WorldWideScience

Sample records for reciprocating lubricated sliding

  1. Tribology of the lubricant quantized sliding state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Capozza, Rosario; Vanossi, Andrea; Santoro, Giuseppe E; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2009-11-07

    In the framework of Langevin dynamics, we demonstrate clear evidence of the peculiar quantized sliding state, previously found in a simple one-dimensional boundary lubricated model [A. Vanossi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 056101 (2006)], for a substantially less idealized two-dimensional description of a confined multilayer solid lubricant under shear. This dynamical state, marked by a nontrivial "quantized" ratio of the averaged lubricant center-of-mass velocity to the externally imposed sliding speed, is recovered, and shown to be robust against the effects of thermal fluctuations, quenched disorder in the confining substrates, and over a wide range of loading forces. The lubricant softness, setting the width of the propagating solitonic structures, is found to play a major role in promoting in-registry commensurate regions beneficial to this quantized sliding. By evaluating the force instantaneously exerted on the top plate, we find that this quantized sliding represents a dynamical "pinned" state, characterized by significantly low values of the kinetic friction. While the quantized sliding occurs due to solitons being driven gently, the transition to ordinary unpinned sliding regimes can involve lubricant melting due to large shear-induced Joule heating, for example at large speed.

  2. Hydrophobins as aqueous lubricant additive for a soft sliding contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Seunghwan; Røn, Troels; Pakkanen, Kirsi I.

    2015-01-01

    lubrication characteristic is dominant via ‘self-healing’ mechanism. FpHYD5 revealed a better lubrication than HFBI presumably due to the presence of glycans and improved hydration of the sliding interface. Two type II hydrophobins function more favorably compared to a synthetic amphiphilic copolymer, PEO-PPO...

  3. Controllable sliding bearings and controllable lubrication principles-an overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Ilmar F.

    2018-01-01

    -mechanical actuators have been coupled to such bearings. Depending on (i) the actuator type; (ii) the actuation principle, i.e., hydraulic, pneumatic, piezoelectric or magnetic among others; and (iii) how such an actuator is coupled to the sliding bearings, different regulation and control actions of fluid film...... bearing gap and its preload via moveable and compliant sliding surfaces; and (d) the control of the lubricant viscosity. All four parameters, i.e., pressure, flow (velocity profiles), gap and viscosity, are explicit parameters in the modified form of Reynolds' equations for active lubrication....... In this framework, this paper gives one main original contribution to the state-of-the-art of radial sliding bearings and controllable lubrication: a comprehensive overview about the different types of controllable sliding bearings and principles used by several authors. The paper ends with some conclusive remarks...

  4. Boundary lubrication of glass: rubber sliding contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, E. van der; Lossie, C.M.; Bommel, K.J.C. van; Reinders, S.A.F.; Lenting, H.B.M.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer brush coatings represent a promising class of coatings for friction control [1], especially in a humid environment [2]. A study on the feasibility of a specific class of polymer brush coatings [5] was done for a sliding system that involves ‘silicon skin L7350’: a silicon rubber used by FIFA

  5. Lubricated sliding wear behaviour of Ni-P-W multilayered alloy coatings produced by pulse plating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagopoulos, C. N.; Papachristos, V. D.; Christoffersen, Lasse

    2000-01-01

    The lubricated sliding wear behaviour of Ni-P-W multilayered alloy coatings sliding against hardened steel discs was studied, in a pin-on-disc set-up. The multilayered coatings had been deposited on mild steel pins by pulse plating and they consisted of ternary Ni-P-W layers of high and low W con...... lubrication regimes. The wear mechanisms in each lubrication regime were studied and in mixed lubrication regime, the effect of normal load and sliding speed on wear volume and friction coefficient was also studied. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved....

  6. Tribological characteristic enhancement effects by polymer thickened oil in lubricated sliding contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratomo, Ariawan Wahyu; Muchammad, Tauviqirrahman, Mohammad; Jamari, Bayuseno, Athanasius P.

    2016-04-01

    Polymer thickened oils are the most preferred materials for modern lubrication applications due to their high shear. The present paper explores a lubrication mechanism in sliding contact lubricated with polymer thickened oil considering cavitation. Investigations are carried out by using a numerical method based on commercial CFD (computational fluid dynamic) software ANSYS for fluid flow phenomenon (Fluent) to assess the tribological characteristic (i.e. hydrodynamic pressure distribution) of lubricated sliding contact. The Zwart-Gerber-Belamri model for cavitation is adopted in this simulation to predict the extent of the full film region. The polymer thickened oil is characterized as non-Newtonian power-law fluid. The simulation results show that the cavitation lead lower pressure profile compared to that without cavitation. In addition, it is concluded that the characteristic of the lubrication performance with polymer thickened oil is strongly dependent on the Power-law index of lubricant.

  7. Tribological Behaviour of W-DLC against an Aluminium Alloy Subjected to Lubricated Sliding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bhowmick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diamond like carbon (DLC coatings mitigate aluminium adhesion and reduce friction under the ambient conditions but their tribological behaviour under lubricated sliding need to be further investigated. In this study, tribological tests were performed to evaluate the friction and wear characteristics of W-DLC and H-DLC coatings sliding against an aluminium alloy (319 Al under unlubricated (40 % RH and lubricated sliding conditions. For unlubricated sliding, coefficient of friction (COF values of H-DLC and W-DLC were 0.15 and 0.20. A lower COF value of 0.11 was observed when W-DLC was tested using lubricant oil incorporating sulphur while the H-DLC’s COF remained almost unchanged. The mechanisms responsible for the low friction of W-DLC observed during lubricated sliding were revealed by studying the compositions of the coating surfaces and the transfer layers formed on 319 Al. Micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the transfer layers formed during lubricated sliding of W-DLC incorporated tungsten disulphide (WS2.

  8. Surface Modification Of The High Temperature Porous Sliding Bearings With Solid Lubricant Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiśniewska-Weinert H.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A surface modification of stainless steel bearing sleeves is developed to improve the tribology characteristics at high temperature. Solid lubricant nano- and microparticles are applied for this purpose. To create the quasi-hydrodynamic lubrication regimes, the solid lubricant powder layer is made by developed pressure impregnation technique. Porous sliding bearing sleeve prototypes were made by powder metallurgy technique. The purpose of the paper is to define the friction and wear characteristics of the sleeves and to determine the influence of sealing of the sliding interface on these characteristics. It is found that application of WS2 sold lubricant nano- and micro-particles and preservation of a particle leakage out of interface allows to achieve at the high temperature the friction coefficients comparable to those at ambient temperature.

  9. Analysis of the dynamic behavior and lubrication characteristics of a small reciprocating compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Jong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a study on the dynamic behavior and lubrication characteristics of a reciprocating compression mechanism used in small refrigeration compressor is performed. In the problem formulation of the compressor dynamics, the viscous frictional force between piston and cylinder wall is considered in order to determine the coupled dynamic behaviors of piston and crankshaft. The solutions of the equations of motion of the reciprocating mechanism along with the time dependent Reynolds equations for the lubricating film between piston and cylinder wall and oil films of the journal bearings are obtained simultaneously. The hydrodynamic forces of journal bearings are calculated using finite bearing model and Gumbel boundary condition. And, a Newton-Raphson procedure was employed in solving the nonlinear equations of piston and crankshaft. The results explored the effects of design parameters on the stability and lubrication characteristics of the compression mechanism

  10. Feasibility of Applying Controllable Lubrication Techniques to Reciprocating Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulido, Edgar Estupinan

    of the reciprocating engine, obtained with the help of multibody dynamics (rigid components) and finite elements method (flexible components), and the global system of equations is numerically solved. The analysis of the results was carried out with focus on the behaviour of the journal orbits, maximum fluid film...

  11. Onset of frictional sliding of rubber-glass contact under dry and lubricated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuononen, Ari J

    2016-06-13

    Rubber friction is critical in many applications ranging from automotive tyres to cylinder seals. The process where a static rubber sample transitions to frictional sliding is particularly poorly understood. The experimental and simulation results in this paper show a completely different detachment process from the static situation to sliding motion under dry and lubricated conditions. The results underline the contribution of the rubber bulk properties to the static friction force. In fact, simple Amontons' law is sufficient as a local friction law to produce the correct detachment pattern when the rubber material and loading conditions are modelled properly. Simulations show that micro-sliding due to vertical loading can release initial shear stresses and lead to a high static/dynamic friction coefficient ratio, as observed in the measurements.

  12. Comparison of sliding friction and wear behaviour of overhead conveyor steels tested under dry and lubrication conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro-Regal, G.; Fernandez-Vicente, A.; Martinez, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    The sliding friction and wear behaviour of different steel qualities were investigated with and without lubrication conditions. Steel qualities tested are normally used in the overhead conveyor system of many industrial fields, like the automotive sector. Sliding wear tests have been conducted by means of a pin-on-disk machine. A 100Cr6 steel similar to that used within the overhead conveyor trolleys has been employed as a pin. Friction coefficient values obtained under lubrication conditions were three times smaller than those obtained without lubrication. The mechanism that controls wear behaviour under lubrication conditions is an abrasive one and the wear values obtained are almost worthless. On the other hand, mechanism controlling wear during non lubrication tests, was a combination of abrasion and adhesion. (Author) 20 refs

  13. Site specific SEM/FIB/TEM for analysis of lubricated sliding wear of aluminium alloy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J C; Jones, H; Rainforth, W M

    2006-01-01

    Although extensive research has been undertaken into the dry sliding wear of aluminium alloys, only limited work has been reported on lubricated wear. In this paper, the lubricated sliding wear of some powder derived aluminium alloy composites is reported. Stereo pairs of the worn surface were obtained in the SEM and digitally reconstructed to give an accurate projection of the surface topography. Analysis of the average surface roughness (R a ) along chosen sections provided quantitative information about the wear mechanism. Following this, dual beam focused ion beam (FIB) was undertaken to further explore the features revealed by the SEM surface reconstructions, with TEM sections removed from selected regions. Surface deformation was confined to a narrow layer, typically 1μm thick. Subgrain size within the subsurface layer was comparable to that found in dry sliding wear tests. Reinforcement fracture occurred in the surface particles only. The resultant fragments were often incorporated back into the surface following detachment, such that the total volume fraction reinforcement at the surface was greater than in the bulk. Thus, the dynamic surface topography was a result of three factors: surface deformation, local detachment of reinforcement and re-incorporation of the fragments back into the surface

  14. Electromagnetic Linear Vibration Energy Harvester Using Sliding Permanent Magnet Array and Ferrofluid as a Lubricant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Hee Chae

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an electromagnetic linear vibration energy harvester with an array of rectangular permanent magnets as a springless proof mass. Instead of supporting the magnet assembly with spring element, ferrofluid has been used as a lubricating material. When external vibration is applied laterally to the harvester, magnet assembly slides back and forth on the channel with reduced friction and wear due to ferrofluid, which significantly improves the long-term reliability of the device. Electric power is generated across an array of copper windings formed at the bottom of the aluminum housing. A proof-of-concept harvester has been fabricated and tested with a vibration exciter at various input frequencies and accelerations. For the device where 5 μL of ferrofluid was used for lubrication, maximum output power of 493 μW has been generated, which was 4.37% higher than that without ferrofluid. Long-term reliability improvement due to ferrofluid lubrication has also been verified. For the device with ferrofluid, 1.02% decrease of output power has been observed, in contrast to 59.73% decrease of output power without ferrofluid after 93,600 cycles.

  15. Numerical analysis of micro-/nanoscale gas-film lubrication of sliding surface with complicated structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawagoe, Yoshiaki; Isono, Susumu; Takeno, Takanori; Yonemura, Shigeru; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Miki, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that the friction between a partially polished diamond-coated surface and a metal surface was drastically reduced to zero when they are slid at a few m/s. Since the sliding was noiseless, it seems that the diamond-coated surface was levitated over the counter surface and the sliding mechanism was the gas film lubrication. Recently, the mechanism of levitation of a slider with a micro/nanoscale surface structure on a rotating disk was theoretically clarified [S. Yonemura et al., Tribol. Lett., (2014), doi:10.1007/s11249-014-0368-2]. Probably, the partially polished diamond-coated surface may be levitated by high gas pressure generated by the micro/nanoscale surface structure on it. In this study, in order to verify our deduction, we performed numerical simulations of sliding of partially polished diamond-coated surface by reproducing its complicated surface structure using the data measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). As a result, we obtained the lift force which is large enough to levitate the slider used in the experiment

  16. Numerical analysis of micro-/nanoscale gas-film lubrication of sliding surface with complicated structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoe, Yoshiaki; Isono, Susumu; Takeno, Takanori [Department of Nanomechanics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Yonemura, Shigeru; Takagi, Toshiyuki [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Miki, Hiroyuki [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2014-12-09

    It has been reported that the friction between a partially polished diamond-coated surface and a metal surface was drastically reduced to zero when they are slid at a few m/s. Since the sliding was noiseless, it seems that the diamond-coated surface was levitated over the counter surface and the sliding mechanism was the gas film lubrication. Recently, the mechanism of levitation of a slider with a micro/nanoscale surface structure on a rotating disk was theoretically clarified [S. Yonemura et al., Tribol. Lett., (2014), doi:10.1007/s11249-014-0368-2]. Probably, the partially polished diamond-coated surface may be levitated by high gas pressure generated by the micro/nanoscale surface structure on it. In this study, in order to verify our deduction, we performed numerical simulations of sliding of partially polished diamond-coated surface by reproducing its complicated surface structure using the data measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). As a result, we obtained the lift force which is large enough to levitate the slider used in the experiment.

  17. Sliding friction in the hydrodynamic lubrication regime for a power-law fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, P B

    2017-01-01

    A scaling analysis is undertaken for the load balance in sliding friction in the hydrodynamic lubrication regime, with a particular emphasis on power-law shear-thinning typical of a structured liquid. It is argued that the shear-thinning regime is mechanically unstable if the power-law index n   <  1/2, where n is the exponent that relates the shear stress to the shear rate. Consequently the Stribeck (friction) curve should be discontinuous, with possible hysteresis. Further analysis suggests that normal stress and flow transience (stress overshoot) do not destroy this basic picture, although they may provide stabilising mechanisms at higher shear rates. Extensional viscosity is also expected to be insignificant unless the Trouton ratio is large. A possible application to shear thickening in non-Brownian particulate suspensions is indicated. (paper)

  18. Tribological behavior of the carbon fiber reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite coating under dry sliding and water lubrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Haiyan; Feng Zhizhong; Chen Jianmin; Zhou Huidi

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polyphenylene sulphide (PPS) composite coatings (the mass fraction of the carbon fiber varied from 1 to 5 wt%) were prepared by flame spraying. The microstructure and physical properties of the composite coating were studied. The friction and wear characteristics of the PPS coating and carbon fiber reinforced PPS composite coating under dry- and water-lubricated sliding against stainless steel were comparatively investigated using a block-ring tester. The composite coatings showed lower friction coefficient and higher wear rate than pure PPS coatings under dry sliding. Under water-lubricated condition, the composite coatings showed better wear resistance than under dry. Under water-lubricated condition the tribological behaviors of the 3 wt% carbon fiber reinforced composite coating also were investigated under different sliding speed and load. The result showed that the sliding speed had little effect on the tribological properties, but the load affected greatly on that of the composite coatings. The morphologies of the worn surfaces of the composite coatings and the counterpart steel were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) for compositional analysis

  19. Experimental evidence of the thermal effect of lubricating oil sprayed in sliding-vane air compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Valenti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A way to increase the efficiency of positive-displacement air compressor is spraying the lube oil to exploit it not only as lubricating and sealing agent but also as thermal ballast. This work seeks the experimental evidence in sliding-vane compressors by measuring the air standard volume flow rate and the electrical power input of three diverse configurations. The first configuration, taken as the reference, employs a conventional injection system comprising calibrated straight orifices. The other two, referred to as advanced, adopt smaller orifices and pressure-swirl full-cone nozzles designed for the purpose; the third configuration utilizes a pump to boost the oil pressure. The laser imagining technique shows that the nozzles generate sprays that break-up within a short distance into spherical droplets, ligaments, ramifications and undefined structures. Tests on the packaged compressors reveal that the advanced configurations provide almost the same air flow rate while utilizing half of the oil because the sprays generate a good sealing. Moreover, the sprayed oil is acting as a thermal ballast because the electrical input is reduced by 3.5% and 3.0%, respectively, if the pump is present or not , while the specific energy requirement, accounting for the slightly reduced air flow, by 2.4% and 2.9%, respectively.

  20. DURABILITY AND TRIBOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF THERMALLY SPRAYED WC CERMET COATING IN LUBRICATED ROLLING WITH SLIDING CONTACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Durability and tribological properties of thermally sprayed WC-Cr-Ni cermet coating were investigated experimentally in lubricated rolling with sliding contact conditions. By means of the high energy type flame spraying (Hi-HVOF method, the coating was formed onto the axially ground and circumferentially ground roller specimens made of a thermally refined carbon steel. In the experiments, the WC cermet coated steel roller was mated with the carburized hardened steel roller without coating in line contact condition. The coated roller was mated with the smooth non-coated roller under a contact pressure of 1.0 or 1.2 GPa, and it was mated with the rough non-coated roller under a contact pressure of 0.6 or 0.8 GPa. As a result, it was found that in general, the coating on the circumferentially ground substrate shows a lower durability compared with that on the axially ground substrate and this difference appears more distinctly for the higher contact pressure for both smooth mating surface and rough mating surface. It was also found that there are significant differences in the tribological properties of WC cermet coating depending on the contact pressure. In addition, depending on the smooth or rough mating surface, remarkable differences in the tribological properties were found.

  1. A three-dimensional model for lubricant depletion under sliding condition on bit patterned media of hard disk drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we model the depletion dynamics of the molecularly thin layer of lubricants on a bit patterned media disk of hard disk drives under a sliding air bearing head. The dominant physics and consequently, the lubricant depletion dynamics on a patterned disk are shown to be significantly different from the well-studied cases of a smooth disk. Our results indicate that the surface tension effect, which is negligible on a flat disk, apparently suppresses depletion by enforcing a bottleneck effect around the disk pattern peak regions to thwart the migration of lubricants. When the disjoining pressure is relatively small, it assists the depletion. But, when the disjoining pressure becomes dominant, the disjoining pressure resists depletion. Disk pattern orientation plays a critical role in the depletion process. The effect of disk pattern orientation on depletion originates from its complex interaction with other intermingled factors of external air shearing stress distribution and lubricant particle trajectory. Patterning a disk surface with nanostructures of high density, large height/pitch ratio, and particular orientation is demonstrated to be one efficient way to alleviate the formation of lubricant depletion tracks.

  2. Use of Textured Surfaces to Mitigate Sliding Friction and Wear of Lubricated and Non-Lubricated Contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    If properly employed, the placement of three-dimensional feature patterns, also referred to as textures, on relatively-moving, load-bearing surfaces can be beneficial to their friction and wear characteristics. For example, geometric patterns can function as lubricant supply channels or depressions in which to trap debris. They can also alter lubricant flow in a manner that produces thicker load-bearing films locally. Considering the area occupied by solid areas and spaces, textures also change the load distribution on surfaces. At least ten different attributes of textures can be specified, and their combinations offer wide latitude in surface engineering. By employing directional machining and grinding procedures, texturing has been used on bearings and seals for well over a half century, and the size scales of texturing vary widely. This report summarizes past work on the texturing of load-bearing surfaces, including past research on laser surface dimpling of ceramics done at ORNL. Textured surfaces generally show most pronounced effects when they are used in conformal or nearly conformal contacts, like that in face seals. Combining textures with other forms of surface modification and lubrication methods can offer additional benefits in surface engineering for tribology. As the literature and past work at ORNL shows, texturing does not always provide benefits. Rather, the selected pattern and arrangement of features must be matched to characteristics of the proposed application, bearing materials, and lubricants.

  3. The influence of reciprocating sliding wear on the oxidation behaviour of Fe-12Cr steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.

    1988-04-01

    Medium-chromium ferritic alloys are used extensively in the boiler and core sections of advanced gas cooled reactors. It was discovered in the early 1970s, that under certain conditions these alloys could undergo the phenomenon known as breakaway oxidation. In this type of oxidation the rate limiting step is located at the oxide/metal interface rather than the more usual gas/oxide interface and results in linear oxidation kinetics. It has been shown that repeated removal of oxide layers can expose chromium depleted metal to the oxidising gas and promote nucleation of breakaway oxidation. The question has been addressed as to whether high temperature sliding wear processes can also disrupt the surface so as to make the material potentially susceptible to breakaway oxidation. To this end high temperature reciprocating wear of Fe-12Cr material in both low and high pressure reactor gas has been investigated. (author)

  4. The influence of reciprocating sliding wear on the oxidation behaviour of Fe-12Cr steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    Medium-chromium ferritic alloys are used extensively in advanced gas cooled reactors (AGRs). Under certain conditions these alloys can undergo breakaway oxidation in which the rate-limiting step is located at the oxide/metal interface rather than the more usual gas/oxide interface; this results in linear oxidation kinetics. Repeated removal of oxide layers can expose chromium-depleted metal to the oxidizing gas and promote nucleation of breakaway oxidation. The question has been addressed as to whether high temperature sliding wear processes can also disrupt the surface so as to make the material potentially susceptible to breakaway oxidation. High temperature reciprocating wear tests of Fe-12Cr material in both low and high pressure reactor gas have been carried out. As expected, compact adhesive load-bearing oxide and mixed oxide/metal beds form in wear regions. These contacting features wear at very low rates of less than 10 -16 m 3 (Nm) -1 . Preformed oxides wear at sufficiently low rates at high temperature as to preclude the possibility of exposure of the underlying metal to the reactor gas. It is thus unlikely that sliding wear processes will accelerate the tendency for initiation of breakaway oxidation. (author)

  5. Characterization of the lubricity of bio-oil/diesel fuel blends by high frequency reciprocating test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yufu; Wang, Qiongjie; Hu, Xianguo; Li, Chuan; Zhu, Xifeng

    2010-01-01

    The diesel fuel was mixed with the rice husk bio-oil using some emulsifiers based on the theory of Hydrophile-Lipophile Balance (HLB). The lubricity of the bio-oil/diesel fuel blend was studied on a High Frequency Reciprocating Test Rig (HFRR) according to ASTM D 6079-2004. The microscopic topography and chemical composition on the worn surface were analyzed respectively using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The profile and surface roughness of the rubbed trace were measured using a profilometer. The chemical group and composition were studied by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The results showed that the lubrication ability of the present fuel blend was better than that of the Chinese conventional diesel fuel (number zero). However, the anti-corrosion and anti-wear properties of the fuel blend were not satisfactory in comparison with those of conventional diesel fuel.

  6. Friction and wear behaviour of Mo-W doped carbon-based coating during boundary lubricated sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovsepian, Papken Eh.; Mandal, Paranjayee; Ehiasarian, Arutiun P.; Sáfrán, G.; Tietema, R.; Doerwald, D.

    2016-03-01

    A molybdenum and tungsten doped carbon-based coating (Mo-W-C) was developed in order to provide low friction in boundary lubricated sliding condition at ambient and at high temperature. The Mo-W-C coating showed the lowest friction coefficient among a number of commercially available state-of-the-art DLC coatings at ambient temperature. At elevated temperature (200 °C), Mo-W-C coating showed a significant reduction in friction coefficient with sliding distance in contrast to DLC coatings. Raman spectroscopy revealed the importance of combined Mo and W doping for achieving low friction at both ambient and high temperature. The significant decrease in friction and wear rate was attributed to the presence of graphitic carbon debris (from coating) and 'in situ' formed metal sulphides (WS2 and MoS2, where metals were supplied from coating and sulphur from engine oil) in the transfer layer.

  7. Friction and wear behaviour of Mo–W doped carbon-based coating during boundary lubricated sliding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovsepian, Papken Eh.; Mandal, Paranjayee; Ehiasarian, Arutiun P.; Sáfrán, G.; Tietema, R.; Doerwald, D.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel Mo–W–C coating provides extremely low friction (μ ∼ 0.03) in lubricated condition. • Mo–W–C outperforms existing DLCs in terms of low friction, independent of temperature. • Tribochemical reactions govern the wear mechanism of Mo–W–C coating. • The transfer layer contains graphitic carbon and ‘in situ’ formed WS 2 and MoS 2 . • WS 2 and MoS 2 are the key factors facilitating appreciably low friction and wear rate. - Abstract: A molybdenum and tungsten doped carbon-based coating (Mo–W–C) was developed in order to provide low friction in boundary lubricated sliding condition at ambient and at high temperature. The Mo–W–C coating showed the lowest friction coefficient among a number of commercially available state-of-the-art DLC coatings at ambient temperature. At elevated temperature (200 °C), Mo–W–C coating showed a significant reduction in friction coefficient with sliding distance in contrast to DLC coatings. Raman spectroscopy revealed the importance of combined Mo and W doping for achieving low friction at both ambient and high temperature. The significant decrease in friction and wear rate was attributed to the presence of graphitic carbon debris (from coating) and ‘in situ’ formed metal sulphides (WS 2 and MoS 2 , where metals were supplied from coating and sulphur from engine oil) in the transfer layer.

  8. Friction and wear behaviour of Mo–W doped carbon-based coating during boundary lubricated sliding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovsepian, Papken Eh., E-mail: p.hovsepian@shu.ac.uk [Nanotechnology Centre for PVD Research, HIPIMS Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University, City Campus, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Mandal, Paranjayee, E-mail: 200712mum@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Centre for PVD Research, HIPIMS Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University, City Campus, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Ehiasarian, Arutiun P., E-mail: a.ehiasarian@shu.ac.uk [Nanotechnology Centre for PVD Research, HIPIMS Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University, City Campus, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Sáfrán, G., E-mail: safran.gyorgy@ttk.mta.hu [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thegeut 29-33 (Hungary); Tietema, R., E-mail: rtietema@hauzer.nl [IHI Hauzer Techno Coating B.V., Van Heemskerckweg 22, 5928 LL Venlo (Netherlands); Doerwald, D., E-mail: ddoerwald@hauzer.nl [IHI Hauzer Techno Coating B.V., Van Heemskerckweg 22, 5928 LL Venlo (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel Mo–W–C coating provides extremely low friction (μ ∼ 0.03) in lubricated condition. • Mo–W–C outperforms existing DLCs in terms of low friction, independent of temperature. • Tribochemical reactions govern the wear mechanism of Mo–W–C coating. • The transfer layer contains graphitic carbon and ‘in situ’ formed WS{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2}. • WS{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2} are the key factors facilitating appreciably low friction and wear rate. - Abstract: A molybdenum and tungsten doped carbon-based coating (Mo–W–C) was developed in order to provide low friction in boundary lubricated sliding condition at ambient and at high temperature. The Mo–W–C coating showed the lowest friction coefficient among a number of commercially available state-of-the-art DLC coatings at ambient temperature. At elevated temperature (200 °C), Mo–W–C coating showed a significant reduction in friction coefficient with sliding distance in contrast to DLC coatings. Raman spectroscopy revealed the importance of combined Mo and W doping for achieving low friction at both ambient and high temperature. The significant decrease in friction and wear rate was attributed to the presence of graphitic carbon debris (from coating) and ‘in situ’ formed metal sulphides (WS{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2}, where metals were supplied from coating and sulphur from engine oil) in the transfer layer.

  9. Topographic and Electrochemical Ti6Al4V Alloy Surface Characterization in Dry and Wet Reciprocating Sliding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Doni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This present paper shows the behavior of functional integrity of the state Ti6Al4V alloy under reciprocating sliding wear conditions in acomparative way for two different counter materials, steel and ceramicballs in dry and corrosive environment (3.5% NaCl. The surface integrity analysis of the dry reciprocating wear tests was based on the evolution of The roughness parameters with the applied load. In the case of reciprocating wear tests in corrosive environment the surface integrity analysis was based on electrochemical parameters. Comparative analysis of the evolution of the roughness parameters with the applied load shows a higher stability of the Ti6Al4V/Al2O3 contact pair, while from the point of view of the electrochemical parameters the Tribological properties are worse than Ti6Al4V/steel ball contact pair.

  10. Interpretation of the Friction Coefficient During Reciprocating Sliding of Ti6Al4V Alloy Against Al2O3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mitrovic

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tribological behaviour of Ti6Al4V alloy, during linear reciprocating sliding against alumina, at nanotribometer (ball-on-flat type of contact was investigated. Experiments were carried out for sliding in Ringer's solution, over a range of loads (100 - 1000 mN and speeds (4 - 12 mm/s. Friction behaviour of the contact pairs was investigated by analysis of the dynamic friction coefficient plots and effective root mean square (rms coefficient of friction, COFrms. Presented mathematical envelopes of dynamic coefficient of friction curves and averaged envelope signals provided additional explanation of one calculated COFrms value. Envelopes of dynamic coefficient of friction enabled easier determination of different periods during sliding, which were further related to wear mechanisms.

  11. Effect of Lubrication on Sliding Wear of Red Mud Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy 6061

    OpenAIRE

    N. Panwar; R.P. Poonia; G. Singh; R. Dabral; A. Chauhan

    2017-01-01

    In present study, Red mud, an industrial waste, has been utilized as a reinforcement material to fabricate Aluminium 6061 matrix based metal matrix composite. Taguchi L18 orthogonal array has been employed for fabrication of composite castings and for conducting the tribological experimentation. ANOVA analysis has been applied to examine the effect of individual parameters such as sliding condition: dry and wet, reinforcement weight fraction, load, speed, and sliding distance on specific wear...

  12. Lubrication of the Human Anklejoint in Walking with the Synovial Fluid Filtrated by the Cartilage with the Surface Zone Worn-out:Steady Pure Sliding Motion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Miroslav

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 10 (1999), s. 1059-1069 ISSN 0021-9290 Keywords : biphasic articular cartilage * biphasic synovial fluid * boooundary lubrication * human ankle joint * sliding motion Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 1.536, year: 1999

  13. Effect of Lubrication on Sliding Wear of Red Mud Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy 6061

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Panwar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In present study, Red mud, an industrial waste, has been utilized as a reinforcement material to fabricate Aluminium 6061 matrix based metal matrix composite. Taguchi L18 orthogonal array has been employed for fabrication of composite castings and for conducting the tribological experimentation. ANOVA analysis has been applied to examine the effect of individual parameters such as sliding condition: dry and wet, reinforcement weight fraction, load, speed, and sliding distance on specific wear rate obtained experimentally. It has been found that tensile strength and impact energy increases while elongation decreases, with increasing weight fraction and decrease in particle size of red mud. The percentage contribution of the effect of factors on SWR is Sliding condition (73.17, speed (7.84, percentage reinforcement (7.35, load (5.75, sliding distance (2.24, and particle size (1.25. It has also been observed that specific wear rate is very low in wet condition. However, it decreases with increase in weight fraction of reinforcement, decrease in load and sliding speed. Al6061/red mud metal matrix composites have shown reasonable strength and wear resistance. The use of red mud in Aluminium composite provides the solution for disposal of red mud and can possibly become an economic replacement of Aluminium and its alloys.

  14. Deformation and friction of MoS2 particles in liquid suspensions used to lubricate sliding contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Rashmi R.; Biswas, Sanjay K.

    2010-01-01

    Tribology of a well known solid lubricant molybdenum disulphide is studied here in water and oil medium, over a large range of contact dimensions. Lateral force microscopy is used to identify the deformation modes; intra-crystalline slip, plastic grooving, fragmentation and fracture, of single particles. The medium and agglomeration were found to dictate the deformation mode. Steel on steel tribology lubricated by suspensions of these particles in liquid media was conducted over a range of contact pressure and sliding velocity. A scrutiny of the frictional data with the aid of Raman spectroscopy to identify the transfer film, suggested that the particle size, as it is at contact, is an important tribological parameter. Ultrasonication of the suspension and dispersion of the particle by surfactants were used to control the apriori particle size fed into the suspension. Correspondence of friction data of the gently sonicated suspension with that of the ultrasonicated suspension with dispersants indicated the importance of liquid ingestion by these particles as it controls their mode of deformation and consequent tribology.

  15. Effects of texture diameter and depth on the tribological performance of DLC coating under lubricated sliding condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, A.; Masjuki, H. H.; Varman, M.; Kalam, M. A.; Quazi, M. M.; Al Mahmud, K. A. H.; Gulzar, M.; Habibullah, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the effect of surface texturing parameters on the tribological performance of amorphous hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) under oil lubrication has been investigated. Micro dimples were created on a substrate by using a picosecond laser. After surface texturing was performed, amorphous hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating was deposited through magnetron sputtering. Dimple diameter varied from 50 μm to 300 μm, and dimple depth varied from 6 μm to 30 μm. Results show that at respective dimple diameter and depth of 100 μm and 6 μm, surface texturing improved the tribological performance of the amorphous hydrogenated DLC coating. Whereas, at a higher dimple diameter of 300 μm and dimple depth of 30 μm, the tribological performance of textured amorphous hydrogenated DLC was worse than that of un-textured amorphous hydrogenated DLC. The performance enhancement in the case of dimple diameter and depth of 100 μm and 6 μm can be due to micro textures, which can serve as a lubricant reservoir at the interface during sliding and remove wear particles from the contact. However, this beneficial mechanism could be obtained at an optimum texture diameter and depth.

  16. Effects of Material Combinations on Friction and Wear of PEEK/Steel Pairs under Oil-Lubricated Sliding Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagaki, T.; Nakamura, T.; Hashimoto, Y.; Kawabata, M.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of material combinations on the friction and wear of PEEK/steel pairs are studied using blocks on a ring wear tester under oil-lubricated conditions. The rings are made of forged steel (SF540A) and a PEEK composite filled with 30 wt% carbon fibre. The surface roughness is 0.15 and 0.32 μm Ra, respectively. The blocks are also made of the same materials as the rings: the forged steel and the PEEK composite. Finished with an emery paper of #600, the surface roughness is 0.06 and 0.23 μm Ra, respectively. Sliding tests for 4 combinations of two materials are conducted. The load is increased up to 1177 N at 1 N s-1. The sliding velocity is varied in the range of 10 to 19 m s-1. In some cases, the ring temperature is measured with a thermocouple with a diameter of 0.5 mm, located 1 mm below the frictional surface. Results indicate that the forged steel’s ring and the PEEK composite’s block is the best combination among 4 combinations, because seizure does not occur under the increasing load up to 1177 N at the sliding velocity of 10-19 m s-1. In contrast, seizure occurs at 15 and 19 m s-1 in the other three combinations. However, the PEEK composite’s ring shows a lower friction coefficient as compared to the forged steel’s ring, when seizure does not occur. Wear scars are observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The seizure mechanisms are then discussed.

  17. Three Types of Active Lubrication Systems for the Main Bearings of Reciprocating Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Ilmar; Pulido, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    method (flexible components). The main equations that govern the dynamics of the injection for a hydraulic-actuated, a piezoelectric-actuated and a mechanical-actuated oil injector are presented in this study. The global system is numerically solved using as a case of study a single-cylinder combustion......In the paper the authors investigate three different schemes for the realization of the controllable oil injection system to be couple to the main engine bearings. The use of active lubrication in fluid film bearings helps to enhance the hydrodynamic fluid film by increasing the fluid film...

  18. Effect of triangular texture on the tribological performance of die steel with TiN coatings under lubricated sliding condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Xiang, Xin; Shao, Tianmin; La, Yingqian; Li, Junling

    2016-12-01

    The friction and wear of stamping die surface can affect the service life of stamping die and the quality of stamping products. Surface texturing and surface coating have been widely used to improve the tribological performance of mechanical components. This study experimentally investigated the effect of triangular surface texture on the friction and wear properties of the die steel substrate with TiN coatings under oil lubrication. TiN coatings were deposited on a die steel (50Cr) substrate through a multi-arc ion deposition system, and then triangular surface texturing was fabricated by a laser surface texturing. The friction and wear test was conducted by a UMT-3 pin-on-disk tribometer under different sliding speeds and different applied loads, respectively. The adhesion test was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of triangular texturing on the interfacial bonding strength between the TiN coating and the die steel substrate. Results show that the combination method of surface texturing process and surface coating process has excellent tribological properties (the lowest frictional coefficient and wear volume), compared with the single texturing process or the single coating process. The tribological performance is improved resulting from the high hardness and low elastic modulus of TiN coatings, and the generation of hydrodynamic pressure, function of micro-trap for wear debris and micro-reservoirs for lubricating oil of the triangular surface texture. In addition, the coating bonding strength of the texturing sample is 3.63 MPa, higher than that of the single coating sample (3.48 MPa), but the mechanisms remain to be further researched.

  19. Reciprocating sliding wear of Inconel 600 tubing in room temperature air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hun; Choi, Jong Hyun; Kim, Jun Ki; Hong, Hyun Seon; Kim, Seon Jin

    2003-01-01

    The sliding wear behavior of the material of a steam generator in a nuclear power station (Inconel 600) was investigated at room temperature. Effects of the wear parameters such as material combination, sliding distance and contact stress were examined with various mating materials including 304 austenitic stainless steel, Inconel 600 and Al-Cu alloy 2011. In the prediction of the wear volume by Archard's wear equation, the standard error range was calculated to be ±4.04x10 -9 m 3 and the reliability to be 71.9% for the combination of Inconel 600 and 304 stainless steel. The error range was considered to be relatively broad because the wear coefficient in Archard's equation was assumed to be a constant, regardless of the changes in the mechanical properties during the wear. In the present study, the sliding wear behavior turned out to be influenced by the material combination; the wear volume of 304 stainless steel did not linearly increase with the sliding distance, while that of other material combinations exhibited linear increases. Based on the experimental results, the wear coefficient was modified as a function of the sliding distance. The calculation with the modified wear equation showed that the error range narrowed down to ±2.60x10 -9 m 3 and the reliability increased to 75.3%, compared to Archard's original equation

  20. A new reciprocating sliding wear testing apparatus for high temperature gaseous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.; Radford, T.J.; Mawson, D.; Kaye, P.

    1988-01-01

    A new reciprocating wear testing rig is described that has been designed, built and commissioned at the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories, United Kingdom. The objectives of this work are to improve upon the range of parameters offered by the existing rigs and to provide additional facilities for data acquisition and analysis. (author)

  1. New reciprocating sliding wear testing apparatus for high temperature gaseous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.F.; Radford, T.J.; Mawson, D.; Kaye, P.

    1988-09-01

    A new reciprocating wear testing rig is described that has been designed, built and commissioned at the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories, United Kingdom. The objectives of this work are to improve upon the range of parameters offered by the existing rigs and to provide additional facilities for data acquisition and analysis.

  2. Influence of load and sliding velocity on wear resistance of solid-lubricant composites of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, S. V.; Kornienko, L. A.; Buslovich, D. G.; Alexenko, V. O.; Ivanova, L. R.

    2017-12-01

    To determine the limits of the operation loading intervals appropriate for the use of solid lubricant UHMWPE composites in tribounits for mechanical engineering and medicine, the tribotechnical properties of UHMWPE blends with the optimum solid lubricant filler content (polytetrafluoroethylene, calcium stearate, molybdenum disulfide, colloidal graphite, boron nitride) are studied under dry sliding friction at different velocities (V = 0.3 and 0.5 m/s) and loads (P = 60 and 140 N). It is shown that the wear resistance of solid lubricant UHMWPE composites at moderate sliding velocities (V = 0.3 m/s) and loads (P = 60 N) increases 2-3 times in comparison with pure UHMWPE, while at high load P = 140 N wear resistance of both neat UHMWPE and its composites is reduced almost twice. At high sliding velocities and loads (up to P = 140 N), multiple increasing of the wear of pure UHMWPE and its composites takes place (by the factor of 5 to 10). The operational conditions of UHMWPE composites in tribounits in engineering and medicine are discussed.

  3. Pleural Lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Porta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During breathing, the pleural surfaces slide against each other continuously without damage. Pleural liquid and lubricating molecules should provide the lubrication of the sliding surfaces, thus protecting the mesothelium from shear-induced abrasion. D’Angelo et al. (Respir. Physiol. Neurobiol. 2004 measured the coefficient of kinetic friction (μ of rabbit parietal pleura sliding against visceral pleura in vitro at physiological velocities and under physiological loads; it was ~0.02 and did not change with sliding velocity, consistent with boundary lubrication. μ in boundary lubrication can be influenced by surface molecules like hyaluronan, sialomucin or surface active phospholipidis. Hyaluronan or sialomucin is able to restore good boundary lubrication in damaged mesothelium. Nevertheless, hyaluronidase and neuraminidase treatment of the mesothelium does not increase μ, though neuraminidase cleaves sialic acid from the mesothelium. Short pronase or phospholipase treatment, so as to affect only the mesothelial glycocalyx, increases μ, and this increase is removed by hyaluronan or sialomucin. On the other hand, addition of phospholipids after phospholipase treatment produces a small effect relative to that of hyaluronan or sialomucin, and this effect is similar with unsaturated or saturated phospholipids. In damaged mesothelium, the lubrication regimen becomes mixed, but addition of hyaluronan or sialomucin restores boundary lubrication.

  4. Tribochemical synthesis of nano-lubricant films from adsorbed molecules at sliding solid interface: Tribo-polymers from α-pinene, pinane, and n-decane

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Barthel, Anthony J.; Kim, Seong H.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanochemical reactions of adsorbed molecules at sliding interfaces were studied for α-pinene (C10H16), pinane (C10H18), and n-decane (C10H22) on a stainless steel substrate surface. During vapor phase lubrication, molecules adsorbed at the sliding interface could be activated by mechanical shear. Under the equilibrium adsorption condition of these molecules, the friction coefficient of sliding steel surfaces was about 0.2 and a polymeric film was tribochemically produced. The synthesis yield of α-pinene tribo-polymers was about twice as much as pinane tribo-polymers. In contrast to these strained bicyclic hydrocarbons, n-decane showed much weaker activity for tribo-polymerization at the same mechanical shear condition. These results suggested that the mechanical shear at tribological interfaces could induce the opening of the strained ring structure of α-pinene and pinane, which leads to polymerization of adsorbed molecules at the sliding track. On a stainless steel surface, such polymerization reactions of adsorbed molecules do not occur under typical surface reaction conditions. The mechanical properties and boundary lubrication efficiency of the produced tribo-polymer films are discussed.

  5. Big data in reciprocal space: Sliding fast Fourier transforms for determining periodicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Rama K., E-mail: rvv@ornl.gov; Belianinov, Alex; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Tselev, Alexander; Jesse, S. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Gianfrancesco, Anthony G. [UT/ORNL Bredesen Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Kalinin, Sergei V. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); UT/ORNL Bredesen Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2015-03-02

    Significant advances in atomically resolved imaging of crystals and surfaces have occurred in the last decade allowing unprecedented insight into local crystal structures and periodicity. Yet, the analysis of the long-range periodicity from the local imaging data, critical to correlation of functional properties and chemistry to the local crystallography, remains a challenge. Here, we introduce a Sliding Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) filter to analyze atomically resolved images of in-situ grown La{sub 5/8}Ca{sub 3/8}MnO{sub 3} (LCMO) films. We demonstrate the ability of sliding FFT algorithm to differentiate two sub-lattices, resulting from a mixed-terminated surface. Principal Component Analysis and Independent Component Analysis of the Sliding FFT dataset reveal the distinct changes in crystallography, step edges, and boundaries between the multiple sub-lattices. The implications for the LCMO system are discussed. The method is universal for images with any periodicity, and is especially amenable to atomically resolved probe and electron-microscopy data for rapid identification of the sub-lattices present.

  6. Sliding-wear resistance of pure near fully-dense B4C under lubrication with water, diesel fuel, and paraffin oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortiz, Angel L.; Leal, Victor Manuel Candelario; Borrero-López, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    The sliding-wear resistance of pure near fully-dense B4C is investigated, and the wear mode/mechanisms identified, under lubrication with water, diesel fuel, and paraffin oil. It is found that the wear is mild in the three cases, with specific wear rates (SWRs) of 10−16–10−17 m3/N m. Nonetheless......, the wear resistance of the B4C ceramic is one order of magnitude greater under oil lubrication (1016 N m/m3) than under water lubrication (1015 N m/m3), and twice as great for the specific case of paraffin oil than diesel fuel, attributable to the lubricant’s viscosity. It is also found that the wear mode...... is always abrasion, and that the wear mechanisms are plastic deformation and localized fracture with grain pullout. However, in agreement with the macro-wear data, the severity of the wear damage is lower under lubrication with paraffin oil, followed by diesel fuel, and lastly water. Finally...

  7. Improving the Friction Durability of Magnetic Head-Disk Interfaces by Thin Lubricant Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojiro Miyake

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanowear and viscoelasticity were evaluated to study the nanotribological properties of lubricant films of Z-tetraol, D-4OH, and A20H, including their retention and replenishment properties. For A20H and thick Z-tetraol-coated disks, the disk surface partially protrudes, and the phase lag (tan⁡δ increases with friction. This result is consistent with replenishment of the lubricant upon tip sliding. For the D-4OH-coated disk, the tan⁡δ value decreases with tip sliding, similar to the case for the unlubricated disk. The durability of the lubricant-coated magnetic disks was then evaluated by load increase and decrease friction tests. The friction force of the unlubricated disk rapidly increases after approximately 30 reciprocating cycles, regardless of the load. The lubrication state can be estimated by mapping the dependence of friction coefficient on the reciprocating cycle number and load. The friction coefficient can be classified into one of four areas. The lowest friction area constitutes fluid lubrication. The second area constitutes the transition to mixed lubrication. The third area constitutes boundary lubrication. The highest friction of the fourth area results from surface fracture. The boundary lubricating area of the A20H lubricant was wide, because of its good retention and replenishment properties.

  8. Double angle seal forming lubricant film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, William D.

    1984-01-01

    A lubricated piston rod seal which inhibits gas leaking from a high pressure chamber on one side of the seal to a low pressure chamber on the other side of the seal. A liquid is supplied to the surface of the piston rod on the low pressure side of the seal. This liquid acts as lubricant for the seal and provides cooling for the rod. The seal, which can be a plastic, elastomer or other material with low elastic modulus, is designed to positively pump lubricant through the piston rod/seal interface in both directions when the piston rod is reciprocating. The capacity of the seal to pump lubricant from the low pressure side to the high pressure side is less than its capacity to pump lubricant from the high pressure side to the low pressure side which ensures that there is zero net flow of lubricant to the high pressure side of the seal. The film of lubricant between the seal and the rod minimizes any sliding contact and prevents the leakage of gas. Under static conditions gas leakage is prevented by direct contact between the seal and the rod.

  9. The Sliding Wear and Friction Behavior of M50-Graphene Self-Lubricating Composites Prepared by Laser Additive Manufacturing at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiyao; Shi, Xiaoliang; Huang, Yuchun; Deng, Xiaobin; Lu, Guanchen; Yan, Zhao; Zhou, Hongyan; Xue, Bing

    2018-03-01

    M50 steel is widely applied to manufacture aircraft bearings where service lives are mainly determined by the friction and wear behaviors. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the tribological behaviors and wear mechanisms of M50-1.5 wt.% graphene composites (MGC) prepared by laser additive manufacturing (LAM) (MGC-LAM) sliding against Si3N4 ball from 25 to 550 °C at 18 N-0.2 m/s. XRD, EPMA, FESEM, and EDS mapping were conducted to understand the major mechanisms leading to the improvement in the sliding behavior of MGC-LAM. The results indicated that MGC-LAM showed the excellent friction and wear performance at 25-550 °C for the lower friction coefficient of 0.16-0.52 and less wear rate of 6.1-9.5 × 10-7 mm3 N-1 m-1. Especially at 350 °C, MGC-LAM obtained the best tribological performance (0.16, 6.1 × 10-7mm3 N-1 m-1). It was attributed to the dense coral-like microstructure, as well as the formed surface lubricating structure which is composed of the upper uniform lubricating film with massive graphene and the underneath compacted layer.

  10. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study on Temperature Distribution of Self-Lubricating Packing Rings in Reciprocating Compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Xiaohan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonuniform abrasion failure and high-temperature thermal failure of packing rings have a significant influence on compressor reliability, particularly that of oil-free compressors. In this study, a test rig was constructed to measure the dynamic temperature of packing rings under different operational conditions in an oil-free reciprocating compressor. The dynamic axial and radial temperature distributions of the packing rings were obtained using an innovative internal temperature testing device that kept the thermocouples and packing box relatively static during compressor operation. A three-dimensional heat transfer model was also developed to analyze the temperature distribution of the packing boxes, piston rod, and cylinder during such operation. Good agreement was observed between the simulation results and experimental data, which showed an average relative error of less than 2.35%. The results indicate that the pressure ratio exerts a significant effect on the axial temperature distribution and determines which packing ring reaches the maximum temperature. They also show the average temperature to rise with an increase in the rotational speed and to fall with an improvement in the external cooling conditions. Finally, the material of the packing rings was found to affect the temperature gradient from their inner to outer surface.

  11. Slide 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Slide 1 · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17.

  12. Lubrication fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Pirro, DM

    2001-01-01

    This work discusses product basics, machine elements that require lubrication, methods of application, lubricant storage and handling, and lubricant conservation. This edition emphasizes the need for lubrication and careful lubricant selection.

  13. Slide 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Slide 1 · Slide 2 · Membrane Phospholipids · Slide 4 · NAE and NAPE · Biological and Pharmacological properties · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Slide 20 · Slide 21 · Slide 22 · Slide 23 · Slide 24 · Slide 25.

  14. Ultra Low Friction of DLC Coating with Lubricant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, M; Yoshida, K

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find a trigger to make clear a mechanism of the ultra low friction by evaluating the friction property of DLC-DLC combination under lubrication with the simple fluid. The Pin-on-disc reciprocating and rotating sliding tests were conducted to evaluate the friction property. The super low friction property of pure sliding with the ta-C(T) pair coated by the filtered arc deposition process under oleic acid lubrication was found at the mixed lubrication condition. It was thought that the low share strength tribofilm composed of water and acid seemed to be formed on ta-C sliding interface. Additionally, the smooth sliding surface formed on ta-C(T) was seemed to be required to keep this tribofilm. Then, the super low friction was thought to be obtained by this superlubrication condition. Although the accurate and direct experimental data must be required to make clear this super low friction mechanism, the advanced effect obtained by the simple material combination is expected to be applied on the large industrial fields in near future.

  15. Slide 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Slide 1 · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Immunology of VL · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Strategies To Design Drugs · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Slide 20 · Slide 21 · Slide 22 · Slide 23 · Slide 24 · Slide 25 · Slide 26 · Slide 27 · Slide 28.

  16. Slide 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Second Question How Did this Shift in ToT Come About? Slide 8 · Second Question How Did this Shift in ToT Come About? Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 17 · Slide 20 · Slide 21 · Slide 22 · Slide 23 · Slide 24 · Slide 25 · Slide 26 · Slide 27 · Slide 30 · India's Globalization.

  17. The unlubricated reciprocating sliding wear of 316 stainless steel in C02 in the temperature range 20 to 6000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.

    1985-11-01

    The friction and wear behaviour of 316 stainless steel in C0 2 has been investigated in the load range 8 - 5ON from 20 to 600 0 C. Wear transitions occurred at all temperatures but were load dependent. At and below 300 0 C wear transitions only took place at low leads whereas above 300 0 C transitions were seen al all loads. The low temperature wear transition, giving an order of magnitude decrease in wear rate was associated with a change in friction behaviour. The friction force across the specimen was initially widely fluctuating and varied from cycle to cycle. After a time, which did not necessarily coincide with the wear transition the cyclic variation in the friction force become much less. This smoother sliding is thought to indicate a trend to oxide -oxide contacts. At higher temperatures wear transitions result in a two orders of magnitude reduction in wear. The corresponding friction transition was similar to the low temperature friction change but also included a marked temporary drop in the coefficient of friction. (author)

  18. Lubrication fundamentals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    This book is organized under the following headings: lubricating oils; lubricating greases; synthetic lubricants; machine elements; lubricant application; internal combustion engines; stationary gas turbines; steam turbines; hydraulic turbines; nuclear power plants; automotive chassis components; automotive power transmissions; compressors; handling, storing, and dispensing lubricants, in-plant handling for lubricant conservation

  19. Reciprocating sliding behaviour of self-mated amorphous diamond-like carbon coatings on Si3N4 ceramics under tribological stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, M.; Abreu, C.S.; Salgueiredo, E.; Almeida, F.A.; Fernandes, A.J.S.; Costa, F.M.; Gomes, J.R.; Silva, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Amorphous diamond-like carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering have been deposited on silicon nitride based substrates for tribological purposes. A conductive Si 3 N 4 /30% vol.TiN composite was produced for bias substrate application. Friction and wear properties of carbon coated self-mated pairs were assessed using a reciprocal motion ball-on-flat setup in unlubricated conditions with applied normal loads of 3 N and 5 N. The worn surfaces were studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in order to identify the prevalent wear mechanism. Unbiased and biased substrates behaved differently, the former undergoing premature delamination while the latter endured the tribological test conditions (3 N, ∼ 43 m). Very low friction coefficient values of ∼ 0.015 were sustained assuring remarkable wear behaviour. Surface grooving and wear debris accumulation in the sliding track lead to a roughness increase from the nominal rms value of ∼ 12 nm to ∼ 97 nm, although no weight loss and surface profile modification was quantifiable

  20. Lubrication and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, V; Dowson, D

    1976-02-01

    Mechanisms of lubrication of human synovial joints have been analysed in terms of the operating conditions of the joint, the synovial fluid and articular cartilage. In the hip and knee during a walking cycle the load may rise up to four times body weight. In the knee on dropping one metre the load may go up to 25 time body weight. The elastic modulus of cartilage is similar to that of the synthetic rubber of a car tyre. The cartilage surface is rough and in elderly specimens the centre line average is 2-75 mum. The friction force generated in reciprocating tests shows that both cartilage and synovial fluid are important in lubrication. The viscosity-shear rate relationships of normal synovial fluid show that it is non-Newtonian. Osteoarthrosic fluid is less so and rheumatoid fluid is more nearly Newtonian. Experiments with hip joints in a pendulum machine show that fluid film lubrication obtains at some phases of joint action. Boundary lubrication prevails under certain conditions and has been examined with a reciprocating friction machine. Digestion of hyaluronate does not alter the boundary lubrication, but trypsin digestion does. Surface active substances (lauryl sulphate and cetyl 3-ammonium bromide) give a lubricating ability similar to that of synovial fluid. The effectiveness of the two substances varies with pH.

  1. Slide 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Slide 1 · Matsyagandhya A case of genetic disorder · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Active Site with Molybdopterin Ligation · Disadvantage of a Chemist to Model the Cofactor · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Active Site Investigation · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19.

  2. Slide 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Slide 25 · Life course epidemiology and chronic diseases · Models · Slide 28 · Slide 29 · Slide 30 · New Delhi Birth Cohort · New Delhi Birth Cohort (NDBC) · Slide 33 · Slide 34 · Slide 35 · Slide 36 · Slide 37 · Slide 38 · Slide 39 · CONCLUSIONS Urban Children and Adolescents · CONCLUSIONS New Delhi Birth Cohort.

  3. An Electrochemical Processing Strategy for Improving Tribological Performance of Aisi 316 Stainless Steel Under Grease Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jiaojuan; Li, Maolin; Lin, Naiming; Zhang, Xiangyu; Qin, Lin; Tang, Bin

    2014-12-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance of AISI 316 stainless steel (316 SS) under grease lubrication, electrochemical processing was conducted on it to obtain a rough (surface texturing-like) surface by making use of the high sensitivity of austenitic stainless steel to pitting corrosion in Cl--rich environment. Numerous corrosion pits or micro-ditches acted as micro-reservoirs on the obtained surface. While the grease could offer consistent lubrication, and then improve the tribological performance of 316 SS. Tribological behaviors of raw 316 SS and the treated sample were measured using a reciprocating type tribometer sliding against GCr15 steel counterpart under dry and grease lubrication conditions. The results showed that the mass losses of the two samples were in the same order of magnitude, and the raw sample exhibited lower friction coefficient in dry sliding. When the tests were conducted under grease lubrication condition, the friction coefficients and mass losses of the treated sample were far lower than those of the raw 316 SS. The tribological performance of 316 SS under grease lubrication was drastically improved after electrochemical processing.

  4. Friction and wear performance of low-friction carbon coatings under oil lubrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalchenko, A.; Ajayi, O. O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    2001-01-01

    Amorphous carbon coatings with very low friction properties were recently developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These coatings have shown good promise in mitigating excessive wear and scuffing problems associated with low-lubricity diesel fuels. To reduce the negative effect of sulfur and other lubricant additives in poisoning the after-treatment catalyst, a lubricant formulation with a low level of sulfur may be needed. Exclusion of proven sulfur-containing extreme pressure (EP) and antiwear additives from oils will require other measures to ensure durability of critical lubricated components. The low-friction carbon coating has the potential for such applications. In the present study, we evaluated the friction and wear attributes of three variations of the coating under a boundary lubrication regime. Tests were conducted with both synthetic and mineral oil lubricants using a ball-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding. Although the three variations of the coating provided modest reductions in friction coefficient, they all reduced wear substantially compared to an uncoated surface. The degradation mode of oxidative wear on the uncoated surface was replaced by a polishing wear mode on the coated surfaces

  5. Influence of non-smooth surface on tribological properties of glass fiber-epoxy resin composite sliding against stainless steel under natural seawater lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaofeng; Gao, Dianrong; Liang, Yingna; Chen, Bo

    2015-11-01

    With the development of bionics, the bionic non-smooth surfaces are introduced to the field of tribology. Although non-smooth surface has been studied widely, the studies of non-smooth surface under the natural seawater lubrication are still very fewer, especially experimental research. The influences of smooth and non-smooth surface on the frictional properties of the glass fiber-epoxy resin composite (GF/EPR) coupled with stainless steel 316L are investigated under natural seawater lubrication in this paper. The tested non-smooth surfaces include the surfaces with semi-spherical pits, the conical pits, the cone-cylinder combined pits, the cylindrical pits and through holes. The friction and wear tests are performed using a ring-on-disc test rig under 60 N load and 1000 r/min rotational speed. The tests results show that GF/EPR with bionic non-smooth surface has quite lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance than GF/EPR with smooth surface without pits. The average friction coefficient of GF/EPR with semi-spherical pits is 0.088, which shows the largest reduction is approximately 63.18% of GF/EPR with smooth surface. In addition, the wear debris on the worn surfaces of GF/EPR are observed by a confocal scanning laser microscope. It is shown that the primary wear mechanism is the abrasive wear. The research results provide some design parameters for non-smooth surface, and the experiment results can serve as a beneficial supplement to non-smooth surface study.

  6. Slide 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Potency of Stem Cells · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · World Wide Clinical trials using MSCs · Slide 7 · Bone Marrow derived Human MSCs (hMSC) in culture · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Fetal MSCs · Morphology of murine fetal heart derived stem cells (fHSCs) · Growth Kinetics of fHSCs · Phenotype of ...

  7. Slide system for machine tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Spivey S.; Green, Walter L.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention relates to a machine tool which permits the machining of nonaxisymmetric surfaces on a workpiece while rotating the workpiece about a central axis of rotation. The machine tool comprises a conventional two-slide system (X-Y) with one of these slides being provided with a relatively short travel high-speed auxiliary slide which carries the material-removing tool. The auxiliary slide is synchronized with the spindle speed and the position of the other two slides and provides a high-speed reciprocating motion required for the displacement of the cutting tool for generating a nonaxisymmetric surface at a selected location on the workpiece.

  8. Frictional characteristics of stainless steel 440C lubricated with water at pressurized high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    The fatigue life of stainless steel bearings is one of the most critical factors to determine the performance of the driving system. Because the bearings which are installed on the driving mechanism in the nuclear reactor are operated at high temperature and high pressure and especially lubricated with water with low viscosity, the friction and wear characteristics of the bearing material should be investigated thoroughly. In many control element drive mechanisms in the nuclear reactor the support bearings are made of the stainless steel and the sliding bearing ceramic material mainly. This study is focused on the characteristics of support bearing which may be used in the SMART. The ball bearings are made of standardized 440C stainless steel, and it supports thrust load including the weight of the driving system and external force. The friction and wear characteristics of this material operating under severe lubrication condition are not well known yet, however it will be changed with respect to temperature and boundary pressure. In this paper the friction characteristics are investigated experimentally using the reciprocating tribometer which can simulate the SMART operating conditions. Highly purified water is used as lubricant, and the water is warmed up and pressurized. Friction forces on the reciprocating specimens are measured insitu strain gages

  9. Oleoplaning droplets on lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Dan; Timonen, Jaakko V. I.; Li, Ruoping; Velling, Seneca J.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2017-10-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in using lubricated surfaces to achieve extreme liquid repellency: a foreign droplet immiscible with the underlying lubricant layer was shown to slide off at a small tilt angle behaviour was hypothesized to arise from a thin lubricant overlayer film sandwiched between the droplet and solid substrate, but this has not been observed experimentally. Here, using thin-film interference, we are able to visualize the intercalated film under both static and dynamic conditions. We further demonstrate that for a moving droplet, the film thickness follows the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin law. The droplet is therefore oleoplaning--akin to tyres hydroplaning on a wet road--with minimal dissipative force and no contact line pinning. The techniques and insights presented in this study will inform future work on the fundamentals of wetting for lubricated surfaces and enable their rational design.

  10. Lubrication a practical guide to lubricant selection

    CERN Document Server

    Lansdown, A R

    1982-01-01

    Lubrication: A Practical Guide to Lubricant Selection provides a guide to modern lubrication practice in industry, with emphasis on practical application, selection of lubricants, and significant factors that determine suitability of a lubricant for a specific application. Organized into 13 chapters, this book begins with a brief theoretical opening chapter on the basic principles of lubrication. A chapter then explains the choice of lubricant type, indicating how to decide whether to use oil, grease, dry lubricant, or gas lubrication. Subsequent chapters deal with detailed selection of lubric

  11. Developments in lubricant technology

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, S P

    2014-01-01

    Provides a fundamental understanding of lubricants and lubricant technology including emerging lubricants such as synthetic and environmentally friendly lubricants Teaches the reader to understand the role of technology involved in the manufacture of lubricants Details both major industrial oils and automotive oils for various engines Covers emerging lubricant technology such as synthetic and environmentally friendly lubricants Discusses lubricant blending technology, storage, re-refining and condition monitoring of lubricant in equipment

  12. Hydrodynamic Lubrication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Hydrodynamic Lubrication Experiment with 'Floating' Drops. Jaywant H Arakeri K R Sreenivas. General Article Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 51-58. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Self-lubricating polymer composites : Tribology and interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Jintao

    2015-01-01

    In cooperation with SKF, this PhD project focus on the improvement of the tribological performance of self-lubricating composites for dry sliding bearings. Several novel self-lubricating composites with very good performance and low production cost is developed in this research, which perform better

  14. Slide 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Projected Rainfall (Weighted Mean CDF; A1B scenario) · Slide 18 · Imprecise Probability · Bounds for Probability of Drought · Slide 21 · Possibility Distribution of GCMs and Scenarios · Mahanadi River Basin - Streamflow · Projections for future monsoon inflows to Hirakud Reservoir · Slide 25 · Rule curve for adaptive policies.

  15. Angle-dependent lubricated tribological properties of stainless steel by femtosecond laser surface texturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Li, Yang-Bo; Bai, Feng; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Lubricated tribological properties of stainless steel were investigated by femtosecond laser surface texturing. Regular-arranged micro-grooved textures with different spacing and micro-groove inclination angles (between micro-groove path and sliding direction) were produced on AISI 304L steel surfaces by an 800 nm femtosecond laser. The spacing of micro-groove was varied from 25 to 300 μm, and the inclination angles of micro-groove were measured as 90° and 45°. The tribological properties of the smooth and textured surfaces with micro-grooves were investigated by reciprocating ball-on-flat tests against Al2O3 ceramic balls under starved oil lubricated conditions. Results showed that the spacing of micro-grooves significantly affected the tribological property. With the increase of micro-groove spacing, the average friction coefficients and wear rates of textured surfaces initially decreased then increased. The tribological performance also depended on the inclination angles of micro-grooves. Among the investigated patterns, the micro-grooves perpendicular to the sliding direction exhibited the lowest average friction coefficient and wear rate to a certain extent. Femtosecond laser-induced surface texturing may remarkably improve friction and wear properties if the micro-grooves were properly distributed.

  16. A lubricant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parfenova, V.A.; Belov, P.S.; Guliaev, I.A.; Korenev, K.D.

    1979-07-30

    For the purpose of improving the thermo-oxidation stability of washing and protective properties, dithiophosphate of the metal having the formula ((pi-R-C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OCH/sub 2/-CH/sub 2/O)/sub 2/P(=S)S)/sub 2/M (where R is the alkyl of C/sub 8/--C/sub 12/ isostructure, M is either cadmium, barium, or zinc) (I) is added into the petroleum oil for the lubrication of car engine units and containing polyethylene oxyphenylpolyamine (PEP). The lubricant has the following composition, in %: PEP, 1 to 5; (I), 0.5 to 5; petroleum oil, up to 100. In order to produce a lubricant for petroleum oil, for example MT-16, PEF and (I) are added (R = octyl or dodecyl), it is heated up to 80/sup 0/ and mixed in a nitrogen current for one hour. The combination of the additives in the patented composition has synergistic activities and the oil being patented, according to operative properties, surpasses the oil with industrial dithiophosphate additive MNI-IP-22k.

  17. New Universal Tribometer as Pin or Ball-on-Disc and Reciprocating Pin-on-Plate Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kaleli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper contains a description of a new Universal Tribometer design which enables simulation of different contact and test types such as pin-on-disc, ball-on-disc and linear reciprocating tests. There are many models of wear Tribometer in the world market. These devices are manufactured by various companies abroad and are imported to our country. Cost of this devices start from 50.000 euros and goes to hundreds of thousands of euros. One of the most commonly used of this device is Reciprocating Pin-on-Plate Tribo Test Machine. This wear tester is produced at a low limited cost within the KAP (Scientifical Research Project Coordinator of Yıldız Technical University. The test machine can work including three types of Tribotest rigs (Reciprocating Pin-on-Plate, Pin-on-Disc and Ball-on-Disc. It is designed to operate also at high temperatures up to 500 ˚C. The new piece of equipment allows instrumented tribological testing of piston ring and cylinder liner samples at low and high temperatures and boundary lubrication conditions of any typical gasoline or Diesel engines. Some friction results were shown in boundary lubricating conditions between piston ring and cylinder liner sliding pairs describing Tribotest machine is driven by AC servo motor which is more accurate than DC motor.

  18. Formation of metal-F bonds during frictional sliding : Influence of water and applied load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, J. T.; Pei, Y. T.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2016-01-01

    Effects of water lubrication and applied load on the formation of PTFE transfer films and metal-F bonds during sliding when PTFE filled composites sliding against steel and Al2O3 are investigated. In water lubricated conditions, XPS analysis reveals that a thin layer of water molecules at the

  19. Modern reciprocating compressors for the use of high pressure refrigerants (e.g. R410A, CO2). Criteria for construction and lubricating systems; Moderne zuigercompressoren voor de toepassing van hogedrukkoudemiddelen (zoals R410A, CO2). Eisen aan constructie en smeersystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Lande, C. [Uniechemie, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Grosse-Kracht, R. [Bitzer, Kuehlmaschinenbau, Sindelfingen (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    The use of high pressure refrigerants like R410A (air conditioning and chillers) and CO2 (low temperature cascade in supermarkets) demands changes in the standard fine reciprocating compressors. The design accounts essential criteria like thermodynamic and physical properties and the interaction between refrigerants and applied lubricants. These are high pressures, the mass flow, the vapour density, the high specific cooling capacity, the power consumption and the temperatures of oil and discharge gasses. [Dutch] De toepassing van R410A (in de klimaat-techniek) en CO2 (in lagetemperatuurcascade-installaties voor de supermarkttoepassing) vereist een aanpassing van standaard semi-hermetische zuigercompressoren om de fysische- en thermodynamische eigenschappen van het koudemiddel tot hun recht te laten komen. Dit zijn vooral de optredende drukken, de massastroom, de dampdichtheid, de hoge specifieke koelcapaciteit, het opgenomen vermogen en de olie- en persgastemperatuur.

  20. The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6Al-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Lukaszewicz, Victor; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6Al-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is the possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a 'back-up', self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212-coated Ti6-4, and PS212-coated Ti6-4/PM212.

  1. Slide 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Game Theory · Strategic Form Games (Normal Form Games) · Example : Prisoner's Dilemma · Dominant Strategy Equilibrium · Nash Equilibrium · Nash's Theorem · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Example 1: Mechanism Design Fair Division of a Cake · Example 2: Mechanism Design Truth Elicitation through an Indirect Mechanism.

  2. Solid lubricants and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Braithwaite, E R

    1964-01-01

    Solid Lubricants and Surfaces deals with the theory and use of solid lubricants, particularly in colloidal form. Portions of this book are devoted to graphite and molybdenum disulfides, which are widely used solid lubricants in colloidal form. An extensive literature on the laboratory examination of hundreds of solids as potential lubricants is also provided in this text. Other topics discussed include the metals and solid lubricants; techniques for examining surfaces; other solid lubricants; metal shaping; and industrial uses of solid-lubricant dispersions. This publication is beneficial to e

  3. Soft lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotheim, Jan; Mahadevan, Laksminarayanan

    2004-11-01

    We study the lubrication of fluid-immersed soft interfaces and show that elastic deformation couples tangential and normal forces and thus generates lift. We consider materials that deform easily, due to either geometry (e.g a shell) or constitutive properties (e.g. a gel or a rubber), so that the effects of pressure and temperature on the fluid properties may be neglected. Four different system geometries are considered: a rigid cylinder moving tangentially to a soft layer coating a rigid substrate; a soft cylinder moving tangentially to a rigid substrate; a cylindrical shell moving tangentially to a rigid substrate; and finally a journal bearing coated with a thin soft layer, which being a conforming contact allows us to gauge the influence of contact geometry. In addition, for the particular case of a soft layer coating a rigid substrate we consider both elastic and poroelastic material responses. Finally, we consider the role of contact geometry in the context of the journal bearing, a conforming contact. For all these cases we find the same generic behavior: there is an optimal combination of geometric and material parameters that maximizes the dimensionless normal force as a function of the softness.

  4. Tribological properties and lubrication mechanism of in situ graphene-nickel matrix composite impregnated with lubricating oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Du, Jinfang; Pang, Xianjuan; Wang, Haizhong; Yang, Hua; Jiang, Jinlong

    2018-05-01

    A solid-liquid synergetic lubricating system has been designed to develop a novel self-lubricating nickel matrix composite. The graphene-nickel (G-Ni) matrix composite with porous structure was fabricated by in situ growing graphene in bulk nickel using a powder metallurgy method. The porous structures of the composite were used to store polyalphaolefin (PAO) oil for self-lubricating. It is found that the G-Ni matrix composite under oil lubrication condition exhibited superior tribological properties as compared to pure nickel and the composite under dry sliding condition. The prestored oil was released from pores to the sliding surface forming a lubricating oil film during friction process. This lubricating oil film can protect the worn surface from severe oxidation, and help the formation and transfer of a carbon-based solid tribofilm derived from graphene and lubricating oil. This solid (graphene)-liquid (oil) synergistic lubricating mechanism is responsible for the reduction of friction coefficient and improvement of wear resistance of the in situ fabricated G-Ni matrix composite.

  5. Elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication

    CERN Document Server

    Dowson, D; Hopkins, D W

    1977-01-01

    Elasto-Hydrodynamic Lubrication deals with the mechanism of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication, that is, the lubrication regime in operation over the small areas where machine components are in nominal point or line contact. The lubrication of rigid contacts is discussed, along with the effects of high pressure on the lubricant and bounding solids. The governing equations for the solution of elasto-hydrodynamic problems are presented.Comprised of 13 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication and representation of contacts by cylinders, followed by a discussio

  6. Biodiesel as a lubricity additive for ultra low sulfur diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subongkoj Topaiboul1 and 2,*

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available With the worldwide trend to reduce emission from diesel engines, ultra low sulfur diesel has been introduced with thesulfur concentration of less than 10 ppm. Unfortunately, the desulfurization process inevitably reduces the lubricity of dieselfuel significantly. Alternatively, biodiesel, with almost zero sulfur content, has been added to enhance lubricity in an ultralow sulfur diesel. This work has evaluated the effectiveness of the biodiesel amount, sourced from palm and jatropha oil,and origin in ultra low sulfur diesel locally available in the market. Wear scar from a high-frequency reciprocating rig isbenchmarked to the standard value (460 m of diesel fuel lubricity. It was found that very small amount (less than 1% ofbiodiesel from either source significantly improves the lubricity in ultra low sulfur diesel, and the biodiesel from jatropha oilis a superior lubricity enhancer.

  7. Electromagnetic Reciprocity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, David F.

    2014-11-01

    A reciprocity theorem is an explicit mathematical relationship between two different wavefields that can exist within the same space - time configuration. Reciprocity theorems provi de the theoretical underpinning for mod ern full waveform inversion solutions, and also suggest practical strategies for speed ing up large - scale numerical modeling of geophysical datasets . In the present work, several previously - developed electromagnetic r eciprocity theorems are generalized to accommodate a broader range of medi um, source , and receiver types. Reciprocity relations enabling the interchange of various types of point sources and point receivers within a three - dimensional electromagnetic model are derived. Two numerical modeling algorithms in current use are successfully tested for adherence to reciprocity. Finally, the reciprocity theorem forms the point of departure for a lengthy derivation of electromagnetic Frechet derivatives. These mathe matical objects quantify the sensitivity of geophysical electromagnetic data to variatio ns in medium parameters, and thus constitute indispensable tools for solution of the full waveform inverse problem. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Labor atories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. Signif icant portions of the work reported herein were conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and CARBO Ceramics Incorporated. The author acknowledges Mr. Chad Cannan and Mr. Terry Pa lisch of CARBO Ceramics, and Ms. Amy Halloran, manager of SNL's Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences Department, for their interest in and encouragement of this work. Special thanks are due to Dr . Lewis C. Bartel ( recently retired from Sandia National Labo ratories

  8. Biodegradation of lubricant oil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M

    2012-09-25

    Sep 25, 2012 ... lubricating oil, showed high biodegradation efficiency for different used lubricating oils. Capability of ..... amount after biodegradation showed no difference in the .... products polluted sites in Elele, Rivers State, Ngeria.

  9. The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6A1-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Lukaszewicz, Victor

    1995-01-01

    The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6A1-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is a possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a 'backup,' self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212 coated Ti6-4, and Ps212 coated Ti6-4/PM212

  10. Preparation and tribological properties of self-lubricating TiO2/graphite composite coating on Ti6Al4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Ming; Zhou, Xinjian; Xiao, Qian; Liang, Jun; Huo, Xiaodi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A TiO 2 /graphite composite coating is produced on Ti alloy by one-step PEO process. ► The TiO 2 /graphite composite coating exhibits excellent self-lubricating behavior. ► The self-lubricating composite coating improves the wear resistance by comparison to the conventional PEO coating. - Abstract: One-step plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process in a graphite-dispersed phosphate electrolyte was used to prepare a graphite-containing oxide composite coating on Ti6Al4V alloy. The composition and microstructure of the oxide coatings produced in the phosphate electrolytes with and without addition of graphite were analyzed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tribological properties of the uncoated Ti6Al4V alloy and oxide coatings were evaluated using a reciprocating ball-on-disk tribometer. Results showed that the graphite-containing oxide composite coating can be successfully produced on Ti6Al4V alloy in the graphite-dispersed phosphate electrolyte using PEO process. The graphite-containing oxide composite coating registered much lower friction coefficient and wear rate than the uncoated Ti6Al4V alloy and the oxide coating without graphite under dry sliding condition, exhibiting excellent self-lubricating property.

  11. Superlubric sliding of graphene nanoflakes on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaofeng; Kwon, Sangku; Park, Jeong Young; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-02-26

    The lubricating properties of graphite and graphene have been intensely studied by sliding a frictional force microscope tip against them to understand the origin of the observed low friction. In contrast, the relative motion of free graphene layers remains poorly understood. Here we report a study of the sliding behavior of graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) on a graphene surface. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we found that the GNFs show facile translational and rotational motions between commensurate initial and final states at temperatures as low as 5 K. The motion is initiated by a tip-induced transition of the flakes from a commensurate to an incommensurate registry with the underlying graphene layer (the superlubric state), followed by rapid sliding until another commensurate position is reached. Counterintuitively, the average sliding distance of the flakes is larger at 5 K than at 77 K, indicating that thermal fluctuations are likely to trigger their transitions from superlubric back to commensurate ground states.

  12. The experiment research of the friction sliding isolation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shirong; Li, Jiangle; Wang, Sheliang

    2018-04-01

    This paper investigated the theory of the friction sliding isolation structure, The M0S2 solid lubricant was adopted as isolation bearing friction materials, and a new sliding isolation bearing was designed and made. The formula of the friction factor and the compression stress was proposed. The feasibility of the material MoS2 used as the coating material in a friction sliding isolation system was tested on the 5 layers concrete frame model. Two application experiment conditions were presented. The results of the experiment research indicated that the friction sliding isolation technology have a good damping effect.

  13. Frictional lubricity enhanced by quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, Tommaso; Pellegrini, Franco; Santoro, Giuseppe E; Tosatti, Erio

    2018-04-03

    The quantum motion of nuclei, generally ignored in the physics of sliding friction, can affect in an important manner the frictional dissipation of a light particle forced to slide in an optical lattice. The density matrix-calculated evolution of the quantum version of the basic Prandtl-Tomlinson model, describing the dragging by an external force of a point particle in a periodic potential, shows that purely classical friction predictions can be very wrong. The strongest quantum effect occurs not for weak but for strong periodic potentials, where barriers are high but energy levels in each well are discrete, and resonant Rabi or Landau-Zener tunneling to states in the nearest well can preempt classical stick-slip with nonnegligible efficiency, depending on the forcing speed. The resulting permeation of otherwise unsurmountable barriers is predicted to cause quantum lubricity, a phenomenon which we expect should be observable in the recently implemented sliding cold ion experiments.

  14. Lubrication of nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, E.; Mack, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    Safe operation of liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors requires a knowledge of the tribological behaviour of contacting components at high temperatures with slow relative movement at high frictional loads in a chemically aggressive environment. Experiments have been performed on various material combinations in liquid sodium and argon. Because of the small sliding movements, hydrodynamic lubrication is not expected and thus surface finish is an important factor. Tests have been performed on brushed, ground and lapped surfaces. Among the material combinations tested a CrC-coating on a 1.4961 stainless steel substrate performed well. Friction coefficients of 0.35-0.5 in argon and 0.1-1.2 in liquid sodium were recorded. (author)

  15. Slide layout and integrated design (SLIDE) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, S.G.

    1975-01-01

    SLIDE is a FORTRAN IV program for producing 35 mm color slides on the Control Data CYBER-74. SLIDE interfaces with the graphics package, DISSPLA, on the CYBER-74. It was designed so that persons with no previous computer experience can easily and quickly generate their own textual 35 mm color slides for verbal presentations. SLIDE's features include seven different colors, five text sizes, ten tab positions, and two page sizes. As many slides as desired may be produced during any one run of the program. Each slide is designed to represent an 8 1 / 2 in. x 11 in. or an 11 in. x 8 1 / 2 in. page. The input data cards required to run the SLIDE program and the program output are described. Appendixes contain a sample program run showing input, output, and the resulting slides produced and a FORTRAN listing of the SLIDE program. (U.S.)

  16. A new Friction and Lubrication Test for Cold Forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Wibom, Ole; Aalborg Nielsen, J

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a new friction and lubrication test for cold forging. The test allows controlled variation of the surface expansion in the range 0-2000%, the tool temperature in the range 20-270°C and the sliding length between 0 and infinite. Friction is decreasing with increasing temperature...

  17. Development of a quantitative lubricant test for deep drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2004-01-01

    A tribological test for deep drawing has been developed by which the performance of lubricants may be evaluated quantitatively measuring the maximum backstroke force on the punch due to sliding friction between tool and work piece surface. The forming force is found not to give useful information...

  18. Rotation of an immersed cylinder sliding near a thin elastic coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Saintyves, Baudouin; Jules, Theo; Salez, Thomas; Schönecker, Clarissa; Mahadevan, L.; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-07-01

    It is known that an object translating parallel to a soft wall in a viscous fluid produces hydrodynamic stresses that deform the wall, which in turn results in a lift force on the object. Recent experiments with cylinders sliding under gravity near a soft incline, which confirmed theoretical arguments for the lift force, also reported an unexplained steady-state rotation of the cylinders [B. Saintyves et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113, 5847 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1525462113]. Motivated by these observations, we show, in the lubrication limit, that an infinite cylinder that translates in a viscous fluid parallel to a soft wall at constant speed and separation distance must also rotate in order to remain free of torque. Using the Lorentz reciprocal theorem, we show analytically that for small deformations of the elastic layer, the angular velocity of the cylinder scales with the cube of the sliding speed. These predictions are confirmed numerically. We then apply the theory to the gravity-driven motion of a cylinder near a soft incline and find qualitative agreement with the experimental observations, namely, that a softer elastic layer results in a greater angular speed of the cylinder.

  19. Grease lubrication in rolling bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Lugt, Piet M

    2012-01-01

    The definitive book on the science of grease lubrication for roller and needle bearings in industrial and vehicle engineering. Grease Lubrication in Rolling Bearings provides an overview of the existing knowledge on the various aspects of grease lubrication (including lubrication systems) and the state of the art models that exist today. The book reviews the physical and chemical aspects of grease lubrication, primarily directed towards lubrication of rolling bearings. The first part of the book covers grease composition, properties and rheology, including thermal

  20. Standard test method for conducting friction tests of piston ring and cylinder liner materials under lubricated conditions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for conducting laboratory bench-scale friction tests of materials, coatings, and surface treatments intended for use in piston rings and cylinder liners in diesel or spark-ignition engines. The goal of this procedure is to provide a means for preliminary, cost-effective screening or evaluation of candidate ring and liner materials. A reciprocating sliding arrangement is used to simulate the contact that occurs between a piston ring and its mating liner near the top-dead-center position in the cylinder where liquid lubrication is least effective, and most wear is known to occur. Special attention is paid to specimen alignment, running-in, and lubricant condition. 1.2 This test method does not purport to simulate all aspects of a fired engine’s operating environment, but is intended to serve as a means for preliminary screening for assessing the frictional characteristics of candidate piston ring and liner material combinations in the presence of fluids that behave as u...

  1. Metal forming and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Lubrication is essential in most metal forming processes. The lubricant film has two basic functions, [1]: i. to separate the work piece and tool surfaces and ii. to cool the workpiece and the tool. Separation of the two surfaces implies lower friction facilitating deformation and lowering the tool...

  2. Lubrication method and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, R.S.

    1988-05-03

    In a combustion turbine engine comprising a bearing member journaling a rotatable component, and compressor means providing pressurized air, the method of providing liquid lubricant to the bearing member is described comprising the steps of: providing the liquid lubricant sealed within a collapsible and penetrable bladder member; enclosing the bladder member and lubricant within a substantially closed housing sealingly cooperating with the bladder member to define a pair of chambers; arranging a penetrating lance member in one of the pair of chambers in confronting relationship with the bladder member; providing communication of the pressurized air with the other of the pair of chambers to force the bladder member into impaled sealing relationship with the lance member; communicating the lubricant to the bearing member via the lance member; and utilizing the pressurized air within the other chamber to collapse the bladder member, simultaneously flowing the lubricant to the bearing member.

  3. Effect of solid lubricants on friction and wear behaviour of alloyed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Friction and wear behaviour of MoS2, boric acid, graphite and TiO2 at four different sliding speeds (1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 m/s) has been compared with dry sliding condition. MoS2 and graphite show 30 to 50% reduction in mass loss compared to other lubricants at all sliding speeds. Friction coefficient reduces with increase in ...

  4. A Systems Approach to the Solid Lubrication of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Zaldana, Antonio R.; Radil, Kevin C.

    2002-01-01

    Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings which rely upon solid lubricants to reduce friction and minimize wear during sliding which occurs at start-up and shut-down when surface speeds are too low to allow the formation of a hydrodynamic air film. This solid lubrication is typically accomplished by coating the non-moving foil surface with a thin, soft polymeric film. The following paper introduces a systems approach in which the solid lubrication is provided by a combination of self lubricating shaft coatings coupled with various wear resistant and lubricating foil coatings. The use of multiple materials, each providing different functions is modeled after oil-lubricated hydrodynamic sleeve bearing technology which utilizes various coatings and surface treatments in conjunction with oil lubricants to achieve optimum performance. In this study, room temperature load capacity tests are performed on journal foil air bearings operating at 14,000 rpm. Different shaft and foil coating technologies such as plasma sprayed composites, ceramic, polymer and inorganic lubricant coatings are evaluated as foil bearing lubricants. The results indicate that bearing performance is improved through the individual use of the lubricants and treatments tested. Further, combining several solid lubricants together yielded synergistically better results than any material alone.

  5. The personal norm of reciprocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perugini, M.; Gallucci, M.; Presaghi, F.; Ercolani, A.P.

    2002-01-01

    Reciprocity is here considered as an internalized social norm, and a questionnaire to measure individual differences in the internalized norm of reciprocity is presented. The questionnaire, Personal Norm of Reciprocity (PNR), measures three aspects of reciprocity: positive reciprocity, negative

  6. Practical lubrication for industrial facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bloch, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Now completely revised and updated, this definitive, hands-on reference provides a comprehensive resource on the fundamental principles of lubricant application, what products are available, and which lubricants are most effective for specific applications. It also offers a detailed and highly practical discussion of lubrication delivery systems. You'll gain a clearer understanding of the "why" of relevant industrial lubrication practices, and, importantly, how these practices will facilitate optimized results. Lubricant applications covered include bearings and machine elements in earthbound

  7. Fuels and Lubricants Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Modern naval aircraft and turbine-powered craft require reliable and high-quality fuels and lubricants to satisfy the demands imposed upon them for top performance...

  8. Mixed Mechanism of Lubrication by Lipid Bilayer Stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boţan, Alexandru; Joly, Laurent; Fillot, Nicolas; Loison, Claire

    2015-11-10

    Although the key role of lipid bilayer stacks in biological lubrication is generally accepted, the mechanisms underlying their extreme efficiency remain elusive. In this article, we report molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayer stacks undergoing load and shear. When the hydration level is reduced, the velocity accommodation mechanism changes from viscous shear in hydration water to interlayer sliding in the bilayers. This enables stacks of hydrated lipid bilayers to act as efficient boundary lubricants for various hydration conditions, structures, and mechanical loads. We also propose an estimation for the friction coefficient; thanks to the strong hydration forces between lipid bilayers, the high local viscosity is not in contradiction with low friction coefficients.

  9. The influence oil film lubrication of the piston-cylinder dynamic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Tokar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available An analytical study of the dynamics of a piston in a reciprocating engine was conducted. The equation of Reynolds and moving of piston are derived. The analysis, which incorporates a hydrodynamic lubrication model, was applied to M501 diesel engine. The results of this study indicate that piston dynamics were found to be sensitive to piston-cylinder bore clearance, location of the wrist pin and lubricant viscosity, underscoring their importance in engine design.

  10. The effect of graphene content and sliding speed on the wear mechanism of nickel–graphene nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algul, H.; Tokur, M.; Ozcan, S.; Uysal, M.; Cetinkaya, T.; Akbulut, H.; Alp, A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphene reinforced nickel matrix composites were produced by pulse electroplating method at a constant current density of 5 A/dm"2. • Incorporating graphene refines the grain size and changes the microstructure of the coating. • Incorporating graphene greatly improves the friction reduction and wear resistance of the coating. • The nickel/graphene composite coating containing 500 mg/L graphene in the electrolyte showed the best results. - Abstract: Nickel–graphene metal matrix composite coatings were fabricated by pulse electrodeposition technique from a Watt's type electrolyte. Effect of the graphene concentration in the electrolyte on the microstructure, microhardness, tribological features of nanocomposite coatings were evaluated in details. Microhardness of the composite coating was measured using a Vicker's microhardness indenter. The surfaces of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Raman spectroscopy, EDS and XRD analysis were used to determine chemical composition and structure of composite coatings. The tribological behavior of the resultant composite coating was tested by a reciprocating ball-on disk method at constant load but varying sliding speeds for determination the wear loss and friction coefficient features against a counterface. The wear and friction variations of the electrodeposited nickel graphene nanocomposite coatings sliding against an M50 steel balls were carried out on a CSM Instrument. The friction and wear properties of the coatings were examined without any lubrication at room temperature in the ambient air. The change in wear mechanisms by changing graphene nanosheets content was also comprehensively studied.

  11. Tribological Properties of Surface-Textured and Plasma-Nitrided Pure Titanium Under Oil Lubrication Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baosen; Dong, Qiangsheng; Ba, Zhixin; Wang, Zhangzhong; Shi, Hancheng; Xue, Yanting

    2018-01-01

    Plasma nitriding was conducted as post-treatment for surface texture on pure titanium to obtain a continuous nitriding layer. Supersonic fine particles bombarding (SFPB) was carried out to prepare surface texture. The surface morphologies and chemical composition were analyzed using scanning electron microscope and energy disperse spectroscopy. The microstructures of modified layers were characterized by transmission electron microscope. The tribological properties of surface-textured and duplex-treated pure titanium under oil lubrication condition were systematically investigated in the ball-on-plate reciprocating mode. The effects of applied load and sliding velocity on the tribological behavior were analyzed. The results show that after duplex treatments, the grains size in modified layer becomes slightly larger, and hardness is obviously improved. Wear resistance of duplex-treated pure titanium is significantly improved referenced to untreated and surface-textured pure titanium, which is 3.22 times as much as untreated pure titanium and 2.15 times of that for surface-textured pure titanium, respectively.

  12. Towards green lubrication in machining

    CERN Document Server

    Liew Yun Hsien, Willey

    2014-01-01

    The book gives an overview of environmental friendly gaseous and vapour, refrigerated compressed gas, solid lubricant, mist lubrication, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) and vegetable oils that can be used as lubricants and additives in industrial machining applications. This book introduces vegetable oils as viable and good alternative resources because of their environmental friendly, non-toxic and readily biodegradable nature.  The effectiveness of various types of vegetables oils as lubricants and additives in reducing wear and friction is discussed in this book. Engineers and scientist working in the field of lubrication and machining will find this book useful.

  13. Bifurcation of elastic solids with sliding interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigoni, D.; Bordignon, N.; Piccolroaz, A.; Stupkiewicz, S.

    2018-01-01

    Lubricated sliding contact between soft solids is an interesting topic in biomechanics and for the design of small-scale engineering devices. As a model of this mechanical set-up, two elastic nonlinear solids are considered jointed through a frictionless and bilateral surface, so that continuity of the normal component of the Cauchy traction holds across the surface, but the tangential component is null. Moreover, the displacement can develop only in a way that the bodies in contact do neither detach, nor overlap. Surprisingly, this finite strain problem has not been correctly formulated until now, so this formulation is the objective of the present paper. The incremental equations are shown to be non-trivial and different from previously (and erroneously) employed conditions. In particular, an exclusion condition for bifurcation is derived to show that previous formulations based on frictionless contact or `spring-type' interfacial conditions are not able to predict bifurcations in tension, while experiments-one of which, ad hoc designed, is reported-show that these bifurcations are a reality and become possible when the correct sliding interface model is used. The presented results introduce a methodology for the determination of bifurcations and instabilities occurring during lubricated sliding between soft bodies in contact.

  14. Power system with an integrated lubrication circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Brian D [East Peoria, IL; Akasam, Sivaprasad [Peoria, IL; Algrain, Marcelo C [Peoria, IL; Johnson, Kris W [Washington, IL; Lane, William H [Chillicothe, IL

    2009-11-10

    A power system includes an engine having a first lubrication circuit and at least one auxiliary power unit having a second lubrication circuit. The first lubrication circuit is in fluid communication with the second lubrication circuit.

  15. Tribological Behavior of Si3N4/Ti3SiC2 Contacts Lubricated by Lithium-Based Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haizhong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The tribological performance of Si3N4 ball sliding against Ti3SiC2 disc lubricated by lithium-based ionic liquids (ILs was investigated using an Optimol SRV-IV oscillating reciprocating friction and wear tester at room temperature (RT and elevated temperature (100°C. Glycerol and the conventional imidazolium-based IL 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonylimide (L-F106 were used as references under the same experimental conditions. The results show that the lithium-based ILs had higher thermal stabilities than glycerol and lower costs associated with IL preparation than L-F106. The tribotest results show that the lithium-based ILs were effective in reducing the friction and wear of Si3N4/Ti3SiC2 contacts. [Li(urea]TFSI even produced better tribological properties than glycerol and L-F106 both at RT and 100°C. The SEM/EDS and XPS results reveal that the excellent tribological endurance of Si3N4/Ti3SiC2 contacts lubricated by lithium-based ILs was mainly attributed to the formation of surface protective films composed of various tribochemical products.

  16. Preparation of flame sprayed poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-hexafluoropropylene) coatings and their tribological properties under water lubrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhizhong; Xu Haiyan; Yan Fengyuan

    2008-01-01

    Poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-hexafluoropropylene) (FEP) coatings were prepared on AISI-1045 steel via flame spraying. The chemical changes of the FEP powder occurring during the spraying process were analyzed by means of Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. The flame spraying of the FEP powders under the chosen conditions did not lead to structural changes related to degradation and oxidation. The friction and wear behaviors of the FEP coatings sliding against AISI-52100 steel ball under dry- and water-lubricated conditions were investigated using a ball-on-disc test rig, and the worn surface morphologies of the coatings were also observed using the scanning electron microscope. The FEP coatings recorded smaller friction coefficients under water lubrication than under dry sliding. However, the wear rate of the coating under water lubrication was about two times of that under dry sliding. This indicated that water as a lubricant was able to effectively reduce the friction coefficient but it led to an increased wear rate of the FEP coatings/steel sliding pairs. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) results illustrate that the transfer film did formed during the dry sliding but it is hindered under water lubrication, and it might be the major cause of the larger wear rate under the water lubrication.

  17. Glass transitions in lubricants - Its relation to elastohydrodynamic lubrication /EHD/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaad, M.; Bair, S.; Sanborn, D. M.; Winer, W. O.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary investigation into the possible role of glass transition and glassy state behavior of lubricants in EHD contacts is reported. Measurements of the glass transition of lubricants as a function of pressure by two methods are presented along with a discussion indicating possible implications of the results to EHD lubrication.

  18. Graphene as a protective coating and superior lubricant for electrical contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Diana; Erdemir, Ali; Sumant, Anirudha V.

    2014-12-01

    Potential for graphene to be used as a lubricant for sliding electrical contacts has been evaluated. Graphene, being deposited as a sporadic flakes on the gold substrate sliding against titanium nitride ball shows not only significant improvement in tribological behavior by reducing both friction (by factor of 2-3) and wear (by 2 orders) but also, even more importantly, demonstrates stable and low electrical resistance at the sliding contacts undergoing thousands of sliding passes regardless of the test environment (i.e., both in humid and dry conditions).

  19. Coefficient of friction of a starved lubricated spur gear pair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Huaiju; Zhu, Caichao; Sun, Zhangdong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Song, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    The frictional power loss issue of gear pairs becomes an important concern in both industry and academia due to the requirement of the energy saving and the improvement of power density of gear drives. A thermal starved elastohydrodynamic lubrication model is developed to study the tribological performance of a spur gear pair under starved lubrication conditions. The contact pressure, the film thickness, the temperature rise, the frictional power loss, as well as the coefficient of friction are evaluated by considering the variation of the curvature radius, the sliding/rolling motion, and the load distribution of gear tooth within the meshing period. Effects of lubrication starvation condition, load and speed on the coefficient of friction are studied.

  20. Feasibility study of self-lubrication by chlorine implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhajdenung, T.; Aizawa, T.; Yoshitake, M.; Mitsuo, A.

    2003-01-01

    Implantation of chlorine into titanium nitride (TiN) coating on the high-speed steel substrate has succeeded in significant reduction of wear rate and friction coefficient for original TiN under dry wear condition. Through precise investigation on the surface reaction in the wear track, in situ formation of oxygen-deficient titanium oxides was found to play a role as a lubricious oxide. In the present paper, this self-lubrication mechanism is further investigated for various wearing conditions. For wide range of sliding speed and normal load in the wear map, the wear volume of a counter material is actually reduced with comparison to the un-implanted TiN. Effect of the ion implantation dose on this self-lubrication mechanism is also studied for practical use. Some comments are made on further application of this self-lubrication to manufacturing

  1. Elastic model of the traction behavior of two traction lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Rohn, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    In the analysis of rolling-sliding concentrated contacts, such as gears, bearings and traction drives, the traction characteristics of the lubricant are of prime importance. The elastic shear modulus and limiting shear stress properties of the lubricant dictate the traction/slip characteristics and power loss associated with an EHD contact undergoing slip and/or spin. These properties can be deducted directly from the initial slope m and maximum traction coefficient micron of an experimental traction curve. In this investigation, correlation equations are presented to predict m and micron for two modern traction fluids based on the regression analysis of 334 separate traction disk machine experiments. The effects of contact pressure, temperature, surface velocity, ellipticity ratio are examined. Problems in deducing lubricant shear moduli from disk machine tests are discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N83-20116

  2. Reciprocity of weighted networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squartini, Tiziano; Picciolo, Francesco; Ruzzenenti, Franco; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2013-01-01

    In directed networks, reciprocal links have dramatic effects on dynamical processes, network growth, and higher-order structures such as motifs and communities. While the reciprocity of binary networks has been extensively studied, that of weighted networks is still poorly understood, implying an ever-increasing gap between the availability of weighted network data and our understanding of their dyadic properties. Here we introduce a general approach to the reciprocity of weighted networks, and define quantities and null models that consistently capture empirical reciprocity patterns at different structural levels. We show that, counter-intuitively, previous reciprocity measures based on the similarity of mutual weights are uninformative. By contrast, our measures allow to consistently classify different weighted networks according to their reciprocity, track the evolution of a network's reciprocity over time, identify patterns at the level of dyads and vertices, and distinguish the effects of flux (im)balances or other (a)symmetries from a true tendency towards (anti-)reciprocation.

  3. Limits of Lubrication in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam

    as delivered stainless steel surfaces implying microstructure changes in terms of larger ratio of closed lubricant pockets due to selective grain boundary etching. Strategic surfaces have also been created by macroscopic texturing using spherical indentations having a very small edge slope in order to promote...... by strategic surfaces in comparison to normal stainless steel surfaces implying a larger extent of bi-axial stretching. Numerical simulations have been applied in order to evaluate limits of lubrication in the simulative strip reduction based on predictions of critical parameters appearing in terms......-models corresponds well to experimental results in terms of lubricant film breakdown and subsequently pick-up development. Punching and blanking have been investigated regarding tribological conditions in case of using stainless steel workpiece materials. However, this has called for development of a new test method...

  4. Reciprocating pellet press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Charles W.

    1981-04-07

    A machine for pressing loose powder into pellets using a series of reciprocating motions has an interchangeable punch and die as its only accurately machines parts. The machine reciprocates horizontally between powder receiving and pressing positions. It reciprocates vertically to press, strip and release a pellet.

  5. Rayleigh reciprocity relations: Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Ju; Li Xiao-Lei; Wang Ning

    2016-01-01

    Classical reciprocity relations have wide applications in acoustics, from field representation to generalized optical theorem. In this paper we introduce our recent results on the applications and generalization of classical Rayleigh reciprocity relation: higher derivative reciprocity relations as a generalization of the classical one and a theoretical proof on the Green’s function retrieval from volume noises. (special topic)

  6. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  7. Mixed Lubricated Line Contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faraon, I.C.

    2005-01-01

    The present work deals with friction in mixed lubricated line contacts. Components in systems are becoming smaller and due to, for instance power transmitted, partial contact may occur. In industrial applications, friction between the moving contacting surfaces cannot be avoided, therefore it is

  8. On a model for the prediction of the friction coefficient in mixed lubrication based on a load-sharing concapt with measured surface roughness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akchurin, Aydar; Bosman, Rob; Lugt, Pieter Martin; van Drogen, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A new model was developed for the simulation of the friction coefficient in lubricated sliding line contacts. A half-space-based contact algorithm was linked with a numerical elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication solver using the load-sharing concept. The model was compared with an existing asperity-based

  9. Experiments on Ultrasonic Lubrication Using a Piezoelectrically-assisted Tribometer and Optical Profilometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sheng; Dapino, Marcelo

    2015-09-28

    Friction and wear are detrimental to engineered systems. Ultrasonic lubrication is achieved when the interface between two sliding surfaces is vibrated at a frequency above the acoustic range (20 kHz). As a solid-state technology, ultrasonic lubrication can be used where conventional lubricants are unfeasible or undesirable. Further, ultrasonic lubrication allows for electrical modulation of the effective friction coefficient between two sliding surfaces. This property enables adaptive systems that modify their frictional state and associated dynamic response as the operating conditions change. Surface wear can also be reduced through ultrasonic lubrication. We developed a protocol to investigate the dependence of friction force reduction and wear reduction on the linear sliding velocity between ultrasonically lubricated surfaces. A pin-on-disc tribometer was built which differs from commercial units in that a piezoelectric stack is used to vibrate the pin at 22 kHz normal to the rotating disc surface. Friction and wear metrics including effective friction force, volume loss, and surface roughness are measured without and with ultrasonic vibrations at a constant pressure of 1 to 4 MPa and three different sliding velocities: 20.3, 40.6, and 87 mm/sec. An optical profilometer is utilized to characterize the wear surfaces. The effective friction force is reduced by 62% at 20.3 mm/sec. Consistently with existing theories for ultrasonic lubrication, the percent reduction in friction force diminishes with increasing speed, down to 29% friction force reduction at 87 mm/sec. Wear reduction remains essentially constant (49%) at the three speeds considered.

  10. Effectiveness of Biodiesel from Various Tropical Oil Crops on Lubricity Improvement of Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chollacoop, Nuwong; Topaiboul, Subongkoj; Goodwin, Vituruch (Bioenergy Group, National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), Thailand Science Park, Pathumthani, 12120 (Thailand)). e-mail: nuwongc@mtec.or.th

    2008-10-15

    Ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) has been introduced worldwide with an aim to reduce emission. Since the desulfurization process for ULSD inadvertently reduces its lubricity, lubricity additive is needed. Biodiesel emerges as a potential candidate due to its excellent lubricity property and little sulfur content. In the present study, biodiesel from various energy crops available in Thailand was added at various amounts to ULSD to test the lubricity according to the CEC-F-06-A-96 standard (using High-Frequency Reciprocating Rig: HFRR [1]). It was found that when biodiesel from crude palm, jatropha, soybean, coconut, sunflower, rice, corn and sesame oils of less than 1% (by volume) is additized to ULSD, the lubricity is improved to meet the diesel standard. Further addition beyond 2% (by volume) does not improve lubricity remarkably, where the lubrication seems to saturate. Biodiesel improves lubricity property by film formation preventing mechanical contact between the rubbing surfaces, and the effectiveness varies among different feedstock oils. Biodiesel from crude palm oil, jatropha oil and coconut oil seemingly are superior lubricity additives in ULSD than that from soybean oil, sunflower oil, rice oil, corn oil and sesame oil. Keywords: biodiesel, bio-lubricants, palm oil, sunflower oil

  11. A preventive maintenance lubricant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapaykina, S A; Ol' kov, P L; Pertsev, A N; Rodzevillo, I T; Rogacheva, O I; Zinov' yev, A P

    1980-02-15

    A method is disclosed to lower the adherence of materials by reducing the viscosity of a preventive maintenance lubricant against adhesion of moist, freeflowing materials, containing extract of selective cleaning of oil fractions and asphalt. Gas oil of catalytic cracking is added having a boiling point of 190-300 degrees, with the following ratio of components (%): selective cleaning extract, 43-50; asphalt, 14-16; and gas oil of catalytic cracking, the remainder, Treating a surface with the proposed lubricant lowers the specific resistance to shift of rock compared with the prototype (g/cm/sup 2/): sand (moisture content, 18%) from 3.82 to 1.55; and clay (moisture content 16%), from 5.41 to 3.51.

  12. Progress in Tribological Properties of Nano-Composite Hard Coatings under Water Lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianzhi Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The tribological properties, under water-lubricated conditions, of three major nano-composite coatings, i.e., diamond-like carbon (DLC or a-C, amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx and transition metallic nitride-based (TiN-based, CrN-based, coatings are reviewed. The influences of microstructure (composition and architecture and test conditions (counterparts and friction parameters on their friction and wear behavior under water lubrication are systematically elucidated. In general, DLC and a-CNx coatings exhibit superior tribological performance under water lubrication due to the formation of the hydrophilic group and the lubricating layer with low shear strength, respectively. In contrast, TiN-based and CrN-based coatings present relatively poor tribological performance in pure water, but are expected to present promising applications in sea water because of their good corrosion resistance. No matter what kind of coatings, an appropriate selection of counterpart materials would make their water-lubricated tribological properties more prominent. Currently, Si-based materials are deemed as beneficial counterparts under water lubrication due to the formation of silica gel originating from the hydration of Si. In the meantime, the tribological properties of nano-composite coatings in water could be enhanced at appropriate normal load and sliding velocity due to mixed or hydrodynamic lubrication. At the end of this article, the main research that is now being developed concerning the development of nano-composite coatings under water lubrication is described synthetically.

  13. Oil and natural gas technology review-lubrication and lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moos, J

    1966-01-01

    A summary is presented of the advances made during 1967 in the following areas: production and transmission of natural gas; geosciences; drilling and production technology; secondary recovery; transportation by tanker, pipelines, and tank cars; storage; planning of refineries; control and automation; cracking and gasification of crude oil; separation and hydrogenation processes; petrochemicals; combustion technology; fuels and additives; air and water pollution control; production of lubricants; lubrication with mist, gas, and vapors; hydraulic fluids; lubricant additives; oxidation and aging of oils; greases; solid lubricants; bearings; machining; friction and wear; and changes in materials of construction. (220 refs.)

  14. Fault lubrication during earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Toro, G; Han, R; Hirose, T; De Paola, N; Nielsen, S; Mizoguchi, K; Ferri, F; Cocco, M; Shimamoto, T

    2011-03-24

    The determination of rock friction at seismic slip rates (about 1 m s(-1)) is of paramount importance in earthquake mechanics, as fault friction controls the stress drop, the mechanical work and the frictional heat generated during slip. Given the difficulty in determining friction by seismological methods, elucidating constraints are derived from experimental studies. Here we review a large set of published and unpublished experiments (∼300) performed in rotary shear apparatus at slip rates of 0.1-2.6 m s(-1). The experiments indicate a significant decrease in friction (of up to one order of magnitude), which we term fault lubrication, both for cohesive (silicate-built, quartz-built and carbonate-built) rocks and non-cohesive rocks (clay-rich, anhydrite, gypsum and dolomite gouges) typical of crustal seismogenic sources. The available mechanical work and the associated temperature rise in the slipping zone trigger a number of physicochemical processes (gelification, decarbonation and dehydration reactions, melting and so on) whose products are responsible for fault lubrication. The similarity between (1) experimental and natural fault products and (2) mechanical work measures resulting from these laboratory experiments and seismological estimates suggests that it is reasonable to extrapolate experimental data to conditions typical of earthquake nucleation depths (7-15 km). It seems that faults are lubricated during earthquakes, irrespective of the fault rock composition and of the specific weakening mechanism involved.

  15. Reciprocity in optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potton, R J

    2004-01-01

    The application of reciprocity principles in optics has a long history that goes back to Stokes, Lorentz, Helmholtz and others. Moreover, optical applications need to be seen in the context of applications of reciprocity in particle scattering, acoustics, seismology and the solution of inverse problems, generally. In some of these other fields vector wave propagation is, as it is in optics, of the essence. For this reason the simplified approach to light wave polarization developed by, and named for, Jones is explored initially to see how and to what extent it encompasses reciprocity. The characteristic matrix of a uniform dielectric layer, used in the analysis of interference filters and mirrors, is reciprocal except when the layer is magneto-optical. The way in which the reciprocal nature of a characteristic matrix can be recognized is discussed next. After this, work on the influence of more realistic attributes of a dielectric stack on reciprocity is reviewed. Some of the numerous technological applications of magneto-optic non-reciprocal media are identified and the potential of a new class of non-reciprocal components is briefly introduced. Finally, the extension of the classical reciprocity concept to systems containing components that have nonlinear optical response is briefly mentioned

  16. Effective lecture slides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jae Hoon

    1986-01-01

    Lawyers, with their constant opportunity for practice, show a talent for public oratory that few doctors can equal. However, the physician, despite his more modest and hesitant delivery, has one great advantage over the most experienced lawyer. He is allowed to use slides. Slides of good quality conceal defects in oratory and they make for a confident speaker and a contented audience. By contrast, smudged, complicated or ill prepared slides may draw attention to minor defects in delivery and make the audience inattentive.

  17. Wear Behavior of Medium Carbon Steel with Biomimetic Surface Under Starved Lubricated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihui; Shao, Feixian; Liang, Yunhong; Lin, Pengyu; Tong, Xin; Ren, Luquan

    2017-07-01

    Friction and wear under starved lubrication condition are both key life-related factors for mechanical performance of many structural parts. In this paper, different surface morphologies on medium carbon steel were fabricated using laser, inspired by the surface coupling effect of biological system. The friction and sliding wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens (characterized by convex and concave units on the specimen surface) were studied under starved lubrication condition. The stress distribution on different sliding surfaces under sliding friction was studied using finite element method. The results showed that the tribological performance of studied surfaces under starved lubrication condition depended not only on the surface morphology but also on the structure of biomimetic units below surface (subsurface structure). The friction coefficient of biomimetic surface was effectively reduced by the concave unit depth, while the refined microstructure with higher hardness led to the much better wear resistance. In addition to lubricant reserving and wear debris trapping effect derived from the surface concave morphology, it was believed that the well-formed subsurface structure of biomimetic units could carry much heavy loads against tribopair, which enhanced the function of surface topography and resulted in complementary lubrication in the wear contact area. The uniform stress distribution on the entire biomimetic surface also played an important role in stabilizing the friction coefficient and reducing the wear cracks.

  18. Cooling lubricants; Kuehlschmierstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, W. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Breuer, D. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Blome, H. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Deininger, C. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Hahn, J.U. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Kleine, H. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Nies, E. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Pflaumbaum, W. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Stockmann, R. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Willert, G. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Inst. fuer Arbeitssicherheit, St. Augustin (Germany); Sonnenschein, G. [Maschinenbau- und Metall-Berufsgenossenschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    As a rule, the base substances used are certain liquid hydrocarbons from mineral oils as well as from native and synthetic oils. Through the addition of further substances the cooling lubricant takes on the particular qualities required for the use in question. Employees working with cooling lubricants are exposed to various hazards. The assessment of the concentrations at the work station is carried out on the basis of existing technical rules for contact with hazardous substances. However, the application/implementation of compulsory investigation and supervision in accordance with these rules is made difficult by the fact that cooling lubricants are, as a rule, made up of complicated compound mixtures. In addition to protecting employees from exposure to mists and vapours from the cooling lubricants, protection for the skin is also of particular importance. Cooling lubricants should not, if at all possible, be brought into contact with the skin. Cleansing the skin and skin care is just as important as changing working clothes regularly, and hygiene and cleanliness at the workplace. Unavoidable emissions are to be immediately collected at the point where they arise or are released and safely disposed of. This means taking into account all sources of emissions. The programme presented in this report therefore gives a very detailed account of the individual protective measures and provides recommendations for the design of technical protection facilities. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Als Basisstoffe dienen in der Regel bestimmte fluessige Kohlenwasserstoffverbindungen aus Mineraloelen sowie aus nativen oder synthetischen Oelen. Durch die Zugabe von weiteren Stoffen erlangt der Kuehlschmierstoff seine fuer den jeweiligen Anwendungsabfall geforderten Eigenschaften. Beschaeftigte, die mit Kuehlschmierstoffen umgehen, sind unterschiedliche Gefahren ausgesetzt. Die Beurteilung der Kuehlschmierstoffkonzentrationen in der Luft am Arbeitsplatz erfolgt auf der Grundlage bestehender

  19. Simulative Testing of Friction and Lubrication in Cold Forging of Steel and Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, Ermanno; Bay, Niels; Aida, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    torque during testing combined with an analysis of the sliding velocity distribution along the punch nose. The latter is determined by FE analysis of the test. Results show friction stress for unalloyed low C-steel provided with different types of lubricants, i.e. phosphate coating plus soap, phosphate...

  20. A mechanical model for surface layer formation on self-lubricating ceramic composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Jiupeng; Valefi, Mahdiar; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Schipper, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    To predict the thickness of a self-lubricating layer on the contact surface of ceramic composite material containing a soft phase during dry sliding test, a mechanical model was built to calculate the material transfer of the soft second phase in the composite to the surface. The tribological test,

  1. Experimental analysis of influence of different lubricants types on the multi-phase ironing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Djordjević

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at presenting results of an experimental analysis of the different types of lubricants influence on the multi-phase ironing process. Based on sliding of the metal strip between the two contact elements a special tribological model was adopted. The subject of experimental investigations was variations of the drawing force, contact pressure and the friction coefficient for each type of the applied lubricants. The ironing process was conducted in three-phases at the constant sliding velocity. The objective of this analysis was to compare all the applied lubricants in order to estimate their quality from the point of view of their applicability in the multi-phase ironing process.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT LUBRICANTS TYPES ON THE MULTI-PHASE IRONING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Djordjević

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at presenting results of an experimental analysis of the different types of lubricants influence on the multi-phase ironing process. Based on sliding of the metal strip between the two contact elements a special tribological model was adopted. The subject of experimental investigations was variations of the drawing force, contact pressure and the friction coefficient for each type of the applied lubricants. The ironing process was conducted in three-phases at the constant sliding velocity. The objective of this analysis was to compare all the applied lubricants in order to estimate their quality from the point of view of their applicability in the multi-phase ironing process.

  3. Reciprocating Linear Electric Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldowsky, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Features include structural simplicity and good force/displacement characteristics. Reciprocating motor has simple, rugged construction, relatively low reciprocating weight, improved power delivery, and improved force control. Wear reduced by use of magnetic bearings. Intended to provide drivers for long-lived Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, concept has less exotic applications, such as fuel pumps.

  4. The Structure of Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molm, Linda D.

    2010-01-01

    Reciprocity is one of the defining features of social exchange and social life, yet exchange theorists have tended to take it for granted. Drawing on work from a decade-long theoretical research program, I argue that reciprocity is structured and variable across different forms of exchange, that these variations in the structure of reciprocity…

  5. Elastohydrodynamics of a sliding, spinning and sedimenting cylinder near a soft wall

    OpenAIRE

    Salez, Thomas; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the motion of a fluid-immersed negatively buoyant particle in the vicinity of a thin compressible elastic wall, a situation that arises in a variety of technological and natural settings. We use scaling arguments to establish different regimes of sliding, and complement these estimates using thin-film lubrication dynamics to determine an asymptotic theory for the sedimentation, sliding, and spinning motions of a cylinder. The resulting theory takes the form of three coupled nonlin...

  6. Mailing microscope slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many insects feed agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants and cause millions of dollars of damage annually. Identification for some of these require the preparation of a microscope slide for examination. There are times when a microscope slide may need to be sent away to a speci...

  7. Self lubricating fluid bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapich, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    The invention concerns self lubricating fluid bearings, which are used in a shaft sealed system extending two regions. These regions contain fluids, which have to be isolated. A first seal is fluid tight for the first region between the carter shaft and the shaft. The second seal is fluid tight between the carter and the shaft, it communicates with the second region. The first fluid region is the environment surrounding the shaft carter. The second fluid region is a part of a nuclear reactor which contains the cooling fluid. The shaft is conceived to drive a reactor circulating and cooling fluid [fr

  8. Self-lubricating formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borzenko, V.A.; Koltovskiy, L.V.; Koshelyov, Yu.I.; Kuzovlyev, G.F.; Lebedyev, S.I.; Sitnikov, S.A.; Telegin, V.D.

    1979-12-30

    To improve operation of scrubbers that operate in crystallizers for deparaffinization of oil products, a formula is being suggested which contains siliceous fibers, and a type of thermoactive resin - phenol-formaldehyde laquer, with the following component ration (% weight): carbon fiber 20-25, siliceous fibers 20-30, dry lubricant 10-15, phenolformaldehyde laquer up to 100. Phys.-mech. characteristics are flexure, compression, Ak of the suggested and known compositions (kgs/cm/sup 2/) 2150-2450 and 2550-2700, 32-37 and 1750, 2150 and 27 operation resource 2100:2500 and 1400.

  9. Characteristics Study of In-Situ Capacitive Sensor for Monitoring Lubrication Oil Debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhibin; Wang, Yishou; Qing, Xinlin

    2017-12-08

    As an essential part of engine health monitoring (EHM), online lubrication oil debris monitoring has recently received great attention for the assessment of rotating and reciprocating parts in aero-engines, due to its high integration, low cost and safe characteristics. However, it is be a challenge to find a suitable sensor operating in such a complex environment. We present an unconventional novel approach, in which a cylinder capacitive sensor is designed and integrated with the pipeline of an engine lubrication system, so that the capacitive sensor can effectively detect changes in the lubrication oil condition. In this paper, an attempt to illustrate the performance characteristics of the developed cylinder capacitive sensor is made, through an experiment system that simulates a real scenario of a lubrication oil system. The main aim of the research was to qualitatively describe the relationship between the sensor parameter and the lubrication oil debris. In addition, the effect of the temperature and flow rate of the lubrication oil on capacitance change was performed by several experiments and we figured out a compensation method. The experimental results demonstrated that the cylinder capacitive sensor can potentially be used for lubrication oil debris monitoring of the health condition of an aero-engine.

  10. Direct observation of lubricant additives using tomography techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yunyun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Sanchez, Carlos [Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Parkinson, Dilworth Y. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Liang, Hong, E-mail: hliang@tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Lubricants play important roles in daily activities such as driving, walking, and cooking. The current understanding of mechanisms of lubrication, particularly in mechanical systems, has been limited by the lack of capability in direct observation. Here, we report an in situ approach to directly observe the motion of additive particles in grease under the influence of shear. Using the K-edge tomography technique, it is possible to detect particular additives in a grease and observe their distribution through 3D visualization. A commercial grease as a reference was studied with and without an inorganic additive of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} microparticles. The results showed that it was possible to identify these particles and track their movement. Under a shear stress, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles were found to adhere to the edge of calcium complex thickeners commonly used in grease. Due to sliding, the grease formed a film with increased density. This approach enables in-line monitoring of a lubricant and future investigation in mechanisms of lubrication.

  11. Composite Coatings with Ceramic Matrix Including Nanomaterials as Solid Lubricants for Oil-Less Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posmyk A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the theoretical basis of manufacturing and chosen applications of composite coatings with ceramic matrix containing nanomaterials as a solid lubricant (AHC+NL. From a theoretical point of view, in order to reduce the friction coefficient of sliding contacts, two materials are required, i.e. one with a high hardness and the other with low shear strength. In case of composite coatings AHC+NL the matrix is a very hard and wear resistant anodic oxide coating (AHC whereas the solid lubricant used is the nanomaterial (NL featuring a low shear strength such as glassy carbon nanotubes (GC. Friction coefficient of cast iron GJL-350 sliding against the coating itself is much higher (0.18-0.22 than when it slides against a composite coating (0.08-0.14. It is possible to reduce the friction due to the presence of carbon nanotubes, or metal nanowires.

  12. The Role of Solid Lubricants for Brake Friction Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Österle

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This review article comprises of three parts. Firstly, reports of brake manufacturers on the beneficial impact of solid lubricants for pad formulations are surveyed. Secondly, since tribofilms were identified to play a crucial role in friction stabilization and wear reduction, the knowledge about tribofilm structures formed during automotive braking was reviewed comprehensively. Finally, a model for simulating the sliding behavior of tribofilms is suggested and a review on modelling efforts with different model structures related to real tribofilms will be presented. Although the variety of friction composites involved in commercial brake systems is very broad, striking similarities were observed in respect to tribofilm nanostructures. Thus, a generalization of the tribofilm nanostructure is suggested and prerequisites for smooth sliding performance and minimal wear rates have been identified. A minimum of 13 vol % of soft inclusions embedded in an iron oxide based tribofilm is crucial for obtaining the desired properties. As long as the solid lubricants or their reaction products are softer than magnetite, the main constituent of the tribofilm, the model predicts smooth sliding and minimum wear.

  13. Synthetic lubricating oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Jurado, J

    1953-01-01

    A yellow solid petroleum paraffin d/sup 60/ 0.808, I number 3.5, average molecular weight 350, chlorinated and condensed with benzene, xylene, or naphthalene by the Friedel and Crafts reaction, in the presence of anhydrous AlCl/sub 3/ or activated Al, gave synthetic lubricating oils. Xylene was the preferred aromatic compound, naphthalene required the use of less completely chlorinated paraffin, benzene produced resins difficult to remove and gave darker oils with excessive green fluorescence. Activated Al rather than anhydrous AlCl/sub 3/ gave darker oils with higher viscosity and Conradson C values. Tar from the low-temperature distillation of lignite, used as a source of a paraffin fraction melting 40/sup 0/ to 48/sup 0/ (chlorinated to 26.5 percent Cl) and an aromatic fraction, 45 percent aromatic compounds by volume (mainly polysubstituted benzenes), I number 10, was converted to a similar synthetic lubricant with the following properties: Kinematic viscosity at 210/sup 0/ F., 50.4 centistokes; viscosity index, 92; Conradson C, 1.5 percent; solidification point, 9/sup 0/; S, 0.41 percent.

  14. Sliding friction of nanocomposite WC1-x/C coatings: transfer film and its influence on tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Gubisch, M; Spiess, L; Schaefer, J A

    2009-06-01

    The transfer film on steel spheres formed in reciprocating sliding against nanocomposite coatings based on nanocrystalline WC1-x in amorphous carbon matrix is characterized and correlated with the tribological properties measured by a precision microtribometer. With the presence of transfer film, a coefficient of friction approximately 0.13 and a depth wear rate approximately 0.35 x 10(-10) m/N.Pass were obtained. The central zone of the transfer film covering approximately 25% of the Hertz contact area is intact while cracks and wear debris are found in the vast peripheral area. It is also heavily oxidized due to the absence of carbon, which is located at the peripherals and acts as lubricants. We propose that the oxidation of WC and adhesion of the oxides to the surface of sphere is the main mechanism for the buildup of the transfer films. With the thickening of the film, the internal stress increases. Under the shear stress, spalling and cracking of the transfer film take place. The overall tribological performance of the coatings is therefore a competing process of buildup and spalling of transfer films.

  15. Friction-induced nano-structural evolution of graphene as a lubrication additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Mao, Junyuan; Li, Yingru; He, Yongyong; Luo, Jianbin

    2018-03-01

    Graphene has attracted enormous attention in the field of lubrication based on its excellent physical and chemical properties. Although many studies have obtained thermally or chemically- exfoliated graphene and investigated their wide and important application, few studies have reported their physical nano-structural evolution under friction. In this study, we investigated the lubrication properties of graphene additives with different layer numbers and interlayer spacing by exfoliating. The additives with a higher degrees of exfoliation changed to ordering under friction, and had better lubrication properties, while that with a lower degrees exhibited obvious structural defects and high friction. Therefore, the original degrees of exfoliation plays a key role in the structural evolution of graphene and superior lubrication can be achieved through the physical nano-structure changing to ordering, even graphitization. Furthermore, the ordered tribofilm on the frictional interfaces was parallel to the sliding direction, meaning the highly exfoliated graphene indeed reaching slippage between its layers, which wasn't experimentally discovered in previous studies. This work provides a new understanding of the relationship between friction-induced nano-structural evolution and lubrication properties of graphene as a lubrication additive, and has great potential for the structural design of graphene as a lubrication additive.

  16. Testing of newly developed functional surfaces under pure sliding conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godi, Alessandro; Mohaghegh, Kamran; Grønbæk, J.

    2013-01-01

    the surfaces in an industrial context. In this paper, a number of experimental tests were performed using a novel test rig, called axial sliding test, simulating the contact of surfaces under pure sliding conditions. The aim of the experiments is to evaluate the frictional behavior of a new typology...... of textured surfaces, the so-called multifunctional surfaces, characterized by a plateau area able to bear loads and a deterministic pattern of lubricant pockets. Six surface typologies, namely three multifunctional and three machined using classical processes, were chosen to slide against a mirror....... The results comparison showed clearly how employing multifunctional surfaces can reduce friction forces up to 50 % at high normal loads compared to regularly ground or turned surfaces. Friction coefficients approximately equal to 0.12 were found for classically machined surfaces, whereas the values were 0...

  17. Crystalline misfit-angle implications for solid sliding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manini, Nicola; Braun, O.M.

    2011-01-01

    For the contact of two finite portions of interacting rigid crystalline surfaces, we compute the pinning energy barrier dependency on the misfit angle and contact area. This simple model allows us to investigate a broad contact-size and angular range, thus obtaining the statistical properties of the energy barriers opposing sliding for a single asperity. These data are used to generate the distribution of static frictional thresholds for the contact of polycrystals, as in dry or even lubricated friction. This distribution is used as the input of a master equation to predict the sliding properties of macroscopic contacts. -- Highlights: → The pinning energy barrier depends on the misfit angle and contact area. → We compute this dependence for a idealized rigid model. → We obtain a distribution of static frictional thresholds. → It is used as input of a master-equation model for macroscopic surfaces in contact. → Overall we predict a transition from stick-slip to smooth sliding.

  18. Feasibility of Applying Controllable Lubrication to Dynamically Loaded Journal Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estupinan, Edgar Alberto; Santos, Ilmar

    2009-01-01

    A multibody dynamic model of the main mechanical components of a hermetic reciprocating compressor is presented in this work. Considering that some of the mechanical elements are interconnected via thin fluid films, the multibody dynamic model is coupled to the equations from the dynamics...... of the fluid films, based on fluid film theory. For a dynamically loaded journal bearing, the fluid film pressure distribution can be computed by numerically solving the Reynolds equation, by means of finite-difference method. Particularly, in this study the main focus is on the lubrication behavior...... and reaction forces in a reciprocating compressor have a cyclic behavior, periodic oil pressure injection rules based on the instantaneous crank angle and load bearing condition can be established. In this paper, several bearing configurations working under different oil pressure injection rules conditions...

  19. Attribution and reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebald, Alexander Christopher

    2010-01-01

    , in turn, influence behavior. Dufwenberg and Kirchsteiger [Dufwenberg, M., Kirchsteiger, G., 2004. A theory of sequential reciprocity. Games Econ. Behav. 47 (2), 268-298] formalize this empirical finding in their ‘theory of sequential reciprocity'. This paper extends their analysis by moves of chance. More...... precisely, an extended framework is presented which allows for the analysis of strategic interactions of reciprocal agents in situations in which material outcomes also depend on chance. Moves of chance influence the attribution of responsibilities, people's perceptions about the (un)kindness of others and......, hence, their reciprocal behavior. Furthermore, with the help of two applications it is demonstrated how this framework can be used to explain experimental findings showing that people react very differently in outcomewise-identical situations depending on the moves of chance involved....

  20. Mechanics of slide dams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.A.

    1970-01-01

    Studies which promote the use of nuclear energy for peaceful projects in engineering are sponsored by the Atomic Energy Commission under the Plowshare program. Specific projects being considered include the construction of harbors, canals, and dams. Of these projects, perhaps the most difficult to accomplish will be the latter. This paper which is in two parts considers the problems which are associated with the construction of slide dams with nuclear explosives. It examines first the characteristics of conventional earth and rock-fill dams which are based upon proven techniques developed after many years of experience. The characteristics of natural landslide dams are also briefly considered to identify potential problems that must be overcome by slide dam construction techniques. Second, the mechanics of slide dams as determined from small-scale laboratory studies are presented. It is concluded that slide dams can be constructed and that small-scale field tests and additional laboratory studies are justified. (author)

  1. Mechanics of slide dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, G A [Engineering, Agbabian-Jacobsen Associates, Los Angeles (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Studies which promote the use of nuclear energy for peaceful projects in engineering are sponsored by the Atomic Energy Commission under the Plowshare program. Specific projects being considered include the construction of harbors, canals, and dams. Of these projects, perhaps the most difficult to accomplish will be the latter. This paper which is in two parts considers the problems which are associated with the construction of slide dams with nuclear explosives. It examines first the characteristics of conventional earth and rock-fill dams which are based upon proven techniques developed after many years of experience. The characteristics of natural landslide dams are also briefly considered to identify potential problems that must be overcome by slide dam construction techniques. Second, the mechanics of slide dams as determined from small-scale laboratory studies are presented. It is concluded that slide dams can be constructed and that small-scale field tests and additional laboratory studies are justified. (author)

  2. Sliding mode control and observation

    CERN Document Server

    Shtessel, Yuri; Fridman, Leonid; Levant, Arie

    2014-01-01

    The sliding mode control methodology has proven effective in dealing with complex dynamical systems affected by disturbances, uncertainties and unmodeled dynamics. Robust control technology based on this methodology has been applied to many real-world problems, especially in the areas of aerospace control, electric power systems, electromechanical systems, and robotics. Sliding Mode Control and Observation represents the first textbook that starts with classical sliding mode control techniques and progresses toward newly developed higher-order sliding mode control and observation algorithms and their applications. The present volume addresses a range of sliding mode control issues, including: *Conventional sliding mode controller and observer design *Second-order sliding mode controllers and differentiators *Frequency domain analysis of conventional and second-order sliding mode controllers *Higher-order sliding mode controllers and differentiators *Higher-order sliding mode observers *Sliding mode disturbanc...

  3. The effect of graphene content and sliding speed on the wear mechanism of nickel–graphene nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algul, H., E-mail: halgul@sakarya.edu.tr; Tokur, M.; Ozcan, S.; Uysal, M.; Cetinkaya, T.; Akbulut, H.; Alp, A.

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphene reinforced nickel matrix composites were produced by pulse electroplating method at a constant current density of 5 A/dm{sup 2}. • Incorporating graphene refines the grain size and changes the microstructure of the coating. • Incorporating graphene greatly improves the friction reduction and wear resistance of the coating. • The nickel/graphene composite coating containing 500 mg/L graphene in the electrolyte showed the best results. - Abstract: Nickel–graphene metal matrix composite coatings were fabricated by pulse electrodeposition technique from a Watt's type electrolyte. Effect of the graphene concentration in the electrolyte on the microstructure, microhardness, tribological features of nanocomposite coatings were evaluated in details. Microhardness of the composite coating was measured using a Vicker's microhardness indenter. The surfaces of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Raman spectroscopy, EDS and XRD analysis were used to determine chemical composition and structure of composite coatings. The tribological behavior of the resultant composite coating was tested by a reciprocating ball-on disk method at constant load but varying sliding speeds for determination the wear loss and friction coefficient features against a counterface. The wear and friction variations of the electrodeposited nickel graphene nanocomposite coatings sliding against an M50 steel balls were carried out on a CSM Instrument. The friction and wear properties of the coatings were examined without any lubrication at room temperature in the ambient air. The change in wear mechanisms by changing graphene nanosheets content was also comprehensively studied.

  4. Tribological performance of Zinc soft metal coatings in solid lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash; Krishnan Anirudh, V.; Reddy Narala, Suresh Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Solid lubrication by soft coatings is an important technique for superior tribological performance in machine contacts involving high pressures. Coating with soft materials ensures that the subsurface machine component wear decreases, ensuring longer life. Several soft metal coatings have been studied but zinc coatings have not been studied much. This paper essentially deals with the soft coating by zinc through electroplating on hard surfaces, which are subsequently tested in sliding experiments for tribological performance. The hardness and film thickness values have been found out, the coefficient of friction of the zinc coating has been tested using a pin on disc wear testing machine and the results of the same have been presented.

  5. Micro-lubrication of Directionally Oriented Contact Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Maršálek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A description of the set of software tools for detailed computational modelling of thin lubrication layers behaviour is presented in this paper. Individual chapters outline reasons for realization of its each part, explain the functionality of each software tool and the given mathematical definition or digital implementation of all important equations or formulae. The following are examples of partial results of the analysis carried out and the resulting flow factors databases for some kinds of rough surfaces, together with an example of the analysis result of the connecting rod sliding bearing of supercharged internal combustion engine.

  6. Selected Landscape Plants. Slide Script.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Kevin

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with commercially important woody ornamental landscape plants. Included in the script are narrations for use with a total of 253 slides illustrating 92 different plants. Several slides are used to illustrate each plant: besides a view of…

  7. Investigation of Different Piston Ring Curvatures on Lubricant Transport along Cylinder Liner in Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Hannibal Christian; Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the hydrodynamic lubrication of the top compression piston ring in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine is presented. The groove mounted piston ring is driven by the reciprocal motion of the piston. The ring shape follows a circular geometry and the effect...

  8. Investigation of different piston ring curvatures on lubricant transport along cylinder liner in large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, H; Klit, P; Vølund, A

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the hydrodynamic lubrication of the top compression piston ring in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine is presented. The groove mounted piston ring is driven by the reciprocal motion of the piston. The ring shape follows a circular geometry and the effect...

  9. Dimensioning and design rules for sliding bearings; optimisation problems; Bemessungs- und Gestaltungsregeln fuer Gleitlager: Optimierungsfragen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, K. [Fachhochschule Duesseldorf (Germany); Fricke, J.

    2000-07-01

    Already in the design stage of sliding bearings, optimal conditions for operation at a later stage should be envisaged. The contribution presents hints for optimal design and calculation of radial and axial bearings, e.g. gap design, optimised supporting strength, friction loss and lubricant throughput, lubricant exchange and lubricant heat exchange, and improved control of internal lubricant flow. [German] Bei der Auslegung von Gleitlagern ist es von Interesse, moeglichst optimale Bedingungen fuer den spaeteren Betrieb zu schaffen. Im vorliegenden Beitrag werden einige bereits bekannte und auch neue Hinweise zur optimalen Gestaltung und Berechnung, sowohl fuer Radial- als auch Axiallager gegeben. Dies betreffen im wesentlichen: die Gestaltung des Spaltverlaufs, Empfehlungen zur Optimierung der Tragfaehigkeit, der Reibungsverluste und des Schmierstoffdurchsatzes, Hinweise zum Schmierstoff- bzw. Schmierstoff-Waermeaustausch und die Verbesserung der inneren Schmierstofffuehrung. (orig.)

  10. The Thermohydrodynamic Analysis of Sliding Bearing High-Speed Motorized Spindle by Rotor Dynamic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Songsheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This is paper presents thermohydrodynamic characteristics of high speed motorized spindle sliding bearing rotor system. The dynamic characteristic of the oil film bearing is affected by temperature increment, thereby affecting the high-speed spindle rotor system dynamics. This study applied the hydrodynamic lubrication theory, the influence of temperature on the viscosity of lubricating oil, associated with the bearing stiffness, oil film damping and other performance parameters, is considered in generalized Reynolds equation of oil film bearing. The theoretical model of the sliding bearing rotor system is established by using the transfer matrix method to analyze the dynamic characteristic and verified by experiments. The results show the high temperature environment in the motorized spindle and the friction of the bearing lead to oil temperature rise and viscosity reduction, which influences the bearing capacity, stiffness and damping, hence impact on the critical speeds and modal shapes of the sliding bearing rotor system.

  11. Effectiveness of solid lubricant coatings for friction in hard vacuum (10-9 tor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkin, B. I.; Lyubraskiy, I. M.; Udovenko, V. F.; Sentyurikhina, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    A study was made of the efficiency of solid lubricating coatings, based on MoS2 with various binders, during friction and under highvacuum conditions. Mass spectrometry was used for an analysis of the composition of the gas evolved from the coatings in the friction process. It is shown that the vacuum level, loading, and sliding velocity influence coating effectiveness. In the friction process the solid lubricant coatings yield characteristic decay products associated with the chemical nature of the binders. The mechanism of coating breakdown during friction is associated with the binder breakdown mechanism.

  12. Research on a lubricating grease print process for cylindrical cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, XianYan; Tan, XiaoYan

    2017-09-01

    In vehicle braking system and clutch system of transmission, there is always a kind of cylindrical component dose reciprocating motion. The main working method is the reciprocating motion between the rubber sealing parts and cylindrical parts, the main factor affects the service life of the product is the lubricating performance of the moving parts. So the lubricating performance between cylinders and rubber sealing rings is particularly important, same as the quality of the grease applies on the surface of the surface of cylinder. Traditional method of manually applying grease has some defects such as applying unevenly, applying tools like brush and cloth easily falls off and affect the cleanness of products, contact skin easily cause allergy, waste grease due to the uncontrollable of grease quantity using in applying, low efficiency of manual operation. An automatic, quantitative and high pressure applying equipment is introduced in this document to replace the traditional manually applying method, which can guarantee the applying quality of the grease which are painted on the surface of cylinder and bring economic benefits to the company.

  13. Friction Properties of Polished Cvd Diamond Films Sliding against Different Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zichao; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties, like the well-known extreme hardness, low coefficient of friction and high chemical inertness, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have found applications as a hard coating for drawing dies. The surface roughness of the diamond films is one of the most important attributes to the drawing dies. In this paper, the effects of different surface roughnesses on the friction properties of diamond films have been experimentally studied. Diamond films were fabricated using hot filament CVD. The WC-Co (Co 6wt.%) drawing dies were used as substrates. A gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen gas was used as the feedstock gas. The CVD diamond films were polished using mechanical polishing. Polished diamond films with three different surface roughnesses, as well as the unpolished diamond film, were fabricated in order to study the tribological performance between the CVD diamond films and different metals with oil lubrication. The unpolished and polished CVD diamond films are characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), surface profilometer, Raman spectrum and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The friction examinations were carried out by using a ball-on-plate type reciprocating friction tester. Low carbide steel, stainless steel, copper and aluminum materials were used as counterpart balls. Based on this study, the results presented the friction coefficients between the polished CVD films and different metals. The friction tests demonstrate that the smooth surface finish of CVD diamond films is beneficial for reducing their friction coefficients. The diamond films exhibit low friction coefficients when slid against the stainless steel balls and low carbide steel ball, lower than that slid against copper ball and aluminum ball, attributed to the higher ductility of copper and aluminum causing larger amount of wear debris adhering to the sliding interface and higher adhesive

  14. Contribution of fine filler particles to energy dissipation during wet sliding of elastomer compounds on a rough surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    Elastomer compounds reinforced with precipitated silica can exhibit elevated wet sliding friction on a rough surface in comparison with corresponding compounds filled with carbon black particles. The underlying mechanism is currently not well understood. To unravel this puzzling observation, the variation of wet sliding friction with filler volume fraction is examined at the sliding speed of the order of 1 m s -1 under different lubrication conditions. Depending on the lubrication liquid-water or ethanol-a compound that shows both higher bulk hysteretic loss and lower modulus does not always exhibit a higher wet sliding friction. A thorough characterization of the bulk rheology of the compounds investigated fails to provide the rationale for such behaviour, thus constituting an apparent violation of the conventional viscoelastic understanding of rubber friction on a rough surface. On the other hand, the detected lowering of friction when the lubrication liquid is changed from water to ethanol resembles the effect of liquid medium on interfacial adhesion reported in the literature. Hence, it is suggested that a stronger interfacial attractive interaction should exist in water between the road surface and silica particles on the compound surface immediately next to the road surface. This should be related to the elevated wet sliding friction detected for silica-filled compounds under water lubrication

  15. Reciprocity in electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunning, J.; Goodman, P.

    1991-01-01

    The symmetry of reciprocity is reviewed in the context of relativistic quantum mechanics with the specific aim of relating to P-C-T invariances. From this investigation global time reversal is found to be sufficient condition for reciprocity to hold in scattering from a vector potential. Elastic scattering is assumed. The paper also deals exclusively with the scattering of a charged particle by an electromagnetic field. The present proof is free from assumptions of small angle scattering and from restrictions on z-dependent terms in the scattering equation, and by avoiding S-matrix theory is thought to be accessible to undergraduate teaching. 9 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  16. Reciprocity in electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunning, J.; Goodman, P.

    1992-01-01

    The symmetry of reciprocity is reviewed in the context of relativistic quantum mechanics with the specific aim of relating to C, P and T invariances. From this investigation global time reversal is found to be a sufficient condition for reciprocity to hold in scattering from a vector potential. The present proof is free from assumptions of small-angle scattering and from restrictions on z-dependent terms in the scattering equation, and by avoiding S-matrix theory is thought to be accessible to undergraduate teaching. (orig.)

  17. Linear and Non-Linear Control Techniques Applied to Actively Lubricated Journal Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2003-01-01

    The main objectives of actively lubricated bearings are the simultaneous reduction of wear and vibration between rotating and stationary machinery parts. For reducing wear and dissipating vibration energy until certain limits, one can count with the conventional hydrodynamic lubrication. For furt......The main objectives of actively lubricated bearings are the simultaneous reduction of wear and vibration between rotating and stationary machinery parts. For reducing wear and dissipating vibration energy until certain limits, one can count with the conventional hydrodynamic lubrication....... For further reduction of shaft vibrations one can count with the active lubrication action, which is based on injecting pressurised oil into the bearing gap through orifices machined in the bearing sliding surface. The design and efficiency of some linear (PD, PI and PID) and non-linear controllers, applied...... vibration reduction of unbalance response of a rigid rotor, where the PD and the non-linear P controllers show better performance for the frequency range of study (0 to 80 Hz). The feasibility of eliminating rotor-bearing instabilities (phenomena of whirl) by using active lubrication is also investigated...

  18. A friction model for cold forging of aluminum, steel and stainless steel provided with conversion coating and solid film lubricant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Eriksen, Morten; Tan, Xincai

    2011-01-01

    Adopting a simulative tribology test system for cold forging the friction stress for aluminum, steel and stainless steel provided with typical lubricants for cold forging has been determined for varying normal pressure, surface expansion, sliding length and tool/work piece interface temperature...

  19. In Situ Analysis of the Tribochemical Films Formed by SiC Sliding Against Mo in Partial Pressures of SO2, O2, and H2S Gases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singer, I. L; Le Mogne, T; Donnet, C; Martin, J. M

    1996-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were used to identify gas reaction layers and tribochemical films formed during reciprocating sliding tests in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) tribometer...

  20. Pulsed Plasma Lubrication Device and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Bickler, Donald B. (Inventor); D'Agostino, Saverio A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a lubrication device comprising a solid lubricant disposed between and in contact with a first electrode and a second electrode dimensioned and arranged such that application of an electric potential between the first electrode and the second electrode sufficient to produce an electric arc between the first electrode and the second electrode to produce a plasma in an ambient atmosphere at an ambient pressure which vaporizes at least a portion of the solid lubricant to produce a vapor stream comprising the solid lubricant. Methods to lubricate a surface utilizing the lubrication device in-situ are also disclosed.

  1. Upgrading the lubricity of bio-oil via homogeneous catalytic esterification under vacuum distillation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yufu; Zheng, Xiaojing; Peng, Yubin; Li, Bao; Hu, Xianguo; Yin, Yanguo

    2015-01-01

    In order to accelerate the application of bio-oil in the internal combustion engines, homogeneous catalytic esterification technology under vacuum distillation conditions was used to upgrade the crude bio-oil. The lubricities of the crude bio-oil (BO) and refined bio-oil with homogeneous catalytic esterification (RBO hce ) or refined bio-oil without catalyst but with distillation operation (RBO wc ) were evaluated by a high frequency reciprocating test rig according to the ASTM D 6079 standard. The basic physiochemical properties and components of the bio-oils were analyzed. The surface morphology, contents and chemical valence of active elements on the worn surfaces were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that RBO hce has better lubricities than those of BO, but RBO wc has worse lubricities than those of BO. The tribological mechanisms of the bio-oils are attributed to the combined actions of lubricating films and factors that will break the film. Compared with BO, plenty of phenols in RBO wc results in corrosion of the substrate and destroys the integrity of the lubricating films, which is responsible for its corrosive wear. However, more esters and alkanes in RBO hce contribute to forming a complete boundary lubricating film on the rubbed surfaces which result in its excellent antifriction and antiwear properties. - Highlights: • Refined bio-oil was prepared through homogeneous catalytic esterification technology. • Properties of the bio-oils before and after refining were assessed by HFRR. • Refined bio-oil showed better lubricities than crude bio-oil. • More esters and alkanes in refined bio-oil contributed to forming superior boundary lubrication

  2. Wear reduction through piezoelectrically-assisted ultrasonic lubrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Sheng; J Dapino, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Traditional lubricants are undesirable in harsh aerospace environments and certain automotive applications. Ultrasonic vibrations can be used to reduce and modulate the effective friction coefficient between two sliding surfaces. This paper investigates the relationship between friction force reduction and wear reduction in ultrasonically lubricated surfaces. A pin-on-disc tribometer is modified through the addition of a piezoelectric transducer which vibrates the pin at 22 kHz in the direction perpendicular to the rotating disc surface. Friction and wear metrics including volume loss, surface roughness, friction forces and apparent stick-slip effects are measured without and with ultrasonic vibrations at three different sliding velocities. SEM imaging and 3D profilometry are used to characterize the wear surfaces and guide model development. Over the range of speeds considered, ultrasonic vibrations reduce the effective friction force up to 62% along with a wear reduction of up to 49%. A simple cube model previously developed to quantify friction force reduction is implemented which describes wear reduction within 15% of the experimental data. (paper)

  3. Soluble, Exfoliated Two-Dimensional Nanosheets as Excellent Aqueous Lubricants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenling; Cao, Yanlin; Tian, Pengyi; Guo, Fei; Tian, Yu; Zheng, Wen; Ji, Xuqiang; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-11-30

    Dispersion in water of two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets is conducive to their practical applications in fundamental science communities due to their abundance, low cost, and ecofriendliness. However, it is difficult to achieve stable aqueous 2D material suspensions because of the intrinsic hydrophobic properties of the layered materials. Here, we report an effective and economic way of producing various 2D nanosheets (h-BN, MoS 2 , MoSe 2 , WS 2 , and graphene) as aqueous dispersions using carbon quantum dots (CQDs) as exfoliation agents and stabilizers. The dispersion was prepared through a liquid phase exfoliation. The as-synthesized stable 2D nanosheets based dispersions were characterized by UV-vis, HRTEM, AFM, Raman, XPS, and XRD. The solutions based on CQD decorated 2D nanosheets were utilized as aqueous lubricants, which realized a friction coefficient as low as 0.02 and even achieved a superlubricity under certain working conditions. The excellent lubricating properties were attributed to the synergetic effects of the 2D nanosheets and CQDs, such as good dispersion stability and easy-sliding interlayer structure. This work thus proposes a novel strategy for the design and preparation of high-performance water based green lubricants.

  4. Hidden patterns of reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syi

    2014-03-21

    Reciprocity can help the evolution of cooperation. To model both types of reciprocity, we need the concept of strategy. In the case of direct reciprocity there are four second-order action rules (Simple Tit-for-tat, Contrite Tit-for-tat, Pavlov, and Grim Trigger), which are able to promote cooperation. In the case of indirect reciprocity the key component of cooperation is the assessment rule. There are, again, four elementary second-order assessment rules (Image Scoring, Simple Standing, Stern Judging, and Shunning). The eight concepts can be formalized in an ontologically thin way we need only an action predicate and a value function, two agent concepts, and the constant of goodness. The formalism helps us to discover that the action and assessment rules can be paired, and that they show the same patterns. The logic of these patterns can be interpreted with the concept of punishment that has an inherent paradoxical nature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, J. [ORNL; Viola, M. B. [General Motors Company

    2013-10-31

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  6. Top-of-Rail lubricant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A.; Boparai, A. S.

    2000-07-14

    Analysis of the volatile and semivolatile fractions collected after use of the TOR lubricant indicated that other than contaminants in the collection laboratory, no compounds on the EPA's Target Compound Lists (Tables 2 and 5) were detected in these fractions. The data of these qualitative analyses, given in the various tables in the text, indicate only the relative amounts of the tentatively identified compounds. The authors recommend that quantitative analysis be performed on the volatile and semivolatile fractions to allow confirmation of the tentatively identified compounds and to obtain absolute amounts of the detected compounds. Additionally, the semivolatile fraction should be analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify compounds that are not chromatographable under the temperature program used for determination of semivolatile compounds. Introducing the top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant into the wheel/rail interface results in a reduction of almost 60% of lateral friction force over the forces encountered under dry conditions. This reveals good potential for energy savings, as well as wear reduction, for railroad companies. In TOR lubrication, an increase in the angle of attack and axle load results in increased lateral friction and rate of lubricant consumption. The most efficient TOR lubricant quantity to be used in the wheel/rail interface must be calculated precisely according to the number of cars, axle loads, train speed, and angle of attack.

  7. When you lubricate well, you go well? A cause analysis of damages on bearer rings at a hydrogen compressor recently brought into service with the aid of monitoring the lubricating points of cylinder liners; Wer gut schmiert, der gut faehrt? Ursachenanalyse an Tragringschaeden bei einem neu in Betrieb genommenen Wasserstoffverdichter mit Hilfe einer Zylinderschmierstellenueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, Lars [Bayernoil Raffineriegesellschaft mbH, Neustadt a.d. Donau (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    For humans the blood circuit transports the ''lifeblood''. It supplies the body with the different essential nutrients and disposes adverse waste. The circuit of lubricant in recip compressors has quiet similar functions. It provides all relevant components with lubricant. This lubricant circuit supplies i.a. the crosshead slide way and bearings, where a hydrodynamic flooding is created. At the same time frictional heat is conducted and pollutions as well as deposits are washed away. But especially for recip compressors there is also another lubricating system, which is barely applied in the real operating process. It is about the supply of the packing glands and the piston liners with lubricant inside the compression chamber at ''wet running machines''. In the case of the lubricant supply at cylinder liners the lubricating oil is dispatched to the appropriate areas by an external lubricating system, which consists of a reservoir and an oil pump. This is a loss lubrication, i.e. the used lubricate is transported into the process by the transfer medium. The mechanical quality of this lubricating system can have great influence on the durability of bearer rings and sealing rings in a recip compressor. Especially the homogeneity of the dispatched lubricating oil amount and the absolute dispatched amount are two very important factors. The absolute amount is within the range of cm{sup 3} per hour. The influences of the cylinder liner lubricant supply on the durability of piston seal rings and bearer rings are shown with the concrete example of one recip compressor. Analytical measures to clearly detect such damages at the bearer rings are disclosed, just as which possibility there is to measure the low quantity of lubricant to the cylinder liners reliably. Furthermore a solution is presented, which allows the solid operation of the compressor.

  8. Screening the performance of lubricants for ironing of stainless steel with a strip reduction test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Bay, Niels; Andersen, Mette Merete

    1997-01-01

    A laboratory strip reduction test simulating the tribological conditions of an ironing process is proposed. The test is capable of simulating varying process conditions such as reduction, drawing speed, tool temperature and sliding length. The test makes it possible to quantify the onset of break...... of breakdown of the lubricant film and subsequent galling. Experimental investigations of stainless steel show the influence of varying process conditions and the performance of different lubricants.......A laboratory strip reduction test simulating the tribological conditions of an ironing process is proposed. The test is capable of simulating varying process conditions such as reduction, drawing speed, tool temperature and sliding length. The test makes it possible to quantify the onset...

  9. TiN-Coating Effects on Stainless Steel Tribological Behavior Under Dry and Lubricated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liqiang; Yang, Huisheng; Pang, Xiaolu; Gao, Kewei; Tran, Hai T.; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2014-04-01

    The tribological properties of magnetron sputtered titanium nitride coating on 316L steel, sliding against Si3N4 ceramic ball under dry friction and synthetic perspiration lubrication, were investigated. The morphology of the worn surface and the elemental composition of the wear debris were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. TiN coatings and 316L stainless steel had better tribological properties under synthetic perspiration lubrication than under dry friction. Among the three tested materials (316L, 1.6 and 2.4 μm TiN coatings), 2.4 μm TiN coating exhibits the best wear resistance. The difference in wear damage of the three materials is essentially due to the wear mechanisms. For the TiN coating, the damage is attributed to abrasive wear under synthetic perspiration lubrication and the complex interactive mechanisms, including abrasive and adhesive wear, along with plastic deformation, under dry friction.

  10. RADIAL FORCE IMPACT ON THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT AND TEMPERATURE OF A SELF-LUBRICATING PLAIN BEARING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Bojić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-lubricating bearings are available in spherical, plain, flanged journal, and rod end bearing configurations. They were originally developed to eliminate the need for re-lubrication, to provide lower torque and to solve application problems where the conventional metal-to-metal bearings would not perform satisfactorily, for instance, in the presence of high frequency vibrations. Among the dominant tribological parameters of the self-lubricating bearing, two could be singled out: the coefficient of friction and temperature. To determine these parameters, an experimental method was applied in this paper. By using this method, the coefficient of friction and temperature were identified and their correlation was established. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of radial force on tribological parameters in order to predict the behavior of sliding bearings with graphite in real operating conditions.

  11. Development of lubricant test for punching and blanking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam

    2001-01-01

    The background for development of new lubricants Requirements to lubricant test for punching Methods of evaluating lubricants Test equipment developed at DTU Conclusion.......The background for development of new lubricants Requirements to lubricant test for punching Methods of evaluating lubricants Test equipment developed at DTU Conclusion....

  12. Tethered Lubricants for Small Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynden A. Archer

    2006-01-09

    The objective of this research project is two-fold. First, to fundamentally understand friction and relaxation dynamics of polymer chains near surfaces; and second, to develop novel self-lubricated substrates suitable for MEMS devices. During the three-year performance period of this study the PI and his students have shown using theory and experiments that systematic introduction of disorder into tethered lubricant coatings (e.g. by using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) mixtures or SAMs with nonlinear, branched architectures) can be used to significantly reduce the friction coefficient of a surface. They have also developed a simple procedure based on dielectric spectroscopy for quantifying the effect of surface disorder on molecular relaxation in lubricant coatings. Details of research accomplishments in each area of the project are described in the body of the report.

  13. Micro-tribological properties of hydroxyapatite-based composites in dry sliding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Zhi; Liu, Yong; Liu, Bowei; Liu, Meiling

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The micro-tribological properties of HA-based composites were investigated. ► The micro-scale test is greatly benefits to the analyses of the wear mechanism. ► A higher speed benefits the formation of the lubricating layer, when high in Cu. ► With increasing Cu, the wear mechanism shift from abrasive wear to adhesive wear. - Abstract: The micro-tribological properties of hydroxyapatite-based composites sliding against alumina balls were investigated by a ball-on-block tribometer. Surface properties of the HA-based composites were measured and examined by using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Running-in behavior during sliding tests was studied as a function of surface properties. The effects of copper fibers, initial surface roughness, and sliding velocity on the friction coefficient and the wear resistance were discussed. Results show that a lubricant layer benefits the tribological properties of the composites. With the increasing of Cu, the lubricant layer is more stable, and resistant to increase of the sliding velocity. At a Cu content of 15%, the wear curve is very stable even at a velocity of 900 rpm. The wear mechanism also changes from abrasive wear to adhesive wear. A model was quoted to describe the relationship between the wear resistant and the load

  14. Numerical analysis of all flow state lubrication performance of water-lubricated thrust bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Xiao; Deng Liping; Huang Wei; Liu Lizhi; Zhao Xuecen; Liu Songya

    2015-01-01

    A model enabling all different flow state lubrication performance simulation and analysis for water-lubricated thrust bearing is presented, considering the temperature influence and elastic deformation. Lubrication state in the model is changed directly from laminar lubrication to turbulent lubrication once Reynolds number exceeds the critical Reynolds number. The model is numerically solved and results show that temperature variation is too little to influence the lubrication performance; the elastic deformation can slightly reduce the load carrying capacity of the thrust bearing; and the turbulent lubrication can remarkably improve the load carrying capacity. (authors)

  15. Empirical Investigation of Electricity Self-Generation in a Lubricated Sliding–Rolling Contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ščepanskis, Mihails; Gould, Benjamin; Greco, Aaron

    2017-07-20

    The paper reports the empirical observations of voltage generation in a lubricated tribocontact with different oils altering load, sliding and temperature. The investigation is done in the context of research of the root cause of white etching cracks (WEC) failure in bearings. Tested oils of different additive packages found completely different electrical behavior. The oil, which is known to produce WECs in laboratory tests, demonstrated non-zero voltage generation

  16. Rotor Rolling over a Water-Lubricated Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatokhin, V. F.

    2018-02-01

    The article presents the results of studying the effect of forces associated with secondary damping coefficients (gyroscopic forces) on the development of asynchronous rolling of the rotor over a water-lubricated bearing. The damping forces act against the background of other exciting forces in the rotor-supports system, in particular, the exciting forces of contact interaction between the rotor and bearing. The article considers a rotor resting on supports rubbing against the bearing and the occurrence of self-excited vibration in the form of asynchronous roll-over. The rotor supports are made in the form of plain-type water-lubricated bearings. The plain-type bearing's lubrication stiffness and damping forces are determined using the wellknown algorithms taking into account the physical properties of water serving as lubrication of the bearing. The bearing sliding pair is composed of refractory materials. The lubrication layer in such bearings is thinner than that used in oil-lubricated bearings with white metal lining, and there is no white metal layer in waterlubricated bearings. In case of possible deviations from normal operation of the installation, the rotating rotor comes into direct contact with the liner's rigid body. Unsteady vibrations are modeled using a specially developed software package for calculating the vibration of rotors that rub against the turbine (pump) stator elements. The stiffness of the bearing liner with the stator support structure is specified by a dependence in the force-deformation coordinate axes. In modeling the effect of damping forces, the time moment corresponding to the onset of asynchronous rolling-over with growing vibration amplitudes is used as the assessment criterion. With a longer period of time taken for the rolling-over to develop, it becomes possible to take the necessary measures in response to actuation of the equipment set safety system, which require certain time for implementing them. It is shown that the

  17. Laboratory services series: a lubrication program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, H.B.; Miller, T.L.

    1976-05-01

    The diversity of equipment and operating conditions at a major national research and development laboratory requires a systematic, effective lubrication program. The various phases of this program and the techniques employed in formulating and administering this program are discussed under the following topics: Equipment Identification, Lubrication Requirements, Assortment of Lubricants, Personnel, and Scheduling.

  18. Laboratory services series: a lubrication program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, H.B.; Miller, T.L.

    1976-05-01

    The diversity of equipment and operating conditions at a major national research and development laboratory requires a systematic, effective lubrication program. The various phases of this program and the techniques employed in formulating and administering this program are discussed under the following topics: Equipment Identification, Lubrication Requirements, Assortment of Lubricants, Personnel, and Scheduling

  19. A new lubricant carrier for metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Bay, Niels; Tang, Peter Torben

    2009-01-01

    A lubricant carrier for metal forming processes is developed. Surfaces with pores of micrometer size for entrapping lubricant are generated by electrochemical deposition of an alloy, consisting of two immiscible metals, of which one metal subsequently is etched away leaving 5 mu m layers with a s...... extrusion at high reduction and excessive stroke comparing with conventionally lubrication using phosphate coating and soap....

  20. Solid lubricants in the power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaensheimer, J.

    1981-01-01

    Example application are first outlined, followed by descriptions of inorganic solid lubricants and plastics. Waxes, soaps and salts are discussed. Notes for usage are given. Solid lubricants in oils and greases are comprehensively described, followed by the sections entitled Solid lubricants for gearboxes . References to samples, tests, standards and bibliography make up the conclusion. (orig.) [de

  1. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for medical... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...

  2. Tribological Performance of M50-Ag-TiC Self-Lubricating Composites at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyan; Shi, Xiaoliang; Huang, Yuchun; Liu, Xiyao; Li, Ben

    2018-05-01

    M50 steel is widely used in aero-engine bearings and other high-temperature bearings. However, the poor wear of M50 steel resistance restrains its further applications. In this paper, the sliding tribological behaviors of M50 steel, M50-Ag composites (MAC) and M50-Ag-TiC composites (MATC) against Si3N4 ball were investigated from 150 to 600 °C at 15 N-0.2 m/s. MATC showed better tribological properties in comparison with M50 and MAC. Especially at 450 °C, MATC obtained the lowest friction coefficient of 0.15 and smallest wear rate of 1.3 × 10-5 mm3 N-1 m-1. The excellent tribological performance of MATC during the friction test was attributed to the continuous lubricating film containing lubricant Ag and reinforcement TiC, as well as the subsurface compacted layer that could well support the lubricating film to prevent it from being destroyed. At 600 °C, because of the tribo-chemical reaction between Ag and Mo oxide during sliding process, the newly formed Ag2MoO4 lubricating film was well spread out on the friction surface, which could continuously improve the tribological behavior of MATC. This investigation was meaningful to improve the anti-friction and wear resistance of M50 matrix bearing over a wide temperature range.

  3. Presentation = Speech + Slides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derik Badman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Back in October, Aaron Schmidt posted “HOWTO give a good presentation” to his blog walking paper. His second bullet point of “thoughts” on good presentations is: Please don’t fill your slides with words. Find some relevant and pretty pictures to support what you’re saying. You can use the pictures to remind yourself what you’re going [...

  4. Reciprocity, World Prices and Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis; Woodland, Alan D.

    We examine in detail the circumstances under which reciprocity, as defined in Bagwell and Staiger (1999), leads to fixed world prices. We show that a change of tariffs satisfying reciprocity does not necessarily imply constant world prices in a world of many goods and countries. While it is possi...... of all countries, independently of whether world prices change and independently of the relative numbers of goods and countries.......We examine in detail the circumstances under which reciprocity, as defined in Bagwell and Staiger (1999), leads to fixed world prices. We show that a change of tariffs satisfying reciprocity does not necessarily imply constant world prices in a world of many goods and countries. While...... it is possible to find tariff reforms that are consistent with both reciprocity and constant world prices, these reforms do not follow from the reciprocity condition, but rather from the requirement of unchanged world prices. We propose an alternative reciprocity rule that is guaranteed to raise the welfare...

  5. Reciprocity relations in aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaslet, Max A; Spreiter, John R

    1953-01-01

    Reverse flow theorems in aerodynamics are shown to be based on the same general concepts involved in many reciprocity theorems in the physical sciences. Reciprocal theorems for both steady and unsteady motion are found as a logical consequence of this approach. No restrictions on wing plan form or flight Mach number are made beyond those required in linearized compressible-flow analysis. A number of examples are listed, including general integral theorems for lifting, rolling, and pitching wings and for wings in nonuniform downwash fields. Correspondence is also established between the buildup of circulation with time of a wing starting impulsively from rest and the buildup of lift of the same wing moving in the reverse direction into a sharp-edged gust.

  6. Reciprocity in Vector Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Green’s Theorem to the left hand side of Equation (3.2) converts it to a surface integral that vanishes for the impedance boundary conditions one...There are situations where this assumption does not hold, such as at boundaries between layers or in an inhomogeneous layer , because the density gradient...instead of requiring one model run for each source location. Application of the vector-scalar reciprocity principle is demonstrated with analytic

  7. Corrupt reciprocity: An experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Graf Lambsdorff, Johann; Frank, Björn

    2007-01-01

    We let students play a corruption game, embedded into a variant of the ultimatum game. Those allotted the role of public servants chose between whistleblowing, opportunism and reciprocity by delivery (of a contract) and those acting as businesspeople chose how to frame the game and whether to blow the whistle. While opportunism and abstaining from whistleblowing is the Nash equilibrium, another likely outcome was that businesspeople allocate resources to punishing public servants for non-deli...

  8. Cutting efficiency of Reciproc and waveOne reciprocating instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca; Giansiracusa Rubini, Alessio; Grande, Nicola M; Testarelli, Luca; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cutting efficiency of 2 new reciprocating instruments, Reciproc and WaveOne. Twenty-four new Reciproc R25 and 24 new WaveOne Primary files were activated by using a torque-controlled motor (Silver Reciproc) and divided into 4 groups (n = 12): group 1, Reciproc activated by Reciproc ALL program; group 2, Reciproc activated by WaveOne ALL program; group 3, WaveOne activated by Reciproc ALL program; and group 4, WaveOne activated by WaveOne ALL program. The device used for the cutting test consisted of a main frame to which a mobile plastic support for the handpiece is connected and a stainless steel block containing a Plexiglas block (inPlexiglass, Rome, Italy) against which the cutting efficiency of the instruments was tested. The length of the block cut in 1 minute was measured in a computerized program with a precision of 0.1 mm. Means and standard deviations of each group were calculated, and data were statistically analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test (P cutting efficiency than WaveOne Primary for both the movements used (P cutting efficiency than WaveOne instruments used with their proper reciprocating motion (P .05). Reciproc instruments demonstrated statistically higher cutting efficiency than WaveOne instruments. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Green Lubricants for Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The increasing focus on legislation towards diminishing the impact on working environment as well as external environment has driven efforts to develop new, environmentally benign lubricants for metal forming. The present paper gives an overview of these efforts to substitute environmentally...

  10. Analysis of Thermo-Mechanical Distortions in Sliding Components : An ALE Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owczarek, P.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    A numerical technique for analysis of heat transfer and thermal distortion in reciprocating sliding components is proposed. In this paper we utilize the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) description where the mesh displacement can be controlled independently from the material displacement. A

  11. Tribological properties of ceramics evaluated at low sliding speeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Kano, Shigeki

    1998-03-01

    Low speed tribological properties of stainless steel, ceramics and hard metals were investigated in air at room temperature and in nitrogen atmosphere at high temperature for the consideration of sliding type support structure in intermediate heat exchanger of fast reactor. The following results are obtained. (1) In low speed friction measurements in air at room temperature, friction coefficients of ceramics and hard metals were smaller than that of stainless steel. Surface roughness of the specimens increased the friction force and silicon carbide showed the smallest friction coefficient among the specimens with mirror polished surface. (2) From the results of friction measurements at various sliding speeds in air at room temperature, friction coefficients of ceramics and hard metals were always stable and lower than that of stainless steel. Among ceramics, PSZ showed the smallest friction and silicon carbide showed the most stable friction at any sliding speeds. (3) Friction coefficients of silicon carbide and silicon nitride in nitrogen atmosphere at high temperature showed low values as measured at room temperature. On the contrary, friction coefficient of stainless steel measured in nitrogen atmosphere at high temperature were higher than that measured at room temperature, over 1. (4) In the reciprocal sliding tests in nitrogen atmosphere at high temperature, friction coefficient of stainless steel were over 1. On the contrary, the friction coefficients of ceramics were less than 1 instead of chipping during the slidings. (author)

  12. Self lubrication of bitumen froth in pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper I will review the main properties of water lubricated pipelines and explain some new features which have emerged from studies of self-lubrication of Syncrudes' bitumen froth. When heavy oils are lubricated with water, the water and oil are continuously injected into a pipeline and the water is stable when in a lubricating sheath around the oil core. In the case of bitumen froth obtained from the Alberta tar sands, the water is dispersed in the bitumen and it is liberated at the wall under shear; water injection is not necessary because the froth is self-lubricating

  13. Effect of friction on the slide guide in an elevator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X-g; Li, H-g; Meng, G [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: xingang.zhang@gmail.com

    2008-02-15

    The slide guide in an elevator moves in contact against the guide rail. This kind of surface contact exhibits a highly non-linear hysteretic friction behaviour which hampers greatly the riding quality of the elevator system. This paper presents an experimental investigation on this type of phenomenon through measuring the contact friction force between the interface of the slide guide and the rail under different combination of input parameters. The experiment shows frictional behaviours including pre-sliding/gross-sliding regimes, transition behaviour between them, time lag, and velocity (weakening and strengthening) dependence. In addition, it is found that different materials in contact, lubrications and friction duration have strong impacts on evaluation of the friction characteristics. The observations in the test provide an insight into relationships between different friction behaviours and can be used to validate the appropriate theoretical friction models.

  14. The Effect of Reciprocity Norms on Moral Judgment and Causal Attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    Kindergarten children and adults were shown slides with an accompanying taped soundtrack which portrayed reciprocal and nonreciprocal aggressive and prosocial interactions. Following each episode, subjects' evaluations of the actor and their attributions concerning the cause of his behavior were obtained. (Author/JMB)

  15. Sand Particles Impact on the Tribological Behavior of Sliding Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldajah Saud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lubricant contaminants cause severe problems to machines. Substantial research has been conducted to study the impact of such contaminates on the tribological performance of lubricated contacts. The primary goal of such studies is to find solutions to avoid the dirtiest cause of damaging machines’ parts and to reduce energy consumption and maintenance costs. The current study investigates the tribological behavior of contaminated lubricated contacts; the contaminants considered in this research are sand particles. The effect of the sand particles concentration levels on friction and wear of a tribological system under sliding contact was studied. Three different concentration levels were tested; 5%, 10% and 15%.The experimental program was carried out using an in-house built ball on disc machine at room temperature, constant normal load, constant speed, constant running time and constant travelling distance. Results showed that both friction coefficient and wear volume of the contacting surfaces are dependent on the concentration level of the sand particles. Both friction coefficient and wear volume increased by increasing the sand particles concentration. SEM was utilized to study the wear mechanisms of the contacting surfaces, it was found that the dominant wear mechanism in all cases was abrasive wear.

  16. SLIDES: a program to draw slides and posters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, R.; Schofield, J.

    1977-04-01

    SLIDES is a program which takes text and commands as input and prepares lettered slides and posters. When run on the time-sharing computer, the program can display its output on an interactive graphics terminal; in batch, it can direct its graphical output to a variety of plotters. The program uses DISSPLA graphical subroutines and standard ANL plotter subroutines. This report contains material written for the beginning user, who should be able to produce useful slides or posters by following the examples. This report also serves as a complete reference for the SLIDES program. 4 figures.

  17. The Wear Characteristics of Heat Treated Manganese Phosphate Coating Applied to AlSi D2 Steel with Oil Lubricant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Alankaram

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, in the area of material design conversion coatings play an important role in the applications where temperature, corrosion, oxidation and wear come in to play. Wear of metals occurs when relative motion between counter-surfaces takes place, leading to physical or chemical destruction of the original top layers. In this study, the tribological behaviour of heat treated Manganese phosphate coatings on AISI D2 steel with oil lubricant was investigated. The Surface morphology of manganese phosphate coatings was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX .The wear tests were performed in a pin on disk apparatus as per ASTM G-99 Standard. The wear resistance of the coated steel was evaluated through pin on disc test using a sliding velocity of 3.0m/s under Constant loads of 40 N and 100 N with in controlled condition of temperature and humidity. The Coefficient of friction and wear rate were evaluated. Wear pattern of Manganese phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant, Heat treated Manganese phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant were captured using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The results of the wear test established that the heat treated manganese phosphate coating with oil lubricant exhibited the lowest average coefficient of friction and the lowest wear loss up to 6583 m sliding distance under 40 N load and 3000 m sliding distance even under 100 N load respectively. The Wear volume and temperature rise in heat treated Manganese Phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant is lesser than the Manganese Phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant

  18. De-Lubrication Behavior Of Novel EBS Based Admixed Lubricant In Aluminum P/M Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh M.C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research is to develop a novel lubricant for Al-Cu-Mg P/M alloy and to address the effects of the lubricant and compaction pressure on sintered properties. A lubricant mixture consisting of Ethylene Bis Stearamide, Zn-Stearate, and fatty acid was newly developed in this study, and the de-lubrication behavior was compared with that of other commercial lubricants, such as Ethylene Bis Stearamide, Zn-Stearate, and Al-Stearate. Density and transverse rupture strength of sintered materials with each lubricant were examined, respectively. The microstructural analysis was conducted using optical microscope.

  19. State-of-the-Art of Extreme Pressure Lubrication Realized with the High Thermal Diffusivity of Liquid Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haijiang; Tian, Pengyi; Lu, Hongyu; Jia, Wenpeng; Du, Haodong; Zhang, Xiangjun; Li, Qunyang; Tian, Yu

    2017-02-15

    Sliding between two objects under very high load generally involves direct solid-solid contact at molecular/atomic level, the mechanism of which is far from clearly disclosed yet. Those microscopic solid-solid contacts could easily lead to local melting of rough surfaces. At extreme conditions, this local melting could propagate to the seizure and welding of the entire interface. Traditionally, the microscopic solid-solid contact is alleviated by various lubricants and additives based on their improved mechanical properties. In this work, we realized the state-of-the-art of extreme pressure lubrication by utilizing the high thermal diffusivity of liquid metal, 2 orders of magnitude higher than general organic lubricants. The extreme pressure lubrication property of gallium based liquid metal (GBLM) was compared with gear oil and poly-α-olefin in a four-ball test. The liquid metal lubricates very well at an extremely high load (10 kN, the maximum capability of a four-ball tester) at a rotation speed of 1800 rpm for a duration of several minutes, much better than traditional organic lubricants which typically break down within seconds at a load of a few kN. Our comparative experiments and analysis showed that this superextreme pressure lubrication capability of GBLM was attributed to the synergetic effect of the ultrafast heat dissipation of GBLM and the low friction coefficient of FeGa 3 tribo-film. The present work demonstrated a novel way of improving lubrication capability by enhancing the lubricant thermal properties, which might lead to mechanical systems with much higher reliability.

  20. In situ observation of a hydrogel-glass interface during sliding friction

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Tetsurou; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Ahmed, Jamil; Kamita, Gen; Yashima, Shintaro; Furukawa, Yuichiro; Ota, Yuko; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Gong, Jian Ping

    2014-01-01

    Direct observation of hydrogel contact with a solid surface in water is indispensable for understanding the friction, lubrication, and adhesion of hydrogels under water. However, this is a difficult task since the refractive index of hydrogels is very close to that of water. In this paper, we present a novel method to in situ observe the macroscopic contact of hydrogels with a solid surface based on the principle of critical refraction. This method was applied to investigate the sliding frict...

  1. Identifying lubricant options for compressor bearing designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnaz, J.; Seeton, C.; Dixon, L.

    2017-08-01

    Today’s refrigeration and air conditioning market is not only driven by the environmental aspects of the refrigerants, but also by the energy efficiency and reliability of system operation. Numerous types of compressor designs are used in refrigeration and air conditioning applications which means that different bearings are used; and in some cases, multiple bearing types within a single compressor. Since only one lubricant is used, it is important to try to optimize the lubricant to meet the various demands and requirements for operation. This optimization entails investigating different types of lubricant chemistries, viscosities, and various formulation options. What makes evaluating these options more challenging is the refrigerant which changes the properties of the lubricant delivered to the bearing. Once the lubricant and refrigerant interaction are understood, through various test methods, then work can start on collaborating with compressor engineers on identifying the lubricant chemistry and formulation options. These interaction properties are important to the design engineer to make decisions on the adequacy of the lubricant before compressor tests are started. This paper will discuss the process to evaluate lubricants for various types of compressors and bearing design with focus on what’s needed for current refrigerant trends. In addition, the paper will show how the lubricant chemistry choice can be manipulated through understanding of the bearing design and knowledge of interaction with the refrigerant to maximize performance. Emphasis will be placed on evaluation of synthetic lubricants for both natural and synthetic low GWP refrigerants.

  2. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

    2006-03-31

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. This represents a substantial (30-40%) reduction of the ringpack friction alone. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. Further improvements via piston, lubricant, and surface designs offer additional opportunities. Tests of low-friction lubricants are in progress and preliminary results are very promising. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction

  3. Advanced `KS-6` dry type lubricant for aluminum sheet forming; Arumi ban seikeiyo koseino kokei junkatsuzai `KS-5`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, K.; Sugita, T.; Imamura, Y. [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    The advanced `KS-5` dry film type lubricant was developed for press forming of aluminum sheets. KS-5 uses water- soluble resin poly-alkylene-oxide superior in formability, weldability and adhesivity, and contains higher fatty-acid soap as oil solvent to improve a formability. The verification test result of KS-5 is as follows. Both stretchability and drawability were confirmed through a ball head stretching test and a cylinder drawing test as formability test, respectively, and a forming height more than that of mild steel sheets was obtained by using the solid lubricant showing a high stretchability. The drawability of nearly 80% of that of mild steel sheets was also obtained showing a high formability. Since the amount of the solid lubricant has reciprocal effect on the formability and degreasing property, it is important to select the suitable amount of the solid lubricant according to use conditions. Lubricants generally deteriorate a spot weldability, however, this lubricant has no practical problems by coating rust preventive oil. 3 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Single Common Powertrain Lubricant Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    this particular shortcoming of the current MIL specification lubricant lineup . Perameter: Units: Average Std. Dev. Average Std. Dev. Average...variations of each 0.2-second time block of all engagements. Test Number The run number listed on this report is a random number and is not sequential ...is not sequential . Only SwRI® can link this run number to JDQ-96, L0254054, August 3, 2010. Page 2 of3 John Deere JDQ-96 Performed using 1400

  5. Solid Lubricated Rolling Element Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-15

    lubricant into uneven patches of varnish . This varnish , along with the file-like action of the exposed ball carbides on the relatively softer races, can...its structure. Fluorine , one of the most reactive elements, reacts with graphite without combustion from about 790’F to 1022°F, forming a grey-colored...to allow for molding and machining after molding. 0 Method 2 (Hughes) Impregnating these dense weaves with a Thermid 600 polyimide varnish

  6. Transition to thermohydrodynamic lubrication problem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ciuperca, I. S.; Feireisl, Eduard; Jai, M.; Petrov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 3 (2017), s. 391-414 ISSN 0033-569X EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : free boundary problems * lubrication * asymptotic approach * Stokes equation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.788, year: 2016 http://www.ams.org/journals/qam/2017-75-03/S0033-569X-2017-01468-X/

  7. Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Alice Mae

    This research investigated biofluid lubrication related to artificial joints using tribological and rheological approaches. Biofluids studied here represent two categories of fluids, base fluids and nanostructured biofluids. Base fluids were studied through comparison of synthetic fluids (simulated body fluid and hyaluronic acid) as well as natural biofluids (from dogs, horses, and humans) in terms of viscosity and fluid shear stress. The nano-structured biofluids were formed using molecules having well-defined shapes. Understanding nano-structured biofluids leads to new ways of design and synthesis of biofluids that are beneficial for artificial joint performance. Experimental approaches were utilized in the present research. This includes basic analysis of biofluids' property, such as viscosity, fluid shear stress, and shear rate using rheological experiments. Tribological investigation and surface characterization were conducted in order to understand effects of molecular and nanostructures on fluid lubrication. Workpiece surface structure and wear mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The surface topography was examined using a profilometer. The results demonstrated that with the adding of solid additives, such as crown ether or fullerene acted as rough as the other solids in the 3-body wear systems. In addition, the fullerene supplied low friction and low wear, which designates the lubrication purpose of this particular particle system. This dissertation is constructed of six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction to body fluids, as mentioned earlier. After Chapter II, it examines the motivation and approach of the present research, Chapter III discusses the experimental approaches, including materials, experimental setup, and conditions. In Chapter IV, lubrication properties of various fluids are discussed. The tribological properties and performance nanostructured biofluids are

  8. Used lubricants and ecological problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimov, A.Yu.; Dzhamalov, A.A.; Lashkhi, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    This planet is undergoing a severe ecological crisis. The consequent problems include not only how to prevent the destruction of contemporary civilization, but also how to preserve mankind as a biological species. In the onset of this crisis, used lubricants (ULs) play a role that is by no means the least important. Every year, the worldwide discharge of petroleum products to the biosphere is approximately 6 million tonnes, of which more than 50% consists of ULs. The ecologically dangerous components of both commercial lubricants and used lubricants are the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are originally present in crude oil; polyhalobiphenyls, mainly polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) of anthropogenic origin; sulfur- and chlorine-containing additives; a number of biocides; organic compounds of metals (lead, barium, antimony, zinc); and nitrites. These substances are distributed in the atmosphere, water, and soil, entering the food chain and appearing in foodstuffs. Moreover, hydrocarbons of petroleum and synthetic oils with a low degree of biodegradability (10-30%) accumulate in the environment and may shift the ecological equilibrium (accelerated multiplication and mutation of microorganisms that assimilate petroleum products). 32 refs., 1 fig

  9. Leaping shampoo glides on a lubricating air layer

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, S.

    2013-06-10

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one\\'s hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine bubbles. The resulting microbubble sizes suggest this air layer is of submicron thickness. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding.

  10. Leaping shampoo glides on a lubricating air layer

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, S.; Li, Erqiang; Marston, J. O.; Bonito, A.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2013-01-01

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine bubbles. The resulting microbubble sizes suggest this air layer is of submicron thickness. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding.

  11. Leaping shampoo glides on a lubricating air layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Li, E. Q.; Marston, J. O.; Bonito, A.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2013-06-01

    When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet glide on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine bubbles. The resulting microbubble sizes suggest this air layer is of submicron thickness. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding.

  12. Slippery self-lubricating polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizenberg, Joanna; Aizenberg, Michael; Cui, Jiaxi; Dunn, Stuart; Hatton, Benjamin; Howell, Caitlin; Kim, Philseok; Wong, Tak Sing; Yao, Xi

    2018-05-08

    The present disclosure describes a strategy to create self-healing, slippery self-lubricating polymers. Lubricating liquids with affinities to polymers can be utilized to get absorbed within the polymer and form a lubricant layer (of the lubricating liquid) on the polymer. The lubricant layer can repel a wide range of materials, including simple and complex fluids (water, hydrocarbons, crude oil and bodily fluids), restore liquid-repellency after physical damage, and resist ice, microorganisms and insects adhesion. Some exemplary applications where self-lubricating polymers will be useful include energy-efficient, friction-reduction fluid handling and transportation, medical devices, anti-icing, optical sensing, and as self-cleaning, and anti-fouling materials operating in extreme environments.

  13. No sliding in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtengel, Kirill; Nayak, Chetan; Bishara, Waheb; Chamon, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    In this letter, we analyse the following apparent paradox: as has been recently proved by Hastings (2004 Phys. Rev. 69 104431), under a general set of conditions, if a local Hamiltonian has a spectral gap above its (unique) ground state (GS), all connected equal-time correlation functions of local operators decay exponentially with distance. On the other hand, statistical mechanics provides us with examples of 3D models displaying so-called sliding phases (O'Hern et al 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 2745) which are characterized by the algebraic decay of correlations within 2D layers and exponential decay in the third direction. Interpreting this third direction as time would imply a gap in the corresponding (2+1)D quantum Hamiltonian which would seemingly contradict Hastings' theorem. The resolution of this paradox lies in the non-locality of such a quantum Hamiltonian. (letter to the editor)

  14. Reciprocal Relationships: Something for Everyone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumosa, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Reciprocal relationships based on mutual goals, respect and trust are key to maintaining working relationships and getting reliable research results. Yet relationship building is not a concept taught in academia. These skills are often learned the hard way, with singular solutions found for case-by-case scenarios. Several journeys to identify the components, barriers and rewards of reciprocal relationships are discussed.

  15. Structural Behaviour of Reciprocal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the comparison of several two-dimensional and three-dimensional reciprocal configurations. The goal of such comparison is to analyse the structural behaviour when changing the geometric parameters used to describe the geometry of reciprocal structures....

  16. A Review of Ionic Liquid Lubricants

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony E. Somers; Patrick C. Howlett; Douglas R. MacFarlane; Maria Forsyth

    2013-01-01

    Due to ever increasing demands on lubricants, such as increased service intervals, reduced volumes and reduced emissions, there is a need to develop new lubricants and improved wear additives. Ionic liquids (ILs) are room temperature molten salts that have recently been shown to offer many advantages in this area. The application of ILs as lubricants in a diverse range of systems has found that these materials can show remarkable protection against wear and significantly reduce friction in th...

  17. Lubricant test for punching and blanking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2003-01-01

    Punching/blanking is one of the tribologically wise most severe metal forming processes.Insu $cient lubrication leads to heavy pick-up of work piece material on the punch stem,bad tolerances and eventual breakdown of the punch due to excessive backstroke force,especially in case of tribologically...... of alternative lubricants the present paper describes a new lubricant test for punching....

  18. Lubrication for hot working of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotlib, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    The isothermal lubrication of the following composition is suggested, wt. %: aluminium powder 4-6, iron scale 15-25, vitreous enamel up to 100. The lubricant improves forming and decreases the danger of the metal fracture when titanium alloys working. It is advisable to use the suggested lubrication when stamping thin-walled products of titanium alloys at the blank temperature from 700 to 1000 deg C [ru

  19. Belief in reciprocity in a Chinese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Jianxin

    2012-08-01

    Belief in reciprocity refers to a personally internalized faith in the reciprocity norm: that people will return positive and negative interactions or favors in kind. The current study aims to examine the relationship between belief in reciprocity and altruism among a Chinese sample. The Personal Norm of Reciprocity Scale, Trait Forgiveness Scale, Prosocial Tendency Measure, and Altruism Scale were used to assess extent of belief in reciprocity, forgiveness, and prosocial motivation, respectively, among 204 Chinese undergraduates. The results indicated that belief in reciprocity was a partially negative, but not neutral, reciprocity norm for Chinese people. Specifically, belief in reciprocity was positively related to negative reciprocity, but not significantly related to positive reciprocity. Moreover, belief in reciprocity was negatively related to both prosocial tendency and altruistic motivation. The results also indicated that forgiveness largely mediated the effect of belief in reciprocity on altruism. Finally, the implications and limitations of the current study were discussed.

  20. The effect of transient conditions on synovial fluid protein aggregation lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myant, Connor William; Cann, Philippa

    2014-06-01

    Little is known about the prevailing lubrication mechanisms in artificial articular joints and the way in which these mechanisms determine implant performance. The authors propose that interfacial film formation is determined by rheological changes local to the contact and is driven by aggregation of synovial fluid proteins within the contact inlet region. A direct relationship between contact film thickness and size of the protein aggregation within the inlet region has been observed. In this paper the latest experimental observations of the protein aggregation mechanism are presented for conditions which more closely mimic joint kinematics and loading. Lubricant films were measured for a series of bovine calf serum solutions for CoCrMo femoral component sliding against a glass disc. An optical interferometric apparatus was employed to study the effects of transient motion on lubricant film formation. Central film thickness was measured as a function of time for a series of transient entrainment conditions; start-up motion, steady-state and non-steady-state uni-directional sliding, and bi-directional sliding. The size of the inlet aggregations was found to be dependent upon the type of transient condition. Thick protective protein films were observed to build up within the main contact region for all uni-directional tests. In contrast the inlet aggregation was not observed for bi-directional tests. Contact film thickness and wear was found to be directly proportional to the presence of the inlet protein phase. The inlet phase and contact films were found to be fragile when disrupted by surface scratches or subjected to reversal of the sliding direction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fabrics coated with lubricated nanostructures display robust omniphobicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shillingford, Cicely; MacCallum, Noah; Wong, Tak-Sing; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The development of a stain-resistant and pressure-stable textile is desirable for consumer and industrial applications alike, yet it remains a challenge that current technologies have been unable to fully address. Traditional superhydrophobic surfaces, inspired by the lotus plant, are characterized by two main components: hydrophobic chemical functionalization and surface roughness. While this approach produces water-resistant surfaces, these materials have critical weaknesses that hinder their practical utility, in particular as robust stain-free fabrics. For example, traditional superhydrophobic surfaces fail (i.e., become stained) when exposed to low-surface-tension liquids, under pressure when impacted by a high-velocity stream of water (e.g., rain), and when exposed to physical forces such as abrasion and twisting. We have recently introduced slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS), a self-healing, pressure-tolerant and omniphobic surface, to address these issues. Herein we present the rational design and optimization of nanostructured lubricant-infused fabrics and demonstrate markedly improved performance over traditional superhydrophobic textile treatments: SLIPS-functionalized cotton and polyester fabrics exhibit decreased contact angle hysteresis and sliding angles, omni-repellent properties against various fluids including polar and nonpolar liquids, pressure tolerance and mechanical robustness, all of which are not readily achievable with the state-of-the-art superhydrophobic coatings. (paper)

  2. Fabrics coated with lubricated nanostructures display robust omniphobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillingford, Cicely; MacCallum, Noah; Wong, Tak-Sing; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The development of a stain-resistant and pressure-stable textile is desirable for consumer and industrial applications alike, yet it remains a challenge that current technologies have been unable to fully address. Traditional superhydrophobic surfaces, inspired by the lotus plant, are characterized by two main components: hydrophobic chemical functionalization and surface roughness. While this approach produces water-resistant surfaces, these materials have critical weaknesses that hinder their practical utility, in particular as robust stain-free fabrics. For example, traditional superhydrophobic surfaces fail (i.e., become stained) when exposed to low-surface-tension liquids, under pressure when impacted by a high-velocity stream of water (e.g., rain), and when exposed to physical forces such as abrasion and twisting. We have recently introduced slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS), a self-healing, pressure-tolerant and omniphobic surface, to address these issues. Herein we present the rational design and optimization of nanostructured lubricant-infused fabrics and demonstrate markedly improved performance over traditional superhydrophobic textile treatments: SLIPS-functionalized cotton and polyester fabrics exhibit decreased contact angle hysteresis and sliding angles, omni-repellent properties against various fluids including polar and nonpolar liquids, pressure tolerance and mechanical robustness, all of which are not readily achievable with the state-of-the-art superhydrophobic coatings.

  3. Reciprocating linear motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldowsky, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reciprocating linear motor is formed with a pair of ring-shaped permanent magnets having opposite radial polarizations, held axially apart by a nonmagnetic yoke, which serves as an axially displaceable armature assembly. A pair of annularly wound coils having axial lengths which differ from the axial lengths of the permanent magnets are serially coupled together in mutual opposition and positioned with an outer cylindrical core in axial symmetry about the armature assembly. One embodiment includes a second pair of annularly wound coils serially coupled together in mutual opposition and an inner cylindrical core positioned in axial symmetry inside the armature radially opposite to the first pair of coils. Application of a potential difference across a serial connection of the two pairs of coils creates a current flow perpendicular to the magnetic field created by the armature magnets, thereby causing limited linear displacement of the magnets relative to the coils.

  4. Development of High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhattacharya, Rabi

    1999-01-01

    ... environment. To test this approach, UES and Cleveland State University have conducted experiments to form cesium oxythiotungstate, a high temperature lubricant, on Inconel 718 surface from composite coatings...

  5. Ecotoxicological study of used lubricating oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, P.K.; Chan, W.L.; Wang, J.; Wong, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    Used lubricating oil is more toxic than crude oil and fuel oil since it contains comparatively high levels of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). No detail toxicological study has been conducted to evaluate the hazards of used lubricating oil to the environment. This study reports a battery of bioassays using bacteria (Microtox test and Mutatox test), algae, amphipod and shrimp larvae to determine the toxicity of water soluble fraction of used lubricating oil. The results will be used to formulate a complete and extensive ecotoxicological assessment of the impacts of used lubricating oil on aquatic environment

  6. Slide Buyers Guide. 1974 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaurier, Nancy

    Designed for studio art instructors, museum education programs, public libraries, high school teachers, and those who buy slides for teaching art history at the college level, this guide lists sources of slides in the United States and over 20 foreign countries. All U.S. sources are listed first, commercial sources are alphabetical by name and…

  7. On the lubrication mechanism of detonation-synthesis nanodiamond additives in lubricant composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelevskii, A. A.; Esina, A. V.; Voznyakovskii, A. P.; Fadin, Yu. A.

    2017-09-01

    The lubrication of detonation-synthesis diamond additives in lubricant composites has been discussed. The mechanism of interaction between nanodiamonds and friction surface has been shown to depend on the applied load. Two models of the lubrication of nanodiamonds and the conditions for their validity have also been proposed.

  8. Lubrication from mixture of boric acid with oils and greases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali

    1995-01-01

    Lubricating compositions including crystalline boric acid and a base lubricant selected from oils, greases and the like. The lubricity of conventional oils and greases can also be improved by adding concentrates of boric acid.

  9. Strip reduction testing of lubricants developed during ENFORM project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gazvoda, S.; Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Olsson, David Dam

    Strip reduction testing of lubricants developed during ENFORM project. Experiments were conducted with the strip reduction test [1] in order to classify experimental lubricants, developed during concerned project. One reference lubricant was used during testing....

  10. Tribological properties of Ti-doped DLC coatings under ionic liquids lubricated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xin; Xia Yanqiu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, titanium doped diamond-like carbon (Ti-DLC) coatings were prepared onto AISI 52100 steel substrates using medium frequency magnetic sputtering process, and were analyzed using the Raman and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Two kinds of 1,3-dialkyl imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) were synthesized and evaluated as lubricants for Ti-DLC/steel contacts at room temperature, and PFPE as comparison lubricant. The tribological properties of the ILs were investigated using a ball-on-disk type UMT reciprocating friction tester. The results indicated that the ILs have excellent friction-reducing properties, the friction coefficient kept at a relatively stable value of 0.07-0.06, which was reduced approximately by 47% compared with perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The worn surfaces of Ti-DLC coatings were observed and analyzed using a MICROXAM-3D non-contact surface profiler, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Ti-DLC coatings using ionic liquids lubricating systems are considered as potential lubricating system in vacuum and space moving friction pairs.

  11. The Lubrication Ability of Ionic Liquids as Additives for Wind Turbine Gearboxes Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Gutierrez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The amount of energy that can be gained from the wind is unlimited, unlike current energy sources such as fossil and coal. While there is an important push in the use of wind energy, gears and bearing components of the turbines often fail due to contact fatigue, causing costly repairs and downtime. The objective of this work is to investigate the potential tribological benefits of two phosphonium-based ionic liquids (ILs as additives to a synthetic lubricant without additives and to a fully formulated and commercially available wind turbine oil. In this work, AISI 52100 steel disks were tested in a ball-on-flat reciprocating tribometer against AISI 440C steel balls. Surface finish also affects the tribological properties of gear surfaces. In order to understand the combined effect of using the ILs with surface finish, two surface finishes were also used in this study. Adding ILs to the commercial available or synthetic lubricant reduced the wear scar diameter for both surface finishes. This decrease was particularly important for trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl amide, where a wear reduction of the steel disk around 20% and 23% is reached when 5 wt % of this IL is added to the commercially available lubricant and to the synthetic lubricant without additives, respectively.

  12. Nuclear fuel handling grapple carriage with self-lubricating bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, E.E.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a nuclear fuel handling grapple carriage having a bearing with a lubricant reservoir that is capable of being refilled when the bearing and reservoir are submerged in a lubricant pool. The lubricant reservoir supplies lubricant to the bearing while the bearing allows a small amount of lubricant to leak passed appropriately placed seals creating a positive out flow of lubricant thereby preventing foreign material from entering the bearing

  13. Improved Ionic Liquids as Space Lubricants, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ionic liquids are candidate lubricant materials. However for application in low temperature space mechanisms their lubrication performance needs to be enhanced. UES...

  14. Aminodisulfides as additives to lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balin, A.I.; Tarasevich, V.B.; Veretenova, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    A study was carried out and tehcnology developed for producing sulfur-nitrogen containing additives of the type of aminodisulfide by interaction of beta, beta-dichlordialkyl (aryl) disulfides with diethanolamine in a medium of sulfur-diethanolamine. The 2,2'-bis-(diethanol)-dialkyl(aryl) disulfides obtained do not hydrolyze in aqueous soltuions of alkalis, exhibit rather high antiscoring properties and are recommended for tests as active additives of high pressure to SOZH and technological lubricants of the oil and emulsion types.

  15. Preliminary Evaluation of PS300: A New Self-Lubricating High Temperature Composite Coating for Use to 800 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, C.; Edmonds, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces PS300, a plasma sprayed, self-lubricating composite coating for use in sliding contacts at temperatures to 800 C. PS300 is a metal bonded chrome oxide coating with silver and BaF2/CaF2 eutectic solid lubricant additives. PS300 is similar to PS200, a chromium carbide based coating, which is currently being investigated for a variety of tribological applications. In pin-on-disk testing up to 650 C, PS300 exhibited comparable friction and wear properties to PS200. The PS300 matrix, which is predominantly chromium oxide rather than chromium carbide, does not require diamond grinding and polishes readily with silicon carbide abrasives greatly reducing manufacturing costs compared to PS200. It is anticipated that PS300 has potential for sliding bearing and seal applications in both aerospace and general industry.

  16. Mechanical strength and thermophysical properties of PM212: A high temperature self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Phillip M.; Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Martineau, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A powder metallurgy composite, PM212, composed of metal bonded chromium carbide and solid lubricants is shown to be self-lubricating to a maximum application temperature of 900 C. The high temperature compressive strength, tensile strength, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity data needed to design PM212 sliding contact bearings and seals are reported for sintered and isostatically pressed (HIPed) versions of PM212. Other properties presented are room temperature density, hardness, and elastic modulus. In general, both versions appear to have adequate strength to be considered as sliding contact bearing materials, but the HIPed version, which is fully dense, is much stronger than the sintered version which contains about 20 percent pore volume. The sintered material is less costly to make, but the HIPed version is better where high compressive strength is important.

  17. The influence of the vane on the lubrication characteristics between the vane and the rolling piston of a rotary compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Ihn Sung; Jung, Jae Youn

    2006-01-01

    The rolling piston type rotary compressor has been widely used for refrigeration and air -conditioning systems due to its compactness and high-speed operation. The present analysis is part of a research program directed toward maximizing the advantages of refrigerant compressors. The study of lubrication characteristics in the critical sliding component is essential for the design of refrigerant compressors. Therefore, theoretical investigation of the lubrication characteristics of a rotary compressor being used for refrigeration and air-conditioning systems was investigated. The Newton-Raphson method was used for a partial elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis between the vane and the rolling piston of a rotary compressor. The results demonstrated that the vane thickness and the center line position of the vane significantly influenced the friction force and the energy loss between the vane and the rolling piston

  18. Electromagnetic reciprocity in antenna theory

    CERN Document Server

    Stumpf, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The reciprocity theorem is among the most intriguing concepts in wave field theory and has become an integral part of almost all standard textbooks on electromagnetic (EM) theory. This book makes use of the theorem to quantitatively describe EM interactions concerning general multiport antenna systems. It covers a general reciprocity-based description of antenna systems, their EM scattering properties, and further related aspects. Beginning with an introduction to the subject, Electromagnetic Reciprocity in Antenna Theory provides readers first with the basic prerequisites before offering coverage of the equivalent multiport circuit antenna representations, EM coupling between multiport antenna systems and their EM interactions with scatterers, accompanied with the corresponding EM compensation theorems.

  19. Reciprocity principle in duct acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.-C.

    1979-01-01

    Various reciprocity relations in duct acoustics have been derived on the basis of the spatial reciprocity principle implied in Green's functions for linear waves. The derivation includes the reciprocity relations between mode conversion coefficients for reflection and transmission in nonuniform ducts, and the relation between the radiation of a mode from an arbitrarily terminated duct and the absorption of an externally incident plane wave by the duct. Such relations are well defined as long as the systems remain linear, regardless of acoustic properties of duct nonuniformities which cause the mode conversions.

  20. The Lubricity of Glycerol and its Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, J.

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol has been recognised as an excellent diesel fuel and lubricant. It is a liquid that can originate from the transesterification of plant oil that also results in plant oil metyl (or ethyl) ester (biodiesel). Machine elements lubricated by glycerol show very low friction, in fact lower than...

  1. Ionic liquids as lubricant additives: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yan; Qu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In pursuit of energy efficiency and durability throughout human history, advances in lubricants have always played important roles. Ionic liquids (ILs) are room-temperature molten salts that possess unique physicochemical properties and have shown great potential in many applications with lubrication as one of the latest. While earlier work (2001–2011) primarily explored the feasibility of using ILs as neat or base lubricants, using ILs as lubricant additives has become the new focal research topic since the breakthrough in ILs’ miscibility in nonpolar hydrocarbon oils in early 2012. This work reviews the recent advances in developing ILs as additives for lubrication with an attempt to correlate among the cationic and anionic structures, oil-solubility, and other relevant physicochemical properties, and lubricating behavior. Effects of the concentration of ILs in lubricants and the compatibility between ILs and other additives in the lubricant formulation on the tribological performance are described followed by a discussion of wear protection mechanism based on tribofilm characterization. As a result, future research directions are suggested at the end.

  2. A Biomimetic Approach to Lubricate Engineering Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn, Troels

    lubrication characteristic is dominant via ‘selfhealing’ mechanism. The glycosylated FpHYD5 revealed a better lubrication than HFBI. Two type II hydrophobins function more favorably compared to synthetic amphiphilic copolymer, PEO-PPO-PEO, with a similar molecular weight. This is ascribed to higher amount...

  3. Lubricity characteristics of marine distillate fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crutchley, Ian [Innospec Fuel Specialties, Ellesmere Port (United Kingdom); Green, Michael [Intertek Lintec ShipCare Services, Darlington (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    This article from Innospec Fuel Specialties, Ellesmere Port, UK, and Intertek Lintec ShipCare Services, Darlington, UK, examines the lubricity characteristics of marine distillate fuels available today in relation to the requirements and limits imposed in ISO8217:2010. It will estimate expected failure rates and also asses the perceived relationship between lubricity, sulphur content and viscosity. (orig.)

  4. Tribological Properties of Water-lubricated Rubber Materials after Modification by MoS2 Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Conglin; Yuan, Chengqing; Wang, Lei; Liu, Wei; Bai, Xiuqin; Yan, Xinping

    2016-01-01

    Frictional vibration and noise caused by water-lubricated rubber stern tube bearings, which are generated under extreme conditions, severely threaten underwater vehicles’ survivability and concealment performance. This study investigates the effect of flaky and spherical MoS2 nanoparticles on tribological properties and damping capacity of water-lubricated rubber materials, with the aim of decreasing frictional noise. A CBZ-1 tribo-tester was used to conduct the sliding tests between rubber ring-discs and ZCuSn10Zn2 ring-discs with water lubrication. These materials’ typical mechanical properties were analysed and compared. Coefficients of friction (COFs), wear rates, and surface morphologies were evaluated. Frictional noise and critical velocities of generating friction vibration were examined to corroborate above analysis. Results showed that spherical MoS2 nanoparticles enhanced rubber material’s mechanical and tribological properties and, in turn, reduced the friction noise and critical velocity. Flaky MoS2 nanoparticles reduced COF but did not enhance their mechanical properties, i.e., the damping capacity, wear resistance property; thus, these nanoparticles did not reduce the critical velocity obviously, even though increased the frictional noise at high load. The knowledge gained in the present work will be useful for optimizing friction pairs under extreme conditions to decrease frictional noise of water-lubricated rubber stern tube bearings. PMID:27713573

  5. Intermetallic Nickel-Titanium Alloys for Oil-Lubricated Bearing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, C.; Pepper, S. V.; Noebe, R.; Hull, D. R.; Glennon, G.

    2009-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, NITINOL 60 (60NiTi), containing 60 wt% nickel and 40 wt% titanium, is shown to be a promising candidate material for oil-lubricated rolling and sliding contact applications such as bearings and gears. NiTi alloys are well known and normally exploited for their shape memory behavior. When properly processed, however, NITINOL 60 exhibits excellent dimensional stability and useful structural properties. Processed via high temperature, high-pressure powder metallurgy techniques or other means, NITINOL 60 offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. NITINOL 60 is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, less dense than steel, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, nongalling and nonmagnetic. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic encompasses all of these attributes. Further, NITINOL 60 has shown remarkable tribological performance when compared to other aerospace bearing alloys under oil-lubricated conditions. Spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) tests were conducted in vacuum using NITINOL 60 balls loaded between rotating 440C stainless steel disks, lubricated with synthetic hydrocarbon oil. Under conditions considered representative of precision bearings, the performance (life and friction) equaled or exceeded that observed with silicon nitride or titanium carbide coated 440C bearing balls. Based upon this preliminary data, it appears that NITINOL 60, despite its high titanium content, is a promising candidate alloy for advanced mechanical systems requiring superior and intrinsic corrosion resistance, electrical conductivity and nonmagnetic behavior under lubricated contacting conditions.

  6. Cyclic Fatigue Resistance of Reciproc Blue, Reciproc, and WaveOne Gold Reciprocating Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Cangül; Inan, Uğur; Demiral, Murat; Keleş, Ali

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the cyclic fatigue resistance of Reciproc Blue R25 (VDW, Munich, Germany) with Reciproc R25 (VDW) and WaveOne Gold Primary (Denstply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland). Fifteen Reciproc Blue R25, 15 Reciproc R25, and 15 WaveOne Gold Primary instruments were collected and tested in a dynamic cyclic fatigue test device, which has an artificial canal with a 60° angle of curvature and a 5-mm radius of curvature. All instruments were operated until fracture occurred, and time to fracture (TF) and the lengths of the fractured fragments were recorded. The mean and standard deviations of TF and fragment length were calculated for each reciprocating system. TF data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis 1-way analysis of variance and the Dunn test, whereas fractured fragment length data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance (P  .05). Reciproc Blue R25 instruments had significantly higher cyclic fatigue resistance than WaveOne Gold and Reciproc R25 instruments. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Direct reciprocity in spatial populations enhances R-reciprocity as well as ST-reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Kohei; Tanimoto, Jun; Wang, Zhen; Hagishima, Aya; Ikegaya, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    As is well-known, spatial reciprocity plays an important role in facilitating the emergence of cooperative traits, and the effect of direct reciprocity is also obvious for explaining the cooperation dynamics. However, how the combination of these two scenarios influences cooperation is still unclear. In the present work, we study the evolution of cooperation in 2 × 2 games via considering both spatial structured populations and direct reciprocity driven by the strategy with 1-memory length. Our results show that cooperation can be significantly facilitated on the whole parameter plane. For prisoner's dilemma game, cooperation dominates the system even at strong dilemma, where maximal social payoff is still realized. In this sense, R-reciprocity forms and it is robust to the extremely strong dilemma. Interestingly, when turning to chicken game, we find that ST-reciprocity is also guaranteed, through which social average payoff and cooperation is greatly enhanced. This reciprocity mechanism is supported by mean-field analysis and different interaction topologies. Thus, our study indicates that direct reciprocity in structured populations can be regarded as a more powerful factor for the sustainability of cooperation.

  8. Richness and Reciprocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Harding RN, PhD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Recruiting and retaining nurses in mental health practice settings have long been problematic: A situation which is not helped by student nurses being exposed to negative attitudes about mental health nursing or poor clinical experiences. A pilot program in which student nurses were mentored on the mental health clinical placement was initiated at an Australian School of Nursing. A qualitative study was undertaken to explore the value of this program for the student mentee and the registered nurse mentor. A questionnaire containing six questions was distributed to all participants before and after the clinical experience. The questions were open format seeking data on (a the perceived advantages or disadvantages of mentoring, (b perceptions of whether mentoring contributes to professional development, and (c whether mentoring contributes personally to the participant. The data were subjected to inductive thematic analysis. The registered nurse mentors found that time diverted from clients was a barrier to mentoring students; however, they experienced reciprocity through nurturance of self, students, and the profession. The student mentees found that they experienced a richer and deeper learning environment. Mentoring provides a satisfying learning environment for both parties if carefully implemented and supported.

  9. Lubricants : the lifeblood of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremblay, Y. [Petro-Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    With the significant investments in wind turbine equipment, companies need to exercise due diligence when it comes to the types of lubricants and fluids used. Mechanical and equipment issues can often be eliminated with improved maintenance practices and the appropriate selection of lubricants. This presentation discussed lubricants as being the lifeblood of wind turbines. The presentation first provided an overview and discussed wind turbine trends and application trends. The technical aspects of fluid formation were presented. Lubrication maintenance practices and oil monitoring were discussed. Last, key industry tests, and OEM specifications for bearings, gearboxes, and wind turbines were identified. It was concluded that improved maintenance practices in combination with the correct lubricant selection can address several operating problems. figs.

  10. Lubricant Test Methods for Sheet Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Olsson, David Dam; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2008-01-01

    appearing in different sheet forming operations such as stretch forming, deep drawing, ironing and punching. The laboratory tests have been especially designed to model the conditions in industrial production. Application of the tests for evaluating new lubricants before introducing them in production has......Sheet metal forming of tribologically difficult materials such as stainless steel, Al-alloys and Ti-alloys or forming in tribologically difficult operations like ironing, punching or deep drawing of thick plate requires often use of environmentally hazardous lubricants such as chlorinated paraffin...... oils in order to avoid galling. The present paper describes a systematic research in the development of new, environmentally harmless lubricants focusing on the lubricant testing aspects. A system of laboratory tests has been developed to study the lubricant performance under the very varied conditions...

  11. Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles

    KAUST Repository

    Giese, Andrew; Latypov, Daniel; Amato, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    obstacles. One state-of-the-art local collision avoidance technique is Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance (ORCA). Despite being fast and efficient for circular-shaped agents, ORCA may deadlock when polygonal shapes are used. To address this shortcoming

  12. The Influence of Tool Texture on Friction and Lubrication in Strip Reduction Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulaiman, Mohd Hafis Bin; Christiansen, Peter; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2017-01-01

    While texturing of workpiece surfaces to promote lubrication in metal forming has beenapplied for several decades, tool surface texturing is rather new. In the present paper, tool texturing is studied as a method to prevent galling. A strip reduction test was conducted with tools provided...... with shallow, longitudinal pockets oriented perpendicular to the sliding direction. The pockets had small angles to the workpiece surface and the distance between them were varied. The experiments reveal that the distance between pockets should be larger than the pocket width, thereby creating a topography...... similar to flat table mountains to avoid mechanical interlocking in the valleys; otherwise, an increase in drawing load and pick-up on the tools are observed. The textured tool surface lowers friction and improves lubrication performance, provided that the distance between pockets is 2–4 times larger than...

  13. Sliding hiatal hernia in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    JOLANTA SPUŻAK; KRZYSZTOF KUBIAK; MARCIN JANKOWSKI; MACIEJ GRZEGORY; KAMILA GLIŃSKA-SUCHOCKA; JÓZEF NICPOŃ; VASYL VLIZLO; IGOR MAKSYMOVYCH

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Sliding hiatal hernia is a disorder resulting from a displacement of the abdominal part of the oesophagus and/or a part of the stomach into the thoracic cavity through the oesophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. The disorder may be congenital or acquired. Congenital hernia follows disturbances in the embryonic development. In the literature the predisposition to congenital sliding hiatal hernia is observed in the dogs of shar-pei and chow-chow breeds. Pathogenesis of acquired slidin...

  14. K-groups of reciprocity functors

    OpenAIRE

    Ivorra, Florian; Rülling, Kay

    2012-01-01

    In this work we introduce reciprocity functors, construct the associated K-group of a family of reciprocity functors, which itself is a reciprocity functor, and compute it in several different cases. It may be seen as a first attempt to get close to the notion of reciprocity sheaves imagined by B. Kahn. Commutative algebraic groups, homotopy invariant Nisnevich sheaves with transfers, cycle modules or K\\"ahler differentials are examples of reciprocity functors. As commutative algebraic groups...

  15. Macroscopic assessment of cartilage shear: effects of counter-surface roughness, synovial fluid lubricant, and compression offset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quynhhoa T; Wong, Benjamin L; Chun, June; Yoon, Yeoung C; Talke, Frank E; Sah, Robert L

    2010-06-18

    During joint articulation, cartilage is subjected to compression, shear, and sliding, mechanical factors that regulate and affect cartilage metabolism. The objective of this study was to use an in vitro material-on-cartilage shear test to elucidate the effects of counter-surface roughness (Polished, Mildly rough, and Rough), lubricants (phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and bovine synovial fluid (bSF)), and compression offset on the shearing and sliding of normal human talar cartilage under dynamic lateral displacement. Peak shear stress (sigma(xz,m)) and strain (E(xz,m)) increased with increasing platen roughness and compression offset, and were 30% higher with PBS than with bSF. Compared to PBS, bSF was more effective as a lubricant for P than for M and R platens as indicated by the higher reduction in kinetic friction coefficient (-60% vs. -20% and -19%, respectively), sigma(xz,m) (-50% vs. -14% and -17%) and E(xz,m) (-54% vs. -19% and -17%). Cartilage shear and sliding were evident for all counter-surfaces either at low compression offset (10%) or with high lateral displacement (70%), regardless of lubricant. An increase in tissue shear occurred with either increased compression offset or increased surface roughness. This material and biomechanical test system allow control of cartilage sigma(xz,m) and E(xz,m), and hence, sliding magnitude, for an imposed lateral displacement. It therefore can facilitate study of cartilage mechanobiological responses to distinct regimes of cartilage loading and articulation, such as shear with variable amounts of sliding. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanopolishing by colloidal nanodiamond in elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvani, Khosro A., E-mail: Khosro.asgharishir@bison.howard.edu; Mosleh, Mohsen; Smith, Sonya T. [Howard University, Department of Mechanical Engineering (United States)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, the feasibility of using explosion synthesized diamond nanoparticles with an average particle size (APS) of 3–5 nm with a concentration of 1 % by weight for improving lubrication and friction in elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) was investigated. Owing to the orders of magnitude increase in the viscosity of the lubricant in the EHL contact zone, diamond nanoparticles in the lubricant polish the surfaces at the nanoscale which decreases the composite roughness of contacting surfaces. The reduced composite roughness results in an increased film thickness ratio which yields lower friction. In the numerical analysis, governing equations of lubricant flow in the full elastohydrodynamic lubrication were solved, and the shear stress distribution over the fluid film was calculated. Using an abrasion model and the shear stress distribution profile, the material removal by the nanofluid containing nanoparticles and the resultant surface roughness were determined. The numerical analysis showed that in full EHL regime, the nanolubricant can reduce the composite roughness of moving surfaces. Experimental results from prior studies which exhibited surface polishing by such nanolubricants in boundary, mixed, and full elastohydrodynamic lubrication were used for comparison to the numerical model.

  17. Nanopolishing by colloidal nanodiamond in elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, Khosro A.; Mosleh, Mohsen; Smith, Sonya T.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using explosion synthesized diamond nanoparticles with an average particle size (APS) of 3-5 nm with a concentration of 1 % by weight for improving lubrication and friction in elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) was investigated. Owing to the orders of magnitude increase in the viscosity of the lubricant in the EHL contact zone, diamond nanoparticles in the lubricant polish the surfaces at the nanoscale which decreases the composite roughness of contacting surfaces. The reduced composite roughness results in an increased film thickness ratio which yields lower friction. In the numerical analysis, governing equations of lubricant flow in the full elastohydrodynamic lubrication were solved, and the shear stress distribution over the fluid film was calculated. Using an abrasion model and the shear stress distribution profile, the material removal by the nanofluid containing nanoparticles and the resultant surface roughness were determined. The numerical analysis showed that in full EHL regime, the nanolubricant can reduce the composite roughness of moving surfaces. Experimental results from prior studies which exhibited surface polishing by such nanolubricants in boundary, mixed, and full elastohydrodynamic lubrication were used for comparison to the numerical model.

  18. Application of a Biodegradable Lubricant in a Diesel Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schramm, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    , NOx, THC, PM, lubricant-SOF and PAH from one diesel and one gasoline type vehicle using biodegradable lubricants and conventional lubricants. This paper describes the results of the experiments with the diesel type vehicle only. Lubricant consumption and fuel consumption are other important parameters...

  19. A study of mechanisms of liquid lubrication in metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Bay, Niels; Eriksen, Morten

    1998-01-01

    Applying a transparent tool technique the lubrication in plane strip drawing of aluminium sheet is studied providing the strip with surface pockets for entrapment of lubricant. The compression and eventual escape of trapped lubricant by Micro Plasto HydroDynamic Lubrication (MPHDL) as well as Micro...

  20. Vegetable oil basestocks for lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcés, Rafael

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of vegetable biodegradable basestocks for lubricant oils present several advantages over the much more extended mineral bases. These advantages refer to biodegradability, a renewable feedstock of local production, lubricant and viscosity index and lower costs than synthetic lubricant bases. Despite these benefits, their use in industry and motor vehicles is not yet extensive due their lower stability and higher pour points. Vegetable oils are esters of fatty acids and glycerol, and their physicochemical properties rely mainly on the composition of their acyl moieties. Thus, to assure the maximum levels of stability while maintaining acceptable behavior at low temperatures, monounsaturated fatty acids are preferred for this purpose. The presence of natural antioxidants also improves the properties of these vegetable based stocks as lubricants. These oils usually require additives to improve their viscosity value, oxidative stability and properties at low temperatures. In the present work, the different sources of vegetable oils appropriate for biolubricant production were reviewed. Their properties and the future improvement of the oil bases, oil based stock production, uses and additives are discussed.

    El uso de bases vegetales biodegradables para aceites lubricantes presenta varias ventajas sobre las mucho más extendidas bases minerales. Estas ventajas se centran sobre todo en su biodegradabilidad, en ser un recurso renovable de producción local, en su lubricidad y en su índice de viscosidad, presentando además costes más bajos que las bases sintéticas. Sin embargo, estas ventajas no han extendido el uso de bases vegetales ni en industria ni en automoción debido a su menor estabilidad y sus mayores puntos críticos de fluidez. Los aceites vegetales son ésteres de ácidos grasos y glicerol y sus propiedades físico-químicas dependen principalmente de su composición acílica. Así, para asegurar los máximos niveles de

  1. Effect of surface finishing on friction and wear of Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone (PEEK under oil lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Fontoura de Andrade

    Full Text Available Abstract The tribological properties of poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK containing 30% of carbon fiber were studied in an oil-lubricated environment and different surface finishing of the metallic counterbody. Four different finishing processes, commonly used in the automotive industry, were chosen for this study: turning, grinding, honing and polishing. The test system used was tri-pin on disc with pins made of PEEK and counterbody made of steel; they were fully immersed in ATF Dexron VI oil. Some test parameters were held constant, such as the apparent pressure of 2 MPa, linear velocity of 2 m/s, oil temperature at 85 °C, and the time - 120 minutes. The lubrication regime for the apparent pressure of 1 MPa to 7 MPa range was also studied at different sliding speeds. A direct correlation was found between the wear rate, friction coefficient and the lubrication regime, wherein wear under hydrodynamic lubrication was, on average, approximately 5 times lower, and the friction coefficient 3 times lower than under boundary lubrication.

  2. Graphite and Hybrid Nanomaterials as Lubricant Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu J. Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lubricant additives, based on inorganic nanoparticles coated with organic outer layer, can reduce wear and increase load-carrying capacity of base oil remarkably, indicating the great potential of hybrid nanoparticles as anti-wear and extreme-pressure additives with excellent levels of performance. The organic part in the hybrid materials improves their flexibility and stability, while the inorganic part is responsible for hardness. The relationship between the design parameters of the organic coatings, such as molecular architecture and the lubrication performance, however, remains to be fully elucidated. A survey of current understanding of hybrid nanoparticles as lubricant additives is presented in this review.

  3. Feasibility of Applying Active Lubrication to Reduce Vibration in Industrial Compressors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Ilmar; Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Scalabrin, A.

    2004-01-01

    of the orifices distributed over the sliding surface. The dynamic coefficients of tilting-pad bearings with and without active lubrication and their influence on an industrial compressor of 391 Kg, which operates with a maximum speed of 10,200 rpm, are analyzed. In the original compressor design, the bearing...... housings are mounted on squeeze-film dampers in order to ensure reasonable stability margins during full load condition (high maximum continuous speed). Instead of having a combination of tilting-pad bearings and squeeze-film dampers, another design solution is proposed and theoretically investigated...

  4. Gastric mucus and mucuslike hydrogels: Thin film lubricating properties at soft interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn, Troels; Patil, Navin J.; Ajalloueian, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    to be superior at hydrophilic tribological interfaces compared to hydrophobic ones. Facile spreading of all mucus samples at hydrophilic steel–polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) interfaces allowed for the retainment of the lubricating films over a wide range of speed, slide/roll ratio, and external load. In contrast......, poor wetting at hydrophobic PDMS–PDMS interfaces led to depletion of the mucus samples from the interface with increasing speed. Among the different mucus models investigated in this study, fluid mixtures of commercially available porcine gastric mucin (PGM) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) displayed...

  5. The role of lubricant analysis in maximizing lubricant and equipment life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janis, J.

    1995-01-01

    Lubricant analysis has always played an important yet somewhat invisible role in equipment health monitoring. At its most primitive, simple observations and field testing alert equipment operators to changing conditions. At its most advanced, data from performance and analytical tests are used to develop or select optimum lubricants for service, stretch drain intervals, predict remaining equipment life and identify potential equipment or system problems at an incipient stage. Coupled with thermography and vibration analysis, lubricant analysis can become a major component of a comprehensive predictive maintenance (PM) program. Ontario Hydro finds itself at a turning point regarding the use and monitoring of lubricants. Increasing emphasis on equipment reliability and plant life extension, coupled with major, recent changes in lubricant composition in response to environmental, energy and safety concerns, forces an upgrading of many aspects of lubricant monitoring so that it may establish itself as a key part of modern PM practices. This paper discusses some of these aspects. (author)

  6. Potential of Palm Olein as Green Lubricant Source: Lubrication Analysis and Chemical Characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darfizzi Derawi; Jumat Salimon

    2014-01-01

    Palm olein (PO o ) is widely used as edible oil in tropical countries. The lubrication properties and chemical compositions of PO o being considered to be used as renewable raw material for bio lubricant synthesis. PO o is suitable to be used directly as bio lubricant for medium temperature industrial applications. Palm olein has good viscosity index, oxidative stability, flash and fire point as a lubricant source. PO o contains unsaturated triacylglycerols (TAG): Palmitin-Olein-Olein, POO (33.3 %), Palmitin-Olein-Palmitin, POP (29.6 %), which are very important to produce good lubricant properties. This unsaturated bond is preferable in chemical modification to produce bio lubricant. The chemical compositions of PO o were tested by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) techniques. (author)

  7. Mapping stain distribution in pathology slides using whole slide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Cheng Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whole slide imaging (WSI offers a novel approach to digitize and review pathology slides, but the voluminous data generated by this technology demand new computational methods for image analysis. Materials and Methods: In this study, we report a method that recognizes stains in WSI data and uses kernel density estimator to calculate the stain density across the digitized pathology slides. The validation study was conducted using a rat model of acute cardiac allograft rejection and another rat model of heart ischemia/reperfusion injury. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was conducted to label ED1 + macrophages in the tissue sections and the stained slides were digitized by a whole slide scanner. The whole slide images were tessellated to enable parallel processing. Pixel-wise stain classification was conducted to classify the IHC stains from those of the background and the density distribution of the identified IHC stains was then calculated by the kernel density estimator. Results: The regression analysis showed a correlation coefficient of 0.8961 between the number of IHC stains counted by our stain recognition algorithm and that by the manual counting, suggesting that our stain recognition algorithm was in good agreement with the manual counting. The density distribution of the IHC stains showed a consistent pattern with those of the cellular magnetic resonance (MR images that detected macrophages labeled by ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide or micron-sized iron-oxide particles. Conclusions: Our method provides a new imaging modality to facilitate clinical diagnosis. It also provides a way to validate/correlate cellular MRI data used for tracking immune-cell infiltration in cardiac transplant rejection and cardiac ischemic injury.

  8. Public privacy: Reciprocity and Silence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Kennedy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In his 1958 poem 'Dedication to my Wife' TS Eliot proclaims "these are private words addressed to you in public". Simultaneously written for his wife, Valerie Fletcher, and to the implied you of a discourse network, Eliot's poem helps to illustrate the narrative voices and silences that are constitutive of an intimate public sphere. This paper situates reciprocity as a condition of possibility for public privacy. It shows how reciprocity is enabled by systems of code operating through material and symbolic registers. Code promises to control communication, to produce neutral, systemic forms of meaning. Yet such automation is challenged by uneven and fragmented patterns of reciprocity. Moreover, examining the media of public privacy reveals historical trajectories important for understanding contemporary socio­technical platforms of reciprocity. To explore the implicit requirement of reciprocity in publicly private practices, three sites of communication are investigated framed by a media archaeology perspective: postal networks, the mail­art project PostSecret and the anonymous zine 'You'.

  9. Indirect Reciprocity; A Field Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Apeldoorn, Jacobien; Schram, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Indirect reciprocity involves cooperative acts towards strangers, either in response to their kindness to third parties (downstream) or after receiving kindness from others oneself (upstream). It is considered to be important for the evolution of cooperative behavior amongst humans. Though it has been widely studied theoretically, the empirical evidence of indirect reciprocity has thus far been limited and based solely on behavior in laboratory experiments. We provide evidence from an online environment where members can repeatedly ask and offer services to each other, free of charge. For the purpose of this study we created several new member profiles, which differ only in terms of their serving history. We then sent out a large number of service requests to different members from all over the world. We observe that a service request is more likely to be rewarded for those with a profile history of offering the service (to third parties) in the past. This provides clear evidence of (downstream) indirect reciprocity. We find no support for upstream indirect reciprocity (in this case, rewarding the service request after having previously received the service from third parties), however. Our evidence of downstream indirect reciprocity cannot be attributed to reputational effects concerning one's trustworthiness as a service user.

  10. Direct reciprocity in structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veelen, Matthijs; García, Julián; Rand, David G; Nowak, Martin A

    2012-06-19

    Reciprocity and repeated games have been at the center of attention when studying the evolution of human cooperation. Direct reciprocity is considered to be a powerful mechanism for the evolution of cooperation, and it is generally assumed that it can lead to high levels of cooperation. Here we explore an open-ended, infinite strategy space, where every strategy that can be encoded by a finite state automaton is a possible mutant. Surprisingly, we find that direct reciprocity alone does not lead to high levels of cooperation. Instead we observe perpetual oscillations between cooperation and defection, with defection being substantially more frequent than cooperation. The reason for this is that "indirect invasions" remove equilibrium strategies: every strategy has neutral mutants, which in turn can be invaded by other strategies. However, reciprocity is not the only way to promote cooperation. Another mechanism for the evolution of cooperation, which has received as much attention, is assortment because of population structure. Here we develop a theory that allows us to study the synergistic interaction between direct reciprocity and assortment. This framework is particularly well suited for understanding human interactions, which are typically repeated and occur in relatively fluid but not unstructured populations. We show that if repeated games are combined with only a small amount of assortment, then natural selection favors the behavior typically observed among humans: high levels of cooperation implemented using conditional strategies.

  11. Wear Characteristics of Ceramic Coating Materials by Plasma Spray under the Lubricative Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Ho

    2001-02-01

    This paper is to investigate the wear behaviors of two types of ceramics, Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 , by coated plasma thermal spray method under the lubricative environment. The lubricative environments are grease fluids, a general hydraulic fluids, and bearing fluids. The wear testing machine used a pin on disk type. Wear characteristics, which were friction force, friction coefficient and the specific wear rate, according to the lubricative environments were obtained at the four kinds of load, and the sliding velocity is 0.2m/sec. After the wear experiments, the wear surfaces of the each test specimen were observed by a scanning electronic microscope. The obtained results are as follows. : 1. The friction coefficients of TiO 2 coating materials are 0.11 ∼ 0.16 range and those of Al 2 O 3 are 0.24 ∼ 0.39. The friction coefficient of two coating materials is relative to the hardness of these materials. 2. The friction coefficient of TiO 2 coating materials in three lubricative environments is almost same to each other in spite of changing of applied loads. 3. The friction coefficient of Al 2 O 3 coating materials is more large in low load than high load. And the friction coefficient in grease is more large than a general hydraulic and bearing fluids had almost same friction coefficient. 4. The specific wear rate in TiO 2 is greatly increasing according to change the applied loads, but that in Al 2 O 3 is slightly. And the wear in grease is the least among three lubricating environments. 5. On the wear mechanism by SEM image observation, the wear of Al 2 O 3 is adhesive wear and TiO 3 is abrasive wear

  12. 49 CFR 396.5 - Lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS INSPECTION, REPAIR, AND MAINTENANCE § 396.5 Lubrication. Every motor carrier shall ensure that each motor vehicle subject to its control is...

  13. Excellent lubricating behavior of Brasenia schreberi mucilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinjin; Liu, Yuhong; Luo, Jianbin; Liu, Pengxiao; Zhang, Chenhui

    2012-05-22

    The present work reports an excellent lubrication property of an aquatic plant called Brasenia schreberi (BS). To investigate the lubrication characteristics of the BS mucilage, a novel measuring system is designed, and an ultralow friction coefficient about 0.005 between the mucilage and glass surface has been obtained. It is found that the ultralow friction is closely related to the structure of mucilage and water molecules in the mucilage. The microstructure analysis indicates that the mucilage surrounding BS forms a kind of polysaccharide gel with many nanosheets. A possible lubrication mechanism is proposed that the formation of hydration layers among these polymer nanosheets with plenty of bonded water molecules causes the ultralow friction. The excellent lubrication property has a potential application for reducing the friction between a glossy pill coated with such layer of mucilage and people's throats.

  14. Fundamentals of Friction and Vapor Phase Lubrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gellman, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This is the final report for the three year research program on "Fundamentals of Friction and Vapor Phase Lubrication" conducted at Carnegie Mellon with support from AFOSR grant number F49630-01-1-0069...

  15. Nanoscale Organic−Inorganic Hybrid Lubricants

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daniel; Archer, Lynden A.

    2011-01-01

    Silica (SiO2) nanoparticles densely grafted with amphiphilic organic chains are used to create a family of organic-inorganic hybrid lubricants. Short sulfonate-functionalized alkylaryl chains covalently tethered to the particles form a dense corona

  16. Fuels and Petroleum, Oil & Lubricants (POL) Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuels and Lubricants Technology Team operates and maintains the Fuels and POL Labs at TARDEC. Lab experts adhere to standardized American Society for Testing and...

  17. Biodegradable lubricants - ''the solution for future?''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, A.

    1997-01-01

    The environmental impact of lubricants use concern the direct effects from spills but also the indirect effects such as their lifetime and the emissions from thermal engines. The biodegradable performances and the toxicity are the environmental criteria that must be taken into account in the development and application of lubricants together with their technical performances. This paper recalls first the definition of biodegradable properties of hydrocarbons and the standardized tests, in particular the CEC and AFNOR tests. Then, the biodegradable performances of basic oils (mineral, vegetal, synthetic esters, synthetic hydrocarbons etc..), finite lubricants (hydraulic fluids..) and engine oils is analyzed according to these tests. Finally, the definition of future standards would take into account all the environmental characteristics of the lubricant: biodegradable performances, energy balance (CO 2 , NOx and Hx emissions and fuel savings), eco-toxicity and technical performances (wearing and cleanliness). (J.S.)

  18. Determining minimum lubrication film for machine parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1978-01-01

    Formula predicts minimum film thickness required for fully-flooded ball bearings, gears, and cams. Formula is result of study to determine complete theoretical solution of isothermal elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication of fully-flooded elliptical contacts.

  19. Lubrication and cooling for high speed gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The problems and failures occurring with the operation of high speed gears are discussed. The gearing losses associated with high speed gearing such as tooth mesh friction, bearing friction, churning, and windage are discussed with various ways shown to help reduce these losses and thereby improve efficiency. Several different methods of oil jet lubrication for high speed gearing are given such as into mesh, out of mesh, and radial jet lubrication. The experiments and analytical results for the various methods of oil jet lubrication are shown with the strengths and weaknesses of each method discussed. The analytical and experimental results of gear lubrication and cooling at various test conditions are presented. These results show the very definite need of improved methods of gear cooling at high speed and high load conditions.

  20. Reciprocation of perceived organizational support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberger, R; Armeli, S; Rexwinkel, B; Lynch, P D; Rhoades, L

    2001-02-01

    Four hundred thirteen postal employees were surveyed to investigate reciprocation's role in the relationships of perceived organizational support (POS) with employees' affective organizational commitment and job performance. The authors found that (a) POS was positively related to employees' felt obligation to care about the organization's welfare and to help the organization reach its objectives; (b) felt obligation mediated the associations of POS with affective commitment, organizational spontaneity, and in-role performance; and (c) the relationship between POS and felt obligation increased with employees' acceptance of the reciprocity norm as applied to work organizations. Positive mood also mediated the relationships of POS with affective commitment and organizational spontaneity. The pattern of findings is consistent with organizational support theory's assumption that POS strengthens affective commitment and performance by a reciprocation process.

  1. Tribology experiment. [journal bearings and liquid lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    A two-dimensional concept for Spacelab rack 7 was developed to study the interaction of liquid lubricants and surfaces under static and dynamic conditions in a low-gravity environment fluid wetting and spreading experiments of a journal bearing experiments, and means to accurately measure and record the low-gravity environment during experimentation are planned. The wetting and spreading process of selected commercial lubricants on representative surface are to the observes in a near-zero gravity environment.

  2. Investigation of lubricants under boundary friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidebroek, E; Pietsch, E

    1942-01-01

    Numerous observations of such lubrication processes within range of boundary friction on journal bearings and gear tooth profiles have strengthened the supposition that it should be possible to study the attendant phenomena with engineering methods and equipment. These considerations formed the basis of the present studies, which have led to the discovery of relations governing the suitability of bearing surfaces and the concept of "lubricating quality."

  3. Noise estimation of oil lubricated journal bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Byoung Hoo; Kim, Kyung Woong

    2003-01-01

    Noise estimating procedures of oil lubricated journal bearings are presented. Nonlinear analysis of rotor-bearing system including unbalance mass of the rotor is performed in order to obtain acoustical properties of the bearing. Acoustical properties of the bearing are investigated through frequency analysis of the pressure fluctuation of the fluid film calculated from the nonlinear analysis. Noise estimating procedures presented in this paper could aid in the evaluation and understanding of acoustical properties of oil lubricated journal bearings

  4. Advanced lubrication systems and materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, S.

    1998-05-07

    This report described the work conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology under an interagency agreement signed in September 1992 between DOE and NIST for 5 years. The interagency agreement envisions continual funding from DOE to support the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine technologies in terms of lubrication, friction, and wear control encountered in the development of advanced transportation technologies. However, in 1994, the DOE office of transportation technologies was reorganized and the tribology program was dissolved. The work at NIST therefore continued at a low level without further funding from DOE. The work continued to support transportation technologies in the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine development. Under this program, significant progress has been made in advancing the state of the art of lubrication technology for advanced engine research and development. Some of the highlights are: (1) developed an advanced high temperature liquid lubricant capable of sustaining high temperatures in a prototype heat engine; (2) developed a novel liquid lubricant which potentially could lower the emission of heavy duty diesel engines; (3) developed lubricant chemistries for ceramics used in the heat engines; (4) developed application maps for ceramic lubricant chemistry combinations for design purpose; and (5) developed novel test methods to screen lubricant chemistries for automotive air-conditioning compressors lubricated by R-134a (Freon substitute). Most of these findings have been reported to the DOE program office through Argonne National Laboratory who manages the overall program. A list of those reports and a copy of the report submitted to the Argonne National Laboratory is attached in Appendix A. Additional reports have also been submitted separately to DOE program managers. These are attached in Appendix B.

  5. New Lubricants Protect Machines and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    In 1994, NASA and Lockheed Martin Space Operations commissioned Sun Coast Chemicals of Daytona Inc to develop a new type of lubricant that would be safe for the environment and help "grease the wheels" of the shuttle-bearing launcher platform. Founded in 1989, Sun Coast Chemicals is known amongst the racing circuit for effective lubricants that help overcome engine and transmission problems related to heat and wear damage. In a matter of weeks, Sun Coast Chemical produced the biodegradable, high-performance X-1R Crawler Track Lube. In 1996, Sun Coast Chemical determined there was a market for this new development, and introduced three derivative products, Train Track Lubricant, Penetrating Spray Lubricant, and Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid, and then quickly followed with a gun lubricant/cleaner and a fishing rod and reel lubricant. Just recently, Sun Coast introduced the X-1R Corporation, which folds the high-performance, environmentally safe benefits into a full line of standard automotive and specially formulated racing products. The entire X-1R automotive product line has stood up to rigorous testing by groups such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Swedish National Testing and Research Institute, the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Oakland University (Rochester, Michigan), and Morgan-McClure Motorsports (Abingdon, Virginia). The X-1R Corporation also markets "handy packs" for simple jobs around the house, consisting of a multi-purpose, multi-use lubricant and grease. In 2003, The X-1R Corporation teamed up with Philadelphia-based Penn Tackle Manufacturing Co., a leading manufacturer of fishing tackle since 1932, to jointly develop and market a line of advanced lubrication products for saltwater and freshwater anglers

  6. Tribological Behavior of Oil-Lubricated Laser Textured Steel Surfaces in Conformal Flat and Non-Conformal Contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchenko, A. M. [Inst. for Problems of Materials Science, Dept. 7, 3 Krzhizhanovsky Street, Kyiv 03142, UA (Corresponding author), e-mail: andrii.kovalchenko@gatech.edu; Erdemir, A. [Argonne National Lab., Energy Systems Division, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 US; Ajayi, O. O. [Argonne National Lab., Energy Systems Division, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 US; Etsion, I. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Haifa 32000, IL

    2017-01-30

    Changing the surface texture of sliding surfaces is an effective way to manipulate friction and wear of lubricated surfaces. Having realized its potential, we have done very extensive studies on the effects of laser surface texturing (LST, which involves the creation of an array of microdimples on a surface) on friction and wear behavior of oil-lubricated steel surfaces in the early 2000s. In this paper, we reviewed some of our research accomplishments and assessed future directions of the laser texturing field in many diverse industrial applications. Our studies specifically addressed the impact of laser texturing on friction and wear of both the flat conformal and initial non-conformal point contact configurations using a pin-on-disk test rig under fully-flooded synthetic oil lubricants with different viscosities. Electrical resistance measurement between pin and LST disks was also used to determine the operating lubrication regimes in relation to friction. In conformal contact, we confirmed that LST could significantly expand the operating conditions for hydrodynamic lubrication to significantly much higher loads and slower speeds. In particular, with LST and higher viscosity oils, the low-friction full hydrodynamic regime was shifted to the far left in the Stribeck diagram. Overall, the beneficial effects of laser surface texturing were more pronounced at higher speeds and loads and with higher viscosity oil. LST was also observed to reduce the magnitude of friction coefficients in the boundary regime. For the non-conformal contact configuration, we determined that LST would produce more abrasive wear on the rubbing counterface compared to the untreated surfaces due to a reduction in lubricant fluid film thickness, as well as the highly uneven and rough nature of the textured surfaces. However, this higher initial wear rate has led to faster generation of a conformal contact, and thus transition from the high-friction boundary to lower friction mixed

  7. Static and kinetic friction force and surface roughness of different archwire-bracket sliding contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion-Vilches, Francisco J; Bermudez, María-Dolores; Fructuoso, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the static and kinetic friction forces of the contact bracket-archwire with different dental material compositions in order to select those materials with lower resistance to sliding. We carried out sliding friction tests by means of a universal testing machine following an experimental procedure as described in ASTM D1894 standard. We determined the static and kinetic friction forces under dry and lubricating conditions using an artificial saliva solution at 36.5ºC. The bracket-archwire pairs studied were: stainless steel-stainless steel; stainless steel-glass fiber composite; stainless steel-Nitinol 60; sapphire-stainless steel; sapphire-glass fiber composite; and sapphire-Nitinol 60. The best performance is obtained for Nitinol 60 archwire sliding against a stainless steel bracket, both under dry and lubricated conditions. These results are in agreement with the low surface roughness of Nitinol 60 with respect to the glass fiber composite archwire. The results described here contribute to establishing selection criteria for materials for dental archwire-brackets.

  8. Determinan Kepuasan Pelanggan Pada Produk Pertamina Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berto Mulia Wibawa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Determinants of Customer Satisfaction at Pertamina's Lubricants ProductLubricant industry is one of the strategic industries in around the world. The potential of the lubricant industry in Indonesia grows rapidly along with the increasing demand and the number of a vehicle from year to year. This study aims to analyze factors that influencing customer satisfaction Pertamina Lubricants product and measure how far the customer satisfaction level of its product. This study observed eight categories of Pertamina Lubricants product, with quota sampling technique where each category of the product taken 30 samples, so the total number of the sample are 240 respondents. Multiple linear regression and customer satisfaction index were used in this study. The study finds brand popularity has the most significant effect on customer satisfaction, followed by price and durability. Customer satisfaction level stands at 78 percent, which means belongs in the satisfied category. Managerial implications of this study provide strategies for Pertamina Lubricants to improve their business performance and to increase the level of customer satisfactionDOI:  10.15408/ess.v7i1.4309  

  9. Sliding seal materials for low heat rejection engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Kevin; Lankford, James; Vinyard, Shannon

    1989-01-01

    Sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising piston seal materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, and loading conditions that are representative of the low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine environment. These materials included carbides, oxides, and nitrides. In addition, silicon nitride and partially stablized zirconia disks (cylinder liners) were ion-implanted with TiNi, Ni, Co, and Cr, and subsequently run against carbide pins (piston rings), with the objective of producing reduced friction via solid lubrication at elevated temperature. Friction and wear measurements were obtained using pin-on-disk laboratory experiments and a unique engine friction test rig. Unmodified ceramic sliding couples were characterized at all temperatures by friction coefficients of 0.24 and above during the pin-on-disk tests. The coefficient at 800 C in an oxidizing environment was reduced to below 0.1, for certain material combination, by the ion-implantation of TiNi or Co. This beneficial effect was found to derive from the lubricious Ti, Ni, and Co oxides. Similar results were demonstrated on the engine friction test rig at lower temperatures. The structural integrity and feasibility of engine application with the most promising material combination were demonstrated during a 30-hour single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine test.

  10. Static frictional resistance with the slide low-friction elastomeric ligature system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven P; Ben Bihi, Saida

    2009-11-01

    This ex-vivo study compared the static frictional resistance of a low-friction ligation system against a conventional elastomeric module, and studied the effect of storage in a simulated oral environment on the static frictional resistance of both ligation systems. Eighty stainless steel brackets were tested by sliding along straight lengths of 0.018 inch round and 0.019 x 0.025 inch rectangular stainless steel wires ligated with either conventional elastomerics or the Slide system (Leone, Florence, Italy). During the tests the brackets and wires were lubricated with artificial saliva. A specially constructed jig assembly was used to hold the bracket and archwire securely. The jig was clamped in an Instron universal load testing machine. Crosshead speed was controlled via a microcomputer connected to the Instron machine. The static frictional forces at 0 degree bracket/wire angulation were measured for both systems, fresh from the pack and after storage in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The results of this investigation demonstrated that the Slide ligatures produced significantly lower static frictional resistance than conventional elastomeric modules in the fresh condition and after 24 hours of storage in a simulated oral environment (p static frictional resistance of conventional elastomeric modules and the Slide system (p = 0.525). The claim by the manufacturer that the Slide system produces lower frictional resistance than conventional elastomeric modules is upheld.

  11. Embeddability behaviour of tin-based bearing material in dry sliding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeren, Adalet

    2007-01-01

    In this study, tin-based bearing material has been investigated in dry sliding conditions. The low Sb content (7%) is known as SAE 12 and is Sn-Sb-Cu alloy and is widely used in the automotive industry. Wear and friction characteristics were determined with respect to sliding distance, sliding speed and bearing load, using a Tecquipment HFN type 5 journal bearing test equipment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-disperse X-ray spectrography (EDX) are used to understand the tribological events, especially embeddability. Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate the tribological properties of tin-based bearing alloy used especially in heavy industrial service conditions. Tests were carried out in dry sliding conditions, since despite the presence of lubricant film, under heavy service conditions dry sliding may occur from time to time, causing local wear. As a result of local wear, bearing materials and bearing may be out of their tolerance limits in their early lifetime. Embeddability is an important property due to inversely affecting the hardness and the strength of the bearing

  12. Sliding friction and wear behaviors of surface-coated natural serpentine mineral powders as lubricant additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baosen; Xu Yi; Gao Fei; Shi Peijing; Xu Binshi; Wu Yixiong

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the friction and wear properties of surface-coated natural serpentine powders (SP) suspended in diesel engine oil using an Optimal SRV oscillating friction and wear tester. The worn surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results indicated that the additives can improve the wear resistance and decrease friction coefficient of carbon steel friction couples. The 0.5 wt% content of serpentine powders is found most efficient in reducing friction and wear at the load of 50 N. The SEM and XPS analysis results demonstrate that a tribofilm forms on the worn surface, which is responsible for the decrease in friction and wear, mainly with iron oxides, silicon oxides, graphite and organic compounds.

  13. Atomistic study of ternary oxides as high-temperature solid lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongyu

    Friction and wear are important tribological phenomena tightly associated with the performance of tribological components/systems such as bearings and cutting machines. In the process of contact and sliding, friction and wear lead to energy loss, and high friction and wear typically result in shortened service lifetime. To reduce friction and wear, solid lubricants are generally used under conditions where traditional liquid lubricants cannot be applied. However, it is challenging to maintain the functionality of those materials when the working environment becomes severe. For instance, at elevated temperatures (i.e., above 400 °C), most traditional solid lubricants, such as MoS2 and graphite, will easily oxidize or lose lubricity due to irreversible chemical changes. For such conditions, it is necessary to identify materials that can remain thermally stable as well as lubricious over a wide range of temperatures. Among the currently available high-temperature solid lubricants, Ag-based ternary metal oxides have recently drawn attention due to their low friction and ability to resist oxidation. A recent experimental study showed that the Ag-Ta-O ternary exhibited an extremely low coefficient of friction (0.06) at 750 °C. To fully uncover the lubricious nature of this material as a high-temperature solid lubricant, a series of tribological investigations were carried out based on one promising candidate - silver tantalate (AgTaO3). The study was then extended to alternative materials, Cu-Ta-O ternaries, to accommodate a variety of application requirements. We aimed to understand, at an atomic level, the effects of physical and chemical properties on the thermal, mechanical and tribological behavior of these materials at high temperatures. Furthermore, we investigated potassium chloride films on a clean iron surface as a representative boundary lubricating system in a nonextreme environment. This investigation complemented the study of Ag/Cu-Ta-O and enhanced the

  14. Coupled hydrodynamic-structure analysis of piston motion in reciprocating compressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Seung Ju; Cho, Jin Rae; Ryu, Sung Hyon

    2003-01-01

    The piston slap phenomenon is one of the major noise source of reciprocating compressors used in household electric appliances. In response to public demand, strict regulations are increasingly being imposed on the allowable noise level which is caused mostly by household electric appliances. In this paper, the dynamic behavior of suction and discharge valves are analytically calculated and the lubricant behavior between piston and cylinder are investigated using two-dimensional Reynolds equation. And the piston slap caused by the piston secondary motion is investigated by the finite element method

  15. Molecular Dynamics Study on Lubrication Mechanism in Crystalline Structure between Copper and Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Saitoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the nanosized mechanism of good lubrication in copper disulfide (Cu2S crystal which is used as a sliding material, atomistic modeling of Cu2S is conducted and molecular dynamics (MD simulations are performed in this paper. The interatomic interaction between atoms and crystalline structure in the phase of hexagonal crystal of Cu2S are carefully estimated by first-principle calculations. Then, approximating these interactions, we originally construct a conventional interatomic potential function of Cu2S crystal in its hexagonal phase. By using this potential function, we perform MD simulation of Cu2S crystal which is subjected to shear loading parallel to the basal plane. We compare results obtained by different conditions of sliding directions. Unlike ordinary hexagonal metallic crystals, it is found that the easy-glide direction does not always show small shear stress for Cu2S crystal. Besides, it is found that shearing velocity affects largely the magnitude of averaged shear stress. Generally speaking, higher velocity results in higher resistance against shear deformation. As a result, it is understood that Cu2S crystal exhibits somewhat liquid-like (amorphous behavior in sliding condition and shear resistance increases with increase of sliding speed.

  16. Reduced Need of Lubricity Additives in Soybean Oil Blends Under Boundary Lubrication Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converging prices of vegetable oils and petroleum, along with increased focus on renewable resources, gave more momentum to vegetable oil lubricants. Boundary lubrication properties of four Extreme Pressure (EP) additive blends in conventional Soy Bean Oil (SBO) and Paraffinic Mineral Oil (PMO) of ...

  17. Boundary lubrication of bearing steel in water-based lubricants with functional additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the effect of additives on boundary lubrication of bearing steel for water-based lubrication systems. The oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion and the water-glycol based liquid were selected as the base fluids for research. Sulfur compounds, nitrogen heterocycles and graphene

  18. Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants. Final report, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavestri, R.C. [Imagination Resources, Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Part one of this research provides manufacturers of components of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment with a useful list of lubricant additives, sources, functional properties and chemical species. The list in part one is comprised of domestic lubricant additive suppliers and the results of a literature search that was specifically targeted for additives reported to be useful in polyolester chemistry.

  19. Slide-based ergometer rowing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Anders; Alkjær, T; Kanstrup, I-L

    2012-01-01

    Force production profile and neuromuscular activity during slide-based and stationary ergometer rowing at standardized submaximal power output were compared in 14 male and 8 female National Team rowers. Surface electromyography (EMG) was obtained in selected thoracic and leg muscles along with sy...

  20. Linear Motor With Air Slide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Fenn, Ralph C.

    1993-01-01

    Improved linear actuator comprises air slide and linear electric motor. Unit exhibits low friction, low backlash, and more nearly even acceleration. Used in machinery in which positions, velocities, and accelerations must be carefully controlled and/or vibrations must be suppressed.

  1. SlideDog / Siim Sein

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sein, Siim

    2015-01-01

    SlideDog on multimeediumi esitluse tööriist, mis võimaldab ühendada PowerPointi esitlused, PDF-failid, Prezi esitlused, videoklipid, helifailid, veebilehed ja palju muud üheks sujuvaks esitluskogemuseks konverentsil, seminaril või muul üritusel

  2. Teacher License Reciprocity. 50-State Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    This policy report defines and provides a 50-state review of teacher license reciprocity, explores how state-specific licensing requirements impact the teacher labor market, and includes examples of national and state efforts to facilitate reciprocity.

  3. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  4. The Principle of Structural Reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugnale, Alberto; Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the principle of structural reciprocity, considering its origins in both Occidental and Orient culture and aiming to highlight the definition, main peculiarities and interesting aspects of such concept referring to its application to the world of construction. Issues spannin...

  5. Reciprocity and Humility in Wonderland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Beth

    2011-01-01

    This article supports the perspective of Jan Valle regarding the importance of recognizing the subjectivity inherent in decisions about Learning Disabilities. The author argues that the perspectives of both parents and professionals are informed by subjective judgments that must be taken into account in decision making. A reciprocal approach to…

  6. Indirect Reciprocity : A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Apeldoorn, J.; Schram, A.

    2016-01-01

    Indirect reciprocity involves cooperative acts towards strangers, either in response to their kindness to third parties (downstream) or after receiving kindness from others oneself (upstream). It is considered to be important for the evolution of cooperative behavior amongst humans. Though it has

  7. A Theory of Sequential Reciprocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufwenberg, M.; Kirchsteiger, G.

    1998-01-01

    Many experimental studies indicate that people are motivated by reciprocity. Rabin (1993) develops techniques for incorporating such concerns into game theory and economics. His model, however, does not fare well when applied to situations with an interesting dynamic structure (like many

  8. Social evolution: reciprocity there is.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborsky, Michael

    2013-06-03

    The theory of cooperation predicts that altruism can be established by reciprocity, yet empirical evidence from nature is contentious. Increasingly though, experimental results from social vertebrates challenge the nearly exclusive explanatory power of relatedness for the evolution of cooperation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Indirect reciprocity with optional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghang, Whan; Nowak, Martin A

    2015-01-21

    Indirect reciprocity is a mechanism for the evolution of cooperation that is relevant for prosocial behavior among humans. Indirect reciprocity means that my behavior towards you also depends on what you have done to others. Indirect reciprocity is associated with the evolution of social intelligence and human language. Most approaches to indirect reciprocity assume obligatory interactions, but here we explore optional interactions. In any one round a game between two players is offered. A cooperator accepts a game unless the reputation of the other player indicates a defector. For a game to take place, both players must accept. In a game between a cooperator and a defector, the reputation of the defector is revealed to all players with probability Q. After a sufficiently large number of rounds the identity of all defectors is known and cooperators are no longer exploited. The crucial condition for evolution of cooperation can be written as hQB>1, where h is the average number of rounds per person and B=(b/c)-1 specifies the benefit-to-cost ratio. We analyze both stochastic and deterministic evolutionary game dynamics. We study two extensions that deal with uncertainty: hesitation and malicious gossip. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Do infants detect indirect reciprocity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meristo, Marek; Surian, Luca

    2013-10-01

    In social interactions involving indirect reciprocity, agent A acts prosocially towards B and this prompts C to act prosocially towards A. This happens because A's actions enhanced its reputation in the eyes of third parties. Indirect reciprocity may have been of central importance in the evolution of morality as one of the major mechanisms leading to the selection of helping and fair attitudes. Here we show that 10-month-old infants expect third parties to act positively towards fair donors who have distributed attractive resources equally between two recipients, rather than toward unfair donors who made unequal distributions. Infants' responses were dependent on the reciprocator's perceptual exposure to previous relevant events: they expected the reciprocator to reward the fair donor only when it had seen the distributive actions performed by the donors. We propose that infants were able to generate evaluations of agents that were based on the fairness of their distributive actions and to generate expectations about the social preferences of informed third parties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Indirect Reciprocity under Incomplete Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Indirect reciprocity, in which individuals help others with a good reputation but not those with a bad reputation, is a mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations when individuals do not repeatedly interact with the same partners. In a relatively large society where indirect reciprocity is relevant, individuals may not know each other's reputation even indirectly. Previous studies investigated the situations where individuals playing the game have to determine the action possibly without knowing others' reputations. Nevertheless, the possibility that observers of the game, who generate the reputation of the interacting players, assign reputations without complete information about them has been neglected. Because an individual acts as an interacting player and as an observer on different occasions if indirect reciprocity is endogenously sustained in a society, the incompleteness of information may affect either role. We examine the game of indirect reciprocity when the reputations of players are not necessarily known to observers and to interacting players. We find that the trustful discriminator, which cooperates with good and unknown players and defects against bad players, realizes cooperative societies under seven social norms. Among the seven social norms, three of the four suspicious norms under which cooperation (defection) to unknown players leads to a good (bad) reputation enable cooperation down to a relatively small observation probability. In contrast, the three trustful norms under which both cooperation and defection to unknown players lead to a good reputation are relatively efficient. PMID:21829335

  12. Are Ionic Liquids Good Boundary Lubricants? A Molecular Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Lhermerout

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of ionic liquids as lubricants has attracted substantial interest over the past decade and this has produced a rich literature. The aim of this review is to summarize the main findings about frictional behavior of ionic liquids in the boundary lubrication regime. We first recall why the unusual properties of ionic liquids make them very promising lubricants, and the molecular mechanisms at the origin of their lubricating behavior. We then point out the main challenges to be overcome in order to optimise ionic liquid lubricant performance for common applications. We finally discuss their use in the context of electroactive lubrication.

  13. An Inquiry into Relationship Suicides and Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mark S.; Callanan, Valerie J.; Lester, David; Haines, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Few theories on suicide have been grounded in the norm of reciprocity. There is literature on suicide, however, describing motivations such as retaliation and retreat which can be interpreted as modes of adaptation to the norm of reciprocity. We propose a reciprocity-based theory to explain suicides associated with relationship problems. Employing…

  14. Capuchin Monkeys Judge Third-Party Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R.; Takimoto, Ayaka; Kuroshima, Hika; Fujita, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Increasing interest is being shown in how children develop an understanding of reciprocity in social exchanges and fairness in resource distribution, including social exchanges between third parties. Although there are descriptions of reciprocity on a one-to-one basis in other species, whether nonhumans detect reciprocity and violations of…

  15. 30 CFR 955.16 - Reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reciprocity. 955.16 Section 955.16 Mineral... AND ON INDIAN LANDS § 955.16 Reciprocity. (a) Grant of certificate. OSM shall grant an OSM blaster certificate through reciprocity to any qualified applicant who demonstrates that he or she, and whom OSM finds...

  16. 46 CFR 8.120 - Reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reciprocity. 8.120 Section 8.120 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 8.120 Reciprocity. (a) The Commandant may delegate authority to a classification society that has... determine reciprocity on a “case-by-case” basis. (b) In order to demonstrate that the conditions described...

  17. Polyelectrolyte brushes: a novel stable lubrication system in aqueous conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Terada, Masami; Takahara, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Surface-initiated controlled radical copolymerizations of 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride) (MTAC), and 3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt (SPMK) were carried out on a silicon wafer and glass ball to prepare polyelectrolyte brushes with excellent water wettability. The frictional coefficient of the polymer brushes was recorded on a ball-on-plate type tribometer by linear reciprocating motion of the brush specimen at a selected velocity of 1.5 x 10(-3) m s-1 under a normal load of 0.49 N applied to the stationary glass ball (d = 10 mm) at 298 K. The poly(DMAEMA-co-MPC) brush partially cross-linked by bis(2-iodoethoxy)ethane maintained a relatively low friction coefficient around 0.13 under humid air (RH > 75%) even after 200 friction cycles. The poly(SPMK) brush revealed an extremely low friction coefficient around 0.01 even after 450 friction cycles. We supposed that the abrasion of the brush was prevented owing to the good affinity of the poly(SPMK) brush for water forming a water lubrication layer, and electrostatic repulsive interactions among the brushes bearing sulfonic acid groups. Furthermore, the poly(SPMK-co-MTAC) brush with a chemically cross-linked structure showed a stable low friction coefficient in water even after 1400 friction cycles under a normal load of 139 MPa, indicating that the cross-linking structure improved the wear resistance of the brush layer.

  18. Enhanced Nanotribology and Optimal Self-lubrication in Novel Polymer-Metal Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seam, Alisha; Brostow, Witold; Olea-Mejia, Oscar

    2006-10-01

    Cheaper to produce, light-weight polymeric materials with improved micro and nano-scale tribological characteristics ar gradually replacing the heavier metals in gears, cams, ball-bearings, chains, and other critical machine components which operate under high stress, experience substantial sliding friction and wear, and require external lubrication regimes. Application of such high-performance synthetic materials in a whole range of machinery, manufacturing, aerospace and transportation industries would produce far reaching economic, energy conservation and environmental benefits. This paper devises and investigates a novel and previously untested method of developing self-lubricating and wear-resistant polymer based materials (PBMs) by blending a polymer with small proportions of a metallic additive. Tribological experiments establish that as increasing proportions of the metallic additive Iron (Fe) are added to the polymeric base polyethylene (PE), the friction and wear of the resulting composite (PE-Fe) experiences significant decline until an optimal value of 3 to 5 % Iron and then stabilize. Theoretical analysis reveals this phenomenon to likely be a result of the nano-structural formation of a lubricating oxide layer on surface of the polymer-metal composite. Furthermore, the oxide layer prevented significant degradation of the viscoelastic scratch-recovery of the base polymer, even with 10 percent metal additive (Fe) in the composite samples.

  19. MoS2 solid-lubricating film fabricated by atomic layer deposition on Si substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yazhou; Liu, Lei; Lv, Jun; Yang, Junjie; Sha, Jingjie; Chen, Yunfei

    2018-04-01

    How to reduce friction for improving efficiency in the usage of energy is a constant challenge. Layered material like MoS2 has long been recognized as an effective surface lubricant. Due to low interfacial shear strengths, MoS2 is endowed with nominal frictional coefficient. In this work, MoS2 solid-lubricating film was directly grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si substrate using MoCl5 and H2S. Various methods were used to observe the grown MoS2 film. Moreover, nanotribological properties of the film were observed by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Results show that MoS2 film can effectively reduce the friction force by about 30-45% under different loads, indicating the huge application value of the film as a solid lubricant. Besides the interlayer-interfaces-sliding, the smaller capillary is another reason why the grown MoS2 film has smaller friction force than that of Si.

  20. Tribological Evaluation of Date Palm Fruit Syrup–A Potential Environmental-Friendly Lubricant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Samad Mohammed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Date palm is one of the most cultivated palms mostly found in the Middle Eastern regions of the world. The date palm fruits are not only nutritionally rich, but also have a good amount of fatty acids such as oleic acid, palmitic acid, and linoleic acids, which have excellent anti-wear and lubricating properties, making it a potentially good candidate to be used as an environmentally-friendly lubricant. This study is a preliminary effort to explore the lubricating properties of date palm fruit syrup by conducting ball-on-disc wear tests on mild steel samples. Different concentrations (50, 75, and 100 vol % of the syrup in water were tested at a normal load of 50 N and a sliding linear speed of 0.1 m/s. Scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry were used to characterize the wear tracks and estimate the wear rates. 100 vol % date syrup with a viscosity of 16.95 mPa·s showed excellent results by reducing the coefficient of friction of steel-on-steel from 0.6 (dry conditions to a value of ~0.1. The depth of the wear track reduced from ~152 µm (dry conditions to ~11 µm, signifying a considerable reduction in wear.

  1. Enhancement of tribofilm formation from water lubricated PEEK composites by copper nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chuanping; Fan, Shuguang; Zhang, Shengmao; Zhang, Pingyu; Wang, Qihua

    2018-06-01

    A high-performance tribofilm is crucial to enhance the tribological performance of tribomaterials. In order to promote tribofilm formation under water lubrication conditions, copper nanowires as a functional nanomaterial were filled into neat polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and PEEK10SCF8Gr (i.e., PEEK filled with 10 vol.% short carbon fibers and 8 vol.% graphite flakes). The results show that the addition of copper nanowires and a greater applied load can enhance materials transfer and tribofilm formation during sliding process. Moreover, copper nanowires can share a part of applied load, and retard the fatigue effect to some extent. In addition, copper nanowires, carbon fibers and graphite can synergistically improve the tribological performance and the tribofilm formation under water lubrication and severe working conditions. In particular, only 0.5 vol.% copper nanowires can form a high-performance tribofilm, which endows superior lubricating property and wear resistance capacity of the PEEK10SCF8Gr. Furthermore, the surface analysis indicates that the tribofilm contains some transferred materials and the products from tribochemical reactions as well.

  2. Investigation of reciprocating conformal contact of piston skirt-to-surface modified cylinder liner in high performance engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, S.; Rahnejat, H. [Loughborough University (United Kingdom). Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering; Howell-Smith, S. [Perfect Bore Motorsport Ltd., Andover (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-15

    The article presents detailed analysis of the conforming contact between a piston and cylinder liner in a high-speed racing engine under extreme operating conditions owing to high loads and operating speeds in excess of 19 000 r/min, resulting in a high sliding velocity of 42 m/s. The analysis indicates contact forces generated in the order of 2.5 kN. The contribution due to fluid film lubrication is found to reside in iso-viscous rigid or elastic regimes of lubrication, which is insufficient to form a coherent lubricant film during some parts of the cycle, such as at top-dead-centre (TDC). The article shows that at combustion, 95 per cent of the contact can remain in boundary or mixed regimes of lubrication. Piston skirt surface modification features are used in conjunction with an electrolytically applied composite coating, Ni[SiC]p to produce advanced cylinder liners to remedy the situation. Detailed numerical analysis shows that significant improvement is achieved in the regime of lubrication condition. (author)

  3. Discrete-time nonlinear sliding mode controller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Keywords: Discrete-time delay system, Sliding mode control, nonlinear sliding ... of engineering systems such as chemical process control, delay in the actuator ...... instrumentation from Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology (MNNIT),.

  4. Optimization of wear behavior of electroless Ni-P-W coating under dry and lubricated conditions using genetic algorithm (GA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadeb Mukhopadhyay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the tribological behavior of Ni-P-W coating under dry and lubricated condition. The coating is deposited onto mild steel (AISI 1040 specimens by the electroless method using a sodium hypophosphite based alkaline bath. Coating characterization is done to investigate the effect of microstructure on its performance. The change in microhardness is observed to be quite significant after annealing the deposits at 400°C for 1h. A pin–on–disc type tribo-tester is used to investigate the tribological behavior of the coating under dry and lubricated conditions. The experimental design formulation is based on Taguchi’s orthogonal array. The design parameters considered are the applied normal load, sliding speed and sliding duration while the response parameter is wear depth. Multiple regression analysis is employed to obtain a quadratic model of the response variables with the main design parameters under considerations. A high value of coefficient of determination of 95.3% and 87.5% of wear depth is obtained under dry and lubricated conditions, respectively which indicate good correlation between experimental results and the multiple regression models. Analysis of variance at a confidence level of 95% shows that the models are statistically significant. Finally, the quadratic equations are used as objective functions to obtain the optimal combination of tribo testing parameters for minimum wear depth using genetic algorithm (GA.

  5. Turbine lubrication fluid varnish mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farooq, Khalid [Pall Corporation, Port Washington, NY (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Varnish deposits on internal surfaces in turbine lube systems result in a number of adverse operational issues, especially the restriction and sticking of the moving parts of servo- or directional control valves, resulting in their malfunction. The lubrication fluid has limited solvency for the varnish-forming material, hence a typical turbine will have the majority of this material as deposits and a relatively small portion as suspension in the fluid phase, in quasi-equilibrium with the deposits. The lube system needs to be cleaned by removing the suspended varnish-forming material from the fluid phase, which allows the deposits to re-entrain into the fluid phase, until the majority of the transferable deposits are removed and the fluid carries no significant amount of the material to have any adverse effect. The methods used for the removal of varnish from turbine lube systems include chemical cleaning/flushing, electrostatic charge induced agglomeration/retention, and the adsorption of the varnish suspended in the oil on an adsorbent medium. The paper discusses an absorption-based removal method that utilizes a fibrous medium that has pronounced affinity for the removal and retention of the varnish-forming material from the fluid as well as the deposits from surfaces that are in quasi-equilibrium with the varnish precursors in the fluid. The filtration medium is a composite, made with cellulose bonded by specially formulated, temperature-cured resins. The absorptive medium exhibits high structural and chemical integrity and has been thoroughly tested on operating turbines, showing reduction in varnish levels from the critical range to below normal range in a relatively short time. The experience with the utilization of the absorptive medium in laboratory tests and in two operating turbines is presented. (orig.)

  6. Nanoscale Organic−Inorganic Hybrid Lubricants

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daniel

    2011-03-15

    Silica (SiO2) nanoparticles densely grafted with amphiphilic organic chains are used to create a family of organic-inorganic hybrid lubricants. Short sulfonate-functionalized alkylaryl chains covalently tethered to the particles form a dense corona brush that stabilizes them against aggregation. When these hybrid particles are dispersed in poly-α-olefin (PAO) oligomers, they form homogeneous nanocomposite fluids at both low and high particle loadings. By varying the volume fraction of the SiO2 nanostructures in the PAO nanocomposites, we show that exceptionally stable hybrid lubricants can be created and that their mechanical properties can be tuned to span the spectrum from simple liquids to complex gels. We further show that these hybrid lubricants simultaneously exhibit lower interfacial friction coefficients, enhanced wear and mechanical properties, and superior thermal stability in comparison with either PAO or its nanocomposites created at low nanoparticle loadings. Profilometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis of the wear track show that the enhanced wear characteristics in PAO-SiO2 composite lubricants originate from two sources: localization of the SiO2 particles into the wear track and extension of the elastohydrodynamic lubrication regime to Sommerfeld numbers more than an order of magnitude larger than for PAO. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. Tacit Collusion under Fairness and Reciprocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doruk İriş

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper departs from the standard profit-maximizing model of firm behavior by assuming that firms are motivated in part by personal animosity–or respect–towards their competitors. A reciprocal firm responds to unkind behavior of rivals with unkind actions (negative reciprocity, while at the same time, it responds to kind behavior of rivals with kind actions (positive reciprocity. We find that collusion is easier to sustain when firms have a concern for reciprocity towards competing firms provided that they consider collusive prices to be kind and punishment prices to be unkind. Thus, reciprocity concerns among firms can have adverse welfare consequences for consumers.

  8. Using reciprocity in Boundary Element Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter Møller; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    The concept of reciprocity is widely used in both theoretical and experimental work. In Boundary Element calculations reciprocity is sometimes employed in the solution of computationally expensive scattering problems, which sometimes can be more efficiently dealt with when formulated...... as the reciprocal radiation problem. The present paper concerns the situation of having a point source (which is reciprocal to a point receiver) at or near a discretized boundary element surface. The accuracy of the original and the reciprocal problem is compared in a test case for which an analytical solution...

  9. Preliminary evaluation of PS300: A new self-lubricating high temperature composite coating for use to 800{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DellaCorte, C.; Edmonds, B.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper introduces PS300, a plasma sprayed, self-lubricating composite coating for use in sliding contacts at temperatures to 800{degrees}C. PS300 is a metal bonded chrome oxide coating with silver and BaF{sub 2}/CaF{sub 2} eutectic solid lubricant additives. PS300 is similar to PS200, a chromium carbide based coating; which is currently being investigated for a variety of tribological applications. In pin-on-disk testing up to 650{degrees}C, PS300 exhibited comparable friction and wear properties to PS200. The PS300 matrix, which is predominantly chromium oxide rather than chromium carbide, does not require diamond grinding and polishes readily with silicon carbide abrasives greatly reducing manufacturing costs compared to PS200. It is anticipated that PS300 has potential for sliding bearing and seal applications in both aerospace and general industry.

  10. Mechanics of a gaseous film barrier to lubricant wetting of elastohydrodynamically lubricated conjunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl, J. M.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two analytical models, one based on simple hydrodynamic lubrication and the other on soft elastohydrodynamic lubrication, are presented and compared to delineate the dominant physical parameters that govern the mechanics of a gaseous film between a small droplet of lubricant and the outer race of a ball bearing. Both models are based on the balance of gravity forces, air drag forces, and air film lubrication forces and incorporate a drag coefficient C sub D and a lubrication coefficient C sub L to be determined from experiment. The soft elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) model considers the effects of droplet deformation and solid-surface geometry; the simpler hydrodynamic lubrication (HL) model assumes that the droplet remains essentially spherical. The droplet's angular position depended primarily on the ratio of gas inertia to droplet gravity forces and on the gas Reynolds number and weakly on the ratio of droplet gravity forces to surface tension forces (Bond number) and geometric ratios for the soft EHL. An experimental configuration in which an oil droplet is supported by an air film on the rotating outer race of a ball bearing within a pressure-controlled chamber produced measurements of droplet angular position as a function of outer-race velocity droplet size and type, and chamber pressure.

  11. Marmoset monkeys evaluate third-party reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Yasue, Miyuki; Banno, Taku; Ichinohe, Noritaka

    2014-05-01

    Many non-human primates have been observed to reciprocate and to understand reciprocity in one-to-one social exchanges. A recent study demonstrated that capuchin monkeys are sensitive to both third-party reciprocity and violation of reciprocity; however, whether this sensitivity is a function of general intelligence, evidenced by their larger brain size relative to other primates, remains unclear. We hypothesized that highly pro-social primates, even with a relatively smaller brain, would be sensitive to others' reciprocity. Here, we show that common marmosets discriminated between human actors who reciprocated in social exchanges with others and those who did not. Monkeys accepted rewards less frequently from non-reciprocators than they did from reciprocators when the non-reciprocators had retained all food items, but they accepted rewards from both actors equally when they had observed reciprocal exchange between the actors. These results suggest that mechanisms to detect unfair reciprocity in third-party social exchanges do not require domain-general higher cognitive ability based on proportionally larger brains, but rather emerge from the cooperative and pro-social tendencies of species, and thereby suggest this ability evolved in multiple primate lineages. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Lubricated immersed boundary method in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fai, Thomas G.; Rycroft, Chris H.

    2018-03-01

    Many biological examples of fluid-structure interaction, including the transit of red blood cells through the narrow slits in the spleen and the intracellular trafficking of vesicles into dendritic spines, involve the near-contact of elastic structures separated by thin layers of fluid. Motivated by such problems, we introduce an immersed boundary method that uses elements of lubrication theory to resolve thin fluid layers between immersed boundaries. We demonstrate 2nd-order accurate convergence for simple two-dimensional flows with known exact solutions to showcase the increased accuracy of this method compared to the standard immersed boundary method. Motivated by the phenomenon of wall-induced migration, we apply the lubricated immersed boundary method to simulate an elastic vesicle near a wall in shear flow. We also simulate the dynamics of a vesicle traveling through a narrow channel and observe the ability of the lubricated method to capture the vesicle motion on relatively coarse fluid grids.

  13. Additives for high-temperature liquid lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Emil A.; Yavrouian, Andre H.; Repar, John

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary research program was conducted to demonstrate a new concept for additives to liquid lubricants. It was demonstrated that suspensions of o-phthalonitrile and a substituted 1,2-maleonitrile in mineral oil and dilute solutions of o-phthalonitrile and tetrafluoro-o-phthalonitrile extended the lifetime of bearings under boundary lubricating conditions. The solutions exhibited coefficients of friction under high loads of 0.02-0.03. These results were consistent with the hypothesis that these compounds react with the hot metal surface to form a planar lubricating film by means of a metal or metal oxide template reaction. Also, the adherence was very strong due to the chelating action of the planar macrocycles postulated to form under the experimental conditions.

  14. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on availability of additional R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  15. Electrical charging effects on the sliding friction of a model nano-confined ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozza, R.; Vanossi, A. [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); CNR-IOM Democritos National Simulation Center, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Benassi, A. [CNR-IOM Democritos National Simulation Center, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Tosatti, E. [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); CNR-IOM Democritos National Simulation Center, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Strada Costiera 11, 34014 Trieste (Italy)

    2015-10-14

    Recent measurements suggest the possibility to exploit ionic liquids (ILs) as smart lubricants for nano-contacts, tuning their tribological and rheological properties by charging the sliding interfaces. Following our earlier theoretical study of charging effects on nanoscale confinement and squeezout of a model IL, we present here molecular dynamics simulations of the frictional and lubrication properties of that model under charging conditions. First, we describe the case when two equally charged plates slide while being held together to a confinement distance of a few molecular layers. The shear sliding stress is found to rise strongly and discontinuously as the number of IL layers decreases stepwise. However, the shear stress shows, within each given number of layers, only a weak dependence upon the precise value of the normal load, a result in agreement with data extracted from recent experiments. We subsequently describe the case of opposite charging of the sliding plates and follow the shear stress when the charging is slowly and adiabatically reversed in the course of time, under fixed load. Despite the fixed load, the number and structure of the confined IL layers change with changing charge, and that in turn drives strong friction variations. The latter involves first of all charging-induced freezing of the IL film, followed by a discharging-induced melting, both made possible by the nanoscale confinement. Another mechanism for charging-induced frictional changes is a shift of the plane of maximum shear from mid-film to the plate-film interface, and vice versa. While these occurrences and results invariably depend upon the parameters of the model IL and upon its specific interaction with the plates, the present study helps identifying a variety of possible behavior, obtained under very simple assumptions, while connecting it to an underlying equilibrium thermodynamics picture.

  16. Friction of self-lubricating surfaces by ion beam techniques. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, R.S.; Rai, A.K.

    1992-05-01

    UES, Inc. conducted a research and development program designed to establish conditions for ion implantation/mixing of suitable additives into the surfaces of bulk ceramics and metals for obtaining self-lubricating low friction and wear characteristics. The substrates considered were ZrO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, steel and Ni-base superalloy. The lubricant additives chosen were BaF{sub 2}/CaF{sub 2}Ag, MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The initial tasks of the program were to synthesis these lubricant compounds by co-implantation of constituent elements if sufficient beams of desired elements were obtained. The final tasks were to investigate high energy (MeV) ion mixing of deposited coatings as well as to investigate ion beam assisted deposition using low energy ion beams. It was shown that MoS{sub 2} can be synthesized by co-implantation of Mo{sup +} and S{sup +} in ceramic materials with appropriate choice of energies to obtain nearly overlapping depth profiles. The sliding life of DC magnetron sputtered MoS{sub 2} films of thicknesses {approximately}7500{Angstrom} on ceramic materials such as sapphire, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 3} were improved by ten to thousand fold after 2 Mev Ag{sup +} ion mixing. Ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and ion beam mixing were utilized to fabricate self-lubricating coatings of CaF{sub 2}/Ag and BaF/CaF{sub 2}/Ag composites.

  17. Tolerance Optimization for Mechanisms with Lubricated Joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.-H.; Lee, S.J.; Choi, D.-H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses an analytical approach to tolerance optimization for planar mechanisms with lubricated joints based on mechanical error analysis. The mobility method is applied to consider the lubrication effects at joints and planar mechanisms are stochastically defined by using the clearance vector model for mechanical error analysis. The uncertainties considered in the analysis are tolerances on link lengths and radial clearances and these are selected as design variables. To show the validity of the proposed method for mechanical error analysis, it is applied to two examples, and the results obtained are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the mechanical error analysis, tolerance optimizations are applied to the examples

  18. Adaptive Fuzzy Integral Sliding-Mode Regulator for Induction Motor Using Nonlinear Sliding Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Yong-Kun Lu

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive fuzzy integral sliding-mode controller using nonlinear sliding surface is designed for the speed regulator of a field-oriented induction motor drive in this paper. Combining the conventional integral sliding surface with fractional-order integral, a nonlinear sliding surface is proposed for the integral sliding-mode speed control, which can overcome the windup problem and the convergence speed problem. An adaptive fuzzy control term is utilized to approximate the uncertainty. The ...

  19. Tribological properties of three-dimensional braided carbon/Kevlar/epoxy hybrid composites under dry and lubricated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Y.Z.; Huang, Y.; He, F.; Li, Q.Y.; Lian, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the tribological properties of three-dimensional (3-D) braided carbon/Kevlar/epoxy hybrid composites. Their specific wear rate and the coefficient of friction were examined as a function of operating conditions (load and sliding distance) under dry and lubricated conditions. In addition, the 3-D braided hybrid composites with varying carbon to Kevlar fiber volume ratio were tested to assess hybrid effects. It was found that the friction and wear rate decreased with sliding distance and then leveled off under dry and lubricated conditions. Different changing patterns with normal load were observed under two different sliding conditions. Furthermore, it was noted that negative hybrid effects on the wear resistance and the friction coefficient were identified for the current 3-D braided hybrid system. The composite with a carbon to Kevlar ratio of 3:2 was found to have the least wear and friction among all 3-D braided hybrid composites studied. Worn surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and wear mechanisms were discussed in this study

  20. Development and efficiency assessment of process lubrication for hot forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargin, S.; Artyukh, Viktor; Ignatovich, I.; Dikareva, Varvara

    2017-10-01

    The article considers innovative technologies in testing and production of process lubricants for hot bulk forging. There were developed new compositions of eco-friendly water-graphite process lubricants for hot extrusion and forging. New approaches to efficiency assessment of process lubricants are developed and described in the following article. Laboratory and field results are presented.

  1. Deposited Micro Porous Layer as Lubricant Carrier in Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Bay, Niels; Tang, Peter Torben

    2008-01-01

    as lubricant reservoirs. Conventional friction tests for cold forming; ring compression and double cup extrusion tests are carried out with Molykote DX paste and mineral oil as lubricant. Both lubricants act as intended for the ring compressions test whereas only the low viscosity oil perform successfully...... in the cup extrusion test. For all specimens without the porous coating, high friction conditions are identified....

  2. FY2014 Fuel & Lubricant Technologies Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stork, Kevin [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Annual progress report for Fuel & Lubricant Technologies. The Fuel & Lubricant Technologies Program supports fuels and lubricants research and development (R&D) to provide vehicle manufacturers and users with cost-competitive options that enable high fuel economy with low emissions, and contribute to petroleum displacement.

  3. Developments of New Lubricants for Cold Forging of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenberg, Thomas; Christensen, Erik; Olesen, P.

    1997-01-01

    Two new lubricant systems for cold forging of stainless steel have been developed. The main component of these systems are FeCl3 and ZnCa2(PO4)2, respectively. Both lubricant systems have been tested using a backward extrusion test. The results show excellent lubricating properties with respect...

  4. Evaluation report on the development of ultra-solid lubricant with cluster diamond; Cluster diamond wo riyoshita kotai junkatsu fukugo zairyo no kaihatsu hyoka hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The fiscal 1998-2000 results of efforts to develop cluster diamond (CD)-diffused solid lubricant composite materials expected to exhibit excellent lubrication are stated. Since friction greatly affects machine life and energy efficiency, friction reduction is an important task. Very hard and microscopic CD was utilized for the achievement of a friction coefficient of 0.08. A manufacturing technology for molds 10nm or smaller was developed, which enabled the development of a gear not larger than 8mm. The success will enable the operation of micromachines in the absence of lubrication which is impossible at present. A CD-aided functional layer creation technology was also developed. It is expected that the development and practical application of micromechanisms will make rapid progress in the 21st century. Much is expected from the creation, and goods with the achievement applied thereto, of advanced technologies whereinto non-lubrication, functional layer creation, and excellent heat conductivity are incorporated. It is quite significant that, since CD is available in any field as far as light-load low-speed sliding conditions are satisfied, sliding parts will be improved and service life will be prolonged. (NEDO)

  5. Attractors near grazing–sliding bifurcations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendinning, P; Kowalczyk, P; Nordmark, A B

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove, for the first time, that multistability can occur in three-dimensional Fillipov type flows due to grazing–sliding bifurcations. We do this by reducing the study of the dynamics of Filippov type flows around a grazing–sliding bifurcation to the study of appropriately defined one-dimensional maps. In particular, we prove the presence of three qualitatively different types of multiple attractors born in grazing–sliding bifurcations. Namely, a period-two orbit with a sliding segment may coexist with a chaotic attractor, two stable, period-two and period-three orbits with a segment of sliding each may coexist, or a non-sliding and period-three orbit with two sliding segments may coexist

  6. A new atomic force microscopy based technique for studying nanoscale friction at high sliding velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tambe, Nikhil S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2005-01-01

    Tribological studies on the micro/nanoscale conducted using an atomic force microscope (AFM) have been limited to low sliding velocities ( -1 ) due to inherent instrument limitations. Studies of tribological properties of materials, coatings and lubricants that find applications in micro/nanoelectromechanical systems and magnetic head-media in magnetic storage devices that operate at high sliding velocities have thus been rendered inadequate. We have developed a new technique to study nanotribological properties at high sliding velocities (up to 10 mm s -1 ) by modifying the commercial AFM set-up. A custom calibrated nanopositioning piezo stage is used for mounting samples and scanning is achieved by providing a triangular input voltage pulse. A capacitive sensor feedback control system is employed to ensure a constant velocity profile during scanning. Friction data are obtained by processing the AFM laser photo-diode signals using a high sampling rate data acquisition card. The utility of the modified set-up for nanoscale friction studies at high sliding velocities is demonstrated using results obtained from various tests performed to study the effect of scan size, rest time, acceleration and velocity on the frictional force for single crystal silicon (100) with native oxide

  7. Imperfect information facilitates the evolution of reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Shun

    2016-06-01

    The existence of cooperation demands explanation since cooperation is costly to the actor. Reciprocity has long been regarded as a potential explanatory mechanism for the existence of cooperation. Reciprocity is a mechanism wherein a cooperator responds to an opponent's behavior by switching his/her own behavior. Hence, a possible problematic case relevant to the theory of reciprocity evolution arises when the mechanism is such that the information regarding an opponent's behavior is imperfect. Although it has been confirmed also by previous theoretical studies that imperfect information interferes with the evolution of reciprocity, this argument is based on the assumption that there are no mistakes in behavior. And, a previous study presumed that it might be expected that when such mistakes occur, reciprocity can more readily evolve in the case of imperfect information than in the case of perfect information. The reason why the previous study considers so is that in the former case, reciprocators can miss defections incurred by other reciprocators' mistakes due to imperfect information, allowing cooperation to persist when such reciprocators meet. However, contrary to this expectation, the previous study has shown that even when mistakes occur, imperfect information interferes with the evolution of reciprocity. Nevertheless, the previous study assumed that payoffs are linear (i.e., that the effect of behavior is additive and there are no synergetic effects). In this study, we revisited the same problem but removed the assumption that payoffs are linear. We used evolutionarily stable strategy analysis to compare the condition for reciprocity to evolve when mistakes occur and information is imperfect with the condition for reciprocity to evolve when mistakes occur and information is perfect. Our study revealed that when payoffs are not linear, imperfect information can facilitate the evolution of reciprocity when mistakes occur; while when payoffs are linear

  8. Non-linear friction in reciprocating hydraulic rod seals: Simulation and measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, A K; Tilley, D G; Johnston, D N; Bowen, C R; Keogh, P S

    2009-01-01

    Non-linear seal friction can impede the performance of hydraulic actuation systems designed for high precision positioning with favourable dynamic response. Methods for predicting seal friction are required to help develop sealing systems for this type of application. Recent simulation techniques have claimed progress, although have yet to be validated experimentally. A conventional reciprocating rod seal is analysed using established elastohydrodynamic theory and the mixed lubrication Greenwood-Williamson-average Reynolds model. A test rig was used to assess the accuracy of the simulation results for both instroke and outstroke. Inverse hydrodynamic theory is shown to predict a U 0.5 power law between rod speed and friction. Comparison with experimental data shows the theory to be qualitatively inaccurate and to predict friction levels an order of magnitude lower than those measured. It was not possible to model the regions very close to the inlet and outlet due to the high pressure gradients at the edges of the contact. The mixed lubrication model produces friction levels within the correct order of magnitude, although incorrectly predicts higher friction during instroke than outstroke. Previous experiments have reported higher friction during instroke than outstroke for rectangular seals, suggesting that the mixed lubrication model used could possibly be suitable for symmetric seals, although not for seal tribology in general.

  9. The effects of ion implantation on the tribology of perfluoropolyether-lubricated 440C stainless steel couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogrin, Bradley; Jones, William R., Jr.; Wilbur, Paul J.; Pilar, Herrera-Fierro; Williamson, Don L.

    1995-01-01

    The lubricating lifetime of thin films of a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) based on hexafluoropropene oxide in the presence of ion implanted 440C stainless steel is presented. Stainless steel discs, either unimplanted or implanted with N2, C, Ti, Ti + N2, or Ti + C had a thin film of PFPE (60-400 A) applied to them reproducibly (+/- 20 percent) and uniformly (+/- 15 percent) using a device developed for this study. The lifetimes of these films were quantified by measuring the number of sliding-wear cycles required to induce an increase in the friction coefficient from an initial value characteristic of the lubricated wear couple to a final, or failure value, characteristic of an unlubricated, unimplanted couple. The tests were performed in a dry nitrogen atmosphere (less than 1 percent RH) at room temperature using a 3 N normal load with a relative sliding speed of 0.05 m/s. The lubricated lifetime of the 440C couple was increased by an order of magnitude by implanting the disc with Ti. Ranked from most to least effective, the implanted species were: Ti; Ti+C; unimplanted; N2; C approximately equals Ti+N2. The mechanism postulated to explain these results involves the formation of a passivating or reactive layer which inhibits or facilitates the production of active sites. The corresponding surface microstructures induced by ion implantation, obtained using x-ray diffraction and conversion electron Mossbauer spectroscopy, ranked from most to least effective in enhancing lubricant lifetime were: amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti; amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti-C + TiC; unimplanted; epsilon-(Fe,Cr)(sub x)N, x = 2 or 3; amorphous Fe-Cr-C approximately equals amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti-N.

  10. Tribology: Friction, lubrication, and wear technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: introduction and definitions of terms; friction concepts; lubrication technology concepts; wear technology concepts; and tribological transitions. This document is designed for educators who seek to teach these concepts to their students.

  11. Physicochemical properties and lubricant potentials of Blighia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fatty acid methyl ester analysis (FAME) revealed 96.89 % of monounsaturated fatty acids and esters in the range ... uniformity, hardness, disintegration and dissolution characteristics. Conclusion: Blighia sapida seed oil is a potentially useful low-cost tablet lubricant. However ... Products derived from plants sources can be ...

  12. A Review of Ionic Liquid Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony E. Somers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to ever increasing demands on lubricants, such as increased service intervals, reduced volumes and reduced emissions, there is a need to develop new lubricants and improved wear additives. Ionic liquids (ILs are room temperature molten salts that have recently been shown to offer many advantages in this area. The application of ILs as lubricants in a diverse range of systems has found that these materials can show remarkable protection against wear and significantly reduce friction in the neat state. Recently, some researchers have shown that a small family of ILs can also be incorporated into non-polar base oils, replacing traditional anti-wear additives, with excellent performance of the neat IL being maintained. ILs consist of large asymmetrical ions that may readily adsorb onto a metal surface and produce a thin, protective film under boundary lubrication conditions. Under extreme pressure conditions, certain IL compounds can also react to form a protective tribofilm, in particular when fluorine, phosphorus or boron atoms are present in the constituent ions.

  13. On the lubrication of mechanical face seals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbinge, H.

    1999-01-01

    Hence, in this thesis, a model is presented which is able to calculate a complete Stribeck curve for a mechanical face seal and, as a consequence, the transition from full film to mixed lubrication as a function of the operational conditions. This model is based on a combination of a contact model

  14. Self-lubricating fluid bearing assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapich, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    A sealed self-lubricating fluid bearing assembly is described for circulating fluid in the form of a gas coolant in a nuclear reactor, the power for the circulator being provided by a shaft located within the primary containment vessel. In such a system the reactor coolant is isolated from the fluid region at the far end of the drive shaft. (U.K.)

  15. A quantitative lubricant test for deep drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan L.

    2010-01-01

    A tribological test for deep drawing has been developed by which the performance of lubricants may be evaluated quantitatively measuring the maximum backstroke force on the punch owing to friction between tool and workpiece surface. The forming force is found not to give useful information...

  16. Thermo-hydrodynamic lubrication in hydrodynamic bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneau, Dominique; Souchet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This Series provides the necessary elements to the development and validation of numerical prediction models for hydrodynamic bearings. This book describes the thermo-hydrodynamic and the thermo-elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication. The algorithms are methodically detailed and each section is thoroughly illustrated.

  17. Self-lubricating fluorine shaft seal material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, W. R.

    1970-01-01

    Lubricating film is produced by a reaction of fluorine with a composite of aluminum oxide and nickel powder. The rate of nickel fluoride generation is proportional to the rate at which the fluoride is rubbed off the surface, allowing the seal to operate with the lowest possible heating.

  18. Formulation of lubricating grease using Beeswax thickener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaila, N.; Japar, A.; Aizudin, M.; Aziz, A.; Najib Razali, Mohd

    2018-04-01

    The issues on environmental pollution has brought the industries to seek the alternative green solutions for lubricating grease formulation. The significant challenges in producing modified grease are in which considering the chosen thickener as one of the environmental friendly material. The main purposes of the current research were to formulate lubricant grease using different types of base oils and to study the effect of thickener on the formulated lubricant grease. Used oil and motor oil were used as the base oils for the grease preparation. Beeswax and Damar were used as thickener and additive. The grease is tested based on its consistency, stability and oil bleeding. The prepared greases achieved grease consistency of grade 2 and 3 except for grease with unfiltered used oil. Grease formulated with used oil and synthetic oil tend to harden and loss its lubricating ability under high temperature compared to motor oil’ grease. Grease modification using environmental friendly thickener were successfully formulated but it is considered as a low temperature grease as the beeswax have low melting point of 62°C-65°C.

  19. 14 CFR 33.71 - Lubrication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... arranged that condensed water vapor that might freeze and obstruct the line cannot accumulate at any point... fireproof. (9) Each unpressurized oil tank may not leak when subjected to a maximum operating temperature... supply becomes depleted due to failure of any part of the lubricating system other than the tank itself...

  20. Exploring Low Emission Lubricants for Diesel Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J. M.

    2000-07-06

    A workshop to explore the technological issues involved with the removal of sulfur from lubricants and the development of low emission diesel engine oils was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 30 through February 1, 2000. It presented an overview of the current technology by means of panel discussions and technical presentations from industry, government, and academia.

  1. The Lubrication Qualities of Dimethyl Ether (DME)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Sorenson, Spencer C; Jakobsen, J.

    2002-01-01

    by mixing the DME with reasonable amounts of additives. The main conclusion drawn from these measurements is that a combination of lubricity and viscosity comparable to one of diesel oil cannot be reached in the case of DME unless a huge amount of additive is used. This is not an attractive solution...

  2. The use of screening tests in spacecraft lubricant evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeras, Chris; Hilton, Mike; Carre, David; Didziulis, Stephen; Fleischauer, Paul

    1993-01-01

    A lubricant screening test fixture has been devised in order to satisfy the need to obtain lubricant performance data in a timely manner. This fixture has been used to perform short-term tests on potential lubricants for several spacecraft applications. The results of these tests have saved time by producing qualitative performance rankings of lubricant selections prior to life testing. To date, this test fixture has been used to test lubricants for 3 particular applications. The qualitative results from these tests have been verified by life test results and have provided insight into the function of various anti-wear additives.

  3. Tribology. Mechanisms of antiwear tribofilm growth revealed in situ by single-asperity sliding contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosvami, N N; Bares, J A; Mangolini, F; Konicek, A R; Yablon, D G; Carpick, R W

    2015-04-03

    Zinc dialkyldithiophosphates (ZDDPs) form antiwear tribofilms at sliding interfaces and are widely used as additives in automotive lubricants. The mechanisms governing the tribofilm growth are not well understood, which limits the development of replacements that offer better performance and are less likely to degrade automobile catalytic converters over time. Using atomic force microscopy in ZDDP-containing lubricant base stock at elevated temperatures, we monitored the growth and properties of the tribofilms in situ in well-defined single-asperity sliding nanocontacts. Surface-based nucleation, growth, and thickness saturation of patchy tribofilms were observed. The growth rate increased exponentially with either applied compressive stress or temperature, consistent with a thermally activated, stress-assisted reaction rate model. Although some models rely on the presence of iron to catalyze tribofilm growth, the films grew regardless of the presence of iron on either the tip or substrate, highlighting the critical role of stress and thermal activation. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Sliding wear characteristics of carburized steels and thermally refined steels implanted with nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Keiichi; Koda, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Eiichi.

    1995-01-01

    In order to concretely examine the application of surface reforming by ion implantation, nitrogen ion implantation was applied to the thermally refined steels S45C and SCM440 and the carburized steel SCM415, which are high versatile steels for mechanical structures, and their friction and wear characteristics were examined. The results are summarized as follows. In the surface-reformed material, in which nitrogen was implanted for the purpose of improving the seizure durability of the carburized steel, the load-frictional coefficient curve in lubricated sliding friction was similar to that of the material without implantation, but it was recognized that the load at which seizure occurred reached 2000 kgf or more, and as the amount of implantation was more, the material withstood higher load. In the lubricated sliding friction using a pin-ring type wear testing machine of the thermally refined steels and those to which implantation was applied, it was recognized that the specific wear amount was less in the implanted steels than in those without implantation. The results of the analysis of the implanted surface layers and the friction surfaces are reported. (K.I.)

  5. Applications of sliding mode control

    CERN Document Server

    Ghommam, Jawhar; Zhu, Quanmin

    2017-01-01

    This book presents essential studies and applications in the context of sliding mode control, highlighting the latest findings from interdisciplinary theoretical studies, ranging from computational algorithm development to representative applications. Readers will learn how to easily tailor the techniques to accommodate their ad hoc applications. To make the content as accessible as possible, the book employs a clear route in each paper, moving from background to motivation, to quantitative development (equations), and lastly to case studies/illustrations/tutorials (simulations, experiences, curves, tables, etc.). Though primarily intended for graduate students, professors and researchers from related fields, the book will also benefit engineers and scientists from industry. .

  6. Numerical analysis of gas leakage in the piston-cylinder clearance of reciprocating compressors considering compressibility effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, V. M.; Deschamps, C. J.

    2017-08-01

    Leakage is a major source of inefficiency in low-capacity reciprocating compressors. Not only does it lower the mass flow rate provided by the compressor, reducing its volumetric efficiency, but also gives rise to outflux of energy that decreases the isentropic efficiency. Leakage in the piston-cylinder clearance of reciprocating compressors is driven by the piston motion and pressure difference between the compression chamber and the shell internal environment. In compressors adopted for domestic refrigeration, such a clearance is usually filled by a mixture of refrigerant and lubricating oil. Besides its lubricating function, the oil also acts as sealing element for the piston-cylinder clearance, and hence leakage is expected to be more detrimental to oil-free compressors. This paper presents a model based on the Reynolds equation for compressible fluid flow to predict leakage in oil-free reciprocating compressors. The model is solved throughout the compression cycle so as to assess the effect of the clearance geometry and piston velocity on leakage and compressor efficiency. The results show that compressible fluid flow formulation must be considered for predictions of gas leakage in the cylinder-piston clearance.

  7. Onsager Reciprocity in Premelting Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, S. S. L.; Spannuth, M. J.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    The diffusive motion of foreign particles dispersed in a premelting solid is analyzed within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. We determine the mass diffusion coefficient, thermal diffusion coefficient and Soret coefficient of the particles in the dilute limit, and find good agreement with experimental data. In contrast to liquid suspensions, the unique nature of premelting solids allows us to derive an expression for the Dufour coefficient and independently verify the Onsager reciprocal relation coupling diffusion to the flow of heat. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  8. Onsager Reciprocity in Premelting Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, S. S. L.

    2009-02-01

    The diffusive motion of foreign particles dispersed in a premelting solid is analyzed within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. We determine the mass diffusion coefficient, thermal diffusion coefficient and Soret coefficient of the particles in the dilute limit, and find good agreement with experimental data. In contrast to liquid suspensions, the unique nature of premelting solids allows us to derive an expression for the Dufour coefficient and independently verify the Onsager reciprocal relation coupling diffusion to the flow of heat. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  9. Reciprocity of mobile phone calls

    OpenAIRE

    Kovanen, Lauri; Saramaki, Jari; Kaski, Kimmo

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the reciprocity of human behaviour based on mobile phone usage records. The underlying question is whether human relationships are mutual, in the sense that both are equally active in keeping up the relationship, or is it on the contrary typical that relationships are lopsided, with one party being significantly more active than the other. We study this question with the help of a mobile phone data set consisting of all mobile phone calls between 5.3 million customers of...

  10. Towards a unified theory of reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    In a unified theory of human reciprocity, the strong and weak forms are similar because neither is biologically altruistic and both require normative motivation to support cooperation. However, strong reciprocity is necessary to support cooperation in public goods games. It involves inflicting costs on defectors; and though the costs for punishers are recouped, recouping costs requires complex institutions that would not have emerged if weak reciprocity had been enough.

  11. Detecting reciprocity at a global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Morgan R; Obradovich, Nick; Sun, Lijun; Woon, Wei Lee; LeVeck, Brad L; Rahwan, Iyad

    2018-01-01

    Reciprocity stabilizes cooperation from the level of microbes all the way up to humans interacting in small groups, but does reciprocity also underlie stable cooperation between larger human agglomerations, such as nation states? Famously, evolutionary models show that reciprocity could emerge as a widespread strategy for achieving international cooperation. However, existing studies have only detected reciprocity-driven cooperation in a small number of country pairs. We apply a new method for detecting mutual influence in dynamical systems to a new large-scale data set that records state interactions with high temporal resolution. Doing so, we detect reciprocity between many country pairs in the international system and find that these reciprocating country pairs exhibit qualitatively different cooperative dynamics when compared to nonreciprocating pairs. Consistent with evolutionary theories of cooperation, reciprocating country pairs exhibit higher levels of stable cooperation and are more likely to punish instances of noncooperation. However, countries in reciprocity-based relationships are also quicker to forgive single acts of noncooperation by eventually returning to previous levels of mutual cooperation. By contrast, nonreciprocating pairs are more likely to exploit each other's cooperation via higher rates of defection. Together, these findings provide the strongest evidence to date that reciprocity is a widespread mechanism for achieving international cooperation.

  12. Detecting reciprocity at a global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Morgan R.; Obradovich, Nick; Sun, Lijun; Woon, Wei Lee; LeVeck, Brad L.; Rahwan, Iyad

    2018-01-01

    Reciprocity stabilizes cooperation from the level of microbes all the way up to humans interacting in small groups, but does reciprocity also underlie stable cooperation between larger human agglomerations, such as nation states? Famously, evolutionary models show that reciprocity could emerge as a widespread strategy for achieving international cooperation. However, existing studies have only detected reciprocity-driven cooperation in a small number of country pairs. We apply a new method for detecting mutual influence in dynamical systems to a new large-scale data set that records state interactions with high temporal resolution. Doing so, we detect reciprocity between many country pairs in the international system and find that these reciprocating country pairs exhibit qualitatively different cooperative dynamics when compared to nonreciprocating pairs. Consistent with evolutionary theories of cooperation, reciprocating country pairs exhibit higher levels of stable cooperation and are more likely to punish instances of noncooperation. However, countries in reciprocity-based relationships are also quicker to forgive single acts of noncooperation by eventually returning to previous levels of mutual cooperation. By contrast, nonreciprocating pairs are more likely to exploit each other’s cooperation via higher rates of defection. Together, these findings provide the strongest evidence to date that reciprocity is a widespread mechanism for achieving international cooperation. PMID:29326983

  13. Friction Regimes of Water-Lubricated Diamond (111): Role of Interfacial Ether Groups and Tribo-Induced Aromatic Surface Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Moras, Gianpietro; Moseler, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale quantum molecular dynamics of water-lubricated diamond (111) surfaces in sliding contact reveals multiple friction regimes. While water starvation causes amorphization of the tribological interface, small H2O traces are sufficient to preserve crystallinity. This can result in high friction due to cold welding via ether groups or in ultralow friction due to aromatic surface passivation triggered by tribo-induced Pandey reconstruction. At higher water coverage, Grotthuss-type diffusion and H2O dissociation yield dense H /OH surface passivation leading to another ultralow friction regime.

  14. Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

    2006-11-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis has been followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. In this program, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been adapted and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed ring-pack friction reduction of 30-40%, which translates to total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. The study on surface textures, including roughness characteristics, cross hatch patterns, dimples and grooves have shown that even relatively small-scale changes can have a large effect on ring/liner friction, in some cases reducing FMEP by as much as 30% from a smooth surface case. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Testing of low-friction lubricants showed that total engine FMEP reduced by up to {approx}16.5% from the commercial reference oil without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. Piston friction studies

  15. Histopathology slide projector: a simple improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Akhilesh K R; Bhattacharya, Nirjhar

    2008-07-01

    The ability to examine histopathology and other hematological slides under microscope is a necessary and important service which should be available in every health facility. The slides need to be projected on to a screen. We describe an inexpensive and easily constructed technique for projecting magnified images of slides using a simple microscope. It is effective both for making observations and for use as a teaching aid.

  16. Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles

    KAUST Repository

    Giese, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Modern multi-agent systems frequently use highlevel planners to extract basic paths for agents, and then rely on local collision avoidance to ensure that the agents reach their destinations without colliding with one another or dynamic obstacles. One state-of-the-art local collision avoidance technique is Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance (ORCA). Despite being fast and efficient for circular-shaped agents, ORCA may deadlock when polygonal shapes are used. To address this shortcoming, we introduce Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles (RRVO). RRVO generalizes ORCA by introducing a notion of rotation for polygonally-shaped agents. This generalization permits more realistic motion than ORCA and does not suffer from as much deadlock. In this paper, we present the theory of RRVO and show empirically that it does not suffer from the deadlock issue ORCA has, permits agents to reach goals faster, and has a comparable collision rate at the cost of performance overhead quadratic in the (typically small) user-defined parameter δ.

  17. Reciprocal Learning: One Teacher's Narrative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adrienne RIGLER

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a personal narrative from the perspective of one teacher in Toronto who participated in the Canada-China Reciprocal Learning in Teacher Education and School Education Partnership Grant Project.I took part in a Sister School partnership between 2013 and 2017.Over the four years,I came to understand relationships in an international professional learning community.Participating in the project gave me the benefit of seeing my practice through an international lens.For my students,it offered a global citizenship experience.Although there are numerous professional development opportunities in Toronto,this partnership extends beyond a lunch and learn,or a full day professional learning.The commitment to my partners has fueled my desire to incorporate new teaching ideas and has required ongoing reflection on my own teaching practice.In this article,I will explain some of the challenges,stages of development,reciprocal learning,and implications for future international professional learning communities.

  18. Quantum coherence: Reciprocity and distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Asutosh, E-mail: asukumar@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad-211019 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2017-03-18

    Quantum coherence is the outcome of the superposition principle. Recently, it has been theorized as a quantum resource, and is the premise of quantum correlations in multipartite systems. It is therefore interesting to study the coherence content and its distribution in a multipartite quantum system. In this work, we show analytically as well as numerically the reciprocity between coherence and mixedness of a quantum state. We find that this trade-off is a general feature in the sense that it is true for large spectra of measures of coherence and of mixedness. We also study the distribution of coherence in multipartite systems by looking at monogamy-type relation–which we refer to as additivity relation–between coherences of different parts of the system. We show that for the Dicke states, while the normalized measures of coherence violate the additivity relation, the unnormalized ones satisfy the same. - Highlights: • Quantum coherence. • Reciprocity between quantum coherence and mixedness. • Distribution of quantum coherence in multipartite quantum systems. • Additivity relation for distribution of quantum coherence in Dicke and “X” states.

  19. Indirect reciprocity with trinary reputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Shoma; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2013-01-21

    Indirect reciprocity is a reputation-based mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations when individuals do not repeatedly meet. The conditions under which cooperation based on indirect reciprocity occurs have been examined in great details. Most previous theoretical analysis assumed for mathematical tractability that an individual possesses a binary reputation value, i.e., good or bad, which depends on their past actions and other factors. However, in real situations, reputations of individuals may be multiple valued. Another puzzling discrepancy between the theory and experiments is the status of the so-called image scoring, in which cooperation and defection are judged to be good and bad, respectively, independent of other factors. Such an assessment rule is found in behavioral experiments, whereas it is known to be unstable in theory. In the present study, we fill both gaps by analyzing a trinary reputation model. By an exhaustive search, we identify all the cooperative and stable equilibria composed of a homogeneous population or a heterogeneous population containing two types of players. Some results derived for the trinary reputation model are direct extensions of those for the binary model. However, we find that the trinary model allows cooperation under image scoring under some mild conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Self-adapted sliding scale spectroscopy ADC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qichun; Wang Jingjin

    1992-01-01

    The traditional sliding scale technique causes a disabled range that is equal to the sliding length, thus reduces the analysis range of a MCA. A method for reduce ADC's DNL, which is called self-adapted sliding scale method, has been designed and tested. With this method, the disabled range caused by a traditional sliding scale method can be eliminated by a random trial scale and there is no need of an additional amplitude discriminator with swing threshold. A special trial-and-correct logic is presented. The tested DNL of the spectroscopy ADC described here is less than 0.5%

  1. Modelling the initiation of basal sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantelli, E.; Schoof, C.

    2017-12-01

    The initiation of basal sliding is a thermally-controlled process that affects ice speed, englacial heat transport, and melt water production at the bed, and ultimately influences the large-scale dynamics of ice sheets. From a modelling perspective, describing the onset of sliding in thin-film models suitable for ice sheet scale simulations is problematic. In particular, previous work concluded that, under shallow-ice mechanics, the scenario of a hard switch from frozen to molten bed leads to an infinite vertical velocity at the onset, and higher-order mechanical formulations are needed to describe sliding initiation. An alternative view considers the occurrence of subtemperate sliding, which allows for a smooth sliding velocity across the onset. However, the sliding velocity decreases rapidly as temperature drops below the melting point, thus raising the issue of whether a mechanical model that does not resolve the ice sheet thickness scale is ever appropriate to model the onset of sliding. In this study we first present a boundary layer model for the hard switch scenario. Our analysis, which considers a thermo-mechanically coupled Stokes flow near the onset, shows that the abrupt onset of sliding is never possible. In fact, the acceleration of ice flow deflects the flowlines towards the bed, which freezes again immediately downstream to the onset. This leads to the conclusion that the sliding velocity must change smoothly across the onset, thus the temperature dependence of sliding needs to be taken into account. In this context, we examine a limiting case of standard temperature-dependent sliding laws, where sliding onset takes the form of an extended transition region interposed between fully frozen and temperate bed. In the transition region basal temperature is at the melting point, and the sliding velocity varies smoothly as dictated by the energy budget of the bed. As the extent of this region is not small compared to the ice sheet length scale, we couple

  2. USDOE Top-of-Rail Lubricant Project; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohumad F. Alzoubi; George R. Fenske; Robert A. Erck; Amrit S. Boparai

    2002-01-01

    Lubrication of wheel/rail systems has been recognized for the last two decades as a very important issue for railroads. Energy savings and less friction and wear can be realized if a lubricant can be used at the wheel/rail interface. On the other hand, adverse influences are seen in operating and wear conditions if improper or excessive lubrication is used. Also, inefficiencies in lubrication need to be avoided for economic and environmental reasons. The top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant concept was developed by Texaco Corporation to lubricate wheels and rails effectively and efficiently. Tranergy Corporation has been developing its SENTRAEN 2000(trademark) lubrication system for the last ten years, and this revolutionary new high-tech on-board rail lubrication system promises to dramatically improve the energy efficiency, performance, safety, and track environment of railroads. The system is fully computer-controlled and ensures that all of the lubricant is consumed as the end of the train passes. Lubricant quantity dispensed is a function of grade, speed, curve, and axle load. Tranergy also has its LA4000(trademark) wheel and rail simulator, a lubrication and traction testing apparatus. The primary task of this project was collecting and analyzing the volatile and semivolatile compounds produced as the lubricant was used. The volatile organic compounds were collected by Carbotrap cartridges and analyzed by adsorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The semivolatile fraction was obtained by collecting liquid that dripped from the test wheel. The collected material was also analyzed by GC/MS. Both of these analyses were qualitative. The results indicated that in the volatile fraction, the only compounds on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund List of Analytes detected were contaminants either in the room air or from other potential contamination sources in the laboratory. Similarly, in the semivolatile fraction none of the detected

  3. Lubricant effects on low Dk and silicone hydrogel lens comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Jerome; Papas, Eric

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the influence of three lubricants of varying viscosity, on postinsertion and 6 h comfort with contact lens wear. Comfort and associated symptoms of dryness were assessed in 15 experienced contact lens wearers. Subjects wore a low Dk lens in one eye and a silicone hydrogel in the other and participated in four separate trials involving no lubricant (baseline), saline, and two commercially available lubricants of differing viscosity. The in-eye lubricants were used immediately following lens insertion and every 2 h postinsertion for a 6 h wear period. Postlens insertion comfort was significantly better for both lens types when lubricants or saline were used compared with no lubricant use. After 6 h lens wear, comfort was influenced by lens type and not by in-eye lubricant or saline use. Also after 6 h lens wear, less dryness sensation was reported for silicone hydrogel lenses when using lubricants but not saline. Although lubricant use does help reduce dryness symptoms with silicone hydrogel lens wear, there appears to be minimal longer-term benefit to comfort. Furthermore, increased lubricant viscosity did not lead to improved longer-term comfort.

  4. Eurosafe-2011 - Papers and slides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document gathers some slides, papers and posters that were presented at the 2011 annual EUROSAFE forum. This forum focuses in its plenary part on 'Nuclear safety: new challenges, gained experience and public expectations' in the light of the Fukushima nuclear power station (NPS) accident. The topic will be considered from the point of view of Japanese safety authorities, of a regulator, of an international organisation, of a utility and of a Technical Safety Organisation (TSO). The first part of the second day will be devoted to presentations of the Fukushima NPS accident. The second part of this day will present the latest work carried out by ETSON (European Technical Safety Organizations Network) and EUROSAFE members and their partners worldwide through three seminars (nuclear safety research and safety assessment, radiation protection and environment, nuclear material and nuclear facilities security) and a workshop on operating experience feedback on nuclear fuel cycle facilities

  5. Lubricating Properties of Ceramic-Bonded Calcium Fluoride Coatings on Nickel-Base Alloys from 75 to 1900 deg F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1962-01-01

    The endurance life and the friction coefficient of ceramic-bonded calcium fluoride (CaF2) coatings on nickel-base alloys were determined at temperatures from 75 F to 1900 F. The specimen configuration consisted of a hemispherical rider (3/16-in. rad.) sliding against the flat surface of a rotating disk. Increasing the ambient temperature (up to 1500 F) or the sliding velocity generally reduced the friction coefficient and improved coating life. Base-metal selection was critical above 1500 F. For instance, cast Inconel sliding against coated Inconel X was lubricated effectively to 1500 F, but at 1600 F severe blistering of the coatings occurred. However, good lubrication and adherence were obtained for Rene 41 sliding against coated Rene 41 at temperatures up to 1900 F; no blisters developed, coating wear life was fairly good, and the rider wear rate was significantly lower than for the unlubricated metals. Friction coefficients were 0.12 at 1500 F, 0.15 at 1700 F, and 0.17 at 1800 F and 1900 F. Because of its ready availability, Inconel X appears to be the preferred substrate alloy for applications in which the temperature does not exceed 1500 F. Rene 41 would have to be used in applications involving higher temperatures. Improved coating life was derived by either preoxidizing the substrate metals prior to the coating application or by applying a very thin (less than 0.0002 in.) burnished and sintered overlay to the surface of the coating. Preoxidation did not affect the friction coefficient. The overlay generally resulted in a higher friction coefficient than that obtained without the overlay. The combination of both modifications resulted in longer coating life and in friction coefficients intermediate between those obtained with either modification alone.

  6. Reciprocal Tutoring: Design with Cognitive Load Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chih-Yueh; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2016-01-01

    "Reciprocal tutoring," as reported in "Exploring the design of computer supports for reciprocal tutoring" (Chan and Chou 1997), has extended the meaning and scope of "intelligent tutoring" originally implemented in stand alone computers. This research is a follow-up to our studies on a "learning companion…

  7. Free-Form Kinetic Reciprocal System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Sassone, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic Reciprocal System (KRS) are innovative moveable structures based on the principle of reciprocity [1] with internal pin-slot constraints [2]. The analysis of KRS kinematic and static determinacy is developed through the construction of kinematic matrices, accordingly with [3] and a discuss...

  8. Loneliness, exchange orientation, and reciprocity in friendships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham (Bram); Prins, K.S.

    Guided by equity theory this study among 185 Dutch students explored the effects of exchange orientation and reciprocity in the relationship with the best friend upon loneliness. Reciprocity was in general more common in this relationship than feeling advantaged or deprived. The association between

  9. Non-reciprocity in nonlinear elastodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Antoine; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    2018-01-01

    Reciprocity is a fundamental property of linear time-invariant (LTI) acoustic waveguides governed by self-adjoint operators with symmetric Green's functions. The break of reciprocity in LTI elastodynamics is only possible through the break of time reversal symmetry on the micro-level, and this can be achieved by imposing external biases, adding nonlinearities or allowing for time-varying system properties. We present a Volterra-series based asymptotic analysis for studying spatial non-reciprocity in a class of one-dimensional (1D), time-invariant elastic systems with weak stiffness nonlinearities. We show that nonlinearity is neither necessary nor sufficient for breaking reciprocity in this class of systems; rather, it depends on the boundary conditions, the symmetries of the governing linear and nonlinear operators, and the choice of the spatial points where the non-reciprocity criterion is tested. Extension of the analysis to higher dimensions and time-varying systems is straightforward from a mathematical point of view (but not in terms of new non-reciprocal physical phenomena), whereas the connection of non-reciprocity and time irreversibility can be studied as well. Finally, we show that suitably defined non-reciprocity measures enable optimization, and can provide physical understanding of the nonlinear effects in the dynamics, enabling one to establish regimes of "maximum nonlinearity." We highlight the theoretical developments by means of a numerical example.

  10. 33 CFR 173.17 - Reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reciprocity. 173.17 Section 173.17 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL NUMBERING AND CASUALTY AND ACCIDENT REPORTING Numbering § 173.17 Reciprocity. (a) Section...

  11. 23 CFR 1235.8 - Reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reciprocity. 1235.8 Section 1235.8 Highways NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION AND FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GUIDELINES UNIFORM SYSTEM FOR PARKING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES § 1235.8 Reciprocity. The State system...

  12. 36 CFR 251.63 - Reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reciprocity. 251.63 Section 251.63 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAND USES Special Uses § 251.63 Reciprocity. If it is determined that a right-of-way shall be needed by the United States...

  13. Education, Gift and Reciprocity: A Preliminary Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the importance and role of the reciprocity relationship in education. It presents a review on the mobilization of the principle of reciprocity--in the anthropological but also sociological and economic senses--in educational processes, especially in adult education. The study is divided into three parts. The first part analyzes…

  14. Reciprocity in therapeutic relationships: A conceptual review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Sima; Arcidiacono, Eleonora; Aguglia, Eugenio; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Reciprocity has generally been understood as a process of giving and taking, within an exchange of emotions or services, and has long been recognized as a central part of human life. However, an understanding of reciprocity in professional helping relationships has seldom received attention, despite movements in mental health care towards more collaborative approaches between service users and professionals. In this review, a systematic search of the published papers was conducted in order to explore how reciprocity is conceptualized and understood as part of the dyadic therapeutic relationship between professionals and service users. Eleven papers met our inclusion criteria and a narrative synthesis was used to synthesize the key concepts of reciprocity. The concepts of: 'dynamic equilibrium', 'shared affect', 'asymmetric alliance', and 'recognition as a fellow human being' were recurrent in understandings of reciprocity in professional contexts. These conceptualizations of reciprocity were also linked to specific behavioural and psychological processes. The findings suggest that reciprocity may be conceptualized and incorporated as a component of mental health care, with recurrent and observable processes which may be harnessed to promote positive outcomes for service users. To this end, we make recommendations for further research to progress and develop reciprocal processes in mental health care. © 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. 49 CFR 384.214 - Reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reciprocity. 384.214 Section 384.214 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY... Reciprocity. The State shall allow any person to operate a CMV in the State who is not disqualified from...

  16. Information seeking and reciprocity: A transformational analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, M.; Perugini, M.

    2003-01-01

    The motivation to reciprocate is analyzed within the framework of interdependence theory, with focus on the process of transformation of situations. A model of transformation is presented for the motivation to reciprocate and hypotheses regarding allocation behavior and information seeking are

  17. Experience with synthetic fluorinated fluid lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Peter L.; Bohner, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Since the late 1970's, the wet lubricant of choice for space mechanisms has been one of the family of synthetic perfluoro polyalkylether (PFPE) compounds, namely Fomblin Z-25 (Bray-815Z) or DuPont's Krytox 143xx series. While offering the advantages of extremely low vapor pressures and wide temperature ranges, these oils and derived greases have a complex chemistry compared to the more familiar natural and synthetic hydrocarbons. Many aerospace companies have conducted test programs to characterize the behavior of these compounds in a space environment, resulting in a large body of hard knowledge as well as considerable space lore concerning the suitability of the lubricants for particular applications and techniques for successful application. The facts are summarized and a few myths about the compounds are dispelled, and some performance guidelines for the mechanism design engineer are provided.

  18. Noise of oil lubricated journal bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Byoung Hoo; Kim, Kyung Woong

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to provide a procedure to calculate the noise of oil lubricated journal bearings. To do this, the nonlinear transient analysis of rotor-bearing system including rotor imbalance is performed. Acoustical properties of the bearing are investigated through frequency analysis of the pressure fluctuation of the fluid film calculated from the nonlinear analysis. Furthermore, a transmission theory of plane waves on a boundary of the outer surface of the bearing is used to obtain the sound pressure level of the bearing. Results show that the sound pressure level of the bearing can be increased with the rotational speed of the rotor although the whirl amplitude of the rotor is decreased at high speed. Noise estimating procedures presented in this paper could be an aid in the evaluation and understanding of acoustical properties of oil lubricated journal bearings

  19. Tribological characteristics of Si3N4-based composites in unlubricated sliding against steel ball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.-C.; Huang, J.-L.

    2004-01-01

    The dry-sliding wear mechanism of Si 3 N 4 -based composites against AISI-52100 steel ball was studied using a ball-on-disc mode in a reciprocation motion. The addition of TiN particles can increase the fracture toughness of Si 3 N 4 -based composites. The fracture toughness of Si 3 N 4 -based composites played an important role for wear behavior. The Si 3 N 4 -based composites exhibits a small friction and wear coefficient compared to monolithic Si 3 N 4 . Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies displayed fine wear grooves along the sliding traces. The subsurface deformation shows that the microcrack propagation extends along the TiN/Si 3 N 4 grain interface. The wear mechanisms were determined with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy

  20. Technology development for indigenous water lubricated bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limaye, P.K.; Soni, N.L.; Agrawal, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    Water Lubricated Bearings (WLB) are used in various mechanisms of fuel handling systems of PHWRs and AHWR. Availability and random failures of these bearings was a major factor in refuelling operations. Indigenous development of these bearings was taken up and 7 types of antifriction bearings in various sizes (totaling 37 variants) for PHWR, AHWR and Dhruva applications were successfully developed. This paper deals with various aspects of WLB development. (author)

  1. Reciprocity Outperforms Conformity to Promote Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Angelo; Balliet, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Evolutionary psychologists have proposed two processes that could give rise to the pervasiveness of human cooperation observed among individuals who are not genetically related: reciprocity and conformity. We tested whether reciprocity outperformed conformity in promoting cooperation, especially when these psychological processes would promote a different cooperative or noncooperative response. To do so, across three studies, we observed participants' cooperation with a partner after learning (a) that their partner had behaved cooperatively (or not) on several previous trials and (b) that their group members had behaved cooperatively (or not) on several previous trials with that same partner. Although we found that people both reciprocate and conform, reciprocity has a stronger influence on cooperation. Moreover, we found that conformity can be partly explained by a concern about one's reputation-a finding that supports a reciprocity framework.

  2. Universal water-dilutable inhibited protective lubricants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamtseva, M.V.; Kardash, N.V.; Latynina, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    In the interest of environmental protection, improvement of working conditions, and reduced fire hazard in production operations, water-based protective lubricants are now available in a wide assortment, and the production volume has increased greatly. The term water-dilutable inhibited protective lubricants (WDIPL) means water-soluble, water-emulsifiable, or water-dispersible products with the dual function of reducing friction and wear and protecting metal surfaces against corrosion for specified periods of time. According to the standard Unified System of Protection Against Corrosion and Aging (COST 9.103-78), WDIPLs are classed as products for the temporary corrosion protection of metals and end-items. In the general class of WDIPLs one can identify water-dilutable combination corrosion inhibitors, film-forming inhibited petroleum compositions (FIPC-d), detergent-preservative fluids, operational-preservative lubricating-cooling process compounds (ICPC), and, finally, universal multifunctional products. Combined corrosion inhibitors may consist of water-soluble organic and inorganic compounds; water/oil and oil-soluble surfactants - corrosion inhibitors of the chemisorption type or donor and/or acceptor types; shielding inhibitors of the adsorption type; and fast-acting water-displacing components. 23 refs

  3. Modeling the Sliding/Falling Ladder Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, William P.; Fox, James B.

    2003-01-01

    Recently we were presented with an interesting twist to the sliding ladder problem viewed in the related rates section of most calculus textbooks. Our problem concerning a sliding ladder that eventually hits the ground. At first, those attempting this problem fell into the calculus trap using only related rates. Previous work for this problem…

  4. [Heritage Education Lesson Plans and Slide Presentations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buren, Maurie

    Field tested in 27 schools and in grades four through twelve, this teaching unit stresses heritage education through the study of southern U.S. architectural styles for homes from the pioneer log structures to the 1950s ranch home. Each of the four lessons in this unit focuses around a slide presentation of 20 slides designed to fit into one…

  5. Fatty acid methyl esters, carbon nanotubes and carbon nanowalls coatings such as lubricity improvers of low sulfur diesel fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cursaru, Diana Luciana; Tanasescu, Constantin [Petroleum-Gas Univ. of Ploiesti (Romania); Vizireanu, Sorin [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (Romania)

    2013-06-01

    In this study the lubricity of diesel fuel was restored by different methods, firstly by classic addition of fatty acid methyl esters or by dispersing carbon nanotubes into diesel fuels and secondly, by protecting the metallic surfaces which are in the direct contact to the low sulfur diesel fuel, by application of solid carbon nanowalls coatings synthesized by radiofrequency plasma beam deposition. The fatty acid methyl esters were prepared by transesterification of the sun flower oil in the presence of methanol. The carbon nanotubes were synthesized by CO disproportionation method and were characterized by RAMAN spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The CNWs layers, before the friction tests, were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, while the wear on the steel balls was investigated by optical microscopy of the HRRT apparatus and the wear track on the steel disk was investigated by SEM, AFM and profilometry. The lubricity was measured using the High Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) method. It has been found that CNWs layers exhibit a lubricating potential for the rubbed surfaces in the presence of low sulfur diesel fuels. Tribological analyses of various carbon materials revealed that the friction coefficient of carbon nanowalls is close to the values obtained for graphite. (orig.)

  6. Tribological Behaviors of Graphene and Graphene Oxide as Water-Based Lubricant Additives for Magnesium Alloy/Steel Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Xie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The tribological behaviors of graphene and graphene oxide (GO as water-based lubricant additives were evaluated by use of a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer for magnesium alloy-steel contacts. Three sets of test conditions were examined to investigate the effect of concentration, the capacity of carrying load and the endurance of the lubrication film, respectively. The results showed that the tribological behaviors of water can be improved by adding the appropriate graphene or GO. Compared with pure deionized water, 0.5 wt.% graphene nanofluids can offer reduction of friction coefficient by 21.9% and reduction of wear rate by 13.5%. Meanwhile, 0.5 wt.% GO nanofluids were found to reduce the friction coefficient and wear rate up to 77.5% and 90%, respectively. Besides this, the positive effect of the GO nanofluids was also more pronounced in terms of the load-carrying capacity and the lubrication film endurance. The wear mechanisms have been tentatively proposed according to the observation of the worn surfaces by field emission scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometer (FESEM-EDS and Raman spectrum as well as the wettability of the nanofluids on the magnesium alloy surface by goniometer.

  7. Tribological Behaviors of Graphene and Graphene Oxide as Water-Based Lubricant Additives for Magnesium Alloy/Steel Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongmei; Jiang, Bin; Dai, Jiahong; Peng, Cheng; Li, Chunxia; Li, Quan; Pan, Fusheng

    2018-01-29

    The tribological behaviors of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) as water-based lubricant additives were evaluated by use of a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer for magnesium alloy-steel contacts. Three sets of test conditions were examined to investigate the effect of concentration, the capacity of carrying load and the endurance of the lubrication film, respectively. The results showed that the tribological behaviors of water can be improved by adding the appropriate graphene or GO. Compared with pure deionized water, 0.5 wt.% graphene nanofluids can offer reduction of friction coefficient by 21.9% and reduction of wear rate by 13.5%. Meanwhile, 0.5 wt.% GO nanofluids were found to reduce the friction coefficient and wear rate up to 77.5% and 90%, respectively. Besides this, the positive effect of the GO nanofluids was also more pronounced in terms of the load-carrying capacity and the lubrication film endurance. The wear mechanisms have been tentatively proposed according to the observation of the worn surfaces by field emission scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometer (FESEM-EDS) and Raman spectrum as well as the wettability of the nanofluids on the magnesium alloy surface by goniometer.

  8. Influence of the Previous Preheating Temperature on the Static Coefficient of Friction with Lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Živković

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations static coefficient of friction in lubricated conditions and pre-heating of the sample pin at high temperatures is discussed in this paper. The static coefficient of friction was measured in the sliding steel copper pins per cylinder of polyvinylchloride. Pins are previously heated in a special chamber from room temperature to a temperature of 800 oC with a step of 50 °C. Tribological changes in the surface layer of the pins caused by pre-heating the pins at high temperatures and cooling systems have very significantly influenced the increase in the coefficient of static friction. The results indicate the possibility of improving the friction characteristics of metal materials based on their thermal treatment at elevated temperatures.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication and boundary lubrication for automotive tribology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washizu, Hitoshi; Sanda, Shuzo; Hyodo, Shi-aki; Ohmori, Toshihide; Nishino, Noriaki; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    Friction control of machine elements on a molecular level is a challenging subject in vehicle technology. We describe the molecular dynamics studies of friction in two significant lubrication regimes. As a case of elastohydrodynamic lubrication, we introduce the mechanism of momentum transfer related to the molecular structure of the hydrocarbon fluids, phase transition of the fluids under high pressure, and a submicron thickness simulation of the oil film using a tera-flops computer. For boundary lubrication, the dynamic behavior of water molecules on hydrophilic and hydrophobic silicon surfaces under a shear condition is studied. The dynamic structure of the hydrogen bond network on the hydrophilic surface is related to the low friction of the diamond-like carbon containing silicon (DLC-Si) coating

  10. Lubricant flow analysis for effective lubrication of tractor forward/reverse clutch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daekyung Noh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the high power requirements of tractors, their low-power transmission gears often experience durability problems such as burning of the clutch. The operation of tractors under high load conditions also causes clutch slip, with the consequent longer operation duration exacerbating the burning of the friction plate. Solving this problem requires effective lubricant distribution. This was achieved in the present study by the development of an analysis model for predicting the lubricant flow rate. The reliability of the model was verified by comparing its predictions for various operation conditions with experimental measurements. Using the model, it was determined that effective distribution of the lubricant could be achieved without significant modification of the system, by only adjusting the gaps between the clutch piston and the housing, and between the separation plates and the case. Keywords: Mechanical engineering

  11. Tribological behavior of a new green industrial lubricant for stamping operations - Application to Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buteri, A.; Borgeot, M.; Roizard, X.; Lallemand, F.; Melot, J.-M.; Morand, L.

    2016-11-01

    Thanks to a fruitful collaboration between different academic and industrial research entities, a new green lubricant solution AFULudine has been developed for stamping operations in substitution to the usual mineral oils, with the idea and the wish to combine different essential properties such as a low environmental impact and ease-of-use according to the market needs and the more and more restrictive environmental legislation (e.g. REACH). Based on the Self-Assembled-Monolayer (SAM) principle and so, on a perfect control of the chemical reaction between the solution and the substrate (grafting of molecules onto the surface), AFULudine offers an efficient technical answer for improving stamping processes. The present study, focused on stainless steel stampings (comparison between a 441-1.4509 grade and a 304-1.4301 grade), investigates the performances of this new green industrial lubricant at different levels: from laboratory tests to industrial conditions through the production of hundreds of parts. Additional results coming from tests made on a rotational pin- on-disk tribometer will allow us to appreciate and retrieve more local information about the tribofilm creation during sliding. Moreover, the comparison with different mineral oils currently used at industrial scale, will strengthen the AFULudine performances. Indeed, this new solution usually outperforms a majority of such oils whatever their viscosity and their own composition: formulation, content of extreme pressure additives (Cl, S, P)...

  12. Experimental evaluation of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for use to 760 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which further developed and investigated chromium carbide based self-lubricating coatings for use to 760 C. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The three coating components were blended in powder form, applied to stainless steel substrates by plasma spraying and then diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. A variety of coating compositions was tested to determine the coating composition which gave optimum tribological results. Coatings were tested in air, helium, and hydrogen at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. Several counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications, such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines. In general, silver and fluoride additions to chromium carbide reduced the friction coefficient and increased the wear resistance relative to the unmodified coating. The lubricant additives acted synergistically in reducing friction and wear.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of lubricant depletion by pulsed laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young Woo; Rosenkranz, Andreas; Talke, Frank E.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to numerically investigate the effect of pulsed laser heating on lubricant depletion. The maximum temperature, the lubricant depletion width, the number of evaporated lubricant beads and the number of fragmented lubricant chains were studied as a function of laser peak power, pulse duration and repetition rate. A continuous-wave laser and a square pulse laser were simulated and compared to a Gaussian pulse laser. With increasing repetition rate, pulsed laser heating was found to approach continuous-wave laser heating.

  14. Effect of gamma radiation on graphite - PTFE dry lubrication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sachin; Tyagi, Mukti; Seshadri, Geetha; Tyagi, Ajay Kumar; Varshney, Lalit

    2017-12-01

    An effect of gamma radiation on lubrication behavior of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system has been studied using (TR-TW-30L) tribometer with thrust washer attachment in plane contact. Different compositions of graphite and PTFE were prepared and irradiated by gamma rays. Gamma radiation exposure significantly improves the tribological properties indicated by decrease in coefficient of friction and wear properties of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system. SEM and XRD analysis confirm the physico-chemical modification of graphite-PTFE on gamma radiation exposure leading to a novel dry lubrication system with good slip and anti friction properties.

  15. Lubricating graphene with a nanometer-thick perfluoropolyether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozbial, Andrew; Li, Zhiting; Iasella, Steven; Taylor, Alexander T.; Morganstein, Brittni; Wang, Yongjin; Sun, Jianing; Zhou, Bo; Randall, Nicholas X.; Liu, Haitao; Li, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Due to its atomic thickness (thinness), the wear of graphene in nanoscale devices or as a protective coating is a serious concern. It is highly desirable to develop effective methods to reduce the wear of graphene. In the current paper, the effect of a nano-lubricant, perfluoropolyether, on the wear of graphene on different substrates is investigated. Graphene was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The nano-lubricant is applied on the graphene by dip-coating. The friction and wear of graphene samples are characterized by nanotribometer, AFM, optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that lubricating silicon/graphene with nano-lubricant reduces the friction but increases the wear. However, lubricating nickel/graphene with nano-lubricant has little effect on the friction but reduce the wear significantly. The underlying mechanism has been discussed on the basis of the graphene–substrate adhesion and the roughness. The current study provides guidance to the future design of graphene-containing devices. - Highlights: • The effect of a nano-lubricant on the friction and wear of CVD graphene was studied. • Lubricating Graphene/Si results in lower friction but higher wear. • Lubricating Ggraphene/Ni results in lower wear but unchanged friction. • The mechanisms were discussed based on the roughness and interfacial adhesion

  16. Slides with no attached paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warin, Dominique; Wallenius, Janne; Ouzounian, Gerald; Wikberg, Peter; Todd, Terry A.; Kormilitsyn, Mikhael V.; Osipenko, Alexander G.; Mayorshin, A.A.; McLachlan, Fiona; Nash, Ken L.; Nilsson, M.; Grimes, T.; Braley, J.C.; TAKESHITA, Kenji; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Spendlikova, I.; Distler, P.; John, J.; Sebesta, F.; VU, Trong-Hung; SIMONIN, Jean-Pierre; PAULENOVA, Alena; PRECEK, Martin; HARTIG, Kyle; KNAPP, Nathan; Vidick, Geoffrey; Bouslimani, Nouri; Desreux, Jean F.; Lewis, F.W.; Hudson, M.J.; Harwood, L.M.; Nunez, Ana; Nagarajan, K.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Raj, Baldev; Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Alexander; Pouchon, Manuel A.; Skarnemark, Gunnar; Allard, Stefan; Ekberg, Christian; Retegan, Teodora; Nordlund, Anders; John, Jan; Maershin, Alexander; Zakirov, R.; Panov, A.; Toropov, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    This document brings together the different presentations (slides) given at the workshop but with no attached paper. These slides refer to the following presentations: - Presentation of ITN (Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear); - Minor Actinide Partitioning (Dominique Warin); - Transmutation (Janne Wallenius); - Radioactive Waste Management, IGD-TP (Gerald Ouzounian); - Present status of the Swedish nuclear waste management programme (Peter Wikberg); - The U.S. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program - Separations Research and Development (Terry Todd); - Strategies and national programs of closed fuel cycles - Russian Expert Vision (Mikhael Kormilitsyn) - Extraction Studies Of Potential Solvent Formulations For The GANEX Process (Fiona MacLachlan); - Investigations of The Fundamental Chemistry of the TALSPEAK Process (Ken Nash); - Extraction Separation of Trivalent Minor Actinides and Lanthanides by Hexa-dentate Nitrogen-donor Extractant, TPEN, and its Analogs (Kenji Takeshita); - Fluorinated Diluents for HLW Processing - technological point of view (Vasiliy Babain); - Extraction properties of some new pyridine molecules and search for better diluents (Irena Spendlikova); - Kinetics of extraction of Eu 3+ ion by TODGA and CyMe 4 -BTBP studied using the RMC technique (Trong Hung Vu); - Redox Chemistry of Neptunium in Solutions of Nitric Acid (Alena Paulenova); - NMR applied to actinide ions and their complexes. In search of covalency effects (Geoffrey Vidick); - Towards 'Stability Rules' for Radiolysis of bis-DGA compounds (Ana Nunez); - Pyroprocess Research Activities at IGCAR, Kalpakkam, India (K. Nagarajan); - Critical issues of nuclear energy systems employing molten salt fluorides: from ISTC No. 1606 to No. 3749 (1. year of project activity) and MARS/EVOL cooperation (Victor Ignatiev); - Conversion processes: Internal Gelation and the Sphere-pac concept (Manuel Pouchon); - A Combined Nuclear Technology and Nuclear Chemistry Master. A Unique

  17. Reciprocity and Ethical Tuberculosis Treatment and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diego S; Dawson, Angus; Upshur, Ross E G

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the notion of reciprocity in the context of active pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis (TB) treatment and related control policies and practices. We seek to do three things: First, we sketch the background to contemporary global TB care and suggest that poverty is a key feature when considering the treatment of TB patients. We use two examples from TB care to explore the role of reciprocity: isolation and the use of novel TB drugs. Second, we explore alternative means of justifying the use of reciprocity through appeal to different moral and political theoretical traditions (i.e., virtue ethics, deontology, and consequentialism). We suggest that each theory can be used to provide reasons to take reciprocity seriously as an independent moral concept, despite any other differences. Third, we explore general meanings and uses of the concept of reciprocity, with the primary intention of demonstrating that it cannot be simply reduced to other more frequently invoked moral concepts such as beneficence or justice. We argue that reciprocity can function as a mid-level principle in public health, and generally, captures a core social obligation arising once an individual or group is burdened as a result of acting for the benefit of others (even if they derive a benefit themselves). We conclude that while more needs to be explored in relation to the theoretical justification and application of reciprocity, sufficient arguments can be made for it to be taken more seriously as a key principle within public health ethics and bioethics more generally.

  18. Reciprocity of agonistic support in ravens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Orlaith N; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cooperative behaviour through reciprocation or interchange of valuable services in primates has received considerable attention, especially regarding the timeframe of reciprocation and its ensuing cognitive implications. Much less, however, is known about reciprocity in other animals, particularly birds. We investigated patterns of agonistic support (defined as a third party intervening in an ongoing conflict to attack one of the conflict participants, thus supporting the other) in a group of 13 captive ravens, Corvus corax. We found support for long-term, but not short-term, reciprocation of agonistic support. Ravens were more likely to support individuals who preened them, kin and dominant group members. These results suggest that ravens do not reciprocate on a calculated tit-for-tat basis, but aid individuals from whom reciprocated support would be most useful and those with whom they share a good relationship. Additionally, dyadic levels of agonistic support and consolation (postconflict affiliation from a bystander to the victim) correlated strongly with each other, but we found no evidence to suggest that receiving agonistic support influences the victim's likelihood of receiving support (consolation) after the conflict ends. Our findings are consistent with an emotionally mediated form of reciprocity in ravens and provide additional support for convergent cognitive evolution in birds and mammals.

  19. On Reciprocal Causation in the Evolutionary Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Erik I

    2018-01-01

    Recent calls for a revision of standard evolutionary theory (SET) are based partly on arguments about the reciprocal causation. Reciprocal causation means that cause-effect relationships are bi-directional, as a cause could later become an effect and vice versa. Such dynamic cause-effect relationships raise questions about the distinction between proximate and ultimate causes, as originally formulated by Ernst Mayr. They have also motivated some biologists and philosophers to argue for an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES). The EES will supposedly expand the scope of the Modern Synthesis (MS) and SET, which has been characterized as gene-centred, relying primarily on natural selection and largely neglecting reciprocal causation. Here, I critically examine these claims, with a special focus on the last conjecture. I conclude that reciprocal causation has long been recognized as important by naturalists, ecologists and evolutionary biologists working in the in the MS tradition, although it it could be explored even further. Numerous empirical examples of reciprocal causation in the form of positive and negative feedback are now well known from both natural and laboratory systems. Reciprocal causation have also been explicitly incorporated in mathematical models of coevolutionary arms races, frequency-dependent selection, eco-evolutionary dynamics and sexual selection. Such dynamic feedback were already recognized by Richard Levins and Richard Lewontin in their bok The Dialectical Biologist . Reciprocal causation and dynamic feedback might also be one of the few contributions of dialectical thinking and Marxist philosophy in evolutionary theory. I discuss some promising empirical and analytical tools to study reciprocal causation and the implications for the EES. Finally, I briefly discuss how quantitative genetics can be adapated to studies of reciprocal causation, constructive inheritance and phenotypic plasticity and suggest that the flexibility of this approach

  20. Two distinct neural mechanisms underlying indirect reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Takezawa, Masanori; Nakawake, Yo; Kunimatsu, Akira; Yamasue, Hidenori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyashita, Yasushi; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-03-18

    Cooperation is a hallmark of human society. Humans often cooperate with strangers even if they will not meet each other again. This so-called indirect reciprocity enables large-scale cooperation among nonkin and can occur based on a reputation mechanism or as a succession of pay-it-forward behavior. Here, we provide the functional and anatomical neural evidence for two distinct mechanisms governing the two types of indirect reciprocity. Cooperation occurring as reputation-based reciprocity specifically recruited the precuneus, a region associated with self-centered cognition. During such cooperative behavior, the precuneus was functionally connected with the caudate, a region linking rewards to behavior. Furthermore, the precuneus of a cooperative subject had a strong resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) with the caudate and a large gray matter volume. In contrast, pay-it-forward reciprocity recruited the anterior insula (AI), a brain region associated with affective empathy. The AI was functionally connected with the caudate during cooperation occurring as pay-it-forward reciprocity, and its gray matter volume and rsFC with the caudate predicted the tendency of such cooperation. The revealed difference is consistent with the existing results of evolutionary game theory: although reputation-based indirect reciprocity robustly evolves as a self-interested behavior in theory, pay-it-forward indirect reciprocity does not on its own. The present study provides neural mechanisms underlying indirect reciprocity and suggests that pay-it-forward reciprocity may not occur as myopic profit maximization but elicit emotional rewards.

  1. Effect of load on the tribological properties of hypereutectic Al-Si alloy under boundary lubrication conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parveen; Wani, M. F.

    2017-11-01

    Researchers reported that the IC engine components (piston, cylinder liner etc) fail due to the friction losses (~45%) and wear losses (~25-40%). So the demand of light weight, low friction and wear resistance alloys increases day by day, which reduces the emission and increases the efficiency of the IC engine. In this connection, tribological tests on hypereutectic Al-25Si alloy were performed using a ball-on-disk configuration under dry and lubricated sliding conditions. Hypereutectic Al-25Si alloy was prepared by rapid solidification process with T6 condition. T6 condition improves the friction, wear and mechanical properties of the alloy. Friction coefficient and wear rate of the alloy was measured under high loads ranging from 100 to 300 N. It was found that the friction coefficient (COF) and wear rate of hypereutectic Al-25Si alloy/steel tribo pair increased with increase in load. Significant reduction in COF and wear rate was accomplished with SAE20W50 engine oil and Si particles act as solid lubricant. Optical microscope, 3D surface profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) were used for characterization the worn surface morphologies. The morphology, size and distribution of high Si particles due to its fabrication process caused the improvements in COF and wear rate under lubricated conditions. Adhesive wear, abrasive wear and plastic deformation acted as the dominant wear mechanism for hypereutectic Al-25Si alloy.

  2. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  3. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28

    Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition

  4. Reciprocity Effects in the Trust Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Smith

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available I use data from a previous experiment for classifying subjects based on their behavior in the trust game. Prior literature defines a “reciprocity effect” as the tendency for Second Movers to return proportions increasing in the amounts that they receive. In the data that I use, 31% of Second Movers show reciprocity effects, 31% are neutral, and 25% consistently free-ride, indicating that the aggregate reciprocity effect for the sample as a whole is attributable to a minority of the subjects.

  5. Born's reciprocity principle in stochastic phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prugovecki, E.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the application of Born's reciprocity principle to relativistic quantum mechanics in stochastic phase space (by the requirement that the proper wave functions of extended particles satisfy the Born-Lande as well as the Klein-Gordon equation) leads to the unique determination of these functions for any given value of their rms radius. The resulting particle propagators display not only Lorentz but also reciprocal invariance. This feature remains true even in the case of mass-zero particles, such as photons, when their localization is achieved by means of extended test particles whose proper wave functions obey the reciprocity principle. (author)

  6. Whole slide imaging for educational purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Pantanowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Digitized slides produced by whole slide image scanners can be easily shared over a network or by transferring image files to optical or other data storage devices. Navigation of digitized slides is interactive and intended to simulate viewing glass slides with a microscope (virtual microscopy. Image viewing software permits users to edit, annotate, analyze, and easily share whole slide images (WSI. As a result, WSI have begun to replace the traditional light microscope, offering a myriad of opportunities for education. This article focuses on current applications of WSI in education and proficiency testing. WSI has been successfully explored for graduate education (medical, dental, and veterinary schools, training of pathology residents, as an educational tool in allied pathology schools (e.g., cytotechnology, for virtual tracking and tutoring, tele-education (tele-conferencing, e-learning, virtual workshops, at tumor boards, with interactive publications, and on examinations. WSI supports flexible and cost-effective distant learning and augments problem-oriented teaching, competency evaluation, and proficiency testing. WSI viewed on touchscreen displays and with tablet technology are especially beneficial for education. Further investigation is necessary to develop superior WSI applications that better support education and to design viewing stations with ergonomic tools that improve the WSI-human interface and navigation of virtual slides. Studies to determine the impact of training pathologists without exposure to actual glass slides are also needed.

  7. An updated nuclear criticality slide rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, C.M.; Broadhead, B.L.

    1998-04-01

    This Volume 2 contains the functional version of the updated nuclear criticality slide rule (more accurately, sliding graphs) that is referenced in An Updated Nuclear Criticality Slide Rule: Technical Basis, NUREG/CR-6504, Vol. 1 (ORNL/TM-13322/V1). This functional slide rule provides a readily usable open-quotes in-handclose quotes method for estimating pertinent nuclear criticality accident information from sliding graphs, thereby permitting (1) the rapid estimation of pertinent criticality accident information without laborious or sophisticated calculations in a nuclear criticality emergency situation, (2) the appraisal of potential fission yields and external personnel radiation exposures for facility safety analyses, and (3) a technical basis for emergency preparedness and training programs at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The slide rule permits the estimation of neutron and gamma dose rates and integrated doses based upon estimated fission yields, distance from the fission source, and time-after criticality accidents for five different critical systems. Another sliding graph permits the estimation of critical solution fission yields based upon fissile material concentration, critical vessel geometry, and solution addition rate. Another graph provides neutron and gamma dose-reduction factors for water, steel, and concrete. Graphs from historic documents are provided as references for estimating critical parameters of various fissile material systems. Conversion factors for various English and metric units are provided for quick reference

  8. Influences of lubricant pocket geometry and working conditions upon micro lubrication mechanisms in upsetting and strip drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shimizu, Ichiro; Martins, P. A. F.; Bay, Niels

    2010-01-01

    , during upsetting and strip drawing, by means of a rigid-viscoplastic finite-element formulation. Special emphasis is placed on the effect of pocket geometry on the build-up of hydrostatic pressure, which is responsible for the onset of micro-lubrication mechanisms. A good agreement is found between......Micro-lubricant pockets located in the surface of plastically deforming workpieces are recognised to improve the performance of fluid lubrication in a metal-forming process. This work investigates the joint influence of pocket geometry and process working conditions on micro-lubrication mechanisms...

  9. Ultralow Friction Self-Lubricating Nanocomposites with Mesoporous Metal-Organic Frameworks as Smart Nanocontainers for Lubricants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoliang; Xie, Guoxin; Si, Lina; Wen, Shizhu; Guo, Dan

    2017-11-01

    Smart nanocontainers with stimuli-responsive property can be used to fabricate a new kind of self-lubricating nanocomposite, while the practical potential of the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as nanocontainers for lubricants has not been realized. In this work, mesoporous Cu-BTC MOFs storing oleylamine nanocomposites were explored from synthesis and microstructure to self-lubricating characterization. The stress stimuli-responsiveness behavior of the Cu-BTC storing oleylamine (Cu-BTCO) for lubrication has been investigated by subjecting it to macroscopic ball-on-disc friction tests. The steady-state coefficients of friction (COFs) of the Cu-BTC nanocomposites without lubricants were ca. 0.5. In contrast, after oleylamine as the lubricant was incorporated into the Cu-BTC container in the nanocomposite, ultralow friction (COF, ca. 0.03) was achieved. It has been demonstrated that the improved lubricating performance was associated with the lubricating film which was in situ produced by the chemical reaction between the oleylamine released from the nanocontainer and the friction pairs. Therefore, the nanocomposite with smart Cu-BTC container holds the promise of realizing extraordinary self-lubricating properties under stress stimuli.

  10. Study of the effect of tribo-materials and surface finish on the lubricant performance of new halogen-free room temperature ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurín, N.; Minami, I.; Sanes, J.; Bermúdez, M. D.

    2016-03-01

    The present work evaluates different materials and surface finish in the presence of newly designed, hydrophobic halogen-free room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) as lubricants. A reciprocating tribo-tester was employed with steel-ceramic and steel-thermosetting epoxy resin contacts under boundary lubrication conditions. Four different tetraalkylphosphonium organosilanesulfonate RTILs provided excellent lubricating performance, with friction coefficients as low as 0.057, and non-measurable wear for the higher roughness machine-finish stainless steel flat against sapphire balls, in the case of the lubricants containing the 2-trimethylsilylethanesulfonate anion. Higher friction coefficients of the order of 0.1 and wear volumes of the order of 10-4 mm3 were observed for the lower roughness fine-finished flat stainless steel surface. All RTILs prevent wear of epoxy resin against stainless steel balls, with friction coefficients in the range of 0.03-0.06. EDX analysis shows the presence of RTILs on the stainless steel surfaces after the tribological tests. Under the experimental conditions, no corrosive processes were observed.

  11. Friction-induced vibrations and self-organization mechanics and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of sliding contact

    CERN Document Server

    Nosonovsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Many scientists and engineers do not realize that, under certain conditions, friction can lead to the formation of new structures at the interface, including in situ tribofilms and various patterns. In turn, these structures-usually formed by destabilization of the stationary sliding regime-can lead to the reduction of friction and wear. Friction-Induced Vibrations and Self-Organization: Mechanics and Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Sliding Contact combines the mechanical and thermodynamic methods in tribology, thus extending the field of mechanical friction-induced vibrations to non-mechanical instabilities and self-organization processes at the frictional interface. The book also relates friction-induced self-organization to novel biomimetic materials, such as self-lubricating, self-cleaning, and self-healing materials. Explore Friction from a Different Angle-as a Fundamental Force of Nature The book begins with an exploration of friction as a fundamental force of nature throughout the history of science....

  12. Two methodologies for optical analysis of contaminated engine lubricants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghayan, Hamid; Yang, Jun; Bordatchev, Evgueni

    2012-01-01

    The performance, efficiency and lifetime of modern combustion engines significantly depend on the quality of the engine lubricants. However, contaminants, such as gasoline, moisture, coolant and wear particles, reduce the life of engine mechanical components and lubricant quality. Therefore, direct and indirect measurements of engine lubricant properties, such as physical-mechanical, electro-magnetic, chemical and optical properties, are intensively utilized in engine condition monitoring systems and sensors developed within the last decade. Such sensors for the measurement of engine lubricant properties can be used to detect a functional limit of the in-use lubricant, increase drain interval and reduce the environmental impact. This paper proposes two new methodologies for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the presence of contaminants in the engine lubricants. The methodologies are based on optical analysis of the distortion effect when an object image is obtained through a thin random optical medium (e.g. engine lubricant). The novelty of the proposed methodologies is in the introduction of an object with a known periodic shape behind a thin film of the contaminated lubricant. In this case, an acquired image represents a combined lubricant–object optical appearance, where an a priori known periodic structure of the object is distorted by a contaminated lubricant. In the object shape-based optical analysis, several parameters of an acquired optical image, such as the gray scale intensity of lubricant and object, shape width at object and lubricant levels, object relative intensity and width non-uniformity coefficient are newly proposed. Variations in the contaminant concentration and use of different contaminants lead to the changes of these parameters measured on-line. In the statistical optical analysis methodology, statistical auto- and cross-characteristics (e.g. auto- and cross-correlation functions, auto- and cross-spectrums, transfer function

  13. Role of water lubricated bearings in Candu reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ashok N.

    1999-01-01

    During the twentieth century a great emphasis was placed in understanding and defining the operating regime of oil and grease lubricated components. Major advances have been made through elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory in the quantifying the design life of heavily loaded components such as rolling element bearings and gears. Detailed guidelines for the design of oil and grease lubricated components are widely available and are being applied to the successful design of these components. However similar guidelines for water lubricated components are either not available or not well documented. It is often forgotten that the water was used as a lubricant in several components as far back as 1884 B.C. During the twentieth century the water lubricated components continued to play a major role in some high technology industries such as in the power generation plants. In CANDU nuclear reactors water lubrication of several critical components always occupied a pride place and in most cases the only practical mode of lubrication of several critical components always occupied a pride place and in most cases the only practical mode of lubrication. This paper presents some examples of the major water lubricated components in a CANDU reactors. Major part of the paper is focused on presenting an example of successful operating history of water lubricated bearings used in the HT pumps are presented. Both types of bearings have been qualified by tests for operation under normal as well as under more severe postulated condition of loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). These bearings have been designed to operate for the 30 years in the existing CANDU 6 (600 MW) reactors. However for the next generation of CANDU 6 reactors which go into service in the year 2003, the HT pump bearing life has been extended to 40 years. (author)

  14. Ergometer rowing with and without slides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Holsgaard; Jensen, K

    2010-01-01

    A rowing ergometer can be placed on a slide to imitate 'on-water' rowing. The present study examines I) possible differences in biomechanical and physiological variables of ergometer rowing with and without slides and II) potential consequences on training load during exercise. 7 elite oars......-women rowed in a randomized order in a slide or stationary ergometer at 3 predefined submaximal and at maximal intensity. Oxygen uptake was measured and biomechanical variables of the rowing were calculated based upon handle force (force transducer) and velocity/length (potentiometer) of the stroke. Stroke...

  15. Influence of Lubricant Pocket Geometry upon Lubrication Mechanisms on Tool-Workpiece Interfaces in Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shimizu, I; Martins, P.A.F.; Bay, Niels

    2004-01-01

    mechanisms, during upsetting and strip drawing, by means of a rigid viscoplastic finite element formulation. Special emphasis is placed on the effect of pocket geometry on the build up of hydrostatic pressure, which is responsible for the onset of micro lubrication mechanisms. A good agreement is found...... between the numerically predicted and the experimentally measured distributions of hydrostatic stress....

  16. Reciprocity is not give and take: asymmetric reciprocity to positive and negative acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keysar, Boaz; Converse, Benjamin A; Wang, Jiunwen; Epley, Nicholas

    2008-12-01

    Unlike economic exchange, social exchange has no well-defined "value." It is based on the norm of reciprocity, in which giving and taking are to be repaid in equivalent measure. Although giving and taking are colloquially assumed to be equivalent actions, we demonstrate that they produce different patterns of reciprocity. In five experiments utilizing a dictator game, people reciprocated in like measure to apparently prosocial acts of giving, but reciprocated more selfishly to apparently antisocial acts of taking, even when the objective outcomes of the acts of giving and taking were identical. Additional results demonstrate that acts of giving in social exchanges are perceived as more generous than objectively identical acts of taking, that taking tends to escalate, and that the asymmetry in reciprocity is not due to gaining versus losing resources. Reciprocity appears to operate on an exchange rate that assigns value to the meaning of events, in a fashion that encourages prosocial exchanges.

  17. Mathematical modeling of reciprocating pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Kyeom; Jung, Jun Ki; Chai, Jang Bom; Lee, Jin Woo

    2015-01-01

    A new mathematical model is presented for the analysis and diagnosis of a high-pressure reciprocating pump system with three cylinders. The kinematic and hydrodynamic behaviors of the pump system are represented by the piston displacements, volume flow rates and pressures in its components, which are expressed as functions of the crankshaft angle. The flow interaction among the three cylinders, which was overlooked in the previous models, is considered in this model and its effect on the cylinder pressure profiles is investigated. The tuning parameters in the mathematical model are selected, and their values are adjusted to match the simulated and measured cylinder pressure profiles in each cylinder in a normal state. The damage parameter is selected in an abnormal state, and its value is adjusted to match the simulated and ensured pressure profiles under the condition of leakage in a valve. The value of the damage parameter over 300 cycles is calculated, and its probability density function is obtained for diagnosis and prognosis on the basis of the probabilistic feature of valve leakage.

  18. Spite and Reciprocity in Auctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Ikeda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a complete information model of bidding in second price sealed-bid and ascending-bid (English auctions, in which potential buyers know the unit valuation of other bidders and may spitefully prefer that their rivals earn a lower surplus. Bidders with spiteful preferences should overbid in equilibrium when they know their rival has a higher value than their own, and bidders with a higher value underbid to reciprocate the spiteful overbidding of the lower value bidders. The model also predicts different bidding behavior in second price as compared to ascending-bid auctions. The paper also presents experimental evidence broadly consistent with the model. In the complete information environment, lower value bidders overbid more than higher value bidders, and they overbid more frequently in the second price auction than in the ascending price auction. Overall, the lower value bidder submits bids that exceed value about half the time. These patterns are not found in the incomplete information environment, consistent with the model.

  19. SlideToolkit: an assistive toolset for the histological quantification of whole slide images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan G L Nelissen

    Full Text Available The demand for accurate and reproducible phenotyping of a disease trait increases with the rising number of biobanks and genome wide association studies. Detailed analysis of histology is a powerful way of phenotyping human tissues. Nonetheless, purely visual assessment of histological slides is time-consuming and liable to sampling variation and optical illusions and thereby observer variation, and external validation may be cumbersome. Therefore, within our own biobank, computerized quantification of digitized histological slides is often preferred as a more precise and reproducible, and sometimes more sensitive approach. Relatively few free toolkits are, however, available for fully digitized microscopic slides, usually known as whole slides images. In order to comply with this need, we developed the slideToolkit as a fast method to handle large quantities of low contrast whole slides images using advanced cell detecting algorithms. The slideToolkit has been developed for modern personal computers and high-performance clusters (HPCs and is available as an open-source project on github.com. We here illustrate the power of slideToolkit by a repeated measurement of 303 digital slides containing CD3 stained (DAB abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue from a tissue biobank. Our workflow consists of four consecutive steps. In the first step (acquisition, whole slide images are collected and converted to TIFF files. In the second step (preparation, files are organized. The third step (tiles, creates multiple manageable tiles to count. In the fourth step (analysis, tissue is analyzed and results are stored in a data set. Using this method, two consecutive measurements of 303 slides showed an intraclass correlation of 0.99. In conclusion, slideToolkit provides a free, powerful and versatile collection of tools for automated feature analysis of whole slide images to create reproducible and meaningful phenotypic data sets.

  20. Numerical analysis of capillary compensated micropolar fluid lubricated hole-entry journal bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathi Ram

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The micropolar lubricated symmetric/asymmetric hole-entry bearings using capillary restrictor have been analyzed in the present work. Reynolds equation for micropolar lubricant has been derived and solved by FEM. The results have been computed using selected parameters of micropolar lubricant for hole-entry hydrostatic/hybrid journal bearings. A significant increase in damping and stiffness coefficients is observed for bearings having micropolar parameter N2=0.9, lm=10 than similar bearings under Newtonian lubricant. The threshold speed gets increased when symmetric bearing lubricated under micropolar fluid than Newtonian lubricant. The threshold speed gets increased when symmetric bearing lubricated under micropolar fluid than Newtonian lubricant.

  1. Modified Ionic Liquid-Based High-Performance Lubricants for Robotic Operations, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA needs an advanced lubrication solution for its future robotic systems and planetary surface assets. The required lubrication technology must offer...

  2. Borax as a lubricant in powder metallurgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Geovanny Ariza-Suarez

    2014-12-01

    were compacted at 700 MPa in a uniaxial press of 15 tons. DSC-TGA analysis of the mixture with borax was realized. The specimens were sintered in a plasma reactor at 1000 for 30 minutes, with a combined atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Microhardness and density of the sintered samples was haracterized. XRD analysis was realized to detect possible compounds formation by interaction of borax. This paper shows that borax can be used as a lubricant in powder metallurgy.

  3. Nanotribology of Symmetric and Asymmetric Liquid Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yamada

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available When liquid molecules are confined in a narrow gap between smooth surfaces, their dynamic properties are completely different from those of the bulk. The molecular motions are highly restricted and the system exhibits solid-like responses when sheared slowly. This solidification behavior is very dependent on the molecular geometry (shape of liquids because the solidification is induced by the packing of molecules into ordered structures in confinement. This paper reviews the measurements of confined structures and friction of symmetric and asymmetric liquid lubricants using the surface forces apparatus. The results show subtle and complex friction mechanisms at the molecular scale.

  4. Process for the preparation of lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M

    1927-06-04

    A process is described for preparation of lubricants from mixtures of hydrocarbons or hydrocarbon derivatives of mean molecular weight and nonaromatic nature, which is characterized by halogenating the raw oil by the action of halogens or halogen-exchanging compounds and submitting the obtained product to a condensation in presence of aluminum chloride, tin chloride, iron chloride, or other condensing metal chloride or boron fluoride or activated metals, such as activated aluminum, whereby it is worked up in two steps at a temperature below 150 and preferably below 100/sup 0/C.

  5. Piston-Skirt Lubrication System For Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Edgar C.; Burzynski, Marion, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Piston-skirt lubrication system provides steady supply of oil to piston rings of gas compressor. No need for oil-filled crankcase or external oil pump. Instead, part of each piston acts as its own oil pump circulating oil from reservoir. Annular space at bottom of piston and cylinder constitutes working volume of small oil pump. Depending on application, reservoir open to atmosphere, or sealed and pressurized in bellows to prevent contact between oil and atmosphere. Filter removes particles worn away from piston rings and cylinder wall during normal operation.

  6. Hydrodynamic bearing lubricated with magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urreta, H; Leicht, Z; Sanchez, A; Agirre, A; Kuzhir, P; Magnac, G

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work carried out in the development of hydrodynamic lubricated journal bearings with magnetic fluids. Two different fluids have been analyzed, one ferrofluid from FERROTEC APG s10n and one magnetorheological fluid from LORD Corp., MRF122-2ED. Theoretical analysis has been carried out with numerical solutions of Reynolds equation, based on apparent viscosity modulation for ferrofluid and Bingham model for MR fluid. To validate this model, one test bench has been designed, manufactured and set up, where preliminary results shown in this paper demonstrate that magnetic fluids can be used to develop active journal bearings.

  7. Detailed balance and reciprocity in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchartz, Thomas; Rau, Uwe [IEF5-Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    The limiting efficiency of photovoltaic devices follows from the detailed balance of absorption and emission of a diode according to the Shockley-Queisser theory. However, the principle of detailed balance has more implications for the understanding of photovoltaic devices than only defining the efficiency limit. We show how reciprocity relations between carrier collection and dark carrier injection, between electroluminescence emission and photovoltaic quantum efficiency and between open circuit voltage and light emitting diode quantum efficiency all follow from the principle of detailed balance. We also discuss the validity range of the Shockley-Queisser limit and the reciprocity relations. Discussing the validity of the reciprocity relations helps to deepen the understanding of photovoltaic devices and allows us to identify interrelationships between the superposition principle, the diode ideality and the reciprocity relations. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Study of confinement and sliding friction of fluids using sum frequency generation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjundiah, Kumar

    2007-12-01

    Friction and wear are important technologically. Tires on wet roads, windshield wipers and human joints are examples where nanometer-thick liquids are confined between flexible-rigid contact interfaces. Fundamental understanding of the structure of these liquids can assist in the design of products such as artificial joints and lubricants for Micro-electromechanical systems [MEMS]. Prior force measurements have suggested an increase in apparent viscosity of confined liquid and sometimes solid-like responses. But, these have not given the state of molecules under confinement. In the present study, we have used a surface sensitive, non-linear optical technique (infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy [SFG]) to investigate molecular structure at hidden interfaces. SFG can identify chemical groups, concentration and orientation of molecules at an interface. A friction cell was developed to study sliding of a smooth elastomeric lens against a sapphire surface. Experiments were done with dry sliding as well as lubricated sliding in the presence of linear alkane liquids. SFG spectra at the alkane/sapphire interface revealed ordering of the confined alkane molecules. These were more ordered than alkane liquid, but less ordered than alkane crystal. Cooling of the confined alkane below its melting temperature [TM] led to molecular orientation that was different from that of bulk crystal next to a sapphire surface. Molecules were oriented with their symmetry axis parallel to the surface normal. In addition, the melting temperature [Tconf] under confinement for a series of linear alkanes (n =15--27) showed a surprising trend. Intermediate molecular weights showed melting point depression. The T conf values suggested that melting started at the alkane/sapphire interface. In another investigation, confinement of water between an elastomeric PDMS lens and sapphire was studied. SFG spectra at the sapphire/water/PDMS interface revealed a heterogeneous morphology. The

  9. Negative reciprocity and retrenched pension rights

    OpenAIRE

    Montizaan, R.M.; Cörvers, F.; de Grip, A.; Dohmen, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    We document the importance of negatively reciprocal inclinations in labor relationships by showing that a retrenchment of pension rights, which is perceived as unfair, causes a larger reduction in job motivation the stronger workers' negatively reciprocal inclinations are. We exploit unique matched survey and administrative data on male employees in the public sector in the Netherlands and compare the job motivation of employees born in 1950, who faced a substantial retrenchment of their pens...

  10. Lubrication in cold rolling : Numerical simulation using multigrid techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugt, Pieter Martin

    1992-01-01

    In the cold rolling process a lubricant is applied on the rolls and/or the strip mate­rial. Due to the velocities of the rolls and the strip, part of the lubricant is sheared into the contact causing, amongst others, a reduction of the friction. In this thesis a physical-mathematical model is

  11. Testing of environmentally friendly lubricants for sheet metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Olsson, David Dam; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2005-01-01

    the authors have especially been involved in the development of a system of test methods for sheet metal forming and in testing of friction and limits of lubrication of new, environmentally friendly lubricants. An overview of the developed tests is presented together with selected results....

  12. Prediction of limits of lubrication in strip reduction testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2004-01-01

    Pick-up and galling due to lubricant film breakdown is a severe limitation in cold forming of tribologically difficult metals like stainless steel and aluminium. The present paper describes a method of combined experimental and numerical analysis to quantify the limits of lubrication in a dedicated...

  13. Piston ring lubrication and hydrocarbon emissions from internal combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froelund, K.

    1997-11-01

    Is it the intention with this project to improve the existing hydrocarbon emission model at the Institute by combining it with a model for predicting the piston ring lubrication. The piston ring lubrication model should be experimentally verified to ensure the validity of the model. The following items were the objectives of the current study: Develop a piston ring lubrication model. This implies the development of a ring-pack gas flow model; Examine the response of the piston ring lubrication model to changing engineer conditions. Especially, it would be interesting to look at the engine warm-up phase since this is the phase where the engine-out emissions are highest and where the commonly used three way catalyst is not capable of converting the engine-out emissions, thereby leading the engine-out emissions directly out in to the environment with the exhaust gases; In order to verify the piston ring lubrication model the lubricant distribution on the cylinder liner should be investigated experimentally. Here again it would be of great interesting to look at the engine warm-up phase; The piston ring lubrication model should be adjusted for application together with the new hydrocarbon emission model for SI-engines at the Institute in order to increase the accuracy of the latter; The piston ring lubrication model could be used for describing the transport of PAH`s in diesel engines. (EG)

  14. Mild wear modeling in the boundary lubrication regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the increasing demand for smaller and more efficient systems is increasing the stress put on interacting components. This forces components to operate in the boundary lubrication regime. In this lubrication regime, the normal load put on the components is no longer carried by the

  15. Temperature dependence on the synthesis of Jatropha bio lubricant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunam Resul, M.F.M.; Tinia Idaty Mohd Ghazi; Idris, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Jatropha oil has good potential as the renewable energy as well as lubricant feedstock. The synthesis of jatropha bio lubricant was performed by transesterification of jatropha methyl ester (JME) with trimethyl-ol-propane (TMP) with sodium methoxide (NaOCH 3 ) catalyst. The effects of temperature on the synthesis were studied at a range between 120 degree Celsius and 200 degree Celsius with pressure kept at 10 mbar. The conversion of JME to jatropha bio lubricant was found to be the highest (47 %) at 200 degree Celsius. However, it was suggested that the optimum temperature of the reaction is at 150 degree Celsius due to insignificant improvement in bio lubricant production. To maintain forward reaction, the excess amount of JME was maintained at 3.9:1 ratios to TMP. Kinetic study was done and compared. The synthesis was found to follow a second order reaction with overall rate constant of 1.49 x 10 -1 (% wt/ wt.min.degree Celsius) -1 . The estimated activation energy was 3.94 kJ/mol. Pour point for jatropha bio lubricant was at -3 degree Celsius and Viscosity Index (VI) ranged from 178 to 183. The basic properties of jatropha bio lubricant, pour point and viscosities are found comparable to other plant based bio lubricant, namely palm oil and soybean based bio lubricant. (author)

  16. Surface effects in adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buckley, Donald H

    1981-01-01

    ... for carbon bodies to improve their wear resistance in high altitude aircraft generator applications. Basic researchers found that moisture in the carbon was critical t o its lubrication. Therefore, the presence of moisture o n the surface of the carbon was important. With it present, the carbon lubricated very effectively and very low wear was ...

  17. Adaptive system of supplying lubricant to the internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barylnikova, E. P.; Kulakov, A. T.; Kulakov, O. A.

    2017-09-01

    This paper assesses the impact of reducing the pressure in the lubrication system on the failures of the crankshaft bearings. The method of adapting lubricating system of the diesel engine as the wear in operation and depending on the operation modes.

  18. Lubricant reflow after laser heating in heat assisted magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haoyu; Mendez, Alejandro Rodriguez; Xiong, Shaomin; Bogy, David B.

    2015-05-01

    In heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) technology for hard disk drives, the media will be heated to about 500 °C during the writing process in order to reduce its magnetic coercivity and thus allow data writing with the magnetic head transducers. The traditional lubricants such as Z-dol and Z-tetraol may not be able to perform in such harsh heating conditions due to evaporation, decomposition and thermal depletion. However, some of the lubricant depletion can be recovered due to reflow after a period of time, which can help to reduce the chance of head disk interface failure. In this study, experiments of lubricant thermal depletion and reflow were performed using a HAMR test stage for a Z-tetraol type lubricant. Various lubricant depletion profiles were generated using different laser heating conditions. The lubricant reflow process after thermal depletion was monitored by use of an optical surface analyzer. In addition, a continuum based lubrication model was developed to simulate the lubricant reflow process. Reasonably good agreement between simulations and experiments was achieved.

  19. Static non-reciprocity in mechanical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulais, Corentin; Sounas, Dimitrios; Alù, Andrea

    2017-02-23

    Reciprocity is a general, fundamental principle governing various physical systems, which ensures that the transfer function-the transmission of a physical quantity, say light intensity-between any two points in space is identical, regardless of geometrical or material asymmetries. Breaking this transmission symmetry offers enhanced control over signal transport, isolation and source protection. So far, devices that break reciprocity (and therefore show non-reciprocity) have been mostly considered in dynamic systems involving electromagnetic, acoustic and mechanical wave propagation associated with fields varying in space and time. Here we show that it is possible to break reciprocity in static systems, realizing mechanical metamaterials that exhibit vastly different output displacements under excitation from different sides, as well as one-way displacement amplification. This is achieved by combining large nonlinearities with suitable geometrical asymmetries and/or topological features. In addition to extending non-reciprocity and isolation to statics, our work sheds light on energy propagation in nonlinear materials with asymmetric crystalline structures and topological properties. We anticipate that breaking reciprocity will open avenues for energy absorption, conversion and harvesting, soft robotics, prosthetics and optomechanics.

  20. The Effects of Acid Passivation, Tricresyl Phosphate Presoak, and UV/Ozone Treatment on the Tribology of Perfluoropolyether-Lubricated 440C Stainless Steel Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Jansen, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    The boundary-lubrication performance of two perfluoropolyether (PFPE) thin films in the presence of passivated 440C stainless steel is presented. The study used a standard ball on disk (BoD) tribometer in dry nitrogen and a vacuum spiral orbit tribometer (SOT). Stainless steel surfaces were passivated with one of four techniques: high and low temperature chromic acid bath, a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) soak, or UV/Ozone treated for 15 min. After passivation, each BoD disk had a 400A film of Krytox 16256 (PFPE) applied to it. The lifetimes of these films were quantified by measuring the number of sliding cycles before an increase in friction occurred. The lubricated lifetime of the 440C couple was not altered as a result of the various passivation techniques. The resulting surface chemistry of each passivation technique was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The SOT was used to examine the effects of the TCP treatment on the lubricated lifetime of another PFPE, Brayco 815Z, under rolling conditions. None of the passivation techniques were found to dramatically increase the oxide film thickness or lubricated lifetimes.

  1. SlideJ: An ImageJ plugin for automated processing of whole slide images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Mea, Vincenzo; Baroni, Giulia L; Pilutti, David; Di Loreto, Carla

    2017-01-01

    The digital slide, or Whole Slide Image, is a digital image, acquired with specific scanners, that represents a complete tissue sample or cytological specimen at microscopic level. While Whole Slide image analysis is recognized among the most interesting opportunities, the typical size of such images-up to Gpixels- can be very demanding in terms of memory requirements. Thus, while algorithms and tools for processing and analysis of single microscopic field images are available, Whole Slide images size makes the direct use of such tools prohibitive or impossible. In this work a plugin for ImageJ, named SlideJ, is proposed with the objective to seamlessly extend the application of image analysis algorithms implemented in ImageJ for single microscopic field images to a whole digital slide analysis. The plugin has been complemented by examples of macro in the ImageJ scripting language to demonstrate its use in concrete situations.

  2. SlideJ: An ImageJ plugin for automated processing of whole slide images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Della Mea

    Full Text Available The digital slide, or Whole Slide Image, is a digital image, acquired with specific scanners, that represents a complete tissue sample or cytological specimen at microscopic level. While Whole Slide image analysis is recognized among the most interesting opportunities, the typical size of such images-up to Gpixels- can be very demanding in terms of memory requirements. Thus, while algorithms and tools for processing and analysis of single microscopic field images are available, Whole Slide images size makes the direct use of such tools prohibitive or impossible. In this work a plugin for ImageJ, named SlideJ, is proposed with the objective to seamlessly extend the application of image analysis algorithms implemented in ImageJ for single microscopic field images to a whole digital slide analysis. The plugin has been complemented by examples of macro in the ImageJ scripting language to demonstrate its use in concrete situations.

  3. Chaos control using sliding-mode theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazzal, Jamal M.; Natsheh, Ammar N.

    2007-01-01

    Chaos control means to design a controller that is able to mitigating or eliminating the chaos behavior of nonlinear systems that experiencing such phenomenon. In this paper, a nonlinear Sliding-Mode Controller (SMC) is presented. Two nonlinear chaotic systems are chosen to be our case study in this paper, the well known Chua's circuit and Lorenz system. The study shows the effectiveness of the designed nonlinear Sliding-Mode Controller

  4. Application of a Biodegradable Lubricant in a Diesel Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schramm, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    The IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement has initiated this project concerning the application of biodegradable lubricants to diesel and gasoline type vehicles. Emission measurements on a chassis dynamometer were carried out. The purpose of these measurements was to compare the emissions of CO, CO2......, NOx, THC, PM, lubricant-SOF and PAH from one diesel and one gasoline type vehicle using biodegradable lubricants and conventional lubricants. This paper describes the results of the experiments with the diesel type vehicle only. Lubricant consumption and fuel consumption are other important parameters...... that have been evaluated during the experiments. Both vehicle types were operated on conventional crude oil based fuels and alternative fuels. The diesel vehicle was operated on conventional diesel fuel from a Danish fuel station, low sulfur diesel from Sweden and biodiesel, which was bought at a fuel...

  5. Tribological performance of nanoparticles as lubricating oil additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulzar, M., E-mail: mubashir-nustian@hotmail.com; Masjuki, H. H., E-mail: masjuki@um.edu.my; Kalam, M. A.; Varman, M.; Zulkifli, N. W. M. [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Centre for Energy Sciences (Malaysia); Mufti, R. A. [National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST) (Pakistan); Zahid, Rehan [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Centre for Energy Sciences (Malaysia)

    2016-08-15

    The prospect of modern tribology has been expanded with the advent of nanomaterial-based lubrication systems, whose development was facilitated by the nanotechnology in recent years. In literature, a variety of nanoparticles have been used as lubricant additives with potentially interesting friction and wear properties. To date, although there has been a great deal of experimental research on nanoparticles as lubricating oil additives, many aspects of their tribological behavior are yet to be fully understood. With growing number of possibilities, the key question is: what types of nanoparticles act as a better lubricating oil additive and why? To answer this question, this paper reviews main types of nanoparticles that have been used as lubricants additives and outlines the mechanisms by which they are currently believed to function. Significant aspects of their tribological behavior such as dispersion stability and morphology are also highlighted.

  6. Compressibilities and viscosities of reference, vegetable, and synthetic gear lubricants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueira Muñiz, Teresa; Lugo, Luis; Fernández, Josefa

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, one of the primary choices of base oils for environmentally aware lubricants is vegetable oils. This is due to their good natural biodegradability and very low toxicity in combination with very good lubricity characteristics. The development of new vegetable-based lubricants requires...... values of six gear lubricants, two of them reference mineral oils and the other four developed biodegradable oils based in high oleic sunflower oil or in synthetic esters. It was found that all of the lubricants have both similar compressibilities and similar expansivities. Dowson and Higginson, Zhu.......06%. Dowson and Higginson and Zhu and Wen equations of state do not predict well the isothermal compressibilities, with AAD % being around 45% for both equations. Moreover, the viscosities were measured in the temperature range from 278.15 to 373.15 K at atmospheric pressure for these oils, and the viscosity...

  7. Tribological performance of nanoparticles as lubricating oil additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulzar, M.; Masjuki, H. H.; Kalam, M. A.; Varman, M.; Zulkifli, N. W. M.; Mufti, R. A.; Zahid, Rehan

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of modern tribology has been expanded with the advent of nanomaterial-based lubrication systems, whose development was facilitated by the nanotechnology in recent years. In literature, a variety of nanoparticles have been used as lubricant additives with potentially interesting friction and wear properties. To date, although there has been a great deal of experimental research on nanoparticles as lubricating oil additives, many aspects of their tribological behavior are yet to be fully understood. With growing number of possibilities, the key question is: what types of nanoparticles act as a better lubricating oil additive and why? To answer this question, this paper reviews main types of nanoparticles that have been used as lubricants additives and outlines the mechanisms by which they are currently believed to function. Significant aspects of their tribological behavior such as dispersion stability and morphology are also highlighted.

  8. A comparison of the lubrication behavior of whey protein model foods using tribology in linear and elliptical movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Caroline L; Foegeding, E Allen; van de Velde, Fred

    2017-08-01

    Lubrication is an important factor in the sensory evaluation of food products. Tribology provides a theoretical framework and instrumental methods for evaluating frictional properties between two moving surfaces and the lubrication behavior of products between these surfaces. Relating frictional measurements to sensory properties detected during oral processing requires careful and pertinent choices in surface materials and testing conditions. The aims of this study were to investigate: (a) differences in lubrication behavior of a range of food textures and (b) the differences between linear and elliptical movement and added saliva to understand the contribution of food structure to friction. Six whey protein model food samples, ranging in texture from fluid to semisolid to soft solid, were analyzed using a pin on disk tribometer to determine the coefficient of friction (COF) across a range of sliding speeds. The samples were analyzed in their initial form and post-oral processing (n = 4) in both linear and elliptical movements. Elliptical movement slightly decreased coefficients of friction and extended the shape of the friction curve. Increases in test food viscosity decreased the COF but differences in viscosity were not apparent when test foods were mixed with saliva. Data correction for viscosity shifted the friction curves horizontally, indicating that lubrication had a greater impact upon friction than viscosity. This study provides initial insights for further comparison of linear and elliptical movement with a variety of sample compositions. Sensory perception of smoothness and creaminess are often major contributors to overall hedonic food liking and are a major reason why products high in fat and sugar are more highly preferred over other foods. These parameters are influenced by friction and lubrication between the tongue, palate, teeth, food products, and saliva during oral processing. Tribology provides an instrumental method to evaluate friction

  9. Preparing Scientific Papers, Posters, and Slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Maeno, Misato

    2016-01-01

    Publications and presentations are important in academic medicine. The ability to present information in a standard fashion is critically important. Papers, posters, and slides must be prepared appropriately to maximize their chance of being accepted. The first step is to use word processing software correctly. English language usage must conform to standard scientific English usage. Abbreviations should be avoided as much as possible. Numerical data must be presented with the appropriate number of significant figures. The first step in preparing a paper is to decide the target journal. Papers should always be written in 12 point Times New Roman font, while slides and posters should be in Arial or Helvetica. The Results section must contain actual data with appropriate statistical analysis. Take great care to prepare figures and tables according to the journal's instructions. Posters must be prepared to allow easy reading at a distance of 2m. Use a white background and dark letters. The majority of the area of your poster should be Results, and there is no need to include the abstract or references on a poster. Slide presentations should be limited to about one slide for each minute of the talk. Avoid the use of animations and excessive use of color. Do not use abbreviations on slides. Following these simple guidelines will meet the requirements of most journals and allow your audience to appreciate the data on your posters and slides. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of distribution of striated laser hardening tracks on dry sliding wear resistance of biomimetic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Zhou, Ti; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Li, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Some biological surfaces were proved to have excellent anti-wear performance. Being inspired, Nd:YAG pulsed laser was used to create striated biomimetic laser hardening tracks on medium carbon steel samples. Dry sliding wear tests biomimetic samples were performed to investigate specific influence of distribution of laser hardening tracks on sliding wear resistance of biomimetic samples. After comparing wear weight loss of biomimetic samples, quenched sample and untreated sample, it can be suggested that the sample covered with dense laser tracks (3.5 mm spacing) has lower wear weight loss than the one covered with sparse laser tracks (4.5 mm spacing); samples distributed with only dense laser tracks or sparse laser tracks (even distribution) were proved to have better wear resistance than samples distributed with both dense and sparse tracks (uneven distribution). Wear mechanisms indicate that laser track and exposed substrate of biomimetic sample can be regarded as hard zone and soft zone respectively. Inconsecutive striated hard regions, on the one hand, can disperse load into small branches, on the other hand, will hinder sliding abrasives during wear. Soft regions with small range are beneficial in consuming mechanical energy and storing lubricative oxides, however, soft zone with large width (>0.5 mm) will be harmful to abrasion resistance of biomimetic sample because damages and material loss are more obvious on surface of soft phase. As for the reason why samples with even distributed bionic laser tracks have better wear resistance, it can be explained by the fact that even distributed laser hardening tracks can inhibit severe worn of local regions, thus sliding process can be more stable and wear extent can be alleviated as well.

  11. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-05-06

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  12. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  13. Boundary mode lubrication of articular cartilage by recombinant human lubricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Jones, Aled R C; Flannery, Carl R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-06-01

    Lubrication of cartilage involves a variety of physical and chemical factors, including lubricin, a synovial glycoprotein that has been shown to be a boundary lubricant. It is unclear how lubricin boundary lubricates a wide range of bearings from tissue to artificial surfaces, and if the mechanism is the same for both soluble and bound lubricin. In the current study, experiments were conducted to investigate the hypothesis that recombinant human lubricin (rh-lubricin) lubricates cartilage in a dose-dependent manner and that soluble and bound fractions of rh-lubricin both contribute to the lubrication process. An rh-lubricin dose response was observed with maximal lubrication achieved at concentrations of rh-lubricin greater than 50 microg/mL. A concentration-response variable-slope model was fit to the data, and indicated that rh-lubricin binding to cartilage was not first order. The pattern of decrease in equilibrium friction coefficient indicated that aggregation of rh-lubricin or steric arrangement may regulate boundary lubrication. rh-lubricin localized at the cartilage surface was found to lubricate a cartilage-glass interface in boundary mode, as did soluble rh-lubricin at high concentrations (150 microg/mL); however, the most effective lubrication occurred when both soluble and bound rh-lubricin were present at the interface. These findings point to two distinct mechanisms by which rh-lubricin lubricates, one mechanism involving lubricin bound to the tissue surface and the other involving lubricin in solution. Copyright 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society

  14. Improvement of Tribological Performance of AISI H13 Steel by Means of a Self-Lubricated Oxide-Containing Tribo-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xianghong; Jin, Yunxue; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qiuyang; Wang, Shuqi

    2018-03-01

    A self-lubricated oxide-containing tribo-layer was induced to form by continuously adding particles of MoS2, Fe2O3 or their mixtures onto sliding interfaces of AISI H13 and 52100 steels. The artificial tribo-layer was always noticed to form continuously and cover the worn surface (termed as cover-type), whereas the original tribo-layer spontaneously formed with no additive was usually discontinuous and inserted into the substrate (termed as insert-type). Clearly, the cover-type and insert-type tribo-layers exactly corresponded to low and high wear rates, respectively. For the mixed additives of Fe2O3 + MoS2, the protective tribo-layers presented a load-carrying capability and lubricative function, which are attributed to the existence of Fe2O3 and MoS2. Hence, the wear rates and friction coefficients of H13 steel were markedly reduced.

  15. Ball Bearings Equipped for In Situ Lubrication on Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Mario; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.; Jansen, Mark; Predmore, Roamer

    2005-01-01

    In situ systems that provide fresh lubricants to ball/race contacts on demand have been developed to prolong the operational lives of ball bearings. These systems were originally intended to be incorporated into ball bearings in mechanisms that are required to operate in outer space for years, in conditions in which lubricants tend to deteriorate and/or evaporate. These systems may also be useful for similarly prolonging bearing lifetimes on Earth. Reservoirs have been among the means used previously to resupply lubricants. Lubricant- resupply reservoirs are bulky and add complexity to bearing assemblies. In addition, such a reservoir cannot be turned on or off as needed: it supplies lubricant continuously, often leading to an excess of lubricant in the bearing. A lubricator of the present type includes a porous ring cartridge attached to the inner or the outer ring of a ball bearing (see Figure 1). Oil is stored in the porous cartridge and is released by heating the cartridge: Because the thermal expansion of the oil exceeds that of the cartridge, heating causes the ejection of some oil. A metal film can be deposited on a face of the cartridge to serve as an electrical-resistance heater. The heater can be activated in response to a measured increase in torque that signals depletion of oil from the bearing/race contacts. Because the oil has low surface tension and readily wets the bearing-ring material, it spreads over the bearing ring and eventually reaches the ball/race contacts. The Marangoni effect (a surface-tension gradient associated with a temperature gradient) is utilized to enhance the desired transfer of lubricant to the ball/race contacts during heating. For a test, a ball bearing designed for use at low speed was assembled without lubricant and equipped with a porous-ring lubricator, the resistance heater of which consumed a power of less than 1 W when triggered on by a torque-measuring device. In the test, a load of 20 lb (.89 N) was applied and the

  16. Whole Slide Images for primary diagnostics in pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Janabi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Whole slide imaging is the process of digitizing glass slides resulting in the creation of Whole Slide Images (WSI). WSI are usually explored with the aid of an image viewer in a manner that closely simulates examining glass slides with a conventional microscope, permitting the manipulation of an

  17. Semantic focusing allows fully automated single-layer slide scanning of cervical cytology slides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Lahrmann

    Full Text Available Liquid-based cytology (LBC in conjunction with Whole-Slide Imaging (WSI enables the objective and sensitive and quantitative evaluation of biomarkers in cytology. However, the complex three-dimensional distribution of cells on LBC slides requires manual focusing, long scanning-times, and multi-layer scanning. Here, we present a solution that overcomes these limitations in two steps: first, we make sure that focus points are only set on cells. Secondly, we check the total slide focus quality. From a first analysis we detected that superficial dust can be separated from the cell layer (thin layer of cells on the glass slide itself. Then we analyzed 2,295 individual focus points from 51 LBC slides stained for p16 and Ki67. Using the number of edges in a focus point image, specific color values and size-inclusion filters, focus points detecting cells could be distinguished from focus points on artifacts (accuracy 98.6%. Sharpness as total focus quality of a virtual LBC slide is computed from 5 sharpness features. We trained a multi-parameter SVM classifier on 1,600 images. On an independent validation set of 3,232 cell images we achieved an accuracy of 94.8% for classifying images as focused. Our results show that single-layer scanning of LBC slides is possible and how it can be achieved. We assembled focus point analysis and sharpness classification into a fully automatic, iterative workflow, free of user intervention, which performs repetitive slide scanning as necessary. On 400 LBC slides we achieved a scanning-time of 13.9±10.1 min with 29.1±15.5 focus points. In summary, the integration of semantic focus information into whole-slide imaging allows automatic high-quality imaging of LBC slides and subsequent biomarker analysis.

  18. Semantic focusing allows fully automated single-layer slide scanning of cervical cytology slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahrmann, Bernd; Valous, Nektarios A; Eisenmann, Urs; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Grabe, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-based cytology (LBC) in conjunction with Whole-Slide Imaging (WSI) enables the objective and sensitive and quantitative evaluation of biomarkers in cytology. However, the complex three-dimensional distribution of cells on LBC slides requires manual focusing, long scanning-times, and multi-layer scanning. Here, we present a solution that overcomes these limitations in two steps: first, we make sure that focus points are only set on cells. Secondly, we check the total slide focus quality. From a first analysis we detected that superficial dust can be separated from the cell layer (thin layer of cells on the glass slide) itself. Then we analyzed 2,295 individual focus points from 51 LBC slides stained for p16 and Ki67. Using the number of edges in a focus point image, specific color values and size-inclusion filters, focus points detecting cells could be distinguished from focus points on artifacts (accuracy 98.6%). Sharpness as total focus quality of a virtual LBC slide is computed from 5 sharpness features. We trained a multi-parameter SVM classifier on 1,600 images. On an independent validation set of 3,232 cell images we achieved an accuracy of 94.8% for classifying images as focused. Our results show that single-layer scanning of LBC slides is possible and how it can be achieved. We assembled focus point analysis and sharpness classification into a fully automatic, iterative workflow, free of user intervention, which performs repetitive slide scanning as necessary. On 400 LBC slides we achieved a scanning-time of 13.9±10.1 min with 29.1±15.5 focus points. In summary, the integration of semantic focus information into whole-slide imaging allows automatic high-quality imaging of LBC slides and subsequent biomarker analysis.

  19. The neural correlates of reciprocity are sensitive to prior experience of reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceda, Ricardo; Prendes-Alvarez, Stefania; Hsu, Jung-Jiin; Tripathi, Shanti P; Kilts, Clint D; James, G Andrew

    2017-08-14

    Reciprocity is central to human relationships and is strongly influenced by multiple factors including the nature of social exchanges and their attendant emotional reactions. Despite recent advances in the field, the neural processes involved in this modulation of reciprocal behavior by ongoing social interaction are poorly understood. We hypothesized that activity within a discrete set of neural networks including a putative moral cognitive neural network is associated with reciprocity behavior. Nineteen healthy adults underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning while playing the trustee role in the Trust Game. Personality traits and moral development were assessed. Independent component analysis was used to identify task-related functional brain networks and assess their relationship to behavior. The saliency network (insula and anterior cingulate) was positively correlated with reciprocity behavior. A consistent array of brain regions supports the engagement of emotional, self-referential and planning processes during social reciprocity behavior. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Friction and wear performance of bearing ball sliding against diamond-like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenjiang; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Kar, Satyananda; Li, Dangjuan; Su, Junhong

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the tribological properties of bearing steel ball (Japan standard, SUJ2) sliding against tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) coatings and amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) coatings. The reciprocating sliding testes are performed with ball-on-plate friction tester in ambient air condition. Analysis of friction coefficient, wear volume and microstructure in wear scar are carried out using optical microscopy, atom force morphology (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show the SUJ2 on ta-C coating has low friction coefficient (around 0.15) but high wear loss. In contrast, the low wear loss of SUJ2 on a-C:H coating with high (around 0.4) and unsteady friction coefficient. Some Fe2O3, FeO and graphitization have been found on the wear scar of SUJ2 sliding against ta-C coating. Nearly no oxide materials exist on the wear scar of SUJ2 against a-C:H coating. The mechanism and hypothesis of the wear behavior have been investigated according to the measurement results. This study will contribute to proper selection and understand the tribological performance of bearing steels against DLC coatings.