19. Substrate recognition and motion mode analyses of PFV integrase in complex with viral DNA via coarse-grained models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Hu

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is an important target in the development of drugs against the AIDS virus. Drug design based on the structure of IN was markedly hampered due to the lack of three-dimensional structure information of HIV-1 IN-viral DNA complex. The prototype foamy virus (PFV IN has a highly functional and structural homology with HIV-1 IN. Recently, the X-ray crystal complex structure of PFV IN with its cognate viral DNA has been obtained. In this study, both Gaussian network model (GNM and anisotropy network model (ANM have been applied to comparatively investigate the motion modes of PFV DNA-free and DNA-bound IN. The results show that the motion mode of PFV IN has only a slight change after binding with DNA. The motion of this enzyme is in favor of association with DNA, and the binding ability is determined by its intrinsic structural topology. Molecular docking experiments were performed to gain the binding modes of a series of diketo acid (DKA inhibitors with PFV IN obtained from ANM, from which the dependability of PFV IN-DNA used in the drug screen for strand transfer (ST inhibitors was confirmed. It is also found that the functional groups of keto-enol, bis-diketo, tetrazole and azido play a key role in aiding the recognition of viral DNA, and thus finally increase the inhibition capability for the corresponding DKA inhibitor. Our study provides some theoretical information and helps to design anti-AIDS drug based on the structure of IN.

  20. Transport of the GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase α/β-subunit precursor protein to the Golgi apparatus requires a combinatorial sorting motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Mine; Braulke, Thomas; Storch, Stephan

    2013-01-11

    The Golgi-resident N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase (PT) complex is composed of two α-, β-, and γ-subunits and represents the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker on soluble lysosomal proteins. Mutations in the PT complex cause the lysosomal storage diseases mucolipidosis II and III. A prerequisite for the enzymatic activity is the site-1 protease-mediated cleavage of the PT α/β-subunit precursor protein in the Golgi apparatus. Here, we have investigated structural requirements of the PT α/β-subunit precursor protein for its efficient export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Both wild-type and a cleavage-resistant type III membrane PT α/β-subunit precursor protein are exported whereas coexpressed separate α- and β-subunits failed to reach the cis-Golgi compartment. Mutational analyses revealed combinatorial, non-exchangeable dileucine and dibasic motifs located in a defined sequence context in the cytosolic N- and C-terminal domains that are required for efficient ER exit and subsequent proteolytic activation of the α/β-subunit precursor protein in the Golgi. In the presence of a dominant negative Sar1 mutant the ER exit of the PT α/β-subunit precursor protein is inhibited indicating its transport in coat protein complex II-coated vesicles. Expression studies of missense mutations identified in mucolipidosis III patients that alter amino acids in the N- and C-terminal domains demonstrated that the substitution of a lysine residue in close proximity to the dileucine sorting motif impaired ER-Golgi transport and subsequent activation of the PT α/β-subunit precursor protein. The data suggest that the oligomeric type III membrane protein PT complex requires a combinatorial sorting motif that forms a tertiary epitope to be recognized by distinct sites within the coat protein complex II machinery.

  1. Increased reactive oxygen species production and lower abundance of complex I subunits and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B protein despite normal mitochondrial respiration in insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefort, Natalie; Glancy, Brian; Bowen, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    the higher ROS production. Tandem mass spectrometry identified protein abundance differences per mitochondrial mass in insulin resistance, including lower abundance of complex I subunits and enzymes involved in the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and fatty acids (e.g., carnitine...... palmitoyltransferase 1B). CONCLUSIONS: We provide data suggesting normal oxidative capacity of mitochondria in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle in parallel with high rates of ROS production. Furthermore, we show specific abundance differences in proteins involved in fat and BCAA oxidation that might contribute...... to the accumulation of lipid and BCAA frequently associated with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance....

  2. Effects of chronic fluoride exposure on object recognition memory and mRNA expression of SNARE complex in hippocampus of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Haijun; Du, Wenjuan; Zhou, Bingrui; Zhang, Wen; Xu, Guoli; Niu, Ruiyan; Sun, Zilong

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of long-term fluoride exposure on object recognition memory and mRNA expression of soluble N-ethylmaleimidesensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNARE) complex (synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2), and syntaxin 1A) in the hippocampus of male mice. Sixty sexually matured male Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups: control group (given distilled water), low F group (25 mg/L NaF, corresponding to 11 mg/L F(-)), medium F group (50 mg/L NaF, corresponding to 22 mg/L F(-)), and high F group (100 mg/L NaF, corresponding to 45 mg/L F(-)). After 180 days, the spontaneous locomotor behavior and object recognition memory were detected by open field test and novel object recognition (NOR) test. Results showed that compared with the control group, frequency in each zone, total distance, and line crosses were significantly increased in low F and medium F groups, suggesting fluoride enhanced excitement of mice, while there were no marked changes in high F group. Twenty-four hours after training, a deficit of long-term memory (LTM) occurred only in high F group (P recognition memory, and upregulate VAMP-2 mRNA expression, which are involved in the adverse effects of fluoride on the object recognition memory of nervous system.

  3. Aptamers to the sigma factor mimic promoter recognition and inhibit transcription initiation by bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miropolskaya, Nataliya; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2016-01-08

    Promoter recognition by bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a multi-step process involving multiple protein-DNA interactions and several structural and kinetic intermediates which remain only partially characterized. We used single-stranded DNA aptamers containing specific promoter motifs to probe the interactions of the Thermus aquaticus RNAP σ(A) subunit with the -10 promoter element in the absence of other parts of the promoter complex. The aptamer binding decreased intrinsic fluorescence of the σ subunit, likely as a result of interactions between the -10 element and conserved tryptophan residues of the σ DNA-binding region 2. By monitoring these changes, we demonstrated that DNA binding proceeds through a single rate-limiting step resulting in formation of very stable complexes. Deletion of the N-terminal domain of the σ(A) subunit increased the rate of aptamer binding while replacement of this domain with an unrelated N-terminal region 1.1 from the Escherichia coli σ(70) subunit restored the original kinetics of σ-aptamer interactions. The results demonstrate that the key step in promoter recognition can be modelled in a simple σ-aptamer system and reveal that highly divergent N-terminal domains similarly modulate the DNA-binding properties of the σ subunit. The aptamers efficiently suppressed promoter-dependent transcription initiation by the holoenzyme of RNA polymerase, suggesting that they may be used for development of novel transcription inhibitors.

  4. The origin recognition complex interacts with a subset of metabolic genes tightly linked to origins of replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Shor

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The origin recognition complex (ORC marks chromosomal sites as replication origins and is essential for replication initiation. In yeast, ORC also binds to DNA elements called silencers, where its primary function is to recruit silent information regulator (SIR proteins to establish transcriptional silencing. Indeed, silencers function poorly as chromosomal origins. Several genetic, molecular, and biochemical studies of HMR-E have led to a model proposing that when ORC becomes limiting in the cell (such as in the orc2-1 mutant only sites that bind ORC tightly (such as HMR-E remain fully occupied by ORC, while lower affinity sites, including many origins, lose ORC occupancy. Since HMR-E possessed a unique non-replication function, we reasoned that other tight sites might reveal novel functions for ORC on chromosomes. Therefore, we comprehensively determined ORC "affinity" genome-wide by performing an ORC ChIP-on-chip in ORC2 and orc2-1 strains. Here we describe a novel group of orc2-1-resistant ORC-interacting chromosomal sites (ORF-ORC sites that did not function as replication origins or silencers. Instead, ORF-ORC sites were comprised of protein-coding regions of highly transcribed metabolic genes. In contrast to the ORC-silencer paradigm, transcriptional activation promoted ORC association with these genes. Remarkably, ORF-ORC genes were enriched in proximity to origins of replication and, in several instances, were transcriptionally regulated by these origins. Taken together, these results suggest a surprising connection among ORC, replication origins, and cellular metabolism.

  5. Solution assembly of cytokine receptor ectodomain complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zining; Ciardelli, T.L. [Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology; Johnson, K.W. [Chiron Corp., Emeryville, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For the majority of single transmembrane-spanning cell surface receptors, signal transmission across the lipid bilayer barrier involves several discrete components of molecular recognition. The interaction between ligand and the extracellular segment of its cognate receptor (ectodomain) initiates either homomeric or heteromeric association of receptor subunits. Specific recognition among these subunits may then occur between ectodomain regions, within the membrane by interhelical contact or inside the cell between cytoplasmic domains. Any or all of these interactions may contribute to the stability of the signaling complex. It is the characteristics of ligand binding by the ectodomains of these receptors that controls the heteromeric or homomeric nature and the stoichiometry of the complex. Cytokines and their receptors belong to a growing family of macromolecular systems that exhibit these functional features and share many structural similarities as well. Interleukin-2 is a multifunctional cytokine that represents, perhaps, the most complex example to date of ligand recognition among the hematopoietin receptor family. It is the cooperative binding of IL-2 by all three proteins on the surface of activated T-lymphocytes, however, that ultimately results in crosslinking of the {beta}- and {gamma}-subunits and signaling via association of their cytoplasmic domains. Although the high-affinity IL-2R functions as a heterotrimer, heterodimers of the receptor subunits are also physiologically important. The {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer or {open_quotes}pseudo-high affinity{close_quotes} receptor captures IL-2 as a preformed cell surface complex while the {beta}/{gamma} intermediate affinity site exists, in the absence of the {alpha} subunit, on the majority of natural killer cells. We have begun to study stable complexes of cytokine receptor ectodomains of defined composition and that mimic the ligand binding characteristics of the equivalent cell surface receptor sites.

  6. Trigger Factor Binds to Ribosome-Signal-Recognition Particle (SRP) Complexes and Is Excluded by Binding of the SRP Receptor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iwona Buskiewicz; Elke Deuerling; Shan-Qing Gu; Johannes Jöckel; Marina V. Rodnina; Bernd Bukau; Wolfgang Wintermeyer; Thomas A. Steitz

    2004-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) and signal recognition particle (SRP) bind to the bacterial ribosome and are both crosslinked to protein L23 at the peptide exit, where they interact with emerging nascent peptide chains...

  7. NAC (Nascent Polypeptide-associated Complex) and Its Alpha Subunit NACA%NAC(初期多肽相关复合体)及其α亚基NACA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘娇玲; 吕晓莉; 陈克平

    2015-01-01

    初期多肽相关复合体(nascent polypeptide-associated complex,NAC)是新生肽链从核糖体上延伸出来第一个接触的异二聚体蛋白复合体,从古生菌、酵母到哺乳动物都高度保守.NAC是一个具有多种功能的蛋白,包括保护新生肽链、调控新生肽转位进入内质网和线粒体、肌肉损伤修复等.其α亚基NACA/αNAC(nascent polypeptide-associated complex alpha subunit)主要在转录调控中起作用.此外,NACA还能调控FADD(Fas-associated with death domain protein)所介导的信号转导.在一些病毒性疾病,如乙肝、丙肝和非洲猪瘟中,NACA能与病毒的某些蛋白相互作用,致使机体功能紊乱.在老年痴呆症和唐氏综合征患者脑细胞中,与正常水平相比,NACA表达下调.%NAC (nascent polypeptide-associated complex) is the first cytosolic heterodimeric protein complex to contact nascent polypeptide chains emerging from ribosomes and is evolutionarily conserved in the genomes from archaea,yeast to mammals.NAC is found to be a multifunctional protein which can shield nascent chains,regulate nascent chains translocating into endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria,repair muscle damage and so on.However,its α subunit NACA/αNAC (nascent polypeptide-associated complex alpha subunit) is identified mainly functioning in transcriptional regulation.It may play a role in FADD-mediated signal transduction process.Moreover,in many viral diseases,such as the Viral Hepatitis Type B,C and the African swine fever,it is found to be able to interact with the relevant viral protein to cause physiological disorders.Even in the brain tissues of patients with Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome,NACA is found downregulated.

  8. Rational design of a cytotoxic dinuclear Cu2 complex that binds by molecular recognition at two neighboring phosphates of the DNA backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jany, Thomas; Moreth, Alexander; Gruschka, Claudia; Sischka, Andy; Spiering, Andre; Dieding, Mareike; Wang, Ying; Samo, Susan Haji; Stammler, Anja; Bögge, Hartmut; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele; Anselmetti, Dario; Glaser, Thorsten

    2015-03-16

    The mechanism of the cytotoxic function of cisplatin and related anticancer drugs is based on their binding to the nucleobases of DNA. The development of new classes of anticancer drugs requires establishing other binding modes. Therefore, we performed a rational design for complexes that target two neighboring phosphates of the DNA backbone by molecular recognition resulting in a family of dinuclear complexes based on 2,7-disubstituted 1,8-naphthalenediol. This rigid backbone preorganizes the two metal ions for molecular recognition at the distance of two neighboring phosphates in DNA of 6-7 Å. Additionally, bulky chelating pendant arms in the 2,7-position impede nucleobase complexation by steric hindrance. We successfully synthesized the Cu(II)2 complex of the designed family of dinuclear complexes and studied its binding to dsDNA by independent ensemble and single-molecule methods like gel electrophoresis, precipitation, and titration experiments followed by UV-vis spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), as well as optical tweezers (OT) and magnetic tweezers (MT) DNA stretching. The observed irreversible binding of our dinuclear Cu(II)2 complex to dsDNA leads to a blocking of DNA synthesis as studied by polymerase chain reactions and cytotoxicity for human cancer cells.

  9. A subcomplex of RNA polymerase III subunits involved in transcription termination and reinitiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrieux, Emilie; Alic, Nazif; Ducrot, Cécile; Acker, Joël; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    While initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase III (Pol III) has been thoroughly investigated, molecular mechanisms driving transcription termination remain poorly understood. Here we describe how the characterization of the in vitro transcriptional properties of a Pol III variant (Pol IIIΔ), lacking the C11, C37, and C53 subunits, revealed crucial information about the mechanisms of Pol III termination and reinitiation. The specific requirement for the C37–C53 complex in terminator recognition was determined. This complex was demonstrated to slow down elongation by the enzyme, adding to the evidence implicating the elongation rate as a critical determinant of correct terminator recognition. In addition, the presence of the C37–C53 complex required the simultaneous addition of C11 to Pol IIIΔ for the enzyme to reinitiate after the first round of transcription, thus uncovering a role for polymerase subunits in the facilitated recycling process. Interestingly, we demonstrated that the role of C11 in recycling was independent of its role in RNA cleavage. The data presented allowed us to propose a model of Pol III termination and its links to reinitiation. PMID:16362040

  10. Stable interaction between the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complex Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC) and DNA polymerase {epsilon} is mediated by the cohesion-specific subunits, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takeshi; Takano, Ryuji; Takeo, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Rina; Ogawa, Kaori; Ohashi, Eiji; Tsurimoto, Toshiki

    2010-11-05

    One of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complexes, Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC), is involved in sister chromatid cohesion. To examine its relationship with factors involved in DNA replication, we performed a proteomics analysis of Ctf18-interacting proteins. We found that Ctf18 interacts with a replicative DNA polymerase, DNA polymerase ε (pol ε). Co-immunoprecipitation with recombinant Ctf18-RFC and pol ε demonstrated that their binding is direct and mediated by two distinct interactions, one weak and one stable. Three subunits that are specifically required for cohesion in yeast, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8, formed a trimeric complex (18-1-8) and together enabled stable binding with pol ε. The C-terminal 23-amino acid stretch of Ctf18 was necessary for the trimeric association of 18-1-8 and was required for the stable interaction. The weak interaction was observed with alternative loader complexes including Ctf18-RFC(5), which lacks Dcc1 and Ctf8, suggesting that the common loader structures, including the RFC small subunits (RFC2-5), are responsible for the weak interaction. The two interaction modes, mediated through distinguishable structures of Ctf18-RFC, both occurred through the N-terminal half of pol ε, which includes the catalytic domain. The addition of Ctf18-RFC or Ctf18-RFC(5) to the DNA synthesis reaction caused partial inhibition and stimulation, respectively. Thus, Ctf18-RFC has multiple interactions with pol ε that promote polymorphic modulation of DNA synthesis. We propose that their interaction alters the DNA synthesis mode to enable the replication fork to cooperate with the establishment of cohesion.

  11. Synthesis and molecular recognition of novel oligo(ethylenediamino) bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s and their copper(II) complexes: enhanced molecular binding ability and selectivity by multiple recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; You, C C; Li, B

    2001-03-16

    Four bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s tethered by different lengths of oligo(ethylenediamine)s have been synthesized and their inclusion complexation behavior with selected substrates elucidated by circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence decay. In order to study their binding ability quantitatively, inclusion complexation stability constants with four dye guests, that is, brilliant green (BG), methyl orange (MO), ammonium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), and sodium 6-(p-toluidino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), have been determined in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C with spectrophotometric, spectropolarimetric, or spectrofluorometric titrations. The results obtained indicate that the two tethered cyclodextrin units might cooperatively bind to a guest, and the molecular binding ability toward model substrates, especially linear guests such as TNS and MO, could be extended. The tether length plays a crucial role in the molecular recognition, the binding constants for ANS and TNS decrease linearly with an increase in the tether length of dimeric cyclodextrin. The Gibbs free energy changes (-deltaGo) for the unit increment per ethylene are 0.99 kJ mol(-1) for ANS and 0.44 kJmol(-1) for TNS, respectively. On the other hand, the presence of a copper(II) ion in metallobis(beta-cyclodextrin)s oligo(ethylenediamino) tethers enhances not only the original binding ability, but also the molecular selectivity through triple or multiple recognition, as compared with the parent bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s.

  12. Facial Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihalache Sergiu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During their lifetime, people learn to recognize thousands of faces that they interact with. Face perception refers to an individual's understanding and interpretation of the face, particularly the human face, especially in relation to the associated information processing in the brain. The proportions and expressions of the human face are important to identify origin, emotional tendencies, health qualities, and some social information. From birth, faces are important in the individual's social interaction. Face perceptions are very complex as the recognition of facial expressions involves extensive and diverse areas in the brain. Our main goal is to put emphasis on presenting human faces specialized studies, and also to highlight the importance of attractiviness in their retention. We will see that there are many factors that influence face recognition.

  13. Regulation of the nuclear gene that encodes the alpha-subunit of the mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase complex. Activation by upstream stimulatory factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, G A; Jordan, E M

    1997-04-18

    We have previously identified several positive cis-acting regulatory regions in the promoters of the bovine and human nuclear-encoded mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase alpha-subunit genes (ATPA). One of these cis-acting regions contains the sequence 5'-CACGTG-3' (an E-box), to which a number of transcription factors containing a basic helix-loop-helix motif can bind. This E-box element is required for maximum activity of the ATPA promoter in HeLa cells. The present study identifies the human transcription factor, upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2), as a nuclear factor that binds to the ATPA E-box and demonstrates that USF2 plays a critical role in the activation of the ATPA gene in vivo. Evidence includes the following. Antiserum directed against USF2 recognized factors present in HeLa nuclear extracts that interact with the ATPA promoter in mobility shift assays. Wild-type USF2 proteins synthesized from expression vectors trans-activated the ATPA promoter through the E-box, whereas truncated USF2 proteins devoid of the amino-terminal activation domains did not. Importantly, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of USF2 lacking the basic DNA binding domain but able to dimerize with endogenous USF proteins significantly reduced the level of activation of the ATPA promoter caused by ectopically coexpressed USF2, demonstrating the importance of endogenous USF2 in activation of the ATPA gene.

  14. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the subunit stoichiometry study of high-mass non-covalent complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniatte, M.; Lesieur, C.; Vecsey-Semjen, B.; Buckley, J. T.; Pattus, F.; van der Goot, F. G.; van Dorsselaer, A.

    1997-12-01

    This study explores the potential of MALDI-TOF MS for the mass measurement of large non-covalent protein complexes. The following non-covalent complexes have been investigated: aerolysin from Aeromonas hydrophila (335 kDa) and [alpha]-haemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus (233 kDa) which are both cytolytic toxins, three enzymes known to be homotetramers in solution: bovine liver catalase (235 kDa), rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase (232 kDa), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (147 kDa) and finally a lectin, concanavalin A (102 kDa). Three different matrix preparations were systematically tested under various conditions: ferulic acid dissolved in THF, 2,6-dihydroxyacetophenone in 20 mM aqueous ammonium citrate and a two-step sample preparation with sinapinic acid. It was possible to find a suitable combination of matrix and preparation type which allowed the molecularity of all complexes tested to be deduced from the MALDI mass spectrum. Trimeric and tetrameric intermediates accumulating during the formation of the active heptameric aerolysin complex were also identified, this allowing a formation mechanism to be proposed. The observation of large specific non-covalent complexes has been found to be dependent on the choice of matrix, the type of sample preparation used, the solvent evaporation speed, the pH of the resulting matrix-sample mixture and the number of shots acquired on a given area. From this set of experiments, some useful guidelines for the observation of large complexes by MALDI could therefore be deduced. Fast evaporation of the solvent is particularly necessary in the case of pH sensitive complexes. An ESMS study on the same non-covalent complexes indicated that, rather surprisingly, reliable results could be obtained by MALDI-TOF MS on several very large complexes (above 200 kDa) for which ESMS yielded no clear spectra.

  15. Identification of novel immunogenic proteins from Mycoplasma bovis and establishment of an indirect ELISA based on recombinant E1 beta subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhong Sun

    Full Text Available The pathogen Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis is a major cause of respiratory disease, mastitis, and arthritis in cattle. Screening the key immunogenic proteins and updating rapid diagnostic techniques are necessary to the prevention and control of M. bovis infection. In this study, 19 highly immunogenic proteins from M. bovis strain PD were identified using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Of these 19 proteins, pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component beta subunit (PDHB showed excellent immune reactivity and repeatability. PDHB was found to be conserved in different M. bovis isolates, as indicated by Western blot analysis. On the basis of these results, a rPDHB-based indirect ELISA (iELISA was established for the detection of serum antibodies using prokaryotically expressed recombinant PDHB protein as the coating antigen. The specificity analysis result showed that rPDHB-based iELISA did not react with other pathogens assessed in our study except M. agalactiae (which infects sheep and goats. Moreover, 358 serum samples from several disease-affected cattle feedlots were tested using this iELISA system and a commercial kit, which gave positive rates of 50.8% and 39.9%, respectively. The estimated Kappa agreement coefficient between the two methods was 0.783. Notably, 39 positive serum samples that had been missed by the commercial kit were all found to be positive by Western blot analysis. The detection rate of rPDHB-based iELISA was significantly higher than that of the commercial kit at a serum dilution ratio of 1∶5120 to 1∶10,240 (P<0.05. Taken together, these results provide important information regarding the novel immunogenic proteins of M. bovis. The established rPDHB-based iELISA may be suitable for use as a new method of antibody detection in M. bovis.

  16. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  17. Molecular modeling on the recognition of DNA sequence and conformational repair of sheared DNA by novel chiral metal complex D, L-[Co(phen)2hpip]3+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Yanbo; ZHANG; Cuiping

    2006-01-01

    A study on the recognition of DNA sequence and conformational repair of sheared DNA by Novel Chiral Metal complex D,L-[Co(phen)2hpip]3+ (phen=1,10 phenanthroline, hpip=2-[2-hydroxyphenyl] imidazole [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline) is carried out with molecular simulations. The results reveal that two isomers of the complex could both recognize the normal DNA in the minor groove orientation, while recognize the sheared DNA in the major groove orientation and both isomers could convert the conformation of mismatched bases from sheared form to parallel form. Further analysis shows that the steric details of complex's intercalation to base stack determine the results of recognition, which is induced by the steric collision among ancillary ligand phen, bases and DNA backbone, and by the steric crowding occurring in the process of structural expansion of bases and DNA backbone. Detailed analysis reveals that the conformational repair of mismatched bases relates not only to the steric interactions, but also to the π-π stack among normal bases, mismatched bases and hpip ligand.

  18. Most neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies target novel epitopes requiring both Lassa virus glycoprotein subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James E.; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Cross, Robert W.; Yenni, Rachael E.; Elliott, Deborah H.; Rouelle, Julie A.; Kannadka, Chandrika B.; Smira, Ashley A.; Garry, Courtney E.; Bradley, Benjamin T.; Yu, Haini; Shaffer, Jeffrey G.; Boisen, Matt L.; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Zandonatti, Michelle A.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson; de la Torre, Juan C.; Andersen, Kristian G.; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Gbakie, Michael; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J.; Fonnie, Richard; Jalloh, Simbirie C.; Kargbo, Brima; Vandi, Mohamed A.; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Ikponmwosa, Odia; Asogun, Danny A.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Follarin, Onikepe A.; Schieffelin, John S.; Pitts, Kelly R.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Kulakoski, Peter C.; Wilson, Russell B.; Happi, Christian T.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Gevao, Sahr M.; Khan, S. Humarr; Grant, Donald S.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever is a severe multisystem disease that often has haemorrhagic manifestations. The epitopes of the Lassa virus (LASV) surface glycoproteins recognized by naturally infected human hosts have not been identified or characterized. Here we have cloned 113 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for LASV glycoproteins from memory B cells of Lassa fever survivors from West Africa. One-half bind the GP2 fusion subunit, one-fourth recognize the GP1 receptor-binding subunit and the remaining fourth are specific for the assembled glycoprotein complex, requiring both GP1 and GP2 subunits for recognition. Notably, of the 16 mAbs that neutralize LASV, 13 require the assembled glycoprotein complex for binding, while the remaining 3 require GP1 only. Compared with non-neutralizing mAbs, neutralizing mAbs have higher binding affinities and greater divergence from germline progenitors. Some mAbs potently neutralize all four LASV lineages. These insights from LASV human mAb characterization will guide strategies for immunotherapeutic development and vaccine design. PMID:27161536

  19. The TIP60 complex regulates bivalent chromatin recognition by 53BP1 through direct H4K20me binding and H2AK15 acetylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Karine; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Avvakumov, Nikita; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Roques, Céline; Pandita, Raj K.; Paquet, Eric; Herst, Pauline; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Pandita, Tej K.; Legube, Gaëlle; Doyon, Yannick; Durocher, Daniel; Côté, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The NuA4/TIP60 acetyltransferase complex is a key regulator of genome expression and stability. Here, we identified MBTD1 as a new stable subunit of the complex and gleaned intriguing insights into TIP60’s function. Harboring a histone reader domain for H4K20me1/2, MBTD1 allows TIP60 to associate with specific gene promoters and to promote the repair of DNA double strand breaks by homologous recombination. Interestingly, the non-homologous end joining factor 53BP1 engages chromatin through simultaneous binding of H4K20me2 and H2AK15ub, and it was postulated that Tip60-dependent acetylation of H4 regulates this binding. Our findings now indicate that the TIP60 complex is a potent regulator of DNA damage repair pathways in part by targeting the same histone mark as 53BP1. In addition, deposition of H2AK15ub by RNF168 inhibits chromatin acetylation by TIP60, while this residue can be acetylated by TIP60 in vivo, blocking its ubiquitylation. Altogether, these results uncover an intricate mechanism orchestrated by the TIP60 complex which regulates 53BP1-dependent repair pathway selection through incompatible bivalent binding and modification of chromatin. PMID:27153538

  20. A Coumarin-Based Luminescent Chemosensor for Recognition of Cu(2+) and its In-Situ Complex for CN(-) Sensing via Cu(2+) Displacement Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Soma; Talukder, Shrabani

    2016-11-22

    A new coumarin based chemosensor has been developed for selective fluorescent recognition of Cu(2+) in MeOH/H2O (4:1, v/v at pH = 7.2 aqueous solution) medium with 1:1 binding stoichiometry. The in-situ prepared Cu(2+) complex displays high selectivity towards CN(-) via Cu(2+) displacement approach with detection limit in the micro molar range. Moreover, in presence of Cu(2+), the receptor exhibits reversible emission change with EDTA and thus offers an interesting property of molecular 'IMPLICATION' logic gate with Cu(2+) and EDTA as chemical inputs.

  1. Disease-Associated Mutations in the HSPD1 Gene Encoding the Large Subunit of the Mitochondrial HSP60/HSP10 Chaperonin Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, Peter; Fernandez-Guerra, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) forms together with heat shock protein 10 (HSP10) double-barrel chaperonin complexes that are essential for folding to the native state of proteins in the mitochondrial matrix space. Two extremely rare monogenic disorders have been described that are caused by missen...

  2. Coupling of metal-based light-harvesting antennas and electron-donor subunits: Trinuclear Ruthenium(II) complexes containing tetrathiafulvalene-substituted polypyridine ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagna, Sebastiano; Serroni, Scolastica; Puntoriero, Fausto

    2002-01-01

    Three new tetrathiafulvalene-substituted 2,2'-bipyridine ligands, cis-bpy-TTF1, trans-bpy-TTF1, and cis-bpy-TTF2 have been prepared and characterized. X-ray analysis of trans-bpy-TTF1, is also reported. Such ligands have been used to prepare two new trinuclear Ru-II complexes, namely, [{(bpy)(2)R...

  3. A revised model for AMP-activated protein kinase structure: The alpha-subunit binds to both the beta- and gamma-subunits although there is no direct binding between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelly A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-11-24

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor for cellular metabolic energy state. It is activated by a high AMP/ATP ratio and leads to metabolic changes that conserve energy and utilize alternative cellular fuel sources. The kinase is composed of a heterotrimeric protein complex containing a catalytic alpha-subunit, an AMP-binding gamma-subunit, and a scaffolding beta-subunit thought to bind directly both the alpha- and gamma-subunits. Here, we use coimmunoprecipitation of proteins in transiently transfected cells to show that the alpha2-subunit binds directly not only to the beta-subunit, confirming previous work, but also to the gamma1-subunit. Deletion analysis of the alpha2-subunit reveals that the C-terminal 386-552 residues are sufficient to bind to the beta-subunit. The gamma1-subunit binds directly to the alpha2-subunit at two interaction sites, one within the catalytic domain consisting of alpha2 amino acids 1-312 and a second within residues 386-552. Binding of the alpha2 and the gamma1-subunits was not affected by 400 mum AMP or ATP. Furthermore, we show that the beta-subunit C terminus is essential for binding to the alpha2-subunit but, in contrast to previous work, the beta-subunit does not bind directly to the gamma1-subunit. Taken together, this study presents a new model for AMPK heterotrimer structure where through its C terminus the beta-subunit binds to the alpha-subunit that, in turn, binds to the gamma-subunit. There is no direct interaction between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

  4. Strip Steel Surface Defect Recognition Based on Complex Network Characteristics%基于复杂网络特性的带钢表面缺陷识别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任海鹏; 马展峰

    2011-01-01

    针对带钢表面缺陷识别问题,提出一种基于动态演化复杂网络特性的特征描述方法,这些特征同时具有位移、旋转不变性、大小不变性、较强的抗干扰能力和鲁棒性,为缺陷识别提供良好的分类特征;为了提高分类器的效率,应用主成分分析法(Principal component analysis,PCA)对复杂网络特征向量进行特征降维处理;采用最优有向无环图支持向量机(Directed acyclic graph support vector machine,DAGSVM)算法进行缺陷分类.结果表明该方法识别率高而且识别速度快.%A feature extraction method based on the characteristics of dynamic evolution complex networks is proposed for the strip steel surface defect recognition. The extracted features possess displacement, rotation and size invariability, strong anti-interference ability and robustness, therefore they are good classification features for steel surface defect recognition. In order to improve the efficiency of classification, the principal component analysis (PCA) is adopted to reduce the dimension of the feature vector. The directed acyclic graph support vector machine (DAG-SVM) algorithm is used for the defect classification. The experimental results show that this method is of high recognition rate and fast recognition speed.

  5. Increased activation of the left hippocampus region in Complex PTSD during encoding and recognition of emotional words: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Thomaes; E. Dorrepaal; N.P.J. Draijer; M.B. de Ruiter; B.M. Elzinga; A.J. van Balkom; P.L.M. Smoor; J. Smit; D.J. Veltman

    2009-01-01

    To gain insight into memory disturbances in Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD), we investigated declarative memory function and medial temporal lobe activity in patients and healthy non-traumatized controls. A case-control study was performed in nine patients with Complex PTSD and

  6. Increased activation of the left hippocampus region in Complex PTSD during encoding and recognition of emotional words: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomaes, K.; Dorrepaal, E.; Draijer, P.J.; Ruiter, M.; Elzinga, B.N.; Balkom, van A.J.L.M.; Smoor, P.L.M.; Smit, J.H.; Veltman, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    To gain insight into memory disturbances in Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD), we investigated declarative memory function and medial temporal lobe activity in patients and healthy non-traumatized controls. A case-control study was performed in nine patients with Complex PTSD and

  7. DNA binding properties of the small cascade subunit Csa5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Daume

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems provide immunity against viral attacks in archaeal and bacterial cells. Type I systems employ a Cas protein complex termed Cascade, which utilizes small CRISPR RNAs to detect and degrade the exogenic DNA. A small sequence motif, the PAM, marks the foreign substrates. Previously, a recombinant type I-A Cascade complex from the archaeon Thermoproteus tenax was shown to target and degrade DNA in vitro, dependent on a native PAM sequence. Here, we present the biochemical analysis of the small subunit, Csa5, of this Cascade complex. T. tenax Csa5 preferentially bound ssDNA and mutants that showed decreased ssDNA-binding and reduced Cascade-mediated DNA cleavage were identified. Csa5 oligomerization prevented DNA binding. Specific recognition of the PAM sequence was not observed. Phylogenetic analyses identified Csa5 as a universal member of type I-A systems and revealed three distinct groups. A potential role of Csa5 in R-loop stabilization is discussed.

  8. Three-dimensional structure of the ligand-binding core of GluR2 in complex with the agonist (S)-ATPA: implications for receptor subunit selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Marie-Louise; Hogner, Anders; Stensbøl, Tine B; Gouaux, Eric; Egebjerg, Jan; Kastrup, Jette S

    2003-02-27

    Two X-ray structures of the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with (S)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid ((S)-ATPA) have been determined with and without Zn(2+) ions. (S)-ATPA induces a domain closure of ca. 21 degrees compared to the apo form. The tert-butyl moiety of (S)-ATPA is buried in a partially hydrophobic pocket and forces the ligand into the glutamate-like binding mode. The structures provide new insight into the molecular basis of agonist selectivity between AMPA and kainate receptors.

  9. Glutamate-119 of the large alpha-subunit is the catalytic base in the hydration of 2-trans-enoyl-coenzyme A catalyzed by the multienzyme complex of fatty acid oxidation from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X Y; Yang, S Y

    1997-09-09

    Glu139 of the large alpha-subunit of the multienzyme complex of fatty acid oxidation from Escherichia coli was identified as the catalytic residue of enoyl-CoA hydratase [Yang, S.-Y., He, X.-Y., & Schulz, H. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 6441-6447]. To determine whether any of the other conserved protic residues is directly involved in the hydratase catalysis, the multienzyme complexes with either an alpha/Asp69 --> Asn or an alpha/Glu119 --> Gln mutation were overproduced and characterized. The catalytic properties of 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase and l-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase of the mutant complexes were almost unaffected. The amidation of Asp69 and Glu119 caused a 7.6- and 88-fold decrease, respectively, in the kcat of enoyl-CoA hydratase without a significant change in the Km value of the hydratase as well as a 5.9- and 62-fold increase, respectively, in the Km of Delta3-cis-Delta2-trans-enoyl-CoA isomerase with a very small decrease in the kcat of the latter enzyme. The data suggest that the carboxyl group of Glu119 is particularly important to the catalytic activity of enoyl-CoA hydratase. Furthermore, the wild-type hydratase shows a bell-shaped pH dependence of the kcat/Km with pKa values of 5.9 and 9.2, whereas the Glu119 --> Gln mutant hydratase has only a single pKa of 9.5. A simple explanation for these observations is that a deprotonated Glu119 and a protonated Glu139 are required for the high kcat of the enoyl-CoA hydratase. The results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, together with the structural information about the spatial arrangement of two conserved glutamate residues of rat liver enoyl-CoA hydratase [Engel, C. K., Mathieu, M., Zeelen, J. P., Hiltunen, J. K., and Wierenga, R. K. (1996) EMBO J. 15, 5135-5145] to which Glu119 and Glu139 of the large alpha-subunit correspond, lead to the conclusion that the gamma-carboxyl group of Glu119 serves as the second general acid-base functional group in catalyzing the hydration of 2-trans-enoyl-CoA.

  10. An in situ generated achiral Cu(II)-containing polymer complex sensor for enantioselective recognition induced from L-/D-histidine enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo; Meng, Fandian; Wang, Yuxiang; Cheng, Yixiang; Zhu, Chengjian

    2014-12-01

    A novel achiral polymer P-1 is synthesized by the polymerization of (2,5-bis(octyloxy)-1,4-phenylene)diboronic acid (M-1) with pyridine-2,6-diylbis(methanylylidene)bis(4-iodoaniline) (M-2) via Pd-catalyzed Suzuki coupling reaction. The tridentate ligand in the main chain backbone can further coordinate with Cu(2+) to afford the corresponding achiral copper-containing polymer complex P-2, which selectively responds to L-/D-histidine with significant fluorescence enhancement over other amino acids. Interestingly, P-2 exhibits obvious CD response toward L- or D-histidine compared with its model compound MC, indicating that this kind Cu(II)-containing polymer complex sensor can be used as an effective chemosensor for enantioselective recognition of histidine enantiomers by means of CD spectroscopy.

  11. A Functional Monomer Is Not Enough: Principal Component Analysis of the Influence of Template Complexation in Pre-Polymerization Mixtures on Imprinted Polymer Recognition and Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Golker

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this report, principal component analysis (PCA has been used to explore the influence of template complexation in the pre-polymerization phase on template molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP recognition and polymer morphology. A series of 16 bupivacaine MIPs were studied. The ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA-crosslinked polymers had either methacrylic acid (MAA or methyl methacrylate (MMA as the functional monomer, and the stoichiometry between template, functional monomer and crosslinker was varied. The polymers were characterized using radioligand equilibrium binding experiments, gas sorption measurements, swelling studies and data extracted from molecular dynamics (MD simulations of all-component pre-polymerization mixtures. The molar fraction of the functional monomer in the MAA-polymers contributed to describing both the binding, surface area and pore volume. Interestingly, weak positive correlations between the swelling behavior and the rebinding characteristics of the MAA-MIPs were exposed. Polymers prepared with MMA as a functional monomer and a polymer prepared with only EGDMA were found to share the same characteristics, such as poor rebinding capacities, as well as similar surface area and pore volume, independent of the molar fraction MMA used in synthesis. The use of PCA for interpreting relationships between MD-derived descriptions of events in the pre-polymerization mixture, recognition properties and morphologies of the corresponding polymers illustrates the potential of PCA as a tool for better understanding these complex materials and for their rational design.

  12. DNA binding and cleavage studies of new sulfasalazine-derived dipeptide Zn(II) complex: Validation for specific recognition with 5 Prime -TMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabassum, Sartaj, E-mail: tsartaj62@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, UP 202002 (India); Al-Asbahy, Waddhaah M.; Afzal, Mohd.; Shamsi, Manal; Arjmand, Farukh [Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, UP 202002 (India)

    2012-11-15

    A new water soluble complex [Zn(glygly)(ssz)(H{sub 2}O)]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O, 1 derived from dipeptide (glycyl glycine) and sulfasalazine was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis, NMR, ESI-MS) and analytical methods. The in vitro DNA binding studies of complex 1 with calf-thymus DNA were carried out by employing various biophysical methods and molecular docking technique which reveals strong electrostatic binding via phosphate backbone of DNA helix, in addition to partial intercalation. To gain further insight into the molecular recognition at the target site, interaction studies of complex 1 with 5 Prime -TMP and 5 Prime -GMP were carried out by UV-vis titration which was validated by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR with 5 Prime -TMP, which implicate the preferential selectivity of 1 towards N3 of thymine. Complex 1 is accessible to minor groove of DNA and cleaved pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway (validated by T4 ligase assay). - Graphical abstract: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and cleavage studies of [Zn(glygly)(ssz)(H{sub 2}O)]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (1) containing glycyl glycine and sulfasalazine ligand. Complex 1 recognize minor groove of DNA and show hydrolytic DNA cleavage. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel Zn(II) complex 1 bearing bioactive glycyl glycine and sulfasalazine ligand scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cleavage activity of 1 was enhanced in presence of activators: H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>MPA>GSH>Asc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complex 1 recognize minor groove as depicted in the cleavage pattern and molecular docking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complex 1 cleaves pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic mechanism and validated by T4 DNA ligase experiments.

  13. G protein signaling governing cell fate decisions involves opposing Gα subunits in Cryptococcus neoformans

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Xue, Chaoyang; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Communication between cells and their environments is often mediated by G protein-coupled receptors and cognate G proteins. In fungi, one such signaling cascade is the mating pathway triggered by pheromone/pheromone receptor recognition. Unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which expresses two Gα subunits, most filamentous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes have three Gα subunits. Previous studies have defined the Gα subunit acting upstream of the cAMP-protein kinase A pathway, but it has been unclea...

  14. Knowledge-based remote sensing of complex objects: Recognition of spatial patterns resulting from natural hydrocarbon seepages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werff, Harald Michael Arnout van der

    2006-01-01

    This thesis outlines the development of four image processing algorithms that combine spectral and spatial information for the detection of complex objects on the Earth' surface by remote sensing. Complex objects are objects that are composed of several smaller parts. These smaller parts may not be

  15. Sodium channel β subunits: emerging targets in channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Heather A; Isom, Lori L

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are responsible for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. VGSCs in mammalian brain are heterotrimeric complexes of α and β subunits. Although β subunits were originally termed auxiliary, we now know that they are multifunctional signaling molecules that play roles in both excitable and nonexcitable cell types and with or without the pore-forming α subunit present. β subunits function in VGSC and potassium channel modulation, cell adhesion, and gene regulation, with particularly important roles in brain development. Mutations in the genes encoding β subunits are linked to a number of diseases, including epilepsy, sudden death syndromes like SUDEP and SIDS, and cardiac arrhythmia. Although VGSC β subunit-specific drugs have not yet been developed, this protein family is an emerging therapeutic target.

  16. Structure of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin E in Complex with TCR Defines the Role of TCR Loop Positioning in Superantigen Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin E J Rödström

    Full Text Available T cells are crucial players in cell-mediated immunity. The specificity of their receptor, the T cell receptor (TCR, is central for the immune system to distinguish foreign from host antigens. Superantigens are bacterial toxins capable of inducing a toxic immune response by cross-linking the TCR and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II and circumventing the antigen specificity. Here, we present the structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin E (SEE in complex with a human T cell receptor, as well as the unligated T cell receptor structure. There are clear structural changes in the TCR loops upon superantigen binding. In particular, the HV4 loop moves to circumvent steric clashes upon complex formation. In addition, a predicted ternary model of SEE in complex with both TCR and MHC class II displays intermolecular contacts between the TCR α-chain and the MHC, suggesting that the TCR α-chain is of importance for complex formation.

  17. Recognition and tethering of transport vesicles at the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkos, Tomasz M; Lowe, Martin

    2017-02-23

    The Golgi apparatus occupies a central position within the secretory pathway where it is a hub for vesicle trafficking. Distinct classes of transport vesicles traffic diverse cargoes into and out of this organelle, as well as between the different Golgi subcompartments. A key feature of Golgi trafficking is the specific recognition of transport vesicles at the different regions of the Golgi apparatus, required for the correct cargo delivery. Specificity is ensured by coiled-coil golgins and multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs), which act together to capture vesicles and promote their subsequent fusion with the Golgi membrane. In this review we discuss our current understanding of how golgins and MTCs function together to mediate the specific recognition of vesicles at the Golgi apparatus.

  18. Biochemical study of multiple drug recognition sites on central benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifiletti, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor complex of mammalian brain possesses recognition sites which mediate (at least in part) the pharmacologic actions of the 1,4-benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Evidence is provided suggesting the existence of least seven distinct drug recognition sites on this complex. Interactions between the various recognition sites have been explored using radioligand binding techniques. This information is utilized to provide a comprehensive scheme for characterizing receptor-active drugs on an anxiolytic-anticonvulsant/proconvulsant continuum using radioligand binding techniques, as well as a comprehensive program for identifying potential endogenous receptor-active substances. Further evidence is provided here supporting the notion of benzodiazepine recognition site heterogeneity. Classical 1,4-benzodiazepines do not appear to differentiate two populations of benzodiazepine receptors in an equilibrium sense, but appear to do so in a kinetic sense. An apparent physical separation of the two receptor subtypes can be achieved by differential solubilization. The benzodiazepine binding subunit can be identified by photoaffinity labeling with the benzodiazepine agonist (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepan. Conditions for reproducible partial proteolytic mapping of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled receptors are established. From these maps, it is concluded that there are probably no major differences in the primary sequence of the benzodiazepine binding subunit in various regions of the rat central nervous system.

  19. Ftmw Study of the Chirality Recognition Between Two Different Chiral Molecules: the Glycidol-Propylene Oxide Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Javix; Sunahori, Fumie X.; Borho, Nicole; Xu, Yunjie

    2010-06-01

    The chirality recognition effect between the prototype chiral molecular systems, i.e. glycidol and propylene oxide has been studied using rotational spectroscopy and high level ab initio calculations. Extensive ab initio calculations have been performed to locate all possible low energy conformers of the diastereomeric pair and twenty eight minima have been found. The four most sable hetero and four homo chiral dimers, formed from the two lowest energy monomer conformations G+g- and G-g+ of the glycidol, were predicted to be close in their stability. Jet-cooled rotational spectra of some of them have been detected using a pulsed molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer and been assigned for the first time. All the low energy binary conformers observed show one primary intermolecular O-H- - -O hydrogen bond and two secondary intermolecular C-H- - -O hydrogen bonds. The induced fit phenomenon detectedwill be discussed.

  20. Reconsideration of systematic relationships within the order Euplotida (Protista, Ciliophora) using new sequences of the gene coding for small-subunit rRNA and testing the use of combined data sets to construct phylogenies of the Diophrys-complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhenzhen; Song, Weibo; Clamp, John C; Chen, Zigui; Gao, Shan; Zhang, Qianqian

    2009-03-01

    Comprehensive molecular analyses of phylogenetic relationships within euplotid ciliates are relatively rare, and the relationships among some families remain questionable. We performed phylogenetic analyses of the order Euplotida based on new sequences of the gene coding for small-subunit RNA (SSrRNA) from a variety of taxa across the entire order as well as sequences from some of these taxa of other genes (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and histone H4) that have not been included in previous analyses. Phylogenetic trees based on SSrRNA gene sequences constructed with four different methods had a consistent branching pattern that included the following features: (1) the "typical" euplotids comprised a paraphyletic assemblage composed of two divergent clades (family Uronychiidae and families Euplotidae-Certesiidae-Aspidiscidae-Gastrocirrhidae), (2) in the family Uronychiidae, the genera Uronychia and Paradiophrys formed a clearly outlined, well-supported clade that seemed to be rather divergent from Diophrys and Diophryopsis, suggesting that the Diophrys-complex may have had a longer and more separate evolutionary history than previously supposed, (3) inclusion of 12 new SSrRNA sequences in analyses of Euplotidae revealed two new clades of species within the family and cast additional doubt on the present classification of genera within the family, and (4) the intraspecific divergence among five species of Aspidisca was far greater than those of closely related genera. The ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 coding regions and partial histone H4 genes of six morphospecies in the Diophrys-complex were sequenced along with their SSrRNA genes and used to compare phylogenies constructed from single data sets to those constructed from combined sets. Results indicated that combined analyses could be used to construct more reliable, less ambiguous phylogenies of complex groups like the order Euplotida, because they provide a greater amount and diversity of information.

  1. Microprocessor complex subunit DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8 (Dgcr8) is required for schwann cell myelination and myelin maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Pin; Oksuz, Idil; Hurley, Edward; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2015-10-02

    We investigated the role of a key component of the Microprocessor complex, DGCR8, in the regulation of myelin formation and maintenance. We found that conditionally ablating Dgcr8 in Schwann cells (SCs) during development results in an arrest of SC differentiation. Dgcr8 conditional knock-out (cKO) SCs fail to form 1:1 relationships with axons or, having achieved this, fail to form myelin sheaths. The expression of genes normally found in immature SCs, such as sex-determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2), is increased in Dgcr8 cKO SCs, whereas the expression of myelin-related genes, including the master regulatory transcription factor early growth response 2 (Egr2), is decreased. Additionally, expression of a novel gene expression program involving sonic hedgehog (Shh), activated de novo in injured nerves, is elevated in Dgcr8 cKOs but not in Egr2 null mice, a model of SC differentiation arrest, suggesting that the injury-related gene expression program in Dgcr8 cKOs cannot be attributed to differentiation arrest. Inducible ablation of Dgcr8 in adult SCs results in gene expression changes similar to those found in cKOs, including an increase in the expression of Sox2 and Shh. Analyses of these nerves mainly reveal normal myelin thickness and axon size distribution but some dedifferentiated SCs and increased macrophage infiltration. Together our data suggest that Dgcr8 is responsible for modulation of gene expression programs underlying myelin formation and maintenance as well as suppression of an injury-related gene expression program.

  2. Hexanuclear, heterometallic, Ni₃Ln₃ complexes possessing O-capped homo- and heterometallic structural subunits: SMM behavior of the dysprosium analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goura, Joydeb; Guillaume, Rogez; Rivière, Eric; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2014-08-04

    The reaction of hetero donor chelating mannich base ligand 6,6'-{(2-(dimethylamino)ethylazanediyl)bis(methylene)}bis(2-methoxy-4-methylphenol) with Ni(ClO4)2·6H2O and lanthanide(III) salts [Dy(III) (1); Tb(III) (2); Gd (III) (3); Ho(III) (4); and Er(III) (5)] in the presence of triethylamine and pivalic acid afforded a series of heterometallic hexanuclear Ni(II)-Ln(III) coordination compounds, [Ni3Ln3(μ3-O)(μ3-OH)3(L)3(μ-OOCCMe3)3]·(ClO4)·wCH3CN·xCH2Cl2·yCH3OH·zH2O [for 1, w = 8, x = 3, y = 0, z = 5.5; for 2, w = 0, x = 5, y = 0, z = 6.5; for 3, w = 15, x = 18, y = 3, z = 7.5; for 4, w = 15, x = 20, y = 6, z = 9.5; and for 5, w = 0, x = 3, y = 2, z = 3]. The molecular structure of these complexes reveals the presence of a monocationic hexanuclear derivative containing one perchlorate counteranion. The asymmetric unit of each of the hexanuclear derivatives comprises the dinuclear motif [NiLn(L)(μ3-O)(μ3-OH)(μ-Piv)]. The cation contains three interlinked O-capped clusters: one Ln(III)3O and three Ni(II)Ln(III)2O. Each of the lanthanide centers is eight- coordinated (distorted trigonal-dodecahedron), while the nickel centers are hexacoordinate (distorted octahedral). The study of the magnetic properties of all compounds are reported and suggests single molecule magnet behavior for the Dy(III) derivative (1).

  3. Intermolecular recognition revealed by the complex structure of human CLOCK-BMAL1 basic helix-loop-helix domains with E-box DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zixi Wang; Yaling Wu; Lanfen Li; Xiao-Dong Su

    2013-01-01

    CLOCK (circadian locomotor output cycles kaput) and BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT-like 1) are both transcription factors of the circadian core loop in mammals.Recently published mouse CLOCK-BMAL1 bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix)-PAS (period-ARNT-single-minded) complex structure sheds light on the mechanism for heterodimer formation,but the structural details of the protein-DNA recognition mechanisms remain elusive.Here we have elucidated the crystal structure of human CLOCK-BMAL1 bHLH domains bound to a canonical E-box DNA.We demonstrate that CLOCK and BMAL1 bHLH domains can be mutually selected,and that hydrogen-bonding networks mediate their E-box recognition.We identified a hydrophobic contact between BMAL1 Ile80 and a fianking thymine nucleotide,suggesting that CLOCK-BMAL1 actually reads 7-bp DNA and not the previously believed 6-bp DNA.To find potential non-canonical E-boxes that could be recognized by CLOCK-BMAL1,we constructed systematic single-nucleotide mutations on the E-box and measured their relevant affinities.We defined two non-canonical E-box patterns with high affinities,AACGTGA and CATGTGA,in which the flanking A7-T7' base pair is indispensable for recognition.These results will help us to identify functional CLOCK-BMAL1-binding sites in vivo and to search for clock-controlled genes.Furthermore,we assessed the inhibitory role of potential phosphorylation sites in bHLH regions.We found that the phospho-mimicking mutation on BMAL1 Ser78 could efficiently block DNA binding as well as abolish normal circadian oscillation in cells.We propose that BMAL1 Ser78 should be a key residue mediating input signal-regulated transcriptional inhibition for external cues to entrain the circadian clock by kinase cascade.

  4. HAND GESTURE RECOGNITION BASED ON BP NEURAL NETWORK IN COMPLEX BACKGROUND%复杂背景下BP神经网络的手势识别方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王先军; 白国振; 杨勇明

    2013-01-01

    In light of the characteristics of skin colour in gesture images, the combination of threshold segmentation of skin colour in RGB space and cluster characteristics in YCbCr colour space as well as the application of background model effectively reduce the interference of similar skin colours in background and achieve the detection and segmentation of hand image in complex background. Seven constant Hu moment descriptors of image are used to characterise different binary hand gesture contours. At last, the BP neural network is applied to hand gesture recognition. Experimental results demonstrate that this method has higher recognition rate and better robustness.%针对手势图像的肤色特点,结合肤色在RGB空间的阈值分割和YCbCr颜色空间上的聚簇特性,以及背景模型的应用,有效减少了背景中类肤色的干扰,完成了手部图像在复杂背景下的检测和分割;并采用图像的7个不变Hu矩描述子来表征不同二值化的手势轮廓;最后采用BP神经网络进行手势识别.实验结果表明该方法有较好的识别率和鲁棒性.

  5. The role of the complex textural microstructure co-occurrence matrices, based on Laws’ features, in the characterization and recognition of some pathological structures, from ultrasound images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Alexandrina Mitrea

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The non-invasive diagnosis, based on ultrasound images, is a challenge in nowadays research. We develop computerized, texture-based methods, for automatic and computer assisted diagnosis, using the information obtained from ultrasound images. In this work, we defined the co-occurrence matrix of complex textural microstructures determined by using the Laws’ convolution filters and we experimented it in order to perform the characterization and recognition of some important anatomical and pathological structures, within ultrasound images. These structures were the colorectal tumors and the gingival sulcus, the properties of the latter being important concerning the diagnosis and monitoring of the periodontal disease. We determined the textural model of these structures, using the classical and the newly defined textural features. For the automatic recognition, we used powerful classifiers, such as the Multilayer Perceptron, the Support-Vector Machines, decision-trees based classifiers such as Random Forest and C4.5, respectively AdaBoost in combination with the C4.5 algorithm.

  6. Pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Theodoridis, Sergios

    2003-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a scientific discipline that is becoming increasingly important in the age of automation and information handling and retrieval. Patter Recognition, 2e covers the entire spectrum of pattern recognition applications, from image analysis to speech recognition and communications. This book presents cutting-edge material on neural networks, - a set of linked microprocessors that can form associations and uses pattern recognition to ""learn"" -and enhances student motivation by approaching pattern recognition from the designer's point of view. A direct result of more than 10

  7. Na+/K+-ATPase β1-subunit is recruited in Na-K-2Cl co-transporter isoform 2 multiprotein complexes in rat kidneys: possible role in blood pressure regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmosino, Monica; Torretta, Silvia; Procino, Giuseppe; Timperio, Annamaria; Zolla, Lello; Svelto, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The progression from prehypertensive to hypertensive state in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) is accompanied by a significant increase in membrane expression of Na-K-2Cl co-transporter isoform 2 (NKCC2), suggesting that the altered NKCC2 trafficking and activity are directly related with the development of hypertension in this strain. The aim of this work is to gain insights on the molecular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon. We performed a comparative analysis of NKCC2 multiprotein complexes (MPCs) in the kidney of SHRs versus Wistar Kyoto rats by Blue Native difference gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry. We found that the recruitment of the β-subunit isoform 1 of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (β1NK) in NKCC2 MPCs was significantly increased in the kidneys of SHR compared with Wistar Kyoto rat control strain. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that β1NK actually interacts with NKCC2 in the native tissue. The analysis of the physiological role of β1NK-NKCC2 interaction in human embryonic kidney cells showed that β1NK increased the steady-state membrane expression and activity of NKCC2 enhancing NKCC2 trafficking toward the plasma membrane. We identify a new NKCC2-interacting partner involved in the modulation of NKCC2 intracellular trafficking and possibly involved in the regulation of blood pressure.

  8. INTELLIGENT METAL COMPLEXES CONTAINING N-GLYCOSIDES FORMED FROM TRIS(2-AMINOETHYL)AMINE AND ALDOSES, HAVING MOLECULAR RECOGNITION ABILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Assembly of carbohydrates on nickel (Ⅱ) center by utilizing N-glycosidic bond formation with a branched amine: tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (tren), an unprecedented chiral inversion around the metal center (Co or Mn) induced by an interaction between sugars and sulfate anions, peroxo-bridged dinuclear cobalt (Ⅲ) complex containing Nglycoside ligands from tren and D-glucose and its reversible dioxygen binding property,and novel trimanganese complexes with a linear Mn3 (Ⅱ, Ⅲ, Ⅱ) assemblage bridged by carbohydrates are described.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of the nuclear gene encoding the alpha-subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial F1F0 ATP synthase complex: role for the orphan nuclear receptor, COUP-TFII/ARP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Elzora M; Worley, Teri; Breen, Gail A M

    2003-03-11

    Our laboratory has been studying the transcriptional regulation of the nuclear gene (ATPA) that encodes the alpha-subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial F1F0 ATP synthase complex. We have previously determined that the regulatory factor, upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2), can stimulate transcription of the ATPA gene through the cis-acting regulatory element 1 in the upstream promoter of this gene. In this study, we used the yeast one-hybrid screening method to identify another factor, COUP-TFII/ARP-1, which also binds to the ATPA cis-acting regulatory element 1. Binding of the orphan nuclear receptor, COUP-TFII/ARP-1, to the ATPA regulatory element 1 was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift experiments, and COUP-TFII/ARP-1-containing complexes were detected in HeLa cell nuclear extracts. A mutational analysis indicated that the binding site for COUP-TFII/ARP-1 in the ATPA regulatory element 1 is an imperfect direct repeat of a nuclear receptor response element (A/GGGTCA) with a spacer of three nucleotides. Functional assays in HeLa cells showed that COUP-TFII/ARP-1 represses the ATPA promoter activity in a dose- and sequence-dependent manner. Furthermore, cotransfection assays demonstrated that COUP-TFII/ARP-1 inhibits the USF2-mediated activation of the wild-type ATPA gene promoter but not a mutant promoter that is defective in COUP-TFII/ARP-1-binding. Overexpression of USF2 reversed the COUP-TFII/ARP-1-mediated repression of the ATPA promoter. Mobility shift assays revealed that COUP-TFII/ARP-1 and USF2 compete for binding to the ATPA regulatory element 1. Thus, the ATPA gene is regulated by a multifunctional binding site through which the transcription factors, COUP-TFII/ARP-1 and USF2, bind and exert their antagonistic effects.

  10. Recognition of membrane-bound fusion-peptide/MPER complexes by the HIV-1 neutralizing 2F5 antibody: implications for anti-2F5 immunogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Huarte

    Full Text Available The membrane proximal external region (MPER of the fusogenic HIV-1 glycoprotein-41 harbors the epitope sequence recognized by 2F5, a broadly neutralizing antibody isolated from an infected individual. Structural mimicry of the conserved MPER 2F5 epitope constitutes a pursued goal in the field of anti-HIV vaccine development. It has been proposed that 2F5 epitope folding into its native state is attained in the vicinity of the membrane interface and might involve interactions with other viral structures. Here we present results indicating that oligomeric complexes established between MPER and the conserved amino-terminal fusion peptide (FP can partition into lipid vesicles and be specifically bound by the 2F5 antibody at their surfaces. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy of liposomes doped with MPER:FP peptide mixtures provided the structural grounds for complex recognition by antibody at lipid bilayer surfaces. Supporting the immunogenicity of the membrane-bound complex, these MPER:FP peptide-vesicle formulations could trigger cross-reactive anti-MPER antibodies in rabbits. Thus, our observations suggest that contacts with N-terminal regions of gp41 may stabilize the 2F5 epitope as a membrane-surface antigen.

  11. Structural Basis of Semaphorin-Plexin Recognition and Viral Mimicry from Sema7A and A39R Complexes with PlexinC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Heli; Juo, Z. Sean; Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Focia, Pamela J.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Garcia, K. Christopher; He, Xiaolin (Stanford-MED); (NWU)

    2010-10-18

    Repulsive signaling by Semaphorins and Plexins is crucial for the development and homeostasis of the nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems. Sema7A acts as both an immune and a neural Semaphorin through PlexinC1, and A39R is a Sema7A mimic secreted by smallpox virus. We report the structures of Sema7A and A39R complexed with the Semaphorin-binding module of PlexinC1. Both structures show two PlexinC1 molecules symmetrically bridged by Semaphorin dimers, in which the Semaphorin and PlexinC1 {beta} propellers interact in an edge-on, orthogonal orientation. Both binding interfaces are dominated by the insertion of the Semaphorin's 4c-4d loop into a deep groove in blade 3 of the PlexinC1 propeller. A39R appears to achieve Sema7A mimicry by preserving key Plexin-binding determinants seen in the mammalian Sema7A complex that have evolved to achieve higher affinity binding to the host-derived PlexinC1. The complex structures support a conserved Semaphorin-Plexin recognition mode and suggest that Plexins are activated by dimerization.

  12. Strict major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule class-specific binding by co-receptors enforces MHC-restricted αβTCR recognition during T lineage subset commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-long eLi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of co-receptor dependent αβTCR recognition, considerable effort has been spent on elucidating the basis of CD4 and CD8 lineage commitment in the thymus. The latter is responsible for generating mature CD4 helper and CD8αβ cytotoxic T cell subsets. Although CD4+ and CD8+ T cell recognition of peptide antigens is known to be MHC class I- and MHC class II-restricted, respectively, the mechanism of single positive (SP thymocyte lineage commitment from bipotential double positive (DP progenitors is not fully elucidated. Classical models to explain thymic CD4 versus CD8 fate determination have included a stochastic selection model or instructional models. The latter are based either on strength of signal or duration of signal impacting fate. More recently, differential co-receptor gene imprinting has been shown to be involved in expression of transcription factors impacting cytotoxic T cell development. Here, we address commitment from a structural perspective, focusing on the nature of co-receptor binding to MHC molecules. By surveying 58 MHC class II and 224 MHC class I crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB, it becomes clear that CD4 cannot bind to MHC I molecules, nor can CD8αβ or CD8αα bind to MHC II molecules. Given that the co-receptor delivers Lck to phosphorylate exposed CD3 ITAMs within a peptide/MHC (pMHC-ligated TCR complex to initiate cell signaling, this strict co-receptor recognition fosters MHC class-restricted SP thymocyte lineage commitment at the DP stage even though both co-receptors are expressed on a single cell. In short, the binding preference of an αβTCR for a peptide complexed with an MHC molecule dictates which co-receptor subsequently binds, thereby supporting development of that subset lineage. How function within the lineage is linked further to biopotential fate determination is discussed.

  13. Structural basis for the recognition in an idiotype-anti-idiotype antibody complex related to celiac disease

    KAUST Repository

    Vangone, Anna

    2014-07-30

    Anti-idiotype antibodies have potential therapeutic applications in many fields, including autoimmune diseases. Herein we report the isolation and characterization of AIM2, an anti-idiotype antibody elicited in a mouse model upon expression of the celiac disease-specific autoantibody MB2.8 (directed against the main disease autoantigen type 2 transglutaminase, TG2). To characterize the interaction between the two antibodies, a 3D model of the MB2.8-AIM2 complex has been obtained by molecular docking. Analysis and selection of the different obtained docking solutions was based on the conservation within them of the inter-residue contacts. The selected model is very well representative of the different solutions found and its stability is confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, the binding mode it adopts is very similar to that observed in most of the experimental structures available for idiotype-anti-idiotype antibody complexes. In the obtained model, AIM2 is directed against the MB2.8 CDR region, especially on its variable light chain. This makes the concurrent formation of the MB2.8-AIM2 complex and of the MB2.8-TG2 complex incompatible, thus explaining the experimentally observed inhibitory effect on the MB2.8 binding to TG2. © 2014 Vangone et al.

  14. Recognition and Repair of Communicative Failures: The Interaction between Theory of Mind and Cognitive Complexity in Schizophrenic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Francesca M.; Bono, Adele; Bara, Bruno G.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to perform a detailed and empirical investigation of schizophrenia patients' deficits in recognizing and recovering a communicative failure. In particular, this paper investigates the role of Theory of Mind (ToM) and of the complexity of the mental representations involved in explaining patients' deficits in…

  15. Recognition and Repair of Communicative Failures: The Interaction between Theory of Mind and Cognitive Complexity in Schizophrenic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Francesca M.; Bono, Adele; Bara, Bruno G.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to perform a detailed and empirical investigation of schizophrenia patients' deficits in recognizing and recovering a communicative failure. In particular, this paper investigates the role of Theory of Mind (ToM) and of the complexity of the mental representations involved in explaining patients' deficits in…

  16. Insight to structural subsite recognition in plant thiol protease-inhibitor complexes : Understanding the basis of differential inhibition and the role of water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhayay Bishnu P

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This work represents an extensive MD simulation / water-dynamics studies on a series of complexes of inhibitors (leupeptin, E-64, E-64-C, ZPACK and plant cysteine proteases (actinidin, caricain, chymopapain, calotropin DI of papain family to understand the various interactions, water binding mode, factors influencing it and the structural basis of differential inhibition. Results The tertiary structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes were built by visual interactive modeling and energy minimization followed by dynamic simulation of 120 ps in water environment. DASA study with and without the inhibitor revealed the potential subsite residues involved in inhibition. Though the interaction involving main chain atoms are similar, critical inspection of the complexes reveal significant differences in the side chain interactions in S2-P2 and S3-P3 pairs due to sequence differences in the equivalent positions of respective subsites leading to differential inhibition. Conclusion The key finding of the study is a conserved site of a water molecule near oxyanion hole of the enzyme active site, which is found in all the modeled complexes and in most crystal structures of papain family either native or complexed. Conserved water molecules at the ligand binding sites of these homologous proteins suggest the structural importance of the water, which changes the conventional definition of chemical geometry of inhibitor binding domain, its shape and complimentarity. The water mediated recognition of inhibitor to enzyme subsites (Pn...H2O....Sn of leupeptin acetyl oxygen to caricain, chymopapain and calotropinDI is an additional information and offer valuable insight to potent inhibitor design.

  17. Work environments of different types of nursing subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatt, P; Schneck, R

    1982-11-01

    Based upon organizational theory, the purpose of this research was to identify and describe similarities and differences in the work environments of nine different types of nursing subunits (intensive care, medical, surgical, psychiatric, auxiliary, rehabilitation, rural, paediatric and obstetrical) in hospitals. Six measures of nursing subunit environment were developed: these included measures of nursing subunit autonomy, and the complexity and pervasiveness of other medical and hospital groups interacting with the nursing subunit. Data were collected by questionnaire from headnurses in 157 nursing subunits located in 24 hospitals in Alberta, Canada. The results indicated that the types of nursing subunits were similar in their degree of autonomy from both physicians and administration in the larger context in which they were located but were significantly different in terms of number and heterogeneity of groups outside nurses with which they interacted and the extent to which such groups pervaded the subunits. For example, intensive care units appeared as the type of nursing subunit with the greatest need for interaction with physicians, paramedics, hotel services and so on, whereas, psychiatric subunits appeared to be the least dependent on groups outside nursing in the hospital. These findings have implications for the management practices and educational programme for nursing.

  18. Structural Insights into the Dual Strategy of Recognition by Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein, PGRP-S: Structure of the Ternary Complex of PGRP-S with Lipopolysaccharide and Stearic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pradeep; Dube, Divya; Sinha, Mau; Yadav, Savita; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2013-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are part of the innate immune system. The 19 kDa Short PGRP (PGRP-S) is one of the four mammalian PGRPs. The concentration of PGRP-S in camel (CPGRP-S) has been shown to increase considerably during mastitis. The structure of CPGRP-S consists of four protein molecules designated as A, B, C and D forming stable intermolecular contacts, A–B and C–D. The A–B and C–D interfaces are located on the opposite sides of the same monomer leading to the the formation of a linear chain with alternating A–B and C–D contacts. Two ligand binding sites, one at C–D contact and another at A–B contact have been observed. CPGRP-S binds to the components of bacterial cell wall molecules such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN) from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It also binds to fatty acids including mycolic acid of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Previous structural studies of binary complexes of CPGRP-S with LPS and stearic acid (SA) have shown that LPS binds to CPGRP-S at C–D contact (Site-1) while SA binds to it at the A–B contact (Site-2). The binding studies using surface plasmon resonance showed that LPS and SA bound to CPGRP-S in the presence of each other. The structure determination of the ternary complex showed that LPS and SA bound to CPGRP-S at Site-1 and Site-2 respectively. LPS formed 13 hydrogen bonds and 159 van der Waals contacts (distances ≤4.2 Å) while SA formed 56 van der Waals contacts. The ELISA test showed that increased levels of productions of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ due to LPS and SA decreased considerably upon the addition of CPGRP-S. PMID:23326499

  19. Probing subunit-subunit interactions in the yeast vacuolar ATPase by peptide arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee S Parsons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vacuolar (H(+-ATPase (V-ATPase; V(1V(o-ATPase is a large multisubunit enzyme complex found in the endomembrane system of all eukaryotic cells where its proton pumping action serves to acidify subcellular organelles. In the plasma membrane of certain specialized tissues, V-ATPase functions to pump protons from the cytoplasm into the extracellular space. The activity of the V-ATPase is regulated by a reversible dissociation mechanism that involves breaking and re-forming of protein-protein interactions in the V(1-ATPase - V(o-proton channel interface. The mechanism responsible for regulated V-ATPase dissociation is poorly understood, largely due to a lack of detailed knowledge of the molecular interactions that are responsible for the structural and functional link between the soluble ATPase and membrane bound proton channel domains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain insight into where some of the stator subunits of the V-ATPase associate with each other, we have developed peptide arrays from the primary sequences of V-ATPase subunits. By probing the peptide arrays with individually expressed V-ATPase subunits, we have identified several key interactions involving stator subunits E, G, C, H and the N-terminal domain of the membrane bound a subunit. CONCLUSIONS: The subunit-peptide interactions identified from the peptide arrays complement low resolution structural models of the eukaryotic vacuolar ATPase obtained from transmission electron microscopy. The subunit-subunit interaction data are discussed in context of our current model of reversible enzyme dissociation.

  20. Structure of the Tropomyosin Overlap Complex from Chicken Smooth Muscle: Insight into the Diversity of N-Terminal Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, Jeremiah; Klenchin, Vadim A.; Rayment, Ivan (UW)

    2010-09-08

    Tropomyosin is a stereotypical {alpha}-helical coiled coil that polymerizes to form a filamentous macromolecular assembly that lies on the surface of F-actin. The interaction between the C-terminal and N-terminal segments on adjacent molecules is known as the overlap region. We report here two X-ray structures of the chicken smooth muscle tropomyosin overlap complex. A novel approach was used to stabilize the C-terminal and N-terminal fragments. Globular domains from both the human DNA ligase binding protein XRCC4 and bacteriophage {phi}29 scaffolding protein Gp7 were fused to 37 and 28 C-terminal amino acid residues of tropomyosin, respectively, whereas the 29 N-terminal amino acids of tropomyosin were fused to the C-terminal helix bundle of microtubule binding protein EB1. The structures of both the XRCC4 and Gp7 fusion proteins complexed with the N-terminal EB1 fusion contain a very similar helix bundle in the overlap region that encompasses {approx}15 residues. The C-terminal coiled coil opens to allow formation of the helix bundle, which is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. These structures are similar to that observed in the NMR structure of the rat skeletal overlap complex [Greenfield, N. J., et al. (2006) J. Mol. Biol. 364, 80-96]. The interactions between the N- and C-terminal coiled coils of smooth muscle tropomyosin show significant curvature, which differs somewhat between the two structures and implies flexibility in the overlap complex, at least in solution. This is likely an important attribute that allows tropomyosin to assemble around the actin filaments. These structures provide a molecular explanation for the role of N-acetylation in the assembly of native tropomyosin.

  1. Heteromeric assembly of P2X subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika eSaul

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcripts and/or proteins of P2X receptor (P2XR subunits have been found in virtually all mammalian tissues. Generally more than one of the seven known P2X subunits have been identified in a given cell type. Six of the seven cloned P2X subunits can efficiently form functional homotrimeric ion channels in recombinant expression systems. This is in contrast to other ligand-gated ion channel families, such as the Cys-loop or glutamate receptors, where homomeric assemblies seem to represent the exception rather than the rule. P2XR mediated responses recorded from native tissues rarely match exactly the biophysical and pharmacological properties of heterologously expressed homomeric P2XRs. Heterotrimerization of P2X subunits is likely to account for this observed diversity. While the existence of heterotrimeric P2X2/3Rs and their role in physiological processes is well established, the composition of most other P2XR heteromers and/or the interplay between distinct trimeric receptor complexes in native tissues is not clear. After a description of P2XR assembly and the structure of the intersubunit ATP-binding site, this review summarizes the distribution of P2XR subunits in selected mammalian cell types and the biochemically and/or functionally characterized heteromeric P2XRs that have been observed upon heterologous co-expression of P2XR subunits. We further provide examples where the postulated heteromeric P2XRs have been suggested to occur in native tissues and an overview of the currently available pharmacological tools that have been used to discriminate between homo- and heteromeric P2XRs

  2. Bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s possessing coordinated metal center(s) and their inclusion complexation behavior with model substrates: enhanced molecular binding ability by multiple recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Li, L; Zhang, H Y; Liu, S X; Guan, X D

    2001-12-14

    To investigate quantitatively the cooperative binding ability of several beta-cyclodextrin oligomers bearing single or multiligated metal center(s), the inclusion complexation behavior of four bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s (2-5) linked by 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxy tethers and their copper(II) complexes (6-9) with representative dye guests, i.e., methyl orange (MO), acridine red (AR), rhodamine B (RhB), ammonium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), and sodium 6-(p-toludino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), have been examined in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C by means of UV-vis, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results obtained indicate that bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-5 can associate with one or three copper(II) ion(s) producing 2:1 or 2:3 bis(beta-cyclodextrin)-copper(II) complexes. These metal-ligated oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s can bind two model substrates to form intramolecular 2:2 host-guest inclusion complexes and thus significantly enhance the original binding abilities of parent beta-cyclodextrin and bis(beta-cyclodextrin) toward model substrates through the cooperative binding of two guest molecules by four tethered cyclodextrin moieties, as well as the additional binding effect supplied by ligated metal center(s). Host 6 showed the highest enhancement of the stability constant, up to 38.3 times for ANS as compared with parent beta-cyclodextrin. The molecular binding mode and stability constant of substrates by bridged bis- and oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-9 are discussed from the viewpoint of the size/shape-fit interaction and molecular multiple recognition between host and guest.

  3. Subunit-selective proteasome activity profiling uncovers uncoupled proteasome subunit activities during bacterial infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misas-villamil, Johana C.; Burgh, Van Der Aranka M.; Grosse-holz, Friederike; Bach-pages, Marcel; Kovács, Judit; Kaschani, Farnusch; Schilasky, Sören; Emon, Asif E.K.; Ruben, Mark; Kaiser, Markus; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Hoorn, van der Renier A.L.

    2017-01-01

    The proteasome is a nuclear-cytoplasmic proteolytic complex involved in nearly all regulatory pathways in plant cells. The three different catalytic activities of the proteasome can have different functions, but tools to monitor and control these subunits selectively are not yet available in plant

  4. Structural Basis for Fc[gamma]RIIa Recognition of Human IgG and Formation of Inflammatory Signaling Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsland, Paul A.; Farrugia, William; Bradford, Tessa M.; Sardjono, Caroline Tan; Esparon, Sandra; Trist, Halina M.; Powell, Maree S.; Tan, Peck Szee; Cendron, Angela C.; Wines, Bruce D.; Scott, Andrew M.; Hogarth, P. Mark (Burnet); (Monash); (LICR); (Melbourne)

    2011-09-20

    The interaction of Abs with their specific FcRs is of primary importance in host immune effector systems involved in infection and inflammation, and are the target for immune evasion by pathogens. Fc{gamma}RIIa is a unique and the most widespread activating FcR in humans that through avid binding of immune complexes potently triggers inflammation. Polymorphisms of Fc{gamma}RIIa (high responder/low responder [HR/LR]) are linked to susceptibility to infections, autoimmune diseases, and the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. In this article, we define the three-dimensional structure of the complex between the HR (arginine, R134) allele of Fc{gamma}RIIa (Fc{gamma}RIIa-HR) and the Fc region of a humanized IgG1 Ab, hu3S193. The structure suggests how the HR/LR polymorphism may influence Fc{gamma}RIIa interactions with different IgG subclasses and glycoforms. In addition, mutagenesis defined the basis of the epitopes detected by FcR blocking mAbs specific for Fc{gamma}RIIa (IV.3), Fc{gamma}RIIb (X63-21), and a pan Fc{gamma}RII Ab (8.7). The epitopes detected by these Abs are distinct, but all overlap with residues defined by crystallography to contact IgG. Finally, crystal structures of LR (histidine, H134) allele of Fc{gamma}RIIa and Fc{gamma}RIIa-HR reveal two distinct receptor dimers that may represent quaternary states on the cell surface. A model is presented whereby a dimer of Fc{gamma}RIIa-HR binds Ag-Ab complexes in an arrangement that possibly occurs on the cell membrane as part of a larger signaling assembly.

  5. Insights into carbohydrate recognition by Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin: the crystal structure at 2 A resolution in complex with alpha1-3 mannobiose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerborn, M K; Wright, L M; Reynolds, C D; Grossmann, J G; Rizkallah, P J

    1999-07-01

    Carbohydrate recognition by monocot mannose-binding lectins was studied via the crystal structure determination of daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) lectin. The lectin was extracted from daffodil bulbs, and crystallised in the presence of alpha-1,3 mannobiose. Molecular replacement methods were used to solve the structure using the partially refined model of Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin as a search model. The structure was refined at 2.0 A resolution to a final R -factor of 18.7 %, and Rfreeof 26.7 %. The main feature of the daffodil lectin structure is the presence of three fully occupied binding pockets per monomer, arranged around the faces of a triangular beta-prism motif. The pockets have identical topology, and can bind mono-, di- or oligosaccharides. Strand exchange forms tightly bound dimers, and higher aggregation states are achieved through hydrophobic patches on the surface, completing a tetramer with internal 222-symmetry. There are therefore 12 fully occupied binding pockets per tetrameric cluster. The tetramer persists in solution, as shown with small-angle X-ray solution scattering. Extensive sideways and out-of-plane interactions between tetramers, some mediated via the ligand, make up the bulk of the lattice contacts.A fourth binding site was also observed. This is unique and has not been observed in similar structures. The site is only partially occupied by a ligand molecule due to the much lower binding affinity. A comparison with the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin/mannopentaose complex suggests an involvement of this site in the recognition mechanism for naturally occurring glycans.

  6. The Arabidopsis KINβγ Subunit of the SnRK1 Complex Regulates Pollen Hydration on the Stigma by Mediating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin-Qi; Liu, Chang Zhen; Li, Dan Dan; Zhao, Ting Ting; Li, Fei; Jia, Xiao Na; Zhao, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Pollen-stigma interactions are essential for pollen germination. The highly regulated process of pollen germination includes pollen adhesion, hydration, and germination on the stigma. However, the internal signaling of pollen that regulates pollen-stigma interactions is poorly understood. KINβγ is a plant-specific subunit of the SNF1-related protein kinase 1 complex which plays important roles in the regulation of plant development. Here, we showed that KINβγ was a cytoplasm- and nucleus-localized protein in the vegetative cells of pollen grains in Arabidopsis. The pollen of the Arabidopsis kinβγ mutant could not germinate on stigma, although it germinated normally in vitro. Further analysis revealed the hydration of kinβγ mutant pollen on the stigma was compromised. However, adding water to the stigma promoted the germination of the mutant pollen in vivo, suggesting that the compromised hydration of the mutant pollen led to its defective germination. In kinβγ mutant pollen, the structure of the mitochondria and peroxisomes was destroyed, and their numbers were significantly reduced compared with those in the wild type. Furthermore, we found that the kinβγ mutant exhibited reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pollen. The addition of H2O2 in vitro partially compensated for the reduced water absorption of the mutant pollen, and reducing ROS levels in pollen by overexpressing Arabidopsis CATALASE 3 resulted in compromised hydration of pollen on the stigma. These results indicate that Arabidopsis KINβγ is critical for the regulation of ROS levels by mediating the biogenesis of mitochondria and peroxisomes in pollen, which is required for pollen-stigma interactions during pollination.

  7. Systems biology analysis merging phenotype, metabolomic and genomic data identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG and cellular maintenance processes as major contributors to genetic variability in bovine feed efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Widmann

    Full Text Available Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53 and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1 genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG I442M (rs109570900 and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8 Q204X (rs110344317 loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily

  8. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith

    2016-01-01

    The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens....... Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation...

  9. Crystal structure of lactose permease in complex with an affinity inactivator yields unique insight into sugar recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaptal, Vincent; Kwon, Seunghyug; Sawaya, Michael R.; Guan, Lan; Kaback, H. Ronald; Abramson, Jeff (UCLA); (TTU)

    2011-08-29

    Lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY) with a single-Cys residue in place of A122 (helix IV) transports galactopyranosides and is specifically inactivated by methanethiosulfonyl-galactopyranosides (MTS-gal), which behave as unique suicide substrates. In order to study the mechanism of inactivation more precisely, we solved the structure of single-Cys122 LacY in complex with covalently bound MTS-gal. This structure exhibits an inward-facing conformation similar to that observed previously with a slight narrowing of the cytoplasmic cavity. MTS-gal is bound covalently, forming a disulfide bond with C122 and positioned between R144 and W151. E269, a residue essential for binding, coordinates the C-4 hydroxyl of the galactopyranoside moiety. The location of the sugar is in accord with many biochemical studies.

  10. Crystal structure of lactose permease in complex with an affinity inactivator yields unique insight into sugar recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaptal, Vincent; Kwon, Seunghyug; Sawaya, Michael R; Guan, Lan; Kaback, H Ronald; Abramson, Jeff

    2011-06-07

    Lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY) with a single-Cys residue in place of A122 (helix IV) transports galactopyranosides and is specifically inactivated by methanethiosulfonyl-galactopyranosides (MTS-gal), which behave as unique suicide substrates. In order to study the mechanism of inactivation more precisely, we solved the structure of single-Cys122 LacY in complex with covalently bound MTS-gal. This structure exhibits an inward-facing conformation similar to that observed previously with a slight narrowing of the cytoplasmic cavity. MTS-gal is bound covalently, forming a disulfide bond with C122 and positioned between R144 and W151. E269, a residue essential for binding, coordinates the C-4 hydroxyl of the galactopyranoside moiety. The location of the sugar is in accord with many biochemical studies.

  11. Event recognition by detrended fluctuation analysis: An application to Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex, Tenerife, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Pin, Enrico [Dipartimento di Georisorse e Territorio, Universita di Udine, Via Cotonificio, 114, 33100 Udine (Italy); Carniel, Roberto [Dipartimento di Georisorse e Territorio, Universita di Udine, Via Cotonificio, 114, 33100 Udine (Italy)], E-mail: roberto.carniel@uniud.it; Tarraga, Marta [Departamento de Volcanologia, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, C/JoseGutierrez Abascal 2, 28006, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    In this work we investigate the application of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to seismic data recorded in the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) during the month of July 2004, in a phase of possible unrest of the Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex. Tectonic events recorded in the area are recognized and located by the Spanish national agency Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN) and their catalogue is the only currently available dataset, whose completeness unfortunately suffers from the strong presence of anthropogenic noise. In this paper we propose the use of DFA to help to automatically identify events. The evaluation of this case study proves DFA to be a promising tool to be used for rapidly screening large seismic datasets and highlighting time windows with the potential presence of discrete events.

  12. Dynamic regulation of β1 subunit trafficking controls vascular contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, M Dennis; Bannister, John P; Narayanan, Damodaran; Nair, Anitha; Grubbs, Jordan E; Gabrick, Kyle S; Boop, Frederick A; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2014-02-11

    Ion channels composed of pore-forming and auxiliary subunits control physiological functions in virtually all cell types. A conventional view is that channels assemble with their auxiliary subunits before anterograde plasma membrane trafficking of the protein complex. Whether the multisubunit composition of surface channels is fixed following protein synthesis or flexible and open to acute and, potentially, rapid modulation to control activity and cellular excitability is unclear. Arterial smooth muscle cells (myocytes) express large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channel α and auxiliary β1 subunits that are functionally significant modulators of arterial contractility. Here, we show that native BKα subunits are primarily (∼95%) plasma membrane-localized in human and rat arterial myocytes. In contrast, only a small fraction (∼10%) of total β1 subunits are located at the cell surface. Immunofluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy demonstrated that intracellular β1 subunits are stored within Rab11A-postive recycling endosomes. Nitric oxide (NO), acting via cGMP-dependent protein kinase, and cAMP-dependent pathways stimulated rapid (≤1 min) anterograde trafficking of β1 subunit-containing recycling endosomes, which increased surface β1 almost threefold. These β1 subunits associated with surface-resident BKα proteins, elevating channel Ca(2+) sensitivity and activity. Our data also show that rapid β1 subunit anterograde trafficking is the primary mechanism by which NO activates myocyte BK channels and induces vasodilation. In summary, we show that rapid β1 subunit surface trafficking controls functional BK channel activity in arterial myocytes and vascular contractility. Conceivably, regulated auxiliary subunit trafficking may control ion channel activity in a wide variety of cell types.

  13. The subunit composition and function of mammalian cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadenbach, Bernhard; Hüttemann, Maik

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) from mammals and birds is composed of 13 subunits. The three catalytic subunits I-III are encoded by mitochondrial DNA, the ten nuclear-coded subunits (IV, Va, Vb, VIa, VIb, VIc, VIIa, VIIb, VIIc, VIII) by nuclear DNA. The nuclear-coded subunits are essentially involved in the regulation of oxygen consumption and proton translocation by COX, since their removal or modification changes the activity and their mutation causes mitochondrial diseases. Respiration, the basis for ATP synthesis in mitochondria, is differently regulated in organs and species by expression of tissue-, developmental-, and species-specific isoforms for COX subunits IV, VIa, VIb, VIIa, VIIb, and VIII, but the holoenzyme in mammals is always composed of 13 subunits. Various proteins and enzymes were shown, e.g., by co-immunoprecipitation, to bind to specific COX subunits and modify its activity, but these interactions are reversible, in contrast to the tightly bound 13 subunits. In addition, the formation of supercomplexes with other oxidative phosphorylation complexes has been shown to be largely variable. The regulatory complexity of COX is increased by protein phosphorylation. Up to now 18 phosphorylation sites have been identified under in vivo conditions in mammals. However, only for a few phosphorylation sites and four nuclear-coded subunits could a specific function be identified. Research on the signaling pathways leading to specific COX phosphorylations remains a great challenge for understanding the regulation of respiration and ATP synthesis in mammalian organisms. This article reviews the function of the individual COX subunits and their isoforms, as well as proteins and small molecules interacting and regulating the enzyme.

  14. Structural insights into the dual strategy of recognition by peptidoglycan recognition protein, PGRP-S: structure of the ternary complex of PGRP-S with lipopolysaccharide and stearic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Sharma

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs are part of the innate immune system. The 19 kDa Short PGRP (PGRP-S is one of the four mammalian PGRPs. The concentration of PGRP-S in camel (CPGRP-S has been shown to increase considerably during mastitis. The structure of CPGRP-S consists of four protein molecules designated as A, B, C and D forming stable intermolecular contacts, A-B and C-D. The A-B and C-D interfaces are located on the opposite sides of the same monomer leading to the the formation of a linear chain with alternating A-B and C-D contacts. Two ligand binding sites, one at C-D contact and another at A-B contact have been observed. CPGRP-S binds to the components of bacterial cell wall molecules such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS, lipoteichoic acid (LTA, and peptidoglycan (PGN from both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. It also binds to fatty acids including mycolic acid of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. Previous structural studies of binary complexes of CPGRP-S with LPS and stearic acid (SA have shown that LPS binds to CPGRP-S at C-D contact (Site-1 while SA binds to it at the A-B contact (Site-2. The binding studies using surface plasmon resonance showed that LPS and SA bound to CPGRP-S in the presence of each other. The structure determination of the ternary complex showed that LPS and SA bound to CPGRP-S at Site-1 and Site-2 respectively. LPS formed 13 hydrogen bonds and 159 van der Waals contacts (distances ≤4.2 Å while SA formed 56 van der Waals contacts. The ELISA test showed that increased levels of productions of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ due to LPS and SA decreased considerably upon the addition of CPGRP-S.

  15. Structure of an IgNAR-AMA1 complex: targeting a conserved hydrophobic cleft broadens malarial strain recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Kylie A; Streltsov, Victor A; Coley, Andrew M; Dolezal, Olan; Hudson, Peter J; Batchelor, Adrian H; Gupta, Aditi; Bai, Tao; Murphy, Vincent J; Anders, Robin F; Foley, Michael; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2007-11-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) is essential for invasion of erythrocytes and hepatocytes by Plasmodium parasites and is a leading malarial vaccine candidate. Although conventional antibodies to AMA1 can prevent such invasion, extensive polymorphisms within surface-exposed loops may limit the ability of these AMA1-induced antibodies to protect against all parasite genotypes. Using an AMA1-specific IgNAR single-variable-domain antibody, we performed targeted mutagenesis and selection against AMA1 from three P. falciparum strains. We present cocrystal structures of two antibody-AMA1 complexes which reveal extended IgNAR CDR3 loops penetrating deep into a hydrophobic cleft on the antigen surface and contacting residues conserved across parasite species. Comparison of a series of affinity-enhancing mutations allowed dissection of their relative contributions to binding kinetics and correlation with inhibition of erythrocyte invasion. These findings provide insights into mechanisms of single-domain antibody binding, and may enable design of reagents targeting otherwise cryptic epitopes in pathogen antigens.

  16. Self-recognition mechanism of MamA, a magnetosome-associated TPR-containing protein, promotes complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeytuni, Natalie; Ozyamak, Ertan; Ben-Harush, Kfir; Davidov, Geula; Levin, Maxim; Gat, Yair; Moyal, Tal; Brik, Ashraf; Komeili, Arash; Zarivach, Raz

    2011-08-16

    The magnetosome, a biomineralizing organelle within magnetotactic bacteria, allows their navigation along geomagnetic fields. Magnetosomes are membrane-bound compartments containing magnetic nanoparticles and organized into a chain within the cell, the assembly and biomineralization of magnetosomes are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins. Here, we describe the crystal structures of the magnetosome-associated protein, MamA, from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 and Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. MamA folds as a sequential tetra-trico-peptide repeat (TPR) protein with a unique hook-like shape. Analysis of the MamA structures indicates two distinct domains that can undergo conformational changes. Furthermore, structural analysis of seven crystal forms verified that the core of MamA is not affected by crystallization conditions and identified three protein-protein interaction sites, namely a concave site, a convex site, and a putative TPR repeat. Additionally, relying on transmission electron microscopy and size exclusion chromatography, we show that highly stable complexes form upon MamA homooligomerization. Disruption of the MamA putative TPR motif or N-terminal domain led to protein mislocalization in vivo and prevented MamA oligomerization in vitro. We, therefore, propose that MamA self-assembles through its putative TPR motif and its concave site to create a large homooligomeric scaffold which can interact with other magnetosome-associated proteins via the MamA convex site. We discuss the structural basis for TPR homooligomerization that allows the proper function of a prokaryotic organelle.

  17. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens as a strategy for the potentiation of immune recognition of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K; Hayashi, H; Hamada, C; Khoury, G; Jay, G

    1986-11-01

    Like many primary tumors, human adenovirus type 12 (Ad12)-transformed mouse cells express greatly reduced levels of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens and are highly tumorigenic in immunocompetent hosts. Expression of a transfected class I gene by these cells can abrogate their tumorigenicity. Both the K and the L class I genes can suppress the malignant phenotype. Previous studies showed that interferon can induce class I gene expression in certain Ad12-transformed cells and can suppress their tumorigenic phenotype. We now demonstrate that preimmunization of mice with a nontumorigenic dose of interferon-treated Ad12-transformed tumor cells can afford protection against a subsequent challenge by a tumorigenic dose of untreated Ad12-transformed tumor cells. Similar immunity can also be induced by using cells transfected with the K gene, and the observed protection appears specific to Ad12-transformed cells. Significant protection can be achieved even if immunization is provided subsequent to the tumor challenge. Since increasing numbers of human tumors have been found to have reduced levels of MHC class I antigens, the prospect of therapy by immunization with the parental tumor cells that have been manipulated to induce class I gene expression offers an attractive experimental model.

  18. [Comparative studies of face recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2012-07-01

    Every human being is proficient in face recognition. However, the reason for and the manner in which humans have attained such an ability remain unknown. These questions can be best answered-through comparative studies of face recognition in non-human animals. Studies in both primates and non-primates show that not only primates, but also non-primates possess the ability to extract information from their conspecifics and from human experimenters. Neural specialization for face recognition is shared with mammals in distant taxa, suggesting that face recognition evolved earlier than the emergence of mammals. A recent study indicated that a social insect, the golden paper wasp, can distinguish their conspecific faces, whereas a closely related species, which has a less complex social lifestyle with just one queen ruling a nest of underlings, did not show strong face recognition for their conspecifics. Social complexity and the need to differentiate between one another likely led humans to evolve their face recognition abilities.

  19. Human Emotion Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilbag Singh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of feature extraction of facial expressions with combination of neural network for the recognition of different facial emotions (happy, sad, angry, fear, surprised, neutral etc... Humans are capable of producing thousands of facial actions during communication that vary in complexity, intensity, and meaning. This paper analyses the limitations with existing system Emotion recognition using brain activity. In this paper by using an existing simulator I have achieved 97 percent accurate results and it is easy and simplest way than Emotion recognition using brain activity system. Purposed system depends upon human face as we know face also reflects the human brain activities or emotions. In this paper neural network has been used for better results. In the end of paper comparisons of existing Human Emotion Recognition System has been made with new one.

  20. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kevin Pfister

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  1. Tectonic evolution of kid metamorphic complex and the recognition of Najd fault system in South East Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Yasser M.; El-Shafei, Mohamed K.; Arnous, Mohamed O.

    2017-03-01

    A low-to medium-grade metamorphic belt of a volcano-sedimentary succession occurs in the eastern side of South Sinai as a part of the northernmost extension of the Arabian-Nubian Shield in Egypt. The belt is known as the Kid metamorphic complex. It is considered as one of the major belt among the other exposed metamorphic belts in South Sinai. Here, we detect and investigate the signature of the Najd Fault system in South Sinai based on detailed structural analysis in field and digital image processing. The enhanced satellite image and the geo-spatial distributions confirm that the Kid belt is essentially composed of nine Precambrian units. Field relations and geometrical analysis of the measured structural data revealed that the study area underwent four successive deformational phases (D1-D4). D1 is an upright tight to isoclinal large-scale folds that caused few F1 small-scale folds and a steeply dipping S1 axial plane foliation. The second deformational event D2 produced dominant of sub-horizontal S2 foliation planes accompanied with recumbent isoclinal folds and NW-SE trending L2 lineations. The main sense during D2 was top-to-the-NW with local reversals to the SE. The third folding generations F3 is recorded as axial plane S3-surfaces and is characterized by open concentric folding that overprinting both F1 and F2 folds and has a flexural-slip mechanism. F3 fold hinges plunge to the west-northwest or east-southeast indicate north-northeast-south-southwest shortening during D3. The fourth deformational event D4 is characterized by NE plunging open concentric folding overprint the pre-existing fold generations and formed under flexural slip mechanism reflecting coaxial deformation and indicating change in the stress regime as a result of the change in shortening from NE-SW to NW-SE. This phase is probably accompanied with the final assembly of east and west Gondwana. The dextral NW-SE shear zone that bounded the southwestern portion of the metamorphic belt is

  2. Speech recognition in university classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Wald, Mike; Bain, Keith; Basson, Sara H

    2002-01-01

    The LIBERATED LEARNING PROJECT (LLP) is an applied research project studying two core questions: 1) Can speech recognition (SR) technology successfully digitize lectures to display spoken words as text in university classrooms? 2) Can speech recognition technology be used successfully as an alternative to traditional classroom notetaking for persons with disabilities? This paper addresses these intriguing questions and explores the underlying complex relationship between speech recognition te...

  3. Phosphorylation-Dependent PIH1D1 Interactions Define Substrate Specificity of the R2TP Cochaperone Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Hořejší

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The R2TP cochaperone complex plays a critical role in the assembly of multisubunit machines, including small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins (snoRNPs, RNA polymerase II, and the mTORC1 and SMG1 kinase complexes, but the molecular basis of substrate recognition remains unclear. Here, we describe a phosphopeptide binding domain (PIH-N in the PIH1D1 subunit of the R2TP complex that preferentially binds to highly acidic phosphorylated proteins. A cocrystal structure of a PIH-N domain/TEL2 phosphopeptide complex reveals a highly specific phosphopeptide recognition mechanism in which Lys57 and 64 in PIH1D1, along with a conserved DpSDD phosphopeptide motif within TEL2, are essential and sufficient for binding. Proteomic analysis of PIH1D1 interactors identified R2TP complex substrates that are recruited by the PIH-N domain in a sequence-specific and phosphorylation-dependent manner suggestive of a common mechanism of substrate recognition. We propose that protein complexes assembled by the R2TP complex are defined by phosphorylation of a specific motif and recognition by the PIH1D1 subunit.

  4. Hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI enhance dopamine D2R protomer recognition and signaling of D2-5-HT2A heteroreceptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Narvaez, Manuel; Oflijan, Julia; Agnati, Luigi F; Fuxe, Kjell

    2014-01-03

    Dopamine D2LR-serotonin 5-HT2AR heteromers were demonstrated in HEK293 cells after cotransfection of the two receptors and shown to have bidirectional receptor-receptor interactions. In the current study the existence of D2L-5-HT2A heteroreceptor complexes was demonstrated also in discrete regions of the ventral and dorsal striatum with in situ proximity ligation assays (PLA). The hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI but not the standard 5-HT2AR agonist TCB2 and 5-HT significantly increased the density of D2like antagonist (3)H-raclopride binding sites and significantly reduced the pKiH values of the high affinity D2R agonist binding sites in (3)H-raclopride/DA competition experiments. Similar results were obtained in HEK293 cells and in ventral striatum. The effects of the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists on D2R density and affinity were blocked by the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin. In a forskolin-induced CRE-luciferase reporter gene assay using cotransfected but not D2R singly transfected HEK293 cells DOI and LSD but not TCB2 significantly enhanced the D2LR agonist quinpirole induced inhibition of CRE-luciferase activity. Haloperidol blocked the effects of both quinpirole alone and the enhancing actions of DOI and LSD while ketanserin only blocked the enhancing actions of DOI and LSD. The mechanism for the allosteric enhancement of the D2R protomer recognition and signalling observed is likely mediated by a biased agonist action of the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists at the orthosteric site of the 5-HT2AR protomer. This mechanism may contribute to the psychotic actions of LSD and DOI and the D2-5-HT2A heteroreceptor complex may thus be a target for the psychotic actions of hallunicogenic 5-HT2A agonists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural Basis for Ubiquitin Recognition by the Human ESCRT-II EAP45 GLUE Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam,S.; Langelier, C.; Whitby, F.; Koirala, S.; Robinson, H.; Hill, C.; Sundquist, W.

    2006-01-01

    ESCRT-IESCRT-IIGLUEEAP45VPS36The ESCRT-I and ESCRT-II complexes help sort ubiquitinated proteins into vesicles that accumulate within multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Crystallographic and biochemical analyses reveal that the GLUE domain of the human ESCRT-II EAP45 (also called VPS36) subunit is a split pleckstrin-homology domain that binds ubiquitin along one edge of the {beta}-sandwich. The structure suggests how human ESCRT-II can couple recognition of ubiquitinated cargoes and endosomal phospholipids during MVB protein sorting.

  6. Recognition of emotion in others

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijda, N.H.; Paglieri, F.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter argues that recognition of emotion had a simple basis and a highly complex edifice above it. Its basis is formed by catching intent from expressive and other emotional behavior, using elementary principles of perceptual integration. In intent recognition, mirror neurons under particular

  7. A role for the H4 subunit of vaccinia RNA polymerase in transcription initiation at a viral early promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, L; Shuman, S

    1994-05-13

    The vaccinia virus H4 gene encodes an essential subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase holoenzyme encapsidated within virus particles (Ahn, B., and Moss, B. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 89, 3536-3540; Kane, E. M., and Shuman, S. (1992) J. Virol. 66, 5752-5762). The role of this protein in transcription of viral early genes was revealed by the effects of affinity-purified anti-H4 antibody on discrete phases of the early transcription reaction in vitro. Anti-H4 specifically prevented the synthesis of a 21-nucleotide nascent RNA chain but had no impact on elongation of the 21-mer RNA by preassembled ternary complexes. Inhibition of initiation but not elongation was also observed with affinity-purified anti-D6 antibody directed against the 70-kDa subunit of the vaccinia early transcription initiation factor (ETF). Native gel mobility-shift assays showed that anti-H4 prevented the NTP-dependent recruitment of RNA polymerase to the preinitiation complex of ETF bound at the early promoter. Two species of ternary complexes could be resolved by native gel electrophoresis. Addition of anti-H4 to preformed complexes elicited a supershift of both ternary species but not of the preinitiation complex. Supeshift by anti-D6 revealed that the more rapidly migrating species of ternary complex did not contain immunoreactive ETF. Loss of ETF from the ternary complex was time-dependent. Thus, whereas the H4 protein was a stable constituent of the elongation complex, ETF was dissociable. We suggest that H4 functions as a molecular bridge to ETF and thereby allows specific recognition of early promoters by the core RNA polymerase. H4 is unlike bacterial sigma factor in that it remains bound to polymerase after the elongation complex is established.

  8. Heterodimerization of the human RNase P/MRP subunits Rpp20 and Rpp25 is a prerequisite for interaction with the P3 arm of RNase MRP RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands-Taylor, Katherine L D; Martino, Luigi; Tata, Renée; Babon, Jeffrey J; Bui, Tam T; Drake, Alex F; Beavil, Rebecca L; Pruijn, Ger J M; Brown, Paul R; Conte, Maria R

    2010-07-01

    Rpp20 and Rpp25 are two key subunits of the human endoribonucleases RNase P and MRP. Formation of an Rpp20-Rpp25 complex is critical for enzyme function and sub-cellular localization. We present the first detailed in vitro analysis of their conformational properties, and a biochemical and biophysical characterization of their mutual interaction and RNA recognition. This study specifically examines the role of the Rpp20/Rpp25 association in the formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex. The interaction of the individual subunits with the P3 arm of the RNase MRP RNA is revealed to be negligible whereas the 1:1 Rpp20:Rpp25 complex binds to the same target with an affinity of the order of nM. These results unambiguously demonstrate that Rpp20 and Rpp25 interact with the P3 RNA as a heterodimer, which is formed prior to RNA binding. This creates a platform for the design of future experiments aimed at a better understanding of the function and organization of RNase P and MRP. Finally, analyses of interactions with deletion mutant proteins constructed with successively shorter N- and C-terminal sequences indicate that the Alba-type core domain of both Rpp20 and Rpp25 contains most of the determinants for mutual association and P3 RNA recognition.

  9. Conservation of helical bundle structure between the exocyst subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole J Croteau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exocyst is a large hetero-octomeric protein complex required for regulating the targeting and fusion of secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane in eukaryotic cells. Although the sequence identity between the eight different exocyst subunits is less than 10%, structures of domains of four of the subunits revealed a similar helical bundle topology. Characterization of several of these subunits has been hindered by lack of soluble protein for biochemical and structural studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using advanced hidden Markov models combined with secondary structure predictions, we detect significant sequence similarity between each of the exocyst subunits, indicating that they all contain helical bundle structures. We corroborate these remote homology predictions by identifying and purifying a predicted domain of yeast Sec10p, a previously insoluble exocyst subunit. This domain is soluble and folded with approximately 60% alpha-helicity, in agreement with our predictions, and capable of interacting with several known Sec10p binding partners. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although all eight of the exocyst subunits had been suggested to be composed of similar helical bundles, this has now been validated by our hidden Markov model structure predictions. In addition, these predictions identified protein domains within the exocyst subunits, resulting in creation and characterization of a soluble, folded domain of Sec10p.

  10. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Tandrup Schmidt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the

  11. Probing the Impact of Local Structural Dynamics of Conformational Epitopes on Antibody Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Guttman, Miklos; Davenport, Thaddeus M; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-04-19

    Antibody-antigen interactions are governed by recognition of specific residues and structural complementarity between the antigen epitope and antibody paratope. While X-ray crystallography has provided detailed insights into static conformations of antibody-antigen complexes, factors such as conformational flexibility and dynamics, which are not readily apparent in the structures, can also have an impact on the binding event. Here we investigate the contribution of dynamics in the HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein to antibody recognition of conserved conformational epitopes, including the CD4- and coreceptor-binding sites, and an inner domain site that is targeted by ADCC-active antibodies. Hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) was used to measure local structural dynamics across a panel of variable loop truncation mutants of HIV-1 gp120, including full-length gp120, ΔV3, ΔV1/V2, and extended core, which includes ΔV1/V2 and V3 loop truncations. CD4-bound full-length gp120 was also examined as a reference state. HDX-MS revealed a clear trend toward an increased level of order of the conserved subunit core resulting from loop truncation. Combined with biolayer interferometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements of antibody-antigen binding, we demonstrate that an increased level of ordering of the subunit core was associated with better recognition by an array of antibodies targeting complex conformational epitopes. These results provide detailed insight into the influence of structural dynamics on antibody-antigen interactions and suggest the importance of characterizing the structural stability of vaccine candidates to improve antibody recognition of complex epitopes.

  12. Fingerprint recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Diefenderfer, Graig T.

    2006-01-01

    The use of biometrics is an evolving component in today's society. Fingerprint recognition continues to be one of the most widely used biometric systems. This thesis explores the various steps present in a fingerprint recognition system. The study develops a working algorithm to extract fingerprint minutiae from an input fingerprint image. This stage incorporates a variety of image pre-processing steps necessary for accurate minutiae extraction and includes two different methods of ridge thin...

  13. NOX Activation by Subunit Interaction and Underlying Mechanisms in Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Radhika; Geng, Xiaokun; Li, Fengwu; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAPDH) oxidase (NOX) is an enzyme complex with the sole function of producing superoxide anion and reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the expense of NADPH. Vital to the immune system as well as cellular signaling, NOX is also involved in the pathologies of a wide variety of disease states. Particularly, it is an integral player in many neurological diseases, including stroke, TBI, and neurodegenerative diseases. Pathologically, NOX produces an excessive amount of ROS that exceed the body’s antioxidant ability to neutralize them, leading to oxidative stress and aberrant signaling. This prevalence makes it an attractive therapeutic target and as such, NOX inhibitors have been studied and developed to counter NOX’s deleterious effects. However, recent studies of NOX have created a better understanding of the NOX complex. Comprised of independent cytosolic subunits, p47-phox, p67-phox, p40-phox and Rac, and membrane subunits, gp91-phox and p22-phox, the NOX complex requires a unique activation process through subunit interaction. Of these subunits, p47-phox plays the most important role in activation, binding and translocating the cytosolic subunits to the membrane and anchoring to p22-phox to organize the complex for NOX activation and function. Moreover, these interactions, particularly that between p47-phox and p22-phox, are dependent on phosphorylation initiated by upstream processes involving protein kinase C (PKC). This review will look at these interactions between subunits and with PKC. It will focus on the interaction involving p47-phox with p22-phox, key in bringing the cytosolic subunits to the membrane. Furthermore, the implication of these interactions as a target for NOX inhibitors such as apocynin will be discussed as a potential avenue for further investigation, in order to develop more specific NOX inhibitors based on the inhibition of NOX assembly and activation. PMID:28119569

  14. Subunit organization in cytoplasmic dynein subcomplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen J.; Bonilla, Myriam; Rodgers, Michael E.; Schroer, Trina A.

    2002-01-01

    Because cytoplasmic dynein plays numerous critical roles in eukaryotic cells, determining the subunit composition and the organization and functions of the subunits within dynein are important goals. This has been difficult partly because of accessory polypeptide heterogeneity of dynein populations. The motor domain containing heavy chains of cytoplasmic dynein are associated with multiple intermediate, light intermediate, and light chain accessory polypeptides. We examined the organization of these subunits within cytoplasmic dynein by separating the molecule into two distinct subcomplexes. These subcomplexes were competent to reassemble into a molecule with dynein-like properties. One subcomplex was composed of the dynein heavy and light intermediate chains whereas the other subcomplex was composed of the intermediate and light chains. The intermediate and light chain subcomplex could be further separated into two pools, only one of which contained dynein light chains. The two pools had distinct intermediate chain compositions, suggesting that intermediate chain isoforms have different light chain–binding properties. When the two intermediate chain pools were characterized by analytical velocity sedimentation, at least four molecular components were seen: intermediate chain monomers, intermediate chain dimers, intermediate chain monomers with bound light chains, and a mixture of intermediate chain dimers with assorted bound light chains. These data provide new insights into the compositional heterogeneity and assembly of the cytoplasmic dynein complex and suggest that individual dynein molecules have distinct molecular compositions in vivo. PMID:11967380

  15. Glycine Betaine Recognition through Cation−π Interactions in Crystal Structures of Glycine Betaine Complexes with C-Ethyl-pyrogallol[4]arene and C-Ethyl-resorcin[4]arene as Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ikuhide Fujisawa; Katsuyuki Aoki

    2013-01-01

    The glycine betaine (betaine), interacts with several types of proteins with diverse structures in vivo, and in the contact regions, the aromatic rings of protein residues are frequently found beside the trimethylammonium group of betaine, implying the importance of the cation−π interactions in recognition of this molecule. The crystal structures determined by X-ray crystallography of the complexes of betaine and C-ethyl-pyrogallol[4]arene (pyrogallol cyclic tetramer: PCT) and betaine and C-e...

  16. 编码酶复合体Ⅰ亚单位的线粒体基因新突变导致的MELAS综合征%Novel mutations in the mitochondrial DNA encoded complexsubunit genes associated with MELAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹华; 王朝霞; 李务荣; 洪道俊; 郑日亮; 孙永安; 张巍; 袁云

    2011-01-01

    目的:报道4例由编码酶复合体Ⅰ中NADH脱氢酶(ND)亚单位的线粒体基因(mtDNA)突变所导致的线粒体脑肌病患者,分析其临床及骨骼肌病理改变特点.方法:4例患者的发病年龄在6 ~21岁之间,病程在7~ 20年.其中1例为MELAS、3例为MELAS/Leigh叠加综合征.对4例患者进行肌肉活检和mtDNA全长测序检查.结果:骨骼肌病理检查发现1例同时存在破碎红纤维(RRFs)及SDH深染的血管(SSVs),2例仅有SSVs,另1例未见异常.4例患者均携带mtDNA编码的ND基因突变,分别为位于ND3编码区的T10191C(p.S45P)、ND4编码区的A11470C(p.K237N)、ND5编码区的T13046C(p.M237T)点突变以及累及ND5和ND6编码区的单一大片段缺失( 13025-13033:14417-14425),后3种突变均为新发现的致病性突变.结论:ND基因突变是导致部分MELAS或MELAS/Leigh叠加综合征患者的分子病理学基础,这些患者的骨骼肌病理检查常缺乏典型的线粒体脑肌病的病理改变,如RRFs.%Objective To report the clinical and myopathological features of 4 patients with mitochondrial encepha-lomyopathy associated with mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoded NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunit genes of complex I. Methods The onset age of 4 patients ranged from 6 to 21 years,with a clinical course from 7 to 20 years. A-mong them, 1 case was consistent with MELAS and 3 cases with MELAS/Leigh overlap syndrome. Muscle biopsy and whole sequencing of mtDNA were performed on these patients. Results Skeletal muscle biopsy disclosed both ragged-red fibers ( RRFs) and strongly succinate dehydrogenase-reactive vessels (SSVs) in one case,only SSVs without RRFs in two cases, and no abnormality in one. Whole sequencing of mtDNA revealed T10191C( p. S45P) in ND3 , A11470C( p. K237N) in ND4,T13046C( p. M237T) in ND5 and a single large-scale deletion ranging from 13025-13033 to 14417-14425 encompassing ND5 and ND6 in these patients respectively. Among them,Al 1470C,T13046C and the

  17. Allotopic Expression of a Gene Encoding FLAG Tagged-subunit 8 of Yeast Mitochondrial ATP Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I MADE ARTIKA

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Subunit 8 of yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase is a polypeptide of 48 amino acids encoded by the mitochondrial ATP8 gene. A nuclear version of subunit 8 gene has been designed to encode FLAG tagged-subunit 8 fused with a mitochondrial signal peptide. The gene has been cloned into a yeast expression vector and then expressed in a yeast strain lacking endogenous subunit 8. Results showed that the gene was successfully expressed and the synthesized FLAG tagged-subunit 8 protein was imported into mitochondria. Following import, the FLAG tagged-subunit 8 protein assembled into functional mitochondrial ATP synthase complex. Furthermore, the subunit 8 protein could be detected using anti-FLAG tag monoclonal antibody.

  18. Voltage-gated calcium channel subunits from platyhelminths: Potential role in praziquantel action✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeziorski, Michael C.; Greenberg, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Ca2+) channels provide the pathway for Ca2+ influxes that underlie Ca2+-dependent responses in muscles, nerves and other excitable cells. They are also targets of a wide variety of drugs and toxins. Ca2+ channels are multisubunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming α1 subunit and other modulatory subunits, including the β subunit. Here, we review the structure and function of schistosome Ca2+ channel subunits, with particular emphasis on variant Ca2+ channel β subunits (Cavβvar) found in these parasites. In particular, we examine the role these β subunits may play in the action of praziquantel, the current drug of choice against schistosomiasis. We also present evidence that Cavβvar homologs are found in other praziquantel-sensitive platyhelminths such as the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium, and that these variant β subunits may thus represent a platyhelminth-specific gene family. PMID:16545816

  19. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  20. Subunit structure of the acetylcholine receptor from Electrophorus electricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti-Tronconi, B M; Hunkapiller, M W; Lindstrom, J M; Raftery, M A

    1982-11-01

    The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of the four major peptides (Mr 41,000, 50,000, 55,000, and 62,000) present in purified preparations of Electrophorus electricus nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) have been determined for 24 cycles by automated sequence analysis procedures yielding four unique polypeptide sequences. The sequences showed a high degree of similarity, having identical residues in a number of positions ranging between 37% and 50% for specific pairs of subunits. Comparison of the sequences obtained with those of the subunits of similar molecular weight from Torpedo californica AcChoR revealed an even higher degree of homology (from 46% to 71%) for these two highly diverged species. Simultaneous sequence analysis of the amino termini present in native, purified Electrophorus AcChoR showed that these four related sequences were the only ones present and that they occur in a ratio of 2:1:1:1, with the smallest subunit ("alpha 1") being present in two copies. Genealogical analysis suggests that the subunits of both Torpedo and Electrophorus AcChoRs derive from a common ancestral gene, the divergence having occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry and the very early divergence of the four subunits, as well as the highly conserved structure of the AcChoR complex along animal evolution, suggest that each of the subunits evolved to perform discrete crucial roles in the physiological function of the AcChoR.

  1. Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Schiff bases and their complex compounds have been studied for their .... establishing coordination of the N–(2 – hydroxybenzyl) - L - α - valine Schiff base ..... (1967); “Spectrophotometric Identification of Organic Compounds”, Willey, New.

  2. Forest Fire Recognition Based on Deep Convolutional Neural Network Under Complex Background%复杂背景下基于深度卷积神经网络的森林火灾识别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅天驹; 郑嫦娥; 田野; 丘启敏; 林斯俊

    2016-01-01

    针对森林火灾的特点,提出并设计一种基于深度学习的森林火灾图像识别方法.通过实验,给出用于复杂背景下森林火灾识别的深度卷积神经网络结构,并对该结构进行训练和测试.并且,针对小样本林火识别存在识别率低的问题,提出一种参数替换方法.结果表明,该方法具备较高的正确率,正确率达到98%.同时网络可自动提取特征,无需对输入图像进行复杂预处理,克服了传统算法许多固有的缺点,将其应用在森林火灾识别领域取得了很好的效果.%According to the characteristics of forest fire, a forest fire image recognition method based on deep learning is proposed and designed.The structure of convolutional neural network ( CNN) is given by experiment, which is used in forest fire recogni-tion under the complex background, and it has been trained and tested.A parameters replacement method is presented for low recognition rate existing in small samples forest fire recognition.The results show that the method is of a high accuracy reaching to 98%, it can extract features automatically, the input image doesn' t need to pre-processing, and it overcomes many inherent shortcomings of traditional algorithm.Its application in the field of forest fire recognition achieves good results.

  3. Structural basis for duplex RNA recognition and cleavage by Archaeoglobus fulgidus C3PO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizotto, Eneida A; Lowe, Edward D; Parker, James S

    2013-01-01

    Oligomeric complexes of Trax and Translin proteins, known as C3POs, participate in a variety of eukaryotic nucleic acid metabolism pathways including RNAi and tRNA processing. In RNAi in humans and Drosophila, C3PO activates pre-RISC by removing the passenger strand of the siRNA precursor duplex using nuclease activity present in Trax. It is not known how C3POs engage with nucleic acid substrates. Here we identify a single protein from Archaeoglobus fulgidus that assembles into an octamer with striking similarity to human C3PO. The structure in complex with duplex RNA reveals that the octamer entirely encapsulates a single thirteen base-pair RNA duplex inside a large inner cavity. Trax-like subunit catalytic sites target opposite strands of the duplex for cleavage, separated by seven base pairs. The structure provides insight into the mechanism of RNA recognition and cleavage by an archaeal C3PO-like complex. PMID:23353787

  4. Blonanserin Ameliorates Phencyclidine-Induced Visual-Recognition Memory Deficits: the Complex Mechanism of Blonanserin Action Involving D3-5-HT2A and D1-NMDA Receptors in the mPFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Hirotake; Mouri, Akihiro; Mori, Kentaro; Matsumoto, Yurie; Seki, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Masayuki; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Iwamoto, Kunihiro; Ozaki, Norio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Noda, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Blonanserin differs from currently used serotonin 5-HT2A/dopamine-D2 receptor antagonists in that it exhibits higher affinity for dopamine-D2/3 receptors than for serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. We investigated the involvement of dopamine-D3 receptors in the effects of blonanserin on cognitive impairment in an animal model of schizophrenia. We also sought to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this involvement. Blonanserin, as well as olanzapine, significantly ameliorated phencyclidine (PCP)-induced impairment of visual-recognition memory, as demonstrated by the novel-object recognition test (NORT) and increased extracellular dopamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). With blonanserin, both of these effects were antagonized by DOI (a serotonin 5-HT2A receptor agonist) and 7-OH-DPAT (a dopamine-D3 receptor agonist), whereas the effects of olanzapine were antagonized by DOI but not by 7-OH-DPAT. The ameliorating effect was also antagonized by SCH23390 (a dopamine-D1 receptor antagonist) and H-89 (a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor). Blonanserin significantly remediated the decrease in phosphorylation levels of PKA at Thr197 and of NR1 (an essential subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors) at Ser897 by PKA in the mPFC after a NORT training session in the PCP-administered mice. There were no differences in the levels of NR1 phosphorylated at Ser896 by PKC in any group. These results suggest that the ameliorating effect of blonanserin on PCP-induced cognitive impairment is associated with indirect functional stimulation of the dopamine-D1-PKA-NMDA receptor pathway following augmentation of dopaminergic neurotransmission due to inhibition of both dopamine-D3 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in the mPFC. PMID:25120077

  5. Blonanserin ameliorates phencyclidine-induced visual-recognition memory deficits: the complex mechanism of blonanserin action involving D₃-5-HT₂A and D₁-NMDA receptors in the mPFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Hirotake; Mouri, Akihiro; Mori, Kentaro; Matsumoto, Yurie; Seki, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Masayuki; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Iwamoto, Kunihiro; Ozaki, Norio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Noda, Yukihiro

    2015-02-01

    Blonanserin differs from currently used serotonin 5-HT₂A/dopamine-D₂ receptor antagonists in that it exhibits higher affinity for dopamine-D₂/₃ receptors than for serotonin 5-HT₂A receptors. We investigated the involvement of dopamine-D₃ receptors in the effects of blonanserin on cognitive impairment in an animal model of schizophrenia. We also sought to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this involvement. Blonanserin, as well as olanzapine, significantly ameliorated phencyclidine (PCP)-induced impairment of visual-recognition memory, as demonstrated by the novel-object recognition test (NORT) and increased extracellular dopamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). With blonanserin, both of these effects were antagonized by DOI (a serotonin 5-HT₂A receptor agonist) and 7-OH-DPAT (a dopamine-D₃ receptor agonist), whereas the effects of olanzapine were antagonized by DOI but not by 7-OH-DPAT. The ameliorating effect was also antagonized by SCH23390 (a dopamine-D₁ receptor antagonist) and H-89 (a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor). Blonanserin significantly remediated the decrease in phosphorylation levels of PKA at Thr(197) and of NR1 (an essential subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors) at Ser(897) by PKA in the mPFC after a NORT training session in the PCP-administered mice. There were no differences in the levels of NR1 phosphorylated at Ser(896) by PKC in any group. These results suggest that the ameliorating effect of blonanserin on PCP-induced cognitive impairment is associated with indirect functional stimulation of the dopamine-D₁-PKA-NMDA receptor pathway following augmentation of dopaminergic neurotransmission due to inhibition of both dopamine-D₃ and serotonin 5-HT₂A receptors in the mPFC.

  6. On the influence of crosslinker on template complexation in molecularly imprinted polymers: a computational study of prepolymerization mixture events with correlations to template-polymer recognition behavior and NMR spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoravi, Siamak; Olsson, Gustaf D; Karlsson, Björn C G; Nicholls, Ian A

    2014-06-12

    Aspects of the molecular-level basis for the function of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and trimethylolproprane trimethacrylate crosslinked methacrylic acid copolymers molecularly imprinted with (S)-propranolol have been studied using a series of all-component and all-atom molecular dynamics studies of the corresponding prepolymerization systems. The crosslinking agents were observed to contribute to template complexation, and the results were contrasted with previously reported template-recognition behavior of the corresponding polymers. Differences in the extent to which the two crosslinkers interacted with the functional monomer were identified, and correlations were made to polymer-ligand recognition behavior and the results of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies studies. This study demonstrates the importance of considering the functional monomer-crosslinker interaction when designing molecularly imprinted polymers, and highlights the often neglected general contribution of crosslinker to determining the nature of molecularly imprinted polymer-template selectivity.

  7. Molecular Modeling on the Recognition of Wobble DNA Including G:T Mismatched Pairs by Two Structures of Chiral Metal Complex △,∧-[Ru(phen)2hpip]2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cui-Ping; WU Yan-Bo; YANG Pin

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the recognition of DNA including G:T mismatched pairs by the two different structures of[Ru(phen)2hpip]2+ was firstly studied with molecular modeling respectively. The results revealed that all of the four chiral isomers of the two structures could recognize the mismatched DNA from the minor groove orientation especially and the interaction was enantioselective and sitespecific. The two left isomers were more preferential than the right ones. Especially, the structure Ⅱ which had much lower energy after interacting with DNA was the advantaged structure. Detailed energy analysis indicated that the steric interaction in the process of the complex inserting base stack determined the recognition results and the electrostatic interaction made an effect to some extent.

  8. On the Influence of Crosslinker on Template Complexation in Molecularly Imprinted Polymers: A Computational Study of Prepolymerization Mixture Events with Correlations to Template-Polymer Recognition Behavior and NMR Spectroscopic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Shoravi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of the molecular-level basis for the function of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and trimethylolproprane trimethacrylate crosslinked methacrylic acid copolymers molecularly imprinted with (S-propranolol have been studied using a series of all-component and all-atom molecular dynamics studies of the corresponding prepolymerization systems. The crosslinking agents were observed to contribute to template complexation, and the results were contrasted with previously reported template-recognition behavior of the corresponding polymers. Differences in the extent to which the two crosslinkers interacted with the functional monomer were identified, and correlations were made to polymer-ligand recognition behavior and the results of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies studies. This study demonstrates the importance of considering the functional monomer–crosslinker interaction when designing molecularly imprinted polymers, and highlights the often neglected general contribution of crosslinker to determining the nature of molecularly imprinted polymer-template selectivity.

  9. Optimizing Face Recognition Using PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Abdullah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Principle Component Analysis PCA is a classical feature extraction and data representation technique widely used in pattern recognition. It is one of the most successful techniques in face recognition. But it has drawback of high computational especially for big size database. This paper conducts a study to optimize the time complexity of PCA (eigenfaces that does not affects the recognition performance. The authors minimize the participated eigenvectors which consequently decreases the computational time. A comparison is done to compare the differences between the recognition time in the original algorithm and in the enhanced algorithm. The performance of the original and the enhanced proposed algorithm is tested on face94 face database. Experimental results show that the recognition time is reduced by 35% by applying our proposed enhanced algorithm. DET Curves are used to illustrate the experimental results.

  10. Optimizing Face Recognition Using PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Abdullah

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Principle Component Analysis PCA is a classical feature extraction and data representation technique widely used in pattern recognition. It is one of the most successful techniques in face recognition. But it has drawback of high computational especially for big size database. This paper conducts a study to optimize the time complexity of PCA (eigenfaces that does not affects the recognition performance. The authorsminimize the participated eigenvectors which consequently decreases the computational time. A comparison is done to compare the differences between the recognition time in the original algorithm and in the enhanced algorithm. The performance of the original and the enhanced proposed algorithm is tested on face94 face database. Experimental results show that the recognition time is reduced by 35% by applying our proposed enhanced algorithm. DET Curves are used to illustrate the experimental results.

  11. The 73 kDa subunit of the CPSF complex binds to the HIV-1 LTR promoter and functions as a negative regulatory factor that is inhibited by the HIV-1 Tat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, Laureano; Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Fresno, Manuel; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Muñoz, Eduardo; Calzado, Marco A

    2007-09-14

    Gene expression in eukaryotes requires the post-transcriptional cleavage of mRNA precursors into mature mRNAs. The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) is critical for this process and its 73 kDa subunit (CPSF-73) mediates cleavage coupled to polyadenylation and histone pre-mRNA processing. Using CPSF-73 over-expression and siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments, this study identifies CPSF-73 as an important regulatory protein that represses the basal transcriptional activity of the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Similar results were found with over-expression of the CPSF-73 homologue RC-68, but not with CPSF 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100) and RC-74. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed the physical interaction of CPSF-73 with the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Further experiments revealed indirect CPSF-73 binding to the region between -275 to -110 within the 5' upstream region. Functional assays revealed the importance for the 5' upstream region (-454 to -110) of the LTR for CPSF-73-mediated transcription repression. We also show that HIV-1 Tat protein interacts with CPSF-73 and counteracts its repressive activity on the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Our results clearly show a novel function for CPSF-73 and add another candidate protein for explaining the molecular mechanisms underlying HIV-1 latency.

  12. Association of condensin with chromosomes depends on DNA binding by its HEAT-repeat subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Ilaria; Rutkowska, Anna; Ori, Alessandro; Walczak, Marta; Metz, Jutta; Pelechano, Vicent; Beck, Martin; Haering, Christian H

    2014-06-01

    Condensin complexes have central roles in the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes during cell divisions, but how they interact with chromatin to promote chromosome segregation is largely unknown. Previous work has suggested that condensin, in addition to encircling chromatin fibers topologically within the ring-shaped structure formed by its SMC and kleisin subunits, contacts DNA directly. Here we describe the discovery of a binding domain for double-stranded DNA formed by the two HEAT-repeat subunits of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae condensin complex. From detailed mapping data of the interfaces between the HEAT-repeat and kleisin subunits, we generated condensin complexes that lack one of the HEAT-repeat subunits and consequently fail to associate with chromosomes in yeast and human cells. The finding that DNA binding by condensin's HEAT-repeat subunits stimulates the SMC ATPase activity suggests a multistep mechanism for the loading of condensin onto chromosomes.

  13. Differential Distribution of Exosome Subunits at the Nuclear Lamina and in Cytoplasmic FociD⃞V⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Amy C Graham; Kiss, Daniel L.; Andrulis, Erik D.

    2006-01-01

    The exosome complex plays important roles in RNA processing and turnover. Despite significant mechanistic insight into exosome function, we still lack a basic understanding of the subcellular locales where exosome complex biogenesis and function occurs. Here, we employ a panel of Drosophila S2 stable cell lines expressing epitope-tagged exosome subunits to examine the subcellular distribution of exosome complex components. We show that tagged Drosophila exosome subunits incorporate into compl...

  14. CHARACTER RECOGNITION OF VIDEO SUBTITLES\\

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish S Hiremath

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An important task in content based video indexing is to extract text information from videos. The challenges involved in text extraction and recognition are variation of illumination on each video frame with text, the text present on the complex background and different font size of the text. Using various image processing algorithms like morphological operations, blob detection and histogram of oriented gradients the character recognition of video subtitles is implemented. Segmentation, feature extraction and classification are the major steps of character recognition. Several experimental results are shown to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm

  15. Logo Recognition Theory and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jingying

    2011-01-01

    Used by companies, organizations, and even individuals to promote recognition of their brand, logos can also act as a valuable means of identifying the source of a document. E-business applications can retrieve and catalog products according to their logos. Governmental agencies can easily inspect goods using smart mobile devices that use logo recognition techniques. However, because logos are two-dimensional shapes of varying complexity, the recognition process can be challenging. Although promising results have been found for clean logos, they have not been as robust for noisy logos. Logo Re

  16. Evidence for an unusual transmembrane configuration of AGG3, a Class C Gγ Subunit, of Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfenstetter, Susanne; Chakravorty, David; Kula, Ryan; Urano, Daisuke; Trusov, Yuri; Sheahan, Michael B.; McCurdy, David W.; Assmann, Sarah M.; Alan M Jones; Jose R. Botella

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are crucial for the perception of external signals and subsequent signal transduction in animal and plant cells. In both model systems, the complex is comprised of one Gα, one Gβ and one Gγ subunit. However, in addition to the canonical Gγ subunits (Class A), plants also possess two unusual, plant-specific classes of Gγ subunits (Classes B and C) not yet found in animals. These include Gγ subunits lacking the C-terminal CaaX motif (Class B) which is important for mem...

  17. Automatic aircraft recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmam, Hatem; Kim, Jijoong

    2002-08-01

    Automatic aircraft recognition is very complex because of clutter, shadows, clouds, self-occlusion and degraded imaging conditions. This paper presents an aircraft recognition system, which assumes from the start that the image is possibly degraded, and implements a number of strategies to overcome edge fragmentation and distortion. The current vision system employs a bottom up approach, where recognition begins by locating image primitives (e.g., lines and corners), which are then combined in an incremental fashion into larger sets of line groupings using knowledge about aircraft, as viewed from a generic viewpoint. Knowledge about aircraft is represented in the form of whole/part shape description and the connectedness property, and is embedded in production rules, which primarily aim at finding instances of the aircraft parts in the image and checking the connectedness property between the parts. Once a match is found, a confidence score is assigned and as evidence in support of an aircraft interpretation is accumulated, the score is increased proportionally. Finally a selection of the resulting image interpretations with the highest scores, is subjected to competition tests, and only non-ambiguous interpretations are allowed to survive. Experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of the current recognition system are given.

  18. Phosphorylation of ATPase subunits of the 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, G G; Murray, R Z; Pappin, D; Rivett, A J

    1998-07-01

    The 26S proteasome complex plays a major role in the non-lysosomal degradation of intracellular proteins. Purified 26S proteasomes give a pattern of more than 40 spots on 2D-PAGE gels. The positions of subunits have been identified by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides and by immunoblotting with subunit-specific antipeptide antibodies. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from [32P]phosphate-labelled human embryo lung L-132 cells revealed the presence of at least three major phosphorylated polypeptides among the regulatory subunits as well as the C8 and C9 components of the core 20S proteasome. Comparison with the positions of the regulatory polypeptides revealed a minor phosphorylated form to be S7 (MSS1). Antibodies against S4, S6 (TBP7) and S12 (MOV34) all cross-reacted at the position of major phosphorylated polypeptides suggesting that several of the ATPase subunits may be phosphorylated. The phosphorylation of S4 was confirmed by double immunoprecipitation experiments in which 26S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated as above and dissociated and then S4 was immunoprecipitated with subunit-specific antibodies. Antibodies against the non-ATPase subunit S10, which has been suggested by others to be phosphorylated, did not coincide with the position of a phosphorylated polypeptide. Some differences were observed in the 2D-PAGE pattern of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from cultured cells compared to purified rat liver 26S proteasomes suggesting possible differences in subunit compositions of 26S proteasomes.

  19. The Stepwise Reaction of Rhodium and Iridium Complexes of Formula [MCl2 (κ(4) C,N,N',P-L)] with Silver Cations: A Case of trans-Influence and Chiral Self-Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, María; Tejedor, Leyre; Rodríguez, Ricardo; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Lahoz, Fernando J; García-Orduña, Pilar; Carmona, Daniel

    2017-07-27

    Acetonitrile suspensions of the dichlorido complexes [MCl2 (κ(4) C,N,N',P-L)] [M=Rh (1), Ir (2)] react with AgSbF6 in a 1:2 molar ratio affording the bis-acetonitrile complexes [M(κ(4) C,N,N',P-L)(NCMe)2 ][SbF6 ]2 (3 and 4). The reaction takes place in a sequential manner and the intermediates can be isolated varying the M:Ag molar ratio. In a 2:1 molar ratio, it affords the dimetallic monochlorido-bridged compounds [{MCl(κ(4) C,N,N',P-L)}2 (μ-Cl)][SbF6 ] (5 and 6). In a 1:1 molar ratio, the monosubstituted solvato-complexes [MCl(κ(4) C,N,N',P-L)(Solv)][SbF6 ] (Solv=H2 O, MeCN, 7-10) were obtained. Finally, in a 2:3 molar ratio, it gives complexes 11 and 12 of formula [{M(κ(4) C,N,N',P-L)(NCMe)(μ-Cl)}2 Ag][SbF6 ]3 in which a silver cation joints two cationic monosubstituted acetonitrile-complexes [MCl(κ(4) C,N,N',P-L)(NCMe)](+) through the remaining chlorido ligands and two Ag⋅⋅⋅C interactions with one of the phenyl rings of each PPh2 group. In all the complexes, the aminic nitrogen and the central metal atom are stereogenic centers. In the trimetallic complexes 11 and 12, the silver atom is also a stereogenic center. The formation of the cation of the dimetallic complexes 5 and 6, as well as that of the trimetallic complexes 11 and 12, takes place with chiral molecular self-recognition. Experimental data and DFT calculations provide plausible explanations for the observed molecular recognition. The new complexes have been characterized by analytical, spectroscopic means and by X-ray diffraction methods. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Cytoplasmic N-Terminal Domain of Subunit I, a Homolog of Subunit a, of V-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Vyas, Nand K.; Baker, Matthew L.; Quiocho, Florante A. (Baylor)

    2012-02-27

    Subunit 'a' is associated with the membrane-bound (VO) complex of eukaryotic vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase acidification machinery. It has also been shown recently to be involved in diverse membrane fusion/secretory functions independent of acidification. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal cytosolic domain from the Meiothermus ruber subunit 'I' homolog of subunit a. The structure is composed of a curved long central {alpha}-helix bundle capped on both ends by two lobes with similar {alpha}/{beta} architecture. Based on the structure, a reasonable model of its eukaryotic subunit a counterpart was obtained. The crystal structure and model fit well into reconstructions from electron microscopy of prokaryotic and eukaryotic vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPases, respectively, clarifying their orientations and interactions and revealing features that could enable subunit a to play a role in membrane fusion/secretion.

  1. Structural characterization of recombinant crustacyanin subunits from the lobster Homarus americanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michele; Folli, Claudia; Pincolini, Elisa; McClintock, Timothy S; Rössle, Manfred; Berni, Rodolfo; Cianci, Michele

    2012-08-01

    Crustacean crustacyanin proteins are linked to the production and modification of carapace colour, with direct implications for fitness and survival. Here, the structural and functional properties of the two recombinant crustacyanin subunits H(1) and H(2) from the American lobster Homarus americanus are reported. The two subunits are structurally highly similar to the corresponding natural apo crustacyanin CRTC and CRTA subunits from the European lobster H. gammarus. Reconstitution studies of the recombinant crustacyanin proteins H(1) and H(2) with astaxanthin reproduced the bathochromic shift of 85-95 nm typical of the natural crustacyanin subunits from H. gammarus in complex with astaxanthin. Moreover, correlations between the presence of crustacyanin genes in crustacean species and the resulting carapace colours with the spectral properties of the subunits in complex with astaxanthin confirmed this genotype-phenotype linkage.

  2. Speaker Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Lasse Lohilahti; Jørgensen, Kasper Winther

    2005-01-01

    Speaker recognition is basically divided into speaker identification and speaker verification. Verification is the task of automatically determining if a person really is the person he or she claims to be. This technology can be used as a biometric feature for verifying the identity of a person...... in applications like banking by telephone and voice mail. The focus of this project is speaker identification, which consists of mapping a speech signal from an unknown speaker to a database of known speakers, i.e. the system has been trained with a number of speakers which the system can recognize....

  3. Sulfatide recognition by colonization factor antigen CS6 from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Jansson

    Full Text Available The first step in the pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC infections is adhesion of the bacterium to the small intestinal epithelium. Adhesion of ETEC is mediated by a number of antigenically distinct colonization factors, and among these, one of the most commonly detected is the non-fimbrial adhesin coli surface antigen 6 (CS6. The potential carbohydrate recognition by CS6 was investigated by binding of recombinant CS6-expressing E. coli and purified CS6 protein to a large number of variant glycosphingolipids separated on thin-layer chromatograms. Thereby, a highly specific binding of the CS6-expressing E. coli, and the purified CS6 protein, to sulfatide (SO(3-3Galbeta1Cer was obtained. The binding of the CS6 protein and CS6-expressing bacteria to sulfatide was inhibited by dextran sulfate, but not by dextran, heparin, galactose 4-sulfate or galactose 6-sulfate. When using recombinantly expressed and purified CssA and CssB subunits of the CS6 complex, sulfatide binding was obtained with the CssB subunit, demonstrating that the glycosphingolipid binding capacity of CS6 resides within this subunit. CS6-binding sulfatide was present in the small intestine of species susceptible to CS6-mediated infection, e.g. humans and rabbits, but lacking in species not affected by CS6 ETEC, e.g. mice. The ability of CS6-expressing ETEC to adhere to sulfatide in target small intestinal epithelium may thus contribute to virulence.

  4. The recognition of work

    OpenAIRE

    Nierling, Linda

    2007-01-01

    The following article argues that recognition structures in work relations differ significantly in the sphere of paid work in contrast to unpaid work in private spheres. According to the systematic approach on recognition of Axel Honneth three different levels of recognition are identified: the interpersonal recognition, organisational recognition and societal recognition. Based on this framework it can be stated that recognition structures in the sphere of paid work and in private spheres di...

  5. Glycine Betaine Recognition through Cation−π Interactions in Crystal Structures of Glycine Betaine Complexes with C-Ethyl-pyrogallol[4]arene and C-Ethyl-resorcin[4]arene as Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuhide Fujisawa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The glycine betaine (betaine, interacts with several types of proteins with diverse structures in vivo, and in the contact regions, the aromatic rings of protein residues are frequently found beside the trimethylammonium group of betaine, implying the importance of the cation−π interactions in recognition of this molecule. The crystal structures determined by X-ray crystallography of the complexes of betaine and C-ethyl-pyrogallol[4]arene (pyrogallol cyclic tetramer: PCT and betaine and C-ethyl-resorcin[4]arene (resorcinol cyclic tetramer: RCT mimic the conformations of betaine and protein complexes and show that the clathrate conformations are retained by the cation−π interactions. The difference of the conformation feature of betaine in the Protein Data Bank and in the Cambridge Structural Database was found by chance during the research and analyzed with the torsion angles.

  6. Chiral Recognition for the Two Enantiomers of Phenylalanine and Four Amino Acid Derivatives with (S)-Phenylethylamine Derived Nickel(II) Macrocyclic Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jeong Jae; Ryoo, Jae Jeong [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    The potency of new chiral selector candidate was assessed by this simple chiral discrimination test. This experiment showed that the macrocyclic molecule can be a powerful candidate as a chiral selector to obtain optically pure amino acid or amino acid derivatives, particularly phenylalanine and N-benzoyl-phenylalanine enantiomers from racemic mixtures. This study attempted to use the chiral metal organic framework (MOF), 1, as a good chiral selector candidate for the chiral discrimination of racemic phenylalanine, N-benzoyl-alanine, N-benzoyl-phenylalanine, N-benzoyl-methionine, N-CBZ-alanine. The chiral recognition ability of the chiral macromolecule, was examined by varying the molar ratio of the macromolecule and racemates.

  7. The elusive third subunit IIa of the bacterial B-type oxidases: the enzyme from the hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus.

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    Laurence Prunetti

    Full Text Available The reduction of molecular oxygen to water is catalyzed by complicated membrane-bound metallo-enzymes containing variable numbers of subunits, called cytochrome c oxidases or quinol oxidases. We previously described the cytochrome c oxidase II from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus as a ba(3-type two-subunit (subunits I and II enzyme and showed that it is included in a supercomplex involved in the sulfide-oxygen respiration pathway. It belongs to the B-family of the heme-copper oxidases, enzymes that are far less studied than the ones from family A. Here, we describe the presence in this enzyme of an additional transmembrane helix "subunit IIa", which is composed of 41 amino acid residues with a measured molecular mass of 5105 Da. Moreover, we show that subunit II, as expected, is in fact longer than the originally annotated protein (from the genome and contains a transmembrane domain. Using Aquifex aeolicus genomic sequence analyses, N-terminal sequencing, peptide mass fingerprinting and mass spectrometry analysis on entire subunits, we conclude that the B-type enzyme from this bacterium is a three-subunit complex. It is composed of subunit I (encoded by coxA(2 of 59000 Da, subunit II (encoded by coxB(2 of 16700 Da and subunit IIa which contain 12, 1 and 1 transmembrane helices respectively. A structural model indicates that the structural organization of the complex strongly resembles that of the ba(3 cytochrome c oxidase from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus, the IIa helical subunit being structurally the lacking N-terminal transmembrane helix of subunit II present in the A-type oxidases. Analysis of the genomic context of genes encoding oxidases indicates that this third subunit is present in many of the bacterial oxidases from B-family, enzymes that have been described as two-subunit complexes.

  8. Optical pattern recognition for printed music notation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homenda, Wladyslaw

    1995-03-01

    The paper presents problems related to automated recognition of printed music notation. Music notation recognition is a challenging problem in both fields: pattern recognition and knowledge representation. Music notation symbols, though well characterized by their features, are arranged in elaborated way in real music notation, which makes recognition task very difficult and still open for new ideas. On the other hand, the aim of the system, i.e. application of acquired printed music into further processing requires special representation of music data. Due to complexity of music nature and music notation, music representation is one of the key issue in music notation recognition and music processing. The problems of pattern recognition and knowledge representation in context or music processing are discussed in this paper. MIDISCAN, the computer system for music notation recognition and music processing, is presented.

  9. Gesture recognition on smart cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziri, Aziz; Chevobbe, Stephane; Darouich, Mehdi

    2013-02-01

    Gesture recognition is a feature in human-machine interaction that allows more natural interaction without the use of complex devices. For this reason, several methods of gesture recognition have been developed in recent years. However, most real time methods are designed to operate on a Personal Computer with high computing resources and memory. In this paper, we analyze relevant methods found in the literature in order to investigate the ability of smart camera to execute gesture recognition algorithms. We elaborate two hand gesture recognition pipelines. The first method is based on invariant moments extraction and the second on finger tips detection. The hand detection method used for both pipeline is based on skin color segmentation. The results obtained show that the un-optimized versions of invariant moments method and finger tips detection method can reach 10 fps on embedded processor and use about 200 kB of memory.

  10. Structure of the archaeal Cascade subunit Csa5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeks, Judith; Graham, Shirley; Anderson, Linzi; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.; Naismith, James H.

    2013-01-01

    The Cascade complex for CRISPR-mediated antiviral immunity uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target invading DNA species from mobile elements such as viruses, leading to their destruction. The core of the Cascade effector complex consists of the Cas5 and Cas7 subunits, which are widely conserved in prokaryotes. Cas7 binds crRNA and forms the helical backbone of Cascade. Many archaea encode a version of the Cascade complex (denoted Type I-A) that includes a Csa5 (or small) subunit, which interacts weakly with the core proteins. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Csa5 protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Csa5 comprises a conserved α-helical domain with a small insertion consisting of a weakly conserved β-strand domain. In the crystal, the Csa5 monomers have multimerized into infinite helical threads. At each interface is a strictly conserved intersubunit salt bridge, deletion of which disrupts multimerization. Structural analysis indicates a shared evolutionary history among the small subunits of the CRISPR effector complexes. The same α-helical domain is found in the C-terminal domain of Cse2 (from Type I-E Cascade), while the N-terminal domain of Cse2 is found in Cmr5 of the CMR (Type III-B) effector complex. As Cmr5 shares no match with Csa5, two possibilities present themselves: selective domain loss from an ancestral Cse2 to create two new subfamilies or domain fusion of two separate families to create a new Cse2 family. A definitive answer awaits structural studies of further small subunits from other CRISPR effector complexes. PMID:23846216

  11. Structural basis of plant homeodomain finger 6 (PHF6) recognition by the retinoblastoma binding protein 4 (RBBP4) component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhonghua; Li, Fudong; Zhang, Beibei; Li, Sai; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2015-03-06

    The NuRD complex is a conserved transcriptional coregulator that contains both chromatin-remodeling and histone deacetylase activities. Mutations of PHF6 are found in patients with Börjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or acute myeloid leukemia. Recently, PHF6 was identified to interact with the NuRD complex, and this interaction is mediated by the RBBP4 component. However, little is known about the molecular basis for the interaction. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complex of the NuRD subunit RBBP4 bound to the PHF6 peptide (residues 162-170). The PHF6 peptide binds to the top surface of the RBBP4 β-propeller. A pair of positively charged residues of the PHF6 peptide insert into the negatively charged pocket of RBBP4, which is critical for the interaction between PHF6 and RBBP4. Corresponding PHF6 mutants impair this interaction in vitro and in vivo. Structural comparison shows that the PHF6-binding pocket overlaps with FOG1 and histone H3 on RBBP4/Nurf55, but it is distinct from the pocket recognizing histone H4, Su(z)12, and MTA1. We further show that the middle disordered region (residues 145-207, containing the RBBP4-binding motif) is sufficient for the transcriptional repression mediated by PHF6 on the GAL4 reporter, and knockdown of RBBP4 diminished the PHF6-mediated repression. Our RBBP4-PHF6 complex structure provides insights into the molecular basis of PHF6-NuRD complex interaction and implicates a role for PHF6 in chromatin structure modulation and gene regulation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. The subunit delta-subunit b domain of the Escherichia coli F1F0 ATPase. The B subunits interact with F1 as a dimer and through the delta subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, A J; Wilkens, S; Aggeler, R; Morris, M B; Howitt, S M; Capaldi, R A

    1997-12-05

    The delta and b subunits are both involved in binding the F1 to the F0 part in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase (ECF1F0). The interaction of the purified delta subunit and the isolated hydrophilic domain of the b subunit (bsol) has been studied here. Purified delta binds to bsol weakly in solution, as indicated by NMR studies and protease protection experiments. On F1, i.e. in the presence of ECF1-delta, delta, and bsol interact strongly, and a complex of ECF1.bsol can be isolated by native gel electrophoresis. Both delta subunit and bsol are protected from trypsin cleavage in this complex. In contrast, the delta subunit is rapidly degraded by the protease when bound to ECF1 when bsol is absent. The interaction of bsol with ECF1 involves the C-terminal domain of delta as delta(1-134) cannot replace intact delta in the binding experiments. As purified, bsol is a stable dimer with 80% alpha helix. A monomeric form of bsol can be obtained by introducing the mutation A128D (Howitt, S. M., Rodgers, A. J.,W., Jeffrey, P. D., and Cox, G. B. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 7038-7042). Monomeric bsol has less alpha helix, i.e. only 58%, is much more sensitive to trypsin cleavage than dimer, and unfolds at much lower temperatures than the dimer in circular dichroism melting studies, indicating a less stable structure. The bsol dimer, but not monomer, binds to delta in ECF1. To examine whether subunit b is a monomor or dimer in intact ECF1F0, CuCl2 was used to induce cross-link formation in the mutants bS60C, bQ104C, bA128C, bG131C, and bS146C. With the exception of bS60C, CuCl2 treatment resulted in formation of b subunit dimers in all mutants. Cross-linking yield was independent of nucleotide conditions and did not affect ATPase activity. These results show the b subunit to be dimeric for a large portion of the C terminus, with residues 124-131 likely forming a pair of parallel alpha helices.

  13. Tolerance and recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Marius Hansteen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though “toleration” and “recognition” designate opposing attitudes (to tolerate something, implies a negative stance towards it, whereas recognition seems to imply a positive one, the concepts do not constitute mutually exclusive alternatives. However, “toleration” is often associated with liberal universalism, focusing on individual rights, whereas “recognition” often connotes communitarian perspectives, focusing on relations and identity. This paper argues that toleration may be founded on recognition, and that recognition may imply toleration. In outlining a differentiated understanding of the relationship between toleration and recognition, it seems apt to avoid an all-to-general dichotomy between universalism and particularism or, in other words, to reach beyond the debate between liberalism and communitarianism in political philosophy.The paper takes as its starting point the view that the discussion on toleration and diversity in intercultural communication is one of the contexts where it seems important to get beyond the liberal/communitarian dichotomy. Some basic features of Rainer Forst’s theory of toleration and Axel Honneth’s theory of the struggle for recognition are presented, in order to develop a more substantial understanding of the relationship between the concepts of toleration and recognition. One lesson from Forst is that toleration is a normatively dependent concept, i.e., that it is impossible to deduce principles for toleration and its limits from a theory of toleration as such. A central lesson from Honneth is that recognition – understood as a basic human need – is always conflictual and therefore dynamic.Accordingly, a main point in the paper is that the theory of struggles for and about recognition (where struggles for designates struggles within an established order of recognition, and struggles about designates struggles that challenge established orders of recognition may clarify what

  14. Regulation of Voltage-Activated K(+) Channel Gating by Transmembrane β Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-activated K(+) (K(V)) channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. K(V) channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD) surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs). The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many K(V) channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the K(V) β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM) segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of K(V) α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening, and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into K(V) channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  15. Regulation of KV channel voltage-dependent activation by transmembrane β subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui eSun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-activated K+ (KV channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. KV channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSD. The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many KV channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the KV β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of KV α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into KV channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  16. Mechanism of CRISPR-RNA guided recognition of DNA targets in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erp, Paul B G; Jackson, Ryan N; Carter, Joshua; Golden, Sarah M; Bailey, Scott; Wiedenheft, Blake

    2015-09-30

    In bacteria and archaea, short fragments of foreign DNA are integrated into Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR) loci, providing a molecular memory of previous encounters with foreign genetic elements. In Escherichia coli, short CRISPR-derived RNAs are incorporated into a multi-subunit surveillance complex called Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense). Recent structures of Cascade capture snapshots of this seahorse-shaped RNA-guided surveillance complex before and after binding to a DNA target. Here we determine a 3.2 Å x-ray crystal structure of Cascade in a new crystal form that provides insight into the mechanism of double-stranded DNA binding. Molecular dynamic simulations performed using available structures reveal functional roles for residues in the tail, backbone and belly subunits of Cascade that are critical for binding double-stranded DNA. Structural comparisons are used to make functional predictions and these predictions are tested in vivo and in vitro. Collectively, the results in this study reveal underlying mechanisms involved in target-induced conformational changes and highlight residues important in DNA binding and protospacer adjacent motif recognition.

  17. The mitochondrial respiratory chain of the secondary green alga Euglena gracilis shares many additional subunits with parasitic Trypanosomatidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Emilie; Lapaille, Marie; Degand, Hervé; Cilibrasi, Laura; Villavicencio-Queijeiro, Alexa; Morsomme, Pierre; González-Halphen, Diego; Field, Mark C; Remacle, Claire; Baurain, Denis; Cardol, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    The mitochondrion is an essential organelle for the production of cellular ATP in most eukaryotic cells. It is extensively studied, including in parasitic organisms such as trypanosomes, as a potential therapeutic target. Recently, numerous additional subunits of the respiratory-chain complexes have been described in Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi. Since these subunits had apparently no counterparts in other organisms, they were interpreted as potentially associated with the parasitic trypanosome lifestyle. Here we used two complementary approaches to characterise the subunit composition of respiratory complexes in Euglena gracilis, a non-parasitic secondary green alga related to trypanosomes. First, we developed a phylogenetic pipeline aimed at mining sequence databases for identifying homologues to known respiratory-complex subunits with high confidence. Second, we used MS/MS proteomics after two-dimensional separation of the respiratory complexes by Blue Native- and SDS-PAGE both to confirm in silico predictions and to identify further additional subunits. Altogether, we identified 41 subunits that are restricted to E. gracilis, T. brucei and T. cruzi, along with 48 classical subunits described in other eukaryotes (i.e. plants, mammals and fungi). This moreover demonstrates that at least half of the subunits recently reported in T. brucei and T. cruzi are actually not specific to Trypanosomatidae, but extend at least to other Euglenozoa, and that their origin and function are thus not specifically associated with the parasitic lifestyle. Furthermore, preliminary biochemical analyses suggest that some of these additional subunits underlie the peculiarities of the respiratory chain observed in Euglenozoa.

  18. Cloning, Expression and Purification of Subunit H of Vacuolar H+-ATPase from Mythimna separata Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Lu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The vacuolar (H+-ATPase (V-ATPase of insect, which is composed of membrane-bound V0 complex and peripheral V1 complex, participates in lots of important physiological process. Subunit H, as a subunit of V1 complex, plays a vital role in bridging the communication between V1 and V0 complexes and interaction with other proteins. Yeast subunit H has been successfully crystallized through expression in E. coli, but little is known about the structure of insect subunit H. In this study, we cloned, expressed and purified the subunit H from midgut of Mythimna separata Walker. Through RACE (rapidly amplification of cDNA ends technique, we got 1807 bp full length of subunit H, and to keep the nature structure of subunit H, we constructed Baculovirus expression vector with His-tag in the C-terminal and expressed the recombinant protein in insect sf9 cells, thereafter, purified the recombinant protein by Ni-NTA columns. Results of SDS-PAGE, western blotting and mass spectrometry showed that the recombinant protein was successfully expressed. The method of expressing and purifying M. separata subunit H will provide a foundation for obtaining the crystal of subunit H and further study of the design of novel insecticides based on its structure and function.

  19. Recognition without Awareness: Encoding and Retrieval Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, Fergus I. M.; Rose, Nathan S.; Gopie, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The article reports 4 experiments that explore the notion of recognition without awareness using words as the material. Previous work by Voss and associates has shown that complex visual patterns were correctly selected as targets in a 2-alternative forced-choice (2-AFC) recognition test although participants reported that they were guessing. The…

  20. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Experimental Approach Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9′ serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Key Results Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose–response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9′S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Conclusions and Implications Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. PMID:24206220

  1. Characterisation of the tryptophan synthase alpha subunit in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gierl Alfons

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, such as Salmonella typhimurium, tryptophan is synthesized from indole-3-glycerole phosphate (IGP by a tryptophan synthase αββα heterotetramer. Plants have evolved multiple α (TSA and β (TSB homologs, which have probably diverged in biological function and their ability of subunit interaction. There is some evidence for a tryptophan synthase (TS complex in Arabidopsis. On the other hand maize (Zea mays expresses the TSA-homologs BX1 and IGL that efficiently cleave IGP, independent of interaction with TSB. Results In order to clarify, how tryptophan is synthesized in maize, two TSA homologs, hitherto uncharacterized ZmTSA and ZmTSAlike, were functionally analyzed. ZmTSA is localized in plastids, the major site of tryptophan biosynthesis in plants. It catalyzes the tryptophan synthase α-reaction (cleavage of IGP, and forms a tryptophan synthase complex with ZmTSB1 in vitro. The catalytic efficiency of the α-reaction is strongly enhanced upon complex formation. A 160 kD tryptophan synthase complex was partially purified from maize leaves and ZmTSA was identified as native α-subunit of this complex by mass spectrometry. ZmTSAlike, for which no in vitro activity was detected, is localized in the cytosol. ZmTSAlike, BX1, and IGL were not detectable in the native tryptophan synthase complex in leaves. Conclusion It was demonstrated in vivo and in vitro that maize forms a tryptophan synthase complex and ZmTSA functions as α-subunit in this complex.

  2. License plate recognition using DTCNNs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Brugge, M.H; Stevens, J.H; Nijhuis, J.A G; Spaanenburg, L; Tavsanonoglu, V

    1998-01-01

    Automatic license plate recognition requires a series of complex image processing steps. For practical use, the amount of data to he processed must be minimized early on. This paper shows that the computationally most intensive steps can be realized by DTCNNs. Moreover; high-level operations like fi

  3. Simultaneous tracking and activity recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina Elena; Fleet, David J.; Hamilton, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    Many tracking problems involve several distinct objects interacting with each other. We develop a framework that takes into account interactions between objects allowing the recognition of complex activities. In contrast to classic approaches that consider distinct phases of tracking and activity...

  4. In situ localization of N and C termini of subunits of the flagellar nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) using SNAP tag and cryo-electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kangkang; Awata, Junya; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Witman, George B; Porter, Mary E; Nicastro, Daniela

    2015-02-27

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has reached nanoscale resolution for in situ three-dimensional imaging of macromolecular complexes and organelles. Yet its current resolution is not sufficient to precisely localize or identify most proteins in situ; for example, the location and arrangement of components of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), a key regulator of ciliary/flagellar motility that is conserved from algae to humans, have remained elusive despite many cryo-ET studies of cilia and flagella. Here, we developed an in situ localization method that combines cryo-ET/subtomogram averaging with the clonable SNAP tag, a widely used cell biological probe to visualize fusion proteins by fluorescence microscopy. Using this hybrid approach, we precisely determined the locations of the N and C termini of DRC3 and the C terminus of DRC4 within the three-dimensional structure of the N-DRC in Chlamydomonas flagella. Our data demonstrate that fusion of SNAP with target proteins allowed for protein localization with high efficiency and fidelity using SNAP-linked gold nanoparticles, without disrupting the native assembly, structure, or function of the flagella. After cryo-ET and subtomogram averaging, we localized DRC3 to the L1 projection of the nexin linker, which interacts directly with a dynein motor, whereas DRC4 was observed to stretch along the N-DRC base plate to the nexin linker. Application of the technique developed here to the N-DRC revealed new insights into the organization and regulatory mechanism of this complex, and provides a valuable tool for the structural dissection of macromolecular complexes in situ.

  5. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  6. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  7. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali

    2009-12-17

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  8. Fast parallel recognition of LR language suffixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertsch, E; Nederhof, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that suffix recognition for deterministic context-free languages can be done on a PRAM multi-processor within the upper complexity bounds of the graph reachability problem. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular recognition studies on supramolecular systems (XXIV)——Conformations and complexation abilities of chemically modified cyclodextrins in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘育; 尤长城

    2000-01-01

    Circular dichroism spectral and fluorescence decay methods have been employed to determine the conformations of mono[6-(p-tolylseleno)-6-deoxy]-p-CD(1), mono(6-anilino-6-deoxy) β -CD (2) and mono[6-(L-tryptophan)-6-deoxy]-β-CD (3) in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.2, 0.1 mol dm-3) at 298.15 K. The results indicate that compounds 2 and 3 formed self-inclusion complexes in aqueous buffer solution, while the substituent of compound 1 was not included into cyclodextrin cavity at all. Furthermore, the complex stability constant (logKs) and Gibbs free energy change (-ΔG° ) of these three cylcodextrin derivatives with several cycloalkanols have been determined by circular dichroism spectral titration in phosphate buffer solution at 298.15 K. It is found that the location of the substituent affects the stability of host-guest complex in aqueous solution.

  10. The crystal structure of the Split End protein SHARP adds a new layer of complexity to proteins containing RNA recognition motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieti, Fabiana; Gabus, Caroline; Tambalo, Margherita; Huet, Tiphaine; Round, Adam; Thore, Stéphane

    2014-06-01

    The Split Ends (SPEN) protein was originally discovered in Drosophila in the late 1990s. Since then, homologous proteins have been identified in eukaryotic species ranging from plants to humans. Every family member contains three predicted RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region of the protein. We have determined the crystal structure of the region of the human SPEN homolog that contains these RRMs-the SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP), at 2.0 Å resolution. SHARP is a co-regulator of the nuclear receptors. We demonstrate that two of the three RRMs, namely RRM3 and RRM4, interact via a highly conserved interface. Furthermore, we show that the RRM3-RRM4 block is the main platform mediating the stable association with the H12-H13 substructure found in the steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), a long, non-coding RNA previously shown to play a crucial role in nuclear receptor transcriptional regulation. We determine that SHARP association with SRA relies on both single- and double-stranded RNA sequences. The crystal structure of the SHARP-RRM fragment, together with the associated RNA-binding studies, extend the repertoire of nucleic acid binding properties of RRM domains suggesting a new hypothesis for a better understanding of SPEN protein functions.

  11. Critical solvent thermodynamic effect on molecular recognition: The case of the complex formation of carboxylates and ammonium-squaramido based receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piña, M. Nieves, E-mail: neus.pinya@uib.es; López, Kenia A.; Costa, Antoni; Morey, Jeroni, E-mail: jeroni.morey@uib.es

    2013-10-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The enthalpy–entropy compensation in the complex is independent of the spacer used. • The enthalpy–entropy compensation is dependent on the microscopic nature of the binary mixture. • The enthalpy–entropy compensation is dependent on the proportion of the components of the binary mixture. - Abstract: An isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) study on the supramolecular complex formation between carboxylates and ammonium-squaramido based receptors at different ethanol:water proportions is reported. The results obtained show that the formation enthalpy sign of a supramolecular complex in a water–ethanol binary mixture can be influenced by the proportion of the cosolvent. Moreover there is an enthalpy–entropy compensation process in the supramolecular complex formation; in poor water mixtures the process is endothermic, whilst in reach water mixtures the process is exothermic. This behavior is mostly due to the intrinsic nature of the mixture between water and ethanol, and particularly the process of solvation and desolvation of receptor, substrate and complex. When this study is repeated with binary mixtures of water–methanol and water–DMSO it is observed that the nature of the organic solvent affects the results. While the mixture water–methanol has a behavior similar to water–ethanol mixture, the water–DMSO mixture shows clear differences. In order to check this compensation process, △Cp values are calculated at two different proportions water–ethanol, and they are consistent with an enthalpy–entropy compensation process similar to that described by the inclusion process for certain hydrophilic cyclodextrines. The results obtained show that the enthalpy–entropy compensation detected in the supramolecular complex formation between carboxylates and ammonium-squaramido receptors is independent of the spacer used, and more dependent on the microscopic nature and proportion of the binary mixture.

  12. Assembly of ROMK1 (Kir 1.1a) inward rectifier K+ channel subunits involves multiple interaction sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, J C; Bentle, K A; Nichols, C G; Ho, K

    1998-04-01

    The ROMK1 (Kir 1.1a) channel is formed by a tetrameric complex of subunits, each characterized by cytoplasmic N- and C-termini and a core region of two transmembrane helices flanking a pore-forming segment. To delineate the general regions mediating the assembly of ROMK1 subunits we constructed epitope-tagged N-terminal, C-terminal, and transmembrane segment deletion mutants. Nonfunctional subunits with N-terminal, core region, and C-terminal deletions had dominant negative effects when coexpressed with wild-type ROMK1 subunits in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, coexpression of these nonfunctional subunits with Kv 2.1 (DRK1) did not suppress Kv 2.1 currents in control oocytes. Interactions between epitope-tagged mutant and wild-type ROMK1 subunits were studied in parallel by immunoprecipitating [35S]-labeled oocyte membrane proteins. Complexes containing both wild-type and mutant subunits that retained H5, M2, and C-terminal regions were coimmunoprecipitated to a greater extent than complexes consisting of wild-type and mutant subunits with core region and/or C-terminal deletions. The present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple interaction sites located in the core region and cytoplasmic termini of ROMK1 subunits mediate homomultimeric assembly.

  13. Crystal structure of a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain complexed with the Fab fragment of a human IgM antibody: structural basis for recognition of B-cell receptors and superantigen activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graille, M; Stura, E A; Corper, A L; Sutton, B J; Taussig, M J; Charbonnier, J B; Silverman, G J

    2000-05-09

    Staphylococcus aureus produces a virulence factor, protein A (SpA), that contains five homologous Ig-binding domains. The interactions of SpA with the Fab region of membrane-anchored Igs can stimulate a large fraction of B cells, contributing to lymphocyte clonal selection. To understand the molecular basis for this activity, we have solved the crystal structure of the complex between domain D of SpA and the Fab fragment of a human IgM antibody to 2.7-A resolution. In the complex, helices II and III of domain D interact with the variable region of the Fab heavy chain (V(H)) through framework residues, without the involvement of the hypervariable regions implicated in antigen recognition. The contact residues are highly conserved in human V(H)3 antibodies but not in other families. The contact residues from domain D also are conserved among all SpA Ig-binding domains, suggesting that each could bind in a similar manner. Features of this interaction parallel those reported for staphylococcal enterotoxins that are superantigens for many T cells. The structural homology between Ig V(H) regions and the T-cell receptor V(beta) regions facilitates their comparison, and both types of interactions involve lymphocyte receptor surface remote from the antigen binding site. However, T-cell superantigens reportedly interact through hydrogen bonds with T-cell receptor V(beta) backbone atoms in a primary sequence-independent manner, whereas SpA relies on a sequence-restricted conformational binding with residue side chains, suggesting that this common bacterial pathogen has adopted distinct molecular recognition strategies for affecting large sets of B and T lymphocytes.

  14. Exchangeability of the b subunit of the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase of Acetabularia acetabulum with the beta subunit of E. coli F1-ATPase: construction of the chimeric beta subunits and complementation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M; Kadowaki, H; Ikeda, H; Moritani, C; Kanazawa, H

    1997-11-10

    The gene encoding the b subunit of the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase (aclB) was isolated from total RNA and poly(A)+ RNA of Acetabularia acetabulum and sequenced (total nucleotides of 3038 bp and an open reading frame with 478 amino acids). The deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to the beta subunit of the F type ATPases, but was different in the N-terminal 120 amino acids. The role of the N-terminal region was investigated using an F -ATPase beta-less mutant of E. coli, JP17. The JP17 strain expressing the aclB could not grow under conditions permitting oxidative phosphorylation, although ACLB was detected in the membrane fraction. The beta subunit was divided into three portions: amino acid position from 1 to 95 (portion A), 96 to 161 (portion B) and 162 to the C-terminus (portion C). The corresponding regions of ACLB were designated as portions A' (from 1 to 106), B' (from 107 to 172) and C' (from 173 to 478). Chimeric proteins with combinations of A-B'-C', A-B-C' and A'-B-C restored the function as the beta subunit in E. coli F0F1-complex, but those with combinations of A'-B'-C and A-B'-C had no function as the beta subunit. These findings suggested that portion B plays an important role in the assembly and function of the beta subunit in the F0F1-complex, while portion B' of ACLB exhibited inhibitory effects on assembly and function. In addition, portion A was also important for interaction of the beta subunit with the alpha subunit in E. coli F0F1-complex. These findings also suggested that the b subunit of the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase of A. acetabulum has a different function in the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase complex, although the primary structure resembled to the beta subunit of the F1-ATPase.

  15. Iris analysis for biometric recognition systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bodade, Rajesh M

    2014-01-01

    The book presents three most significant areas in Biometrics and Pattern Recognition. A step-by-step approach for design and implementation of Dual Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DTCWT) plus Rotated Complex Wavelet Filters (RCWF) is discussed in detail. In addition to the above, the book provides detailed analysis of iris images and two methods of iris segmentation. It also discusses simplified study of some subspace-based methods and distance measures for iris recognition backed by empirical studies and statistical success verifications.

  16. Dissecting the signaling mechanisms underlying recognition and preference of food odors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Gareth; Shen, Yu; Ha, Heonick; Donato, Alessandra; Wallis, Samuel; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yun

    2014-07-09

    Food is critical for survival. Many animals, including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, use sensorimotor systems to detect and locate preferred food sources. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying food-choice behaviors are poorly understood. Here, we characterize the molecular signaling that regulates recognition and preference between different food odors in C. elegans. We show that the major olfactory sensory neurons, AWB and AWC, play essential roles in this behavior. A canonical Gα-protein, together with guanylate cyclases and cGMP-gated channels, is needed for the recognition of food odors. The food-odor-evoked signal is transmitted via glutamatergic neurotransmission from AWC and through AMPA and kainate-like glutamate receptor subunits. In contrast, peptidergic signaling is required to generate preference between different food odors while being dispensable for the recognition of the odors. We show that this regulation is achieved by the neuropeptide NLP-9 produced in AWB, which acts with its putative receptor NPR-18, and by the neuropeptide NLP-1 produced in AWC. In addition, another set of sensory neurons inhibits food-odor preference. These mechanistic logics, together with a previously mapped neural circuit underlying food-odor preference, provide a functional network linking sensory response, transduction, and downstream receptors to process complex olfactory information and generate the appropriate behavioral decision essential for survival. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/339389-15$15.00/0.

  17. Steric shielding of surface epitopes and impaired immune recognition induced by the ebola virus glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Francica

    Full Text Available Many viruses alter expression of proteins on the surface of infected cells including molecules important for immune recognition, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and II molecules. Virus-induced downregulation of surface proteins has been observed to occur by a variety of mechanisms including impaired transcription, blocks to synthesis, and increased turnover. Viral infection or transient expression of the Ebola virus (EBOV glycoprotein (GP was previously shown to result in loss of staining of various host cell surface proteins including MHC1 and β1 integrin; however, the mechanism responsible for this effect has not been delineated. In the present study we demonstrate that EBOV GP does not decrease surface levels of β1 integrin or MHC1, but rather impedes recognition by steric occlusion of these proteins on the cell surface. Furthermore, steric occlusion also occurs for epitopes on the EBOV glycoprotein itself. The occluded epitopes in host proteins and EBOV GP can be revealed by removal of the surface subunit of GP or by removal of surface N- and O- linked glycans, resulting in increased surface staining by flow cytometry. Importantly, expression of EBOV GP impairs CD8 T-cell recognition of MHC1 on antigen presenting cells. Glycan-mediated steric shielding of host cell surface proteins by EBOV GP represents a novel mechanism for a virus to affect host cell function, thereby escaping immune detection.

  18. Structural basis for Spt5-mediated recruitment of the Paf1 complex to chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wier, Adam D; Mayekar, Manasi K; Héroux, Annie; Arndt, Karen M; VanDemark, Andrew P

    2013-10-22

    Polymerase associated factor 1 complex (Paf1C) broadly influences gene expression by regulating chromatin structure and the recruitment of RNA-processing factors during transcription elongation. The Plus3 domain of the Rtf1 subunit mediates Paf1C recruitment to genes by binding a repeating domain within the elongation factor Spt5 (suppressor of Ty). Here we provide a molecular description of this interaction by reporting the structure of human Rtf1 Plus3 in complex with a phosphorylated Spt5 repeat. We find that Spt5 binding is mediated by an extended surface containing phosphothreonine recognition and hydrophobic interfaces tha