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Sample records for receptors nucleotide-binding oligomerization

  1. Association of Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain Receptors with Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian Amiri, Rajeeh; Tehrani, Mohsen; Taghizadeh, Shirin; Shokri-Shirvani, Javad; Fakheri, Hafez; Ajami, Abolghasem

    2016-10-01

    Host innate immunity can affect the clinical outcomes of Helicobacter pylori infection, including gastritis, gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Nucleotide binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-1 and -2 are two molecules of innate immunity which are involved in the host defense against H. pylori. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the expression level of NOD1 and NOD2 on the susceptibility to gastric cancer as well as peptic ulcer in individuals with H. pylori infection. The gene expression levels of these molecules were compared in three groups of non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) as a control group (n=52); peptic ulcer disease (PUD), (n=53); and gastric cancer (GC), (n=39). Relative expression levels of NOD1 in patients with GC were higher than those of NUD and PUD (p<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). Similarly in case of NOD1, PUD group showed higher level of expression than NUD group (p<0.01). However, there was no significant difference between H. pylori -positive and -negative patients in NUD, PUD, or GC groups. Moreover, the expression levels of NOD2 showed no significant difference among NUD, PUD, or GC groups, while among H. pylori-positive patients, it was higher in GC group than NUD  and PUD groups (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). In addition, positive correlation coefficients were attained between NOD1 and NOD2 expressions in patients with NUD (R2 Linear=0.349, p<0.001), PUD (R2 Linear=0.695, p<0.001), and GC (R2 Linear=0.385, p<0.001). Collectively, the results suggest that the chronic activation of NOD1 and NOD2 receptors might play a role in the development of gastric cancer.

  2. Critical role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor 3 in vascular repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaweck, Sebastian; Zimmer, Sebastian; Struck, Rafael [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Bartok, Eva [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Werner, Nikos [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Bauernfeind, Franz [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Latz, Eicke [Institute of Innate Immunity, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Nickenig, Georg [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Hornung, Veit [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Ghanem, Alexander, E-mail: ghanem@uni-bonn.de [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} NLRP3 is not required for systemic cardiovascular function in healthy mice. {yields} NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and that it does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. {yields} NLRP3 is critical in neointima formation following vascular injury. -- Abstract: Vascular remodeling characterized by hyperproliferative neointima formation is an unfavorable repair process that is triggered by vascular damage. This process is characterized by an increased local inflammatory and proliferative response that critically involves the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}). IL-1{beta} is expressed and cytosolically retained as a procytokine that requires additional processing prior to exerting its pro-inflammatory function. Maturation and release of pro IL-1{beta} is governed by a cytosolic protein scaffold that is known as the inflammasome. Here we show that NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3), an important activating component of the inflammasome, is involved in neointima formation after vascular injury. NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. However, neointima development following wire injury of the carotid artery was significantly decreased in NLRP3-deficient mice as compared to wild-type controls. In all, NLRP3 plays a non-redundant role in vascular damage mediated neointima formation. Our data establish NLRP3 as a key player in the response to vascular damage, which could open new avenues to therapeutic intervention.

  3. Critical role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor 3 in vascular repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaweck, Sebastian; Zimmer, Sebastian; Struck, Rafael; Bartok, Eva; Werner, Nikos; Bauernfeind, Franz; Latz, Eicke; Nickenig, Georg; Hornung, Veit; Ghanem, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NLRP3 is not required for systemic cardiovascular function in healthy mice. → NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and that it does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. → NLRP3 is critical in neointima formation following vascular injury. -- Abstract: Vascular remodeling characterized by hyperproliferative neointima formation is an unfavorable repair process that is triggered by vascular damage. This process is characterized by an increased local inflammatory and proliferative response that critically involves the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). IL-1β is expressed and cytosolically retained as a procytokine that requires additional processing prior to exerting its pro-inflammatory function. Maturation and release of pro IL-1β is governed by a cytosolic protein scaffold that is known as the inflammasome. Here we show that NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3), an important activating component of the inflammasome, is involved in neointima formation after vascular injury. NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. However, neointima development following wire injury of the carotid artery was significantly decreased in NLRP3-deficient mice as compared to wild-type controls. In all, NLRP3 plays a non-redundant role in vascular damage mediated neointima formation. Our data establish NLRP3 as a key player in the response to vascular damage, which could open new avenues to therapeutic intervention.

  4. Invasive Streptococcus mutans induces inflammatory cytokine production in human aortic endothelial cells via regulation of intracellular toll-like receptor 2 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, E; Oho, T

    2017-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the primary etiologic agent of dental caries, can gain access to the bloodstream and has been associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the roles of S. mutans in inflammation in cardiovascular disease remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine cytokine production induced by S. mutans in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and to evaluate the participation of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) -like receptors in HAECs. Cytokine production by HAECs was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and the expression of TLRs and NOD-like receptors was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The involvement of TLR2 and NOD2 in cytokine production by invaded HAECs was examined using RNA interference. The invasion efficiencies of S. mutans strains were evaluated by means of antibiotic protection assays. Five of six strains of S. mutans of various serotypes induced interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production by HAECs. All S. mutans strains upregulated TLR2 and NOD2 mRNA levels in HAECs. Streptococcus mutans Xc upregulated the intracellular TLR2 and NOD2 protein levels in HAECs. Silencing of the TLR2 and NOD2 genes in HAECs invaded by S. mutans Xc led to a reduction in interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. Cytokine production induced by invasive S. mutans via intracellular TLR2 and NOD2 in HAECs may be associated with inflammation in cardiovascular disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Discovery of Nanomolar Desmuramylpeptide Agonists of the Innate Immune Receptor Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing Protein 2 (NOD2) Possessing Immunostimulatory Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobec, Martina; Tomašič, Tihomir; Štimac, Adela; Frkanec, Ruža; Trontelj, Jurij; Anderluh, Marko; Mlinarič-Raščan, Irena; Jakopin, Žiga

    2018-04-12

    Muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a fragment of bacterial peptidoglycan, has long been known as the smallest fragment possessing adjuvant activity, on the basis of its agonistic action on the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2). There is a pressing need for novel adjuvants, and NOD2 agonists provide an untapped source of potential candidates. Here, we report the design, synthesis, and characterization of a series of novel acyl tripeptides. A pivotal structural element for molecular recognition by NOD2 has been identified, culminating in the discovery of compound 9, the most potent desmuramylpeptide NOD2 agonist to date. Compound 9 augmented pro-inflammatory cytokine release from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in synergy with lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, it was able to induce ovalbumin-specific IgG titers in a mouse model of adjuvancy. These findings provide deeper insights into the structural requirements of desmuramylpeptides for NOD2-activation and highlight the potential use of NOD2 agonists as adjuvants for vaccines.

  6. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of duck nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Jin, Hui; Li, Yaqian; Liu, Dejian; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Jiang, Yunbo; Luo, Rui

    2017-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) is an imperative cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and considered as a key member of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family which plays a critical role in innate immunity through sensing microbial components derived from bacterial peptidoglycan. In the current study, the full-length of duck NOD1 (duNOD1) cDNA from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs) was cloned. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that duNOD1 exhibited a strong evolutionary relationship with chicken and rock pigeon NOD1. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that duNOD1 was widely distributed in various organs, with the highest expression observed in the liver. Furthermore, duNOD1 overexpression induced NF-κB activation in DEFs and the CARD domain is crucial for duNOD1-mediated NF-κB activation. In addition, silencing the duNOD1 decreased the activity of NF-κB in DEFs stimulated by iE-DAP. Overexpression of duNOD1 significantly increased the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and RANTES in DEFs. These findings highlight the crucial role of duNOD1 as an intracellular sensor in duck innate immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) activation induces apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyo-Eun; Ahn, Mee-Young; Kwon, Seong-Min; Kim, Dong-Jae; Lee, Jun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Microbial Pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), such as nucleotide-binding oligomerization domains (NODs), are essential for mammalian innate immune response. This study was designed to determine the effect of NOD1 and NOD2 agonist on innate immune responses and antitumor activity in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. NODs expression was examined by RT-PCR, and IL-8 production by NODs agonist was examined by ELISA. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the MAPK activation in response to their agonist. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. Flow cytometry and Western blot analysis were performed to determine the MDP-induced cell death. The levels of NODs were apparently expressed in OSCC cells. NODs agonist, Tri-DAP and MDP, led to the production of IL-8 and MAPK activation. NOD2 agonist, MDP, inhibited the proliferation of YD-10B cells in a dose-dependent manner. Also, the ratio of Annexin V-positive cells and cleaved PARP was increased by MDP treatment in YD-10B cells, suggesting that MDP-induced cell death in YD-10B cells may be owing to apoptosis. Our results indicate that NODs are functionally expressed in OSCC cells and can trigger innate immune responses. In addition, NOD2 agonist inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. These findings provide the potential value of MDP as novel candidates for antitumor agents of OSCC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing (NOD 2 in Host Defense during Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

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    Tijmen J Hommes

    Full Text Available Streptococcus (S. pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing (NOD 2 is a pattern recognition receptor located in the cytosol of myeloid cells that is able to detect peptidoglycan fragments of S. pneumoniae. We here aimed to investigate the role of NOD2 in the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae was studied in NOD2 deficient (Nod2-/- and wild-type (Wt alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. In subsequent in vivo experiments Nod2-/- and Wt mice were inoculated with serotype 2 S. pneumoniae (D39, an isogenic capsule locus deletion mutant (D39Δcps or serotype 3 S. pneumoniae (6303 via the airways, and bacterial growth and dissemination and the lung inflammatory response were evaluated. Nod2-/- alveolar macrophages and blood neutrophils displayed a reduced capacity to internalize pneumococci in vitro. During pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae D39 Nod2-/- mice were indistinguishable from Wt mice with regard to bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs, lung pathology and neutrophil recruitment. While Nod2-/- and Wt mice also had similar bacterial loads after infection with the more virulent S. pneumoniae 6303 strain, Nod2-/- mice displayed a reduced bacterial clearance of the normally avirulent unencapsulated D39Δcps strain. These results suggest that NOD2 does not contribute to host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia and that the pneumococcal capsule impairs recognition of S. pneumoniae by NOD2.

  9. Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-1 and -2 Play No Role in Controlling Brucella abortus Infection in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda S. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain proteins (NODs are modular cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the recognition of peptidoglycan-derived molecules. Further, several in vivo studies have demonstrated a role for Nod1 and Nod2 in host defense against bacterial pathogens. Here, we demonstrated that macrophages from NOD1-, NOD2-, and Rip2-deficient mice produced lower levels of TNF-α following infection with live Brucella abortus compared to wild-type mice. Similar reduction on cytokine synthesis was not observed for IL-12 and IL-6. However, NOD1, NOD2, and Rip2 knockout mice were no more susceptible to infection with virulent B. abortus than wild-type mice. Additionally, spleen cells from NOD1-, NOD2-, and Rip2-deficient mice showed unaltered production of IFN-γ compared to C57BL/6 mice. Taken together, this study demonstrates that NOD1, NOD2 and Rip2 are dispensable for the control of B. abortus during in vivo infection.

  10. Lack of Both Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing Proteins 1 and 2 Primes T Cells for Activation-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimsetty, Sashi G; Shigeoka, Alana A; Scheinok, Andrew A; Gavin, Amanda L; Ulevitch, Richard J; McKay, Dianne B

    2017-08-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (Nod)-containing proteins Nod1 and Nod2 play important roles in the innate immune response to pathogenic microbes, but mounting data suggest these pattern recognition receptors might also play key roles in adaptive immune responses. Targeting Nod1 and Nod2 signaling pathways in T cells is likely to provide a new strategy to modify inflammation in a variety of disease states, particularly those that depend on Ag-induced T cell activation. To better understand how Nod1 and Nod2 proteins contribute to adaptive immunity, this study investigated their role in alloantigen-induced T cell activation and asked whether their absence might impact in vivo alloresponses using a severe acute graft versus host disease model. The study provided several important observations. We found that the simultaneous absence of Nod1 and Nod2 primed T cells for activation-induced cell death. T cells from Nod1 × 2 -/- mice rapidly underwent cell death upon exposure to alloantigen. The Nod1 × 2 -/- T cells had sustained p53 expression that was associated with downregulation of its negative regulator MDM2. In vivo, mice transplanted with an inoculum containing Nod1 × 2 -/- T cells were protected from severe graft versus host disease. The results show that the simultaneous absence of Nod1 and Nod2 is associated with accelerated T cell death upon alloantigen encounter, suggesting these proteins might provide new targets to ameliorate T cell responses in a variety of inflammatory states, including those associated with bone marrow or solid organ transplantation. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein regulation of melatonin receptors in lizard brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivkees, S.A.; Carlson, L.L.; Reppert, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Melatonin receptors were identified and characterized in crude membrane preparations from lizard brain by using 125 I-labeled melatonin ( 125 I-Mel), a potent melatonin agonist. 125 I-Mel binding sites were saturable; Scatchard analysis revealed high-affinity and lower affinity binding sites, with apparent K d of 2.3 ± 1.0 x 10 -11 M and 2.06 ± 0.43 x 10 -10 M, respectively. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of crude membranes with the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate (GTP[γS]), significantly reduced the number of high-affinity receptors and increased the dissociation rate of 125 I-Mel from its receptor. Furthermore, GTP[γS] treatment of ligand-receptor complexes solubilized by Triton X-100 also led to a rapid dissociation of 125 I-Mel from solubilized ligand-receptor complexes. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized ligand-receptor complexes revealed two major peaks of radioactivity corresponding to M r > 400,000 and M r ca. 110,000. This elution profile was markedly altered by pretreatment with GTP[γS] before solubilization; only the M r 110,000 peak was present in GTP[γS]-pretreated membranes. The results strongly suggest that 125 I-mel binding sites in lizard brain are melatonin receptors, with agonist-promoted guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupling and that the apparent molecular size of receptors uncoupled from G proteins is about 110,000

  12. Transduction proteins of olfactory receptor cells: identification of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and protein kinase C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anholt, R.R.H.; Mumby, S.M.; Stoffers, D.A.; Girard, P.R.; Kuo, J.F.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the α subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single β subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the α subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/sub sα/ relative to G/sub ichemical bond/ and G/sub ochemical bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with [ 125 I]protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the β subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the α subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium

  13. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange*

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    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H.; Gittens, William H.; Townsend, Philip D.; Sharples, Gary J.; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  14. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H; Gittens, William H; Townsend, Philip D; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2016-01-15

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Functional reconstitution of prostaglandin E receptor from bovine adrenal medulla with guanine nucleotide binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negishi, M.; Ito, S.; Yokohama, H.; Hayashi, H.; Katada, T.; Ui, M.; Hayaishi, O.

    1988-01-01

    Prostaglandin E 2 (PEG 2 ) was found to bind specifically to a 100,000 x g pellet prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. The PGE receptor was associated with a GTP-binding protein (G-protein) and could be covalently cross-linked with this G-protein by dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate) in the 100,000 x g pellet. In order to characterize the G-protein associated with the PGE receptor and reconstitute these proteins in phospholipid vesicles, the authors purified the G-protein to apparent homogeneity from the 100,000 x g pellet. The G-protein served as a substrate of pertussis toxin but differed in its α subunit from two known pertussis toxin substrate G-proteins (G/sub i/ and G 0 ) purified from bovine brain. The molecular weight of the α subunit was 40,000, which is between those of G/sub i/ and G 0 . The purified protein was also distinguished immunologically from G/sub i/ and G 0 and was referred to as G/sub am/. Reconstitution of the PGE receptor with pure C/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G 0 in phospholipid vesicles resulted in a remarkable restoration of [ 3 H]PGE 2 binding activity in a GTP-dependent manner. The efficiency of these three G-proteins in this capacity was roughly equal. When pertussis toxin- or N-ethylmaleimide-treated G-proteins, instead of the native ones, were reconstituted into vesicles, the restoration of binding activity was no longer observed. These results indicate that the PGE receptor can couple functionally with G/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G 0 in phospholipid vesicles and suggest that G/sub am/ may be involved in signal transduction of the PGE receptor in bovine adrenal medulla

  16. Role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein in α1-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca2+ mobilization in DDT1 MF-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornett, L.E.; Norris, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the mechanisms involved in α 1 -adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca 2+ mobilization at the level of the plasma membrane were investigated. Stimulation of 45 Ca 2+ efflux from saponin-permeabilized DDT 1 MF-2 cells was observed with the addition of either the α 1 -adrenergic agonist phenylephrine and guanosine-5'-triphosphate or the nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide guanylyl-imidodiphosphate. In the presence of [ 32 P] NAD, pertussis toxin was found to catalyze ADP-ribosylation of a M/sub r/ = 40,500 (n = 8) peptide in membranes prepared from DDT 1 , MF-2 cells, possibly the α-subunit of N/sub i/. However, stimulation of unidirectional 45 Ca 2+ efflux by phenylephrine was not affected by previous treatment of cells with 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. These data suggest that the putative guanine nucleotide-binding protein which couples the α 1 -adrenergic receptor to Ca 2+ mobilization in DDT 1 MF-2 cells is not a pertussis toxin substrate and may possibly be an additional member of guanine nucleotide binding protein family

  17. Activation of nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor containing protein 3 inflammasome in dendritic cells and macrophages by Streptococcus sanguinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Ayumi; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Hasebe, Akira; Kamezaki, Ryousuke; Fujita, Mari; Nakazawa, Futoshi; Shibata, Ken-Ichiro

    2017-03-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is frequently isolated from the blood of patients with infective endocarditis and contributes to the pathology of this disease through induction of interleukin (IL)-1β responsible for the development of the disease. However, the mechanism of IL-1β induction remains unknown. In this study, S. sanguinis activated a murine dendritic cell (DC) to induce IL-1β and this activity was attenuated by silencing the mRNAs of nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor containing protein 3 (NLRP3) and caspase-1. S. sanguinis induced IL-1β production in murine bone marrow-derived macrophage, but this activity was significantly reduced in bone marrow-derived macrophages from NLRP3-, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain-, and caspase-1-deficient mice. DC phagocytosed S. sanguinis cells, followed by the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The ATP-degradating enzyme attenuated the release of ATP and IL-1β. The inhibitors for ATP receptor reduced IL-1β release in DC. These results strongly suggest that S. sanguinis has the activity to induce IL-1β through the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophage and DC and interaction of purinergic receptors with ATP released is involved in expression of the activity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 regulates Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in endothelial cells through NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, M; Liu, J; Ouyang, X

    2015-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis has been shown to actively invade endothelial cells and induce vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) overexpression. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) is an intracellular pattern recognition reporter, and its involvement in this process was unknown. This study focused on endothelial cells infected with P. gingivalis, the detection of NOD1 expression and the role that NOD1 plays in the upregulation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. The human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (ECV-304) was intruded by P. gingivalis W83, and cells without any treatment were the control group. Expression levels of NOD1, VCAM-1, ICAM-1, phosphorylated P65 between cells with and without treatment on both mRNA and protein levels were compared. Then we examined whether mesodiaminopimelic acid (NOD1 agonist) could increase VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression, meanwhile, NOD1 gene silence by RNA interference could reduce VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and phosphorylated P65 release. At last, we examined whether inhibition of NF-κB by Bay117082 could reduce VCAM-1 and ICAM- 1 expression. The mRNA levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and protein levels by western blot or electrophoretic mobility shift assays (for phosphorylated P65). P. gingivalis invasion showed significant upregulation of NOD1, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. NOD1 activation by meso-diaminopimelic acid increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression, and NOD1 gene silence reduced VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 release markedly. The NF-κB signaling pathway was activated by P. gingivalis, while NOD1 gene silence decreased the activation of NF-κB. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB reduced VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression induced by P. gingivalis in endothelial cells. The results revealed that P. gingivalis induced NOD1 overexpression in endothelial cells and that NOD1 played an important role in the process of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells infected with P

  19. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D; Dixon, Christopher H; Spies, Gerhard B; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J; Westerhof, Lotte B; Gawehns, Fleur K K; Knight, Marc R; Sharples, Gary J; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2015-10-09

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D.; Dixon, Christopher H.; Spies, Gerhard B.; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J.; Westerhof, Lotte B.; Gawehns, Fleur K. K.; Knight, Marc R.; Sharples, Gary J.; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. PMID:26306038

  1. Oligomerization of G protein-coupled receptors: computational methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selent, J; Kaczor, A A

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has unveiled the complexity of mechanisms involved in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) functioning in which receptor dimerization/oligomerization may play an important role. Although the first high-resolution X-ray structure for a likely functional chemokine receptor dimer has been deposited in the Protein Data Bank, the interactions and mechanisms of dimer formation are not yet fully understood. In this respect, computational methods play a key role for predicting accurate GPCR complexes. This review outlines computational approaches focusing on sequence- and structure-based methodologies as well as discusses their advantages and limitations. Sequence-based approaches that search for possible protein-protein interfaces in GPCR complexes have been applied with success in several studies, but did not yield always consistent results. Structure-based methodologies are a potent complement to sequence-based approaches. For instance, protein-protein docking is a valuable method especially when guided by experimental constraints. Some disadvantages like limited receptor flexibility and non-consideration of the membrane environment have to be taken into account. Molecular dynamics simulation can overcome these drawbacks giving a detailed description of conformational changes in a native-like membrane. Successful prediction of GPCR complexes using computational approaches combined with experimental efforts may help to understand the role of dimeric/oligomeric GPCR complexes for fine-tuning receptor signaling. Moreover, since such GPCR complexes have attracted interest as potential drug target for diverse diseases, unveiling molecular determinants of dimerization/oligomerization can provide important implications for drug discovery.

  2. Toll-like receptor 2 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 play divergent roles in the recognition of gut-derived lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Louise; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2008-01-01

    -marrow-derived DC lacking NOD2 produce higher levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and reduced levels of IL-12 and tumour necrosis factor-[alpha] (TNF-[alpha]) in response to LAB. This indicates that peptidoglycan is partly responsible for the T helper type 1 skewing effect of certain LAB. Dendritic cells that are TLR2......-[alpha]-inducing bifidobacteria inhibit the T helper type 1 skewing effect induced by strong immunostimulatory lactobacilli. Here we show that this immunoinhibitory effect of bifidobacteria is dependent on TLR2 and independent of NOD2. Moreover, independently of the cytokine pattern induced by intact LAB, cell wall fractions...

  3. Receptor Oligomerization as a Process Modulating Cellular Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio; Maggio, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    be another level of quality control that may help maintaining GPCRs rather stable throughout evolution. We propose here receptor oligomerization to be a basic molecular mechanism controlling GPCRs redundancy in many different cell types, and the plasma membrane as the first hierarchical cell structure...... at which selective categorical sensing may occur. Categorical sensing can be seen as the cellular capacity for identifying and ordering complex patterns of mixed signals out of a contextual matrix, i.e., the recognition of meaningful patterns out of ubiquitous signals. In this context, redundancy...

  4. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Ørgaard, Anne; Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    , the glucagon receptor, and the receptors for parathyroid hormone (PTHR1 and PTHR2). The dysregulation of several family B1 receptors is involved in diseases, such as diabetes, chronic inflammation, and osteoporosis which underlines the pathophysiological importance of this GPCR subfamily. In spite of this......, investigation of family B1 receptor oligomerization and especially its pharmacological importance is still at an early stage. Even though GPCR oligomerization is a well-established phenomenon, there is a need for more investigations providing a direct link between these interactions and receptor functionality......The superfamily of the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) is the largest family of membrane-associated receptors. GPCRs are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous human diseases, and they constitute an estimated 30-40% of all drug targets. During the last two decades...

  5. Pattern recognition receptors and the inflammasome in kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, Jaklien C.; Kors, Lotte; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Florquin, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptors (NLRs) are families of pattern recognition receptors that, together with inflammasomes, sense and respond to highly conserved pathogen motifs and endogenous molecules released upon cell damage or stress. Evidence

  6. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of 45Ca2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel

  7. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. (Albany Medical College, NY (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel.

  8. Oligomerization interface of RAGE receptor revealed by MS-monitored hydrogen deuterium exchange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Sitkiewicz

    Full Text Available Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE leads to a chronic proinflammatory signal, affecting patients with a variety of diseases. Potentially beneficial modification of RAGE activity requires understanding the signal transduction mechanism at the molecular level. The ligand binding domain is structurally uncoupled from the cytoplasmic domain, suggesting receptor oligomerization is a requirement for receptor activation. In this study, we used hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry to map structural differences between the monomeric and oligomeric forms of RAGE. Our results indicated the presence of a region shielded from exchange in the oligomeric form of RAGE and led to the identification of a new oligomerization interface localized at the linker region between domains C1 and C2. Based on this finding, a model of a RAGE dimer and higher oligomeric state was constructed.

  9. Bay11-7082 attenuates neuropathic pain via inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome activation in dorsal root ganglions in a rat model of lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang AL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ailiang Zhang, Kun Wang, Lianghua Ding, Xinnan Bao, Xuan Wang, Xubin Qiu, Jinbo Liu Spine Surgery, Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lumbar disc herniation (LDH is an important cause of radiculopathy, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Many studies suggested that local inflammation, rather than mechanical compression, results in radiculopathy induced by LDH. On the molecular and cellular level, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome have been implicated in the regulation of neuroinflammation formation and progression. In this study, the autologous nucleus pulposus (NP was implanted in the left L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG to mimic LDH in rats. We investigated the expression of NF-κB and the components of NLRP3 inflammasome in the DRG neurons in rats. Western blotting and immunofluorescence for the related molecules, including NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing caspase-1 activator domain (ASC, caspase-1, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-18, IκBα, p-IκBα, p65, p-p65, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP were examined. In the NP-treated group, the activations of NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65 in DRG neurons in rats were elevated at 1 day after surgery, and the peak occurred at 7 days. Treatment with Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the actions of IKK-β, was able to inhibit expression and activation of the molecules (NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65 and relieve the pain in rats. Our study shows that NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome are involved in the maintenance of NP-induced pain, and that Bay11-7082 could alleviate mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia by inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Keywords: pain, NLRP3, NF-κB, dorsal root ganglion, nucleus pulposus

  10. Nucleotide-oligomerizing domain-1 (NOD1) receptor activation induces pro-inflammatory responses and autophagy in human alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Esmeralda; Carranza, Claudia; Hernández-Sánchez, Fernando; Loyola, Elva; Escobedo, Dante; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Torres, Martha; Sada, Eduardo

    2014-09-25

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerizing domain-1 (NOD1) is a cytoplasmic receptor involved in recognizing bacterial peptidoglycan fragments that localize to the cytosol. NOD1 activation triggers inflammation, antimicrobial mechanisms and autophagy in both epithelial cells and murine macrophages. NOD1 mediates intracellular pathogen clearance in the lungs of mice; however, little is known about NOD1's role in human alveolar macrophages (AMs) or its involvement in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. AMs, monocytes (MNs), and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) from healthy subjects were assayed for NOD1 expression. Cells were stimulated with the NOD1 ligand Tri-DAP and cytokine production and autophagy were assessed. Cells were infected with Mtb and treated with Tri-DAP post-infection. CFUs counting determined growth control, and autophagy protein recruitment to pathogen localization sites was analyzed by immunoelectron microscopy. NOD1 was expressed in AMs, MDMs and to a lesser extent MNs. Tri-DAP stimulation induced NOD1 up-regulation and a significant production of IL1β, IL6, IL8, and TNFα in AMs and MDMs; however, the level of NOD1-dependent response in MNs was limited. Autophagy activity determined by expression of proteins Atg9, LC3, IRGM and p62 degradation was induced in a NOD1-dependent manner in AMs and MDMs but not in MNs. Infected AMs could be activated by stimulation with Tri-DAP to control the intracellular growth of Mtb. In addition, recruitment of NOD1 and the autophagy proteins IRGM and LC3 to the Mtb localization site was observed in infected AMs after treatment with Tri-DAP. NOD1 is involved in AM and MDM innate responses, which include proinflammatory cytokines and autophagy, with potential implications in the killing of Mtb in humans.

  11. Modelling the interdependence between the stoichiometry of receptor oligomerization and ligand binding for a coexisting dimer/tetramer receptor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, X; Vivó, M; Serra, J; Roche, D; Strange, P G; Giraldo, J

    2009-01-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors have been shown to exist as oligomers, but the oligomerization state and the effects of this on receptor function are unclear. For some G protein-coupled receptors, in ligand binding assays, different radioligands provide different maximal binding capacities. Here we have developed mathematical models for co-expressed dimeric and tetrameric species of receptors. We have considered models where the dimers and tetramers are in equilibrium and where they do not interconvert and we have also considered the potential influence of the ligands on the degree of oligomerization. By analogy with agonist efficacy, we have considered ligands that promote, inhibit or have no effect on oligomerization. Cell surface receptor expression and the intrinsic capacity of receptors to oligomerize are quantitative parameters of the equations. The models can account for differences in the maximal binding capacities of radioligands in different preparations of receptors and provide a conceptual framework for simulation and data fitting in complex oligomeric receptor situations.

  12. Kinetics in Signal Transduction Pathways Involving Promiscuous Oligomerizing Receptors Can Be Determined by Receptor Specificity : Apoptosis Induction by TRAIL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szegezdi, Eva; van der Sloot, Almer M.; Mahalingam, Devalingam; O'Leary, Lynda; Cool, Robbert H.; Munoz, Ines G.; Montoya, Guillermo; Quax, Wim J.; de Jong, Steven; Samali, Afshin; Serrano, Luis

    Here we show by computer modeling that kinetics and outcome of signal transduction in case of hetero-oligomerizing receptors of a promiscuous ligand largely depend on the relative amounts of its receptors. Promiscuous ligands can trigger the formation of nonproductive receptor complexes, which slows

  13. Membrane-mediated oligomerization of G protein coupled receptors and its implications for GPCR function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Gahbauer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The dimerization or even oligomerization of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs causes ongoing, controversial debates about its functional role and the coupled biophysical, biochemical or biomedical implications. A continously growing number of studies hints to a relation between oligomerization and function of GPCRs and strengthens the assumption that receptor assembly plays a key role in the regulation of protein function. Additionally, progress in the structural analysis of GPCR-G protein and GPCR-ligand interactions allows to distinguish between actively functional and non-signalling complexes. Recent findings further suggest that the surrounding membrane, i.e. its lipid composition may modulate the preferred dimerization interface and as a result the abundance of distinct dimeric conformations. In this review, the association of GPCRs and the role of the membrane in oligomerization will be discussed. An overview of the different reported oligomeric interfaces is provided and their capability for signaling discussed. The currently available data is summarized with regard to the formation of GPCR oligomers, their structures and dependency on the membrane microenvironment as well as the coupling of oligomerization to receptor function.

  14. The Pseudo signal peptide of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2A prevents receptor oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Anke; Rutz, Claudia; Kreuchwig, Annika; Krause, Gerd; Wiesner, Burkhard; Schülein, Ralf

    2012-08-03

    N-terminal signal peptides mediate the interaction of native proteins with the translocon complex of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and are cleaved off during early protein biogenesis. The corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2a (CRF(2(a))R) possesses an N-terminal pseudo signal peptide, which represents a so far unique domain within the large protein family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In contrast to a conventional signal peptide, the pseudo signal peptide remains uncleaved and consequently forms a hydrophobic extension at the N terminus of the receptor. The functional consequence of the presence of the pseudo signal peptide is not understood. Here, we have analyzed the significance of this domain for receptor dimerization/oligomerization in detail. To this end, we took the CRF(2(a))R and the homologous corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRF(1)R) possessing a conventional cleaved signal peptide and conducted signal peptide exchange experiments. Using single cell and single molecule imaging methods (fluorescence resonance energy transfer and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy, respectively) as well as biochemical experiments, we obtained two novel findings; we could show that (i) the CRF(2(a))R is expressed exclusively as a monomer, and (ii) the presence of the pseudo signal peptide prevents its oligomerization. Thus, we have identified a novel functional domain within the GPCR protein family, which plays a role in receptor oligomerization and which may be useful to study the functional significance of this process in general.

  15. Assembly of Oligomeric Death Domain Complexes during Toll Receptor Signaling*

    OpenAIRE

    Moncrieffe, Martin C.; Grossmann, J. Günter; Gay, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila Toll receptor is activated by the endogenous protein ligand Spätzle in response to microbial stimuli in immunity and spatial cues during embryonic development. Downstream signaling is mediated by the adaptor proteins Tube, the kinase Pelle, and the Drosophila homologue of myeloid differentiation primary response protein (dMyD88). Here we have characterized heterodimeric (dMyD88-Tube) and heterotrimeric (dMyD88-Tube-Pelle) death domain complexes. We show ...

  16. Assembly of Oligomeric Death Domain Complexes during Toll Receptor Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrieffe, Martin C.; Grossmann, J. Günter; Gay, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila Toll receptor is activated by the endogenous protein ligand Spätzle in response to microbial stimuli in immunity and spatial cues during embryonic development. Downstream signaling is mediated by the adaptor proteins Tube, the kinase Pelle, and the Drosophila homologue of myeloid differentiation primary response protein (dMyD88). Here we have characterized heterodimeric (dMyD88-Tube) and heterotrimeric (dMyD88-Tube-Pelle) death domain complexes. We show that both the heterodimeric and heterotrimeric complexes form kidney-shaped structures and that Tube is bivalent and has separate high affinity binding sites for dMyD88 and Pelle. Additionally we found no interaction between the isolated death domains of Pelle and dMyD88. These results indicate that the mode of assembly of the heterotrimeric dMyD88-Tube-Pelle complex downstream of the activated Toll receptor is unique. The measured dissociation constants for the interaction between the death domains of dMyD88 and Tube and of Pelle and a preformed dMyD88-Tube complex are used to propose a model of the early postreceptor events in Drosophila Toll receptor signaling. PMID:18829464

  17. Assembly of oligomeric death domain complexes during Toll receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrieffe, Martin C; Grossmann, J Günter; Gay, Nicholas J

    2008-11-28

    The Drosophila Toll receptor is activated by the endogenous protein ligand Spätzle in response to microbial stimuli in immunity and spatial cues during embryonic development. Downstream signaling is mediated by the adaptor proteins Tube, the kinase Pelle, and the Drosophila homologue of myeloid differentiation primary response protein (dMyD88). Here we have characterized heterodimeric (dMyD88-Tube) and heterotrimeric (dMyD88-Tube-Pelle) death domain complexes. We show that both the heterodimeric and heterotrimeric complexes form kidney-shaped structures and that Tube is bivalent and has separate high affinity binding sites for dMyD88 and Pelle. Additionally we found no interaction between the isolated death domains of Pelle and dMyD88. These results indicate that the mode of assembly of the heterotrimeric dMyD88-Tube-Pelle complex downstream of the activated Toll receptor is unique. The measured dissociation constants for the interaction between the death domains of dMyD88 and Tube and of Pelle and a preformed dMyD88-Tube complex are used to propose a model of the early postreceptor events in Drosophila Toll receptor signaling.

  18. Prediction of Nucleotide Binding Peptides Using Star Graph Topological Indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Munteanu, Cristian R; Fernández Blanco, Enrique; Tan, Zhiliang; Santos Del Riego, Antonino; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    The nucleotide binding proteins are involved in many important cellular processes, such as transmission of genetic information or energy transfer and storage. Therefore, the screening of new peptides for this biological function is an important research topic. The current study proposes a mixed methodology to obtain the first classification model that is able to predict new nucleotide binding peptides, using only the amino acid sequence. Thus, the methodology uses a Star graph molecular descriptor of the peptide sequences and the Machine Learning technique for the best classifier. The best model represents a Random Forest classifier based on two features of the embedded and non-embedded graphs. The performance of the model is excellent, considering similar models in the field, with an Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) value of 0.938 and true positive rate (TPR) of 0.886 (test subset). The prediction of new nucleotide binding peptides with this model could be useful for drug target studies in drug development. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Role for nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) in pericyte-mediated vascular inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarro, Rocio; Delgado-Wicke, Pablo; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described the response of human brain pericytes to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) through TLR4. However, gram-negative pathogen-associated molecular patterns include not only LPS but also peptidoglycan (PGN). Given that the presence of co-purified PGN in the LPS preparation previously ...

  20. Myristoylated α subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buss, J.E.; Mumby, S.M.; Casey, P.J.; Gilman, A.G.; Sefton, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera directed against specific subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to immunoprecipitate these polypeptides from metabolically labeled cells. This technique detects, in extracts of a human astrocytoma cell line, the α subunits of G/sub s/ (stimulatory) (α 45 and α 52 ), a 41-kDa subunit of G/sub i/ (inhibitory) (α 41 ), a 40-kDa protein (α 40 ), and the 36-kDa β subunit. No protein that comigrated with the α subunit of G 0 (unknown function) (α 39 ) was detected. In cells grown in the presence of [ 3 H]myristic acid, α 41 and α 40 contained 3 H label, while the β subunit did not. Chemical analysis of lipids attached covalently to purified α 41 and α 39 from bovine brain also revealed myristic acid. Similar analysis of brain G protein β and γ subunits and of G/sub t/ (Transducin) subunits (α, β, and γ) failed to reveal fatty acids. The fatty acid associated with α 41 , α 40 , and α 39 was stable to treatment with base, suggesting that the lipid is linked to the polypeptide via an amide bond. These GTP binding proteins are thus identified as members of a select group of proteins that contains myristic acid covalently attached to the peptide backbone. Myristate may play an important role in stabilizing interactions of G proteins with phospholipid or with membrane-bound proteins

  1. Selective binding and oligomerization of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor by a low molecular weight, nonpeptidyl ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Michael L; Tian, Shin-Shay; Miller, Stephen G; Kessler, Linda; Baker, Audrey E; Brigham-Burke, Michael R; Dillon, Susan B; Duffy, Kevin J; Keenan, Richard M; Lehr, Ruth; Rosen, Jon; Schneeweis, Lumelle A; Trill, John; Young, Peter R; Luengo, Juan I; Lamb, Peter

    2003-03-14

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor regulates neutrophil production by binding to a specific receptor, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor, expressed on cells of the granulocytic lineage. Recombinant forms of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor are used clinically to treat neutropenias. As part of an effort to develop granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mimics with the potential for oral bioavailability, we previously identified a nonpeptidyl small molecule (SB-247464) that selectively activates murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signal transduction pathways and promotes neutrophil formation in vivo. To elucidate the mechanism of action of SB-247464, a series of cell-based and biochemical assays were performed. The activity of SB-247464 is strictly dependent on the presence of zinc ions. Titration microcalorimetry experiments using a soluble murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor construct show that SB-247464 binds to the extracellular domain of the receptor in a zinc ion-dependent manner. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies demonstrate that SB-247464 induces self-association of the N-terminal three-domain fragment in a manner that is consistent with dimerization. SB-247464 induces internalization of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor on intact cells, consistent with a mechanism involving receptor oligomerization. These data show that small nonpeptidyl compounds are capable of selectively binding and inducing productive oligomerization of cytokine receptors.

  2. Human α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor as a novel target of oligomeric α-synuclein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is associated with a decreased incidence of Parkinson disease (PD through unknown mechanisms. Interestingly, a decrease in the numbers of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α4β2-nAChRs in PD patients suggests an α4β2-nAChR-mediated cholinergic deficit in PD. Although oligomeric forms of α-synuclein have been recognized to be toxic and involved in the pathogenesis of PD, their direct effects on nAChR-mediated cholinergic signaling remains undefined. Here, we report for the first time that oligomeric α-synuclein selectively inhibits human α4β2-nAChR-mediated currents in a dose-dependent, non-competitive and use-independent manner. We show that pre-loading cells with guanyl-5'-yl thiophosphate fails to prevent this inhibition, suggesting that the α-synuclein-induced inhibition of α4β2-nAChR function is not mediated by nAChR internalization. By using a pharmacological approach and cultures expressing transfected human nAChRs, we have shown a clear effect of oligomeric α-synuclein on α4β2-nAChRs, but not on α4β4- or α7-nAChRs, suggesting nAChR subunit selectivity of oligomeric α-synuclein-induced inhibition. In addition, by combining the size exclusion chromatography and atomic force microscopy (AFM analyses, we find that only large (>4 nm oligomeric α-synuclein aggregates (but not monomeric, small oligomeric or fibrillar α-synuclein aggregates exhibit the inhibitory effect on human α4β2-nAChRs. Collectively, we have provided direct evidence that α4β2-nAChR is a sensitive target to mediate oligomeric α-synuclein-induced modulation of cholinergic signaling, and our data imply that therapeutic strategies targeted toward α4β2-nAChRs may have potential for developing new treatments for PD.

  3. The selective phosphorylation of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor-activated signal transduction pathways regulate the responsiveness of cells to external stimuli. These transduction pathways themselves are subject to regulation, most commonly by phosphorylation. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G Proteins), as requisite signal transducing elements for many plasma membrane receptors, are considered likely targets for regulation by phosphorylation. Protein kinase C (PKC) has been shown to phosphorylate the α subunit of G i and other G proteins in solution. However, the occurrence of the phosphorylation of G 1 within intact cells in response to activation of PKC has not been rigorously demonstrated. In this thesis, the extent to which the α subunits of G i undergo phosphorylation within human platelets in response to activation of PKC was examined by means of radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation. Incubation of platelets with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a potent activator of PKC, promoted the phosphorylation of several proteins within saponin-permeabilized and intact platelets incubated with [γ 32 P]ATP and [ 32 P]H 3 PO 4 , respectively. None of the phosphoproteins, however, were precipitated by either of two antisera containing antibodies differing in specificities for epitopes within G iα -despite precipitation of a substantial fraction of the subunit itself. In contrast, other antisera, containing antibodies specific for the recently describe G zα , or antibodies for both G zα and G iα , precipitated a 40-kDa phosphoprotein

  4. Nucleos: a web server for the identification of nucleotide-binding sites in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parca, Luca; Ferré, Fabrizio; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2013-07-01

    Nucleos is a web server for the identification of nucleotide-binding sites in protein structures. Nucleos compares the structure of a query protein against a set of known template 3D binding sites representing nucleotide modules, namely the nucleobase, carbohydrate and phosphate. Structural features, clustering and conservation are used to filter and score the predictions. The predicted nucleotide modules are then joined to build whole nucleotide-binding sites, which are ranked by their score. The server takes as input either the PDB code of the query protein structure or a user-submitted structure in PDB format. The output of Nucleos is composed of ranked lists of predicted nucleotide-binding sites divided by nucleotide type (e.g. ATP-like). For each ranked prediction, Nucleos provides detailed information about the score, the template structure and the structural match for each nucleotide module composing the nucleotide-binding site. The predictions on the query structure and the template-binding sites can be viewed directly on the web through a graphical applet. In 98% of the cases, the modules composing correct predictions belong to proteins with no homology relationship between each other, meaning that the identification of brand-new nucleotide-binding sites is possible using information from non-homologous proteins. Nucleos is available at http://nucleos.bio.uniroma2.it/nucleos/.

  5. Constitutive homo- and hetero-oligomerization of TbetaRII-B, an alternatively spliced variant of the mouse TGF-beta type II receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnaveni, Manda S; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Seeger, Werner

    2006-01-01

    , but the oligomerization pattern and dynamics of TbetaRII splice variants in live cells has not been demonstrated thus far. Using co-immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), we demonstrate that the mouse TbetaRII receptor splice variant TbetaRII-B is capable of forming ligand...

  6. Insights into Basal Signaling Regulation, Oligomerization, and Structural Organization of the Human G-Protein Coupled Receptor 83.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Müller

    Full Text Available The murine G-protein coupled receptor 83 (mGPR83 is expressed in the hypothalamus and was previously suggested to be involved in the regulation of metabolism. The neuropeptide PEN has been recently identified as a potent GPR83 ligand. Moreover, GPR83 constitutes functionally relevant hetero-oligomers with other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR such as the ghrelin receptor (GHSR or GPR171. Previous deletion studies also revealed that the long N-terminal extracellular receptor domain (eNDo of mGPR83 may act as an intra-molecular ligand, which participates in the regulation of basal signaling activity, which is a key feature of GPCR function. Here, we investigated particular amino acids at the eNDo of human GPR83 (hGPR83 by side-directed mutagenesis to identify determinants of the internal ligand. These studies were accompanied by structure homology modeling to combine functional insights with structural information. The capacity for hetero-oligomer formation of hGPR83 with diverse family A GPCRs such as the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R was also investigated, with a specific emphasis on the impact of the eNDo on oligomerization and basal signaling properties. Finally, we demonstrate that hGPR83 exhibits an unusual basal signaling for different effectors, which also supports signaling promiscuity. hGPR83 interacts with a variety of hypothalamic GPCRs such as the MC4R or GHSR. These interactions are not dependent on the ectodomain and most likely occur at interfaces constituted in the transmembrane regions. Moreover, several amino acids at the transition between the eNDo and transmembrane helix 1 were identified, where mutations lead also to biased basal signaling modulation.

  7. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ju Hye; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Yu Jin; Cho, Ju Hyun

    2016-04-01

    NOD1 has important roles in innate immunity as sensor of microbial components derived from bacterial peptidoglycan. In this study, we identified genes encoding components of the NOD1 signaling pathway, including NOD1 (OmNOD1) and RIP2 (OmRIP2) from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and investigated whether OmNOD1 has immunomodulating activity in a rainbow trout hepatoma cell line RTH-149 treated with NOD1-specific ligand (iE-DAP). The deduced amino acid sequence of OmNOD1 contained conserved CARD, NOD and LRR domains. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments indicated that OmNOD1 is involved in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Silencing of OmNOD1 in RTH-149 cells treated with iE-DAP decreased the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. Conversely, overexpression of OmNOD1 resulted in up-regulation of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α expression. In addition, RIP2 inhibitor (gefitinib) significantly decreased the expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by iE-DAP in RTH-149 cells. These findings highlight the important role of NOD1 signaling pathway in fish in eliciting innate immune response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. ► Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. ► Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a ‘master regulator’ of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  9. Structural determination of functional units of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD94 of the reticulocyte binding protein Py235 of Plasmodium yoelii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardina Grüber

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasion of the red blood cells (RBC by the merozoite of malaria parasites involves a large number of receptor ligand interactions. The reticulocyte binding protein homologue family (RH plays an important role in erythrocyte recognition as well as virulence. Recently, it has been shown that members of RH in addition to receptor binding may also have a role as ATP/ADP sensor. A 94 kDa region named Nucleotide-Binding Domain 94 (NBD94 of Plasmodium yoelii YM, representative of the putative nucleotide binding region of RH, has been demonstrated to bind ATP and ADP selectively. Binding of ATP or ADP induced nucleotide-dependent structural changes in the C-terminal hinge-region of NBD94, and directly impacted on the RBC binding ability of RH.In order to find the smallest structural unit, able to bind nucleotides, and its coupling module, the hinge region, three truncated domains of NBD94 have been generated, termed NBD94(444-547, NBD94(566-663 and NBD94(674-793, respectively. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy NBD94(444-547 has been identified to form the smallest nucleotide binding segment, sensitive for ATP and ADP, which became inhibited by 4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan. The shape of NBD94(444-547 in solution was calculated from small-angle X-ray scattering data, revealing an elongated molecule, comprised of two globular domains, connected by a spiral segment of about 73.1 A in length. The high quality of the constructs, forming the hinge-region, NBD94(566-663 and NBD94(674-793 enabled to determine the first crystallographic and solution structure, respectively. The crystal structure of NBD94(566-663 consists of two helices with 97.8 A and 48.6 A in length, linked by a loop. By comparison, the low resolution structure of NBD94(674-793 in solution represents a chair-like shape with three architectural segments.These structures give the first insight into how nucleotide binding impacts on the overall structure of RH and demonstrates the

  10. Different characteristics and nucleotide binding properties of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine C Thomas

    Full Text Available We recently reported that Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH, a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, clustered into macrostructures in response to decreased nucleotide levels and that there were differences between the IMPDH isoforms, IMPDH1 and IMPDH2. We hypothesised that the Bateman domains, which are present in both isoforms and serve as energy-sensing/allosteric modules in unrelated proteins, would contribute to isoform-specific differences and that mutations situated in and around this domain in IMPDH1 which give rise to retinitis pigmentosa (RP would compromise regulation. We employed immuno-electron microscopy to investigate the ultrastructure of IMPDH macrostructures and live-cell imaging to follow clustering of an IMPDH2-GFP chimera in real-time. Using a series of IMPDH1/IMPDH2 chimera we demonstrated that the propensity to cluster was conferred by the N-terminal 244 amino acids, which includes the Bateman domain. A protease protection assay suggested isoform-specific purine nucleotide binding characteristics, with ATP protecting IMPDH1 and AMP protecting IMPDH2, via a mechanism involving conformational changes upon nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain without affecting IMPDH catalytic activity. ATP binding to IMPDH1 was confirmed in a nucleotide binding assay. The RP-causing mutation, R224P, abolished ATP binding and nucleotide protection and this correlated with an altered propensity to cluster. Collectively these data demonstrate that (i the isoforms are differentially regulated by AMP and ATP by a mechanism involving the Bateman domain, (ii communication occurs between the Bateman and catalytic domains and (iii the RP-causing mutations compromise such regulation. These findings support the idea that the IMPDH isoforms are subject to distinct regulation and that regulatory defects contribute to human disease.

  11. In silico screening for inhibitors of p-glycoprotein that target the nucleotide binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Frances K; Follit, Courtney A; Vogel, Pia D; Wise, John G

    2014-12-01

    Multidrug resistances and the failure of chemotherapies are often caused by the expression or overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins such as the multidrug resistance protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp is expressed in the plasma membrane of many cell types and protects cells from accumulation of toxins. P-gp uses ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the transport of a broad range of mostly hydrophobic compounds across the plasma membrane and out of the cell. During cancer chemotherapy, the administration of therapeutics often selects for cells which overexpress P-gp, thereby creating populations of cancer cells resistant to a variety of chemically unrelated chemotherapeutics. The present study describes extremely high-throughput, massively parallel in silico ligand docking studies aimed at identifying reversible inhibitors of ATP hydrolysis that target the nucleotide-binding domains of P-gp. We used a structural model of human P-gp that we obtained from molecular dynamics experiments as the protein target for ligand docking. We employed a novel approach of subtractive docking experiments that identified ligands that bound predominantly to the nucleotide-binding domains but not the drug-binding domains of P-gp. Four compounds were found that inhibit ATP hydrolysis by P-gp. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we showed that at least three of these compounds affected nucleotide binding to the transporter. These studies represent a successful proof of principle demonstrating the potential of targeted approaches for identifying specific inhibitors of P-gp. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. Roles of phosphorylation and nucleotide binding domains in calcium transport by sarcoplasmic reticulum adenosinetriphosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teruel, J.A.; Inesi, G.

    1988-01-01

    The roles of the phosphorylation (phosphorylated enzyme intermediate) and nucleotide binding domains in calcium transport were studied by comparing acetyl phosphate and ATP as substrates for the Ca 2+ -ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The authors found that the maximal level of phosphoenzyme obtained with either substrate is approximately 4 nmol/mg of protein, corresponding to the stoichiometry of catalytic sites in their preparation. The initial burst of phosphoenzyme formation observed in the transient state, following addition of either substrate, is accompanied by internalization of 2 mol of calcium per mole of phosphoenzyme. The internalized calcium is then translocated with a sequential pattern, independent of the substrate used. Following a rate-limiting step, the phosphoenzyme undergoes hydrolytic cleavage and proceeds to the steady-state activity which is soon back inhibited by the rise of Ca 2+ concentration in the lumen of the vesicles. When the back inhibition is released by the addition of oxalate, substrate utilization and calcium transport occur with a ratio of 1:2, independent of the substrate and its concentration. When the nucleotide binding site is derivatized with FITP, the enzyme can still utilize acetyl phosphate (but not ATP) for calcium transport. These observations demonstrate that the basic coupling mechanism of catalysis and calcium transport involves the phosphorylation and calcium binding domains, and not the nucleotide binding domain. On the other hand, occupancy of the FITC-sensitive nucleotide site is involved in kinetic regulation not only with respect to utilization of substrate for the phosphoryl transfer reaction but also for subsequent steps related to calcium translocation and phosphoenzyme turnover

  13. A Nucleotide Phosphatase Activity in the Nucleotide Binding Domain of an Orphan Resistance Protein from Rice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Pohl, Ehmke; Hussey, Patrick J.; Cann, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins (R-proteins) are key components of the plant immune system activated in response to a plethora of different pathogens. R-proteins are P-loop NTPase superfamily members, and current models describe their main function as ATPases in defense signaling pathways. Here we show that a subset of R-proteins have evolved a new function to combat pathogen infection. This subset of R-proteins possesses a nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide-binding domain. Related R-proteins that fall in the same phylogenetic clade all show the same nucleotide phosphatase activity indicating a conserved function within at least a subset of R-proteins. R-protein nucleotide phosphatases catalyze the production of nucleoside from nucleotide with the nucleotide monophosphate as the preferred substrate. Mutation of conserved catalytic residues substantially reduced activity consistent with the biochemistry of P-loop NTPases. Kinetic analysis, analytical gel filtration, and chemical cross-linking demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding domain was active as a multimer. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nucleotide analogues identified the terminal phosphate bond as the target of a reaction that utilized a metal-mediated nucleophilic attack by water on the phosphoester. In conclusion, we have identified a group of R-proteins with a unique function. This biochemical activity appears to have co-evolved with plants in signaling pathways designed to resist pathogen attack. PMID:22157756

  14. A nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide binding domain of an orphan resistance protein from rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Campillo, Alba de San Eustaquio; Pohl, Ehmke; Hussey, Patrick J; Cann, Martin J

    2012-02-03

    Plant resistance proteins (R-proteins) are key components of the plant immune system activated in response to a plethora of different pathogens. R-proteins are P-loop NTPase superfamily members, and current models describe their main function as ATPases in defense signaling pathways. Here we show that a subset of R-proteins have evolved a new function to combat pathogen infection. This subset of R-proteins possesses a nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide-binding domain. Related R-proteins that fall in the same phylogenetic clade all show the same nucleotide phosphatase activity indicating a conserved function within at least a subset of R-proteins. R-protein nucleotide phosphatases catalyze the production of nucleoside from nucleotide with the nucleotide monophosphate as the preferred substrate. Mutation of conserved catalytic residues substantially reduced activity consistent with the biochemistry of P-loop NTPases. Kinetic analysis, analytical gel filtration, and chemical cross-linking demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding domain was active as a multimer. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nucleotide analogues identified the terminal phosphate bond as the target of a reaction that utilized a metal-mediated nucleophilic attack by water on the phosphoester. In conclusion, we have identified a group of R-proteins with a unique function. This biochemical activity appears to have co-evolved with plants in signaling pathways designed to resist pathogen attack.

  15. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  16. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  17. Guanine nucleotide binding proteins in zucchini seedlings: Characterization and interactions with the NPA receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeberg, M.; Jacobs, M.

    1989-01-01

    A microsomal membrane preparation from hypocotyls of dark-grown Cucurbita pepo L. seedlings contains specific high-affinity binding sites for the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5'-[γ-thio] triphosphate (GTP-γ-S). Both the binding affinity and the pattern of binding specificity for GTP and GTP analogs are similar to animal G-proteins, and two zucchini membrane proteins are recognized in western blots by antiserum specific for the σ subunit of platelet G s protein. GTP-γ-S can increase specific naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) binding in zucchini microsomal membrane preparations, with its stimulation increasing with large tissue age. Al +3 and F - agents known to activate G-proteins - decreased NPA specific binding by ca. 15%. In tests of in vitro auxin transport employing zucchini plasma membrane vesicles, AlF - 4 strongly inhibited 3 H-indoleacetic acid nor accumulation; GTP-γ-S effects on this system will be discussed

  18. Oligomerization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1991-03-26

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled. 2 figures.

  19. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoetzel, Isidro; Cheevers, William P.

    2005-01-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain β-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding

  20. Simulation of the coupling between nucleotide binding and transmembrane domains in the ABC transporter BtuCD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob; Kandt, C.; Peters, Günther H.j.

    2007-01-01

    The nucleotide-induced structural rearrangements in ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, leading to substrate translocation, are largely unknown. We have modeled nucleotide binding and release in the vitamin B12 importer BtuCD using perturbed elastic network calculations and biased molecular...

  1. Random mutagenesis of the nucleotide-binding domain of NRC1 (NB-LRR Required for Hypersensitive Response-Associated Cell Death-1), a downstream signalling nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) protein, identifies gain-of-function mutations in the nucleotide-binding pocket

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sueldo, D.J.; Shimels, M.Z.; Spiridon, L.N.; Caldararu, O.; Petrescu, A.J.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.; Tameling, W.I.L.

    2015-01-01

    •Plant nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins confer immunity to pathogens possessing the corresponding avirulence proteins. Activation of NB-LRR proteins is often associated with induction of the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death. •NRC1 (NB-LRR

  2. Genome Wide Analysis of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenglong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding site (NBS disease resistance genes play an important role in defending plants from a variety of pathogens and insect pests. Many R-genes have been identified in various plant species. However, little is known about the NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium distachyon. In this study, using computational analysis of the B. distachyon genome, we identified 126 regular NBS-encoding genes and characterized them on the bases of structural diversity, conserved protein motifs, chromosomal locations, gene duplications, promoter region, and phylogenetic relationships. EST hits and full-length cDNA sequences (from Brachypodium database of 126 R-like candidates supported their existence. Based on the occurrence of conserved protein motifs such as coiled-coil (CC, NBS, leucine-rich repeat (LRR, these regular NBS-LRR genes were classified into four subgroups: CC-NBS-LRR, NBS-LRR, CC-NBS, and X-NBS. Further expression analysis of the regular NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium database revealed that these genes are expressed in a wide range of libraries, including those constructed from various developmental stages, tissue types, and drought challenged or nonchallenged tissue.

  3. A Novel Protein Interaction between Nucleotide Binding Domain of Hsp70 and p53 Motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asita Elengoe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, protein interaction of Homo sapiens nucleotide binding domain (NBD of heat shock 70 kDa protein (PDB: 1HJO with p53 motif remains to be elucidated. The NBD-p53 motif complex enhances the p53 stabilization, thereby increasing the tumor suppression activity in cancer treatment. Therefore, we identified the interaction between NBD and p53 using STRING version 9.1 program. Then, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of p53 motif through homology modeling and determined the binding affinity and stability of NBD-p53 motif complex structure via molecular docking and dynamics (MD simulation. Human DNA binding domain of p53 motif (SCMGGMNR retrieved from UniProt (UniProtKB: P04637 was docked with the NBD protein, using the Autodock version 4.2 program. The binding energy and intermolecular energy for the NBD-p53 motif complex were −0.44 Kcal/mol and −9.90 Kcal/mol, respectively. Moreover, RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds, salt bridge, and secondary structure analyses revealed that the NBD protein had a strong bond with p53 motif and the protein-ligand complex was stable. Thus, the current data would be highly encouraging for designing Hsp70 structure based drug in cancer therapy.

  4. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  5. A generalized allosteric mechanism for cis-regulated cyclic nucleotide binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr P Kornev

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP regulate multiple intracellular processes and are thus of a great general interest for molecular and structural biologists. To study the allosteric mechanism of different cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB domains, we compared cAMP-bound and cAMP-free structures (PKA, Epac, and two ionic channels using a new bioinformatics method: local spatial pattern alignment. Our analysis highlights four major conserved structural motifs: 1 the phosphate binding cassette (PBC, which binds the cAMP ribose-phosphate, 2 the "hinge," a flexible helix, which contacts the PBC, 3 the beta(2,3 loop, which provides precise positioning of an invariant arginine from the PBC, and 4 a conserved structural element consisting of an N-terminal helix, an eight residue loop and the A-helix (N3A-motif. The PBC and the hinge were included in the previously reported allosteric model, whereas the definition of the beta(2,3 loop and the N3A-motif as conserved elements is novel. The N3A-motif is found in all cis-regulated CNB domains, and we present a model for an allosteric mechanism in these domains. Catabolite gene activator protein (CAP represents a trans-regulated CNB domain family: it does not contain the N3A-motif, and its long range allosteric interactions are substantially different from the cis-regulated CNB domains.

  6. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongshan [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Xiang, Quanju [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Department of Microbiology, College of Resource and Environment Science, Sichuan Agriculture University, Yaan 625000 (China); Zhu, Xiaofeng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Dong, Haohao [Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); He, Chuan [School of Electronics and Information, Wuhan Technical College of Communications, No. 6 Huangjiahu West Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan, Hubei 430065 (China); Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Wenjian, E-mail: Wenjian166@gmail.com [Laboratory of Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Dong, Changjiang, E-mail: C.Dong@uea.ac.uk [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  8. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Haohao; He, Chuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ . • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ , which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics

  9. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC)

    2012-09-17

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

  10. Genome-wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunyoung Seo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analyses of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding.

  11. Supramolecular Properties of Triazole-containing Two Armed Peptidomimetics: From Organogelators to Nucleotide-binding Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Tin Ki

    obtain a clearer picture on the mode of association of these two series of branched peptidomimetics, the length of the tripeptidomimetic arms was truncated to a dipeptide, and the amino acid, valine, was used for further studies. Both the two new candidates, 88-K-V2 and 89-B-V2, were shown to dimerize in chloroform as shown from vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) studies. 1H NMR titration experiments indicated a better dimerization strength for the latter candidate due to the intermolecular pi-pi interactions offered by its benzene ring in addition to the intermolecular hydrogen bonding by the amides and triazole units. H/D exchange and 2D NMR experiments, and molecular modeling revealed that 88-K-V2 dimerized through the formation of antiparallel beta-strands whereas formation of parallel beta-strands took place in 89-B-V2. Compound 88-K-V2 was found to form 1:1 complexes with chloride (Ka 640 M-1) and monobasic diethyl phosphate (DEP) ion (Ka 810 M-1) in chloroform. Interestingly, 89-B-V 2 was shown to form the usual 1:1 complex with the former ion (Ka 970 M-1) while forming an unexpected 2:1 complex with the latter with positive cooperativity. It was observed that both the amides and triazole protons were involved in anion-binding. In the 88-K-V2-DEP complex, the host formed a helix-like structure that wrapped around the anion located at the center of the complex as determined by 2D NMR and molecular modeling studies. Finally, further structural modification of 88-K-V2 gave a water-soluble nucleotide-binding tweezer 93-K-R2·4TFA . This tweezer consisted of four arginines (R), two triazole units, two pyrene probes and a small hydrophilic ethanolamine tail. Fluorescence study showed that this tweezer was able to form 1:1 complexes with different nucleotides in water with similar binding strength regardless of the number of phosphate groups present in the nucleotides. Moleular modeling suggested that such a charge-independent binding behavior was due to the similar number

  12. Hetero-oligomeric Complex between the G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor 1 and the Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quang-Kim; VerMeer, Mark; Burgard, Michelle A; Hassan, Ali B; Giles, Jennifer

    2015-05-22

    The new G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER/GPR30) plays important roles in many organ systems. The plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) is essential for removal of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and for shaping the time courses of Ca(2+)-dependent activities. Here, we show that PMCA and GPER/GPR30 physically interact and functionally influence each other. In primary endothelial cells, GPER/GPR30 agonist G-1 decreases PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) extrusion by promoting PMCA tyrosine phosphorylation. GPER/GPR30 overexpression decreases PMCA activity, and G-1 further potentiates this effect. GPER/GPR30 knockdown increases PMCA activity, whereas PMCA knockdown substantially reduces GPER/GPR30-mediated phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2). GPER/GPR30 co-immunoprecipitates with PMCA with or without treatment with 17β-estradiol, thapsigargin, or G-1. Heterologously expressed GPER/GPR30 in HEK 293 cells co-localizes with PMCA4b, the main endothelial PMCA isoform. Endothelial cells robustly express the PDZ post-synaptic density protein (PSD)-95, whose knockdown reduces the association between GPER/GPR30 and PMCA. Additionally, the association between PMCA4b and GPER/GPR30 is substantially reduced by truncation of either or both of their C-terminal PDZ-binding motifs. Functionally, inhibition of PMCA activity is significantly reduced by truncation of GPER/GPR30's C-terminal PDZ-binding motif. These data strongly indicate that GPER/GPR30 and PMCA4b form a hetero-oligomeric complex in part via the anchoring action of PSD-95, in which they constitutively affect each other's function. Activation of GPER/GPR30 further inhibits PMCA activity through tyrosine phosphorylation of the pump. These interactions represent cross-talk between Ca(2+) signaling and GPER/GPR30-mediated activities. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Mutations in the nucleotide binding pocket of MreB can alter cell curvature and polar morphology in Caulobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Natalie A; Pincus, Zachary; Fisher, Isabelle C; Shapiro, Lucy; Theriot, Julie A

    2011-07-01

    The maintenance of cell shape in Caulobacter crescentus requires the essential gene mreB, which encodes a member of the actin superfamily and the target of the antibiotic, A22. We isolated 35 unique A22-resistant Caulobacter strains with single amino acid substitutions near the nucleotide binding site of MreB. Mutations that alter cell curvature and mislocalize the intermediate filament crescentin cluster on the back surface of MreB's structure. Another subset have variable cell widths, with wide cell bodies and actively growing thin extensions of the cell poles that concentrate fluorescent MreB. We found that the extent to which MreB localization is perturbed is linearly correlated with the development of pointed cell poles and variable cell widths. Further, we find that a mutation to glycine of two conserved aspartic acid residues that are important for nucleotide hydrolysis in other members of the actin superfamily abolishes robust midcell recruitment of MreB but supports a normal rate of growth. These mutant strains provide novel insight into how MreB's protein structure, subcellular localization, and activity contribute to its function in bacterial cell shape. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. An Overview of Pathogen Recognition Receptors for Innate Immunity in Dental Pulp

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    Ji-Hyun Jang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs are a class of germ line-encoded receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. The activation of PRRs is crucial for the initiation of innate immunity, which plays a key role in first-line defense until more specific adaptive immunity is developed. PRRs differ in the signaling cascades and host responses activated by their engagement and in their tissue distribution. Currently identified PRR families are the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, the C-type lectin receptors (CLRs, the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs, the retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors (RLRs, and the AIM2-like receptor (ALR. The environment of the dental pulp is substantially different from that of other tissues of the body. Dental pulp resides in a low compliance root canal system that limits the expansion of pulpal tissues during inflammatory processes. An understanding of the PRRs in dental pulp is important for immunomodulation and hence for developing therapeutic targets in the field of endodontics. Here we comprehensively review recent finding on the PRRs and the mechanisms by which innate immunity is activated. We focus on the PRRs expressed on dental pulp and periapical tissues and their role in dental pulp inflammation.

  15. Prolonged Exposure of Cortical Neurons to Oligomeric Amyloid-β Impairs NMDA Receptor Function Via NADPH Oxidase-Mediated ROS Production: Protective Effect of Green Tea (--Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive production of Aβ (amyloid β-peptide has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of AD (Alzheimer's disease. Although not yet well understood, aggregation of Aβ is known to cause toxicity to neurons. Our recent study demonstrated the ability for oligomeric Aβ to stimulate the production of ROS (reactive oxygen species in neurons through an NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate-dependent pathway. However, whether prolonged exposure of neurons to aggregated Aβ is associated with impairment of NMDA receptor function has not been extensively investigated. In the present study, we show that prolonged exposure of primary cortical neurons to Aβ oligomers caused mitochondrial dysfunction, an attenuation of NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx and inhibition of NMDA-induced AA (arachidonic acid release. Mitochondrial dysfunction and the decrease in NMDA receptor activity due to oligomeric Aβ are associated with an increase in ROS production. Gp91ds-tat, a specific peptide inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, and Mn(III-tetrakis(4-benzoic acid-porphyrin chloride, an ROS scavenger, effectively abrogated Aβ-induced ROS production. Furthermore, Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, impairment of NMDA Ca2+ influx and ROS production were prevented by pretreatment of neurons with EGCG [(–-epigallocatechin-3-gallate], a major polyphenolic component of green tea. Taken together, these results support a role for NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production in the cytotoxic effects of Aβ, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of EGCG and other dietary polyphenols in delaying onset or retarding the progression of AD.

  16. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-08

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  17. Systematic Analysis and Comparison of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in a Diploid Cotton Gossypium raimondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hengling; Li, Wei; Sun, Xiwei; Zhu, Shuijin; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Plant disease resistance genes are a key component of defending plants from a range of pathogens. The majority of these resistance genes belong to the super-family that harbors a Nucleotide-binding site (NBS). A number of studies have focused on NBS-encoding genes in disease resistant breeding programs for diverse plants. However, little information has been reported with an emphasis on systematic analysis and comparison of NBS-encoding genes in cotton. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we identified and investigated the NBS-encoding resistance genes in cotton using the whole genome sequence information of Gossypium raimondii. Totally, 355 NBS-encoding resistance genes were identified. Analyses of the conserved motifs and structural diversity showed that the most two distinct features for these genes are the high proportion of non-regular NBS genes and the high diversity of N-termini domains. Analyses of the physical locations and duplications of NBS-encoding genes showed that gene duplication of disease resistance genes could play an important role in cotton by leading to an increase in the functional diversity of the cotton NBS-encoding genes. Analyses of phylogenetic comparisons indicated that, in cotton, the NBS-encoding genes with TIR domain not only have their own evolution pattern different from those of genes without TIR domain, but also have their own species-specific pattern that differs from those of TIR genes in other plants. Analyses of the correlation between disease resistance QTL and NBS-encoding resistance genes showed that there could be more than half of the disease resistance QTL associated to the NBS-encoding genes in cotton, which agrees with previous studies establishing that more than half of plant resistance genes are NBS-encoding genes. PMID:23936305

  18. A primary survey on bryophyte species reveals two novel classes of nucleotide-binding site (NBS genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yu Xue

    Full Text Available Due to their potential roles in pathogen defense, genes encoding nucleotide-binding site (NBS domain have been particularly surveyed in many angiosperm genomes. Two typical classes were found: one is the TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL class and the other is the CC-NBS-LRR (CNL class. It is seldom known, however, what kind of NBS-encoding genes are mainly present in other plant groups, especially the most ancient groups of land plants, that is, bryophytes. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we mainly focused on two bryophyte species: the moss Physcomitrella patens and the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, to survey their NBS-encoding genes. Surprisingly, two novel classes of NBS-encoding genes were discovered. The first novel class is identified from the P. patens genome and a typical member of this class has a protein kinase (PK domain at the N-terminus and a LRR domain at the C-terminus, forming a complete structure of PK-NBS-LRR (PNL, reminiscent of TNL and CNL classes in angiosperms. The second class is found from the liverwort genome and a typical member of this class possesses an α/β-hydrolase domain at the N-terminus and also a LRR domain at the C-terminus (Hydrolase-NBS-LRR, HNL. Analysis on intron positions and phases also confirmed the novelty of HNL and PNL classes, as reflected by their specific intron locations or phase characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis covering all four classes of NBS-encoding genes revealed a closer relationship among the HNL, PNL and TNL classes, suggesting the CNL class having a more divergent status from the others. The presence of specific introns highlights the chimerical structures of HNL, PNL and TNL genes, and implies their possible origin via exon-shuffling during the quick lineage separation processes of early land plants.

  19. Efficacy of the nucleotide-binding oligomerzation domain 1 inhibitor Nodinhibit-1 on corneal alkali burns in rats

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    Xu Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the therapeutic effect of Nodinhibit-1 on alkali-burn-induced corneal neovascularization (CNV and inflammation.The nucleotide-binding oligomerzation domain 1 (NOD1 is a potent angiogenic gene.METHODS:The alkali-burned rat corneas (32 right eyes were treated with eye drops containing Nodinhibit-1 or phosphate buffered solution (PBS, PH 7.4 only, four times per day. CNV and inflammation were monitored using slit lamp microscopy, and the area of CNV was measured by formula. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF was determined by Western blot analysis. The TUNEL assay was used to assess the corneal apoptosis cells.RESULTS:Alkali-burn-induced progressive CNV and inflammation in the cornea. After treatment for 7d and 14d, there were statistically significant differences in the CNV areas and inflammatory index on that between two group(P<0.05, respectively. Epithelial defect quantification showed a significant difference between the two groups at days 4 and 7 after the alkali burns (P<0.05. The apoptotic cells on days 1, 4, and 7 between the two groups showed significant differences at all time points (P<0.05, respectively. Compared to that in control group, the protein level of VEGF expression was significantly reduced whereas the PEDF expression was increase in the Nodinhibit-1 groups on day 14 (P<0.05, respectively=.CONCLUSION:Topical application of 10.0 μg/mL Nodinhibit-1 may have potential effect for the alkali burn-induced CNV and inflammation. The effect of Nodinhibit-1 on CNV may be by regulation the equilibrium of VEGF and PEDF in the wounded cornea.

  20. Bioinformatic analysis of the nucleotide binding site-encoding disease-resistance genes in foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) Beauv.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y B; Xie, X Q; Li, Z Y; Bai, H; Dong, L; Dong, Z P; Dong, J G

    2014-08-28

    The nucleotide-binding site (NBS) disease-resistance genes are the largest category of plant disease-resistance gene analogs. The complete set of disease-resistant candidate genes, which encode the NBS sequence, was filtered in the genomes of two varieties of foxtail millet (Yugu1 and 'Zhang gu'). This study investigated a number of characteristics of the putative NBS genes, such as structural diversity and phylogenetic relationships. A total of 269 and 281 NBS-coding sequences were identified in Yugu1 and 'Zhang gu', respectively. When the two databases were compared, 72 genes were found to be identical and 164 genes showed more than 90% similarity. Physical positioning and gene family analysis of the NBS disease-resistance genes in the genome revealed that the number of genes on each chromosome was similar in both varieties. The eighth chromosome contained the largest number of genes and the ninth chromosome contained the lowest number of genes. Exactly 34 gene clusters containing the 161 genes were found in the Yugu1 genome, with each cluster containing 4.7 genes on average. In comparison, the 'Zhang gu' genome possessed 28 gene clusters, which had 151 genes, with an average of 5.4 genes in each cluster. The largest gene cluster, located on the eighth chromosome, contained 12 genes in the Yugu1 database, whereas it contained 16 genes in the 'Zhang gu' database. The classification results showed that the CC-NBS-LRR gene made up the largest part of each chromosome in the two databases. Two TIR-NBS genes were also found in the Yugu1 genome.

  1. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-2-like 1, a new Annexin A7 interacting protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yue; Meng, Jinyi; Huang, Yuhong; Wu, Jun; Wang, Bo; Ibrahim, Mohammed M.; Tang, Jianwu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • RACK1 formed a complex with Annexin A7. • Depletion of RACK1 inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion. • RACK1 RNAi abolished RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction. • RACK1-Annexin A7 may play a role in regulating the metastatic potentials. - Abstract: We report for the first time that Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-2-like 1 (RACK1) formed a complex with Annexin A7. Hca-F and Hca-P are a pair of syngeneic mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines established and maintained in our laboratory. Our previous study showed that both Annexin A7 and RACK1 were expressed higher in Hca-F (lymph node metastasis >70%) than Hca-P (lymph node metastasis <30%). Suppression of Annexin A7 expression in Hca-F cells induced decreased migration and invasion ability. In this study, knockdown of RACK1 by RNA interference (RNAi) had the same impact on metastasis potential of Hca-F cells as Annexin A7 down-regulation. Furthermore, by co-immunoprecipitation and double immunofluorescence confocal imaging, we found that RACK1 was in complex with Annexin A7 in control cells, but not in the RACK1-down-regulated cells, indicating the abolishment of RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction in Hca-F cells by RACK1 RNAi. Taken together, these results suggest that RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction may be one of the means by which RACK1 and Annexin A7 influence the metastasis potential of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro

  2. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD18 gene encodes a protein that contains potential zinc finger domains for nucleic acid binding and a putative nucleotide binding sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.S.; Prakash, L. (Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine, NY (USA)); Weber, S. (Kodak Research Park, Rochester, NY (USA))

    1988-07-25

    The RAD18 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for postreplication repair of UV damaged DNA. The authors have isolated the RAD18 gene, determined its nucleotide sequence and examined if deletion mutations of this gene show different or more pronounced phenotypic effects than the previously described point mutations. The RAD18 gene open reading frame encodes a protein of 487 amino acids, with a calculated molecular weight of 55,512. The RAD18 protein contains three potential zinc finger domains for nucleic acid binding, and a putative nucleotide binding sequence that is present in many proteins that bind and hydrolyze ATP. The DNA binding and nucleotide binding activities could enable the RAD18 protein to bind damaged sites in the template DNA with high affinity. Alternatively, or in addition, RAD18 protein may be a transcriptional regulator. The RAD18 deletion mutation resembles the previously described point mutations in its effects on viability, DNA repair, UV mutagenesis, and sporulation.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic characterization of a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain from the mouse EAG potassium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques-Carvalho, Maria João; Morais-Cabral, João Henrique

    2012-01-01

    The crystallization conditions and preliminary crystal characterization of the cytoplasmic cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain from the mouse EAG potassium channel are reported. The members of the family of voltage-gated KCNH potassium channels play important roles in cardiac and neuronal repolarization, tumour proliferation and hormone secretion. These channels have a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain which is homologous to cyclic nucleotide-binding domains (CNB-homology domains), but it has been demonstrated that channel function is not affected by cyclic nucleotides and that the domain does not bind nucleotides in vitro. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a CNB-homology domain from a member of the KCNH family, the mouse EAG channel, is reported. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution and the crystal belonged to the hexagonal space group P3 1 21

  4. Pattern-recognition receptors: signaling pathways and dysregulation in canine chronic enteropathies-brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Romy M; Allenspach, Karin

    2017-11-01

    Pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) are expressed by innate immune cells and recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as well as endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules. With a large potential for synergism or convergence between their signaling pathways, PRRs orchestrate a complex interplay of cellular mediators and transcription factors, and thus play a central role in homeostasis and host defense. Aberrant activation of PRR signaling, mutations of the receptors and/or their downstream signaling molecules, and/or DAMP/PAMP complex-mediated receptor signaling can potentially lead to chronic auto-inflammatory diseases or development of cancer. PRR signaling pathways appear to also present an interesting new avenue for the modulation of inflammatory responses and to serve as potential novel therapeutic targets. Evidence for a dysregulation of the PRR toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (NOD)2, and the receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE) exists in dogs with chronic enteropathies. We describe the TLR, NOD2, and RAGE signaling pathways and evaluate the current veterinary literature-in comparison to human medicine-to determine the role of TLRs, NOD2, and RAGE in canine chronic enteropathies.

  5. C-terminal β9-strand of the cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain stabilizes activated states of Kv11.1 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available Kv11.1 potassium channels are important for regulation of the normal rhythm of the heartbeat. Reduced activity of Kv11.1 channels causes long QT syndrome type 2, a disorder that increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest. Kv11.1 channels are members of the KCNH subfamily of voltage-gated K(+ channels. However, they also share many similarities with the cyclic nucleotide gated ion channel family, including having a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology (cNBH domain. Kv11.1 channels, however, are not directly regulated by cyclic nucleotides. Recently, crystal structures of the cNBH domain from mEAG and zELK channels, both members of the KCNH family of voltage-gated potassium channels, revealed that a C-terminal β9-strand in the cNBH domain occupied the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding site thereby precluding binding of cyclic nucleotides. Here we show that mutations to residues in the β9-strand affect the stability of the open state relative to the closed state of Kv11.1 channels. We also show that disrupting the structure of the β9-strand reduces the stability of the inactivated state relative to the open state. Clinical mutations located in this β9-strand result in reduced trafficking efficiency, which suggests that binding of the C-terminal β9-strand to the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding pocket is also important for assembly and trafficking of Kv11.1 channels.

  6. OLIGOMERIZATION AND LIQUEFACTION OF ETHYLENE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oligomerize ethylene gas in a packed bed reactor operated at 100-300°C under apressure of 500psi and ... The gas flow was then switched back to N, gas and temperature controller was simultaneously set to the desired reaction temperature. Once the desired .... be considered non-ideal for ethylene oligomerization.

  7. Improvement of reduced serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients treated with the anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibody tocilizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shoko; Naruto, Takuya; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Mori, Masaaki; Nishimaki, Shigeru; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we determined serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) patients during both the active and the remission phases to investigate how the growth cartilage turnover changed under tocilizumab treatment. Specimens were collected from 201 healthy children under 16 years of age with no growth impairment, and paired sera were collected from 11 sJIA patients treated with tocilizumab. Disease activity was assessed from white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and ferritin, and the COMP concentration was determined by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum COMP concentrations were found independent of age, and the mean value in healthy children was 17.74+/-5.6 U/L. The mean serum COMP in sJIA patients during the active phase was 10.75+/-3.9 U/L, lower than that of healthy children. The mean serum COMP in the remission phase (14.89+/-3.9 U/L) was significantly higher than that in the active period (P<0.05). These results suggested that in sJIA patients, a reduced serum COMP concentration is a useful marker of active disease and growth impairment, and that the growth cartilage turnover suppressed during the active phase is improved in the remission phase under tocilizumab treatment.

  8. Structures of a minimal human CFTR first nucleotide-binding domain as a monomer, head-to-tail homodimer, and pathogenic mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwell, Shane; Brouillette, Christie G.; Conners, Kris; Emtage, Spencer; Gheyi, Tarun; Guggino, William B.; Hendle, Jorg; Hunt, John F.; Lewis, Hal A.; Lu, Frances; Protasevich, Irina I.; Rodgers, Logan A.; Romero, Rich; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Weber, Patricia C.; Wetmore, Diana; Zhang, Feiyu F.; Zhao, Xun (Cystic); (UAB); (JHU); (Columbia); (Lilly)

    2010-04-26

    Upon removal of the regulatory insert (RI), the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be heterologously expressed and purified in a form that remains stable without solubilizing mutations, stabilizing agents or the regulatory extension (RE). This protein, NBD1 387-646({Delta}405-436), crystallizes as a homodimer with a head-to-tail association equivalent to the active conformation observed for NBDs from symmetric ATP transporters. The 1.7-{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure shows how ATP occupies the signature LSGGQ half-site in CFTR NBD1. The {Delta}F508 version of this protein also crystallizes as a homodimer and differs from the wild-type structure only in the vicinity of the disease-causing F508 deletion. A slightly longer construct crystallizes as a monomer. Comparisons of the homodimer structure with this and previously published monomeric structures show that the main effect of ATP binding at the signature site is to order the residues immediately preceding the signature sequence, residues 542-547, in a conformation compatible with nucleotide binding. These residues likely interact with a transmembrane domain intracellular loop in the full-length CFTR channel. The experiments described here show that removing the RI from NBD1 converts it into a well-behaved protein amenable to biophysical studies yielding deeper insights into CFTR function.

  9. High Content Analysis of Compositional Heterogeneities to Study GPCR Oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Samuel McEwen

    In this thesis I demonstrate how the natural compositional heterogeneities of synthetic and living cell model systems can be used to quantitate the mechanics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The thesis is structured around three a...

  10. Role of pattern recognition receptors of the neurovascular unit in inflamm-aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Imola; Nyúl-Tóth, Ádám; Kozma, Mihály; Farkas, Attila E; Krizbai, István A

    2017-11-01

    Aging is associated with chronic inflammation partly mediated by increased levels of damage-associated molecular patterns, which activate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) of the innate immune system. Furthermore, many aging-related disorders are associated with inflammation. PRRs, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs), are expressed not only in cells of the innate immune system but also in other cells, including cells of the neurovascular unit and cerebral vasculature forming the blood-brain barrier. In this review, we summarize our present knowledge about the relationship between activation of PRRs expressed by cells of the neurovascular unit-blood-brain barrier, chronic inflammation, and aging-related pathologies of the brain. The most important damage-associated molecular pattern-sensing PRRs in the brain are TLR2, TLR4, and NLR family pyrin domain-containing protein-1 and pyrin domain-containing protein-3, which are activated during physiological and pathological aging in microglia, neurons, astrocytes, and possibly endothelial cells and pericytes. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. A RIPK2 inhibitor delays NOD signalling events yet prevents inflammatory cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nachbur, Ueli; Stafford, Che A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD) receptors recognize antigens including bacterial peptidoglycans and initiate immune responses by triggering the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through activating NF-κB and MAP kinases. Receptor interacting protein kinase ...

  12. Oligomerization in health and disease

    CERN Document Server

    Giraldo, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    This special volume of Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science focuses on oligomerization in health and disease. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  13. Biophysical characterization of GPCR oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Signe

    level, and revealed the existence of several dimerization interfaces, each with specific kinetics. Finally we investigated how a property of the membrane solubilizing GPCRs affected oligomerization. We observed a dramatic decrease in oligomer stability with increasing geometrical membrane curvature. We...

  14. FRET-based binding assay between a fluorescent cAMP analogue and a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain tagged with a CFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Francisco; Santana-Calvo, Carmen; Sánchez-Guevara, Yoloxochitl; Nishigaki, Takuya

    2017-09-01

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) functions as a regulatory domain of many proteins involved in cyclic nucleotide signalling. We developed a straightforward and reliable binding assay based on intermolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between an adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate analogue labelled with fluorescein and a recombinant CNBD of human EPAC1 tagged with a cyan fluorescence protein (CFP). The high FRET efficiency of this method (~ 80%) allowed us to perform several types of binding experiments with nanomolar range of sample using conventional equipment. In addition, the CFP tag on the CNBD enabled us to perform a specific binding experiment using an unpurified protein. Considering these advantages, this technique is useful to study poorly characterized CNBDs. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. ABC transporter Cdr1p harbors charged residues in the intracellular loop and nucleotide-binding domain critical for protein trafficking and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Banerjee, Atanu; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Mondal, Alok Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-08-01

    The ABC transporter Cdr1 protein of Candida albicans, which plays a major role in antifungal resistance, has two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). The 12 transmembrane helices of TMDs that are interconnected by extracellular and intracellular loops (ICLs) mainly harbor substrate recognition sites where drugs bind while cytoplasmic NBDs hydrolyze ATP which powers drug efflux. The coupling of ATP hydrolysis to drug transport requires proper communication between NBDs and TMDs typically accomplished by ICLs. This study examines the role of cytoplasmic ICLs of Cdr1p by rationally predicting the critical residues on the basis of their interatomic distances. Among nine pairs that fall within a proximity of trafficking. These results point to a new role for ICL/NBD interacting residues in PDR ABC transporters in protein folding and trafficking. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Study of the nucleotide binding site of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe plasma membrane H+-ATPase using formycin triphosphate-terbium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronjat, M.; Lacapere, J.J.; Dufour, J.P.; Dupont, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The plasma membrane of yeasts contains an H+-ATPase similar to the other cation transport ATPases of eukaryotic organisms. This enzyme has been purified and shows H+ transport in reconstituted vesicles. In the presence of Mg2+, formycin triphosphate (FTP) is hydrolyzed by the H+-ATPase and supports H+ transport. When combined with terbium ion, FTP (Tb-FTP) and ATP (Tb-ATP) are no longer hydrolyzed. Competition between Mg-ATP and Tb-FTP for ATP hydrolysis indicates that terbium-associated nucleotides bind to the catalytic site of the H+-ATPase. The fluorescent properties of the Tb-FTP complex were used to study the active site of the H+-ATPase. Fluorescence of Tb-FTP is greatly enhanced upon binding into the nucleotide site of H+-ATPase with a dissociation constant of 1 microM. Tb-ATP, Tb-ADP, and Tb-ITP are competitive inhibitors of Tb-FTP binding with Ki = 4.5, 5.0, and 6.0 microM, respectively. Binding of Tb-FTP is observed only in the presence of an excess of Tb3+ with an activation constant Ka = 25 microM for Tb3+. Analysis of the data reveals that the sites for Tb-FTP and Tb3+ binding are independent entities. In standard conditions these sites would be occupied by Mg-ATP and Mg2+, respectively. These findings suggest an important regulatory role of divalent cations on the activity of H+-ATPase. Replacement of H 2 O by D 2 O in the medium suggests the existence of two types of nucleotide binding sites differing by the hydration state of the Tb3+ ion in the bound Tb-FTP complex

  17. Expression and function of NOD-like receptors by human term gestation-associated tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Aled H; Bevan, Ryan J; Spencer-Harty, Samantha; Scott, Louis M; Jones, Ruth H; Thornton, Catherine A

    2017-10-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors or NOD-like receptors (NLRs) have been implicated in several disease pathologies associated with inflammation. Since local and systemic inflammation is a hallmark of both term and preterm labour, a role for NLRs at the materno-fetal interface has been postulated. Gene expression and immunolocalisation of NLR family members in human placenta, choriodecidua, and amnion were examined. Tissue explants were used to examine the response to activators of NOD1 (Tri-DAP), NOD2 (MDP) and NLRP3 (nigericin). Cell/tissue-free supernatants were examined for the production of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 using specific ELISAs. Expression of transcripts for NOD1, NOD2, NLRP3, NLRC4, NLRX1, NLRP1 and NAIP and protein expression of NOD1, NOD2 and NLRP3 were a broad feature of all term gestation-associated tissues. Production of cytokines was increased significantly in response to all ligands in placenta and choriodecidua, except for MDP-induced IL-10. Similarly, there was a significant in the amnion except for MDP induced IL-1β and IL-10 response to either agonist. IL-1β production was dependent on caspase-1 regardless of agonist used or tissue examined. Term human gestation-associated tissues express functional NLRs which likely play a role in both sterile and pathogen-driven inflammatory responses at the materno-fetal interface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutation analysis of inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein alpha (GNAI) loci in young and familial pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Hande; Donner, Iikki; Kivipelto, Leena; Kuismin, Outi; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; De Menis, Ernesto; Karhu, Auli

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are neoplasms of the anterior pituitary lobe and account for 15-20% of all intracranial tumors. Although most pituitary tumors are benign they can cause severe symptoms related to tumor size as well as hypopituitarism and/or hypersecretion of one or more pituitary hormones. Most pituitary adenomas are sporadic, but it has been estimated that 5% of patients have a familial background. Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) predispose to hereditary pituitary neoplasia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AIP mutations predispose to pituitary tumorigenesis through defective inhibitory GTP binding protein (Gαi) signaling. This finding prompted us to examine whether germline loss-of-function mutations in inhibitory guanine nucleotide (GTP) binding protein alpha (GNAI) loci are involved in genetic predisposition of pituitary tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first time GNAI genes are sequenced in order to examine the occurrence of inactivating germline mutations. Thus far, only somatic gain-of-function hot-spot mutations have been studied in these loci. Here, we have analyzed the coding regions of GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 in a set of young sporadic somatotropinoma patients (n = 32; mean age of diagnosis 32 years) and familial index cases (n = 14), thus in patients with a disease phenotype similar to that observed in AIP mutation carriers. In addition, expression of Gαi proteins was studied in human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and non-functional pituitary tumors. No pathogenic germline mutations affecting the Gαi proteins were detected. The result suggests that loss-of-function mutations of GNAI loci are rare or nonexistent in familial pituitary adenomas.

  19. Stabilization of a nucleotide-binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator yields insight into disease-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Robert M; Chong, P Andrew; Lin, Hong; Yang, Zhengrong; Zhou, Qingxian; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Dawson, Jennifer E; Riordan, John R; Brouillette, Christie G; Thibodeau, Patrick H; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2017-08-25

    Characterization of the second nucleotide-binding domain (NBD2) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has lagged behind research into the NBD1 domain, in part because NBD1 contains the F508del mutation, which is the dominant cause of cystic fibrosis. Research on NBD2 has also been hampered by the overall instability of the domain and the difficulty of producing reagents. Nonetheless, multiple disease-causing mutations reside in NBD2, and the domain is critical for CFTR function, because channel gating involves NBD1/NBD2 dimerization, and NBD2 contains the catalytically active ATPase site in CFTR. Recognizing the paucity of structural and biophysical data on NBD2, here we have defined a bioinformatics-based method for manually identifying stabilizing substitutions in NBD2, and we used an iterative process of screening single substitutions against thermal melting points to both produce minimally mutated stable constructs and individually characterize mutations. We present a range of stable constructs with minimal mutations to help inform further research on NBD2. We have used this stabilized background to study the effects of NBD2 mutations identified in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, demonstrating that mutants such as N1303K and G1349D are characterized by lower stability, as shown previously for some NBD1 mutations, suggesting a potential role for NBD2 instability in the pathology of CF. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The wheat homolog of putative nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat resistance gene TaRGA contributes to resistance against powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Defu; Wang, Xiaobing; Mei, Yu; Dong, Hansong

    2016-03-01

    Powdery mildew, one of the most destructive wheat diseases worldwide, is caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), a fungal species with a consistently high mutation rate that makes individual resistance (R) genes ineffective. Therefore, effective resistance-related gene cloning is vital for breeding and studying the resistance mechanisms of the disease. In this study, a putative nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) R gene (TaRGA) was cloned using a homology-based cloning strategy and analyzed for its effect on powdery mildew disease and wheat defense responses. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses revealed that a Bgt isolate 15 and salicylic acid stimulation significantly induced TaRGA in the resistant variety. Furthermore, the silencing of TaRGA in powdery mildew-resistant plants increased susceptibility to Bgt15 and prompted conidia propagation at the infection site. However, the expression of TaRGA in leaf segments after single-cell transient expression assay highly increased the defense responses to Bgt15 by enhancing callose deposition and phenolic autofluorogen accumulation at the pathogen invading sites. Meanwhile, the expression of pathogenesis-related genes decreased in the TaRGA-silenced plants and increased in the TaRGA-transient-overexpressing leaf segments. These results implied that the TaRGA gene positively regulates the defense response to powdery mildew disease in wheat.

  1. Three-dimensional structures of the mammalian multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein demonstrate major conformational changes in the transmembrane domains upon nucleotide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Mark F; Kamis, Alhaji Bukar; Callaghan, Richard; Higgins, Christopher F; Ford, Robert C

    2003-03-07

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that is associated with multidrug resistance and the failure of chemotherapy in human patients. We have previously shown, based on two-dimensional projection maps, that P-glycoprotein undergoes conformational changes upon binding of nucleotide to the intracellular nucleotide binding domains. Here we present the three-dimensional structures of P-glycoprotein in the presence and absence of nucleotide, at a resolution limit of approximately 2 nm, determined by electron crystallography of negatively stained crystals. The data reveal a major reorganization of the transmembrane domains throughout the entire depth of the membrane upon binding of nucleotide. In the absence of nucleotide, the two transmembrane domains form a single barrel 5-6 nm in diameter and about 5 nm deep with a central pore that is open to the extracellular surface and spans much of the membrane depth. Upon binding nucleotide, the transmembrane domains reorganize into three compact domains that are each 2-3 nm in diameter and 5-6 nm deep. This reorganization opens the central pore along its length in a manner that could allow access of hydrophobic drugs (transport substrates) directly from the lipid bilayer to the central pore of the transporter.

  2. Structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of a dipeptide ABC transporter reveals a novel iron-sulfur cluster-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolu; Zhuo, Wei; Yu, Jie; Ge, Jingpeng; Gu, Jinke; Feng, Yue; Yang, Maojun; Wang, Linfang; Wang, Na

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptide permease (Dpp), which belongs to an ABC transport system, imports peptides consisting of two or three L-amino acids from the matrix to the cytoplasm in microbes. Previous studies have indicated that haem competes with dipeptides to bind DppA in vitro and in vivo and that the Dpp system can also translocate haem. Here, the crystal structure of DppD, the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of the ABC-type dipeptide/oligopeptide/nickel-transport system from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, bound with ATP, Mg(2+) and a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster is reported. The N-terminal domain of DppD shares a similar structural fold with the NBDs of other ABC transporters. Interestingly, the C-terminal domain of DppD contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The UV-visible absorbance spectrum of DppD was consistent with the presence of a [4Fe-4S] cluster. A search with DALI revealed that the [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding domain is a novel structural fold. Structural analysis and comparisons with other ABC transporters revealed that this iron-sulfur cluster may act as a mediator in substrate (dipeptide or haem) binding by electron transfer and may regulate the transport process in Dpp ABC transport systems. The crystal structure provides a basis for understanding the properties of ABC transporters and will be helpful in investigating the functions of NBDs in the regulation of ABC transporter activity.

  3. Genome-wide identification and tissue-specific expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat gene family in Cicer arietinum (kabuli chickpea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ranu; Rawat, Vimal; Suresh, C G

    2017-12-01

    The nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins play an important role in the defense mechanisms against pathogens. Using bioinformatics approach, we identified and annotated 104 NBS-LRR genes in chickpea. Phylogenetic analysis points to their diversification into two families namely TIR-NBS-LRR and non-TIR-NBS-LRR. Gene architecture revealed intron gain/loss events in this resistance gene family during their independent evolution into two families. Comparative genomics analysis elucidated its evolutionary relationship with other fabaceae species. Around 50% NBS-LRRs reside in macro-syntenic blocks underlining positional conservation along with sequence conservation of NBS-LRR genes in chickpea. Transcriptome sequencing data provided evidence for their transcription and tissue-specific expression. Four cis -regulatory elements namely WBOX, DRE, CBF, and GCC boxes, that commonly occur in resistance genes, were present in the promoter regions of these genes. Further, the findings will provide a strong background to use candidate disease resistance NBS-encoding genes and identify their specific roles in chickpea.

  4. NOD-Like Receptors in Intestinal Homeostasis and Epithelial Tissue Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, Marianna; Yeretssian, Garabet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes a dynamic physical barrier segregating the luminal content from the underlying mucosal tissue. Following injury, the epithelial integrity is restored by rapid migration of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) across the denuded area in a process known as wound healing. Hence, through a sequence of events involving restitution, proliferation and differentiation of IECs the gap is resealed and homeostasis reestablished. Relapsing damage followed by healing of the inflamed mucosa is a hallmark of several intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). While several regulatory peptides, growth factors and cytokines stimulate restitution of the epithelial layer after injury, recent evidence in the field underscores the contribution of innate immunity in controlling this process. In particular, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) play critical roles in sensing the commensal microbiota, maintaining homeostasis, and regulating intestinal inflammation. Here, we review the process of intestinal epithelial tissue repair and we specifically focus on the impact of NLR-mediated signaling mechanisms involved in governing epithelial wound healing during disease. PMID:24886810

  5. The Potato Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 is a Pathogen Dependent DNA-Deforming Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenyk, S.; Townsend, P.D.; Dixon, C.H.; Spies, G.B.; Campillo, A.S.E.; Slootweg, E.J.; Westerhof, L.B.; Gawehns, F.K.K.; Knight, M.R.; Sharples, G.J.; Goverse, A.; Palsson, L.O.; Takken, F.L.W.; Cann, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant NLR proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus, however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously we noted a structural homology between the NB domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1

  6. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis Shows That SAV-3 Infection Upregulates Pattern Recognition Receptors of the Endosomal Toll-Like and RIG-I-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways in Macrophage/Dendritic Like TO-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental step in cellular defense mechanisms is the recognition of “danger signals” made of conserved pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs expressed by invading pathogens, by host cell germ line coded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. In this study, we used RNA-seq and the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG to identify PRRs together with the network pathway of differentially expressed genes (DEGs that recognize salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV-3 infection in macrophage/dendritic like TO-cells derived from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L headkidney leukocytes. Our findings show that recognition of SAV-3 in TO-cells was restricted to endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs 3 and 8 together with RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs and not the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors NOD-like receptor (NLRs genes. Among the RLRs, upregulated genes included the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I, melanoma differentiation association 5 (MDA5 and laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2. The study points to possible involvement of the tripartite motif containing 25 (TRIM25 and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS in modulating RIG-I signaling being the first report that links these genes to the RLR pathway in SAV-3 infection in TO-cells. Downstream signaling suggests that both the TLR and RLR pathways use interferon (IFN regulatory factors (IRFs 3 and 7 to produce IFN-a2. The validity of RNA-seq data generated in this study was confirmed by quantitative real time qRT-PCR showing that genes up- or downregulated by RNA-seq were also up- or downregulated by RT-PCR. Overall, this study shows that de novo transcriptome assembly identify key receptors of the TLR and RLR sensors engaged in host pathogen interaction at cellular level. We envisage that data presented here can open a road map for future intervention strategies in SAV infection of salmon.

  7. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer (SG); (Columbia); (JHU)

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  8. ATP-induced conformational changes of nucleotide-binding domains in an ABC transporter. Importance of the water-mediated entropic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Chiba, Shuntaro; Kaneta, Yusuke; Furuta, Tadaomi; Sakurai, Minoru

    2014-11-06

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins belong to a superfamily of active transporters. Recent experimental and computational studies have shown that binding of ATP to the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of ABC proteins drives the dimerization of NBDs, which, in turn, causes large conformational changes within the transmembrane domains (TMDs). To elucidate the active substrate transport mechanism of ABC proteins, it is first necessary to understand how the NBD dimerization is driven by ATP binding. In this study, we selected MalKs (NBDs of a maltose transporter) as a representative NBD and calculated the free-energy change upon dimerization using molecular mechanics calculations combined with a statistical thermodynamic theory of liquids, as well as a method to calculate the translational, rotational, and vibrational entropy change. This combined method is applied to a large number of snapshot structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations containing explicit water molecules. The results suggest that the NBD dimerization proceeds with a large gain of water entropy when ATP molecules bind to the NBDs. The energetic gain arising from direct NBD-NBD interactions is canceled by the dehydration penalty and the configurational-entropy loss. ATP hydrolysis induces a loss of the shape complementarity between the NBDs, which leads to the dissociation of the dimer, due to a decrease in the water-entropy gain and an increase in the configurational-entropy loss. This interpretation of the NBD dimerization mechanism in concert with ATP, especially focused on the water-mediated entropy force, is potentially applicable to a wide variety of the ABC transporters.

  9. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling studies of the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of the human mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurashima-Ito, Kaori [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Ikeya, Teppei [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), (Japan); Senbongi, Hiroshi [Mitochondrial Diseases Group, MRC Dunn Human NutritionUnit (United Kingdom); Tochio, Hidehito [International Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Supramolecular Biology, Yokohama City University, Molecular Biophysics Laboratory (Japan); Mikawa, Tsutomu [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Shibata, Takehiko [RIKEN, Shibata Distinguished Senior Scientist Laboratory (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan)], E-mail: ito-yutaka@center.tmu.ac.jp

    2006-05-15

    Human ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 6 (ABCB6) is a mitochondrial ABC transporter, and presumably contributes to iron homeostasis. Aimed at understanding the structural basis for the conformational changes accompanying the substrate-transportation cycle, we have studied the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of ABCB6 (ABCB6-C) in both the nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling. A non-linear sampling scheme was utilised for indirectly acquired {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N dimensions of all 3D triple-resonance NMR experiments, in order to overcome the instability and the low solubility of ABCB6-C. The backbone resonances for approximately 25% of non-proline residues, which are mostly distributed around the functionally important loops and in the Helical domain, were not observed for nucleotide-free form of ABCB6-C. From the pH, temperature and magnetic field strength dependencies of the resonance intensities, we concluded that this incompleteness in the assignments is mainly due to the exchange between multiple conformations at an intermediate rate on the NMR timescale. These localised conformational dynamics remained in ADP-bound ABCB6-C except for the loops responsible for adenine base and {alpha}/{beta}-phosphate binding. These results revealed that the localised dynamic cooperativity, which was recently proposed for a prokaryotic ABC MJ1267, also exists in a higher eukaryotic ABC, and is presumably shared by all members of the ABC family. Since the Helical domain is the putative interface to the transmembrane domain, this cooperativity may explain the coupled functions between domains in the substrate-transportation cycle.

  10. GPCR engineering yields high-resolution structural insights into beta2-adrenergic receptor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) is a well-studied prototype for heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that respond to diffusible hormones and neurotransmitters. To overcome the structural flexibility of the beta2AR and to facilitate its cr...

  11. Decipher the mechanisms of protein conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding through free-energy landscape analysis: ATP binding to Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Nicolaï

    Full Text Available ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD. Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in

  12. TAM receptor-dependent regulation of SOCS3 and MAPKs contributes to proinflammatory cytokine downregulation following chronic NOD2 stimulation of human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shasha; Hedl, Matija; Abraham, Clara

    2015-02-15

    Microbial-induced cytokine regulation is critical to intestinal immune homeostasis. Acute stimulation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2), the Crohn's disease-associated sensor of bacterial peptidoglycan, induces cytokines. However, cytokines are attenuated after chronic NOD2 and pattern recognition receptor stimulation of macrophages; similar attenuation is observed in intestinal macrophages. The role of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer (TAM) receptors in regulating chronic pattern recognition receptor stimulation and NOD2-induced outcomes has not been examined. Moreover, TAM receptors have been relatively less investigated in human macrophages. Whereas TAM receptors did not downregulate acute NOD2-induced cytokines in primary human macrophages, they were essential for downregulating signaling and proinflammatory cytokine secretion after chronic NOD2 and TLR4 stimulation. Axl and Mer were similarly required in mice for cytokine downregulation after chronic NOD2 stimulation in vivo and in intestinal tissues. Consistently, TAM expression was increased in human intestinal myeloid-derived cells. Chronic NOD2 stimulation led to IL-10- and TGF-β-dependent TAM upregulation in human macrophages, which, in turn, upregulated suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 expression. Restoring suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 expression under TAM knockdown conditions restored chronic NOD2-mediated proinflammatory cytokine downregulation. In contrast to the upregulated proinflammatory cytokines, attenuated IL-10 secretion was maintained in TAM-deficient macrophages upon chronic NOD2 stimulation. The level of MAPK activation in TAM-deficient macrophages after chronic NOD2 stimulation was insufficient to upregulate IL-10 secretion; however, full restoration of MAPK activation under these conditions restored c-Fos, c-Jun, musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog K, and PU.1 binding to the IL-10 promoter and IL-10 secretion. Therefore, TAM receptors are critical for

  13. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound to t...

  14. Endometrial transcription of microbial molecular patterns receptors in Gyr and F1 Holstein x Gyr postpartum cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Martins

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Zebu and Holstein x Zebu crossbred have low incidence of uterine infection when compared to Holstein cows. Resistance to uterine infections may be associated with the ability to recognize invading microorganisms. Endometrial transcription of microbial molecular patterns receptors has been investigated in the postpartum period of Holstein cows, but it is completely unknown in Zebu or Holstein x Zebu cows. In this study, 9 Gyr and 12 F1 Holstein x Gyr cows were submitted to endometrial biopsies at the first and seventh days postpartum, with the objective to measure transcription levels of toll-like receptors (TLRs 1/6, 2, 4, 5, and 9; nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD-like receptors 1 and 2; and coreceptors cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14 and myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2. There was a significant (P<0.05 decrease in transcription of TLR5 in Gyr, and an increase in transcription of TLR9 in F1 cows, between the first and seventh day postpartum. Both groups had low incidences of uterine infections up to 42 days postpartum. Uterine involution completed at 27.7 ± 10.1 and 25.1 ± 4.7 days postpartum for Gyr and F1 cows, respectively. In Gyr cows, higher transcription levels of TLR1/6 and NOD1 correlated to a longer period required for uterine involution. In F1 cows, lower levels of TLR1/6, TLR2 and NOD2 correlated to a longer period required for uterine involution. In conclusion, some pathogen recognition receptors associated significantly with the time required for uterine involution in Gyr and F1 cows.

  15. DNA sequence polymorphisms within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha (Gsα-encoding (GNAS genomic imprinting domain are associated with performance traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullen Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes which are epigenetically regulated via genomic imprinting can be potential targets for artificial selection during animal breeding. Indeed, imprinted loci have been shown to underlie some important quantitative traits in domestic mammals, most notably muscle mass and fat deposition. In this candidate gene study, we have identified novel associations between six validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning a 97.6 kb region within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha gene (GNAS domain on bovine chromosome 13 and genetic merit for a range of performance traits in 848 progeny-tested Holstein-Friesian sires. The mammalian GNAS domain consists of a number of reciprocally-imprinted, alternatively-spliced genes which can play a major role in growth, development and disease in mice and humans. Based on the current annotation of the bovine GNAS domain, four of the SNPs analysed (rs43101491, rs43101493, rs43101485 and rs43101486 were located upstream of the GNAS gene, while one SNP (rs41694646 was located in the second intron of the GNAS gene. The final SNP (rs41694656 was located in the first exon of transcripts encoding the putative bovine neuroendocrine-specific protein NESP55, resulting in an aspartic acid-to-asparagine amino acid substitution at amino acid position 192. Results SNP genotype-phenotype association analyses indicate that the single intronic GNAS SNP (rs41694646 is associated (P ≤ 0.05 with a range of performance traits including milk yield, milk protein yield, the content of fat and protein in milk, culled cow carcass weight and progeny carcass conformation, measures of animal body size, direct calving difficulty (i.e. difficulty in calving due to the size of the calf and gestation length. Association (P ≤ 0.01 with direct calving difficulty (i.e. due to calf size and maternal calving difficulty (i.e. due to the maternal pelvic width size was also observed at the rs

  16. Dimerization and oligomerization of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Ryder, L Rebekka; Steinø, Anne

    2003-01-01

    protein. Using PAGE, urea gradient gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis and MS, we show that dimerization through the SH group can be induced by lowering the pH to 5-6, heating, or under conditions that favour partial unfolding such as urea concentrations above 2.6 m or SDS concentrations above...... that favour partial unfolding or an intramolecular local conformational change that allows oligomerization, resulting in a heterogeneous mixture of oligomers consisting of up to 10 calreticulin monomers. The oligomeric calreticulin was very stable, but oligomerization was partially reversed by addition of 8 m...

  17. Protein dimerization and oligomerization in biology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthews, Jacqueline M

    2012-01-01

    .... However, protein function is so often linked to both homo- and hetero-oligomerization and many heterologous interactions likely evolved from homologous interaction, so this volume also covers many...

  18. Reversible peptide oligomerization over nanoscale gold surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushige Yokoyama

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A selective oligomeric formation of amyloid beta 1-40 (Ab1-40 monomers over a nanogold colloidal surface was investigated. An unfolded Ab1-40 monomer is considered to construct a dimer or trimer based oligomeric form with its hydrophobic segment placing outward under an acidic condition. Under a basic condition, a conformation of Ab is expected to take a folded monomeric form with its hydrophilic segment folded inward, avoiding the networking with residual colloidal particles. The most probable oligomeric form constructed over a 20 nm gold colloidal surface within a 25 ℃ to 65 ℃ temperature range is a dimer based unit and that over 30 or 40 nm gold colloidal surface below 15 ℃ is concluded to be a trimer based unit. However, selective oligomerization was not successfully reproduced under the rest of the conditions. A dipole-induced dipole interaction must cause a flexible structural change between folded and unfolded forms.

  19. RIG-I self-oligomerization is either dispensable or very transient for signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Louber

    Full Text Available Effective host defence against viruses depends on the rapid triggering of innate immunity through the induction of a type I interferon (IFN response. To this end, microbe-associated molecular patterns are detected by dedicated receptors. Among them, the RIG-I-like receptors RIG-I and MDA5 activate IFN gene expression upon sensing viral RNA in the cytoplasm. While MDA5 forms long filaments in vitro upon activation, RIG-I is believed to oligomerize after RNA binding in order to transduce a signal. Here, we show that in vitro binding of synthetic RNA mimicking that of Mononegavirales (Ebola, rabies and measles viruses leader sequences to purified RIG-I does not induce RIG-I oligomerization. Furthermore, in cells devoid of endogenous functional RIG-I-like receptors, after activation of exogenous Flag-RIG-I by a 62-mer-5'ppp-dsRNA or by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, a dsRNA analogue, or by measles virus infection, anti-Flag immunoprecipitation and specific elution with Flag peptide indicated a monomeric form of RIG-I. Accordingly, when using the Gaussia Luciferase-Based Protein Complementation Assay (PCA, a more sensitive in cellula assay, no RIG-I oligomerization could be detected upon RNA stimulation. Altogether our data indicate that the need for self-oligomerization of RIG-I for signal transduction is either dispensable or very transient.

  20. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the α subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the α subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5'-[α- 32 P]triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an α subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera

  1. Developmental changes in the role of a pertussis toxin sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein in the rat cardiac alpha1-adrenergic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    During development, the cardiac alpha 1 -adrenergic chronotropic response changes from positive in the neonate to negative in the adult. This thesis examined the possibility of a developmental change in coupling of a PT-sensitive G-protein to the alpha 1 -adrenergic receptor. Radioligand binding experiments performed with the iodinated alpha 1 -selective radioligand [ 125 I]-I-2-[β-(4-hydroxphenyl)ethylaminomethyl]tetralone ([ 125 I]-IBE 2254) demonstrated that the alpha 1 -adrenergic receptor is coupled to a G-protein in both neonatal and adult rat hearts. However, in the neonate the alpha 1 -adrenergic receptor is coupled to a PT-insensitive G-protein, whereas in the adult the alpha 1 -adrenergic receptor is coupled to both a PT-insensitive and a PT-sensitive G-protein. Consistent with the results from binding experiments, PT did not have any effect on the alpha 1 -mediated positive chronotropic response in the neonate, whereas in the adult the alpha 1 -mediated negative chronotropic response was completely converted to a positive one after PT-treatment. This thesis also examined the possibility of an alteration in coupling of the alpha 1 -adrenergic receptor to its effector under certain circumstances such as high potassium (K + ) depolarization in nerve-muscle (NM) co-cultures, a system which has been previously shown to be a convenient in vitro model to study the mature inhibitory alpha 1 -response

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis NOD1 and NOD2 receptors and their functional role in in-vitro cellular immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Brahma

    Full Text Available Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD-like receptors (NLRs are innate immune receptors that recognize bacterial cell wall components and initiate host immune response. Structure and function of NLRs have been well studied in human and mice, but little information exists on genetic composition and role of these receptors in innate immune system of water buffalo--a species known for its exceptional disease resistance. Here, a comparative study on the functional domains of NOD1 and NOD2 was performed across different species. The NOD mediated in-vitro cellular responses were studied in buffalo peripheral blood mononuclear cells, resident macrophages, mammary epithelial, and fibroblast cells. Buffalo NOD1 (buNOD1 and buNOD2 showed conserved domain architectures as found in other mammals. The domains of buNOD1 and buNOD2 showed analogy in secondary and tertiary conformations. Constitutive expressions of NODs were ubiquitous in different tissues. Following treatment with NOD agonists, peripheral lymphocytes showed an IFN-γ response along-with production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Alveolar macrophages and mammary epithelial cells showed NOD mediated in-vitro immune response through NF-κB dependent pathway. Fibroblasts showed pro-inflammatory cytokine response following agonist treatment. Our study demonstrates that both immune and non-immune cells could generate NOD-mediated responses to pathogens though the type and magnitude of response depend on the cell types. The structural basis of ligand recognition by buffalo NODs and knowledge of immune response by different cell types could be useful for development of non-infective innate immune modulators and next generation anti-inflammatory compounds.

  3. Functional interaction between the two halves of the photoreceptor-specific ATP binding cassette protein ABCR (ABCA4). Evidence for a non-exchangeable ADP in the first nucleotide binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jinhi; Beharry, Seelochan; Molday, Laurie L; Molday, Robert S

    2003-10-10

    ABCR, also known as ABCA4, is a member of the superfamily of ATP binding cassette transporters that is believed to transport retinal or retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine across photoreceptor disk membranes. Mutations in the ABCR gene are responsible for Stargardt macular dystrophy and related retinal dystrophies that cause severe loss in vision. ABCR consists of two tandemly arranged halves each containing a membrane spanning segment followed by a large extracellular/lumen domain, a multi-spanning membrane domain, and a nucleotide binding domain (NBD). To define the role of each NBD, we examined the nucleotide binding and ATPase activities of the N and C halves of ABCR individually and co-expressed in COS-1 cells and derived from trypsin-cleaved ABCR in disk membranes. When disk membranes or membranes from co-transfected cells were photoaffinity labeled with 8-azido-ATP and 8-azido-ADP, only the NBD2 in the C-half bound and trapped the nucleotide. Co-expressed half-molecules displayed basal and retinal-stimulated ATPase activity similar to full-length ABCR. The individually expressed N-half displayed weak 8-azido-ATP labeling and low basal ATPase activity that was not stimulated by retinal, whereas the C-half did not bind ATP and exhibited little if any ATPase activity. Purified ABCR contained one tightly bound ADP, presumably in NBD1. Our results indicate that only NBD2 of ABCR binds and hydrolyzes ATP in the presence or absence of retinal. NBD1, containing a bound ADP, associates with NBD2 to play a crucial, non-catalytic role in ABCR function.

  4. octamethyl-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes nanocomposites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, biodegradable poly(p-dioxanone) (PPDO)/octamethyl-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (ome-POSS) nanocomposites were fabricated by the simple solution casting method with various ome-POSS loadings. Scanning electron microscopic observations indicate that ome-POSS is well dispersed in the ...

  5. Interleukin (IL) 36 gamma induces mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel-forming expression via IL-36 receptor-extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2, and p38-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang Hoon; Choi, Yoon Seok; Na, Hyung Gyun; Song, Si-Youn; Kim, Yong-Dae

    2018-03-01

    Mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel-forming (MUC5AC) expression is significantly increased in allergic and inflammatory airway diseases. Interleukin (IL) 36 gamma is predominantly expressed in airway epithelial cells and plays an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses. IL-36 gamma is induced by many inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and bacterial and viral infections. However, the association between IL-36 gamma and mucin secretion in human airway epithelial cells has not yet been fully investigated. The objective of this study was to determine whether IL-36 gamma might play a role in the regulation of mucin secretion in airway epithelial cells. We investigated the effect and brief signaling pathway of IL-36 gamma on MUC5AC expression in human airway epithelial cells. Enzyme immunoassay, immunoblot analysis, immunofluorescence staining, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and real-time PCR were performed in mucin-producing human airway epithelial NCI-H292 cells and in human nasal epithelial cells after pretreatment with IL-36 gamma, several specific inhibitors, or small interfering RNAs (siRNA). IL-36 gamma induced MUC5AC expression and activated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, p38, and nuclear factor-kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kappa B). IL-36 receptor antagonist significantly attenuated these effects. The specific inhibitor and siRNA of ERK1, ERK2, p38, and NF-kappa B significantly attenuated IL-36 gamma induced MUC5AC expression. These results indicated that IL-36 gamma induced MUC5AC expression via the IL-36 receptor-mediated ERK1/2 and p38/NF-kappa B pathway in human airway epithelial cells.

  6. Structural Determinants at the Interface of the ARC2 and LRR Domains Control the Activation of the NB-LRR Plant Immune Receptors Rx1 and Gpa2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, E.J.; Spiridon, L.N.; Roosien, J.; Butterbach, P.B.E.; Pomp, H.; Westerhof, L.B.; Wilbers, R.H.P.; Bakker, E.H.; Bakker, J.; Petrescu, A.J.; Smant, G.; Goverse, A.

    2013-01-01

    Many plant and animal immune receptors have a modular NB-LRR architecture in which a nucleotide-binding switch domain (NB-ARC) is tethered to a leucine-rich repeat sensor domain (LRR). The cooperation between the switch and sensor domains, which regulates the activation of these proteins, is poorly

  7. Coiled-coil domain-dependent homodimerization of intracellular barley immune receptors defines a minimal functional module for triggering cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maekawa, T.; Cheng, W.; Spiridon, L.N.; Töller, A.; Lukasik, E.; Saijo, Y.; Liu, P.; Shen, Q.H.; Micluta, M.A.; Somssich, I.E.; Takken, F.L.W.; Petrescu, A.J.; Chai, J.; Schulze-Lefert, P.

    2011-01-01

    Plants and animals have evolved structurally related innate immune sensors, designated NLRs, to detect intracellular nonself molecules. NLRs are modular, consisting of N-terminal coiled-coil (CC) or TOLL/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains, a central nucleotide-binding (NB) domain, and C-terminal

  8. The role of innate signaling in the homeostasis of tolerance and immunity in the intestine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.; Loonen, L.M.P.; Karczewski, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the intestine innate recognition of microbes is achieved through pattern recognition receptor (PRR) families expressed in immune cells and different cell lineages of the intestinal epithelium. Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) families

  9. In Silico Molecular Modeling and Docking Studies on Novel Mutants (E229V, H225P and D230C) of the Nucleotide-Binding Domain of Homo sapiens Hsp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elengoe, Asita; Hamdan, Salehhuddin

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we explored the possibility of determining the synergistic interactions between nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of Homo sapiens heat-shock 70 kDa protein (Hsp70) and E1A 32 kDa of adenovirus serotype 5 motif (PNLVP) in the efficiency of killing of tumor cells in cancer treatment. At present, the protein interaction between NBD and PNLVP motif is still unknown, but believed to enhance the rate of virus replication in tumor cells. Three mutant models (E229V, H225P and D230C) were built and simulated, and their interactions with PNLVP motif were studied. The PNLVP motif showed the binding energy and intermolecular energy values with the novel E229V mutant at -7.32 and -11.2 kcal/mol. The E229V mutant had the highest number of hydrogen bonds (7). Based on the root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuation, hydrogen bonds, salt bridge, secondary structure, surface-accessible solvent area, potential energy and distance matrices analyses, it was proved that the E229V had the strongest and most stable interaction with the PNLVP motif among all the four protein-ligand complex structures. The knowledge of this protein-ligand complex model would help in designing Hsp70 structure-based drug for cancer therapy.

  10. Domain architecture and oligomerization properties of the paramyxovirus PIV 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ping; Leser, George P; Demeler, Borries; Lamb, Robert A; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2008-09-01

    The mechanism by which the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein couples receptor binding to activation of virus entry remains to be fully understood, but the HN stalk is thought to play an important role in the process. We have characterized ectodomain constructs of the parainfluenza virus 5 HN to understand better the underlying architecture and oligomerization properties that may influence HN functions. The PIV 5 neuraminidase (NA) domain is monomeric whereas the ectodomain forms a well-defined tetramer. The HN stalk also forms tetramers and higher order oligomers with high alpha-helical content. Together, the data indicate that the globular NA domains form weak intersubunit interactions at the end of the HN stalk tetramer, while stabilizing the stalk and overall oligomeric state of the ectodomain. Electron microscopy of the HN ectodomain reveals flexible arrangements of the NA and stalk domains, which may be important for understanding how these two HN domains impact virus entry.

  11. Polybenzoxazine/Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The organic/inorganic hybrid materials from polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS, inorganic nanoparticles and polybenzoxazine (PBZ have received much interesting recently due to their excellent thermal and mechanical properties, flame retardance, low dielectric constant, well-defined inorganic framework at nanosized scale level, and higher performance relative to those of non-hybrid PBZs. This review describes the synthesis, dielectric constants, and thermal, rheological, and mechanical properties of covalently bonded mono- and multifunctionalized benzoxazine POSS hybrids, other functionalized benzoxazine POSS derivatives, and non-covalently (hydrogen bonded benzoxazine POSS composites.

  12. Nucleotide binding to Na+/K+-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubala, Martin; Lánský, Zdeněk; Ettrich, R.; Plášek, J.; Teisinger, Jan; Amler, Evžen

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 272, č. S1 (2005), s. 191-191 E-ISSN 1742-4658. [FEBS Congress /30./ and IUBMB Conference /9./. 02.07.2005-07.07.2005, Budapest] Keywords : Na+/K+- ATPase * ATP binding * TNP-ATP Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  13. Insights into the diversity of NOD-like receptors: Identification and expression analysis of NLRC3, NLRC5 and NLRX1 in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Claudio A; Ramírez-Cepeda, Felipe; Santana, Paula; Torres, Elisa; Cortés, Jimena; Guzmán, Fanny; Schmitt, Paulina; Mercado, Luis

    2017-07-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) are efficient soluble intracellular sensors that activate defense mechanisms against pathogens. In teleost fish, the involvement of NLRs in the immune response is not well understood. However, recent work has evidenced the expression of different NLRs in response to some pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In the present work, the cDNA sequence encoding three new NOD-like receptors were identified in Oncorhynchus mykiss, namely OmNLRC3, OmNLRC5 and OmNLRX1. Results showed that their sequences coded for proteins of 1135, 836 and 1010 amino acids, respectively. The deduced protein sequences of all receptors showed characteristic domains of this receptor family, such as leucine rich repeats and NACHT domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a high degree of identity with other NOD-like receptors and they are clustered into different families. Transcript expression analysis indicated that OmNLRs are constitutively expressed in liver, spleen, intestine, gill, skin and brain. OmNLR expression was upregulated in kidney and gills from rainbow trout in response to LPS. In order to give new insights into the function of these new NLR members, an in vitro model of immune stimulation was established using the rainbow trout cell line RTgill-W1. Expression analysis revealed that RTgill-W1 overexpressed proinflammatory cytokines in response to LPS and poly I:C alongside with a differential overexpression of OmNLRC3, OmNLRC5 and OmNLRX1. The expression of OmNLRC5 was further verified at the protein level by immunofluorescence. Finally, the effect of the overexpressed cytokines on the OmNLR expression by RTgill-W1 cells was assessed, suggesting a regulatory mechanism on OmNLRC3 expression. Overall, results suggest that O. mykiss NOD-like receptors could play a key role in the defense mechanisms of teleost through PAMP recognition. Future studies will focus on gills which could be related with a key

  14. The Type IV Pilus Assembly ATPase PilB of Myxococcus xanthus Interacts with the Inner Membrane Platform Protein PilC and the Nucleotide-binding Protein PilM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, Lisa Franziska; Friedrich, Carmen; Harms, Andrea; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; van der Does, Chris

    2016-03-25

    Type IV pili (T4P) are ubiquitous bacterial cell surface structures, involved in processes such as twitching motility, biofilm formation, bacteriophage infection, surface attachment, virulence, and natural transformation. T4P are assembled by machinery that can be divided into the outer membrane pore complex, the alignment complex that connects components in the inner and outer membrane, and the motor complex in the inner membrane and cytoplasm. Here, we characterize the inner membrane platform protein PilC, the cytosolic assembly ATPase PilB of the motor complex, and the cytosolic nucleotide-binding protein PilM of the alignment complex of the T4P machinery ofMyxococcus xanthus PilC was purified as a dimer and reconstituted into liposomes. PilB was isolated as a monomer and bound ATP in a non-cooperative manner, but PilB fused to Hcp1 ofPseudomonas aeruginosaformed a hexamer and bound ATP in a cooperative manner. Hexameric but not monomeric PilB bound to PilC reconstituted in liposomes, and this binding stimulated PilB ATPase activity. PilM could only be purified when it was stabilized by a fusion with a peptide corresponding to the first 16 amino acids of PilN, supporting an interaction between PilM and PilN(1-16). PilM-N(1-16) was isolated as a monomer that bound but did not hydrolyze ATP. PilM interacted directly with PilB, but only with PilC in the presence of PilB, suggesting an indirect interaction. We propose that PilB interacts with PilC and with PilM, thus establishing the connection between the alignment and the motor complex. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The roles of the RIIβ linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of the type IIβ protein kinase A: a small angle x-ray and neutron scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Donald K; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T; Taylor, Susan S

    2014-10-10

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. The PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1-280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. Our results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. A novel missense variant (Gln220Arg) of GNB4 encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein, subunit beta-4 in a Japanese family with autosomal dominant motor and sensory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Shiroh; Morikawa, Takuya; Fujioka, Ryuta; Noda, Kazuhito; Kosaka, Kengo; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroki

    2017-09-01

    Dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease F (CMTDIF) is an autosomal dominant hereditary form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) caused by variations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, subunit beta-4 gene (GNB4). We examined two Japanese familial cases with CMT. Case 1 was a 49-year-old male whose chief complaint was slowly progressive gait disturbance and limb dysesthesia that appeared at the age of 47. On neurological examination, he showed hyporeflexia or areflexia, distal limb muscle weakness, and distal sensory impairment with lower dominancy. Nerve conduction studies demonstrated demyelinating sensorimotor neuropathy with reduced action potentials in the lower limbs. Case 2 was an 80-year-old man, Case 1's father, who reported difficulty in riding a bicycle at the age of 76. On neurological examination, he showed areflexia in the upper and lower limbs. Distal sensory impairment in the lower limbs was also observed. Nerve conduction studies revealed mainly axonal involvement. Exome sequencing identified a novel heterozygous nonsynonymous variant (NM_021629.3:c.659T > C [p.Gln220Arg]) in GNB4 exon 8, which is known to be responsible for CMT. Sanger sequencing confirmed that both patients are heterozygous for the variation, which causes an amino acid substitution, Gln220Arg, in the highly conserved region of the WD40 domain of GNB4. The frequency of this variant in the Exome Aggregation Consortium Database was 0.000008247, and we confirmed its absence in 502 Japanese control subjects. We conclude that this novel GNB4 variant is causative for CMTDIF in these patients, who represent the first record of the disease in the Japanese population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. The Nucleotide-Free State of the Multidrug Resistance ABC Transporter LmrA: Sulfhydryl Cross-Linking Supports a Constant Contact, Head-to-Tail Configuration of the Nucleotide-Binding Domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Jones

    Full Text Available ABC transporters are integral membrane pumps that are responsible for the import or export of a diverse range of molecules across cell membranes. ABC transporters have been implicated in many phenomena of medical importance, including cystic fibrosis and multidrug resistance in humans. The molecular architecture of ABC transporters comprises two transmembrane domains and two ATP-binding cassettes, or nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs, which are highly conserved and contain motifs that are crucial to ATP binding and hydrolysis. Despite the improved clarity of recent structural, biophysical, and biochemical data, the seemingly simple process of ATP binding and hydrolysis remains controversial, with a major unresolved issue being whether the NBD protomers separate during the catalytic cycle. Here chemical cross-linking data is presented for the bacterial ABC multidrug resistance (MDR transporter LmrA. These indicate that in the absence of nucleotide or substrate, the NBDs come into contact to a significant extent, even at 4°C, where ATPase activity is abrogated. The data are clearly not in accord with an inward-closed conformation akin to that observed in a crystal structure of V. cholerae MsbA. Rather, they suggest a head-to-tail configuration 'sandwich' dimer similar to that observed in crystal structures of nucleotide-bound ABC NBDs. We argue the data are more readily reconciled with the notion that the NBDs are in proximity while undergoing intra-domain motions, than with an NBD 'Switch' mechanism in which the NBD monomers separate in between ATP hydrolysis cycles.

  18. Endocytic pathways mediating oligomeric Aβ42 neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxton Kevin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD is amyloid plaques, composed primarily of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ. Over-production or diminished clearance of the 42 amino acid form of Aβ (Aβ42 in the brain leads to accumulation of soluble Aβ and plaque formation. Soluble oligomeric Aβ (oAβ has recently emerged to be as a likely proximal cause of AD. Results Here we demonstrate that endocytosis is critical in mediating oAβ42-induced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. Inhibition of clathrin function either with a pharmacological inhibitor, knock-down of clathrin heavy chain expression, or expression of the dominant-negative mutant of clathrin-assembly protein AP180 did not block oAβ42-induced neurotoxicity or intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. However, inhibition of dynamin and RhoA by expression of dominant negative mutants reduced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal Aβ accumulation. Pharmacologic inhibition of the dynamin-mediated endocytic pathway by genistein also reduced neurotoxicity. Conclusions These data suggest that dynamin-mediated and RhoA-regulated endocytosis are integral steps for oligomeric Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal Aβ accumulation.

  19. Activation of nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 by human cytomegalovirus initiates innate immune responses and restricts virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kapoor

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 is an important innate immune sensor of bacterial pathogens. Its induction results in activation of the classic NF-κB pathway and alternative pathways including type I IFN and autophagy. Although the importance of NOD2 in recognizing RNA viruses has recently been identified, its role in sensing DNA viruses has not been studied. We report that infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV results in significant induction of NOD2 expression, beginning as early as 2 hours post infection and increasing steadily 24 hours post infection and afterwards. Infection with human herpesvirus 1 and 2 does not induce NOD2 expression. While the HCMV-encoded glycoprotein B is not required for NOD2 induction, a replication competent virion is necessary. Lentivirus-based NOD2 knockdown in human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs and U373 glioma cells leads to enhanced HCMV replication along with decreased levels of interferon beta (IFN-β and the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL8. NOD2 induction in HCMV-infected cells activates downstream NF-κB and interferon pathways supported by reduced nuclear localization of NF-κB and pIRF3 in NOD2 knockdown HFFs. Stable overexpression of NOD2 in HFFs restricts HCMV replication in association with increased levels of IFN-β and IL8. Similarly, transient overexpression of NOD2 in U373 cells or its downstream kinase, RIPK2, results in decreased HCMV replication and enhanced cytokine responses. However, overexpression of a mutant NOD2, 3020insC, associated with severe Crohn's disease, results in enhanced HCMV replication and decreased levels of IFN-β in U373 cells. These results show for the first time that NOD2 plays a significant role in HCMV replication and may provide a model for studies of HCMV recognition by the host cell and HCMV colitis in Crohn's disease.

  20. Topology and Oligomerization of Mono- and Oligomeric Proteins Regulate Their Half-Lives in the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Saurav; Kundu, Sudip

    2018-06-05

    To find additional structural constraints (besides disordered segments) that regulate protein half-life in the cell, we herein assess the influence of native topology of monomeric and sequestration of oligomeric proteins into multimeric complexes in yeast, human, and mouse. Native topology acts as a molecular marker of globular protein's mechanical resistance and consequently captures their half-life variations on genome scale. Sequestration into multimeric complexes elongates oligomeric protein half-life in the cell, presumably by burying ubiquitinoylation sites and disordered segments required for proteasomal recognition. The latter effect is stronger for proteins associated with multiple complexes and for those binding early during complex self-assembly, including proteins that oligomerize with large proportions of surface buried. After gene duplication, diversification of topology and sequestration into non-identical sets of complexes alter half-lives of paralogous proteins during the course of evolution. Thus, native topology and sequestration into multimeric complexes reflect designing principles of proteins to regulate their half-lives. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Polymorphism and mesomorphism of oligomeric surfactants: effect of the degree of oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurašin, D; Pustak, A; Habuš, I; Šmit, I; Filipović-Vinceković, N

    2011-12-06

    A series of cationic oligomeric surfactants (quaternary dodecyldimethylammonium ions with two, three, or four chains connected by an ethylene spacer at the headgroup level, abbreviated as dimer, trimer, and tetramer) were synthesized and characterized. The influence of the degree of oligomerization on their polymorphic and mesomorphic properties was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, polarizing optical microscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential scanning calorimetry. All compounds display layered arrangements with interdigitated dodecyl chains. The increase in the degree of oligomerization increases the interlayer distance and decreases the ordering in the solid phase; whereas the dimer sample is fully crystalline with well-developed 3D ordering and the trimer and tetramer crystallize as highly ordered crystal smectic phases. The number of thermal phase transitions and sequence of phases are markedly affected by the number of dodecyl chains. Anhydrous samples exhibit polymorphism and thermotropic mesomorphism of the smectic type, with the exception of the tetramer that displays only transitions at higher temperature associated with decomposition and melting. All hydrated compounds form lyotropic mesophases showing reversible phase transitions upon heating and cooling. The sequence of liquid-crystalline phases for the dimer, typical of concentrated ionic surfactant systems, comprises a hexagonal phase at lower temperatures and a smectic phase at higher temperatures. In contrast, the trimer and tetramer reveal textures of the hexagonal phase. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghim, C; Almaas, E

    2008-06-12

    Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamical role of protein-protein associations. We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch), integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast protein binding-unbinding kinetics, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its intrinsic switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced) state from randomly being induced (uninduced). The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of phenotypically important toggle switches, and nested positive feedback loops in

  3. Different domains are critical for oligomerization compatibility of different connexins

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARTÍNEZ, Agustín D.; MARIPILLÁN, Jaime; ACUÑA, Rodrigo; MINOGUE, Peter J.; BERTHOUD, Viviana M.; BEYER, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Oligomerization of connexins is a critical step in gap junction channel formation. Some members of the connexin family can oligomerize with other members and form functional heteromeric hemichannels [e.g. Cx43 (connexin 43) and Cx45], but others are incompatible (e.g. Cx43 and Cx26). To find connexin domains important for oligomerization, we constructed chimaeras between Cx43 and Cx26 and studied their ability to oligomerize with wild-type Cx43, Cx45 or Cx26. HeLa cells co-expressing Cx43, Cx45 or Cx26 and individual chimaeric constructs were analysed for interactions between the chimaeras and the wild-type connexins using cell biological (subcellular localization by immunofluorescence), functional (intercellular diffusion of microinjected Lucifer yellow) and biochemical (sedimentation velocity through sucrose gradients) assays. All of the chimaeras containing the third transmembrane domain of Cx43 interacted with wild-type Cx43 on the basis of co-localization, dominant-negative inhibition of intercellular communication, and altered sedimentation velocity. The same chimaeras also interacted with co-expressed Cx45. In contrast, immunofluorescence and intracellular diffusion of tracer suggested that other domains influenced oligomerization compatibility when chimaeras were co-expressed with Cx26. Taken together, these results suggest that amino acids in the third transmembrane domain are critical for oligomerization with Cx43 and Cx45. However, motifs in different domains may determine oligomerization compatibility in members of different connexin subfamilies. PMID:21348854

  4. Molecular basis of coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Barbara; Bjelic, Saša; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jawhari, Hatim; Jaussi, Rolf; Payapilly, Aishwarya; Jowitt, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michel O; Kammerer, Richard A

    2010-11-16

    Coiled coils are extensively and successfully used nowadays to rationally design multistranded structures for applications, including basic research, biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and medicine. The wide range of applications as well as the important functions these structures play in almost all biological processes highlight the need for a detailed understanding of the factors that control coiled-coil folding and oligomerization. Here, we address the important and unresolved question why the presence of particular oligomerization-state determinants within a coiled coil does frequently not correlate with its topology. We found an unexpected, general link between coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity and trigger sequences, elements that are indispensable for coiled-coil formation. By using the archetype coiled-coil domain of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 as a model system, we show that well-established trimer-specific oligomerization-state determinants switch the peptide's topology from a dimer to a trimer only when inserted into the trigger sequence. We successfully confirmed our results in two other, unrelated coiled-coil dimers, ATF1 and cortexillin-1. We furthermore show that multiple topology determinants can coexist in the same trigger sequence, revealing a delicate balance of the resulting oligomerization state by position-dependent forces. Our experimental results should significantly improve the prediction of the oligomerization state of coiled coils. They therefore should have major implications for the rational design of coiled coils and consequently many applications using these popular oligomerization domains.

  5. Flexibility of the myosin heavy chain: direct evidence that the region containing SH/sub 1/ and SH/sub 2/ can move 10 /Angstrom/ under the influence of nucleotide binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huston, E.E.; Grammer, J.C.; Yount, R.G.

    1988-12-13

    Previous experiments demonstrated that two thiols of skeletal myosin subfragment 1 (SF/sub 1/) could be oxidized to a disulfide bond by treatment with a 2-fold excess of 5,5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) in the presence of MgADP. The resulting characteristic changes in the ATPase activities of SF/sub 1/ and the fact that MgADP was stably trapped at the active site, suggested that the two thiols cross-linked were SH/sub 1/ (Cys-707) and SH/sub 2/ (Cys-697) from the myosin heavy chain. To verify this suggestion, SF/sub 1/, after DTNB treatment as above, was treated with an excess of N-ethylmaleimide to block all accessible thiols. The single protein disulfide produced by DTNB oxidation was reduced with dithioerythritol and the modified SF/sub 1/ internally cross-linked with equimolar (/sup 14/C)p-phenylenedimaleimide (pPDM) in the presence of MgADP. After extensive trypsinization, the major /sup 14/C-labeled peptide was isolated, characterized, and shown to be Cys-Asn-Gly-Val-Leu-Gly-Ile-Arg-Ile-Cys-Arg, in which the two cysteines were cross-linked by pPDM. This peptide is known to contain SH/sub 2/ and SH/sub 1/ in this order and to come from residues 697-708 in the rabbit skeletal myosin heavy chain. Parallel experiments with (/sup 14/C)pPDM and unmodified SF/sub 1/ similar to those above gave an identical SH/sub 1/, SH/sub 2/ tryptic peptide, verifying earlier labeling results. These combined results demonstrate that SH/sub 1/ and SH/sub 2/ cross-linked by pPDM (12-13 /Angstrom/, S to S) or by oxidation with DTNB (2 /Angstrom/, S to S) can move a minimum of 10 /Angstrom/ under the influence of nucleotide binding. Because these residues are separated by only nine amino acids in the primary sequence, this small section of the heavy chain must possess extraordinary flexibility.

  6. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patients...

  7. Protic Cationic Oligomeric Ionic Liquids of the Urethane Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Stryutsky, A. V.; Klymenko, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    Protic oligomeric cationic ionic liquids of the oligo(ether urethane) type are synthesized via the reaction of an isocyanate prepolymer based on oligo(oxy ethylene)glycol with M = 1000 with hexamethylene-diisocyanate followed by blocking of the terminal isocyanate groups with the use of amine...... derivatives of imidazole, pyridine, and 3-methylpyridine and neutralization of heterocycles with ethanesulfonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid. The structures and properties of the synthesized oligomeric ionic liquids substantially depend on the structures of the ionic groups. They are amorphous at room...... temperature, but ethanesulfonate imidazolium and pyridinium oligomeric ionic liquids form a low melting crystalline phase. The proton conductivities of the oligomeric ionic liquids are determined by the type of cation in the temperature range 80-120 degrees C under anhydrous conditions and vary within five...

  8. Modulation of muramyl dipeptide stimulation of cytokine production by blood components.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.H. van der; Netea, M.G.; Dinarello, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Muramyl dipeptide (MDP) is the minimal active fragment of peptidoglycan of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria, with potential beneficial effects as a vaccine adjuvant. Peptidoglycans and MDP are recognized by the intracellular receptor NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2), leading

  9. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-ling Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group. As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves.

  10. An engineered allosteric switch in leucine-zipper oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L; Plecs, J J; Alber, T

    1996-06-01

    Controversy remains about the role of core side-chain packing in specifying protein structure. To investigate the influence of core packing on the oligomeric structure of a coiled coil, we engineered a GCN4 leucine zipper mutant that switches from two to three strands upon binding the hydrophobic ligands cyclohexane and benzene. In solution these ligands increased the apparent thermal stability and the oligomerization order of the mutant leucine zipper. The crystal structure of the peptide-benzene complex shows a single benzene molecule bound at the engineered site in the core of the trimer. These results indicate that coiled coils are well-suited to function as molecular switches and emphasize that core packing is an important determinant of oligomerization specificity.

  11. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaas Eivind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamic role of protein-protein interactions. Results We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch, integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast binding-unbinding kinetics among proteins, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its random switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced state from randomly being induced (uninduced. Conclusion The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of regulatory circuits

  12. Analysis of receptor signaling pathways by mass spectrometry: identification of vav-2 as a substrate of the epidermal and platelet-derived growth factor receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A; Podtelejnikov, A V; Blagoev, B

    2000-01-01

    Oligomerization of receptor protein tyrosine kinases such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by their cognate ligands leads to activation of the receptor. Transphosphorylation of the receptor subunits is followed by the recruitment of signaling molecules containing src homology 2 (SH2...

  13. The purinergic 2X7 receptor participates in renal inflammation and injury induced by high-fat diet: possible role of NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solini, Anna; Menini, Stefano; Rossi, Chiara; Ricci, Carlo; Santini, Eleonora; Blasetti Fantauzzi, Claudia; Iacobini, Carla; Pugliese, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Renal disease associated with type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome is characterized by a distinct inflammatory phenotype. The purinergic 2X7 receptor (P2X7 R) and the nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor containing a pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome have been separately shown to play a role in two models of non-metabolic chronic kidney disease. Moreover, the NLRP3 inflammasome has been implicated in chronic low-grade sterile inflammation characterizing metabolic disorders, though the mechanism(s) involved in inflammasome activation under these conditions are still unknown. We investigated the role of P2X7 R (through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome) in renal inflammation and injury induced by a high-fat diet, an established model of the metabolic syndrome. On a high-fat diet, mice lacking P2X7 R developed attenuated renal functional and structural alterations as well as reduced inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative/carbonyl stress, as compared with wild-type animals, in the absence of significant differences in metabolic parameters. This was associated with blunted up-regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome components NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), pro-caspase 1, pro-interleukin (IL)-1β, and pro-IL-18, as well as reduced inflammasome activation, as evidenced by decreased formation of mature caspase 1, whereas mature IL-1β and IL-18 were not detected. Up-regulated expression of NLRP3 and pro-caspase 1, post-translational processing of pro-caspase-1, and release of IL-18 in response to lipopolysaccharide + 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP were attenuated by P2X7 R silencing in cultured mouse podocytes. Protein and mRNA expression of P2X7 R, NLRP3, and ASC were also increased in kidneys from subjects with type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, showing histologically documented renal disease. These data provide evidence of a major role for the purinergic system, at

  14. Both Ca2+ and Zn2+ are essential for S100A12 protein oligomerization and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhtman Alexander

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human S100A12 is a member of the S100 family of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins that are associated with many diseases including cancer, chronic inflammation and neurological disorders. S100A12 is an important factor in host/parasite defenses and in the inflammatory response. Like several other S100 proteins, it binds zinc and copper in addition to calcium. Mechanisms of zinc regulation have been proposed for a number of S100 proteins e.g. S100B, S100A2, S100A7, S100A8/9. The interaction of S100 proteins with their targets is strongly dependent on cellular microenvironment. Results The aim of the study was to explore the factors that influence S100A12 oligomerization and target interaction. A comprehensive series of biochemical and biophysical experiments indicated that changes in the concentration of calcium and zinc led to changes in the oligomeric state of S100A12. Surface plasmon resonance confirmed that the presence of both calcium and zinc is essential for the interaction of S100A12 with one of its extracellular targets, RAGE – the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products. By using a single-molecule approach we have shown that the presence of zinc in tissue culture medium favors both the oligomerization of exogenous S100A12 protein and its interaction with targets on the cell surface. Conclusion We have shown that oligomerization and target recognition by S100A12 is regulated by both zinc and calcium. Our present work highlighted the potential role of calcium-binding S100 proteins in zinc metabolism and, in particular, the role of S100A12 in the cross talk between zinc and calcium in cell signaling.

  15. Site-directed cross-linking: establishing the dimeric structure of the aspartate receptor of bacterial chemotaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligan, D.L.; Koshland, D.E. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Cysteine residues introduced at specific locations in the aspartate receptor of Salmonella typhimurium provide anchor points for cross-linking and serve as chemical markers for structural studies of this oligomeric receptor. These markers have been used to measure the rate of subunit exchange between oligomeric receptors and to show that ligand binding inhibits this exchange. The cysteine-containing receptors can be oxidatively cross-linked to completion within the oligomeric receptor, indicating that the receptor has an even number of subunits. Based on this observation, a technique has been developed that can be used to determine the oligomeric structure of proteins under a variety of experimental conditions. The technique involves the measurement of the effect of dilution by cysteineless receptor subunits on cross-linking and reveals that the aspartate receptor is dimeric in detergent solution, in a mixed-micelle system, and in reconstituted membrane vesicles. Binding of aspartate does not change the oligomeric structure of the receptor, indicating that transmembrane signaling occurs within an oligomeric receptor of constant size

  16. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Marburg Virus VP35 Oligomerization Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, Jessica F.; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Urata, Sarah M.; Li, Sheng; Tickle, Ian J.; Bricogne, Gérard; Saphire, Erica Ollmann (Scripps); (Globel Phasing); (UCSD)

    2016-11-09

    ABSTRACT

    Marburg virus (MARV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that is classified in a genus distinct from that of Ebola virus (EBOV) (generaMarburgvirusandEbolavirus, respectively). Both viruses produce a multifunctional protein termed VP35, which acts as a polymerase cofactor, a viral protein chaperone, and an antagonist of the innate immune response. VP35 contains a central oligomerization domain with a predicted coiled-coil motif. This domain has been shown to be essential for RNA polymerase function. Here we present crystal structures of the MARV VP35 oligomerization domain. These structures and accompanying biophysical characterization suggest that MARV VP35 is a trimer. In contrast, EBOV VP35 is likely a tetramer in solution. Differences in the oligomeric state of this protein may explain mechanistic differences in replication and immune evasion observed for MARV and EBOV.

    IMPORTANCEMarburg virus can cause severe disease, with up to 90% human lethality. Its genome is concise, only producing seven proteins. One of the proteins, VP35, is essential for replication of the viral genome and for evasion of host immune responses. VP35 oligomerizes (self-assembles) in order to function, yet the structure by which it assembles has not been visualized. Here we present two crystal structures of this oligomerization domain. In both structures, three copies of VP35 twist about each other to form a coiled coil. This trimeric assembly is in contrast to tetrameric predictions for VP35 of Ebola virus and to known structures of homologous proteins in the measles, mumps, and Nipah viruses. Distinct oligomeric states of the Marburg and Ebola virus VP35 proteins may explain differences between them in polymerase function and immune evasion. These findings may provide a more accurate understanding of the

  18. Induced oligomerization targets Golgi proteins for degradation in lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Ritika; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    Manganese protects cells against forms of Shiga toxin by down-regulating the cycling Golgi protein GPP130. Down-regulation occurs when Mn binding causes GPP130 to oligomerize and traffic to lysosomes. To determine how GPP130 is redirected to lysosomes, we tested the role of GGA1 and clathrin, which mediate sorting in the canonical Golgi-to-lysosome pathway. GPP130 oligomerization was induced using either Mn or a self-interacting version of the FKBP domain. Inhibition of GGA1 or clathrin specifically blocked GPP130 redistribution, suggesting recognition of the aggregated GPP130 by the GGA1/clathrin-sorting complex. Unexpectedly, however, GPP130's cytoplasmic domain was not required, and redistribution also occurred after removal of GPP130 sequences needed for its normal cycling. Therefore, to test whether aggregate recognition might be a general phenomenon rather than one involving a specific GPP130 determinant, we induced homo-oligomerization of two unrelated Golgi-targeted constructs using the FKBP strategy. These were targeted to the cis- and trans-Golgi, respectively, using domains from mannosidase-1 and galactosyltransferase. Significantly, upon oligomerization, each redistributed to peripheral punctae and was degraded. This occurred in the absence of detectable UPR activation. These findings suggest the unexpected presence of quality control in the Golgi that recognizes aggregated Golgi proteins and targets them for degradation in lysosomes. © 2015 Tewari et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  19. Fingolimod phosphate attenuates oligomeric amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity via increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Doi

    Full Text Available The neurodegenerative processes that underlie Alzheimer's disease are mediated, in part, by soluble oligomeric amyloid β, a neurotoxic protein that inhibits hippocampal long-term potentiation, disrupts synaptic plasticity, and induces the production of reactive oxygen species. Here we show that the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptor (S1PR agonist fingolimod phosphate (FTY720-P-a new oral drug for multiple sclerosis-protects neurons against oligomeric amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity. We confirmed that primary mouse cortical neurons express all of the S1P receptor subtypes and FTY720-P directly affects the neurons. Treatment with FTY720-P enhanced the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in neurons. Moreover, blocking BDNF-TrkB signaling with a BDNF scavenger, TrkB inhibitor, or ERK1/2 inhibitor almost completely ablated these neuroprotective effects. These results suggested that the neuroprotective effects of FTY720-P are mediated by upregulated neuronal BDNF levels. Therefore, FTY720-P may be a promising therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Exploring the correlation between the sequence composition of the nucleotide binding G5 loop of the FeoB GTPase domain (NFeoB) and intrinsic rate of GDP release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Amy P; Deshpande, Chandrika N; Schenk, Gerhard; Maher, Megan J; Jormakka, Mika

    2014-12-12

    GDP release from GTPases is usually extremely slow and is in general assisted by external factors, such as association with guanine exchange factors or membrane-embedded GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors), which accelerate the release of GDP by several orders of magnitude. Intrinsic factors can also play a significant role; a single amino acid substitution in one of the guanine nucleotide recognition motifs, G5, results in a drastically altered GDP release rate, indicating that the sequence composition of this motif plays an important role in spontaneous GDP release. In the present study, we used the GTPase domain from EcNFeoB (Escherichia coli FeoB) as a model and applied biochemical and structural approaches to evaluate the role of all the individual residues in the G5 loop. Our study confirms that several of the residues in the G5 motif have an important role in the intrinsic affinity and release of GDP. In particular, a T151A mutant (third residue of the G5 loop) leads to a reduced nucleotide affinity and provokes a drastically accelerated dissociation of GDP.

  1. Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS)-Containing Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayandele, Ebunoluwa; Sarkar, Biswajit; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid materials with superior structural and functional properties can be obtained by incorporating nanofillers into polymer matrices. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles have attracted much attention recently due to their nanometer size, the ease of which these particles can be incorporated into polymeric materials and the unique capability to reinforce polymers. We review here the state of POSS-containing polymer nanocomposites. We discuss the influence of the incorporation of POSS into polymer matrices via chemical cross-linking or physical blending on the structure of nanocomposites, as affected by surface functional groups, and the POSS concentration. PMID:28348318

  2. Mechanism of the electrochemical oligomerization of thionaphteneindole: a spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Gabriella; Casalbore Miceli, Giuseppe; Beggiato, Giancarlo; Emmi, Salvatore S.

    1997-10-01

    The UV, visible and NIR spectra recorded during electrolysis of TNI in CH 2Cl 2 have been studied as a function of electrolysis time and of the quantity of charge exchanged. Among the oligomeric species that might be responsible for the behaviour observed, particular attention has been devoted to dimers of TNI characterized by different charges, presence of unpaired electrons, and deprotonation of the amino hydrogens. A sample of these species has been described theoretically by means of the PM3 semiempirical hamiltonian and their spectra have been computed giving results in reasonable agreement with the observed transitions.

  3. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein specific antibodies are pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Pramhed, Anna

    2012-01-01

    -specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). METHODS: B cell immunodominant regions on the COMP molecule were measured with a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using mammalian expressed full-length mouse COMP as well as a panel of recombinant mouse COMP fragments. 18 mAbs specific to COMP were generated......ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a major non-collagenous component of cartilage. Earlier, we developed a new mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis using COMP. This study was undertaken to investigate the epitope specificity and immunopathogenicity of COMP...

  4. Protective Effects of Testosterone on Presynaptic Terminals against Oligomeric β-Amyloid Peptide in Primary Culture of Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Fai Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing lines of evidence support that testosterone may have neuroprotective effects. While observational studies reported an association between higher bioavailable testosterone or brain testosterone levels and reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, there is limited understanding of the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms. Previous studies demonstrated that testosterone could alleviate neurotoxicity induced by β-amyloid (Aβ, but these findings mainly focused on neuronal apoptosis. Since synaptic dysfunction and degeneration are early events during the pathogenesis of AD, we aim to investigate the effects of testosterone on oligomeric Aβ-induced synaptic changes. Our data suggested that exposure of primary cultured hippocampal neurons to oligomeric Aβ could reduce the length of neurites and decrease the expression of presynaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synaptotagmin, and synapsin-1. Aβ also disrupted synaptic vesicle recycling and protein folding machinery. Testosterone preserved the integrity of neurites and the expression of presynaptic proteins. It also attenuated Aβ-induced impairment of synaptic exocytosis. By using letrozole as an aromatase antagonist, we further demonstrated that the effects of testosterone on exocytosis were unlikely to be mediated through the estrogen receptor pathway. Furthermore, we showed that testosterone could attenuate Aβ-induced reduction of HSP70, which suggests a novel mechanism that links testosterone and its protective function on Aβ-induced synaptic damage. Taken together, our data provide further evidence on the beneficial effects of testosterone, which may be useful for future drug development for AD.

  5. DC-SIGN neck domain is a pH-sensor controlling oligomerization: SAXS and hydrodynamic studies of extracellular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarani, Georges; Thépaut, Michel; Stroebel, David; Ebel, Christine; Vivès, Corinne; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Fieschi, Franck

    2009-08-07

    DC-SIGN is a C-type lectin receptor of dendritic cells and is involved in the early stages of numerous infectious diseases. DC-SIGN is organized into a tetramer enabling multivalent interaction with pathogens. Once formed, the DC-SIGN-pathogen complex can be internalized into compartments of increasing acidity. We have studied the pH dependence of the oligomerization state and conformation of the entire extracellular domain and neck region. We present evidence for equilibrium between the monomeric and tetrameric states of the extracellular domain, which exhibits a marked dependence with respect to both pH and ionic strength. Using solution x-ray scattering we have obtained a molecular envelope of the extracellular domain in which a model has been built. Our results highlight the central role of the neck domain in the pH-sensitive control of the oligomerization state, in the extended conformation of the protein, and in carbohydrate recognition domain organization and presentation. This work opens new insight into the molecular mechanism of ligand release and points to new avenues to block the first step of this important infection pathway.

  6. Oligomerization and polymerization of the filovirus matrix protein VP40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmins, Joanna; Schoehn, Guy; Kohlhaas, Christine; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Ruigrok, Rob W.H.; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2003-01-01

    The matrix protein VP40 from Ebola virus plays an important role in the assembly process of virus particles by interacting with cellular factors, cellular membranes, and the ribonuclearprotein particle complex. Here we show that the N-terminal domain of VP40 folds into a mixture of two different oligomeric states in vitro, namely hexameric and octameric ringlike structures, as detected by gel filtration chromatography, chemical cross-linking, and electron microscopy. Octamer formation depends largely on the interaction with nucleic acids, which in turn confers in vitro SDS resistance. Refolding experiments with a nucleic acid free N-terminal domain preparation reveal a mostly dimeric form of VP40, which is transformed into an SDS resistant octamer upon incubation with E. coli nucleic acids. In addition, we demonstrate that the N-terminal domain of Marburg virus VP40 also folds into ringlike structures, similar to Ebola virus VP40. Interestingly, Marburg virus VP40 rings reveal a high tendency to polymerize into rods composed of stacked rings. These results may suggest distinct roles for different oligomeric forms of VP40 in the filovirus life cycle

  7. Bacterial flagellar capping proteins adopt diverse oligomeric states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postel, Sandra; Deredge, Daniel; Bonsor, Daniel A.; Yu, Xiong; Diederichs, Kay; Helmsing, Saskia; Vromen, Aviv; Friedler, Assaf; Hust, Michael; Egelman, Edward H.; Beckett, Dorothy; Wintrode, Patrick L.; Sundberg, Eric J. (UV); (Braunschweig); (Maryland-MED); (Konstanz); (Maryland); (Hebrew)

    2016-09-24

    Flagella are crucial for bacterial motility and pathogenesis. The flagellar capping protein (FliD) regulates filament assembly by chaperoning and sorting flagellin (FliC) proteins after they traverse the hollow filament and exit the growing flagellum tip. In the absence of FliD, flagella are not formed, resulting in impaired motility and infectivity. Here, we report the 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of FliD fromPseudomonas aeruginosa, the first high-resolution structure of any FliD protein from any bacterium. Using this evidence in combination with a multitude of biophysical and functional analyses, we find thatPseudomonasFliD exhibits unexpected structural similarity to other flagellar proteins at the domain level, adopts a unique hexameric oligomeric state, and depends on flexible determinants for oligomerization. Considering that the flagellin filaments on which FliD oligomers are affixed vary in protofilament number between bacteria, our results suggest that FliD oligomer stoichiometries vary across bacteria to complement their filament assemblies.

  8. Zn(2+) site engineering at the oligomeric interface of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard-Nielsen, Kristine; Norregaard, Lene; Hastrup, Hanne

    2002-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters exist as homo-oligomeric proteins. However, the functional implication of this oligomerization remains unclear. Here we demonstrate the engineering of a Zn(2+) binding site at the predicted dimeric interface...

  9. Synaptic transmission block by presynaptic injection of oligomeric amyloid beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Herman; Yu, Eunah; Pigino, Gustavo; Hernandez, Alejandro I.; Kim, Natalia; Moreira, Jorge E.; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2009-01-01

    Early Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathophysiology is characterized by synaptic changes induced by degradation products of amyloid precursor protein (APP). The exact mechanisms of such modulation are unknown. Here, we report that nanomolar concentrations of intraaxonal oligomeric (o)Aβ42, but not oAβ40 or extracellular oAβ42, acutely inhibited synaptic transmission at the squid giant synapse. Further characterization of this phenotype demonstrated that presynaptic calcium currents were unaffected. However, electron microscopy experiments revealed diminished docked synaptic vesicles in oAβ42-microinjected terminals, without affecting clathrin-coated vesicles. The molecular events of this modulation involved casein kinase 2 and the synaptic vesicle rapid endocytosis pathway. These findings open the possibility of a new therapeutic target aimed at ameliorating synaptic dysfunction in AD. PMID:19304802

  10. Fluorescence reporters for Hfq oligomerization and RNA annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for detecting protein-protein, protein-RNA and RNA-RNA interactions, requiring only nanomolar concentrations of labeled components. Fluorescence anisotropy provides information about the assembly of multi-subunit proteins, while molecular beacons provide a sensitive and quantitative reporter for base pairing between complementary RNAs. Here we present a detailed protocol for labeling Hfq protein with cyanine 3-maleimide and dansyl chloride to study the protein oligomerization and RNA binding by semi-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and fluorescence anisotropy. We also present a detailed protocol for measuring the rate of annealing between a molecular beacon and a target RNA in the presence of Hfq using a stopped-flow spectrometer. PMID:25579597

  11. Electron Microscopy Structural Insights into CPAP Oligomeric Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez-Cabrera, Ana L; Delgado, Sandra; Gil-Carton, David

    2017-01-01

    Centrosomal P4.1-associated protein (CPAP) is a cell cycle regulated protein fundamental for centrosome assembly and centriole elongation. In humans, the region between residues 897-1338 of CPAP mediates interactions with other proteins and includes a homodimerization domain. CPAP mutations cause...... into clearly different regular 3D maps (putatively corresponding to dimers and tetramers) and direct observation of individual images representing other complexes of HsCPAP(897-1338) (i.e., putative flexible monomers and higher-order multimers), we report a dynamic oligomeric behavior of this protein, where...... of different oligomers of CPAP, suggesting further insights to understand how this protein works, contributing to the elucidation of control mechanisms for centriole biogenesis....

  12. Diversity and evolutionary relationship of nucleotide binding site ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    site-encoding disease-resistance gene analogues in sweet potato. (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) ... terminal domain of the protein, this class of R-genes can be subdivided into TIR ... from young leaflets using the modified 2.0% (w/v) cetyl trimethyl ...

  13. Effects of Glycine, Water, Ammonia, and Ammonium Bicarbonate on the Oligomerization of Methionine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2017-06-01

    The abiotic oligomerization of amino acids may have created primordial, protein-like biological catalysts on the early Earth. Previous studies have proposed and evaluated the potential of diagenesis for the amino acid oligomerization, simulating the formation of peptides that include glycine, alanine, and valine, separately. However, whether such conditions can promote the formation of peptides composed of multiple amino acids remains unclear. Furthermore, the chemistry of pore water in sediments should affect the oligomerization and degradation of amino acids and oligomers, but these effects have not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the effects of water, ammonia, ammonium bicarbonate, pH, and glycine on the oligomerization and degradation of methionine under high pressure (150 MPa) and high temperature conditions (175 °C) for 96 h. Methionine is more difficult to oligomerize than glycine and methionine dimer was formed in the incubation of dry powder of methionine. Methionine oligomers as long as trimers, as well as methionylglycine and glycylmethionine, were formed under every condition with these additional compounds. Among the compounds tested, the oligomerization reaction rate was accelerated by the presence of water and by an increase in pH. Ammonia also increased the oligomerization rate but consumed methionine by side reactions and resulted in the rapid degradation of methionine and its peptides. Similarly, glycine accelerated the oligomerization rate of methionine and the degradation of methionine, producing water, ammonia, and bicarbonate through its decomposition. With Gly, heterogeneous dimers (methionylglycine and glycylmethionine) were formed in greater amounts than with other additional compounds although smaller amount of these heterogeneous dimers were formed with other additional compounds. These results suggest that accelerated reaction rates induced by water and co-existing reactive compounds promote the oligomerization

  14. Thermal Degradation Mechanism of a Thermostable Polyester Stabilized with an Open-Cage Oligomeric Silsesquioxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Bautista

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A polyester composite was prepared through the polymerization of an unsaturated ester resin with styrene and an open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane with methacrylate groups. The effect of the open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane on the thermal stability of the thermostable polyester was studied using both thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The results showed that the methacryl oligomeric silsesquioxane improved the thermal stability of the polyester. The decomposition mechanism of the polyester/oligomer silsesquioxane composite was proposed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis of the volatiles.

  15. One motif to bind them: A small-XXX-small motif affects transmembrane domain 1 oligomerization, function, localization, and cross-talk between two yeast GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Antonia; Forfar, Rachel; Weston, Cathryn; Bowsher, Leo; Upton, Graham J G; Reynolds, Christopher A; Ladds, Graham; Dixon, Ann M

    2014-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cell-surface receptors in mammals and facilitate a range of physiological responses triggered by a variety of ligands. GPCRs were thought to function as monomers, however it is now accepted that GPCR homo- and hetero-oligomers also exist and influence receptor properties. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe GPCR Mam2 is a pheromone-sensing receptor involved in mating and has previously been shown to form oligomers in vivo. The first transmembrane domain (TMD) of Mam2 contains a small-XXX-small motif, overrepresented in membrane proteins and well-known for promoting helix-helix interactions. An ortholog of Mam2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ste2, contains an analogous small-XXX-small motif which has been shown to contribute to receptor homo-oligomerization, localization and function. Here we have used experimental and computational techniques to characterize the role of the small-XXX-small motif in function and assembly of Mam2 for the first time. We find that disruption of the motif via mutagenesis leads to reduction of Mam2 TMD1 homo-oligomerization and pheromone-responsive cellular signaling of the full-length protein. It also impairs correct targeting to the plasma membrane. Mutation of the analogous motif in Ste2 yielded similar results, suggesting a conserved mechanism for assembly. Using co-expression of the two fungal receptors in conjunction with computational models, we demonstrate a functional change in G protein specificity and propose that this is brought about through hetero-dimeric interactions of Mam2 with Ste2 via the complementary small-XXX-small motifs. This highlights the potential of these motifs to affect a range of properties that can be investigated in other GPCRs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Interaction among Saccharomyces cerevisiae pheromone receptors during endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-I Chang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates endocytosis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor receptor and the role that receptor oligomerization plays in this process. α-factor receptor contains signal sequences in the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain that are essential for ligand-mediated endocytosis. In an endocytosis complementation assay, we found that oligomeric complexes of the receptor undergo ligand-mediated endocytosis when the α-factor binding site and the endocytosis signal sequences are located in different receptors. Both in vitro and in vivo assays suggested that ligand-induced conformational changes in one Ste2 subunit do not affect neighboring subunits. Therefore, recognition of the endocytosis signal sequence and recognition of the ligand-induced conformational change are likely to be two independent events.

  17. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viguerie, N.; Tahiri-Jouti, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Clerc, P.; Logsdon, C.; Svoboda, M.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A.

    1988-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of 125 I-[Tyr 11 ]Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 ± 20 fmol/10 6 cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking 125 I-[Tyr 11 ]somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein N i to inhibit adenylate cyclase

  18. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  19. Diverse oligomeric states of CEACAM IgV domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsor, Daniel A; Günther, Sebastian; Beadenkopf, Robert; Beckett, Dorothy; Sundberg, Eric J

    2015-11-03

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) comprise a large family of cell surface adhesion molecules that bind to themselves and other family members to carry out numerous cellular functions, including proliferation, signaling, differentiation, tumor suppression, and survival. They also play diverse and significant roles in immunity and infection. The formation of CEACAM oligomers is caused predominantly by interactions between their N-terminal IgV domains. Although X-ray crystal structures of CEACAM IgV domain homodimers have been described, how CEACAMs form heterodimers or remain monomers is poorly understood. To address this key aspect of CEACAM function, we determined the crystal structures of IgV domains that form a homodimeric CEACAM6 complex, monomeric CEACAM8, and a heterodimeric CEACAM6-CEACAM8 complex. To confirm and quantify these interactions in solution, we used analytical ultracentrifugation to measure the dimerization constants of CEACAM homodimers and isothermal titration calorimetry to determine the thermodynamic parameters and binding affinities of CEACAM heterodimers. We found the CEACAM6-CEACAM8 heterodimeric state to be substantially favored energetically relative to the CEACAM6 homodimer. Our data provide a molecular basis for the adoption of the diverse oligomeric states known to exist for CEACAMs and suggest ways in which CEACAM6 and CEACAM8 regulate the biological functions of one another, as well as of additional CEACAMs with which they interact, both in cis and in trans.

  20. Free-energy landscape of protein oligomerization from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barducci, Alessandro; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Prakash, Meher K.; Parrinello, Michele

    2013-01-01

    In the realm of protein–protein interactions, the assembly process of homooligomers plays a fundamental role because the majority of proteins fall into this category. A comprehensive understanding of this multistep process requires the characterization of the driving molecular interactions and the transient intermediate species. The latter are often short-lived and thus remain elusive to most experimental investigations. Molecular simulations provide a unique tool to shed light onto these complex processes complementing experimental data. Here we combine advanced sampling techniques, such as metadynamics and parallel tempering, to characterize the oligomerization landscape of fibritin foldon domain. This system is an evolutionarily optimized trimerization motif that represents an ideal model for experimental and computational mechanistic studies. Our results are fully consistent with previous experimental nuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic data, but they provide a unique insight into fibritin foldon assembly. In particular, our simulations unveil the role of nonspecific interactions and suggest that an interplay between thermodynamic bias toward native structure and residual conformational disorder may provide a kinetic advantage. PMID:24248370

  1. Exceptionally High Electric Double Layer Capacitances of Oligomeric Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Michio; Shimizu, Sunao; Sotoike, Rina; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Itoh, Yoshimitsu; Aida, Takuzo

    2017-11-15

    Electric double layer (EDL) capacitors are promising as next-generation energy accumulators if their capacitances and operation voltages are both high. However, only few electrolytes can simultaneously fulfill these two requisites. Here we report that an oligomeric ionic liquid such as IL4 TFSI with four imidazolium ion units in its structure provides a wide electrochemical window of ∼5.0 V, similar to monomeric ionic liquids. Furthermore, electrochemical impedance measurements using Au working electrodes demonstrated that IL4 TFSI exhibits an exceptionally high EDL capacitance of ∼66 μF/cm 2 , which is ∼6 times as high as those of monomeric ionic liquids so far reported. We also found that an EDL-based field effect transistor (FET) using IL4 TFSI as a gate dielectric material and SrTiO 3 as a channel material displays a very sharp transfer curve with an enhanced carrier accumulation capability of ∼64 μF/cm 2 , as determined by Hall-effect measurements.

  2. Preparation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane based imprinted monolith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Chen, Xiu-Xiu; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2015-12-18

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was successfully applied, for the first time, to prepare imprinted monolithic column with high porosity and good permeability. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized with a mixture of PSS-(1-Propylmethacrylate)-heptaisobutyl substituted (MA 0702), naproxon (template), 4-vinylpyridine, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4). The influence of synthesis parameters on the retention factor and imprinting effect, including the amount of MA 0702, the ratio of template to monomer, and the ratio of monomer to crosslinker, was investigated. The greatest imprinting factor on the imprinted monolithic column prepared with MA 0702 was 22, about 10 times higher than that prepared in absence of POSS. The comparisons between MIP monoliths synthesized with POSS and without POSS were made in terms of permeability, column efficiency, surface morphology and pore size distribution. In addition, thermodynamic and Van Deemter analysis were used to evaluate the POSS-based MIP monolith. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing heterogeneity in oligomeric AAA+ machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoeva, Tatyana A

    2017-03-01

    ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities (AAA+ ATPases) are molecular motors that use the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to remodel their target macromolecules. The majority of these ATPases form ring-shaped hexamers in which the active sites are located at the interfaces between neighboring subunits. Structural changes initiate in an active site and propagate to distant motor parts that interface and reshape the target macromolecules, thereby performing mechanical work. During the functioning cycle, the AAA+ motor transits through multiple distinct states. Ring architecture and placement of the catalytic sites at the intersubunit interfaces allow for a unique level of coordination among subunits of the motor. This in turn results in conformational differences among subunits and overall asymmetry of the motor ring as it functions. To date, a large amount of structural information has been gathered for different AAA+ motors, but even for the most characterized of them only a few structural states are known and the full mechanistic cycle cannot be yet reconstructed. Therefore, the first part of this work will provide a broad overview of what arrangements of AAA+ subunits have been structurally observed focusing on diversity of ATPase oligomeric ensembles and heterogeneity within the ensembles. The second part of this review will concentrate on methods that assess structural and functional heterogeneity among subunits of AAA+ motors, thus bringing us closer to understanding the mechanism of these fascinating molecular motors.

  4. Antibodies against alpha-synuclein reduce oligomerization in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Näsström

    Full Text Available Recent research implicates soluble aggregated forms of α-synuclein as neurotoxic species with a central role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and related disorders. The pathway by which α-synuclein aggregates is believed to follow a step-wise pattern, in which dimers and smaller oligomers are initially formed. Here, we used H4 neuroglioma cells expressing α-synuclein fused to hemi:GFP constructs to study the effects of α-synuclein monoclonal antibodies on the early stages of aggregation, as quantified by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation assay. Widefield and confocal microscopy revealed that cells treated for 48 h with monoclonal antibodies internalized antibodies to various degrees. C-terminal and oligomer-selective α-synuclein antibodies reduced the extent of α-synuclein dimerization/oligomerization, as indicated by decreased GFP fluorescence signal. Furthermore, ELISA measurements on lysates and conditioned media from antibody treated cells displayed lower α-synuclein levels compared to untreated cells, suggesting increased protein turnover. Taken together, our results propose that extracellular administration of monoclonal antibodies can modify or inhibit early steps in the aggregation process of α-synuclein, thus providing further support for passive immunization against diseases with α-synuclein pathology.

  5. GPR17: Molecular modeling and dynamics studies of the 3-D structure and purinergic ligand binding features in comparison with P2Y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranghino Graziella

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GPR17 is a G-protein-coupled receptor located at intermediate phylogenetic position between two distinct receptor families: the P2Y and CysLT receptors for extracellular nucleotides and cysteinyl-LTs, respectively. We previously showed that GPR17 can indeed respond to both classes of endogenous ligands and to synthetic compounds active at the above receptor families, thus representing the first fully characterized non-peptide "hybrid" GPCR. In a rat brain focal ischemia model, the selective in vivo knock down of GPR17 by anti-sense technology or P2Y/CysLT antagonists reduced progression of ischemic damage, thus highlighting GPR17 as a novel therapeutic target for stroke. Elucidation of the structure of GPR17 and of ligand binding mechanisms are the necessary steps to obtain selective and potent drugs for this new potential target. On this basis, a 3-D molecular model of GPR17 embedded in a solvated phospholipid bilayer and refined by molecular dynamics simulations has been the first aim of this study. To explore the binding mode of the "purinergic" component of the receptor, the endogenous agonist UDP and two P2Y receptor antagonists demonstrated to be active on GPR17 (MRS2179 and cangrelor were then modeled on the receptor. Results Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that GPR17 nucleotide binding pocket is similar to that described for the other P2Y receptors, although only one of the three basic residues that have been typically involved in ligand recognition is conserved (Arg255. The binding pocket is enclosed between the helical bundle and covered at the top by EL2. Driving interactions are H-bonds and salt bridges between the 6.55 and 6.52 residues and the phosphate moieties of the ligands. An "accessory" binding site in a region formed by the EL2, EL3 and the Nt was also found. Conclusion Nucleotide binding to GPR17 occurs on the same receptor regions identified for already known P2Y receptors. Agonist

  6. Oligomerization of optically active N-(4-hydroxyphenylmandelamide in the presence of β-cyclodextrin and the minor role of chirality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Ritter

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative oligomerization of a chiral mandelamide derivative (N-(4-hydroxyphenylmandelamide, 1 was performed in the presence of horseradish peroxidase, laccase and N,N'-bis(salicylideneethylenediamine-iron(II to obtain chiral oligophenols 2. The low enantioselectivity of the enzymatic catalyzed asymmetric enantiomer-differentiating oligomerizations was investigated. In addition, the poor influence of cyclodextrin on the enantioselectivity of enzymatic catalyzed asymmetric enantiomer-differentiating oligomerizations was studied.

  7. Morphology and Phase Transitions in Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene Triblock Copolymer Grafted with Isobutyl Substituted Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drazowski, Daniel B; Lee, Andre; Haddad, Timothy S

    2007-01-01

    Two symmetric triblock polystyrene-butadiene-polystyrene (SBS) copolymers with different styrene content were grafted with varying amounts of isobutyl-substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules...

  8. Morphology and Phase Transitions in Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene Triblock Copolymer Grafted with Isobutyl Substituted Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drazkowski, Daniel B; Lee, Andre; Haddad, Timothy S

    2006-01-01

    Two symmetric triblock polystyrene-butadiene-polystyrene (SBS) copolymers with different styrene content were grafted with varying amounts of isobutyl-substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules...

  9. Purification and characterization of the V1 vasopressin receptor from rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, J.B.; Dickey, B.F.; Attisano, C.; Fine, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    The rat liver V1 vasopressin receptor was purified approximately 21,000-fold from rat liver microsomes. The receptor was solubilized from membranes using the zwitterionic detergent CHAPS (3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate). Since the V1 receptor loses its ability to bind ligand when solubilized, the authors devised a liposome reconstitution system to assay vasopressin binding activity during purification. The purified receptor exhibits a K/sub d/ of 6 nm, when, prior to solubilization, the membranes were exposed to 1 μm vasopressin. This resulted in the association of a pertussis-toxin insensitive guanine-nucleotide binding protein with the receptor during most of the purification procedure. The authors are further characterizing the V1-associated G-proteins. In the absence of this association, the receptor has a K/sub d/ of 30 nM. Crosslinking of 125 I-vasopressin to a partially purified preparation of receptor demonstrated that the receptor had a molecular weight of approximately 68,000 under reducing conditions, and 58,000 under non-reducing conditions. The purification procedure may prove useful in purifying a number of small peptide hormone receptors (e.g., bradykinin, angiotensin II) and perhaps their associated G-proteins as well

  10. The neuroprotective effects of milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 against oligomeric amyloid β toxicity

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    Li Endong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatidylserine receptor is a key molecule that mediates the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8 is a phosphatidylserine receptor that is expressed on various macrophage lineage cells, including microglia in the central nervous system (CNS. Targeted clearance of degenerated neurons by microglia is essential to maintain healthy neural networks. We previously showed that the CX3C chemokine fractalkine is secreted from degenerated neurons and accelerates microglial clearance of neuronal debris via inducing the release of MFG-E8. However, the mechanisms by which microglia produce MFG-E8 and the precise functions of MFG-E8 are unknown. Methods The release of MFG-E8 from microglia treated with conditioned medium from neurons exposed to neurotoxic substances, glutamate or oligomeric amyloid β (oAβ was measured by ELISA. The neuroprotective effects of MFG-E8 and MFG-E8 − induced microglial phagocytosis of oAβ were assessed by immunocytochemistry. The effects of MFG-E8 on the production of the anti-oxidative enzyme hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1 were determined by ELISA and immunocytochemisty. Results MFG-E8 was induced in microglia treated with conditioned medium from neurons that had been exposed to neurotoxicants, glutamate or oAβ. MFG-E8 significantly attenuated oAβ-induced neuronal cell death in a primary neuron − microglia coculture system. Microglial phagocytosis of oAβ was accelerated by MFG-E8 treatment due to increased CD47 expression in the absence of neurotoxic molecule production, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide, and glutamate. MFG-E8 − treated microglia induced nuclear factor E(2 − related factor 2 (Nrf2 − mediated HO-1 production, which also contributed to neuroprotection. Conclusions These results suggest that microglia release MFG-E8 in response to signals from degenerated neurons and that MFG-E8 protects oAβ-induced neuronal cell death

  11. Forced unbinding of GPR17 ligands from wild type and R255I mutant receptor models through a computational approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fantucci Piercarlo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GPR17 is a hybrid G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR activated by two unrelated ligand families, extracellular nucleotides and cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysteinyl-LTs, and involved in brain damage and repair. Its exploitment as a target for novel neuro-reparative strategies depends on the elucidation of the molecular determinants driving binding of purinergic and leukotrienic ligands. Here, we applied docking and molecular dynamics simulations (MD to analyse the binding and the forced unbinding of two GPR17 ligands (the endogenous purinergic agonist UDP and the leukotriene receptor antagonist pranlukast from both the wild-type (WT receptor and a mutant model, where a basic residue hypothesized to be crucial for nucleotide binding had been mutated (R255I to Ile. Results MD suggested that GPR17 nucleotide binding pocket is enclosed between the helical bundle and extracellular loop (EL 2. The driving interaction involves R255 and the UDP phosphate moiety. To support this hypothesis, steered MD experiments showed that the energy required to unbind UDP is higher for the WT receptor than for R255I. Three potential binding sites for pranlukast where instead found and analysed. In one of its preferential docking conformations, pranlukast tetrazole group is close to R255 and phenyl rings are placed into a subpocket highly conserved among GPCRs. Pulling forces developed to break polar and aromatic interactions of pranlukast were comparable. No differences between the WT receptor and the R255I receptor were found for the unbinding of pranlukast. Conclusions These data thus suggest that, in contrast to which has been hypothesized for nucleotides, the lack of the R255 residue doesn't affect the binding of pranlukast a crucial role for R255 in binding of nucleotides to GPR17. Aromatic interactions are instead likely to play a predominant role in the recognition of pranlukast, suggesting that two different binding subsites are present on GPR17.

  12. A fluorimetric readout reporting the kinetics of nucleotide-induced human ribonucleotide reductase oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan; Lin, Hongyu; Wisitpitthaya, Somsinee; Blessing, William A; Aye, Yimon

    2014-11-24

    Human ribonucleotide reductase (hRNR) is a target of nucleotide chemotherapeutics in clinical use. The nucleotide-induced oligomeric regulation of hRNR subunit α is increasingly being recognized as an innate and drug-relevant mechanism for enzyme activity modulation. In the presence of negative feedback inhibitor dATP and leukemia drug clofarabine nucleotides, hRNR-α assembles into catalytically inert hexameric complexes, whereas nucleotide effectors that govern substrate specificity typically trigger α-dimerization. Currently, both knowledge of and tools to interrogate the oligomeric assembly pathway of RNR in any species in real time are lacking. We therefore developed a fluorimetric assay that reliably reports on oligomeric state changes of α with high sensitivity. The oligomerization-directed fluorescence quenching of hRNR-α, covalently labeled with two fluorophores, allows for direct readout of hRNR dimeric and hexameric states. We applied the newly developed platform to reveal the timescales of α self-assembly, driven by the feedback regulator dATP. This information is currently unavailable, despite the pharmaceutical relevance of hRNR oligomeric regulation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Biocatalytically Oligomerized Epicatechin with Potent and Specific Anti-proliferative Activity for Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaswamy Nagarajan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Catechins, naturally occurring flavonoids derived from wine and green tea, are known to exhibit multiple health benefits. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is one of the most widely investigated catechins, but its efficacy in cancer therapy is still inconsistent and limited. The poor stability of EGCG has contributed to the disparity in the reported anti-cancer activity and other beneficial properties. Here we report an innovative enzymatic strategy for the oligomerization of catechins (specifically epicatechin that yields stable, water-soluble oligomerized epicatechins with enhanced and highly specific anti-proliferative activity for human breast cancer cells. This one-pot oxidative oligomerization is carried out in ambient conditions using Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP as a catalyst yielding water-soluble oligo(epicatechins. The oligomerized epicatechins obtained exhibit excellent growth inhibitory effects against human breast cancer cells with greater specificity towards growth-inhibiting cancer cells as opposed to normal cells, achieving a high therapeutic differential. Our studies indicate that water-soluble oligomeric epicatechins surpass EGCG in stability, selectivity and efficacy at lower doses.

  14. Transient oligomerization of the SARS-CoV N protein--implication for virus ribonucleoprotein packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-ke; Chen, Chia-Min Michael; Chiang, Ming-hui; Hsu, Yen-lan; Huang, Tai-huang

    2013-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) phosphoprotein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) packages the viral genome into a helical ribonucleocapsid and plays a fundamental role during viral self-assembly. The N protein consists of two structural domains interspersed between intrinsically disordered regions and dimerizes through the C-terminal structural domain (CTD). A key activity of the protein is the ability to oligomerize during capsid formation by utilizing the dimer as a building block, but the structural and mechanistic bases of this activity are not well understood. By disulfide trapping technique we measured the amount of transient oligomers of N protein mutants with strategically located cysteine residues and showed that CTD acts as a primary transient oligomerization domain in solution. The data is consistent with the helical oligomer packing model of N protein observed in crystal. A systematic study of the oligomerization behavior revealed that altering the intermolecular electrostatic repulsion through changes in solution salt concentration or phosphorylation-mimicking mutations affects oligomerization propensity. We propose a biophysical mechanism where electrostatic repulsion acts as a switch to regulate N protein oligomerization.

  15. Transient oligomerization of the SARS-CoV N protein--implication for virus ribonucleoprotein packaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-ke Chang

    Full Text Available The nucleocapsid (N phosphoprotein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV packages the viral genome into a helical ribonucleocapsid and plays a fundamental role during viral self-assembly. The N protein consists of two structural domains interspersed between intrinsically disordered regions and dimerizes through the C-terminal structural domain (CTD. A key activity of the protein is the ability to oligomerize during capsid formation by utilizing the dimer as a building block, but the structural and mechanistic bases of this activity are not well understood. By disulfide trapping technique we measured the amount of transient oligomers of N protein mutants with strategically located cysteine residues and showed that CTD acts as a primary transient oligomerization domain in solution. The data is consistent with the helical oligomer packing model of N protein observed in crystal. A systematic study of the oligomerization behavior revealed that altering the intermolecular electrostatic repulsion through changes in solution salt concentration or phosphorylation-mimicking mutations affects oligomerization propensity. We propose a biophysical mechanism where electrostatic repulsion acts as a switch to regulate N protein oligomerization.

  16. Purification of the active C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a receptor - G sub i complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollins, T.E.; Siciliano, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Cianciarulo, D.N.; Bonilla-Argudo, V.; Collier, K.; Springer, M.S. (Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Lab., Rahway, NJ (United States))

    1991-02-01

    The authors have isolated, in an active state, the C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The purification was achieved in a single step using a C5a affinity column in which the C5a molecule was coupled to the resin through its N terminus. The purified receptor, like the crude solubilized molecule, exhibited a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a K{sub d} of 30 pM. Further, the binding of C5a retained its sensitivity to guanine nucleotides, implying that the purified receptor contained a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of three polypeptides with molecular masses of 42, 40, and 36 kDa, which were determined to be the C5a-binding subunit and the {alpha} and {beta} subunits of G{sub i}, respectively. The 36- and 40-kDa polypeptides were identified by immunoblotting and by the ability of pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate the 40-kDa molecule. These results confirm their earlier hypothesis that the receptor exists as a complex with a G protein in the presence or absence of C5a. The tight coupling between the receptor and G protein should make possible the identification of the G protein(s) involved in the transduction pathways used by C5a to produce its many biological effects.

  17. Purification of the active C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a receptor - Gi complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollins, T.E.; Siciliano, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Cianciarulo, D.N.; Bonilla-Argudo, V.; Collier, K.; Springer, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated, in an active state, the C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The purification was achieved in a single step using a C5a affinity column in which the C5a molecule was coupled to the resin through its N terminus. The purified receptor, like the crude solubilized molecule, exhibited a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a K d of 30 pM. Further, the binding of C5a retained its sensitivity to guanine nucleotides, implying that the purified receptor contained a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of three polypeptides with molecular masses of 42, 40, and 36 kDa, which were determined to be the C5a-binding subunit and the α and β subunits of G i , respectively. The 36- and 40-kDa polypeptides were identified by immunoblotting and by the ability of pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate the 40-kDa molecule. These results confirm their earlier hypothesis that the receptor exists as a complex with a G protein in the presence or absence of C5a. The tight coupling between the receptor and G protein should make possible the identification of the G protein(s) involved in the transduction pathways used by C5a to produce its many biological effects

  18. Reactive bay functionalized perylene monoimide-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane organic electronic dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangatia Lodrick Makokha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation-induced quenching is particularly detrimental in perylene diimides, which are characterized by a near-unity fluorescence quantum yield in solution but are far less emissive in the solid state. Previously, perylene diimide has been improved by linking it to the inorganic cage of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes. As a further study on perylene diimidepolyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes, we report on a double functionalized molecular structure, which can be used for substitution at the bay area and as a side group in other materials. Typical solution absorption and emission features of the perylene diimide fragment have been observed in this new reactive perylene diimide-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane. Moreover, reduced stacking during aggregation and spherical particles exhibiting solid fluorescence have been obtained. Organic semiconducting material with enhanced solid state photophysical properties, like solid fluorescence is a subject of great interest owing to its possible high-tech applications in optoelectronic devices.

  19. Transient structural distortion of metal-free Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase triggers aberrant oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Smith, Melanie H; Schulz, Eike

    2009-01-01

    remained enigmatic, however, as is the case in other protein-misfolding diseases. Here, we target the critical conformational change that defines the earliest step toward aggregation. Using nuclear spin relaxation dispersion experiments, we identified a short-lived (0.4 ms) and weakly populated (0.......7%) conformation of metal-depleted SOD1 that triggers aberrant oligomerization. This excited state emanates from the folded ground state and is suppressed by metal binding, but is present in both the disulfide-oxidized and disulfide-reduced forms of the protein. Our results pinpoint a perturbed region......Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease linked to the misfolding of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). ALS-related defects in SOD1 result in a gain of toxic function that coincides with aberrant oligomerization. The structural events triggering oligomerization have...

  20. Controlling amyloid-beta peptide(1-42) oligomerization and toxicity by fluorinated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Ana M; Cardoso, Isabel; Pereira, M Carmo; Coelho, Manuel A N; Saraiva, Maria João; Möhwald, Helmuth; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2010-09-03

    The amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) is a major fibrillar component of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer's disease brains and is related to the pathogenesis of the disease. Soluble oligomers that precede fibril formation have been proposed as the main neurotoxic species that contributes to neurodegeneration and dementia. We hypothesize that oligomerization and cytotoxicity can be repressed by nanoparticles (NPs) that induce conformational changes in Abeta42. We show here that fluorinated and hydrogenated NPs with different abilities to change Abeta42 conformation influence oligomerization as assessed by atomic force microscopy, immunoblot and SDS-PAGE. Fluorinated NPs, which promote an increase in alpha-helical content, exert an antioligomeric effect, whereas hydrogenated analogues do not and lead to aggregation. Cytotoxicity assays confirmed our hypothesis by indicating that the conformational conversion of Abeta42 into an alpha-helical-enriched secondary structure also has antiapoptotic activity, thereby increasing the viability of cells treated with oligomeric species.

  1. Catalyst-controlled oligomerization for the collective synthesis of polypyrroloindoline natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Christopher R; Badillo, Joseph J; Lipshultz, Jeffrey M; Comito, Robert J; MacMillan, David W C

    2017-12-01

    In nature, many organisms generate large families of natural product metabolites that have related molecular structures as a means to increase functional diversity and gain an evolutionary advantage against competing systems within the same environment. One pathway commonly employed by living systems to generate these large classes of structurally related families is oligomerization, wherein a series of enzymatically catalysed reactions is employed to generate secondary metabolites by iteratively appending monomers to a growing serial oligomer chain. The polypyrroloindolines are an interesting class of oligomeric natural products that consist of multiple cyclotryptamine subunits. Herein we describe an iterative application of asymmetric copper catalysis towards the synthesis of six distinct oligomeric polypyrroloindoline natural products: hodgkinsine, hodgkinsine B, idiospermuline, quadrigemine H and isopsychotridine B and C. Given the customizable nature of the small-molecule catalysts employed, we demonstrate that this strategy is further amenable to the construction of quadrigemine H-type alkaloids not isolated previously from natural sources.

  2. N-(1-Pyrenyl Maleimide Induces Bak Oligomerization and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Jurkat Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Rong Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-(1-pyrenyl maleimide (NPM is a fluorescent reagent that is frequently used as a derivatization agent for the detection of thio-containing compounds. NPM has been shown to display a great differential cytotoxicity against hematopoietic cancer cells. In this study, the molecular mechanism by which NPM induces apoptosis was examined. Here, we show that treatment of Jurkat cells with NPM leads to Bak oligomerization, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm, and release of cytochrome C from mitochondria to cytosol. Induction of Bak oligomerization appears to play a critical role in NPM-induced apoptosis, as downregulation of Bak by shRNA significantly prevented NPM-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of caspase 8 by Z-IETD-FMK and/or depletion of Bid did not affect NPM-induced oligomerization of Bak. Taken together, these results suggest that NPM-induced apoptosis is mediated through a pathway that is independent of caspase-8 activation.

  3. Zn(2+) site engineering at the oligomeric interface of the dopamine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard-Nielsen, Kristine; Norregaard, Lene; Hastrup, Hanne; Javitch, Jonathan A; Gether, Ulrik

    2002-07-31

    Increasing evidence suggests that Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters exist as homo-oligomeric proteins. However, the functional implication of this oligomerization remains unclear. Here we demonstrate the engineering of a Zn(2+) binding site at the predicted dimeric interface of the dopamine transporter (DAT) corresponding to the external end of transmembrane segment 6. Upon binding to this site, which involves a histidine inserted in position 310 (V310H) and the endogenous Cys306 within the same DAT molecule, Zn(2+) potently inhibits [(3)H]dopamine uptake. These data provide indirect evidence that conformational changes critical for the translocation process may occur at the interface between two transporter molecules in the oligomeric structure.

  4. Neuronal low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 binds and endocytoses prion fibrils via receptor cluster 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jen, Angela; Parkyn, Celia J; Mootoosamy, Roy C

    2010-01-01

    For infectious prion protein (designated PrP(Sc)) to act as a template to convert normal cellular protein (PrP(C)) to its distinctive pathogenic conformation, the two forms of prion protein (PrP) must interact closely. The neuronal receptor that rapidly endocytoses PrP(C) is the low......-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We show here that on sensory neurons LRP1 is also the receptor that binds and rapidly endocytoses smaller oligomeric forms of infectious prion fibrils, and recombinant PrP fibrils. Although LRP1 binds two molecules of most ligands independently to its receptor...... both prion and LRP1 biology....

  5. osFP: a web server for predicting the oligomeric states of fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Saw; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Preeyanon, Likit; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-01

    Currently, monomeric fluorescent proteins (FP) are ideal markers for protein tagging. The prediction of oligomeric states is helpful for enhancing live biomedical imaging. Computational prediction of FP oligomeric states can accelerate the effort of protein engineering efforts of creating monomeric FPs. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first computational model for predicting and analyzing FP oligomerization directly from the amino acid sequence. After data curation, an exhaustive data set consisting of 397 non-redundant FP oligomeric states was compiled from the literature. Results from benchmarking of the protein descriptors revealed that the model built with amino acid composition descriptors was the top performing model with accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in excess of 80% and MCC greater than 0.6 for all three data subsets (e.g. training, tenfold cross-validation and external sets). The model provided insights on the important residues governing the oligomerization of FP. To maximize the benefit of the generated predictive model, it was implemented as a web server under the R programming environment. osFP affords a user-friendly interface that can be used to predict the oligomeric state of FP using the protein sequence. The advantage of osFP is that it is platform-independent meaning that it can be accessed via a web browser on any operating system and device. osFP is freely accessible at http://codes.bio/osfp/ while the source code and data set is provided on GitHub at https://github.com/chaninn/osFP/.Graphical Abstract.

  6. Guanine nucleotide regulatory protein co-purifies with the D2-dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senogles, S.E.; Caron, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The D 2 -dopamine receptor from bovine anterior pituitary was purified ∼1000 fold by affinity chromatography on CMOS-Sepharose. Reconstitution of the affinity-purified receptor into phospholipid vesicles revealed the presence of high and low affinity agonist sites as detected by N-n-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) competition experiments with 3 H-spiperone. High affinity agonist binding could be converted to the low affinity form by guanine nucleotides, indicating the presence of an endogenous guanine nucleotide binding protein (N protein) in the affinity-purified D 2 receptor preparations. Furthermore, this preparation contained an agonist-sensitive GTPase activity which was stimulated 2-3 fold over basal by 10 μM NPA. 35 S-GTPγS binding to these preparations revealed a stoichiometry of 0.4-0.7 mole N protein/mole receptor, suggesting the N protein may be specifically coupled with the purified D 2 -dopamine receptor and not present as a contaminant. Pertussis toxin treatment of the affinity purified receptor preparations prevented high affinity agonist binding, as well as agonist stimulation of the GTPase activity, presumably by inactivating the associated N protein. Pertussis toxin lead to the ADP-ribosylation of a protein of 39-40K on SDS-PAGE. These findings indicate that an endogenous N protein, N/sub i/ or N/sub o/, co-purifies with the D 2 -dopamine receptor which may reflect a precoupling of this receptor with an N protein within the membranes

  7. Inside-out signaling promotes dynamic changes in the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) oligomeric state to control its cell adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Prerna C; Lee, Hannah S W; Ming, Aaron Y K; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M; Yip, Christopher M; Rocheleau, Jonathan V; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2013-10-11

    Cell-cell contacts are fundamental to multicellular organisms and are subject to exquisite levels of control. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) can engage in both cis-homophilic (parallel) oligomerization and trans-homophilic (anti-parallel) binding. In this study, we establish that the CEACAM1 transmembrane domain has a propensity to form cis-dimers via the transmembrane-embedded (432)GXXXG(436) motif and that this basal state is overcome when activated calmodulin binds to the CEACAM1 cytoplasmic domain. Although mutation of the (432)GXXXG(436) motif reduced CEACAM1 oligomerization, it did not affect surface localization of the receptor or influence CEACAM1-dependent cellular invasion by the pathogenic Neisseria. The mutation did, however, have a striking effect on CEACAM1-dependent cellular aggregation, increasing both the kinetics of cell-cell association and the size of cellular aggregates formed. CEACAM1 association with tyrosine kinase c-Src and tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 was not affected by the (432)GXXXG(436) mutation, consistent with their association with the monomeric form of wild type CEACAM1. Collectively, our results establish that a dynamic oligomer-to-monomer shift in surface-expressed CEACAM1 facilitates trans-homophilic binding and downstream effector signaling.

  8. Methyl methacrylate oligomerically-modified clay and its poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xiaoxia; Jiang, David D.; Wilkie, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    A methyl methacrylate oligomerically-modified clay was used to prepare poly(methyl methacrylate) clay nanocomposites by melt blending and the effect of the clay loading level on the modified clay and corresponding nanocomposite was studied. These nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and cone calorimetry. The results show a mixed intercalated/delaminated morphology with good nanodispersion. The compatibility between the methylacrylate-subsituted clay and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are greatly improved compared to other oligomerically-modified clays

  9. Conformational detection of p53's oligomeric state by FlAsH Fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, Tawnya M.; Allen, Andrew C.; Ma, Wai Kit; Molloy, Rhett G.; Kettelkamp, Charisse N.; Dow, Caitlin A.; Gage, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is a critical checkpoint in prevention of tumor formation, and the function of p53 is dependent on proper formation of the active tetramer. In vitro studies have shown that p53 binds DNA most efficiently as a tetramer, though inactive p53 is predicted to be monomeric in vivo. We demonstrate that FlAsH binding can be used to distinguish between oligomeric states of p53, providing a potential tool to explore p53 oligomerization in vivo. The FlAsH tetra-cysteine ...

  10. 40 CFR 721.3100 - Oligomeric silicic acid ester compound with a hy-droxyl-al-kyla-mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oligomeric silicic acid ester compound with a hy-droxyl-al-kyla-mine. 721.3100 Section 721.3100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3100 Oligomeric silicic acid ester compound with a...

  11. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na+ channel interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na + channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) [G-protein(s)]. These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of [ 3 H] acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of [ 3 H]batrachotoxin to Na + channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced 22 Na + uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na + channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na + channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na + channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na + channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues

  12. Direct demonstration of guanine nucleotide sensitive receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide in the anterior lobe of the rat pituitary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agui, T.; Matsumoto, K.

    1990-01-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors were identified on the membranes from the rat anterior pituitary gland with [ 125 I]VIP. The dissociation constant (Kd) and the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) values were estimated from the competitive inhibition data. The Kd and Bmax values were 1.05 +/- 0.75 nM and 103 +/- 11 fmol/mg protein, respectively. The order of molar potency of related peptides to inhibit [ 125 I]VIP binding was VIP greater than peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) greater than secretin greater than glucagon. Glucagon was not effective to inhibit the binding. [ 125 I]VIP binding was effectively inhibited by the addition of guanine nucleotides. The order of molar potency to inhibit the binding was Gpp(NH)p greater than GTP greater than GDP greater than GMP greater than ATP. These results directly suggest the coupling of VIP receptors with guanine nucleotide binding proteins in the anterior pituitary gland

  13. Chromosomal organization of adrenergic receptor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang-Feng, T.L.; Xue, Feiyu; Zhong, Wuwei; Cotecchia, S.; Frielle, T.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Francke, U.

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptors (ARs) (subtypes α 1 , α 2 , β 1 , and β 2 ) are a prototypic family of guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-coupled receptors that mediate the physiological effects of the hormone epinephrine and the neurotransmitter norepinephrine. The authors have previously assigned the genes for β 2 -and α 2 -AR to human chromosomes 5 and 10, respectively. By Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, they have now mapped the α 1 -AR gene to chromosome 5q32→q34, the same position as β 2 -AR, and the β 1 -AR gene to chromosome 10q24→q26, the region where α 2 -AR, is located. In mouse, both α 2 -and β 1 -AR genes were assigned to chromosome 19, and the α 1 -AR locus was localized to chromosome 11. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis has shown that the α 1 -and β 2 -AR genes in humans are within 300 kilobases (kb) and the distance between the α 2 - and β 1 -AR genes is <225 kb. The proximity of these two pairs of AR genes and the sequence similarity that exists among all the ARs strongly suggest that they are evolutionarily related. Moreover, they likely arose from a common ancestral receptor gene and subsequently diverged through gene duplication and chromosomal duplication to perform their distinctive roles in mediation the physiological effects of catecholamines. The AR genes thus provide a paradigm for understanding the evolution of such structurally conserved yet functionally divergent families off receptor molecules

  14. Influence of oligomeric resins on traction and rolling resistance of silica tire treads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleugels, N.; Pille-Wolf, W.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2016-01-01

    This study concerns the silica-reinforcement of synthetic rubber compounds for passenger tire treads with the objective to gain insight into the beneficial effects of oligomeric resins, derived from natural and synthetic monomers, on the major tire performance factors: rolling resistance and (wet)

  15. Understanding the Influence of oligomeric resins on traction and rolling resistance of silica tire treads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleugels, N.; Pille-Wolf, W.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns the silica reinforcement of styrene–butadiene rubber compounds for passenger car tire treads, with the objective of gaining greater insight into the beneficial effects of oligomeric resins. The major tire performance factors predicted are rolling resistance and (wet) skid

  16. Influence of oligomeric resins on traction and rolling resistance of silica tire treads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleugels, N.; Pille-Wolf, W.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2013-01-01

    This study concerns the silica-reinforcement of synthetic rubber compounds for passenger tire treads with the objective to gain insight into the beneficial effects of oligomeric resins, derived from natural and synthetic monomers, on the major tire performance factors: Rolling Resistance and (Wet)

  17. Oligomerization of a Glucagon-like Peptide 1 Analog: Bridging Experiment and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Tine Maja; Sønderby, Pernille; Ryberg, Line A.

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analog, liraglutide, is a GLP-1 agonist and is used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. From a pharmaceutical perspective, it is important to know the oligomerization state of liraglutide with respect to stability. Compared to GLP-1...

  18. Cobalt Oxide on N-Doped Carbon for 1-Butene Oligomerization to Produce Linear Octenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Dongting [Department; Xu, Zhuoran [Department; Chada, Joseph P. [Department; Carrero, Carlos A. [Department; Rosenfeld, Devon C. [The Dow Chemical Company, 2301 N. Brazosport Boulevard, Freeport, Texas 77541-3257, United States; Rogers, Jessica L. [The Dow Chemical Company, 2301 N. Brazosport Boulevard, Freeport, Texas 77541-3257, United States; Hermans, Ive [Department; Huber, George W. [Department

    2017-10-02

    Cobalt oxide supported on N-doped carbon catalysts were investigated for 1-butene oligomerization. The materials were synthesized by treating activated carbon with nitric acid and subsequently with NH3 at 200, 400, 600, and 800 °C, followed by impregnation with cobalt. The 1-butene oligomerization selectivity increased with ammonia treatment temperature of the carbon support. The oligomerization selectivity of cobalt oxide on N-doped carbon synthesized at 800 °C (800A-CoOx/N-C) is 2.6 times higher than previously reported cobalt oxide on N-doped carbon synthesized with NH4OH (2A-CoOx/N-C). Over 70% of the butene dimers were linear C8 olefins for all catalysts. The oligomerization selectivity increased with 1-butene conversion. The catalysts were characterized by elemental analysis, N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nitrogen content of the catalysts increases with ammonia treatment temperature as confirmed by elemental analysis. The surface content of pyridinic nitrogen with a binding energy of 398.4 ± 0.1 eV increased with ammonia treatment temperature as evidenced by deconvolution of N 1s XPS spectra.

  19. Pro-inflammatory delipidizing cytokines reduce adiponectin secretion from human adipocytes without affecting adiponectin oligomerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Peter J.; van den Pangaart, Petra S.; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; Boon, Louis

    2007-01-01

    Adiponectin and, especially, its oligomeric complex composition have been suggested to be critical in determining insulin sensitivity. Pro-inflammatory cytokines play an important role in the development of insulin resistance in obesity and associated diseases. Therefore, we investigated the effect

  20. Mechanics of the mannitol transporter from Escherichia coli : substrate-probing and oligomeric structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Gertjan

    2006-01-01

    Gertjan Veldhuis bestudeerde de mannitoltransporter van Escherichia coli, EnzymeIImtl (EIImtl), om meer inzicht te krijgen in het bindingsmechanisme en de oligomere toestand van dit membraaneiwit. Hij concludeerde onder andere dat dimeer EIImtl één mannitol bindt, de dimeer zeer stabiel is en dat

  1. Cloning and expression of a human kidney cDNA for an α2-adrenergic receptor subtype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.W.; Kobilka, T.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Kobilka, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    An α 2 -adrenergic receptor subtype has been cloned from a human kidney cDNA library using the gene for the human platelet α 2 -adrenergic receptor as a probe. The deduced amino acid sequence resembles the human platelet α 2 -adrenergic receptor and is consistent with the structure of other members of he family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors. The cDNA was expressed in a mammalian cell line (COS-7), and the α 2 -adrenergic ligand [ 3 H]rauwolscine was bound. Competition curve analysis with a variety of adrenergic ligands suggests that this cDNA clone represents the α 2 B-adrenergic receptor. The gene for this receptor is on human chromosome 4, whereas the gene for the human platelet α 2 -adrenergic receptor (α 2 A) lies on chromosome 10. This ability to express the receptor in mammalian cells, free of other adrenergic receptor subtypes, should help in developing more selective α-adrenergic ligands

  2. Concentration-dependent oligomerization of cross-linked complexes between ferredoxin and ferredoxin–NADP+ reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimata-Ariga, Yoko; Kubota-Kawai, Hisako; Lee, Young-Ho; Muraki, Norifumi; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kurisu, Genji; Hase, Toshiharu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Cross-linked complexes of ferredoxin (Fd) and Fd–NADP + reductase form oligomers. •In the crystal structures, Fd- and FNR moieties swap across the molecules. •The complexes exhibit concentration-dependent oligomerization at sub-milimolar order. -- Abstract: Ferredoxin–NADP + reductase (FNR) forms a 1:1 complex with ferredoxin (Fd), and catalyzes the electron transfer between Fd and NADP + . In our previous study, we prepared a series of site-specifically cross-linked complexes of Fd and FNR, which showed diverse electron transfer properties. Here, we show that X-ray crystal structures of the two different Fd–FNR cross-linked complexes form oligomers by swapping Fd and FNR moieties across the molecules; one complex is a dimer from, and the other is a successive multimeric form. In order to verify whether these oligomeric structures are formed only in crystal, we investigated the possibility of the oligomerization of these complexes in solution. The mean values of the particle size of these cross-linked complexes were shown to increase with the rise of protein concentration at sub-milimolar order, whereas the size of dissociable wild-type Fd:FNR complex was unchanged as analyzed by dynamic light scattering measurement. The oligomerization products were detected by SDS–PAGE after chemical cross-linking of these complexes at the sub-milimolar concentrations. The extent and concentration-dependent profile of the oligomerizaion were differentiated between the two cross-linked complexes. These results show that these Fd–FNR cross-linked complexes exhibit concentration-dependent oligomerization, possibly through swapping of Fd and FNR moieties also in solution. These findings lead to the possibility that some native multi-domain proteins may present similar phenomenon in vivo

  3. Molecular basis of the functional heterogeneity of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numa, S.; Fukuda, K.; Kubo, T.; Maeda, A.; Akiba, I.; Bujo, H.; Nakai, J.; Mishina, M.; Higashida, H.

    1988-01-01

    The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) mediates a variety of cellular responses, including inhibition of adenylate cyclase, breakdown of phosphoinositides, and modulation of potassium channels, through the action of guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins). The question then arises as to whether multiple mAChR species exist that are responsible for the various biochemical and physiological effects. In fact, pharmacologically distinguishable forms of the mAChR occur in different tissues and have been provisionally classified into M 1 (I), M 2 cardiac (II), and M 2 glandular (III) subtypes on the basis of their difference in apparent affinity for antagonists. Here, the authors have made attempts to understand the molecular basis of the functional heterogeneity of the mAChR, using recombinant DNA technology

  4. Live cell imaging unveils multiple domain requirements for in vivo dimerization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presman, Diego M; Ogara, M Florencia; Stortz, Martín

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for life, but are also implicated in disease pathogenesis and may produce unwanted effects when given in high doses. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) transcriptional activity and clinical outcome have been linked to its oligomerization state. Although a point mutation wi...

  5. Structural requirements of acylated Gly-l-Ala-d-Glu analogs for activation of the innate immune receptor NOD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobec, Martina; Mlinarič-Raščan, Irena; Dolenc, Marija Sollner; Jakopin, Žiga

    2016-06-30

    The fragment of bacterial peptidoglycan muramyl dipeptide (MDP) has long been known for its adjuvant activity, however the underlying mechanism of this action has only recently been elucidated. It is ascribed to its agonist action on the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2). In spite of the pressing need for novel adjuvants for human use, this discovery is hampered, by not knowing the structural requirements underlying the immunostimulatory activity. We have investigated how minor modifications of hit compound acyl Gly-L-Ala-D-Glu derivative I modulate the molecular recognition by NOD2. A series of novel desmuramyldipeptides has been designed and synthesized leading to the identification of compound 16, in which the sugar moiety is replaced by a 6-phenylindole moiety, that exhibits the strongest NOD2 activation to date sans the carbohydrate moiety. The results have enabled a deeper understanding of the structural requirements of desmuramylpeptides for NOD2 activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA structure modulates the oligomerization properties of the AAV initiator protein Rep68.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mansilla-Soto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Rep68 is a multifunctional protein of the adeno-associated virus (AAV, a parvovirus that is mostly known for its promise as a gene therapy vector. In addition to its role as initiator in viral DNA replication, Rep68 is essential for site-specific integration of the AAV genome into human chromosome 19. Rep68 is a member of the superfamily 3 (SF3 helicases, along with the well-studied initiator proteins simian virus 40 large T antigen (SV40-LTag and bovine papillomavirus (BPV E1. Structurally, SF3 helicases share two domains, a DNA origin interaction domain (OID and an AAA(+ motor domain. The AAA(+ motor domain is also a structural feature of cellular initiators and it functions as a platform for initiator oligomerization. Here, we studied Rep68 oligomerization in vitro in the presence of different DNA substrates using a variety of biophysical techniques and cryo-EM. We found that a dsDNA region of the AAV origin promotes the formation of a complex containing five Rep68 subunits. Interestingly, non-specific ssDNA promotes the formation of a double-ring Rep68, a known structure formed by the LTag and E1 initiator proteins. The Rep68 ring symmetry is 8-fold, thus differing from the hexameric rings formed by the other SF3 helicases. However, similiar to LTag and E1, Rep68 rings are oriented head-to-head, suggesting that DNA unwinding by the complex proceeds bidirectionally. This novel Rep68 quaternary structure requires both the DNA binding and AAA(+ domains, indicating cooperativity between these regions during oligomerization in vitro. Our study clearly demonstrates that Rep68 can oligomerize through two distinct oligomerization pathways, which depend on both the DNA structure and cooperativity of Rep68 domains. These findings provide insight into the dynamics and oligomeric adaptability of Rep68 and serve as a step towards understanding the role of this multifunctional protein during AAV DNA replication and site-specific integration.

  7. AmTAR2: Functional characterization of a honeybee tyramine receptor stimulating adenylyl cyclase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reim, Tina; Balfanz, Sabine; Baumann, Arnd; Blenau, Wolfgang; Thamm, Markus; Scheiner, Ricarda

    2017-01-01

    The biogenic monoamines norepinephrine and epinephrine regulate important physiological functions in vertebrates. Insects such as honeybees do not synthesize these neuroactive substances. Instead, they employ octopamine and tyramine for comparable physiological functions. These biogenic amines activate specific guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Based on pharmacological data obtained on heterologously expressed receptors, α- and β-adrenergic-like octopamine receptors are better activated by octopamine than by tyramine. Conversely, GPCRs forming the type 1 tyramine receptor clade (synonymous to octopamine/tyramine receptors) are better activated by tyramine than by octopamine. More recently, receptors were characterized which are almost exclusively activated by tyramine, thus forming an independent type 2 tyramine receptor clade. Functionally, type 1 tyramine receptors inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity, leading to a decrease in intracellular cAMP concentration ([cAMP] i ). Type 2 tyramine receptors can mediate Ca 2+ signals or both Ca 2+ signals and effects on [cAMP] i . We here provide evidence that the honeybee tyramine receptor 2 (AmTAR2), when heterologously expressed in flpTM cells, exclusively causes an increase in [cAMP] i . The receptor displays a pronounced preference for tyramine over octopamine. Its activity can be blocked by a series of established antagonists, of which mianserin and yohimbine are most efficient. The functional characterization of two tyramine receptors from the honeybee, AmTAR1 (previously named AmTYR1) and AmTAR2, which respond to tyramine by changing cAMP levels in opposite direction, is an important step towards understanding the actions of tyramine in honeybee behavior and physiology, particularly in comparison to the effects of octopamine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of Membrane Receptors' Oligomers Using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer and Multiphoton Microscopy in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashish K.

    Investigating quaternary structure (oligomerization) of macromolecules (such as proteins and nucleic acids) in living systems (in vivo) has been a great challenge in biophysics, due to molecular diffusion, fluctuations in several biochemical parameters such as pH, quenching of fluorescence by oxygen (when fluorescence methods are used), etc. We studied oligomerization of membrane receptors in living cells by means of Fluorescence (Forster) Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent markers and two photon excitation fluorescence micro-spectroscopy. Using suitable FRET models, we determined the stoichiometry and quaternary structure of various macromolecular complexes. The proteins of interest for this work are : (1) sigma-1 receptor and (2) rhodopsin, are described as below. (1) Sigma-1 receptors are molecular chaperone proteins, which also regulate ion channels. S1R seems to be involved in substance abuse, as well as several diseases such as Alzheimer's. We studied S1R in the presence and absence of its ligands haloperidol (an antagonist) and pentazocine +/- (an agonist), and found that at low concentration they reside as a mixture of monomers and dimers and that they may form higher order oligomers at higher concentrations. (2) Rhodopsin is a prototypical G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and is directly involved in vision. GPCRs form a large family of receptors that participate in cell signaling by responding to external stimuli such as drugs, thus being a major drug target (more than 40% drugs target GPCRs). Their oligomerization has been largely controversial. Understanding this may help to understand the functional role of GPCRs oligomerization, and may lead to the discovery of more drugs targeting GPCR oligomers. It may also contribute toward finding a cure for Retinitis Pigmentosa, which is caused by a mutation (G188R) in rhodopsin, a disease which causes blindness and has no cure so far. Comparing healthy rhodopsin's oligomeric structure with that

  9. Screening of drugs inhibiting in vitro oligomerization of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase with a mutation causing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsuki Anzai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dominant mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 gene have been shown to cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SOD1-ALS. A major pathological hallmark of this disease is abnormal accumulation of mutant SOD1 oligomers in the affected spinal motor neurons. While no effective therapeutics for SOD1-ALS is currently available, SOD1 oligomerization will be a good target for developing cures of this disease. Recently, we have reproduced the formation of SOD1 oligomers abnormally cross-linked via disulfide bonds in a test tube. Using our in vitro model of SOD1 oligomerization, therefore, we screened 640 FDA-approved drugs for inhibiting the oligomerization of SOD1 proteins, and three effective classes of chemical compounds were identified. Those hit compounds will provide valuable information on the chemical structures for developing a novel drug candidate suppressing the abnormal oligomerization of mutant SOD1 and possibly curing the disease.

  10. Hydration effect on the electronic transport properties of oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong-Liang, Li; Huai-Zhi, Li; Yong, Ma; Guang-Ping, Zhang; Chuan-Kui, Wang

    2010-01-01

    A first-principles computational method based on the hybrid density functional theory is developed to simulate the electronic transport properties of oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecular junctions with H 2 O molecules accumulated in the vicinity as recently reported by Na et al. [Nanotechnology 18 424001 (2007)]. The numerical results show that the hydrogen bonds between the oxygen atoms of the oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecule and H 2 O molecules result in the localisation of the molecular orbitals and lead to the lower transition peaks. The H 2 O molecular chains accumulated in the vicinity of the molecular junction can not only change the electronic structure of the molecular junctions, but also open additional electronic transport pathways. The obvious influence of H 2 O molecules on the electronic structure of the molecular junction and its electronic transport properties is thus demonstrated. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  11. Anesthetic propofol attenuates the isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and Aβ oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiying Zhang

    Full Text Available Accumulation and deposition of β-amyloid protein (Aβ are the hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease. The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce caspase activation and increase Aβ accumulation. In addition, recent studies suggest that isoflurane may directly promote the formation of cytotoxic soluble Aβ oligomers, which are thought to be the key pathological species in AD. In contrast, propofol, the most commonly used intravenous anesthetic, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to compare the effects of isoflurane and propofol alone and in combination on caspase-3 activation and Aβ oligomerization in vitro and in vivo. Naïve and stably-transfected H4 human neuroglioma cells that express human amyloid precursor protein, the precursor for Aβ; neonatal mice; and conditioned cell culture media containing secreted human Aβ40 or Aβ42 were treated with isoflurane and/or propofol. Here we show for the first time that propofol can attenuate isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in cultured cells and in the brain tissues of neonatal mice. Furthermore, propofol-mediated caspase inhibition occurred when there were elevated levels of Aβ. Finally, isoflurane alone induces Aβ42, but not Aβ40, oligomerization, and propofol can inhibit the isoflurane-mediated oligomerization of Aβ42. These data suggest that propofol may mitigate the caspase-3 activation by attenuating the isoflurane-induced Aβ42 oligomerization. Our findings provide novel insights into the possible mechanisms of isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity that may aid in the development of strategies to minimize potential adverse effects associated with the administration of anesthetics to patients.

  12. Characterization and ageing study of poly(lactic acid) films plasticized with oligomeric lactic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos, Nuria; Martino, Verónica P.; Jiménez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was melt-blended with a bio-based oligomeric lactic acid (OLA) plasticizer at different concentrations between 15 wt% and 25 wt% in order to enhance PLA ductility and to get a fully biodegradable material with potential application in films manufacturing. OLA was an efficient plasticizer for PLA, as it caused a significant decrease on glass transition temperature (Tg) while improving considerably ductile properties. Only one Tg value was observed in all cases and no ap...

  13. Construction of porous cationic frameworks by crosslinking polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane units with N-heterocyclic linkers

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guojian; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Jing; Xue, Shuang; Liu, Yangqing; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In fields of materials science and chemistry, ionic-type porous materials attract increasing attention due to significant ion-exchanging capacity for accessing diversified applications. Facing the fact that porous cationic materials with robust and stable frameworks are very rare, novel tactics that can create new type members are highly desired. Here we report the first family of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) based porous cationic frameworks (PCIF-n) with enriched poly(ionic li...

  14. An Investigation of Chemical Landscapes in Aqueous Electrosprays by Tracking Oligomerization of Isoprene

    KAUST Repository

    Junior, Adair Gallo

    2017-12-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS) is widely used to characterize neutral and ionic species in solvents. Typically, electrical, thermal, and pneumatic potentials are applied to create electrosprays from which charged ionic species are ejected for downstream analysis by mass spectrometry. Most recently, ESIMS has been exploited to investigate ambient proton transfer reactions at air-water interfaces in real time. We assessed the validity of these experiments via complementary laboratory experiments. Specifically, we characterized the products of two reaction scenarios via ESIMS and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR): (i) emulsions of pH-adjusted water and isoprene (C5H8) that were mechanically agitated, and (ii) electrosprays of pH-adjusted water that were collided with gas-phase isoprene. Our experiments unambiguously demonstrate that, while isoprene does not oligomerize in emulsions, it does undergo protonation and oligomerization in electrosprays, both with and without pH-adjusted water, confirming that C-C bonds form along myriad high-energy pathways during electrospray ionization. We also compared our experimental results with some quantum mechanics simulations of isoprene molecules interacting with hydronium at different hydration levels (gas versus liquid phase). In agreement with our experiments, the kinetic barriers to protonation and oligomerization of isoprene were inaccessible under ambient conditions. Rather, the gas-phase chemistries during electrospray ionization drove the oligomerization of isoprene. Therefore, we consider that ESIMS could induce artifacts in interfacial reactions. These findings warrant a reassessment of previous reports on tracking chemistries under ambient conditions at liquid-vapor interfaces via ESIMS. Further, we took some high-speed images of electrosprays where it was possible to observe the main characteristics of the phenomena, i.e. Taylor cone, charge separation, and Coulomb fission. Finally, we took

  15. PeaTAR1B: Characterization of a Second Type 1 Tyramine Receptor of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenau, Wolfgang; Balfanz, Sabine; Baumann, Arnd

    2017-10-30

    The catecholamines norepinephrine and epinephrine regulate important physiological functions in vertebrates. In insects; these neuroactive substances are functionally replaced by the phenolamines octopamine and tyramine. Phenolamines activate specific guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Type 1 tyramine receptors are better activated by tyramine than by octopamine. In contrast; type 2 tyramine receptors are almost exclusively activated by tyramine. Functionally; activation of type 1 tyramine receptors leads to a decrease in the intracellular concentration of cAMP ([cAMP] i ) whereas type 2 tyramine receptors can mediate Ca 2+ signals or both Ca 2+ signals and effects on [cAMP] i . Here; we report that the American cockroach ( Periplaneta americana ) expresses a second type 1 tyramine receptor (PeaTAR1B) in addition to PeaTAR1A (previously called PeaTYR1). When heterologously expressed in flpTM cells; activation of PeaTAR1B by tyramine leads to a concentration-dependent decrease in [cAMP] i . Its activity can be blocked by a series of established antagonists. The functional characterization of two type 1 tyramine receptors from P. americana ; PeaTAR1A and PeaTAR1B; which respond to tyramine by changing cAMP levels; is a major step towards understanding the actions of tyramine in cockroach physiology and behavior; particularly in comparison to the effects of octopamine.

  16. PeaTAR1B: Characterization of a Second Type 1 Tyramine Receptor of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Blenau

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The catecholamines norepinephrine and epinephrine regulate important physiological functions in vertebrates. In insects; these neuroactive substances are functionally replaced by the phenolamines octopamine and tyramine. Phenolamines activate specific guanine nucleotide-binding (G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Type 1 tyramine receptors are better activated by tyramine than by octopamine. In contrast; type 2 tyramine receptors are almost exclusively activated by tyramine. Functionally; activation of type 1 tyramine receptors leads to a decrease in the intracellular concentration of cAMP ([cAMP]i whereas type 2 tyramine receptors can mediate Ca2+ signals or both Ca2+ signals and effects on [cAMP]i. Here; we report that the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana expresses a second type 1 tyramine receptor (PeaTAR1B in addition to PeaTAR1A (previously called PeaTYR1. When heterologously expressed in flpTM cells; activation of PeaTAR1B by tyramine leads to a concentration-dependent decrease in [cAMP]i. Its activity can be blocked by a series of established antagonists. The functional characterization of two type 1 tyramine receptors from P. americana; PeaTAR1A and PeaTAR1B; which respond to tyramine by changing cAMP levels; is a major step towards understanding the actions of tyramine in cockroach physiology and behavior; particularly in comparison to the effects of octopamine.

  17. Stability of human interferon-beta 1: oligomeric human interferon-beta 1 is inactive but is reactivated by monomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, J; Yamazaki, S; Kawaguchi, K; Kimura, S; Shimizu, H

    1989-10-05

    Human interferon-beta 1 is extremely stable is a low ionic strength solution of pH 2 such as 10 mM HCl at 37 degrees C. However, the presence of 0.15 M NaCl led to a remarkable loss of antiviral activity. The molecular-sieve high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that, whereas completely active human interferon-beta 1 eluted as a 25 kDa species (monomeric form), the inactivated preparation eluted primarily as a 90 kDa species (oligomeric form). The specific activity (units per mg protein) of the oligomeric form was approx. 10% of that of the monomeric form. This observation shows that oligomeric human interferon-beta 1 is apparently in an inactive form. When the oligomeric eluate was resolved by polyacrylamide gel containing sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), it appeared to be monomeric under non-reducing conditions. Monomerization of the oligomeric human interferon-beta 1 by treatment with 1% SDS, fully regenerated its antiviral activity. These results suggest that the inactivation of the human interferon-beta 1 preparation was caused by its oligomerization via hydrophobic interactions without the formation of intermolecular disulphide bonds. These oligomers can be dissociated by SDS to restore biological activity.

  18. Effect Of Oligomeric Enteral Nutrition On Symptoms Of Acute Radiation Enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinsky, P.

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy of abdominal and pelvic tumours is frequently associated with acute radiation enteritis. Predominant symptoms include diarrhea, watery stools, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. There are very few effective interventions available for this condition. Enteral oligomeric nutrition has been used in bowel diseases with functional failure similar to radiation enteritis. The aim of presented work was to observe occurrence of symptoms of radiation enteritis in patients undergoing abdominal or pelvic radiotherapy. Apart from diet and pharmacological therapy, oral oligomeric enteral nutrition (Peptisorb Powder Nutricia) at the dose of 1000 - 2000 ml per day was administered for minimum of 4 days. Planned period of administration was 14 days and longer. Symptoms of radiation enteritis were evaluated at the beginning and in the end of administration. Prevalence of all evaluated symptoms of radiation enteritis was decreased and difference was statistically significant for diarrhea, watery stools, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The use of evaluated oligomeric nutritional support might, in conjunction with pharmacotherapy and diet, alleviate symptoms of acute radiation enteritis and maintain nutritional status of patients. (author)

  19. Chemical activation of bituminous coal for hampering oligomerization of organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liang; Sorial, George A

    2011-12-15

    Activated carbons prepared by KOH activation of bituminous coal were studied for hampering oligomerization of phenolic compounds on its surface. A total of 24 activated carbons with different microporosity and BET surface area were created. The effect of the different variables of the activation process (KOH/bituminous coal ratio, heating temperature, activation time, and flow rate of nitrogen gas) on critical carbon parameters was analyzed. The impact of activated carbon on oligomerization was examined by conducting isotherm experiments at a neutral pH on Carbon(exp) produced with optimal characteristics and granular activated carbon (GAC) F400 for phenol, 2-methylphenol and 2-ethylphenol. These isotherms were collected under anoxic (absence of molecular oxygen) and oxic (presence of molecular oxygen) conditions. The single solute adsorption of phenol, 2-methylphenol and 2-ethylphenol on Carbon(exp) showed no obvious differences between oxic and anoxic environment, which indicated that the Carbon(exp) sample is very effective in hampering the oligomerization of phenolic compounds under oxic conditions. On the other hand, F400, which have lower micropore percentage and BET surface area, significant increases in the adsorptive capacity had been observed when molecular oxygen was present. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Homologous ELISA for detection of oligomeric human TNF: properties of the assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petyovka, N; Lyach, L; Voitenok, N N

    1995-10-26

    In order to quantify oligomeric human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), we have developed a sensitive homologous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Hm-ELISA) using the same monoclonal antibody (MoAb) for both solid and liquid phase. Different anti-TNF MoAb have been compared in terms of their efficacy in the Hm-ELISA, affinity, neutralization capacity and epitope specificity. The data suggest, that effectiveness in the Hm-ELISA may represent a novel characteristic of MoAb. Of the MoAbs tested, 5 N was capable of recognizing oligomeric TNF in the Hm-ELISA with a detection limit of 15 pg/ml. Furthermore, using Hm-ELISA against human TNF, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and lymphotoxin, we have demonstrated that these cytokines are oligomeric in physiological solutions, but are converted into monomeric forms in the presence of the non-ionic detergent Tween 20. High salt buffer was employed to abrogate a nonspecific false positive reaction in the Hm-ELISA found in nearly half of the plasma samples obtained from healthy subjects. Finally, a good correlation between the Hm-ELISA and the L929 bioassay was observed for natural and recombinant TNF measured in human plasma.

  1. Catalytic oligomerization of terminal alkynes promoted by organo-f-complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, T.; Haskel, A.; Eisen, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    Organoactinides of the type Cp* 2 AcMe 2 (Cp*=C 5 Me 5 ; Ac=Th, U) are active catalyst precursors for the oligomerization of terminal alkynes HC triple-bond CR (R=alkyl, aryl, SiMe 3 ). The regioselectivity and the extent of oligomerization strongly depend on the alkyne substituent R, whereas the catalytic reactivity is similar for 1 and 2. In the presence of one of these organoactinides, for example, HCCSiMe 3 regioselectively oligomerizes to the head-to-tail dimer 3 (5%) and the trimer 4 (95%). 1 and 2 react with the terminal alkynes, releasing methane, to the corresponding bisacetylide complexes which are active species and in the catalytic reactions. The bisacetylide complex (η 5 -C 5 Me 5 ) 2 U(CCPh) 2 was identified by proton NMR spectroscopy. Subsequent insertion of alkyne molecules in the actinide-carbon σ-bonds leads to the formation of actinide-alkenyl complexes. The turnover limiting step is the release of the organic oligomer from the actinide-organyl complex. A species of the latter has been spectroscopically characterized in the trimerization reaction of HCCSiMe 3 . In this poster, the catalytic reactivity of the actinide alkyls 1 and 2 with various mono-substituted alkynes as well as the spectroscopic characterization of the key organometallic intermediate complexes in the catalytic cycle and a detailed mechanistic discussion are given

  2. Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric Form of Lassa Virus Matrix Protein Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Kathryn M; Zandonatti, Michelle; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2016-05-01

    The arenavirus matrix protein Z is highly multifunctional and occurs in both monomeric and oligomeric forms. The crystal structure of a dodecamer of Z from Lassa virus, presented here, illustrates a ring-like structure with a highly basic center. Mutagenesis demonstrates that the dimeric interface within the dodecamer and a Lys-Trp-Lys triad at the center of the ring are important for oligomerization. This structure provides an additional template to explore the many functions of Z. The arenavirus Lassa virus causes hundreds of thousands of infections each year, many of which develop into fatal hemorrhagic fever. The arenavirus matrix protein Z is multifunctional, with at least four distinct roles. Z exists in both monomeric and oligomeric forms, each of which likely serves a specific function in the viral life cycle. Here we present the dodecameric form of Lassa virus Z and demonstrate that Z forms a "wreath" with a highly basic center. This structure and that of monomeric Z now provide a pair of critical templates by which the multiple roles of Z in the viral life cycle may be interpreted. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. The role of oligomerization and cooperative regulation in protein function: the case of tryptophan synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Qaiser Fatmi

    Full Text Available The oligomerization/co-localization of protein complexes and their cooperative regulation in protein function is a key feature in many biological systems. The synergistic regulation in different subunits often enhances the functional properties of the multi-enzyme complex. The present study used molecular dynamics and Brownian dynamics simulations to study the effects of allostery, oligomerization and intermediate channeling on enhancing the protein function of tryptophan synthase (TRPS. TRPS uses a set of α/β-dimeric units to catalyze the last two steps of L-tryptophan biosynthesis, and the rate is remarkably slower in the isolated monomers. Our work shows that without their binding partner, the isolated monomers are stable and more rigid. The substrates can form fairly stable interactions with the protein in both forms when the protein reaches the final ligand-bound conformations. Our simulations also revealed that the α/β-dimeric unit stabilizes the substrate-protein conformation in the ligand binding process, which lowers the conformation transition barrier and helps the protein conformations shift from an open/inactive form to a closed/active form. Brownian dynamics simulations with a coarse-grained model illustrate how protein conformations affect substrate channeling. The results highlight the complex roles of protein oligomerization and the fine balance between rigidity and dynamics in protein function.

  4. Physiological relevance of plant 2-Cys peroxiredoxin overoxidation level and oligomerization status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveau, Delphine; Ouahrani, Djelloul; Marok, Mohamed Amine; Blanchard, Laurence; Rey, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins are ubiquitous thioredoxin-dependent peroxidases presumed to display, upon environmental constraints, a chaperone function resulting from a redox-dependent conformational switch. In this work, using biochemical and genetic approaches, we aimed to unravel the factors regulating the redox status and the conformation of the plastidial 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys PRX) in plants. In Arabidopsis, we show that in optimal growth conditions, the overoxidation level mainly depends on the availability of thioredoxin-related electron donors, but not on sulfiredoxin, the enzyme reducing the 2-Cys PRX overoxidized form. We also observed that upon various physiological temperature, osmotic and light stress conditions, the overoxidation level and oligomerization status of 2-Cys PRX can moderately vary depending on the constraint type. Further, no major change was noticed regarding protein conformation in water-stressed Arabidopsis, barley and potato plants, whereas species-dependent up- and down-variations in overoxidation were observed. In contrast, both 2-Cys PRX overoxidation and oligomerization were strongly induced during a severe oxidative stress generated by methyl viologen. From these data, revealing that the oligomerization status of plant 2-Cys PRX does not exhibit important variation and is not tightly linked to the protein redox status upon physiologically relevant environmental constraints, the possible in planta functions of 2-Cys PRX are discussed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Molecular characterization of a rat α2B-adrenergic receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, D.; Harrison, J.K.; D'Angelo, D.D.; Barber, C.M.; Tucker, A.L.; Lu, Z.; Lynch, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    α 2 -Adrenergic receptors comprise a heterogeneous population based on pharmacologic and molecular evidence. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone (pRNGα 2 ) encoding a rat α 2 -adrenergic receptor. A rat kidney cDNA library was screened with an oligonucleotide complementary to a highly conserved region found in all biogenic amine receptors described to date. The deduced amino acid sequence displays many features of guanyl nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors except it does not have a consensus N-linked glycosylation site near the amino terminus. Membranes prepared from COS cells transfected with pRNGα 2 DNA display high affinity an saturable binding to [ 3 H]rauwolscine. Competition curve data analysis shows that RNGα 2 protein binds to a variety of adrenergic drugs with the following rank order of potency: yohimbine ≥ chlorpromazine > prazosin ≥ clonidine > norepinephrine ≥ oxymetazoline. RNGα 2 RNA accumulates in both rat kidney and neonatal rat lung. When a cysteine residue (Cys-169) that is conserved among all members of the seven-transmembrane-region superfamily is changed to phenylalanine, the RNGα 2 protein fails to bind [ 3 H]rauwolscine after expression in COS cells. They conclude that pRNGα 2 likely represents a cDNA for a rat α 2B -adrenergic receptor

  6. A Plant Immune Receptor Detects Pathogen Effectors that Target WRKY Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Panagiotis F; Duxbury, Zane; Huh, Sung Un; Ma, Yan; Segonzac, Cécile; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Cevik, Volkan; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Saucet, Simon B; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Menke, Frank L H; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2015-05-21

    Defense against pathogens in multicellular eukaryotes depends on intracellular immune receptors, yet surveillance by these receptors is poorly understood. Several plant nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immune receptors carry fusions with other protein domains. The Arabidopsis RRS1-R NB-LRR protein carries a C-terminal WRKY DNA binding domain and forms a receptor complex with RPS4, another NB-LRR protein. This complex detects the bacterial effectors AvrRps4 or PopP2 and then activates defense. Both bacterial proteins interact with the RRS1 WRKY domain, and PopP2 acetylates lysines to block DNA binding. PopP2 and AvrRps4 interact with other WRKY domain-containing proteins, suggesting these effectors interfere with WRKY transcription factor-dependent defense, and RPS4/RRS1 has integrated a "decoy" domain that enables detection of effectors that target WRKY proteins. We propose that NB-LRR receptor pairs, one member of which carries an additional protein domain, enable perception of pathogen effectors whose function is to target that domain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dominant integration locus drives continuous diversification of plant immune receptors with exogenous domain fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Paul C; Schudoma, Christian; Jackson, William; Baggs, Erin; Dagdas, Gulay; Haerty, Wilfried; Moscou, Matthew; Krasileva, Ksenia V

    2018-02-19

    The plant immune system is innate and encoded in the germline. Using it efficiently, plants are capable of recognizing a diverse range of rapidly evolving pathogens. A recently described phenomenon shows that plant immune receptors are able to recognize pathogen effectors through the acquisition of exogenous protein domains from other plant genes. We show that plant immune receptors with integrated domains are distributed unevenly across their phylogeny in grasses. Using phylogenetic analysis, we uncover a major integration clade, whose members underwent repeated independent integration events producing diverse fusions. This clade is ancestral in grasses with members often found on syntenic chromosomes. Analyses of these fusion events reveals that homologous receptors can be fused to diverse domains. Furthermore, we discover a 43 amino acid long motif associated with this dominant integration clade which is located immediately upstream of the fusion site. Sequence analysis reveals that DNA transposition and/or ectopic recombination are the most likely mechanisms of formation for nucleotide binding leucine rich repeat proteins with integrated domains. The identification of this subclass of plant immune receptors that is naturally adapted to new domain integration will inform biotechnological approaches for generating synthetic receptors with novel pathogen "baits."

  8. Novel oligomeric proanthocyanidin derivatives interact with membrane androgen sites and induce regression of hormone-independent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampa, Marilena; Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Mavromati, Fani; Pelekanou, Vassiliki; Notas, George; Lagoudaki, Eleni D; Nifli, Artemissia-Phoebe; Morel-Salmi, Cécile; Stathopoulos, Efstathios N; Vercauteren, Joseph; Castanas, Elias

    2011-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy among men in Western societies, and current therapeutic approaches are evolving to manage growth, recurrence, and mortality neoplasia. Membrane androgen receptors (mARs) have been characterized in human prostate cancer, being preferentially expressed in tumor rather than benign gland areas. Furthermore, mAR agonists (protein-conjugated testosterone) decrease in vitro prostate cancer cell growth and induce apoptosis, whereas in vivo they regress growth of tumor xenografts alone or in combination with taxane drugs. In this respect, targeting mARs might be a novel therapeutic approach in prostate cancer. In our search for new small-molecule ligands of mAR, we report that flavanol dimers B1-B4 (oligomeric procyanidins) decrease in vitro growth of the androgen-sensitive (LnCaP) and androgen-resistant (DU145) human prostate cancer cell lines in the following order: B3 = B4 > B2 ≫ B1 (LnCaP) and B2 ≫ B3 = B4 ≫ B1 (DU145). Some of these analogs were previously shown to trigger signaling cascades similar to testosterone-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate. Galloylation does not confer an additional advantage; however, oleylation increases the dimers' antiproliferative potency by a factor of 100. In addition, we report that B2, oleylated or not, displaces testosterone from mARs with an IC(50) value at the nanomolar range and induces DU145 tumor xenograft regression by 50% (testosterone-BSA 40%). In this respect, oleylated B2 is a potent small-molecule agonist of mAR and could be a novel therapeutic agent for advanced prostate cancer, especially when taking into account the absence of androgenic actions and (liver) toxicity.

  9. Link between D1 and D2 dopamine receptors is reduced in schizophrenia and Huntington diseased brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, P.; Niznik, H.B.; Guan, H.C.; Booth, G.; Ulpian, C.

    1989-01-01

    Dopamine receptor types D 1 and D 2 can oppose enhance each other's actions for electrical, biochemical, and psychomotor effects. The authors report a D 1 -D 2 interaction in homogenized tissue as revealed by ligand binding. D 2 agonists lowered the binding of [ 3 H]raclopride to D 2 receptors in striatal and anterior pituitary tissues. Pretreating the tissue with the D 1 -selective antagonist SCH 23390 prevented the agonist-induced decrease in [ 3 H]raclopride binding to D 2 sites in the striatum but not in the anterior pituitary, which has no D 1 receptors. Conversely, a dopamine-induced reduction in the binding of [ 3 H]SCH 23390 to D 1 receptors could be prevented by the D 2 -selective antagonist eticlopride. Receptor photolabeling experiments confirmed both these D 1 -D 2 interactions. The blocking effect by SCH 23390 was similar to that produced by a nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide analogue, and SCH 23390 reduced the number of agonist-labeled D 2 receptors in the high-affinity state. Thus, the D 1 -D 2 link may be mediated by guanine nucleotide-binding protein components. The link may underlie D 1 -D 2 interactions influencing behavior, since the link was missing in over half the postmortem striata from patients with schizophrenia and Huntington disease (both diseases that show some hyperdopamine signs) but was present in human control, Alzheimer, and Parkinson striata

  10. Fish oil alleviates activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis associated with inhibition of TLR4 and NOD signaling pathways in weaned piglets after a lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yulan; Chen, Feng; Li, Quan; Odle, Jack; Lin, Xi; Zhu, Huiling; Pi, Dingan; Hou, Yongqing; Hong, Yu; Shi, Haifeng

    2013-11-01

    Long-chain n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids exert beneficial effects in neuroendocrine dysfunctions in animal models and clinical trials. However, the mechanism(s) underlying the beneficial effects remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that dietary treatment with fish oil (FO) could mitigate LPS-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis through inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein signaling pathways. Twenty-four weaned pigs were used in a 2 × 2 factorial design, and the main factors consisted of diet (5% corn oil vs. 5% FO) and immunological challenge (saline vs. LPS). After 21 d of dietary treatment with 5% corn oil or FO diets, pigs were treated with saline or LPS. Blood samples were collected at 0 (preinjection), 2, and 4 h postinjection, and then pigs were humanely killed by intravenous injection of 40 mg/kg body weight sodium pentobarbital for tissue sample collection. FO led to enrichment of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and total n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in hypothalamus, pituitary gland, adrenal gland, spleen, and thymus. FO decreased plasma adrenocorticotrophin and cortisol concentrations as well as mRNA expressions of hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone and pituitary proopiomelanocortin. FO also reduced mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in hypothalamus, adrenal gland, spleen, and thymus, and of cyclooxygenase 2 in hypothalamus. Moreover, FO downregulated the mRNA expressions of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and its downstream molecules, including cluster differentiation factor 14, myeloid differentiation factor 2, myeloid differentiation factor 88, interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1, tumor necrosis factor-α receptor-associated factor 6, and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells p65, and also decreased the mRNA expressions of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1, nucleotide-binding

  11. Activation of G-proteins by receptor-stimulated nucleoside diphosphate kinase in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bominaar, A A; Molijn, A C; Pestel, M; Veron, M; Van Haastert, P J

    1993-01-01

    Recently, interest in the enzyme nucleoside diphosphate kinase (EC2.7.4.6) has increased as a result of its possible involvement in cell proliferation and development. Since NDP kinase is one of the major sources of GTP in cells, it has been suggested that the effects of an altered NDP kinase activity on cellular processes might be the result of altered transmembrane signal transduction via guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins). In the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum, extracellular cAMP induces an increase of phospholipase C activity via a surface cAMP receptor and G-proteins. In this paper it is demonstrated that part of the cellular NDP kinase is associated with the membrane and stimulated by cell surface cAMP receptors. The GTP produced by the action of NDP kinase is capable of activating G-proteins as monitored by altered G-protein-receptor interaction and the activation of the effector enzyme phospholipase C. Furthermore, specific monoclonal antibodies inhibit the effect of NDP kinase on G-protein activation. These results suggest that receptor-stimulated NDP kinase contributes to the mediation of hormone action by producing GTP for the activation of GTP-binding proteins. Images PMID:8389692

  12. RTA, a candidate G protein-coupled receptor: Cloning, sequencing, and tissue distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, P.C.; Figler, R.A.; Corjay, M.H.; Barber, C.M.; Adam, N.; Harcus, D.R.; Lynch, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    Genomic and cDNA clones, encoding a protein that is a member of the guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor superfamily, were isolated by screening rat genomic and thoracic aorta cDNA libraries with an oligonucleotide encoding a highly conserved region of the M 1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Sequence analyses of these clones showed that they encode a 343-amino acid protein (named RTA). The RTA gene is single copy, as demonstrated by restriction mapping and Southern blotting of genomic clones and rat genomic DNA. RTA RNA sequences are relatively abundant throughout the gut, vas deferens, uterus, and aorta but are only barely detectable (on Northern blots) in liver, kidney, lung, and salivary gland. In the rat brain, RTA sequences are markedly abundant in the cerebellum. TRA is most closely related to the mas oncogene (34% identity), which has been suggested to be a forebrain angiotensin receptor. They conclude that RTA is not an angiotensin receptor; to date, they have been unable to identify its ligand

  13. Complement factor 5a receptor chimeras reveal the importance of lipid-facing residues in transport competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klco, Jeffery M; Sen, Saurabh; Hansen, Jakob L

    2009-01-01

    . Despite relatively conservative substitutions, the lipid-facing chimeras (TM1, TM2, TM4, TM5, TM6 or TM7) were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum/cis-Golgi network. With the exception of the TM7 chimera that did not bind ligand, the lipid-facing chimeras bound ligand with low affinity, but similar...... oligomerization studies demonstrated energy transfer between the wild-type complement factor 5a receptor and the lipid-facing chimeras, suggesting that the lipid-facing residues within a single TM segment are not essential for oligomerization. These studies highlight the importance of the lipid-facing residues...

  14. Microglial phagocytosis induced by fibrillar β-amyloid is attenuated by oligomeric β-amyloid: implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Nan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive microglia are associated with β-amyloid (Aβ deposit and clearance in Alzhiemer's Disease (AD. Paradoxically, entocranial resident microglia fail to trigger an effective phagocytic response to clear Aβ deposits although they mainly exist in an "activated" state. Oligomeric Aβ (oAβ, a recent target in the pathogenesis of AD, can induce more potent neurotoxicity when compared with fibrillar Aβ (fAβ. However, the role of the different Aβ forms in microglial phagocytosis, induction of inflammation and oxidation, and subsequent regulation of phagocytic receptor system, remain unclear. Results We demonstrated that Aβ(1-42 fibrils, not Aβ(1-42 oligomers, increased the microglial phagocytosis. Intriguingly, the pretreatment of microglia with oAβ(1-42 not only attenuated fAβ(1-42-triggered classical phagocytic response to fluorescent microspheres but also significantly inhibited phagocytosis of fluorescent labeled fAβ(1-42. Compared with the fAβ(1-42 treatment, the oAβ(1-42 treatment resulted in a rapid and transient increase in interleukin 1β (IL-1β level and produced higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, nitric oxide (NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and intracellular superoxide anion (SOA. The further results demonstrated that microglial phagocytosis was negatively correlated with inflammatory mediators in this process and that the capacity of phagocytosis in fAβ(1-42-induced microglia was decreased by IL-1β, lippolysaccharide (LPS and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP. The decreased phagocytosis could be relieved by pyrrolidone dithiocarbamate (PDTC, a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB inhibitor, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a free radical scavenger. These results suggest that the oAβ-impaired phagocytosis is mediated through inflammation and oxidative stress-mediated mechanism in microglial cells. Furthermore, oAβ(1-42 stimulation reduced the mRNA expression of CD36, integrin β1 (Itgb1, and Ig

  15. N-Glycosylation instead of cholesterol mediates oligomerization and apical sorting of GPI-APs in FRT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imjeti, Naga Salaija; Lebreton, Stéphanie; Paladino, Simona; de la Fuente, Erwin; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2011-12-01

    Sorting of glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol--anchored proteins (GPI-APs) in polarized epithelial cells is not fully understood. Oligomerization in the Golgi complex has emerged as the crucial event driving apical segregation of GPI-APs in two different kind of epithelial cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and Fisher rat thyroid (FRT) cells, but whether the mechanism is conserved is unknown. In MDCK cells cholesterol promotes GPI-AP oligomerization, as well as apical sorting of GPI-APs. Here we show that FRT cells lack this cholesterol-driven oligomerization as apical sorting mechanism. In these cells both apical and basolateral GPI-APs display restricted diffusion in the Golgi likely due to a cholesterol-enriched membrane environment. It is striking that N-glycosylation is the critical event for oligomerization and apical sorting of GPI-APs in FRT cells but not in MDCK cells. Our data indicate that at least two mechanisms exist to determine oligomerization in the Golgi leading to apical sorting of GPI-APs. One depends on cholesterol, and the other depends on N-glycosylation and is insensitive to cholesterol addition or depletion.

  16. Involvement of C-Terminal Histidines in Soybean PM1 Protein Oligomerization and Cu2+ Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guobao; Liu, Ke; Gao, Yang; Zheng, Yizhi

    2017-06-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are widely distributed among plant species, where they contribute to abiotic stress tolerance. LEA proteins can be classified into seven groups according to conserved sequence motifs. The PM1 protein from soybean, which belongs to the Pfam LEA_1 group, has been shown previously to be at least partially natively unfolded, to bind metal ions and potentially to stabilize proteins and membranes. Here, we investigated the role of the PM1 C-terminal domain and in particular the multiple histidine residues in this half of the protein. We constructed recombinant plasmids expressing full-length PM1 and two truncated forms, PM1-N and PM1-C, which represent the N- and C-terminal halves of the protein, respectively. Immunoblotting and cross-linking experiments showed that full-length PM1 forms oligomers and high molecular weight (HMW) complexes in vitro and in vivo, while PM1-C, but not PM1-N, also formed oligomers and HMW complexes in vitro. When the histidine residues in PM1 and PM1-C were chemically modified, oligomerization was abolished, suggesting that histidines play a key role in this process. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high Cu2+ concentrations promote oligomerization and induce PM1 and PM1-C to form HMW complexes. Therefore, we speculate that PM1 proteins not only maintain ion homeostasis in the cytoplasm, but also potentially stabilize and protect other proteins during abiotic stress by forming a large, oligomeric molecular shield around biological targets. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Elucidation of amyloid beta-protein oligomerization mechanisms: discrete molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanc, B; Betnel, M; Cruz, L; Bitan, G; Teplow, D B

    2010-03-31

    Oligomers of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) play a central role in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Of the two predominant Abeta alloforms, Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42), Abeta(1-42) is more strongly implicated in the disease. We elucidated the structural characteristics of oligomers of Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) and their Arctic mutants, [E22G]Abeta(1-40) and [E22G]Abeta(1-42). We simulated oligomer formation using discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) with a four-bead protein model, backbone hydrogen bonding, and residue-specific interactions due to effective hydropathy and charge. For all four peptides under study, we derived the characteristic oligomer size distributions that were in agreement with prior experimental findings. Unlike Abeta(1-40), Abeta(1-42) had a high propensity to form paranuclei (pentameric or hexameric) structures that could self-associate into higher-order oligomers. Neither of the Arctic mutants formed higher-order oligomers, but [E22G]Abeta(1-40) formed paranuclei with a similar propensity to that of Abeta(1-42). Whereas the best agreement with the experimental data was obtained when the charged residues were modeled as solely hydrophilic, further assembly from spherical oligomers into elongated protofibrils was induced by nonzero electrostatic interactions among the charged residues. Structural analysis revealed that the C-terminal region played a dominant role in Abeta(1-42) oligomer formation whereas Abeta(1-40) oligomerization was primarily driven by intermolecular interactions among the central hydrophobic regions. The N-terminal region A2-F4 played a prominent role in Abeta(1-40) oligomerization but did not contribute to the oligomerization of Abeta(1-42) or the Arctic mutants. The oligomer structure of both Arctic peptides resembled Abeta(1-42) more than Abeta(1-40), consistent with their potentially more toxic nature.

  18. The effects of oligomerization on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm4/6/7 function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davey Megan J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minichromosome maintenance proteins (Mcm 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 are related by sequence and form a variety of complexes that unwind DNA, including Mcm4/6/7. A Mcm4/6/7 trimer forms one half of the Mcm2-7 hexameric ring and can be thought of as the catalytic core of Mcm2-7, the replicative helicase in eukaryotic cells. Oligomeric analysis of Mcm4/6/7 suggests that it forms a hexamer containing two Mcm4/6/7 trimers, however, under certain conditions trimeric Mcm4/6/7 has also been observed. The functional significance of the different Mcm4/6/7 oligomeric states has not been assessed. The results of such an assessment would have implications for studies of both Mcm4/6/7 and Mcm2-7. Results Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm4/6/7 reconstituted from individual subunits exists in an equilibrium of oligomeric forms in which smaller oligomers predominate in the absence of ATP. In addition, we found that ATP, which is required for Mcm4/6/7 activity, shifts the equilibrium towards larger oligomers, likely hexamers of Mcm4/6/7. ATPγS and to a lesser extent ADP also shift the equilibrium towards hexamers. Study of Mcm4/6/7 complexes containing mutations that interfere with the formation of inter-subunit ATP sites (arginine finger mutants indicates that full activity of Mcm4/6/7 requires all of its ATP sites, which are formed in a hexamer and not a trimer. In keeping with this observation, Mcm4/6/7 binds DNA as a hexamer. Conclusions The minimal functional unit of Mcm4/6/7 is a hexamer. One of the roles of ATP binding by Mcm4/6/7 may be to stabilize formation of hexamers.

  19. Crystal structures from the Plasmodium peroxiredoxins: new insights into oligomerization and product binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Dong, Aiping; Pizarro, Juan C; Botchkarsev, Alexei; Min, Jinrong; Wernimont, Amy K; Hills, Tanya; Hui, Raymond; Artz, Jennifer D

    2012-03-19

    Plasmodium falciparum is the protozoan parasite primarily responsible for more than one million malarial deaths, annually, and is developing resistance to current therapies. Throughout its lifespan, the parasite is subjected to oxidative attack, so Plasmodium antioxidant defences are essential for its survival and are targets for disease control. To further understand the molecular aspects of the Plasmodium redox system, we solved 4 structures of Plasmodium peroxiredoxins (Prx). Our study has confirmed PvTrx-Px1 to be a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-sensitive peroxiredoxin. We have identified and characterized the novel toroid octameric oligomer of PyTrx-Px1, which may be attributed to the interplay of several factors including: (1) the orientation of the conserved surface/buried arginine of the NNLA(I/L)GRS-loop; and (2) the C-terminal tail positioning (also associated with the aforementioned conserved loop) which facilitates the intermolecular hydrogen bond between dimers (in an A-C fashion). In addition, a notable feature of the disulfide bonds in some of the Prx crystal structures is discussed. Finally, insight into the latter stages of the peroxiredoxin reaction coordinate is gained. Our structure of PyPrx6 is not only in the sulfinic acid (RSO2H) form, but it is also with glycerol bound in a way (not previously observed) indicative of product binding. The structural characterization of Plasmodium peroxiredoxins provided herein provides insight into their oligomerization and product binding which may facilitate the targeting of these antioxidant defences. Although the structural basis for the octameric oligomerization is further understood, the results yield more questions about the biological implications of the peroxiredoxin oligomerization, as multiple toroid configurations are now known. The crystal structure depicting the product bound active site gives insight into the overoxidation of the active site and allows further characterization of the leaving group

  20. Single-molecule diffusometry reveals the nucleotide-dependent oligomerization pathways of Nicotiana tabacum Rubisco activase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan; Serban, Andrew J.; Wachter, Rebekka M.; Moerner, W. E.

    2018-03-01

    Oligomerization plays an important role in the function of many proteins, but a quantitative picture of the oligomer distribution has been difficult to obtain using existing techniques. Here we describe a method that combines sub-stoichiometric labeling and recently developed single-molecule diffusometry to measure the size distribution of oligomers under equilibrium conditions in solution, one molecule at a time. We use this technique to characterize the oligomerization behavior of Nicotiana tabacum (Nt) Rubisco activase (Nt-Rca), a chaperone-like AAA-plus ATPase essential in regulating carbon fixation during photosynthesis. We directly observed monomers, dimers, and a tetramer/hexamer mixture and extracted their fractional abundance as a function of protein concentration. We show that the oligomerization pathway of Nt-Rca is nucleotide dependent: ATPγS binding strongly promotes tetramer/hexamer formation from dimers and results in a preferred tetramer/hexamer population for concentrations in the 1-10 μM range. Furthermore, we directly observed dynamic assembly and disassembly processes of single complexes in real time and from there estimated the rate of subunit exchange to be ˜0.1 s-1 with ATPγS. On the other hand, ADP binding destabilizes Rca complexes by enhancing the rate of subunit exchange by >2 fold. These observations provide a quantitative starting point to elucidate the structure-function relations of Nt-Rca complexes. We envision the method to fill a critical gap in defining and quantifying protein assembly pathways in the small-oligomer regime.

  1. Arc is a flexible modular protein capable of reversible self-oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrum, Craig; Baumann, Anne; Bustad, Helene J.; Flydal, Marte Innselset; Mariaule, Vincent; Alvira, Sara; Cuéllar, Jorge; Haavik, Jan; Soulé, Jonathan; Valpuesta, José Maria; Márquez, José Antonio; Martinez, Aurora; Bramham, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The immediate early gene product Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein) is posited as a master regulator of long-term synaptic plasticity and memory. However, the physicochemical and structural properties of Arc have not been elucidated. In the present study, we expressed and purified recombinant human Arc (hArc) and performed the first biochemical and biophysical analysis of hArc's structure and stability. Limited proteolysis assays and MS analysis indicate that hArc has two major domains on either side of a central more disordered linker region, consistent with in silico structure predictions. hArc's secondary structure was estimated using CD, and stability was analysed by CD-monitored thermal denaturation and differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF). Oligomerization states under different conditions were studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and visualized by AFM and EM. Biophysical analyses show that hArc is a modular protein with defined secondary structure and loose tertiary structure. hArc appears to be pyramid-shaped as a monomer and is capable of reversible self-association, forming large soluble oligomers. The N-terminal domain of hArc is highly basic, which may promote interaction with cytoskeletal structures or other polyanionic surfaces, whereas the C-terminal domain is acidic and stabilized by ionic conditions that promote oligomerization. Upon binding of presenilin-1 (PS1) peptide, hArc undergoes a large structural change. A non-synonymous genetic variant of hArc (V231G) showed properties similar to the wild-type (WT) protein. We conclude that hArc is a flexible multi-domain protein that exists in monomeric and oligomeric forms, compatible with a diverse, hub-like role in plasticity-related processes. PMID:25748042

  2. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  3. Polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane monolayer as a nanoporous interlayer for preparation of low-k dielectric films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y-L; Liu, C-S; Cho, C-I; Hwu, M-J

    2007-01-01

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane (POSS) monomer was fixed to a silicon surface by reacting octakis(glycidyldimethylsiloxy)octasilsesquioxane (OG-POSS) with the OH-terminated silicon surface in the presence of tin (II) chloride. The POSS cage layer then served as a nanoporous interlayer to reduce the dielectric constants of polyimide films on silicon surfaces. The chemical structure and surface morphology of OG-POSS modified silicon surfaces were characterized with XPS. With the introduction of a POSS nanopored interlayer, the dielectric constants of polyimide films were reduced

  4. Multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization of PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintz, Udo; Meinhart, Anton; Winkler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Crystal structures of two truncated variants of the transcription factor PpsR from R. sphaeroides are presented that enabled the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct. Together, these structures reveal the importance of α-helical PAS extensions for multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function. Per–ARNT–Sim (PAS) domains are essential modules of many multi-domain signalling proteins that mediate protein interaction and/or sense environmental stimuli. Frequently, multiple PAS domains are present within single polypeptide chains, where their interplay is required for protein function. Although many isolated PAS domain structures have been reported over the last decades, only a few structures of multi-PAS proteins are known. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function is poorly understood. The transcription factor PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is such a multi-PAS domain protein that, in addition to its three PAS domains, contains a glutamine-rich linker and a C-terminal helix–turn–helix DNA-binding motif. Here, crystal structures of two N-terminally and C-terminally truncated PpsR variants that comprise a single (PpsR Q-PAS1 ) and two (PpsR N-Q-PAS1 ) PAS domains, respectively, are presented and the multi-step strategy required for the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct (PpsR ΔHTH ) is illustrated. While parts of the biologically relevant dimerization interface can already be observed in the two shorter constructs, the PpsR ΔHTH structure reveals how three PAS domains enable the formation of multiple oligomeric states (dimer, tetramer and octamer), highlighting that not only the PAS cores but also their α-helical extensions are essential for protein oligomerization. The results demonstrate that the long helical glutamine-rich linker of PpsR results from a direct fusion of the N-cap of the PAS1 domain with the C-terminal extension of the N-domain that plays an important

  5. Thermo-mechanical characterization of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polystyrene composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Ignazio; Bottino, Francesco A.; Cicala, Gianluca; Cozzo, Giulia; Latteri, Alberta; Recca, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polystyrene (ph,hib-POSS/PS) composite were studied and compared with those of pristine polymer. ph,hib-POSS/PS system was prepared by solubilization and precipitation of Polystyrene (PS) in the presence of POSS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was performed to check the distribution of the filler in the polymer matrix. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was carried out to measure viscoelastic properties of solid samples. Degradations were carried out into a thermobalance and the obtained thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves were discussed and interpreted

  6. Protic ionic liquids based on the dimeric and oligomeric anions: [(AcO)xH(x-1)]-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K M; Izgorodina, E I; Forsyth, M; MacFarlane, D R; Seddon, K R

    2008-05-28

    We describe a fluidity and conductivity study as a function of composition in N-methylpyrrolidine-acetic acid mixtures. The simple 1 : 1 acid-base mixture appears to form an ionic liquid, but its degree of ionicity is quite low and such liquids are better thought of as poorly dissociated mixtures of acid and base. The composition consisting of 3 moles acetic acid and 1 mole N-methylpyrrolidine is shown to form the highest ionicity mixture in this binary due to the presence of oligomeric anionic species [(AcO)(x)H(x-1)](-) stabilised by hydrogen bonds. These oligomeric species, being weaker bases than the acetate anion, shift the proton transfer equilibrium towards formation of ionic species, thus generating a higher degree of ionicity than is present at the 1 : 1 composition. A Walden plot analysis, thermogravimetric behaviour and proton NMR data, as well as ab initio calculations of the oligomeric species, all support this conclusion.

  7. Interactions of ligands with active and inactive conformations of the dopamine D2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, A; Mohell, N; Backlund Höök, B; Johansson, A M; Hacksell, U; Nordvall, G

    1998-04-10

    The affinities of 19 pharmacologically diverse dopamine D2 receptor ligands were determined for the active and inactive conformations of cloned human dopamine D2 receptors expressed in Ltk cells. The agonist [3H]quinpirole was used to selectively label the guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled, active receptor conformation. The antagonist [3H]raclopride, in the presence of the non-hydrolysable GTP-analogue Gpp(NH)p and sodium ions and in the absence of magnesium ions, was used to label the free inactive receptor conformation. The intrinsic activities of the ligands were determined in a forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP assay using the same cells. An excellent correlation was shown between the affinity ratios (KR/KRG) of the ligands for the two receptor conformations and their intrinsic activity (r=0.96). The ligands included eight structurally related and enantiopure 2-aminotetralin derivatives; the enantiomers of 5-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin, 5-methoxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin, 5-fluoro-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin and 2-(dipropylamino)tetralin. The (S)-enantiomers behaved as full agonists in the cyclic AMP assay and displayed a large KR/KRG ratio. The (R)-enantiomers were classified as partial agonists and had lower ratios. The structure-affinity relationships of these compounds at the active and the inactive receptor conformations were analysed separately, and used in conjunction with a homology based receptor model of the dopamine D2 receptor. This led to proposed binding modes for agonists, antagonists and partial agonists in the 2-aminotetralin series. The concepts used in this study should be of value in the design of ligands with predetermined affinity and intrinsic activity.

  8. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens Transcription Factor BlcR Is Regulated via Oligomerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yi; Fiscus, Valena; Meng, Wuyi; Zheng, Zhida; Zhang, Lian-Hui; Fuqua, Clay; Chen, Lingling (IMCB-Singapore); (Indiana)

    2012-02-08

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens BlcR is a member of the emerging isocitrate lyase transcription regulators that negatively regulates metabolism of {gamma}-butyrolactone, and its repressing function is relieved by succinate semialdehyde (SSA). Our crystal structure showed that BlcR folded into the DNA- and SSA-binding domains and dimerized via the DNA-binding domains. Mutational analysis identified residues, including Phe{sup 147}, that are important for SSA association; BlcR{sup F147A} existed as tetramer. Two BlcR dimers bound to target DNA and in a cooperative manner, and the distance between the two BlcR-binding sequences in DNA was critical for BlcR-DNA association. Tetrameric BlcR{sup F147A} retained DNA binding activity, and importantly, this activity was not affected by the distance separating the BlcR-binding sequences in DNA. SSA did not dissociate tetrameric BlcR{sup F147A} or BlcR{sup F147A}-DNA. As well as in the SSA-binding site, Phe{sup 147} is located in a structurally flexible loop that may be involved in BlcR oligomerization. We propose that SSA regulates BlcR DNA-binding function via oligomerization.

  9. An Asymmetric Deuterium Labeling Strategy to Identify Interprotomer and Intraprotomer NOEs in Oligomeric Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasanoff, Alan

    1998-01-01

    A major difficulty in determining the structure of an oligomeric protein by NMR is the problem of distinguishing inter- from intraprotomer NOEs. In order to address this issue in studies of the 27 kD compact trimeric domain of the MHC class II-associated invariant chain, we compared the 13C NOESY-HSQC spectrum of a uniformly 13C-labeled trimer with the spectrum of the same trimer labeled with 13C in only one protomer, and with deuterium in the other two protomers. The spectrum of the unmixed trimer included both inter- and intraprotomer NOEs while the spectrum of the mixed trimer included only intraprotomer peaks. NOEs clearly absent from the spectrum of the mixed trimer could be confidently assigned to interprotomer interactions. Asymmetrically labeled trimers were isolated by refolding a 13C-labeled shorter form of the protein with a 2H-labeled longer form, chromatographically purifying trimers with only one short chain, and then processing with trypsin to yield only protomers with the desired N- and C-termini. In contrast to earlier studies, in which statistical mixtures of differently labeled protomers were analyzed, our procedure generated only a well-defined 1:2 oligomer, and no other mixed oligomers were present. This increased the maximum possible concentration of NMR-active protomers and thus the sensitivity of the experiments. Related methods should be applicable to many oligomeric proteins, particularly those with slow protomer exchange rates

  10. Direct Evidence of Intrinsic Blue Fluorescence from Oligomeric Interfaces of Human Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Arpan; Bhowmik, Soumitra; Singh, Amit K; Kodgire, Prashant; Das, Apurba K; Mukherjee, Tushar Kanti

    2017-10-10

    The molecular origin behind the concentration-dependent intrinsic blue fluorescence of human serum albumin (HSA) is not known yet. This unusual blue fluorescence is believed to be a characteristic feature of amyloid-like fibrils of protein/peptide and originates due to the delocalization of peptide bond electrons through the extended hydrogen bond networks of cross-β-sheet structure. Herein, by combining the results of spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, native gel electrophoresis, and confocal microscopy, we have shown that the intrinsic blue fluorescence of HSA exclusively originates from oligomeric interfaces devoid of any amyloid-like fibrillar structure. Our study suggests that this low energy fluorescence band is not due to any particular residue/sequence, but rather it is a common feature of self-assembled peptide bonds. The present findings of intrinsic blue fluorescence from oligomeric interfaces pave the way for future applications of this unique visual phenomenon for early stage detection of various protein aggregation related human diseases.

  11. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chung-ke [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tzong-Huah [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Biochemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chu-Ya [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Liao, Yu-heng [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tai-huang, E-mail: bmthh@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse, E-mail: jthuang@chem.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  12. Conformational detection of p53's oligomeric state by FlAsH Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Tawnya M; Allen, Andrew C; Ma, Wai Kit; Molloy, Rhett G; Kettelkamp, Charisse N; Dow, Caitlin A; Gage, Matthew J

    2009-06-19

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is a critical checkpoint in prevention of tumor formation, and the function of p53 is dependent on proper formation of the active tetramer. In vitro studies have shown that p53 binds DNA most efficiently as a tetramer, though inactive p53 is predicted to be monomeric in vivo. We demonstrate that FlAsH binding can be used to distinguish between oligomeric states of p53, providing a potential tool to explore p53 oligomerization in vivo. The FlAsH tetra-cysteine binding motif has been incorporated along the dimer and tetramer interfaces in the p53 tetramerization domain to create reporters for the dimeric and tetrameric states of p53, though the geometry of the four cysteines is critical for efficient FlAsH binding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that FlAsH binding can be used to monitor tetramer formation in real-time. These results demonstrate the potential for using FlAsH fluorescence to monitor protein-protein interactions in vivo.

  13. Oligomerization of glycine and alanine catalyzed by iron oxides: implications for prebiotic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Uma; Bhushan, Brij; Bhattacharjee, G; Kamaluddin

    2012-02-01

    Iron oxide minerals are probable constituents of the sediments present in geothermal regions of the primitive earth. They might have adsorbed different organic monomers (amino acids, nucleotides etc.) and catalyzed polymerization processes leading to the formation of the first living cell. In the present work we tested the catalytic activity of three forms of iron oxides (Goethite, Akaganeite and Hematite) in the intermolecular condensation of each of the amino acids glycine and L-alanine. The effect of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide on the oligomerization has also been studied. Oligomerization studies were performed for 35 days at three different temperatures 50, 90 and 120°C without applying drying/wetting cycling. The products formed were characterized by HPLC and ESI-MS techniques. All three forms of iron oxides catalyzed peptide bond formation (23.2% of gly2 and 10.65% of ala2). The reaction was monitored every 7 days. Formation of peptides was observed to start after 7 days at 50°C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90°C. Reaction at 120°C favors formation of diketopiperazine derivatives. It is also important to note that after 35 days of reaction, goethite produced dimer and trimer with the highest yield among the oxides tested. We suggest that the activity of goethite could probably be due to its high surface area and surface acidity.

  14. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's Aβ peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knuepfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Faendrich, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Sodium phosphate buffer accelerated Aβ(1-40) nucleation relative to HEPES. → Aβ(1-40) fibrils formed in the two buffers show only minor structural differences. → NMR revealed that Aβ(1-40) histidine residues mediate buffer dependent changes. -- Abstract: The oligomerization of Aβ peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of Aβ and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Aβ peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of Aβ fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of Aβ(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  15. Multicoil2: predicting coiled coils and their oligomerization states from sequence in the twilight zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Trigg

    Full Text Available The alpha-helical coiled coil can adopt a variety of topologies, among the most common of which are parallel and antiparallel dimers and trimers. We present Multicoil2, an algorithm that predicts both the location and oligomerization state (two versus three helices of coiled coils in protein sequences. Multicoil2 combines the pairwise correlations of the previous Multicoil method with the flexibility of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs in a Markov Random Field (MRF. The resulting algorithm integrates sequence features, including pairwise interactions, through multinomial logistic regression to devise an optimized scoring function for distinguishing dimer, trimer and non-coiled-coil oligomerization states; this scoring function is used to produce Markov Random Field potentials that incorporate pairwise correlations localized in sequence. Multicoil2 significantly improves both coiled-coil detection and dimer versus trimer state prediction over the original Multicoil algorithm retrained on a newly-constructed database of coiled-coil sequences. The new database, comprised of 2,105 sequences containing 124,088 residues, includes reliable structural annotations based on experimental data in the literature. Notably, the enhanced performance of Multicoil2 is evident when tested in stringent leave-family-out cross-validation on the new database, reflecting expected performance on challenging new prediction targets that have minimal sequence similarity to known coiled-coil families. The Multicoil2 program and training database are available for download from http://multicoil2.csail.mit.edu.

  16. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of 0-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  17. Catalytic Oligomerization of Terminal Alkynes by Lanthanide Carbyls (η5-C5Me5)2LnCH(SiMe3)2 (Ln = Y, La, Ce)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, H.J.; Teuben, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Lanthanide and group 3 carbyls Cp*2LnCH(SiMe3)2 (1, Ln = Y; 2, Ln = La; 3, Ln = Ce) are active catalyst precursors for the oligomerization of terminal alkynes HC≡CR (R = alkyl, aryl, SiMe3). The regioselectivity and the extent of oligomerization depend strongly on the lanthanide applied as well as

  18. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong; Kruse, Andrew C; Chung, Ka Young; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Chae, Pil Seok; Pardon, Els; Calinski, Diane; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Shah, Syed T.A.; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin; Gellman, Samuel H; Steyaert, Jan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Weis, William I; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K [Brussels; (Trinity); (Michigan); (Stanford-MED); (Michigan-Med); (UW)

    2011-12-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β2 adrenergic receptor2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the β2AR and Gs involve the amino- and carboxy-terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β2AR include a 14Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling by a GPCR.

  19. Efficient silkworm expression of human GPCR (nociceptin receptor) by a Bombyx mori bacmid DNA system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajikawa, Mizuho; Sasaki, Kaori; Wakimoto, Yoshitaro; Toyooka, Masaru; Motohashi, Tomoko; Shimojima, Tsukasa; Takeda, Shigeki; Park, Enoch Y.; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2009-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently expressed by a baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). We recently established a novel BEVS using the bacmid system of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), which is directly applicable for protein expression in silkworms. Here, we report the first example of GPCR expression in silkworms by the simple injection of BmNPV bacmid DNA. Human nociceptin receptor, an inhibitory GPCR, and its fusion protein with inhibitory G protein alpha subunit (G i α) were both successfully expressed in the fat bodies of silkworm larvae as well as in the BmNPV viral fraction. Its yield was much higher than that from Sf9 cells. The microsomal fractions including the nociceptin receptor fusion, which are easily prepared by only centrifugation steps, exhibited [ 35 S]GTPγS-binding activity upon specific stimulation by nociceptin. Therefore, this rapid method is easy-to-use and has a high expression level, and thus will be an important tool for human GPCR production.

  20. Chloroplastic protein NRIP1 mediates innate immune receptor recognition of a viral effector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Mamillapalli, Padmavathi; Burch-Smith, Tessa M.; Czymmek, Kirk; Dinesh-Kumar, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Plant innate immunity relies on the recognition of pathogen effector molecules by nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immune receptor families. Previously we have shown the N immune receptor, a member of TIR-NB-LRR family, indirectly recognizes the 50-kDa helicase (p50) domain of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) through its TIR domain. We have identified an N receptor-interacting protein, NRIP1, that directly interacts with both N's TIR domain and p50. NRIP1 is a functional rhodanese sulfurtransferase and is required for N to provide complete resistance to TMV. Interestingly, NRIP1 that normally localizes to the chloroplasts is recruited to the cytoplasm and nucleus by the p50 effector. As a consequence, NRIP1 interacts with N only in the presence of the p50 effector. Our findings show that a chloroplastic protein is intimately involved in pathogen recognition. We propose that N's activation requires a pre-recognition complex containing the p50 effector and NRIP1. PMID:18267075

  1. Efficient silkworm expression of human GPCR (nociceptin receptor) by a Bombyx mori bacmid DNA system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Mizuho; Sasaki, Kaori [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Wakimoto, Yoshitaro; Toyooka, Masaru [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Motohashi, Tomoko; Shimojima, Tsukasa [National Institute of Genetics, 1111 Yata, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540 (Japan); Takeda, Shigeki [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Park, Enoch Y. [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Integrated Bioscience Section, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Oya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Maenaka, Katsumi, E-mail: kmaenaka-umin@umin.net [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2009-07-31

    Guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently expressed by a baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). We recently established a novel BEVS using the bacmid system of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), which is directly applicable for protein expression in silkworms. Here, we report the first example of GPCR expression in silkworms by the simple injection of BmNPV bacmid DNA. Human nociceptin receptor, an inhibitory GPCR, and its fusion protein with inhibitory G protein alpha subunit (G{sub i}{alpha}) were both successfully expressed in the fat bodies of silkworm larvae as well as in the BmNPV viral fraction. Its yield was much higher than that from Sf9 cells. The microsomal fractions including the nociceptin receptor fusion, which are easily prepared by only centrifugation steps, exhibited [{sup 35}S]GTP{gamma}S-binding activity upon specific stimulation by nociceptin. Therefore, this rapid method is easy-to-use and has a high expression level, and thus will be an important tool for human GPCR production.

  2. Regulation of dopamine D2 receptors in a novel cell line (SUP1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivins, K.J.; Luedtke, R.R.; Artymyshyn, R.P.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    A prolactin-secreting cell line, SUP1, has been established from rat pituitary tumor 7315a. In radioligand binding experiments, the D2 receptor antagonist (S)-(-)-3- 125 I iodo-2-hydroxy-6-methoxy-N-[(1-ethyl-2- pyrrolidinyl)methyl]benzamide ( 125 I IBZM) labeled a single class of sites in homogenates of SUP1 cells (Kd = 0.6 nM; Bmax = 45 fmol/mg of protein). The sites displayed a pharmacological profile consistent with that of D2 receptors. Inhibition of the binding of 125 I IBZM by dopamine was sensitive to GTP, suggesting that D2 receptors in SUP1 cells are coupled to guanine nucleotide-binding protein(s). In the presence of isobutylmethylxanthine, dopamine decreased the level of cAMP accumulation in SUP1 cells. Dopamine also inhibited prolactin secretion from SUP1 cells. Both the inhibition of cAMP accumulation and the inhibition of prolactin secretion were blocked by D2 receptor antagonists, suggesting that these effects of dopamine were mediated by an interaction with D2 receptors. The regulation of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells by D2 receptor agonists was investigated. Exposure of SUP1 cells to dopamine or to the D2 receptor agonist N-propylnorapomorphine led to increased expression of D2 receptors, with no change in the affinity of the receptors for 125 I IBZM. An increase in the density of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells was evident within 7 hr of exposure to dopamine. Spiroperidol, a D2 receptor antagonist, blocked the effect of dopamine on receptor density. These results suggest that exposure of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells to agonists leads to an up-regulation of D2 receptors. Dopamine retained the ability to inhibit cAMP accumulation in SUP1 cells exposed to dopamine for 24 hr, suggesting that D2 receptors in SUP1 cells are not desensitized by prolonged exposure to agonist

  3. Dimers of G-Protein Coupled Receptors as Versatile Storage and Response Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Parker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The status and use of transmembrane, extracellular and intracellular domains in oligomerization of heptahelical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are reviewed and for transmembrane assemblies also supplemented by new experimental evidence. The transmembrane-linked GPCR oligomers typically have as the minimal unit an asymmetric ~180 kDa pentamer consisting of receptor homodimer or heterodimer and a G-protein αβγ subunit heterotrimer. With neuropeptide Y (NPY receptors, this assembly is converted to ~90 kDa receptor monomer-Gα complex by receptor and Gα agonists, and dimers/heteropentamers are depleted by neutralization of Gαi subunits by pertussis toxin. Employing gradient centrifugation, quantification and other characterization of GPCR dimers at the level of physically isolated and identified heteropentamers is feasible with labeled agonists that do not dissociate upon solubilization. This is demonstrated with three neuropeptide Y (NPY receptors and could apply to many receptors that use large peptidic agonists.

  4. Structural determinants at the interface of the ARC2 and leucine-rich repeat domains control the activation of the plant immune receptors Rx1 and Gpa2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootweg, Erik J; Spiridon, Laurentiu N; Roosien, Jan; Butterbach, Patrick; Pomp, Rikus; Westerhof, Lotte; Wilbers, Ruud; Bakker, Erin; Bakker, Jaap; Petrescu, Andrei-José; Smant, Geert; Goverse, Aska

    2013-07-01

    Many plant and animal immune receptors have a modular nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) architecture in which a nucleotide-binding switch domain, NB-ARC, is tethered to a LRR sensor domain. The cooperation between the switch and sensor domains, which regulates the activation of these proteins, is poorly understood. Here, we report structural determinants governing the interaction between the NB-ARC and LRR in the highly homologous plant immune receptors Gpa2 and Rx1, which recognize the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida and Potato virus X, respectively. Systematic shuffling of polymorphic sites between Gpa2 and Rx1 showed that a minimal region in the ARC2 and N-terminal repeats of the LRR domain coordinate the activation state of the protein. We identified two closely spaced amino acid residues in this region of the ARC2 (positions 401 and 403) that distinguish between autoactivation and effector-triggered activation. Furthermore, a highly acidic loop region in the ARC2 domain and basic patches in the N-terminal end of the LRR domain were demonstrated to be required for the physical interaction between the ARC2 and LRR. The NB-ARC and LRR domains dissociate upon effector-dependent activation, and the complementary-charged regions are predicted to mediate a fast reassociation, enabling multiple rounds of activation. Finally, we present a mechanistic model showing how the ARC2, NB, and N-terminal half of the LRR form a clamp, which regulates the dissociation and reassociation of the switch and sensor domains in NB-LRR proteins.

  5. Skeletal muscle beta-receptors and isoproterenol-stimulated vasodilation in canine heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, M.J.; Lanoce, V.; Molinoff, P.B.; Wilson, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate whether heart failure alters beta-adrenergic receptors on skeletal muscle and its associated vasculature, the density of beta-adrenergic receptors, isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, and coupling of the guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein were compared in 18 control dogs and 16 dogs with heart failure induced by 5-8 wk of ventricular pacing at 260 beats/min. Hindlimb vascular responses to isoproterenol were compared in eight controls and eight of the dogs with heart failure. In dogs with heart failure, the density of beta-receptors on skeletal muscle was reduced in both gastrocnemius (control: 50 +/- 5; heart failure: 33 +/- 8 fmol/mg of protein) and semitendinosus muscle (control: 43 +/- 9; heart failure: 27 +/- 9 fmol/mg of protein, both P less than 0.05). Receptor coupling to the ternary complex, as determined by isoproterenol competition curves with and without guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), was unchanged. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was significantly decreased in semitendinosus muscle (control: 52.4 +/- 4.6; heart failure: 36.5 +/- 9.5 pmol.mg-1.min-1; P less than 0.05) and tended to be decreased in gastrocnemius muscle (control: 40.1 +/- 8.5; heart failure: 33.5 +/- 4.5 pmol.mg-1.min-1; P = NS). Isoproterenol-induced hindlimb vasodilation was not significantly different in controls and in dogs with heart failure. These findings suggest that heart failure causes downregulation of skeletal muscle beta-adrenergic receptors, probably due to receptor exposure to elevated catecholamine levels, but does not reduce beta-receptor-mediated vasodilation in muscle

  6. Assembly and activation of neurotrophic factor receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simi, Anastasia; Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2010-04-01

    Neurotrophic factors play important roles in the development and function of both neuronal and glial elements of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Their functional diversity is in part based on their ability to interact with alternative complexes of receptor molecules. This review focuses on our current understanding of the mechanisms that govern the assembly and activation of neurotrophic factor receptor complexes. The realization that many, if not the majority, of these complexes exist in a preassembled form at the plasma membrane has forced the revision of classical ligand-mediated oligomerization models, and led to the discovery of novel mechanisms of receptor activation and generation of signaling diversity which are likely to be shared by many different classes of receptors.

  7. Chaperonin of Group I: Oligomeric Spectrum and Biochemical and Biological Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Vilasi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chaperonins play various physiological roles and can also be pathogenic. Elucidation of their structure, e.g., oligomeric status and post-translational modifications (PTM, is necessary to understand their functions and mechanisms of action in health and disease. Group I chaperonins form tetradecamers with two stacked heptameric rings. The tetradecamer is considered the typical functional complex for folding of client polypeptides. However, other forms such as the monomer and oligomers with smaller number of subunits than the classical tetradecamer, also occur in cells. The properties and functions of the monomer and oligomers, and their roles in chaperonin-associated diseases are still incompletely understood. Chaperonin I in eukaryotes occurs in various locations, not just the mitochondrion, which is its canonical place of residence and function. Eukaryotic Chaperonin I, namely Hsp60 (designated HSP60 or HSPD1 in humans has, indeed, been found in the cytosol; the plasma-cell membrane; on the outer surface of cells; in the intercellular space; in biological liquids such as lymph, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid; and in secretions, for instance saliva and urine. Hsp60 has also been found in cell-derived vesicles such as exosomes. The functions of Hsp60 in all these non-canonical locales are still poorly characterized and one of the questions not yet answered is in what form, i.e., monomer or oligomer, is the chaperonin present in these non-canonical locations. In view of the steady increase in interest on chaperonopathies over the last several years, we have studied human HSP60 to determine its role in various diseases, its locations in cells and tissues and migrations in the body, and its post-translational modifications that might have an impact on its location and function. We also carried out experiments to characterize the oligomeric status of extramitochondrial of HSP60 in solution. Here, we provide an overview of our results, focusing on

  8. Interference with RUNX1/ETO Leukemogenic Function by Cell-Penetrating Peptides Targeting the NHR2 Oligomerization Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Bartel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The leukemia-associated fusion protein RUNX1/ETO is generated by the chromosomal translocation t(8;21 which appears in about 12% of all de novo acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs. Essential for the oncogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO is the oligomerization of the chimeric fusion protein through the nervy homology region 2 (NHR2 within ETO. In previous studies, we have shown that the intracellular expression of peptides containing the NHR2 domain inhibits RUNX1/ETO oligomerization, thereby preventing cell proliferation and inducing differentiation of RUNX1/ETO transformed cells. Here, we show that introduction of a recombinant TAT-NHR2 fusion polypeptide into the RUNX1/ETO growth-dependent myeloid cell line Kasumi-1 results in decreased cell proliferation and increased numbers of apoptotic cells. This effect was highly specific and mediated by binding the TAT-NHR2 peptide to ETO sequences, as TAT-polypeptides containing the oligomerization domain of BCR did not affect cell proliferation or apoptosis in Kasumi-1 cells. Thus, the selective interference with NHR2-mediated oligomerization by peptides represents a challenging but promising strategy for the inhibition of the leukemogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO in t(8;21-positive leukemia.

  9. 78 FR 65561 - D-Glucopyranose, oligomeric, decyl octyl glycosides; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... metabolize D-glucopyranose, oligomeric, C 10 -C 16 -alkyl glycosides to water-soluble substances... polyoxyethylene polymers and fatty acids; carriers such as clay and diatomaceous earth; thickeners such as... exposure through drinking water and in residential settings, but does not include occupational exposure...

  10. Regulation of complement by cartilage oligomeric matrix protein allows for a novel molecular diagnostic principle in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Kaisa E; Saxne, Tore; Aspberg, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage, where it catalyzes collagen fibrillogenesis. Elevated amounts of COMP are found in serum during increased turnover of cartilage associated with active joint disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthr...

  11. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Bax and Bak Oligomerization Prevents Genotoxic Cell Death and Promotes Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xin; Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Mergenthaler, Philipp; Zhang, Zhi; Sang, Jing; Daude, Michael; Ehlert, Fabian G R; Diederich, Wibke E; Wong, Eve; Zhu, Weijia; Pogmore, Justin; Nandy, Jyoti P; Satyanarayana, Maragani; Jimmidi, Ravi K; Arya, Prabhat; Leber, Brian; Lin, Jialing; Culmsee, Carsten; Yi, Jing; Andrews, David W

    2017-04-20

    Aberrant apoptosis can lead to acute or chronic degenerative diseases. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) triggered by the oligomerization of the Bcl-2 family proteins Bax/Bak is an irreversible step leading to execution of apoptosis. Here, we describe the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of Bax/Bak oligomerization that prevent MOMP. We demonstrate that these molecules disrupt multiple, but not all, interactions between Bax dimer interfaces thereby interfering with the formation of higher-order oligomers in the MOM, but not recruitment of Bax to the MOM. Small-molecule inhibition of Bax/Bak oligomerization allowed cells to evade apoptotic stimuli and rescued neurons from death after excitotoxicity, demonstrating that oligomerization of Bax is essential for MOMP. Our discovery of small-molecule Bax/Bak inhibitors provides novel tools for the investigation of the mechanisms leading to MOMP and will ultimately facilitate development of compounds inhibiting Bax/Bak in acute and chronic degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Orally administrated cinnamon extract reduces β-amyloid oligomerization and corrects cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Frydman-Marom

    Full Text Available An increasing body of evidence indicates that accumulation of soluble oligomeric assemblies of β-amyloid polypeptide (Aβ play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Specifically, 56 kDa oligomeric species were shown to be correlated with impaired cognitive function in AD model mice. Several reports have documented the inhibition of Aβ plaque formation by compounds from natural sources. Yet, evidence for the ability of common edible elements to modulate Aβ oligomerization remains an unmet challenge. Here we identify a natural substance, based on cinnamon extract (CEppt, which markedly inhibits the formation of toxic Aβ oligomers and prevents the toxicity of Aβ on neuronal PC12 cells. When administered to an AD fly model, CEppt rectified their reduced longevity, fully recovered their locomotion defects and totally abolished tetrameric species of Aβ in their brain. Furthermore, oral administration of CEppt to an aggressive AD transgenic mice model led to marked decrease in 56 kDa Aβ oligomers, reduction of plaques and improvement in cognitive behavior. Our results present a novel prophylactic approach for inhibition of toxic oligomeric Aβ species formation in AD through the utilization of a compound that is currently in use in human diet.

  13. Styrene oligomerization as a molecular probe reaction for zeolite acidity: a UV-Vis spectroscopy and DFT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurmans, I.L.C.; Pidko, E.A.; Groot, de J.M.; Stavitski, E.; Santen, van R.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of H-ZSM-5 crystallites with different framework Si/Al ratios was studied by analyzing the kinetics and reaction mechanism of the oligomerization of 4-fluorostyrene as molecular probe reaction for Brønsted acidity. The formation of carbocationic species was followed by UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  14. Immobilization of isolated FI catalyst on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-functionalized silica for the synthesis of weakly entangled polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yang, Huaqin; Zhang, Jingjing; Mu, Jingshan; Gong, Dirong; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-09-25

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSSs) were adsorbed on methylaluminoxane-activated silica for the immobilization of fluorinated bis(phenoxyimine)Ti complexes (FI catalyst). These POSSs have been characterized as horizontal spacers isolating the active sites and hindering the chain overlap in polymerization. The heterogeneous catalyst exhibits considerable activity in the synthesis of weakly entangled polyethylene.

  15. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to growth and disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity...... in patients with recent-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). COMP levels in JIA and healthy children were compared with those in healthy adults. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1), which has been associated with COMP expression and growth velocity, were studied in parallel. METHODS......: 87 patients with JIA entered the study, including oligoarticular JIA (n = 34), enthesitis-related arthritis (n = 8), polyarticular rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive JIA (n = 2), polyarticular RF-negative JIA (n = 27), systemic JIA (n = 6), and undifferentiated JIA (n = 10). Plasma levels of COMP were...

  16. Hedgehog Buckyball: A High-Symmetry Complete Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report UV-MALDI-TOF MS evidence of a fullerene-like silsesquioxane, a high-symmetry polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS or SSO formulated as R60-Si60O90 or T60 (T = RSiO1.5. The T60 preparation can be performed using a normal hydrolytic condensation of [(3-methacryloxypropyl]trimethoxysilane (MPMS as an example. Theoretically, four 3sp3 hybrid orbitals (each containing an unpaired electron of a Si atom are generated before the bond formation. Then it bonds to another four atom electrons using the four generated hybrid orbitals which produced a stable configuration. This fullerene-like silsesquioxane should exhibit much more functionality, activity and selectivity and is easier to assemble than the double bonds in a fullerene.

  17. Multifunctional Mesoporous Ionic Gels and Scaffolds Derived from Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Hong; Lee, Albert S; Lee, Jong-Chan; Hong, Soon Man; Hwang, Seung Sang; Koo, Chong Min

    2017-02-01

    A new methodology for fabrication of inorganic-organic hybrid ionogels and scaffolds is developed through facile cross-linking and solution extraction of a newly developed ionic polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane with inorganic core. Through design of various cationic tertiary amines, as well as cross-linkable functional groups on each arm of the inorganic core, high-performance ionogels are fabricated with excellent electrochemical stability and unique ion conduction behavior, giving superior lithium ion battery performance. Moreover, through solvent extraction of the liquid components, hybrid scaffolds with well-defined, interconnected mesopores are utilized as heterogeneous catalysts for the CO 2 -catalyzed cycloaddition of epoxides. Excellent catalytic performance, as well as highly efficient recyclability are observed when compared to other previous literature materials.

  18. Efficient light-emitting devices based on platinum-complexes-anchored polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane materials

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2010-08-24

    The synthesis, photophysical, and electrochemical characterization of macromolecules, consisting of an emissive platinum complex and carbazole moieties covalently attached to a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) core, is reported. Organic light-emitting devices based on these POSS materials exhibit a peak external quantum efficiency of ca. 8%, which is significantly higher than that of the analogous devices with a physical blend of the platinum complexes and a polymer matrix, and they represent noticeable improvement in the device efficiency of solution-processable phosphorescent excimer devices. Furthermore, the ratio of monomer and excimer/aggregate electroluminescent emission intensity, as well as the device efficiency, increases as the platinum complex moiety presence on the POSS macromolecules decreases. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  19. Flow cytometry evidence of human granulocytes interaction with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes: effect of nanoparticle charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renò, Filippo; Rizzi, Manuela; Pittarella, Pamela; Carniato, Fabio; Olivero, Francesco; Marchese, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) entering the human body are immediately confronted with the innate part of human immune system. In particular, monocyte and neutrophil granulocytes readily clear particles by phagocytosis, even if in the case of NPs the uptake mechanism may be classified as macropinocytosis. Among engineered nanoparticles, in the last years, siliceous materials have emerged as promising materials for several applications ranging from catalysis to biomedical. The polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) are nanodimensional, easily synthesizable molecular compounds and POSS-based systems are promising carriers for biological molecules. In this work, the ability of human granulocytes to uptake positively and negatively charged POSS was measured using a simple flow cytometry analysis based on cell size modifications. The data obtained showed that after a 30 min exposure only positive NPs were uptaken by human granulocyte using both macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated mechanisms as demonstrated by uptake inhibition mediated by amiloride and chlorpromazine. (paper)

  20. Assembly of the intrinsic factor domains and oligomerization of the protein in the presence of cobalamin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Fedosova, Natalya U; Berglund, Lars

    2004-01-01

    oligomerized. A mixture of two fragments IF(30) + IF(20) and Cbl produced a firm complex, IF(30+20).Cbl, which could not associate to dimers. In contrast to IF(30+20).Cbl, the saturated full-length monomers IF(50).Cbl dimerized with K(d) approximately 1 microM. We suggest a two-domain organization of the full......-length protein, where two distant units, IF(30) and IF(20), can be assembled only by Cbl. They are connected by a protease-sensitive link, whose native structure is likely to be important for dimerization. However, linkage between two domains is not compulsory for Cbl binding. Advantages of the two...

  1. Core-6 fucose and the oligomerization of the 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhengliang L.; Zhou, Hui; Ethen, Cheryl M.; Reinhold, Vernon N.

    2016-01-01

    The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus was responsible for one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. Yet to date, the structure component responsible for its virulence is still a mystery. In order to search for such a component, the neuraminidase (NA) antigen of the virus was expressed, which led to the discovery of an active form (tetramer) and an inactive form (dimer and monomer) of the protein due to different glycosylation. In this report, the N-glycans from both forms were released and characterized by mass spectrometry. It was found that the glycans from the active form had 26% core-6 fucosylated, while the glycans from the inactive form had 82% core-6 fucosylated. Even more surprisingly, the stalk region of the active form was almost completely devoid of core-6-linked fucose. These findings were further supported by the results obtained from in vitro incorporation of azido fucose and "3H-labeled fucose using core-6 fucosyltransferase, FUT8. In addition, the incorporation of fucose did not change the enzymatic activity of the active form, implying that core-6 fucose is not directly involved in the enzymatic activity. It is postulated that core-6 fucose prohibits the oligomerization and subsequent activation of the enzyme. - Graphical abstract: Proposed mechanism for how core-fucose prohibits the tetramerization of the 1918 pandemic viral neuraminidase. Only the cross section of the stalk region with two N-linked glycans are depicted for clarity. (A) Carbohydrate–carbohydrate interaction on non-fucosylated monomer allows tetramerization. (B) Core-fucosylation disrupts the interaction and prevents the tetramerization. - Highlights: • Expressed 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase has inactive and active forms. • The inactive form contains high level of core-6 fucose, while the active form lacks such modification. • Core fucose could interfere the oligomerization of the neuraminidase and thus its activation. • This discovery may explain why

  2. Structural adaptation of the subunit interface of oligomeric thermophilic and hyperthermophilic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugini, Elisa; Tronelli, Daniele; Bossa, Francesco; Pascarella, Stefano

    2009-04-01

    Enzymes from thermophilic and, particularly, from hyperthermophilic organisms are surprisingly stable. Understanding of the molecular origin of protein thermostability and thermoactivity attracted the interest of many scientist both for the perspective comprehension of the principles of protein structure and for the possible biotechnological applications through application of protein engineering. Comparative studies at sequence and structure levels were aimed at detecting significant differences of structural parameters related to protein stability between thermophilic and hyperhermophilic structures and their mesophilic homologs. Comparative studies were useful in the identification of a few recurrent themes which the evolution utilized in different combinations in different protein families. These studies were mostly carried out at the monomer level. However, maintenance of a proper quaternary structure is an essential prerequisite for a functional macromolecule. At the environmental temperatures experienced typically by hyper- and thermophiles, the subunit interactions mediated by the interface must be sufficiently stable. Our analysis was therefore aimed at the identification of the molecular strategies adopted by evolution to enhance interface thermostability of oligomeric enzymes. The variation of several structural properties related to protein stability were tested at the subunit interfaces of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic oligomers. The differences of the interface structural features observed between the hyperthermophilic and thermophilic enzymes were compared with the differences of the same properties calculated from pairwise comparisons of oligomeric mesophilic proteins contained in a reference dataset. The significance of the observed differences of structural properties was measured by a t-test. Ion pairs and hydrogen bonds do not vary significantly while hydrophobic contact area increases specially in hyperthermophilic interfaces. Interface

  3. Core-6 fucose and the oligomerization of the 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhengliang L., E-mail: Leon.wu@bio-techne.com [Bio-Techne Inc., 614 McKinley Place NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413 (United States); Zhou, Hui [Gregg Hall, UNH Glycomics Center, University of New Hampshire (United States); Ethen, Cheryl M. [Bio-Techne Inc., 614 McKinley Place NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413 (United States); Reinhold, Vernon N., E-mail: Vernon.Reinhold@unh.edu [Gregg Hall, UNH Glycomics Center, University of New Hampshire (United States)

    2016-04-29

    The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus was responsible for one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. Yet to date, the structure component responsible for its virulence is still a mystery. In order to search for such a component, the neuraminidase (NA) antigen of the virus was expressed, which led to the discovery of an active form (tetramer) and an inactive form (dimer and monomer) of the protein due to different glycosylation. In this report, the N-glycans from both forms were released and characterized by mass spectrometry. It was found that the glycans from the active form had 26% core-6 fucosylated, while the glycans from the inactive form had 82% core-6 fucosylated. Even more surprisingly, the stalk region of the active form was almost completely devoid of core-6-linked fucose. These findings were further supported by the results obtained from in vitro incorporation of azido fucose and {sup 3}H-labeled fucose using core-6 fucosyltransferase, FUT8. In addition, the incorporation of fucose did not change the enzymatic activity of the active form, implying that core-6 fucose is not directly involved in the enzymatic activity. It is postulated that core-6 fucose prohibits the oligomerization and subsequent activation of the enzyme. - Graphical abstract: Proposed mechanism for how core-fucose prohibits the tetramerization of the 1918 pandemic viral neuraminidase. Only the cross section of the stalk region with two N-linked glycans are depicted for clarity. (A) Carbohydrate–carbohydrate interaction on non-fucosylated monomer allows tetramerization. (B) Core-fucosylation disrupts the interaction and prevents the tetramerization. - Highlights: • Expressed 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase has inactive and active forms. • The inactive form contains high level of core-6 fucose, while the active form lacks such modification. • Core fucose could interfere the oligomerization of the neuraminidase and thus its activation. • This discovery may explain

  4. An Intramolecular Salt Bridge in Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba Toxin Is Involved in the Stability of Helix α-3, Which Is Needed for Oligomerization and Insecticidal Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Sabino; Gómez, Isabel; Sánchez, Jorge; García-Gómez, Blanca-Ines; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2017-10-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis three-domain Cry toxins kill insects by forming pores in the apical membrane of larval midgut cells. Oligomerization of the toxin is an important step for pore formation. Domain I helix α-3 participates in toxin oligomerization. Here we identify an intramolecular salt bridge within helix α-3 of Cry4Ba (D111-K115) that is conserved in many members of the family of three-domain Cry toxins. Single point mutations such as D111K or K115D resulted in proteins severely affected in toxicity. These mutants were also altered in oligomerization, and the mutant K115D was more sensitive to protease digestion. The double point mutant with reversed charges, D111K-K115D, recovered both oligomerization and toxicity, suggesting that this salt bridge is highly important for conservation of the structure of helix α-3 and necessary to promote the correct oligomerization of the toxin. IMPORTANCE Domain I has been shown to be involved in oligomerization through helix α-3 in different Cry toxins, and mutations affecting oligomerization also elicit changes in toxicity. The three-dimensional structure of the Cry4Ba toxin reveals an intramolecular salt bridge in helix α-3 of domain I. Mutations that disrupt this salt bridge resulted in changes in Cry4Ba oligomerization and toxicity, while a double point reciprocal mutation that restored the salt bridge resulted in recovery of toxin oligomerization and toxicity. These data highlight the role of oligomer formation as a key step in Cry4Ba toxicity. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Guanine nucleotide regulation of α1-adrenergic receptors of muscle and kidney eptihelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terman, B.I.; Hughes, R.J.; Slivka, S.R.; Insel, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have examined the effect of guanine nucleotides on the interaction of adrenergic agents with α 1 -adrenergic receptors of two cell lines, the Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and BC3H-1 muscle cells. While gaunylylimidodiphosphoate (Gpp(NH)p) had no effect on the affinity or the total number of [ -3 H]prazosin binding sites in membranes prepared from these cells, the nucleotide decreased the apparent affinity of the agonist epinephrine in competing for [ 3 H]prazosin binding sites in both cell types. The EC 50 of Gpp(NH)p was ∼100 μM, and a maximal effect was seen at 500 μM. In contrast, 100 μM Gpp(NH)p yielding maximal shifts in binding of epinephrine to β-adrenergic receptors in BC3H-1 cell membranes. Guanine nucleotides were significantly more effective than adenine nucleotides in shifting agonist affinity for the α 1 -receptor and Mg ++ was required to observe a maximal effect. α 1 -receptor agonists activated phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis in both cell types, but have no direct effect on membrane adenylate cyclase activity. In intact BC3H-1 cells, α 1 -agonists inhibited β-adrenergic cAMP production, an effect which appears in preliminary studies not to result from enhanced phosphodieterase activity. These results show that agonist binding to α 1 -adrenergic receptors in mammalian kidney and muscle cells is regulated by guanine nucleotides. This regulation and inturn transmembrane signalling (PI hydrolysis) by these receptors appear to involve a guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein, which may be different than G/sub s/ and G/sub i/

  6. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    functional units, receptors co-operate. The total receptor apparatus of individual cell types is composed of different-ligand receptors (e.g. SRIF and non-SRIF receptors) and co-expressed receptor subtypes (e.g. sst(2) and sst(5) receptors) in characteristic proportions. In other words, levels of individual......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  7. Structure of the gene for human β2-adrenergic receptor: expression and promoter characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emorine, L.J.; Marullo, S.; Delavier-Klutchko, C.; Kaveri, S.V.; Durieu-Trautmann, O.; Strosberg, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    The genomic gene coding for the human β 2 -adrenergic receptor (β 2 AR) from A431 epidermoid cells has been isolated. Transfection of the gene into eukaryotic cells restores a fully active receptor/GTP-binding protein/adenylate cyclase complex with β 2 AR properties. Southern blot analyses with β 2 AR-specific probes show that a single β 2 AR gene is common to various human tissues and that its flanking sequences are highly conserved among humans and between man and rabbit, mouse, and hamster. Functional significance of these regions is supported by the presence of a promoter region (including mRNA cap sites, two TATA boxes, a CAAT box, and three G + C-rich regions that resemble binding sites for transcription factor Sp1) 200-300 base pairs 5' to the translation initiation codon. In the 3' flanking region, sequences homologous to glucocorticoid-response elements might be responsible for the increased expression of the β 2 AR gene observed after treatment of the transfected cells with hydrocortisone. In addition, 5' to the promoter region, an open reading frame encodes a 251-residue polypeptide that displays striking homologies with protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins

  8. Computational Study of the Effect of Confinement within Microporous Structures on the Activity and Selectivity of Metallocene Catalysts for Ethylene Oligomerization

    KAUST Repository

    Toulhoat, Hervé; Lontsi Fomena, Mireille; de Bruin, Theodorus

    2011-01-01

    The effect of confinement within some zeolitic structures on the activity and selectivity of metallocene catalysts for the ethylene oligomerization has been investigated using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations (GCMC). The following zeolite

  9. The Ubiquitin Ligase XIAP Recruits LUBAC for NOD2 Signaling in Inflammation and Innate Immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Rune Busk; Nachbur, Ueli; Yabal, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors constitute a first line of defense against invading bacteria. X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis (XIAP) is implicated in the control of bacterial infections, and mutations in XIAP are causally linked to immunodeficiency in X-linked l......Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors constitute a first line of defense against invading bacteria. X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis (XIAP) is implicated in the control of bacterial infections, and mutations in XIAP are causally linked to immunodeficiency in X......-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type-2 (XLP-2). Here, we demonstrate that the RING domain of XIAP is essential for NOD2 signaling and that XIAP contributes to exacerbation of inflammation-induced hepatitis in experimental mice. We find that XIAP ubiquitylates RIPK2 and recruits the linear ubiquitin chain assembly...... signaling. We conclude that XIAP and LUBAC constitute essential ubiquitin ligases in NOD2-mediated inflammatory signaling and propose that deregulation of NOD2 signaling contributes to XLP-2 pathogenesis....

  10. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.meyer@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  11. Characterization of oligomerization of a peptide from the ebola virus glycoprotein by small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, V. V.; Gorshkov, A. N.; Murugova, T. N.; Vasin, A. V.; Lebedev, D. V.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Kiselev, O. I.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies showed that model peptides QNALVCGLRQ (G33) and QNALVCGLRG (G31) corresponding to region 551–560 of the GP protein of the Sudan Ebola virus are prone to oligomerization in solution. Both peptides can form amyloid-like fibrills. The G33 peptide forms fibrils within one day of incubation, whereas the fibrillogenesis of the G31 peptide is observed only after incubation for several months. The possible role of the observed processes in the pathogenesis and the possibility of applying a combination of the TEM and SANS techniques to search for new compounds that are able to influence the protein oligomerization are discussed

  12. Characterization of oligomerization of a peptide from the ebola virus glycoprotein by small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, V. V., E-mail: vlaegur@omrb.pnpi.spb.ru [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Gorshkov, A. N. [Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Institute of Influenza (Russian Federation); Murugova, T. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Vasin, A. V. [Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Institute of Influenza (Russian Federation); Lebedev, D. V.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kiselev, O. I. [Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Institute of Influenza (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies showed that model peptides QNALVCGLRQ (G33) and QNALVCGLRG (G31) corresponding to region 551–560 of the GP protein of the Sudan Ebola virus are prone to oligomerization in solution. Both peptides can form amyloid-like fibrills. The G33 peptide forms fibrils within one day of incubation, whereas the fibrillogenesis of the G31 peptide is observed only after incubation for several months. The possible role of the observed processes in the pathogenesis and the possibility of applying a combination of the TEM and SANS techniques to search for new compounds that are able to influence the protein oligomerization are discussed.

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Est-Y29: a novel oligomeric β-lactamase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, SeungBum; Joo, Sangbum; Yoon, Sangyoung; Kim, Sungsoo; Moon, Jongkook; Ryu, Yeonwoo; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Kim, T. Doohun

    2009-01-01

    Est-Y29, a novel oligomeric class C β-lactamase from a metagenomic library, was crystallized in space group I4 1 and diffraction data were collected to 1.49 Å resolution. β-Lactam antibiotics such as penicillins and cephalosporins have a four-atom ring as a common element in their structure. The β-lactamases, which catalyze the inactivation of these antibiotics, are of great interest because of their high incidence in pathogenic bacteria. A novel oligomeric class C β-lactamase (Est-Y29) from a metagenomic library was expressed, purified and crystallized. The recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal 6×His tag and purified to homogeneity. EstY-29 was crystallized and X-ray intensity data were collected to 1.49 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation

  14. Moyamoya disease-associated protein mysterin/RNF213 is a novel AAA+ ATPase, which dynamically changes its oligomeric state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morito, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Kouki; Hoseki, Jun; Kitamura, Akira; Kotani, Yuri; Kiso, Kazumi; Kinjo, Masataka; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2014-03-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic human cerebrovascular disorder that is characterized by progressive stenosis and abnormal collateral vessels. We recently identified mysterin/RNF213 as its first susceptibility gene, which encodes a 591-kDa protein containing enzymatically active P-loop ATPase and ubiquitin ligase domains and is involved in proper vascular development in zebrafish. Here we demonstrate that mysterin further contains two tandem AAA+ ATPase modules and forms huge ring-shaped oligomeric complex. AAA+ ATPases are known to generally mediate various biophysical and mechanical processes with the characteristic ring-shaped structure. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and biochemical evaluation suggested that mysterin dynamically changes its oligomeric forms through ATP/ADP binding and hydrolysis cycles. Thus, the moyamoya disease-associated gene product is a unique protein that functions as ubiquitin ligase and AAA+ ATPase, which possibly contributes to vascular development through mechanical processes in the cell.

  15. Characterization of oligomerization of a peptide from the ebola virus glycoprotein by small-angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, V. V.; Gorshkov, A. N.; Murugova, T. N.; Vasin, A. V.; Lebedev, D. V.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Kiselev, O. I.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies showed that model peptides QNALVCGLRQ (G33) and QNALVCGLRG (G31) corresponding to region 551-560 of the GP protein of the Sudan Ebola virus are prone to oligomerization in solution. Both peptides can form amyloid-like fibrills. The G33 peptide forms fibrils within one day of incubation, whereas the fibrillogenesis of the G31 peptide is observed only after incubation for several months. The possible role of the observed processes in the pathogenesis and the possibility of applying a combination of the TEM and SANS techniques to search for new compounds that are able to influence the protein oligomerization are discussed.

  16. Moyamoya disease-associated protein mysterin/RNF213 is a novel AAA+ ATPase, which dynamically changes its oligomeric state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morito, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Kouki; Hoseki, Jun; Kitamura, Akira; Kotani, Yuri; Kiso, Kazumi; Kinjo, Masataka; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic human cerebrovascular disorder that is characterized by progressive stenosis and abnormal collateral vessels. We recently identified mysterin/RNF213 as its first susceptibility gene, which encodes a 591-kDa protein containing enzymatically active P-loop ATPase and ubiquitin ligase domains and is involved in proper vascular development in zebrafish. Here we demonstrate that mysterin further contains two tandem AAA+ ATPase modules and forms huge ring-shaped oligomeric complex. AAA+ ATPases are known to generally mediate various biophysical and mechanical processes with the characteristic ring-shaped structure. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and biochemical evaluation suggested that mysterin dynamically changes its oligomeric forms through ATP/ADP binding and hydrolysis cycles. Thus, the moyamoya disease-associated gene product is a unique protein that functions as ubiquitin ligase and AAA+ ATPase, which possibly contributes to vascular development through mechanical processes in the cell. PMID:24658080

  17. Development, validation and evaluation of an analytical method for the determination of monomeric and oligomeric procyanidins in apple extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Wendy J; Voorspoels, Stefan; Jacobs, Griet; Aaby, Kjersti; Meisland, Ane; Garcia-Villalba, Rocio; Tomas-Barberan, Francisco; Piskula, Mariusz K; Mawson, Deborah; Vovk, Irena; Needs, Paul W; Kroon, Paul A

    2017-04-28

    There is a lack of data for individual oligomeric procyanidins in apples and apple extracts. Our aim was to develop, validate and evaluate an analytical method for the separation, identification and quantification of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols in apple extracts. To achieve this, we prepared two types of flavanol extracts from freeze-dried apples; one was an epicatechin-rich extract containing ∼30% (w/w) monomeric (-)-epicatechin which also contained oligomeric procyanidins (Extract A), the second was an oligomeric procyanidin-rich extract depleted of epicatechin (Extract B). The parameters considered for method optimisation were HPLC columns and conditions, sample heating, mass of extract and dilution volumes. The performance characteristics considered for method validation included standard linearity, method sensitivity, precision and trueness. Eight laboratories participated in the method evaluation. Chromatographic separation of the analytes was best achieved utilizing a Hilic column with a binary mobile phase consisting of acidic acetonitrile and acidic aqueous methanol. The final method showed linearity for epicatechin in the range 5-100μg/mL with a correlation co-efficient >0.999. Intra-day and inter-day precision of the analytes ranged from 2 to 6% and 2 to 13% respectively. Up to dp3, trueness of the method was >95% but decreased with increasing dp. Within laboratory precision showed RSD values <5 and 10% for monomers and oligomers, respectively. Between laboratory precision was 4 and 15% (Extract A) and 7 and 30% (Extract B) for monomers and oligomers, respectively. An analytical method for the separation, identification and quantification of procyanidins in an apple extract was developed, validated and assessed. The results of the inter-laboratory evaluation indicate that the method is reliable and reproducible. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of an octaimidazolium-based polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes ionic liquid by an ion-exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jinglin; Ma, Depeng; Sun, Xingrong; Feng, Shengyu; Zhang, Changqiao

    2013-04-07

    Preparation of POSS-min-DS, an octaimidazolium-based polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) room temperature ionic liquid, by an ion-exchange reaction between POSS and sodium dodecyl sulfate was reported. Octaimidazolium-based POSS was synthesized with more than 98% yield within 3 h. POSS-min-DS and octaimidazolium-based POSS were confirmed by (1)H, (13)C, and (29)Si NMR, FT-IR and elemental analysis.

  19. Oligomeric adiponectin forms and their complexes in the blood of healthy donors and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Alexander E; Filatov, Vladimir L; Kolosova, Olga V; Katrukha, Ivan A; Mironova, Ekaterina V; Zhuravleva, Natalya S; Nagibin, Oleg A; Kara, Andrei N; Bereznikova, Anastasiya V; Katrukha, Alexey G

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin (Adn) is a protein that circulates in the blood in several oligomeric forms, namely low-, medium-, and high-molecular-weight forms. Adn may serve as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aims of this work were (1) to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to different Adn oligomeric forms, (2) to design immunoassays suitable for measuring the Adn forms present in human blood, and (3) to investigate the changes in Adn forms that occur in patients with T2DM. Gel filtration, fluoroimmunoassays, and Western blotting were utilized as major techniques in this study. MAbs recognizing various oligomeric forms of Adn were obtained. Complexes between Adn and complement component C1q and between the low molecular weight form of Adn and albumin were described in human blood. A decrease in the total Adn and Adn-albumin complex levels in the blood of patients with T2DM and no difference in the levels of the Adn-C1q complex in comparison with healthy volunteers were demonstrated. An Adn94-Adn63 fluoroimmunoassay was selected as the technique that most accurately measured the mass ratio of Adn oligomers in blood samples, and an Adn214-Adn27 assay that measured the low-molecular-weight form of Adn only.

  20. Detection of Amyloid Beta (Aβ) Oligomeric Composition Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jasmine S.-H.; Whitehead, Shawn N.; Yeung, Ken K.-C.

    2018-02-01

    The use of MALDI MS as a fast and direct method to detect the Aβ oligomers of different masses is examined in this paper. Experimental results suggest that Aβ oligomers are ionized and detected as singly charged ions, and thus, the resulting mass spectrum directly reports the oligomer size distribution. Validation experiments were performed to verify the MS data against artifacts. Mass spectra collected from modified Aβ peptides with different propensities for aggregation were compared. Generally, the relative intensities of multimers were higher from samples where oligomerization was expected to be more favorable, and vice versa. MALDI MS was also able to detect the differences in oligomeric composition before and after the incubation/oligomerization step. Such differences in sample composition were also independently confirmed with an in vitro Aβ toxicity study on primary rat cortical neurons. An additional validation was accomplished through removal of oligomers from the sample using molecular weight cutoff filters; the resulting MS data correctly reflected the removal at the expected cutoff points. The results collectively validated the ability of MALDI MS to assess the monomeric/multimeric composition of Aβ samples. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Spa47 is an oligomerization-activated type three secretion system (T3SS) ATPase from Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Jamie L; Jones, Heather B; Kumar, Prashant; Toth, Ronald T; Middaugh, C Russell; Antony, Edwin; Dickenson, Nicholas E

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative pathogens often use conserved type three secretion systems (T3SS) for virulence. The Shigella type three secretion apparatus (T3SA) penetrates the host cell membrane and provides a unidirectional conduit for injection of effectors into host cells. The protein Spa47 localizes to the base of the apparatus and is speculated to be an ATPase that provides the energy for T3SA formation and secretion. Here, we developed an expression and purification protocol, producing active Spa47 and providing the first direct evidence that Spa47 is a bona fide ATPase. Additionally, size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation identified multiple oligomeric species of Spa47 with the largest greater than 8 fold more active for ATP hydrolysis than the monomer. An ATPase inactive Spa47 point mutant was then engineered by targeting a conserved Lysine within the predicted Walker A motif of Spa47. Interestingly, the mutant maintained a similar oligomerization pattern as active Spa47, but was unable to restore invasion phenotype when used to complement a spa47 null S. flexneri strain. Together, these results identify Spa47 as a Shigella T3SS ATPase and suggest that its activity is linked to oligomerization, perhaps as a regulatory mechanism as seen in some related pathogens. Additionally, Spa47 catalyzed ATP hydrolysis appears to be essential for host cell invasion, providing a strong platform for additional studies dissecting its role in virulence and providing an attractive target for anti-infective agents. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  2. Coatings of molecularly imprinted polymers based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane for open tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing-Li; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Li-Shun; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2016-05-15

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was successfully applied, for the first time, to prepare imprinted monolithic coating for capillary electrochromatography. The imprinted monolithic coating was synthesized with a mixture of PSS-(1-Propylmethacrylate)-heptaisobutyl substituted (MA 0702), S-amlodipine (template), methacrylic acid (functional monomer), and 2-methacrylamidopropyl methacrylate (crosslinker), in a porogenic mixture of toluene-isooctane. The influence of synthesis parameters on the imprinting effect and separation performance, including the amount of MA 0702, the ratio of template to monomer, and the ratio of monomer to crosslinker, was investigated. The greatest resolution for enantiomers separation on the imprinted monolithic column prepared with MA 0702 was up to 22.3, about 2 times higher than that prepared in absence of the POSS. Column efficiency on the POSS-based MIP coatings was beyond 30,000 plate m(-1). The comparisons between MIP coating synthesized with the POSS and without the POSS were made in terms of selectivity, column efficiency, and resolution. POSS-based MIP capillaries with naproxen or zopiclone was also prepared and separation of enantiomers can be achieved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dielectric properties of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-based nanocomposites at 77k

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Ming-Jen; Gorzkowski, Edward; McAllister, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop dielectric nanocomposites for high energy density applications at liquid nitrogen temperature by utilizing a unique nano-material polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS). A POSS molecule is consisted of a silica cage core with 8 silicon and 12 oxygen atoms and organic functional groups attached to the corners of the cage. In this study, we utilize POSS for the fabrication of nanocomposites both as a silica nanoparticle filler to enhance the breakdown strength and as a surfactant for effective dispersion of high permittivity ceramic nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. The matrix materials selected for the study are polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The ceramic nanoparticles are barium strontium titanate (BST 50/50) and strontium titanate. The dielectric properties of the solution-cast nanocomposites films were correlated to the composition and processing conditions. We determined that the addition of POSS did not provide enhanced dielectric performance in PVDF- and PMMA-based materials at either room temperature or 77K. In addition, we found that the dielectric breakdown strength of PMMA is lower at 77K than at room temperature, contradicting literature data.

  4. Ion Channel Conformation and Oligomerization Assessment by Site-Directed Spin Labeling and Pulsed-EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliotas, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels are multimeric integral membrane proteins that respond to increased lipid bilayer tension by opening their nonselective pores to release solutes and relieve increased cytoplasmic pressure. These systems undergo major conformational changes during gating and the elucidation of their mechanism requires a deep understanding of the interplay between lipids and proteins. Lipids are responsible for transmitting lateral tension to MS channels and therefore play a key role in obtaining a molecular-detail model for mechanosensation. Site-directed spin labeling combined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful spectroscopic tool in the study of proteins. The main bottleneck for its use relates to challenges associated with successful isolation of the protein of interest, introduction of paramagnetic labels on desired sites, and access to specialized instrumentation and expertise. The design of sophisticated experiments, which combine a variety of existing EPR methodologies to address a diversity of specific questions, require knowledge of the limitations and strengths, characteristic of each particular EPR method. This chapter is using the MS ion channels as paradigms and focuses on the application of different EPR techniques to ion channels, in order to investigate oligomerization, conformation, and the effect of lipids on their regulation. The methodology we followed, from the initial strategic selection of mutants and sample preparation, including protein purification, spin labeling, reconstitution into lipid mimics to the complete set-up of the pulsed-EPR experiments, is described in detail. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Crystal structure of the Haemophilus influenzae Hap adhesin reveals an intercellular oligomerization mechanism for bacterial aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guoyu; Spahich, Nicole; Kenjale, Roma; Waksman, Gabriel; St Geme, Joseph W

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are complex microbial communities that are common in nature and are being recognized increasingly as an important determinant of bacterial virulence. However, the structural determinants of bacterial aggregation and eventual biofilm formation have been poorly defined. In Gram-negative bacteria, a major subgroup of extracellular proteins called self-associating autotransporters (SAATs) can mediate cell–cell adhesion and facilitate biofilm formation. In this study, we used the Haemophilus influenzae Hap autotransporter as a prototype SAAT to understand how bacteria associate with each other. The crystal structure of the H. influenzae HapS passenger domain (harbouring the SAAT domain) was determined to 2.2 Å by X-ray crystallography, revealing an unprecedented intercellular oligomerization mechanism for cell–cell interaction. The C-terminal SAAT domain folds into a triangular-prism-like structure that can mediate Hap–Hap dimerization and higher degrees of multimerization through its F1–F2 edge and F2 face. The intercellular multimerization can give rise to massive buried surfaces that are required for overcoming the repulsive force between cells, leading to bacterial cell–cell interaction and formation of complex microcolonies. PMID:21841773

  6. Structure-properties relationships of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS filled PS nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Schwab

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS additivated polystyrene (PS based nanocomposites were prepared by melt processing and the structure-properties relationships of the POSS-PS systems were compared to those of the neat PS. In order to investigate the effect of these structural parameters on the final properties of the polymer nanocomposites, five different kinds of POSS samples were used, in particular, POSS with different inorganic cage and with different organic pendent groups. The rheological investigation suggests clearly that the POSS acts as a plasticizer and that the processability of the PS was positively modified. The affinity between the POSS samples and the PS matrix was estimated by the calculated theoretical solubility parameters, considering the Hoy’s method and by morphology analysis. Minor difference between the solubility parameter of POSS and the matrix means better compatibility and no aggregation tendency. Furthermore, the POSS loading leads to a decrease of the rigidity, of the glass transition temperature and of the damping factor of the nanocomposite systems. The loading of different POSS molecules with open cage leads to a more pronounced effect on all the investigated properties that the loading of the POSS molecules with closed cage. Moreover, the melt properties are significantly influenced by the type of inorganic framework, by the type of the pendent organic groups and by the interaction between the POSS organic groups and the host matrix, while, the solid state properties appears to be influenced more by the kind of cage.

  7. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is activated by double-stranded DNA-induced oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Shu, Chang; Yi, Guanghui; Chaton, Catherine T; Shelton, Catherine L; Diao, Jiasheng; Zuo, Xiaobing; Kao, C Cheng; Herr, Andrew B; Li, Pingwei

    2013-12-12

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor mediating innate antimicrobial immunity. It catalyzes the synthesis of a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide, 2',5' cGAMP, that binds to STING and mediates the activation of TBK1 and IRF-3. Activated IRF-3 translocates to the nucleus and initiates the transcription of the IFN-β gene. The structure of mouse cGAS bound to an 18 bp dsDNA revealed that cGAS interacts with dsDNA through two binding sites, forming a 2:2 complex. Enzyme assays and IFN-β reporter assays of cGAS mutants demonstrated that interactions at both DNA binding sites are essential for cGAS activation. Mutagenesis and DNA binding studies showed that the two sites bind dsDNA cooperatively and that site B plays a critical role in DNA binding. The structure of mouse cGAS bound to dsDNA and 2',5' cGAMP provided insight into the catalytic mechanism of cGAS. These results demonstrated that cGAS is activated by dsDNA-induced oligomerization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Photo-polymerization of photocurable resins containing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ho-May; Wu, Shi-Yin; Chang, Feng-Chih; Yen, Ying-Chieh

    2011-01-01

    Photocurable resins, bisphenol A propoxylate glycerolate diacrylate (BPA-PGDA, containing two hydroxyl) and bisphenol A propoxylate diacrylate (BPA-PDA), with fixed photoinitiator (Irgacure 907) concentration and various contents of methacrylisobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (MI-POSS) were prepared and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and differential photocalorimetry. The MI-POSS molecules form crystals or aggregated particles in the cured resin matrix. The BPA-PGDA series photocurable resins show higher viscosity and lower photo-polymerization reactivity than the BPA-PDA series resins. The photo-polymerization rate and conversion of BPA-PGDA series are improved with increasing MI-POSS content. On the contrary, the photo-polymerization behavior of BPA-PDA series photocurable resins remains nearly unchanged by the addition of MI-POSS. Hydrogen-bonding interaction between the hydroxyl of BPA-PGDA and the siloxane of MI-POSS tends to attract and concentrate these acrylate double bonds around MI-POSS particles and thus enhances the photo-polymerization rate and conversion.

  9. Hydroxychloroquine induces inhibition of collagen type II and oligomeric matrix protein COMP expression in chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydroxychloroquine on the level of collagen type II and oligomeric matrix protein COMP expression in chondrocytes of knee osteoarthritis. The rate of growth in cartilage cells was analyzed using MTT assay whereas the Col-2 and COMP expression levels were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. For the determination of MMP-13 expression, ELISA test was used. The results revealed no significant change in the rate of cartilage cell proliferation in hydroxychloroquine-treated compared to untreated cells. Hydroxychloro-quine treatment exhibited concentration- and time-dependent effect on the inhibition of collagen type II and COMP expression in chondrocytes. However, its treatment caused a significant enhancement in the expression levels of MMP-13 compared to the untreated cells. Therefore, hydroxychloro-quine promotes expression of MMP-13 and reduces collagen type II and COMP expression levels in chondrocytes without any significant change in the growth of cells.

  10. Hexokinase 2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: regulation of oligomeric structure by in vivo phosphorylation at serine-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behlke, J; Heidrich, K; Naumann, M; Müller, E C; Otto, A; Reuter, R; Kriegel, T

    1998-08-25

    Homodimeric hexokinase 2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known to have two sites of phosphorylation: for serine-14 the modification in vivo increases with glucose exhaustion [Kriegel et al. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 148-152], while for serine-157 it occurs in vitro with ATP in the presence of nonphosphorylateable five-carbon analogues of glucose [Heidrich et al. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 1960-1964]. We show now by site-directed mutagenesis and sedimentation analysis that serine-14 phosphorylation affects the oligomeric state of hexokinase, its substitution by glutamate causing complete dissociation; glutamate exchange for serine-157 does not. Phosphorylation of wild-type hexokinase at serine-14 likewise causes dissociation in vitro. In view of the higher glucose affinity of monomeric hexokinase and the high hexokinase concentration in yeast [Womack, F., and Colowick, S. P. (1978) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 191, 742-747; Mayes, E. L., Hoggett, J. G., and Kellett, G. L. (1983) Eur. J. Biochem. 133, 127-134], we speculate that the in vivo phosphorylation at serine-14 as transiently occurring in glucose derepression might provide a mechanism to improve glucose utilization from low level and/or that nuclear localization of the monomer might be involved in the signal transduction whereby glucose causes catabolite repression.

  11. Formation of semisolid, oligomerized aqueous SOA: lab simulations of cloud processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Lelia N; Baril, Molly J; Sedehi, Nahzaneen; Galloway, Melissa M; De Haan, David O; Schill, Gregory P; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2014-02-18

    Glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and hydroxyacetone form N-containing and oligomeric compounds during simulated cloud processing with small amines. Using a novel hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analysis (HTDMA) system that allows varied humidification times, the hygroscopic growth (HG) of each of the resulting products of simulated cloud processing was measured. Continuous water uptake (gradual deliquescence) was observed beginning at ∼ 40% RH for all aldehyde-methylamine products. Particles containing ionic reaction products of either glyoxal or glycine were most hygroscopic, with HG between 1.16 and 1.20 at 80% RH. Longer humidification times (up to 20 min) produced an increase in growth factors for glyoxal-methylamine (19% by vol) and methylglyoxal-methylamine (8% by vol) aerosol, indicating that unusually long equilibration times can be required for HTDMA measurements of such particles. Glyoxal- and methylglyoxal-methylamine aerosol particles shattered in Raman microscopy impact-flow experiments, revealing that the particles were semisolid. Similar experiments on glycolaldehyde- and hydroxyacetone-methylamine aerosol found that the aerosol particles were liquid when dried for glyoxal > glycolaldehyde = hydroxyacetone, likely caused by the speed of oligomer formation in each system.

  12. Transparent cellulose/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposites with enhanced UV-shielding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ye; Zhang, Jinming; He, Jiasong; Zhang, Jun

    2016-08-20

    The solubility of eight types of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) derivatives in an ionic liquid 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) and the dispersion of POSS in cellulose matrix were examined. Only a special POSS containing both aminophenyl and nitrophenyl groups (POSS-AN, NH2:NO2=2:6) was selected to prepare nanocomposites, because of its good solubility in AmimCl and high stability during the preparation process. POSS-AN nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in a cellulose matrix with a size of 30-40nm, and so the resultant cellulose/POSS-AN nanocomposite films were transparent. The mechanical properties of the films achieved a maximum tensile strength of 190MPa after addition of 2wt% POSS-AN. Interestingly, all of the cellulose/POSS-AN films exhibited high UV-absorbing capability. For the 15wt% cellulose/POSS-AN film, the transmittance of UVA (315-400nm) and UVB (280-315nm) was only 9.1% and nearly 0, respectively. The UV aging and shielding experiments showed that the transparent cellulose/POSS-AN nanocomposite films possessed anti-UV aging and UV shielding properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Construction of porous cationic frameworks by crosslinking polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane units with N-heterocyclic linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guojian; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Jing; Xue, Shuang; Liu, Yangqing; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    In fields of materials science and chemistry, ionic-type porous materials attract increasing attention due to significant ion-exchanging capacity for accessing diversified applications. Facing the fact that porous cationic materials with robust and stable frameworks are very rare, novel tactics that can create new type members are highly desired. Here we report the first family of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) based porous cationic frameworks (PCIF-n) with enriched poly(ionic liquid)-like cationic structures, tunable mesoporosities, high surface areas (up to 1,025 m2 g-1) and large pore volumes (up to 0.90 cm3 g-1). Our strategy is designing the new rigid POSS unit of octakis(chloromethyl)silsesquioxane and reacting it with the rigid N-heterocyclic cross-linkers (typically 4,4‧-bipyridine) for preparing the desired porous cationic frameworks. The PCIF-n materials possess large surface area, hydrophobic and special anion-exchanging property, and thus are used as the supports for loading guest species PMo10V2O405- the resultant hybrid behaves as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for aerobic oxidation of benzene and H2O2-mediated oxidation of cyclohexane.

  14. MAK33 antibody light chain amyloid fibrils are similar to oligomeric precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Hora

    Full Text Available Little structural information is available so far on amyloid fibrils consisting of immunoglobulin light chains. It is not understood which features of the primary sequence of the protein result in fibril formation. We report here MAS solid-state NMR studies to identify the structured core of κ-type variable domain light chain fibrils. The core contains residues of the CDR2 and the β-strands D, E, F and G of the native immunoglobulin fold. The assigned core region of the fibril is distinct in comparison to the core identified in a previous solid-state NMR study on AL-09 by Piehl at. al, suggesting that VL fibrils can adopt different topologies. In addition, we investigated a soluble oligomeric intermediate state, previously termed the alternatively folded state (AFS, using NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The NMR oligomer spectra display a high degree of similarity when compared to the fibril spectra, indicating a high structural similarity of the two aggregation states. Based on comparison to the native state NMR chemical shifts, we suggest that fibril formation via domain-swapping seems unlikely. Moreover, we used our results to test the quality of different amyloid prediction algorithms.

  15. IntraGolgi distribution of the Conserved Oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, Eliza; Oka, Toshihiko; Ericsson, Maria; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Krieger, Monty

    2006-01-01

    The Conserved Oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is an eight-subunit (Cog1-8) peripheral Golgi protein involved in membrane trafficking and glycoconjugate synthesis. COG appears to participate in retrograde vesicular transport and is required to maintain normal Golgi structure and function. COG mutations interfere with normal transport, distribution, and/or stability of Golgi proteins associated with glycoconjugate synthesis and trafficking, and lead to failure of spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, misdirected migration of gonadal distal tip cells in Caenorhabditis elegans, and type II congenital disorders of glycosylation in humans. The mechanism by which COG influences Golgi structure and function is unclear. Immunogold electron microscopy was used to visualize the intraGolgi distribution of a functional, hemagglutinin epitope-labeled COG subunit, Cog1-HA, that complements the Cog1-deficiency in Cog1-null Chinese hamster ovary cells. COG was found to be localized primarily on or in close proximity to the tips and rims of the Golgi's cisternae and their associated vesicles and on vesicles and vesiculo-tubular structures seen on both the cis and trans-Golgi Network faces of the cisternal stacks, in some cases on COPI containing vesicles. These findings support the proposal that COG is directly involved in controlling vesicular retrograde transport of Golgi resident proteins throughout the Golgi apparatus

  16. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)–poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hybrids as injectable biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstrand, Johanna; López, Alejandro; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    One of the major issues with the currently available injectable biomaterials for hard tissue replacement is the mismatch between their mechanical properties and those of the surrounding bone. Hybrid bone cements that combine the benefits of tough polymeric and bioactive ceramic materials could become a good alternative. In this work, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was copolymerized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to form injectable in situ cross-linkable hybrid cements. The hybrids were characterized in terms of their mechanical, rheological, handling and in vitro bioactive properties. The results indicated that hybridization improves the mechanical and bioactive properties of POSS and PEG. The Young moduli of the hybrids were lower than those of commercial cements and more similar to those of cancellous bone. Furthermore, the strength of the hybrids was similar to that of commercial cements. Calcium deficient hydroxyapatite grew on the surface of the hybrids after 28 days in PBS, indicating bioactivity. The study showed that PEG–POSS-based hybrid materials are a promising alternative to commercial bone cements. (paper)

  17. Optimization of oligomeric enzyme activity in ionic liquids using Rhodotorula glutinis yeast phenylalanine ammonia lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Christiaan C; Sponagle, Brandon J D; Arivalagan, Pugazhendhi; D'Cunha, Godwin B

    2017-01-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (E.C.4.3.1.24, PAL) activity of Rhodotorula glutinis yeast has been demonstrated in four commonly used ionic liquids. PAL forward reaction was carried out in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium methyl sulfate ([BMIM][MeSO 4 ]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF 4 ]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF 6 ]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium lactate ([BMIM][lactate]). Our experiments have revealed that PAL is catalytically active in ionic liquids and the enzyme activity in ([BMIM][PF 6 ]) is comparable to that obtained in aqueous buffer medium. Different conditions were optimized for maximal PAL forward activity including time of incubation (30.0min) L -phenylalanine substrate concentration (30.0mM), nature of buffer (50.0mM Tris-HCl), pH (9.0), temperature (37°C), and speed of agitation (100 rev min -1 ). Under these optimized conditions, about 83% conversion of substrate to product was obtained for the PAL forward reaction that was determined using UV spectroscopy at 290nm. PAL reverse reaction in ([BMIM][PF 6 ]) was determined spectrophotometrically at 520nm; and about 59% substrate conversion was obtained. This data provides further knowledge in enzyme biocatalysis in non-aqueous media, and may be of importance when studying the function of other oligomeric/multimeric proteins and enzymes in ionic liquids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation of Alpha-synuclein Demonstrates its Oligomerization with Dopaminergic Phenotype in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waijiao Cai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-synuclein (αSyn is encoded by the first causal gene identified in Parkinson's disease (PD and is the main component of Lewy bodies, a pathological hallmark of PD. aSyn-based animal models have contributed to our understanding of PD pathophysiology and to the development of therapeutics. Overexpression of human wildtype αSyn by viral vectors in rodents recapitulates the loss of dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra, another defining pathological feature of the disease. The development of a rat model exhibiting bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC of αSyn by recombinant adeno-associated virus facilitates detection of the toxic αSyn oligomers species. We report here neurochemical, neuropathological and behavioral characterization of BiFC of αSyn in mice. Overexpression and oligomerization of αSyn through BiFC is detected by conjugated fluorescence. Reduced striatal dopamine and loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons are accompanied neuroinflammation and abnormal motor activities. Our mouse model may provide a valuable tool to study the role of αSyn in PD and to explore therapeutic approaches. Keywords: Parkinson's disease, Alpha-synuclein, Mouse model, Oligomers, Neuroinflammation

  19. In-situ photocrosslinkable nanohybrid elastomer based on polybutadiene/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirmohammadi, Seyed Amin, E-mail: mirmohammadi.sa@gmail.com [Department of Polymerization Engineering, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nekoomanesh-Haghighi, Mehdi, E-mail: m.nekoomanesh@ippi.ac.ir [Department of Polymerization Engineering, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadian Gezaz, Somayyeh [Department of Chemical Engineering, Payame Noor University (PNU), P. O. Box: 19395-3697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahri-Laleh, Naeimeh [Department of Polymerization Engineering, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atai, Mohammad [Department of Polymer Science, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Hydroxyl functionalized nano-sized POSS or ethyleneglycol as diol monomers was incorporated to hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPBD) chain in the presence of fumaryl chloride as extender. Blue light photocrosslinking system based on camphorquinone (photoinitiator) and dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (accelerator) was applied to cure these two synthesized fumarate based macromers. Self-crosslinkability of unsaturated macromers and also crosslinking in presence of a reactive diluent were investigated in absence and presence of 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, respectively. Finally, photocured samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, equilibrium swelling study, TGA, DMTA, AFM and cell culture. The results showed that incorporation of POSS nanoparticle into the polymer matrix with a perfect distribution and dispersion can enhance thermal stability, mechanical and biocompatibility properties which can prove a good potential of this in-situ photocrosslinkable nanohybrid in medical applications. - Highlights: • Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane was incorporated to HTPBD by fumaryl chloride as extender. • A reactive diluent was used to improve photocrosslinking process of the unsaturated nanohybrid elastomers. • Nanohybrids showed enhanced properties such as thermal stability, mechanical and biocompatibility. • Improved properties were obtained for photocured samples in presence of reactive diluent.

  20. The role of Vif oligomerization and RNA chaperone activity in HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago; Bernacchi, Serena; Sleiman, Dona; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Marquet, Roland; Tisné, Carine; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells that involve most natural HIV-1 target cells. Vif counteracts the packaging of two cellular cytidine deaminases named APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by diverse mechanisms including the recruitment of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasomal degradation of A3G/A3F, the inhibition of A3G mRNA translation or by a direct competition mechanism. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by participating in virus assembly and Gag processing, thus regulating the final stage of virion formation notably genomic RNA dimerization and by inhibiting the initiation of reverse transcription. Vif is a small pleiotropic protein with multiple domains, and recent studies highlighted the importance of Vif conformation and flexibility in counteracting A3G and in binding RNA. In this review, we will focus on the oligomerization and RNA chaperone properties of Vif and show that the intrinsic disordered nature of some Vif domains could play an important role in virus assembly and replication. Experimental evidence demonstrating the RNA chaperone activity of Vif will be presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Complex structure of the fission yeast SREBP-SCAP binding domains reveals an oligomeric organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xin; Qian, Hongwu; Shao, Wei; Li, Jingxian; Wu, Jianping; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Wenqi; Wang, Hong-Wei; Espenshade, Peter; Yan, Nieng

    2016-11-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors are master regulators of cellular lipid homeostasis in mammals and oxygen-responsive regulators of hypoxic adaptation in fungi. SREBP C-terminus binds to the WD40 domain of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which confers sterol regulation by controlling the ER-to-Golgi transport of the SREBP-SCAP complex and access to the activating proteases in the Golgi. Here, we biochemically and structurally show that the carboxyl terminal domains (CTD) of Sre1 and Scp1, the fission yeast SREBP and SCAP, form a functional 4:4 oligomer and Sre1-CTD forms a dimer of dimers. The crystal structure of Sre1-CTD at 3.5 Å and cryo-EM structure of the complex at 5.4 Å together with in vitro biochemical evidence elucidate three distinct regions in Sre1-CTD required for Scp1 binding, Sre1-CTD dimerization and tetrameric formation. Finally, these structurally identified domains are validated in a cellular context, demonstrating that the proper 4:4 oligomeric complex formation is required for Sre1 activation.

  2. Design of a minimal protein oligomerization domain by a structural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, P; Meier, M; Lustig, A

    2000-12-01

    Because of the simplicity and regularity of the alpha-helical coiled coil relative to other structural motifs, it can be conveniently used to clarify the molecular interactions responsible for protein folding and stability. Here we describe the de novo design and characterization of a two heptad-repeat peptide stabilized by a complex network of inter- and intrahelical salt bridges. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation show that this peptide is highly alpha-helical and 100% dimeric tinder physiological buffer conditions. Interestingly, the peptide was shown to switch its oligomerization state from a dimer to a trimer upon increasing ionic strength. The correctness of the rational design principles used here is supported by details of the atomic structure of the peptide deduced from X-ray crystallography. The structure of the peptide shows that it is not a molten globule but assumes a unique, native-like conformation. This de novo peptide thus represents an attractive model system for the design of a molecular recognition system.

  3. RNAi reduces expression and intracellular retention of mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Posey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP, a large extracellular glycoprotein expressed in musculoskeletal tissues, cause two skeletal dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. These mutations lead to massive intracellular retention of COMP, chondrocyte death and loss of growth plate chondrocytes that are necessary for linear growth. In contrast, COMP null mice have only minor growth plate abnormalities, normal growth and longevity. This suggests that reducing mutant and wild-type COMP expression in chondrocytes may prevent the toxic cellular phenotype causing the skeletal dysplasias. We tested this hypothesis using RNA interference to reduce steady state levels of COMP mRNA. A panel of shRNAs directed against COMP was tested. One shRNA (3B reduced endogenous and recombinant COMP mRNA dramatically, regardless of expression levels. The activity of the shRNA against COMP mRNA was maintained for up to 10 weeks. We also demonstrate that this treatment reduced ER stress. Moreover, we show that reducing steady state levels of COMP mRNA alleviates intracellular retention of other extracellular matrix proteins associated with the pseudoachondroplasia cellular pathology. These findings are a proof of principle and the foundation for the development of a therapeutic intervention based on reduction of COMP expression.

  4. Sedimentation Velocity Analysis of Large Oligomeric Chromatin Complexes Using Interference Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Ryan A; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity experiments measure the transport of molecules in solution under centrifugal force. Here, we describe a method for monitoring the sedimentation of very large biological molecular assemblies using the interference optical systems of the analytical ultracentrifuge. The mass, partial-specific volume, and shape of macromolecules in solution affect their sedimentation rates as reflected in the sedimentation coefficient. The sedimentation coefficient is obtained by measuring the solute concentration as a function of radial distance during centrifugation. Monitoring the concentration can be accomplished using interference optics, absorbance optics, or the fluorescence detection system, each with inherent advantages. The interference optical system captures data much faster than these other optical systems, allowing for sedimentation velocity analysis of extremely large macromolecular complexes that sediment rapidly at very low rotor speeds. Supramolecular oligomeric complexes produced by self-association of 12-mer chromatin fibers are used to illustrate the advantages of the interference optics. Using interference optics, we show that chromatin fibers self-associate at physiological divalent salt concentrations to form structures that sediment between 10,000 and 350,000S. The method for characterizing chromatin oligomers described in this chapter will be generally useful for characterization of any biological structures that are too large to be studied by the absorbance optical system. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of redox environment on the oligomerization of higher molecular weight adiponectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuñez Martha

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone with insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory actions. The assembly of trimeric, hexameric, and higher molecular weight (HMW species of adiponectin is a topic of significant interest because physiological actions of adiponectin are oligomer-specific. In addition, adiponectin assembly is an example of oxidative oligomerization of multi-subunit protein complexes in endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Results We previously reported that trimers assemble into HMW adiponectin via intermediates stabilized by disulfide bonds, and complete oxidation of available cysteines locks adiponectin in hexameric conformation. In this study, we examined the effects of redox environment on the rate of oligomer formation and the distribution of oligomers. Reassembly of adiponectin under oxidizing conditions accelerated disulfide bonding but favored formation of hexamers over the HMW species. Increased ratios of HMW to hexameric adiponectin could be achieved rapidly under oxidizing conditions by promoting disulfide rearrangement. Conclusions Based upon these observations, we propose oxidative assembly of multi-subunit adiponectin complexes in a defined and stable redox environment is favored under oxidizing conditions coupled with high rates of disulfide rearrangement.

  6. Reversible unfolding of infectious prion assemblies reveals the existence of an oligomeric elementary brick.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique Igel-Egalon

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian prions, the pathogens that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, propagate by self-perpetuating the structural information stored in the abnormally folded, aggregated conformer (PrPSc of the host-encoded prion protein (PrPC. To date, no structural model related to prion assembly organization satisfactorily describes how strain-specified structural information is encoded and by which mechanism this information is transferred to PrPC. To achieve progress on this issue, we correlated the PrPSc quaternary structural transition from three distinct prion strains during unfolding and refolding with their templating activity. We reveal the existence of a mesoscopic organization in PrPSc through the packing of a highly stable oligomeric elementary subunit (suPrP, in which the strain structural determinant (SSD is encoded. Once kinetically trapped, this elementary subunit reversibly loses all replicative information. We demonstrate that acquisition of the templating interface and infectivity requires structural rearrangement of suPrP, in concert with its condensation. The existence of such an elementary brick scales down the SSD support to a small oligomer and provide a basis of reflexion for prion templating process and propagation.

  7. Interaction between nucleotide binding sites on chloroplast coupling factor 1 during ATP hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckband, D.; Hammes, G.G.

    1987-04-21

    The initial hydrolysis of radioactively-labelled CaATP by chloroplast coupling factor 1 was studied with the quenched-flow method. The time course of hydrolysis can be described as a first-order conversion of the enzyme to an active form followed by steady-state formation of product. The rate constant for the first-order process is independent of substrate concentration but increased hyperbolically to a limiting value of 0.43 s/sup -1/ with increasing concentrations of free Ca/sup 2 +/. A mechanism involving a Ca/sup 2 +/-triggered conversion to an active form of the enzyme is consistent with the data. The steady-state rate varied sigmoidally with the CaATP concentration. Initial exchange of tightly bound ADP is complex: approx. 50% of the bound nucleotide is lost within 30 s, with complete exchange requiring several minutes. The first-order rate constant characterizing the rapid phase of the reaction increases hyperbolically to a limiting value of 0.26 s/sup -1/ as the concentration of CaATP is increased, indicating that the binding of CaATP to the enzyme promotes the exchange process. Modification of the quenched-flow apparatus permitted measurement of the rate of nucleotide exchange during steady-state catalysis. The value of the first-order rate constant characterizing this process is similar to the catalytic rate constant determined under identical conditions. When MgATP is tightly bound to the enzyme, none of the kinetic properties of the enzyme described above were significantly changes. The results obtained suggest a mechanism in which two sites on the enzyme participate in catalysis. Several possible mechanisms consistent with the data are discussed.

  8. Rasp21 sequences opposite the nucleotide binding pocket are required for GRF-mediated nucleotide release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonardsen, L; DeClue, J E; Lybaek, H

    1996-01-01

    The substrate requirements for the catalytic activity of the mouse Cdc25 homolog Guanine nucleotide Release Factor, GRF, were determined using the catalytic domain of GRF expressed in insect cells and E. coli expressed H-Ras mutants. We found a requirement for the loop 7 residues in Ras (amino ac...... and the human Ras like proteins RhoA, Rap1A, Rac1 and G25K revealed a strict Ras specificity; of these only S. pombe Ras was GRF sensitive....

  9. Nucleotide binding induces conformational changes apparent on the Na+/K+ -ATPase large cytoplasmic loop

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimunová, Lenka; Kubala, M.; Lánský, Zdeněk; Teisinger, Jan; Amler, Evžen

    Roč.13, č.1 (2006), s. 37-37 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions on Structural Molecular Biology /5./. 16.03.2006-18.03.2006, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR 1ET400110403; GA ČR GD305/03/H148 Grant - others:Grantová agentura UK(CZ) 200053 Keywords : Na+/K+ - ATPase * ATP binding * TNP-ATP Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  10. Mutational analysis of the nucleotide binding site of Escherichia coli dCTP deaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymark, Majbritt; Johansson, Eva; Larsen, Sine

    2007-01-01

    detectable activity with a 30- and 140-fold reduction in k(cat), respectively. Furthermore, S111T and E138D both showed altered dTTP inhibition compared to wild-type enzyme. S111T was almost insensitive to the presence of dTTP. With the E138D enzyme the dTTP dependent increase in cooperativity of d...... of E138D in complex with dUTP showed a hydrogen bonding network in the active site similar to wild-type enzyme. However, changes in the hydrogen bond lengths between the carboxylate and a catalytic water molecule as well as a slightly different orientation of the pyrimidine ring of the bound nucleotide...

  11. 2-Oxoglutarate levels control adenosine nucleotide binding by Herbaspirillum seropedicae PII proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marco A S; Gerhardt, Edileusa C M; Huergo, Luciano F; Souza, Emanuel M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Chubatsu, Leda S

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen metabolism in Proteobacteria is controlled by the Ntr system, in which PII proteins play a pivotal role, controlling the activity of target proteins in response to the metabolic state of the cell. Characterization of the binding of molecular effectors to these proteins can provide information about their regulation. Here, the binding of ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) to the Herbaspirillum seropedicae PII proteins, GlnB and GlnK, was characterized using isothermal titration calorimetry. Results show that these proteins can bind three molecules of ATP, ADP and 2-OG with homotropic negative cooperativity, and 2-OG binding stabilizes the binding of ATP. Results also show that the affinity of uridylylated forms of GlnB and GlnK for nucleotides is significantly lower than that of the nonuridylylated proteins. Furthermore, fluctuations in the intracellular concentration of 2-OG in response to nitrogen availability are shown. Results suggest that under nitrogen-limiting conditions, PII proteins tend to bind ATP and 2-OG. By contrast, after an ammonium shock, a decrease in the 2-OG concentration is observed causing a decrease in the affinity of PII proteins for ATP. This phenomenon may facilitate the exchange of ATP for ADP on the ligand-binding pocket of PII proteins, thus it is likely that under low ammonium, low 2-OG levels would favor the ADP-bound state. © 2015 FEBS.

  12. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, M; Pandey, S; Tran, V T; Fong, H K

    1991-01-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein alpha subunits (G alpha) including Gs alpha, Gi-1 alpha, Gi-2 alpha, Gi-3 alpha, and Gz alpha (or Gx alpha), where Gs and Gi are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and Gz is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensi...

  13. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Meisheng; Tran, V.T.; Fong, H.K.W. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Pandey, S. (Doheny Eye Inst., Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein {alpha} subunits (G{alpha}) including G{sub s}{alpha}, G{sub i-1}{alpha}, G{sub i-2}{alpha}, G{sub i-3}{alpha}, and G{sub z}{alpha} (or G{sub x}{alpha}), where G{sub s} and G{sub i} are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and G{sub z} is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensitive events. Other G{alpha}-related mRNA transcripts were detected in fetal RPE cells by low-stringency hybridization to G{sub i-2}{alpha} and G{sub s}{alpha} protein-coding cDNA probes. The diversity of G proteins in RPE cells was further studied by cDNA amplification with reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction. This approach revealed that, besides the above mentioned members of the G{alpha} gene family, at least two other G{alpha} subunits are expressed in RPE cells. Human retinal cDNA clones that encode one of the additional G{alpha} subunits were isolated and characterized. The results indicate that this G{alpha} subunit belongs to a separate subfamily of G proteins that may be insensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  14. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 7 (RGS7) Can Exist in a Homo-oligomeric Form That Is Regulated by Gαo and R7-binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayou, Junior; Wang, Qiang; Jang, Geeng-Fu; Pronin, Alexey N; Orlandi, Cesare; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Crabb, John W; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2016-04-22

    RGS (regulator of G protein signaling) proteins of the R7 subfamily (RGS6, -7, -9, and -11) are highly expressed in neurons where they regulate many physiological processes. R7 RGS proteins contain several distinct domains and form obligatory dimers with the atypical Gβ subunit, Gβ5 They also interact with other proteins such as R7-binding protein, R9-anchoring protein, and the orphan receptors GPR158 and GPR179. These interactions facilitate plasma membrane targeting and stability of R7 proteins and modulate their activity. Here, we investigated RGS7 complexes using in situ chemical cross-linking. We found that in mouse brain and transfected cells cross-linking causes formation of distinct RGS7 complexes. One of the products had the apparent molecular mass of ∼150 kDa on SDS-PAGE and did not contain Gβ5 Mass spectrometry analysis showed no other proteins to be present within the 150-kDa complex in the amount close to stoichiometric with RGS7. This finding suggested that RGS7 could form a homo-oligomer. Indeed, co-immunoprecipitation of differentially tagged RGS7 constructs, with or without chemical cross-linking, demonstrated RGS7 self-association. RGS7-RGS7 interaction required the DEP domain but not the RGS and DHEX domains or the Gβ5 subunit. Using transfected cells and knock-out mice, we demonstrated that R7-binding protein had a strong inhibitory effect on homo-oligomerization of RGS7. In contrast, our data indicated that GPR158 could bind to the RGS7 homo-oligomer without causing its dissociation. Co-expression of constitutively active Gαo prevented the RGS7-RGS7 interaction. These results reveal the existence of RGS protein homo-oligomers and show regulation of their assembly by R7 RGS-binding partners. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Link between D sub 1 and D sub 2 dopamine receptors is reduced in schizophrenia and Huntington diseased brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeman, P.; Niznik, H.B.; Guan, H.C.; Booth, G.; Ulpian, C. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1989-12-01

    Dopamine receptor types D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} can oppose enhance each other's actions for electrical, biochemical, and psychomotor effects. The authors report a D{sub 1}-D{sub 2} interaction in homogenized tissue as revealed by ligand binding. D{sub 2} agonists lowered the binding of ({sup 3}H)raclopride to D{sub 2} receptors in striatal and anterior pituitary tissues. Pretreating the tissue with the D{sub 1}-selective antagonist SCH 23390 prevented the agonist-induced decrease in ({sup 3}H)raclopride binding to D{sub 2} sites in the striatum but not in the anterior pituitary, which has no D{sub 1} receptors. Conversely, a dopamine-induced reduction in the binding of ({sup 3}H)SCH 23390 to D{sub 1} receptors could be prevented by the D{sub 2}-selective antagonist eticlopride. Receptor photolabeling experiments confirmed both these D{sub 1}-D{sub 2} interactions. The blocking effect by SCH 23390 was similar to that produced by a nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide analogue, and SCH 23390 reduced the number of agonist-labeled D{sub 2} receptors in the high-affinity state. Thus, the D{sub 1}-D{sub 2} link may be mediated by guanine nucleotide-binding protein components. The link may underlie D{sub 1}-D{sub 2} interactions influencing behavior, since the link was missing in over half the postmortem striata from patients with schizophrenia and Huntington disease (both diseases that show some hyperdopamine signs) but was present in human control, Alzheimer, and Parkinson striata.

  16. Structural fingerprints and their evolution during oligomeric vs. oligomer-free amyloid fibril growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joseph; Hill, Shannon E; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Ciesla, Marissa; Robeel, Rhonda; Persichilli, Christopher; Raynes, Rachel; Westerheide, Sandy; Muschol, Martin

    2013-09-28

    Deposits of fibrils formed by disease-specific proteins are the molecular hallmark of such diverse human disorders as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes, or rheumatoid arthritis. Amyloid fibril formation by structurally and functionally unrelated proteins exhibits many generic characteristics, most prominently the cross β-sheet structure of their mature fibrils. At the same time, amyloid formation tends to proceed along one of two separate assembly pathways yielding either stiff monomeric filaments or globular oligomers and curvilinear protofibrils. Given the focus on oligomers as major toxic species, the very existence of an oligomer-free assembly pathway is significant. Little is known, though, about the structure of the various intermediates emerging along different pathways and whether the pathways converge towards a common or distinct fibril structures. Using infrared spectroscopy we probed the structural evolution of intermediates and late-stage fibrils formed during in vitro lysozyme amyloid assembly along an oligomeric and oligomer-free pathway. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that both pathways produced amyloid-specific β-sheet peaks, but at pathway-specific wavenumbers. We further found that the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T responded to all intermediates along either pathway. The relative amplitudes of thioflavin T fluorescence responses displayed pathway-specific differences and could be utilized for monitoring the structural evolution of intermediates. Pathway-specific structural features obtained from infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T responses were identical for fibrils grown at highly acidic or at physiological pH values and showed no discernible effects of protein hydrolysis. Our results suggest that late-stage fibrils formed along either pathway are amyloidogenic in nature, but have distinguishable structural fingerprints. These pathway-specific fingerprints emerge during the earliest aggregation events and persist throughout the

  17. Bioactivity and properties of a dental adhesive functionalized with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) and bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Marta; Hohlfeld, Lisa; Thanh, Loan Tao; Biehl, Ralf; Lühmann, Nicole; Mohn, Dirk; Wiegand, Annette

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of infiltrating a commercial adhesive with nanosized bioactive glass (BG-Bi) particles or methacryl-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) on material properties and bioactivity. An acetone-based dental adhesive (Solobond Plus adhesive, VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany) was infiltrated with nanosized bioactive glass particles (0.1 or 1wt%), or with monofunctional or multifunctional POSS particles (10 or 20wt%). Unfilled adhesive served as control. Dispersion and hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles were studied by dynamic light scattering. Set specimens were immersed for 28days in artificial saliva at 37°C, and surfaces were mapped for the formation of calcium phospate (Ca/P) precipitates (scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). Viscosity (rheometry) and the structural characteristic of the networks were studied, such as degree of conversion (FTIR spectroscopy), sol fraction and water sorption. POSS particles showed a good dispersion of the particles for both types of particles being smaller than 3nm, while the bioactive glass particles had a strong tendency to agglomerate. All nanoparticles induced the formation of Ca/P precipitates. The viscosity of the adhesive was not or only slightly increased by POSS particle addition but strongly increased by the bioactive glass particles. The degree of conversion, water sorption and sol fraction showed a maintained or improved network structure and properties when filled with BG-Bi and multifunctional POSS, however, less polymerization was found when loading a monofunctional POSS. Multifunctional POSS may be incorporated into dental adhesives to provide a bioactive potential without changing material properties adversely. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances matrix assembly during chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S; Chen, Faye H

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention.

  19. Binding and Oligomerization of Modified and Native Bt Toxins in Resistant and Susceptible Pink Bollworm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josue Ocelotl

    Full Text Available Insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are used extensively in sprays and transgenic crops for pest control, but their efficacy is reduced when pests evolve resistance. Better understanding of the mode of action of Bt toxins and the mechanisms of insect resistance is needed to enhance the durability of these important alternatives to conventional insecticides. Mode of action models agree that binding of Bt toxins to midgut proteins such as cadherin is essential for toxicity, but some details remain unresolved, such as the role of toxin oligomers. In this study, we evaluated how Bt toxin Cry1Ac and its genetically engineered counterpart Cry1AcMod interact with brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV from resistant and susceptible larvae of Pectinophora gossypiella (pink bollworm, a global pest of cotton. Compared with Cry1Ac, Cry1AcMod lacks 56 amino acids at the amino-terminus including helix α-1; previous work showed that Cry1AcMod formed oligomers in vitro without cadherin and killed P. gossypiella larvae harboring cadherin mutations linked with >1000-fold resistance to Cry1Ac. Here we found that resistance to Cry1Ac was associated with reduced oligomer formation and insertion. In contrast, Cry1AcMod formed oligomers in BBMV from resistant larvae. These results confirm the role of cadherin in oligomerization of Cry1Ac in susceptible larvae and imply that forming oligomers without cadherin promotes toxicity of Cry1AcMod against resistant P. gossypiella larvae that have cadherin mutations.

  20. Structure–property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang WG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Weiguo Wang,1,* Xiang Sun,1,* Li Huang,2,* Yu Gao,1 Jinghao Ban,1 Lijuan Shen,1 Jihua Chen1 1Department of Prosthodontics, 2Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS, have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group] and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups] were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials

  1. Morphological evolution in dewetting polystyrene/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane thin film bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rituparna; Karabiyik, Ufuk; Swift, Michael C; Hottle, John R; Esker, Alan R

    2008-05-06

    Morphological evolution in dewetting thin film bilayers of polystyrene (PS) and a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS), trisilanolphenyl-POSS (TPP), was studied as a function of annealing temperature and annealing time. The results demonstrate unique dewetting morphologies in PS/TPP bilayers at elevated temperatures that are significantly different from those typically observed in dewetting polymer/polymer bilayers. During temperature ramp studies by optical microscopy (OM) in the reflection mode, PS/TPP bilayers form cracks with a weak optical contrast at approximately 130 degrees C. The crack formation is attributed to tensile stresses within the upper TPP layer. The weak optical contrast of the cracks observed in the bilayers for annealing temperatures below approximately 160 degrees C is consistent with the cracking and dewetting of only the upper TPP layer from the underlying PS layer. The optical contrast of the morphological features is significantly enhanced at annealing temperatures of >160 degrees C. This observation suggests dewetting of both the upper TPP and the lower PS layers that results in the exposure of the silicon substrate. Upon annealing the PS/TPP bilayers at 200 degrees C in a temperature jump experiment, the upper TPP layer undergoes instantaneous cracking as observed by OM. These cracks in the upper TPP layer serve as nucleation sites for rapid dewetting and aggregation of the TPP layer, as revealed by OM and atomic force microscopy (AFM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that dewetting of the lower PS layer ensued for annealing times >5 min and progressed up to 90 min. For annealing times >90 min, OM, AFM, and XPS results revealed complete dewetting of both the layers with the formation of TPP encapsulated PS droplets.

  2. Endohedral complexes of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) cages with transition metal dihydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiqiao; Corn, John; Hagelberg, Frank, E-mail: hagelber@etsu.edu

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: • Comparative studies of POSS cages with endohedral metal dihydrides. • Exothermic inclusion was found for the T{sub 10} cage with MH{sub 2}, M = Ti, Ru, Os, Pt. • Within this group of metal atoms, the only exothermic MH{sub 4}@T{sub m} unit is that with M = Os. • Enhanced hydrogen atom density, as compared to free MH{sub 4}, was found in the cage. • No exothermic solutions were identified for MH{sub 6}@T{sub 10}. - Abstract: Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) cages are investigated in terms of their potential to enclose small metal hydrides, with the objective of defining conditions that maximize the number of encapsulated hydrogen atoms. Systems of the form MH{sub 2n}@T{sub m}, where n = 1–3, m = 8, 10, and M comprises metal atom species of the groups IV, VI, VIII, X, and XII, are studied by methods of ab initio and density functional theory (DFT). The resulting composites are categorized with respect to their structural and energetic features. For MH{sub 2}@T{sub 8}, it is found in all cases considered that including MH{sub 2} into the POSS cage is an endothermic process. For MH{sub 2}@T{sub 10} and M = Ti, Ru, Os, Pt, inclusion of the MH{sub 2} guest into the cage turns out to be exothermic, and also leaves the cage intact. For MH{sub 4}@T{sub m}, this behavior is only observed for one system, OsH{sub 4}@T{sub 10}.

  3. Biophysical investigation of type A PutAs reveals a conserved core oligomeric structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korasick, David A. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Singh, Harkewal [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Pemberton, Travis A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Luo, Min [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Dhatwalia, Richa [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Tanner, John J. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA

    2017-08-01

    Many enzymes form homooligomers, yet the functional significance of self-association is seldom obvious. Herein, we examine the connection between oligomerization and catalytic function for proline utilization A (PutA) enzymes. PutAs are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze both reactions of proline catabolism. Type A PutAs are the smallest members of the family, possessing a minimal domain architecture consisting of N-terminal proline dehydrogenase and C-terminal l-glutamate-γ-semialdehyde dehydrogenase modules. Type A PutAs form domain-swapped dimers, and in one case (Bradyrhizobium japonicum PutA), two of the dimers assemble into a ring-shaped tetramer. Whereas the dimer has a clear role in substrate channeling, the functional significance of the tetramer is unknown. To address this question, we performed structural studies of four-type A PutAs from two clades of the PutA tree. The crystal structure of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus PutA covalently inactivated by N-propargylglycine revealed a fold and substrate-channeling tunnel similar to other PutAs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and analytical ultracentrifugation indicated that Bdellovibrio PutA is dimeric in solution, in contrast to the prediction from crystal packing of a stable tetrameric assembly. SAXS studies of two other type A PutAs from separate clades also suggested that the dimer predominates in solution. To assess whether the tetramer of B. japonicum PutA is necessary for catalytic function, a hot spot disruption mutant that cleanly produces dimeric protein was generated. The dimeric variant exhibited kinetic parameters similar to the wild-type enzyme. These results implicate the domain-swapped dimer as the core structural and functional unit of type A PutAs.

  4. Oligomerization of Bacillus subtilis DesR is required for fine tuning regulation of membrane fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najle, Sebastián R; Inda, María E; de Mendoza, Diego; Cybulski, Larisa E

    2009-10-01

    The DesK-DesR two-component system regulates the order of membrane lipids in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis by controlling the expression of the des gene coding for the delta 5-acyl-lipid desaturase. To activate des transcription, the membrane-bound histidine kinase DesK phosphorylates the response regulator DesR. This covalent modification of the regulatory domain of dimeric DesR promotes, in a cooperative fashion, the hierarchical occupation of two adjacent, non-identical, DesR-P binding sites, so that there is a shift in the equilibrium toward the tetrameric active form of the response regulator. However, the mechanism of regulation of DesR activity by phosphorylation and oligomerization is not well understood. We employed deletion analysis and reporter fusions to study the role of the N-terminal domain on DesR activity. In addition, electromobility shift assays were used to analyze the binding capacity of the transcription factor to deletion mutants of the des promoter. We show that DesR lacking the N-terminal domain is still able to bind to the des promoter. We also demonstrate that if the RA site is moved closer to the -35 region of Pdes, the adjacent site RB is dispensable for activation. Our results indicate that the unphosphorylated regulatory domain of DesR obstructs the access of the recognition helix of DesR to its DNA target. In addition, we present evidence showing that RB is physiologically relevant to control the activation of the des gene when the levels of DesR-P reach a critical threshold.

  5. Structural fingerprints and their evolution during oligomeric vs. oligomer-free amyloid fibril growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joseph; Hill, Shannon E.; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Ciesla, Marissa; Robeel, Rhonda; Persichilli, Christopher; Raynes, Rachel; Westerheide, Sandy; Muschol, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Deposits of fibrils formed by disease-specific proteins are the molecular hallmark of such diverse human disorders as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes, or rheumatoid arthritis. Amyloid fibril formation by structurally and functionally unrelated proteins exhibits many generic characteristics, most prominently the cross β-sheet structure of their mature fibrils. At the same time, amyloid formation tends to proceed along one of two separate assembly pathways yielding either stiff monomeric filaments or globular oligomers and curvilinear protofibrils. Given the focus on oligomers as major toxic species, the very existence of an oligomer-free assembly pathway is significant. Little is known, though, about the structure of the various intermediates emerging along different pathways and whether the pathways converge towards a common or distinct fibril structures. Using infrared spectroscopy we probed the structural evolution of intermediates and late-stage fibrils formed during in vitro lysozyme amyloid assembly along an oligomeric and oligomer-free pathway. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that both pathways produced amyloid-specific β-sheet peaks, but at pathway-specific wavenumbers. We further found that the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T responded to all intermediates along either pathway. The relative amplitudes of thioflavin T fluorescence responses displayed pathway-specific differences and could be utilized for monitoring the structural evolution of intermediates. Pathway-specific structural features obtained from infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T responses were identical for fibrils grown at highly acidic or at physiological pH values and showed no discernible effects of protein hydrolysis. Our results suggest that late-stage fibrils formed along either pathway are amyloidogenic in nature, but have distinguishable structural fingerprints. These pathway-specific fingerprints emerge during the earliest aggregation events and persist throughout the

  6. Composite polymer electrolyte containing ionic liquid and functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes for anhydrous PEM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subianto, Surya; Mistry, Mayur K; Choudhury, Namita Roy; Dutta, Naba K; Knott, Robert

    2009-06-01

    A new type of supported liquid membrane was made by combining an ionic liquid (IL) with a Nafion membrane reinforced with multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSSs) using a layer-by-layer strategy for anhydrous proton-exchange membrane (PEM) application. The POSS was functionalized by direct sulfonation, and the sulfonated POSS (S-POSS) was incorporated into Nafion 117 membranes by the infiltration method. The resultant hybrid membrane shows strong ionic interaction between the Nafion matrix and the multifunctional POSS, resulting in increased glass transition temperature and thermal stability at very low loadings of S-POSS (1%). The presence of S-POSS has also improved the proton conductivity especially at low humidities, where it shows a marked increase due to its confinement in the ionic domains and promotes water uptake by capillary condensation. In order to achieve anhydrous conductivity, the IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMI-BTSI) was incorporated into these membranes to provide proton conduction in the absence of water. Although the incorporation of an IL shows a plasticizing effect on the Nafion membrane, the S-POSS composite membrane with an IL shows a higher modulus at high temperatures compared to Nafion 117 and a Nafion-IL membrane, with significantly higher proton conductivity (5 mS/cm at 150 degrees C with 20% IL). This shows the ability of the multifunctional POSS and IL to work symbiotically to achieve the desirable proton conductivity and mechanical properties of such membranes by enhancing the ionic interaction within the material.

  7. CARTILAGE OLIGOMERIC MATRIX PROTEIN ENHANCES MATRIX ASSEMBLY DURING CHONDROGENESIS OF HUMAN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Faye H.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate-hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention. PMID:22095699

  8. Reversibility and two state behaviour in the thermal unfolding of oligomeric TIM barrel proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Romero, Sergio; Costas, Miguel; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela; Alejandro Fernández-Velasco, D

    2015-08-28

    Temperature is one of the main variables that modulate protein function and stability. Thermodynamic studies of oligomeric proteins, the dominant protein natural form, have been often hampered because irreversible aggregation and/or slow reactions are common. There are no reports on the reversible equilibrium thermal unfolding of proteins composed of (β/α)8 barrel subunits, albeit this "TIM barrel" topology is one of the most abundant and versatile in nature. We studied the eponymous TIM barrel, triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), belonging to five species of different bacterial taxa. All of them were found to be catalytically efficient dimers. The three-dimensional structure of four enzymes was solved at high/medium resolution. Irreversibility and kinetic control were observed in the thermal unfolding of two TIMs, while for the other three the thermal unfolding was found to follow a two-state equilibrium reversible process. Shifts in the global stability curves of these three proteins are related to the organismal temperature range of optimal growth and modulated by variations in maximum stability temperature and in the enthalpy change at that temperature. Reversibility appears to correlate with the low isoelectric point, the absence of a residual structure in the unfolded state, small cavity volume in the native state, low conformational stability and a low melting temperature. Furthermore, the strong coupling between dimer dissociation and monomer unfolding may reduce aggregation and favour reversibility. It is therefore very thought-provoking to find that a common topological ensemble, such as the TIM barrel, can unfold/refold in the Anfinsen way, i.e. without the help of the cellular machinery.

  9. High-Performance Oligomeric Catholytes for Effective Macromolecular Separation in Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Koen H; Robinson, Sophia G; Braten, Miles N; Sevov, Christo S; Helms, Brett A; Sigman, Matthew S; Minteer, Shelley D; Sanford, Melanie S

    2018-02-28

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries (NRFBs) represent an attractive technology for energy storage from intermittent renewable sources. In these batteries, electrical energy is stored in and extracted from electrolyte solutions of redox-active molecules (termed catholytes and anolytes) that are passed through an electrochemical flow cell. To avoid battery self-discharge, the anolyte and catholyte solutions must be separated by a membrane in the flow cell. This membrane prevents crossover of the redox active molecules, while simultaneously allowing facile transport of charge-balancing ions. A key unmet challenge for the field is the design of redox-active molecule/membrane pairs that enable effective electrolyte separation while maintaining optimal battery properties. Herein, we demonstrate the development of oligomeric catholytes based on tris(dialkylamino)cyclopropenium (CP) salts that are specifically tailored for pairing with size-exclusion membranes composed of polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs). Systematic studies were conducted to evaluate the impact of oligomer size/structure on properties that are crucial for flow battery performance, including cycling stability, charge capacity, solubility, electron transfer kinetics, and crossover rates. These studies have led to the identification of a CP-derived tetramer in which these properties are all comparable, or significantly improved, relative to the monomeric counterpart. Finally, a proof-of-concept flow battery is demonstrated by pairing this tetrameric catholyte with a PIM membrane. After 6 days of cycling, no crossover is detected, demonstrating the promise of this approach. These studies provide a template for the future design of other redox-active oligomers for this application.

  10. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB1 cannabinoid receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jäntti, Maria H.; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • OX 1 and OX 2 orexin and CB 1 cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX 1 orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB 1 cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX 1 , OX 2 and CB 1 receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP 2 green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB 1 receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP 2 to CB 1 produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX 1 –OX 2 interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB 1 receptors, dimerization could be an effective way of forming signal complexes with optimal cannabinoid concentrations

  11. The calcium-sensing receptor changes cell shape via a beta-arrestin-1 ARNO ARF6 ELMO protein network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouschet, Tristan; Martin, Stéphane; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Mundell, Stuart; Henley, Jeremy M

    2007-08-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce the binding of extracellular stimuli into intracellular signalling cascades that can lead to morphological changes. Here, we demonstrate that stimulation of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a GPCR that promotes chemotaxis by detecting increases in extracellular calcium, triggers plasma membrane (PM) ruffling via a pathway that involves beta-arrestin 1, Arf nucleotide binding site opener (ARNO), ADP-ribosylating factor 6 (ARF6) and engulfment and cell motility protein (ELMO). Expression of dominant negative beta-arrestin 1 or its knockdown with siRNA impaired the CaSR-induced PM ruffling response. Expression of a catalytically inactive ARNO also reduced CaSR-induced PM ruffling. Furthermore, beta-arrestin 1 co-immunoprecipitated with the CaSR and ARNO under resting conditions. Agonist treatment did not markedly alter beta-arrestin 1 binding to the CaSR or to ARNO but it did elicit the translocation and colocalisation of the CaSR, beta-arrestin 1 and ARNO to membrane protrusions. Furthermore, ARF6 and ELMO, two proteins known to couple ARNO to the cytoskeleton, were required for CaSR-dependent morphological changes and translocated to the PM ruffles. These data suggest that cells ruffle upon CaSR stimulation via a mechanism that involves translocation of beta-arrestin 1 pre-assembled with the CaSR or ARNO, and that ELMO plays an essential role in this CaSR-signalling-induced cytoskeletal reorganisation.

  12. Glycosylation as a Main Regulator of Growth and Death Factor Receptors Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Gomes Ferreira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is a very frequent and functionally important post-translational protein modification that undergoes profound changes in cancer. Growth and death factor receptors and plasma membrane glycoproteins, which upon activation by extracellular ligands trigger a signal transduction cascade, are targets of several molecular anti-cancer drugs. In this review, we provide a thorough picture of the mechanisms bywhich glycosylation affects the activity of growth and death factor receptors in normal and pathological conditions. Glycosylation affects receptor activity through three non-mutually exclusive basic mechanisms: (1 by directly regulating intracellular transport, ligand binding, oligomerization and signaling of receptors; (2 through the binding of receptor carbohydrate structures to galectins, forming a lattice thatregulates receptor turnover on the plasma membrane; and (3 by receptor interaction with gangliosides inside membrane microdomains. Some carbohydrate chains, for example core fucose and β1,6-branching, exert a stimulatory effect on all receptors, while other structures exert opposite effects on different receptors or in different cellular contexts. In light of the crucial role played by glycosylation in the regulation of receptor activity, the development of next-generation drugs targeting glyco-epitopes of growth factor receptors should be considered a therapeutically interesting goal.

  13. The cysteines of the extracellular loop are crucial for trafficking of human organic cation transporter 2 to the plasma membrane and are involved in oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brast, Sabine; Grabner, Alexander; Sucic, Sonja; Sitte, Harald H; Hermann, Edwin; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Schlatter, Eberhard; Ciarimboli, Giuliano

    2012-03-01

    Human organic cation transporter 2 (hOCT2) is involved in transport of many endogenous and exogenous organic cations, mainly in kidney and brain cells. Because the quaternary structure of transmembrane proteins plays an essential role for their cellular trafficking and function, we investigated whether hOCT2 forms oligomeric complexes, and if so, which part of the transporter is involved in the oligomerization. A yeast 2-hybrid mating-based split-ubiquitin system (mbSUS), fluorescence resonance energy transfer, Western blot analysis, cross-linking experiments, immunofluorescence, and uptake measurements of the fluorescent organic cation 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium were applied to human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells transfected with hOCT2 and partly also to freshly isolated human proximal tubules. The role of cysteines for oligomerization and trafficking of the transporter to the plasma membranes was investigated in cysteine mutants of hOCT2. hOCT2 formed oligomers both in the HEK293 expression system and in native human kidneys. The cysteines of the large extracellular loop are important to enable correct folding, oligomeric assembly, and plasma membrane insertion of hOCT2. Mutation of the first and the last cysteines of the loop at positions 51 and 143 abolished oligomer formation. Thus, the cysteines of the extracellular loop are important for correct trafficking of the transporter to the plasma membrane and for its oligomerization.

  14. Receptor assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K; Ibayashi, H [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-05-01

    This paper summarized present status and problems of analysis of hormone receptor and a few considerations on clinical significance of receptor abnormalities. It was pointed that in future clinical field quantitative and qualitative analysis of receptor did not remain only in the etiological discussion, but that it was an epoch-making field of investigation which contained the possiblity of artificial change of sensitivity of living body on drugs and the development connected directly with treatment of various diseases.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of polyhedral oligomeric titanized silsesquioxane: A new biocompatible cage like molecule for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahyaei, Hossein [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohseni, Mohsen, E-mail: mmohseni@aut.ac.ir [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanbari, Hossein [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Messori, Massimo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria ‘Enzo Ferrari’, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Organic–inorganic hybrid materials have shown improved properties to be used as biocompatible coating in biomedical applications. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) containing coatings are among hybrid materials showing promising properties for these applications. In this work an open cage POSS has been reacted with a titanium alkoxide to end cap the POSS molecule with titanium atom to obtain a so called polyhedral oligomeric metalized silsesquioxane (POMS). The synthesized POMS was characterized by FTIR, RAMAN and UV–visible spectroscopy as well as {sup 29}Si NMR and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) techniques. Appearance of peaks at 920 cm{sup −1} in FTIR and 491 cm{sup −1} and 1083 cm{sup −1} in Raman spectra confirmed Si–O–Ti linkage formation. It was also demonstrated that POMS was in a monomeric form. To evaluate the biocompatibility of hybrids films, pristine POSS and synthesized POMS were used in synthesis of a polycarbonate urethane polymer. Results revealed that POMS containing hybrid, not only had notable thermal and mechanical stability compared to POSS containing one, as demonstrated by DSC and DMTA analysis, they also showed controlled surface properties in such a manner that hydrophobicity and biocompatibility were both reachable to give rise to improved cell viability in presence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and MRC-5 cells. - Highlight: • Polyhedral Oligomeric Metalized Silsesquioxane (POMS) based on titanium was synthesized. • POMS can improve mechanical properties of polyurethane. • POMS increases hydrophobicity of polyurethane. • POMS is a unique nanocage to enhance biocompatibility of polyurethane.

  16. MxiN Differentially Regulates Monomeric and Oligomeric Species of the Shigella Type Three Secretion System ATPase Spa47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Heather B; Dickenson, Nicholas E

    2018-04-17

    Shigella rely entirely on the action of a single type three secretion system (T3SS) to support cellular invasion of colonic epithelial cells and to circumvent host immune responses. The ATPase Spa47 resides at the base of the Shigella needle-like type three secretion apparatus (T3SA), supporting protein secretion through the apparatus and providing a likely means for native virulence regulation by Shigella and a much needed target for non-antibiotic therapeutics to treat Shigella infections. Here, we show that MxiN is a differential regulator of Spa47 and that its regulatory impact is determined by the oligomeric state of the Spa47 ATPase, with which it interacts. In vitro and in vivo characterization shows that interaction of MxiN with Spa47 requires the six N-terminal residues of Spa47 that are also necessary for stable Spa47 oligomer formation and activation. This interaction with MxiN negatively influences the activity of Spa47 oligomers while upregulating the ATPase activity of monomeric Spa47. Detailed kinetic analyses of monomeric and oligomeric Spa47 in the presence and absence of MxiN uncover additional mechanistic insights into the regulation of Spa47 by MxiN, suggesting that the MxiN/Spa47 species resulting from interaction with monomeric and oligomeric Spa47 are functionally distinct and that both could be involved in Shigella T3SS regulation. Uncovering regulation of Spa47 by MxiN addresses an important gap in the current understanding of how Shigella controls T3SA activity and provides the first description of differential T3SS ATPase regulation by a native T3SS protein.

  17. Differential Regulation of Two-Tiered Plant Immunity and Sexual Reproduction by ANXUR Receptor-Like Kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Hyunggon; Feng, Baomin; Hu, Zhangjian; Boisson-Dernier, Aurélien; Franck, Christina M; Meng, Xiangzong; Huang, Yanyan; Zhou, Jinggeng; Xu, Guangyuan; Wang, Taotao; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2017-12-01

    Plants have evolved two tiers of immune receptors to detect infections: cell surface-resident pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that sense microbial signatures and intracellular nucleotide binding domain leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins that recognize pathogen effectors. How PRRs and NLRs interconnect and activate the specific and overlapping plant immune responses remains elusive. A genetic screen for components controlling plant immunity identified ANXUR1 (ANX1), a malectin-like domain-containing receptor-like kinase, together with its homolog ANX2, as important negative regulators of both PRR- and NLR-mediated immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana ANX1 constitutively associates with the bacterial flagellin receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING2 (FLS2) and its coreceptor BRI1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE1 (BAK1). Perception of flagellin by FLS2 promotes ANX1 association with BAK1, thereby interfering with FLS2-BAK1 complex formation to attenuate PRR signaling. In addition, ANX1 complexes with the NLR proteins RESISTANT TO PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE2 (RPS2) and RESISTANCE TO P. SYRINGAE PV MACULICOLA1. ANX1 promotes RPS2 degradation and attenuates RPS2-mediated cell death. Surprisingly, a mutation that affects ANX1 function in plant immunity does not disrupt its function in controlling pollen tube growth during fertilization. Our study thus reveals a molecular link between PRR and NLR protein complexes that both associate with cell surface-resident ANX1 and uncovers uncoupled functions of ANX1 and ANX2 during plant immunity and sexual reproduction. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. In situ oligomerization of 2-(thiophen-3-yl)acetate intercalated into Zn{sub 2}Al layered double hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tronto, Jairo, E-mail: jairotronto@ufv.br [Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Campus de Rio Parsanaíba, Rodovia BR 354 km 310, Cx. Postal 22, CEP, 38.810-000 Rio Paranaíba, MG (Brazil); Pinto, Frederico G.; Costa, Liovando M. da [Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Campus de Rio Parsanaíba, Rodovia BR 354 km 310, Cx. Postal 22, CEP, 38.810-000 Rio Paranaíba, MG (Brazil); Leroux, Fabrice; Dubois, Marc [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, BP 80026, F-6317 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Valim, João B. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Química, Av. dos Bandeirantes 3900, CEP 14.040-901, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    A layered double hydroxide (LDH) with cation composition Zn{sub 2}Al was intercalated with 2-(thiophen-3-yl)acetate (3-TA) monomers. To achieve in situ polymerization and/or oligomerization of the intercalated monomers, soft thermal treatments were carried out, and subsequent hybrid LDH materials were analyzed by means of several characterization techniques using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), {sup 13}C CP–MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spin resonance (EPR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP–OES), and elemental analysis. PXRD analysis suggested that the intercalated monomers formed a bilayer. Thermal treatment of the hybrid LDH assembly above 120 °C provokes partially the breakdown of the layered structure, generating the phase zincite. EPR results indicated that vicinal monomers (oligomerization) were bound to each other after hydrothermal or thermal treatment, leading to a polaron response characteristic of electron conductivity localized on a restricted number of thiophene-based monomer segments. Localized unpaired electrons exist in the material and interact with the {sup 27}Al nuclei of the LDH layers by superhyperfine coupling. These unpaired electrons also interact with the surface of ZnO (O{sup 2−} vacancies), formed during the thermal treatments. - Graphical abstract: We synthesized a layered double hydroxide (LDH) with cation composition Zn{sub 2}Al, intercalated with 2-(thiophen-3-yl)acetate (3-TA) monomers, by coprecipitation at constant pH. We thermally treated the material, to achieve in situ polymerization and/or oligomerization of the intercalated monomers. - Highlights: • A Zn{sub 2}Al–LDH was intercalated with 2-(thiophen-3-yl)acetate monomers. • To achieve in situ oligomerization of the monomers, thermal treatments were made.

  19. A New Star-shaped Carbazole Derivative with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Core: Crystal Structure and Unique Photoluminescence Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zixuan; Yu, Tianzhi; Zhao, Yuling; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Guoyun; Li, Jianfeng; Chai, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    A new inorganic–organic hybrid material based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) capped with carbazolyl substituents, octakis[3-(carbazol-9-yl)propyldimethylsiloxy]-silsesquioxane (POSS-8Cz), was successfully synthesized and characterized. The X-ray crystal structure of POSS-8Cz were described. The photophysical properties of POSS-8Cz were investigated by using UV–vis,photoluminescence spectroscopic analysis. The hybrid material exhibits blue emission in the solution and the solid film.The morphology and thermal stablity properties were measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TG-DTA analysis.

  20. Oligomerization of adenosin-5´-O-ylmethylphosphonate, an isopolar AMP analogue: Evaluation of the route to short oligoadenylates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pressová, Martina; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kóšiová, Ivana; Kopecký, V. Jr.; Cvačka, Josef; Kašička, Václav; Šimák, Ondřej; Točík, Zdeněk; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 3 (2010), s. 277-289 ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06061; GA AV ČR KAN200520801; GA ČR GA203/09/0820; GA ČR GA202/09/0193 Grant - others:EMIL-FW6(XE) 503569 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : spontaneous oligomerization * oligoadenylates * phosphonate linkage Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.572, year: 2010

  1. Implication of the oligomeric state of the N-terminal PTX3 domain in cumulus matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ievoli, Elena; Lindstedt, Ragnar; Inforzato, Antonio; Camaioni, Antonella; Palone, Francesca; Day, Anthony J; Mantovani, Alberto; Salvatori, Giovanni; Salustri, Antonietta

    2011-06-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) plays a key role in the formation of the hyaluronan-rich matrix of the cumulus oophorus surrounding ovulated eggs that is required for successful fertilization and female fertility. PTX3 is a multimeric protein consisting of eight identical protomers held together by a combination of non-covalent interactions and disulfide bonds. Recent findings suggest that the oligomeric status of PTX3 is important for stabilizing the cumulus matrix. Because the role of PTX3 in the cumulus resides in the unique N-terminal sequence of the protomer, we investigated further this issue by testing the ability of distinct Cys/Ser mutants of recombinant N-terminal region of PTX3 (N(_)PTX3) with different oligomeric arrangement to promote in vitro normal expansion in cumuli from Ptx3-null mice. Here we report that the dimer of the N(_)PTX3 is unable to rescue cumulus matrix organization, and that the tetrameric assembly of the protein is the minimal oligomeric state required for accomplishing this function. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 binds to HCs of IαI and TSG-6, which are essential for cumulus matrix formation and able to interact with hyaluronan. Interestingly, here we show by solid-phase binding experiments that the dimer of the N(_)PTX3 retains the ability to bind to both IαI and TSG-6, suggesting that the octameric structure of PTX3 provides multiple binding sites for each of these ligands. These findings support the hypothesis that PTX3 contributes to cumulus matrix organization by cross-linking HA polymers through interactions with multiple HCs of IαI and/or TSG-6. The N-terminal PTX3 tetrameric oligomerization was recently reported to be also required for recognition and inhibition of FGF2. Given that this growth factor has been detected in the mammalian preovulatory follicle, we wondered whether FGF2 negatively influences cumulus expansion and PTX3 may also serve in vivo to antagonize its activity. We found that a molar excess of FGF2, above

  2. Predicting success of oligomerized pool engineering (OPEN for zinc finger target site sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodwin Mathew J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise and efficient methods for gene targeting are critical for detailed functional analysis of genomes and regulatory networks and for potentially improving the efficacy and safety of gene therapies. Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN is a recently developed method for engineering C2H2 zinc finger proteins (ZFPs designed to bind specific DNA sequences with high affinity and specificity in vivo. Because generation of ZFPs using OPEN requires considerable effort, a computational method for identifying the sites in any given gene that are most likely to be successfully targeted by this method is desirable. Results Analysis of the base composition of experimentally validated ZFP target sites identified important constraints on the DNA sequence space that can be effectively targeted using OPEN. Using alternate encodings to represent ZFP target sites, we implemented Naïve Bayes and Support Vector Machine classifiers capable of distinguishing "active" targets, i.e., ZFP binding sites that can be targeted with a high rate of success, from those that are "inactive" or poor targets for ZFPs generated using current OPEN technologies. When evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation on a dataset of 135 experimentally validated ZFP target sites, the best Naïve Bayes classifier, designated ZiFOpT, achieved overall accuracy of 87% and specificity+ of 90%, with an ROC AUC of 0.89. When challenged with a completely independent test set of 140 newly validated ZFP target sites, ZiFOpT performance was comparable in terms of overall accuracy (88% and specificity+ (92%, but with reduced ROC AUC (0.77. Users can rank potentially active ZFP target sites using a confidence score derived from the posterior probability returned by ZiFOpT. Conclusion ZiFOpT, a machine learning classifier trained to identify DNA sequences amenable for targeting by OPEN-generated zinc finger arrays, can guide users to target sites that are most likely to function

  3. Nanomolar oligomerization and selective co-aggregation of α-synuclein pathogenic mutants revealed by single-molecule fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierecki, Emma; Giles, Nichole; Bowden, Quill; Polinkovsky, Mark E.; Steinbeck, Janina; Arrioti, Nicholas; Rahman, Diya; Bhumkar, Akshay; Nicovich, Philip R.; Ross, Ian; Parton, Robert G.; Böcking, Till; Gambin, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, notably Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease is characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies, abnormal aggregates mainly composed of α-synuclein. Moreover, cases of familial Parkinson’s disease have been linked to mutations in α-synuclein. In this study, we compared the behavior of wild-type (WT) α-synuclein and five of its pathological mutants (A30P, E46K, H50Q, G51D and A53T). To this end, single-molecule fluorescence detection was coupled to cell-free protein expression to measure precisely the oligomerization of proteins without purification, denaturation or labelling steps. In these conditions, we could detect the formation of oligomeric and pre-fibrillar species at very short time scale and low micromolar concentrations. The pathogenic mutants surprisingly segregated into two classes: one group forming large aggregates and fibrils while the other tending to form mostly oligomers. Strikingly, co-expression experiments reveal that members from the different groups do not generally interact with each other, both at the fibril and monomer levels. Together, this data paints a completely different picture of α-synuclein aggregation, with two possible pathways leading to the development of fibrils. PMID:27892477

  4. Solution structure of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB2 SAM domain and identification of two distinct homotypic interaction sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Smalla, M.; Schmieder, P.; Kelly, M.; Ter Laak, A.; Krause, G.; Ball, L.; Wahl, M.; Bork, P.; Oschkinat, H.

    1999-01-01

    The sterile alpha motif (SAM) is a protein interaction domain of around 70 amino acids present predominantly in the N- and C-termini of more than 60 diverse proteins that participate in signal transduction and transcriptional repression. SAM domains have been shown to homo- and hetero-oligomerize and to mediate specific protein-protein interactions. A highly conserved subclass of SAM domains is present at the intracellular C-terminus of more than 40 Eph receptor tyrosine kinases that are invo...

  5. A cytosolic juxtamembrane interface modulates plexin A3 oligomerization and signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Barton

    Full Text Available Plexins (plxns are transmembrane (TM receptors involved in the guidance of vascular, lymphatic vessel, and neuron growth as well as cancer metastasis. Plxn signaling results in cytosolic GTPase-activating protein activity, and previous research implicates dimerization as important for activation of plxn signaling. Purified, soluble plxn extracellular and cytosolic domains exhibit only weak homomeric interactions, suggesting a role for the plxn TM and juxtamembrane regions in homooligomerization. In this study, we consider a heptad repeat in the Danio rerio PlxnA3 cytosolic juxtamembrane domain (JM for its ability to influence PlxnA3 homooligomerization in TM-domain containing constructs. Site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with the AraTM assay and bioluminescent energy transfer (BRET² suggest an interface involving a JM heptad repeat, in particular residue M1281, regulates PlxnA3 homomeric interactions when examined in constructs containing an ectodomain, TM and JM domain. In the presence of a neuropilin-2a co-receptor and semaphorin 3F ligand, disruption to PlxnA3 homodimerization caused by an M1281F mutation is eliminated, suggesting destabilization of the PlxnA3 homodimer in the JM is not sufficient to disrupt co-receptor complex formation. In contrast, enhanced homodimerization of PlxnA3 caused by mutation M1281L remains even in the presence of ligand semaphorin 3F and co-receptor neuropilin-2a. Consistent with this pattern of PlxnA3 dimerization in the presence of ligand and co-receptor, destabilizing mutations to PlxnA3 homodimerization (M1281F are able to rescue motor patterning defects in sidetracked zebrafish embryos, whereas mutations that enhance PlxnA3 homodimerization (M1281L are not. Collectively, our results indicate the JM heptad repeat, in particular residue M1281, forms a switchable interface that modulates both PlxnA3 homomeric interactions and signal transduction.

  6. Design, synthesis, and testing of multivalent compounds targeted to melanocortin receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehigaspitiya, Dilani Chathurika

    Our focus is on developing non-invasive molecular imaging reagents, which target human cancers that presently are difficult to detect, such as melanoma. We wish to apply the multivalency concept to differentiate between healthy cells and melanoma cells. Melanoma cells are known to over-express alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone receptors. A successful multivalent construct should show greater avidity towards melanoma cells than healthy cells due to the synergistic effects arising from multivalency. Both oligomeric and shorter linear constructs bearing the minimum active sequence of melanocyte stimulating hormone, His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH2(MSH4), which binds with low micromolar affinity to alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone receptors, were synthesized. Binding affinities of these constructs were evaluated in a competitive binding assay by competing with labeled ligands, Eu-DTPA-PEGO-MSH7 and/or Eu-DTPA-PEGO-NDP-alpha-MSH on the engineered cell line HEK293 CCK2R/hMC4R, which is genetically modified to over-express both the cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R) and human melanocortin 4 receptor (hMC4R). The oligomers were rapidly assembled using microwave-assisted copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition between a dialkyne derivative of MSH4 and a diazide derivative of (Pro-Gly)3 as co-monomers. Three oligomer mixtures were further analyzed based on their degree of oligomerization and the route by which the MSH4 monomers were oligomerized, protected vs deprotected. Completive binding assay against Eu-DTPA-PEGO-MSH7 showed only a statistical enhancement of binding when calculated based on the total MSH4 concentration. However, when the calculation of avidity is based on an estimation of the particles numbers, there was a seven times enhancement of binding compared to a monovalent MSH4 control. The shorter linear multivalent MSH4 constructs were synthesized using ethylene glycol, glycerol, and mannitol as core scaffolds with maximum inter-ligand distances ranging from 27

  7. The miR9863 family regulates distinct Mla alleles in barley to attenuate NLR receptor-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC, nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh. How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at post-transcriptional level is not clear. The microRNA family, miR9863, comprises four members that differentially regulate distinct Mla alleles in barley. We show that miR9863 members guide the cleavage of Mla1 transcripts in barley, and block or reduce the accumulation of MLA1 protein in the heterologous Nicotiana benthamiana expression system. Regulation specificity is determined by variation in a unique single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP in mature miR9863 family members and two SNPs in the Mla miR9863-binding site that separates these alleles into three groups. Further, we demonstrate that 22-nt miR9863s trigger the biogenesis of 21-nt phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs and together these sRNAs form a feed-forward regulation network for repressing the expression of group I Mla alleles. Overexpression of miR9863 members specifically attenuates MLA1, but not MLA10-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling. We propose a key role of the miR9863 family in dampening immune response signaling triggered by a group of MLA immune receptors in barley.

  8. Iron-induced oligomerization of human FXN81-210 and bacterial CyaY frataxin and the effect of iron chelators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlgren, Eva Christina; Fekry, Mostafa; Wiemann, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    long forms, FXN42-210 and FXN56-210, have been shown to spontaneously form oligomeric particles stabilized by the extended N-terminal sequence. The short variant FXN81-210, on other hand, has only been observed in the monomeric state. However, a highly homologous E. coli frataxin CyaY, which also lacks...

  9. Oligomeric forms of the metastasis-related Mts1 (S100A4) protein stimulate neuronal differentiation in cultures of rat hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitskaya, V; Grigorian, M; Kriajevska, M

    2000-01-01

    protein family. The oligomeric but not the dimeric form of Mts1 strongly induces differentiation of cultured hippocampal neurons. A mutant with a single Y75F amino acid substitution, which stabilizes the dimeric form of Mts1, is unable to promote neurite extension. Disulfide bonds do not play an essential...

  10. Identification of a novel receptor-like protein kinase that interacts with a geminivirus nuclear shuttle protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariano, Andrea C.; Andrade, Maxuel O.; Santos, Anesia A.; Carolino, Sonia M.B.; Oliveira, Marli L.; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina; Brommonshenkel, Sergio H.; Fontes, Elizabeth P.B.

    2004-01-01

    Despite extensive studies in plant virus-host interactions, the molecular mechanisms of geminivirus movement and interactions with host components remain largely unknown. A tomato kinase protein and its soybean homolog were found to interact specifically with the nuclear shuttle protein (NSP) of Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) and Tomato crinkle leaf yellows virus (TCrLYV) through yeast two-hybrid screening and in vitro protein binding assays. These proteins, designated LeNIK (Lycopersicon esculentum NSP-Interacting Kinase) and GmNIK (Glycine max NIK), belong to the LRR-RLK (leucine rich-repeat receptor-like kinase) family that is involved in plant developmental processes and/or resistance response. As such, NIK is structurally organized into characteristic domains, including a serine/threonine kinase domain with a nucleotide binding site at the C-terminal region, an internal transmembrane segment and leucine-rich repeats (LRR) at the N-terminal portion. The potential significance of the NSP-NIK interaction is discussed

  11. A novel inhibitor of p75-neurotrophin receptor improves functional outcomes in two models of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbary-Gossart, Sandrine; Lee, Sangmi; Baroni, Marco; Lamarche, Isabelle; Arnone, Michele; Canolle, Benoit; Lin, Amity; Sacramento, Jeffrey; Salegio, Ernesto A; Castel, Marie-Noelle; Delesque-Touchard, Nathalie; Alam, Antoine; Laboudie, Patricia; Ferzaz, Badia; Savi, Pierre; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Manley, Geoffrey T; Ferguson, Adam R; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Bono, Françoise; Beattie, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor is important in multiple physiological actions including neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth during development, and after central nervous system injury. We have discovered a novel piperazine-derived compound, EVT901, which interferes with p75 neurotrophin receptor oligomerization through direct interaction with the first cysteine-rich domain of the extracellular region. Using ligand binding assays with cysteine-rich domains-fused p75 neurotrophin receptor, we confirmed that EVT901 interferes with oligomerization of full-length p75 neurotrophin receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Here we report that EVT901 reduces binding of pro-nerve growth factor to p75 neurotrophin receptor, blocks pro-nerve growth factor induced apoptosis in cells expressing p75 neurotrophin receptor, and enhances neurite outgrowth in vitro Furthermore, we demonstrate that EVT901 abrogates p75 neurotrophin receptor signalling by other ligands, such as prion peptide and amyloid-β. To test the efficacy of EVT901 in vivo, we evaluated the outcome in two models of traumatic brain injury. We generated controlled cortical impacts in adult rats. Using unbiased stereological analysis, we found that EVT901 delivered intravenously daily for 1 week after injury, reduced lesion size, protected cortical neurons and oligodendrocytes, and had a positive effect on neurological function. After lateral fluid percussion injury in adult rats, oral treatment with EVT901 reduced neuronal death in the hippocampus and thalamus, reduced long-term cognitive deficits, and reduced the occurrence of post-traumatic seizure activity. Together, these studies provide a new reagent for altering p75 neurotrophin receptor actions after injury and suggest that EVT901 may be useful in treatment of central nervous system trauma and other neurological disorders where p75 neurotrophin receptor signalling is affected. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  12. Roles of dental pulp fibroblasts in the recognition of bacterium-related factors and subsequent development of pulpitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Nakanishi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available As caries-related bacteria invade deeply into dentin and come into close proximity to the pulp, inflammatory cells (such as lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrate into the bacterium-invaded area and consequently pulpitis develops. Many types of cytokines and adhesion molecules are responsible for the initiation and progression of pulpitis. Dental pulp fibroblasts, a major cell type in the dental pulp, also have capacity to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and express adhesion molecules in response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, including lipopolysaccharide. The innate immune system senses microbial infection using pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD, for PAMPs. In this review, we summarize the roles of dental pulp fibroblasts in the recognition of invaded bacterium-related factors via TLR and NOD pathways, and the subsequent pulpal immune responses, leading to progressive pulpitis.

  13. The role of vitamin D in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lương, Khanh Vinh Quốc; Nguyễn, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2015-01-15

    An abnormal calcium-parathyroid hormone (PTH)-vitamin D axis has been reported in patients with malaria infection. A role for vitamin D in malaria has been suggested by many studies. Genetic studies have identified numerous factors that link vitamin D to malaria, including human leukocyte antigen genes, toll-like receptors, heme oxygenase-1, angiopoietin-2, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, and Bcl-2. Vitamin D has also been implicated in malaria via its effects on the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine, matrix metalloproteinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, prostaglandins, reactive oxidative species, and nitric oxide synthase. Vitamin D may be important in malaria; therefore, additional research on its role in malaria is needed.

  14. Inflammasome in Intestinal Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Nunes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The activation of specific cytosolic pathogen recognition receptors, the nucleotide-binding-oligomerization-domain- (NOD- like receptors (NLRs, leads to the assembly of the inflammasome, a multimeric complex platform that activates caspase-1. The caspase-1 pathway leads to the upregulation of important cytokines from the interleukin (IL-1 family, IL-1β, and IL-18, with subsequent activation of the innate immune response. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure, the mechanisms behind the inflammasome activation, and its possible role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal cancer. Here, we show that the available data points towards the importance of the inflammasome in the innate intestinal immune response, being the complex involved in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, correct intestinal barrier function and efficient elimination of invading pathogens.

  15. Novel Dual Mitochondrial and CD44 Receptor Targeting Nanoparticles for Redox Stimuli-Triggered Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaili; Qi, Mengjiao; Guo, Chunjing; Yu, Yueming; Wang, Bingjie; Fang, Lei; Liu, Mengna; Wang, Zhen; Fan, Xinxin; Chen, Daquan

    2018-02-01

    In this work, novel mitochondrial and CD44 receptor dual-targeting redox-sensitive multifunctional nanoparticles (micelles) based on oligomeric hyaluronic acid (oHA) were proposed. The amphiphilic nanocarrier was prepared by (5-carboxypentyl)triphenylphosphonium bromide (TPP), oligomeric hyaluronic acid (oHA), disulfide bond, and curcumin (Cur), named as TPP-oHA-S-S-Cur. The TPP targeted the mitochondria, the antitumor drug Cur served as a hydrophobic core, the CD44 receptor targeting oHA worked as a hydrophilic shell, and the disulfide bond acted as a connecting arm. The chemical structure of TPP-oHA-S-S-Cur was characterized by 1HNMR technology. Cur was loaded into the TPP-oHA-S-S-Cur micelles by self-assembly. Some properties, including the preparation of micelles, morphology, redox sensitivity, and mitochondrial targeting, were studied. The results showed that TPP-oHA-S-S-Cur micelles had a mean diameter of 122.4 ± 23.4 nm, zeta potential - 26.55 ± 4.99 mV. In vitro release study and cellular uptake test showed that TPP-oHA-S-S-Cur micelles had redox sensibility, dual targeting to mitochondrial and CD44 receptor. This work provided a promising smart multifunctional nanocarrier platform to enhance the solubility, decrease the side effects, and improve the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs.

  16. Allelic barley MLA immune receptors recognize sequence-unrelated avirulence effectors of the powdery mildew pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xunli; Kracher, Barbara; Saur, Isabel M L; Bauer, Saskia; Ellwood, Simon R; Wise, Roger; Yaeno, Takashi; Maekawa, Takaki; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2016-10-18

    Disease-resistance genes encoding intracellular nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs) are key components of the plant innate immune system and typically detect the presence of isolate-specific avirulence (AVR) effectors from pathogens. NLR genes define the fastest-evolving gene family of flowering plants and are often arranged in gene clusters containing multiple paralogs, contributing to copy number and allele-specific NLR variation within a host species. Barley mildew resistance locus a (Mla) has been subject to extensive functional diversification, resulting in allelic resistance specificities each recognizing a cognate, but largely unidentified, AVR a gene of the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). We applied a transcriptome-wide association study among 17 Bgh isolates containing different AVR a genes and identified AVR a1 and AVR a13 , encoding candidate-secreted effectors recognized by Mla1 and Mla13 alleles, respectively. Transient expression of the effector genes in barley leaves or protoplasts was sufficient to trigger Mla1 or Mla13 allele-specific cell death, a hallmark of NLR receptor-mediated immunity. AVR a1 and AVR a13 are phylogenetically unrelated, demonstrating that certain allelic MLA receptors evolved to recognize sequence-unrelated effectors. They are ancient effectors because corresponding loci are present in wheat powdery mildew. AVR A1 recognition by barley MLA1 is retained in transgenic Arabidopsis, indicating that AVR A1 directly binds MLA1 or that its recognition involves an evolutionarily conserved host target of AVR A1 Furthermore, analysis of transcriptome-wide sequence variation among the Bgh isolates provides evidence for Bgh population structure that is partially linked to geographic isolation.

  17. DFT study on the impact of the methylaluminoxane cocatalyst in ethylene oligomerization using a titanium-based catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Pasha, Farhan Ahmad

    2015-01-26

    A computational study within the framework of density functional theory is presented on the oligomerization of ethylene to yield 1-hexene using [(η5-C5H4CMe2C6H5)]TiCl3/MAO] catalyst. This study explicitly takes into account a methylaluminoxane (MAO) cocatalyst model, where the MAO cluster has become an anionic species after having abstracted one chloride anion, yielding a cationic activated catalyst. Hence, the reaction profile was calculated using the zwitterionic system, and the potential energy surface has been compared to the cationic catalytic system. Modest differences were found between the two free energy profiles. However, we show for the first time that the use of a realistic zwitterionic model is required to obtain a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationship between the energy barriers and reaction energies.

  18. DFT study on the impact of the methylaluminoxane cocatalyst in ethylene oligomerization using a titanium-based catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Basset, Jean-Marie; Toulhoat, Hervé ; De Bruin, Theodorus J M

    2015-01-01

    A computational study within the framework of density functional theory is presented on the oligomerization of ethylene to yield 1-hexene using [(η5-C5H4CMe2C6H5)]TiCl3/MAO] catalyst. This study explicitly takes into account a methylaluminoxane (MAO) cocatalyst model, where the MAO cluster has become an anionic species after having abstracted one chloride anion, yielding a cationic activated catalyst. Hence, the reaction profile was calculated using the zwitterionic system, and the potential energy surface has been compared to the cationic catalytic system. Modest differences were found between the two free energy profiles. However, we show for the first time that the use of a realistic zwitterionic model is required to obtain a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationship between the energy barriers and reaction energies.

  19. Effects of Bentonite on p-Methoxybenzyl Acetate: A Theoretical Model for Oligomerization via an Electrophilic-Substitution Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Salmón

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Tonsil Actisil FF, a commercial bentonitic clay, promotes the formation of a series of electrophilic-aromatic-substitution products from para-methoxybenzyl acetate in carbon disulfide. The molecules obtained correspond to linear isomeric dimers, trimers, tetramers and a pentamer, according to their spectroscopic data. A clear indication of the title mechanistic pathway for the oligomerization growth was obtained from the analysis of a set of computational-chemistry calculations using the density-functional-theory level B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p. The corresponding conclusions were based on the computed dipole moments, the HOMO/LUMO distributions, and a natural-populations analysis of the studied molecules.

  20. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes@octavinyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes nanocomposite preparation via cross-linking reaction in acidic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasekharan, Lakshmipriya; Thomas, Sabu [Mahatma Gandhi University, International and Interuniversity Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (India); Comoy, Corinne [Université de Lorraine, SRSMC, UMR 7565 (France); Sivasankarapillai, Anilkumar [NSS Hindu College (India); Kalarikkal, Nandakumar [Mahatma Gandhi University, International and Interuniversity Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (India); Lamouroux, Emmanuel, E-mail: Emmanuel.Lamouroux@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, SRSMC, UMR 7565 (France)

    2016-11-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes have unique properties allowing their use in a wide range of applications—from microelectronics to biomedical and polymer fields. Nevertheless, a crucial aspect for their use resides in the ease of handling them during the process. Here, we report a facile route to prepare multiwalled carbon nanotubes@octavinyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (MWCNT@POSS) nanocomposite. The method involves the formation of a covalent bond between carboxylated MWCNTs and OV-POSS using acid-catalyzed electrophilic addition reaction. The resulting nanocomposite have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), powder X-Ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results confirmed that the formation of MWCNT@POSS nanocomposite did not deteriorate MWCNT structure or morphology. Here, we used a 1:1 ratio of carboxylated MWCNTs and OV-POSS and the POSS content in the nanocomposite was 39.5 wt%.

  1. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein deficiency promotes early onset and the chronic development of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Carlsen, Stefan; Nandakumar, Kutty

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a homopentameric protein in cartilage. The development of arthritis, like collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), involves cartilage as a target tissue. We have investigated the development of CIA in COMP-deficient mice. METHODS: COMP......-deficient mice in the 129/Sv background were backcrossed for 10 generations against B10.Q mice, which are susceptible to chronic CIA. COMP-deficient and wild-type mice were tested for onset, incidence, and severity of arthritis in both the collagen and collagen antibody-induced arthritis models. Serum anti......-collagen II and anti-COMP antibodies as well as serum COMP levels in arthritic and wild-type mice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: COMP-deficient mice showed a significant early onset and increase in the severity of CIA in the chronic phase, whereas collagen II-antibody titers were...

  2. Substitution of proline32 by α-methylproline preorganizes β2-microglobulin for oligomerization but not for aggregation into amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeev, Vladimir; Ebert, Marc-Olivier; Dolenc, Jozica; Hilvert, Donald

    2015-02-25

    Conversion of soluble folded proteins into insoluble amyloids generally proceeds in three distinct mechanistic stages: (1) initial protein misfolding into aggregation-competent conformers, (2) subsequent formation of oligomeric species and, finally, (3) self-assembly into extended amyloid fibrils. In the work reported herein, we interrogated the amyloidogenesis mechanism of human β2-microglobulin (β2m), which is thought to be triggered by a pivotal cis-trans isomerization of a proline residue at position 32 in the polypeptide, with nonstandard amino acids. Using chemical protein synthesis we prepared a β2m analogue in which Pro32 was replaced by the conformationally constrained amino acid α-methylproline (MePro). The strong propensity of MePro to adopt a trans prolyl bond led to enhanced population of a non-native [trans-MePro32]β2m protein conformer, which readily formed oligomers at neutral pH. In the presence of the antibiotic rifamycin SV, which inhibits amyloid growth of wild-type β2m, [MePro32]β2m was nearly quantitatively converted into different spherical oligomeric species. Self-assembly into amyloid fibrils was not observed in the absence of seeding, however, even at low pH (<3), where wild-type β2m spontaneously forms amyloids. Nevertheless, we found that aggregation-preorganized [MePro32]β2m can act in a prion-like fashion, templating misfolded conformations in a natively folded protein. Overall, these results provide detailed insight into the role of cis-trans isomerization of Pro32 and ensuing structural rearrangements that lead to initial β2m misfolding and aggregation. They corroborate the view that conformational protein dynamics enabled by reversible Pro32 cis-trans interconversion rather than simple population of the trans conformer is critical for both nucleation and subsequent growth of β2m amyloid structures.

  3. Assessment of Escherichia coli selenophosphate synthetase oligomeric states by analytical ultracentrifugation and small angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, I.R.; Faim, F.M.; Oliveira Neto, M.; Thiemann, O.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP-SC), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Borges, J.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Selenium is an essential micronutrient for many organisms and is present in selenium-containing proteins as selenocysteine (Sec) and RNAs as selenouridine. Specific selenium incorporation into selenoproteins and RNAs requires the generation of a biologically active selenium donor compound, selenophosphate, which is produced from the activation of selenide with adenosine 5-triphosphate (ATP) in a reaction catalyzed by Selenophosphate Synthetase (SELD). Therefore, SELD is a key enzyme of the selenium pathway in the cell. The Escherichia coli SELD open reading frame was cloned into pET28a (Novagen) expression vector and the recombinant protein was over expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain. In order to purify the protein, we used metal-chelate affinity chromatography followed by a gel filtration step. Analytical Ultracentrifugation (AUC) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) were employed to study the oligomeric states of the soluble protein. The results of AUC revealed dimer-tetramer and tetramer-octamer equilibrium at low concentrations of protein, with dissociation constants of 70 2 and 560 40 M, respectively. Moreover, the SAXS results pointed the oligomeric state of the protein at higher concentrations as predominantly dimeric and the p(r) and the SAXS envelope revealed the SELD as elongated. We also performed initial crystallization trials with protein samples at 7 mg/ml in 96-well sitting-drop crystallization plates at room temperature using a crystallization robot. Needle crystals appeared after some days. X-ray diffraction for these crystals were tested in the MX2 beamline at the Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory (LNLS Campinas). We are now working to improve these crystals in order to obtain suitable crystals for structure determination. (author)

  4. Structural basis for TatA oligomerization: an NMR study of Escherichia coli TatA dimeric structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available Many proteins are transported across lipid membranes by protein translocation systems in living cells. The twin-arginine transport (Tat system identified in bacteria and plant chloroplasts is a unique system that transports proteins across membranes in their fully-folded states. Up to date, the detailed molecular mechanism of this process remains largely unclear. The Escherichia coli Tat system consists of three essential transmembrane proteins: TatA, TatB and TatC. Among them, TatB and TatC form a tight complex and function in substrate recognition. The major component TatA contains a single transmembrane helix followed by an amphipathic helix, and is suggested to form the translocation pore via self-oligomerization. Since the TatA oligomer has to accommodate substrate proteins of various sizes and shapes, the process of its assembly stands essential for understanding the translocation mechanism. A structure model of TatA oligomer was recently proposed based on NMR and EPR observations, revealing contacts between the transmembrane helices from adjacent subunits. Herein we report the construction and stabilization of a dimeric TatA, as well as the structure determination by solution NMR spectroscopy. In addition to more extensive inter-subunit contacts between the transmembrane helices, we were also able to observe interactions between neighbouring amphipathic helices. The side-by-side packing of the amphipathic helices extends the solvent-exposed hydrophilic surface of the protein, which might be favourable for interactions with substrate proteins. The dimeric TatA structure offers more detailed information of TatA oligomeric interface and provides new insights on Tat translocation mechanism.

  5. Tau hyperphosphorylation induces oligomeric insulin accumulation and insulin resistance in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Patricia; Sandebring-Matton, Anna; Merino-Serrais, Paula; Parrado-Fernandez, Cristina; Rabano, Alberto; Winblad, Bengt; Ávila, Jesús; Ferrer, Isidre; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel

    2017-12-01

    Insulin signalling deficiencies and insulin resistance have been directly linked to the progression of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease. However, to date little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms or insulin state and distribution in the brain under pathological conditions. Here, we report that insulin is accumulated and retained as oligomers in hyperphosphorylated tau-bearing neurons in Alzheimer's disease and in several of the most prevalent human tauopathies. The intraneuronal accumulation of insulin is directly dependent on tau hyperphosphorylation, and follows the tauopathy progression. Furthermore, cells accumulating insulin show signs of insulin resistance and decreased insulin receptor levels. These results suggest that insulin retention in hyperphosphorylated tau-bearing neurons is a causative factor for the insulin resistance observed in tauopathies, and describe a novel neuropathological concept with important therapeutic implications. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Functional labeling of insulin receptor subunits in live cells. Alpha 2 beta 2 species is the major autophosphorylated form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Marchand-Brustel, Y.; Ballotti, R.; Gremeaux, T.; Tanti, J.F.; Brandenburg, D.; Van Obberghen, E.

    1989-01-01

    Both receptor subunits were functionally labeled in order to provide methods allowing, in live cells and in broken cell systems, concomitant evaluation of the insulin receptor dual function, hormone binding, and kinase activity. In cell-free systems, insulin receptors were labeled on their alpha-subunit with 125I-photoreactive insulin, and on their beta-subunit by autophosphorylation. Thereafter, phosphorylated receptors were separated from the complete set of receptors by means of anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. Using this approach, a subpopulation of receptors was found which had bound insulin, but which were not phosphorylated. Under nonreducing conditions, receptors appeared in three oligomeric species identified as alpha 2 beta 2, alpha 2 beta, and alpha 2. Mainly the alpha 2 beta 2 receptor species was found to be phosphorylated while insulin was bound to alpha 2 beta 2, alpha 2 beta, and alpha 2 forms. In live cells, biosynthetic labeling of insulin receptors was used. Receptors were first labeled with [35S]methionine. Subsequently, the addition of insulin led to receptor autophosphorylation by virtue of the endogenous ATP pool. The total amount of [35S]methionine-labeled receptors was precipitated with antireceptor antibodies, whereas with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, only the phosphorylated receptors were isolated. Using this approach we made the two following key findings: (1) Both receptor species, alpha 2 beta 2 and alpha 2 beta, are present in live cells and in comparable amounts. This indicates that the alpha 2 beta form is not a degradation product of the alpha 2 beta 2 form artificially generated during receptor preparation. (2) The alpha 2 beta 2 species is the prevalently autophosphorylated form

  7. Zinc and the iron donor frataxin regulate oligomerization of the scaffold protein to form new Fe-S cluster assembly centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, B K; Ranatunga, W; Gakh, O; Smith, D Y; Thompson, J R; Isaya, G

    2017-06-21

    Early studies of the bacterial Fe-S cluster assembly system provided structural details for how the scaffold protein and the cysteine desulfurase interact. This work and additional work on the yeast and human systems elucidated a conserved mechanism for sulfur donation but did not provide any conclusive insights into the mechanism for iron delivery from the iron donor, frataxin, to the scaffold. We previously showed that oligomerization is a mechanism by which yeast frataxin (Yfh1) can promote assembly of the core machinery for Fe-S cluster synthesis both in vitro and in cells, in such a manner that the scaffold protein, Isu1, can bind to Yfh1 independent of the presence of the cysteine desulfurase, Nfs1. Here, in the absence of Yfh1, Isu1 was found to exist in two forms, one mostly monomeric with limited tendency to dimerize, and one with a strong propensity to oligomerize. Whereas the monomeric form is stabilized by zinc, the loss of zinc promotes formation of dimer and higher order oligomers. However, upon binding to oligomeric Yfh1, both forms take on a similar symmetrical trimeric configuration that places the Fe-S cluster coordinating residues of Isu1 in close proximity of iron-binding residues of Yfh1. This configuration is suitable for docking of Nfs1 in a manner that provides a structural context for coordinate iron and sulfur donation to the scaffold. Moreover, distinct structural features suggest that in physiological conditions the zinc-regulated abundance of monomeric vs. oligomeric Isu1 yields [Yfh1]·[Isu1] complexes with different Isu1 configurations that afford unique functional properties for Fe-S cluster assembly and delivery.

  8. Age- and brain region-dependent α-synuclein oligomerization is attributed to alterations in intrinsic enzymes regulating α-synuclein phosphorylation in aging monkey brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Yang, Weiwei; Li, Xin; Li, Xuran; Wang, Peng; Yue, Feng; Yang, Hui; Chan, Piu; Yu, Shun

    2016-02-23

    We previously reported that the levels of α-syn oligomers, which play pivotal pathogenic roles in age-related Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, increase heterogeneously in the aging brain. Here, we show that exogenous α-syn incubated with brain extracts from older cynomolgus monkeys and in Lewy body pathology (LBP)-susceptible brain regions (striatum and hippocampus) forms higher amounts of phosphorylated and oligomeric α-syn than that in extracts from younger monkeys and LBP-insusceptible brain regions (cerebellum and occipital cortex). The increased α-syn phosphorylation and oligomerization in the brain extracts from older monkeys and in LBP-susceptible brain regions were associated with higher levels of polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2), an enzyme promoting α-syn phosphorylation, and lower activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), an enzyme inhibiting α-syn phosphorylation, in these brain extracts. Further, the extent of the age- and brain-dependent increase in α-syn phosphorylation and oligomerization was reduced by inhibition of PLK2 and activation of PP2A. Inversely, phosphorylated α-syn oligomers reduced the activity of PP2A and showed potent cytotoxicity. In addition, the activity of GCase and the levels of ceramide, a product of GCase shown to activate PP2A, were lower in brain extracts from older monkeys and in LBP-susceptible brain regions. Our results suggest a role for altered intrinsic metabolic enzymes in age- and brain region-dependent α-syn oligomerization in aging brains.

  9. Live cell imaging unveils multiple domain requirements for in vivo dimerization of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego M Presman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are essential for life, but are also implicated in disease pathogenesis and may produce unwanted effects when given in high doses. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR transcriptional activity and clinical outcome have been linked to its oligomerization state. Although a point mutation within the GR DNA-binding domain (GRdim mutant has been reported as crucial for receptor dimerization and DNA binding, this assumption has recently been challenged. Here we have analyzed the GR oligomerization state in vivo using the number and brightness assay. Our results suggest a complete, reversible, and DNA-independent ligand-induced model for GR dimerization. We demonstrate that the GRdim forms dimers in vivo whereas adding another mutation in the ligand-binding domain (I634A severely compromises homodimer formation. Contrary to dogma, no correlation between the GR monomeric/dimeric state and transcriptional activity was observed. Finally, the state of dimerization affected DNA binding only to a subset of GR binding sites. These results have major implications on future searches for therapeutic glucocorticoids with reduced side effects.

  10. Computational design of trimeric influenza-neutralizing proteins targeting the hemagglutinin receptor binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Eva-Maria; Bernard, Steffen M.; La, David; Bohn, Alan J.; Lee, Peter S.; Anderson, Caitlin E.; Nieusma, Travis; Holstein, Carly A.; Garcia, Natalie K.; Hooper, Kathryn A.; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Nelson, Jorgen W.; Sheffler, William; Bloom, Jesse D.; Lee, Kelly K.; Ward, Andrew B.; Yager, Paul; Fuller, Deborah H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker , David (UWASH); (Scripps); (FHCRC)

    2017-06-12

    Many viral surface glycoproteins and cell surface receptors are homo-oligomers1, 2, 3, 4, and thus can potentially be targeted by geometrically matched homo-oligomers that engage all subunits simultaneously to attain high avidity and/or lock subunits together. The adaptive immune system cannot generally employ this strategy since the individual antibody binding sites are not arranged with appropriate geometry to simultaneously engage multiple sites in a single target homo-oligomer. We describe a general strategy for the computational design of homo-oligomeric protein assemblies with binding functionality precisely matched to homo-oligomeric target sites5, 6, 7, 8. In the first step, a small protein is designed that binds a single site on the target. In the second step, the designed protein is assembled into a homo-oligomer such that the designed binding sites are aligned with the target sites. We use this approach to design high-avidity trimeric proteins that bind influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) at its conserved receptor binding site. The designed trimers can both capture and detect HA in a paper-based diagnostic format, neutralizes influenza in cell culture, and completely protects mice when given as a single dose 24 h before or after challenge with influenza.

  11. N-terminal aliphatic residues dictate the structure, stability, assembly, and small molecule binding of the coiled-coil region of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekar, Susheel K; Asnani, Mukta; Limbad, Chandani; Haghpanah, Jennifer S; Hom, Wendy; Barra, Hanna; Nanda, Soumya; Lu, Min; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2009-09-15

    The coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMPcc) assembles into a homopentamer that naturally recognizes the small molecule 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (vit D). To identify the residues critical for the structure, stability, oligomerization, and binding to vit D as well as two other small molecules, all-trans-retinol (ATR) and curcumin (CCM), here we perform an alanine scanning mutagenesis study. Ten residues lining the hydrophobic pocket of COMPcc were mutated into alanine; of the mutated residues, the N-terminal aliphatic residues L37, L44, V47, and L51 are responsible for maintaining the structure and function. Furthermore, two polar residues, T40 and Q54, within the N-terminal region when converted into alanine improve the alpha-helical structure, stability, and self-assembly behavior. Helical stability, oligomerization, and binding appear to be linked in a manner in which mutations that abolish helical structure and assembly bind poorly to vit D, ATR, and CCM. These results provide not only insight into COMPcc and its functional role but also useful guidelines for the design of stable, pentameric coiled-coils capable of selectively storing and delivering various small molecules.

  12. Fouling behaviors of polybenzimidazole (PBI)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membranes for engineering osmosis processes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Sicong; Fu, Xiuzhu; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated the individual effects of reverse salt flux and permeate flux on fouling behaviors of as-spun and annealed polybenzimidazole (PBI)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membranes under forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) processes. Two types of membrane fouling had been studied; namely, inorganic fouling (CaSO4·2H2O gypsum scaling) during FO operations and organic fouling (sodium alginate fouling) during PRO operations. It is found that gypsum scaling on the membrane surface may be inhibited and even eliminated with an increase in reverse MgCl2 flux due to competitive formations of MgSO4° and CaSO4·2H2O. In contrast, the increase of reverse NaCl flux exhibits a slight enhancement on alginate fouling in both FO and PRO processes. Comparing to the reverse salt flux, the permeate flux always plays a dominant role in fouling. Therefore, lesser fouling has been observed on the membrane surface under the pressurized PRO process than FO process because the reduced initial flux mitigates the fouling phenomena more significantly than the enhancement caused by an increase in reverse NaCl flux. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Increased serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels and decreased patellar bone mineral density in patients with chondromalacia patellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, E; FitzGerald, O; Saxne, T; Bresnihan, B

    2002-11-01

    Chondromalacia patellae is a potentially disabling disorder characterised by features of patellar cartilage degradation. To evaluate markers of cartilage and bone turnover in patients with chondromalacia patellae. 18 patients with chondromalacia patellae were studied. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (s-COMP) and bone sialoprotein (s-BSP) levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared with those of age and sex matched healthy control subjects. Periarticular bone mineral density (BMD) of both knee joints was assessed by dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA). s-COMP levels were significantly raised in all patients with chondromalacia patellae compared with healthy control subjects (p=0.0001). s-BSP levels did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.41). BMD of the patella was significantly reduced in patients with chondromalacia patellae compared with the control subjects (p=0.016). In patients with bilateral chondromalacia patellae, BMD of the patella was lower in the more symptomatic knee joint (p=0.005). Changes in periarticular BMD were localised to the patella and were not present in femoral regions. Neither s-COMP (p=0.18) nor s-BSP (p=0.40) levels correlated with patellar BMD. Increased s-COMP levels, reflecting cartilage degradation, and reduced BMD localised to the patella may represent clinically useful markers in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with chondromalacia patellae. Measures of cartilage degradation did not correlate with loss of patellar bone density, suggesting dissociated pathophysiological mechanisms.

  14. Development of Biodegradable Poly(citrate)-Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes Hybrid Elastomers with High Mechanical Properties and Osteogenic Differentiation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhang; Yu, Meng; Chen, Xiaofeng; Ma, Peter X; Lei, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Biodegradable elastomeric biomaterials have attracted much attention in tissue engineering due to their biomimetic viscoelastic behavior and biocompatibility. However, the low mechanical stability at hydrated state, fast biodegradation in vivo, and poor osteogenic activity greatly limited bioelastomers applications in bone tissue regeneration. Herein, we develop a series of poly(octanediol citrate)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POC-POSS) hybrids with highly tunable elastomeric behavior (hydrated state) and biodegradation and osteoblasts biocompatibility through a facile one-pot thermal polymerization strategy. POC-POSS hybrids show significantly improved stiffness and ductility in either dry or hydrated conditions, as well as good antibiodegradation ability (20-50% weight loss in 3 months). POC-POSS hybrids exhibit significantly enhanced osteogenic differentiation through upregulating alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and expression of osteogenic markers (ALPL, BGLAP, and Runx2). The high mechanical stability at hydrated state and enhanced osteogenic activity make POC-POSS hybrid elastomers promising as scaffolds and nanoscale vehicles for bone tissue regeneration and drug delivery. This study may also provide a new strategy (controlling the stiffness under hydrated condition) to design advanced hybrid biomaterials with high mechanical properties under physiological condition for tissue regeneration applications.

  15. Pleiotropic benefit of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols on vascular health--a randomized controlled clinical pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weseler, Antje R; Ruijters, Erik J B; Drittij-Reijnders, Marie-José; Reesink, Koen D; Haenen, Guido R M M; Bast, Aalt

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are expanding to a major social-economic burden in the Western World and undermine man's deep desire for healthy ageing. Epidemiological studies suggest that flavanol-rich foods (e.g. grapes, wine, chocolate) sustain cardiovascular health. For an evidenced-based application, however, sound clinical data on their efficacy are strongly demanded. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study we supplemented 28 male smokers with 200 mg per day of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (MOF) from grape seeds. At baseline, after 4 and 8 weeks we measured macro- and microvascular function and a cluster of systemic biomarkers for major pathological processes occurring in the vasculature: disturbances in lipid metabolism and cellular redox balance, and activation of inflammatory cells and platelets. In the MOF group serum total cholesterol and LDL decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05) by 5% (n = 11) and 7% (n = 9), respectively in volunteers with elevated baseline levels. Additionally, after 8 weeks the ratio of glutathione to glutathione disulphide in erythrocytes rose from baseline by 22% (n = 15, Pbenefit of an 8 weeks supplementation with 200 mg/d MOF in humans. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00742287.

  16. Preparation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane based hybrid monoliths by ring-opening polymerization for capillary LC and CEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Zhang, Zhenbin; Dong, Jing; Liu, Zhongshan; Ou, Junjie; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-09-01

    A new organic-inorganic hybrid monolith was prepared by the ring-opening polymerization of octaglycidyldimethylsilyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) with 1,4-butanediamine (BDA) using 1-propanol, 1,4-butanediol, and PEG 10,000 as a porogenic system. Benefiting from the moderate phase separation process, the resulting poly(POSS-co-BDA) hybrid monolith possessed a uniform microstructure and exhibited excellent performance in chromatographic applications. Neutral, acidic, and basic compounds were successfully separated on the hybrid monolith in capillary LC (cLC), and high column efficiencies were achieved in all of the separations. In addition, as the amino groups could generate a strong EOF, the hybrid monolith was also applied in CEC for the separation of neutral and polar compounds, and a satisfactory performance was obtained. These results demonstrate that the poly(POSS-co-BDA) hybrid monolith is a good separation media in chromatographic separations of various types of compounds by both cLC and CEC. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Structural Analysis of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Coated SiC Nanoparticles and Their Applications in Thermoset Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reza-E-Rabby, M.; Jeelani, Sh.; Rangari, V. K.

    2015-01-01

    The SiC nanoparticles (NPs) were sonochemically coated with Octa Isobutyl (OI) polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) to create a compatible interface between particle and thermoset polymer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used to analyze the structure of OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles. These results revealed the formation of a covalent bonding between SiC and OI-POSS. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles has also shown the indication of attachment between these two nanoparticles. The OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles were further reinforced into a thermoset resin system in order to evaluate mechanical and thermal properties of nano composites. The flexural strength, modulus, and glass transition temperature were found to be enhanced while SiC and OI-POSS coated SiC were infused into epoxy system compared to those properties of neat epoxy resin

  18. Glycerol-Induced Aggregation of the Oligomeric L-Asparaginase II from E. coli Monitored with ATR-FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koba Adeishvili

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In this paper attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been employed for the study of the structural composition of aggregates of the oligomeric L-asparaginase II from E.coli formed in the presence of glycerol after the induction of refolding of the protein. Apart from the perfect coincidence of the secondary structure composition of EcA2 as determined by FTIR and crystallography [1], it has also been shown that secondary structure of protein in asparaginase deposits is similar to that of the native conformation: 20.7% extended, 22.3% disordered, 31.4% helix and 25.6% turn/bend/β sheet. Certain structural similarities in the range of experimental error was observed for all three protein deposits presented in this paper, indicating a common structural basis for the composition of this types of aggregates. It is concluded that in the constitution of such precipitates, a partially folded (molten globule like state(s is involved, and its stabilisation is a key factor leading to the aggregation. The results presented in this paper might serve to be a good explanation and an excellent basis for the fundamental theory of protein (oligomers precipitation by osmotic substances.

  19. Functional significance of the oligomeric structure of the Na,K-pump from radiation inactivation and ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norby, J.G.; Jensen, J.

    1991-01-01

    The present article is concerned with the oligomeric structure and function of the Na,K-pump (Na,K-ATPase). The questions we have addressed, using radiation inactivation and target size analysis as well as ligand binding, are whether the minimal structural unit and the functional unit have more than one molecule of the catalytic subunit, alpha. The authors first discuss the fundamentals of the radiation inactivation method and emphasize the necessity for rigorous internal standardization with enzymes of known molecular mass. They then demonstrate that the radiation inactivation of Na,K-ATPase is a stepwise process which leads to intermediary fragments of the alpha-subunit with partial catalytic activity. From the target size analysis it is most likely that the membrane-bound Na,K-ATPase is structurally organized as a diprotomer containing two alpha-subunits. Determination of ADP- and ouabain-binding site stoichiometry favors a theory with one substrate site per (alpha beta) 2. 47 references

  20. Continued biological investigations of boron-rich oligomeric phosphate diesters (OPDs). Tumor-selective boron agents for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mark W.; Shelly, Kenneth; Kane, Robert R.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Clinical success of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy will rely on the selective intracellular delivery of high concentrations of boron-10 to tumor tissue. In order for a boron agent to facilitate clinical success, the simultaneous needs of obtaining a high tumor dose, high tumor selectivity, and low systemic toxicity must be realized. Boron-rich oligomeric phosphate diesters (OPDs) are a class of highly water-soluble compounds containing up to 40% boron by weight. Previous work in our groups demonstrated that once placed in the cytoplasm of tumor cells, OPDs quickly accumulate within the cell nucleus. The objective of the current study was to determine the biodistribution of seven different free OPDs in BALB/c mice bearing EMT6 tumors. Fructose solutions containing between 1.4 and 6.4 micrograms of boron per gram of tissue were interveinously injected in mice seven to ten days after tumor implantation. At intervals during the study, animals were euthanized and samples of tumor, blood, liver, kidney, brain and skin were collected and analyzed for boron content using ICP-AES. Tumor boron concentrations of between 5 and 29 ppm were achieved and maintained over the 72-hour time course of each experiment. Several OPDs demonstrated high tumor selectivity with one oligomer exhibiting a tumor to blood ratio of 35:1. The apparent toxicity of each oligomer was assessed through animal behavior during the experiment and necropsy of each animal upon sacrifice. (author)

  1. Interplay of histidine residues of the Alzheimer’s disease Aβ peptide governs its Zn-induced oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istrate, Andrey N.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Zhokhov, Sergey S.; Mantsyzov, Alexey B.; Kechko, Olga I.; Pastore, Annalisa; Makarov, Alexander A.; Polshakov, Vladimir I.

    2016-02-01

    Conformational changes of Aβ peptide result in its transformation from native monomeric state to the toxic soluble dimers, oligomers and insoluble aggregates that are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Interactions of zinc ions with Aβ are mediated by the N-terminal Aβ1-16 domain and appear to play a key role in AD progression. There is a range of results indicating that these interactions trigger the Aβ plaque formation. We have determined structure and functional characteristics of the metal binding domains derived from several Aβ variants and found that their zinc-induced oligomerization is governed by conformational changes in the minimal zinc binding site 6HDSGYEVHH14. The residue H6 and segment 11EVHH14, which are part of this site are crucial for formation of the two zinc-mediated interaction interfaces in Aβ. These structural determinants can be considered as promising targets for rational design of the AD-modifying drugs aimed at blocking pathological Aβ aggregation.

  2. Structure of the large terminase from a hyperthermophilic virus reveals a unique mechanism for oligomerization and ATP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui-Gang; Jenkins, Huw T; Antson, Alfred A; Greive, Sandra J

    2017-12-15

    The crystal structure of the large terminase from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus bacteriophage D6E shows a unique relative orientation of the N-terminal adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and C-terminal nuclease domains. This monomeric 'initiation' state with the two domains 'locked' together is stabilized via a conserved C-terminal arm, which may interact with the portal protein during motor assembly, as predicted for several bacteriophages. Further work supports the formation of an active oligomeric state: (i) AUC data demonstrate the presence of oligomers; (ii) mutational analysis reveals a trans-arginine finger, R158, indispensable for ATP hydrolysis; (iii) the location of this arginine is conserved with the HerA/FtsK ATPase superfamily; (iv) a molecular docking model of the pentamer is compatible with the location of the identified arginine finger. However, this pentameric model is structurally incompatible with the monomeric 'initiation' state and is supported by the observed increase in kcat of ATP hydrolysis, from 7.8 ± 0.1 min-1 to 457.7 ± 9.2 min-1 upon removal of the C-terminal nuclease domain. Taken together, these structural, biophysical and biochemical data suggest a model where transition from the 'initiation' state into a catalytically competent pentameric state, is accompanied by substantial domain rearrangements, triggered by the removal of the C-terminal arm from the ATPase active site. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Collagen XII and XIV, New Partners of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in the Skin Extracellular Matrix Suprastructure*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R.; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-01-01

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone. PMID:22573329

  4. Collagen XII and XIV, new partners of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in the skin extracellular matrix suprastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-06-29

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone.

  5. Supplementary Material for: A new mode of SAM domain mediated oligomerization observed in the CASKIN2 neuronal scaffolding protein

    KAUST Repository

    Smirnova, Ekaterina; Kwan, Jamie; Siu, Ryan; Gao, Xin; Zoidl, Georg; Demeler, Borries; Saridakis, Vivian; Donaldson, Logan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background CASKIN2 is a homolog of CASKIN1, a scaffolding protein that participates in a signaling network with CASK (calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine kinase). Despite a high level of homology between CASKIN2 and CASKIN1, CASKIN2 cannot bind CASK due to the absence of a CASK Interaction Domain and consequently, may have evolved undiscovered structural and functional distinctions. Results We demonstrate that the crystal structure of the Sterile Alpha Motif (SAM) domain tandem (SAM1-SAM2) oligomer from CASKIN2 is different than CASKIN1, with the minimal repeating unit being a dimer, rather than a monomer. Analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity methods revealed differences in monomer/dimer equilibria across a range of concentrations and ionic strengths for the wild type CASKIN2 SAM tandem and a structure-directed double mutant that could not oligomerize. Further distinguishing CASKIN2 from CASKIN1, EGFP-tagged SAM tandem proteins expressed in Neuro2a cells produced punctae that were distinct both in shape and size. Conclusions This study illustrates a new way in which neuronal SAM domains can assemble into large macromolecular assemblies that might concentrate and amplify synaptic responses.

  6. Structural Analysis of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Coated SiC Nanoparticles and Their Applications in Thermoset Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Reza-E-Rabby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The SiC nanoparticles (NPs were sonochemically coated with OctaIsobutyl (OI polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS to create a compatible interface between particle and thermoset polymer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques were used to analyze the structure of OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles. These results revealed the formation of a covalent bonding between SiC and OI-POSS. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis of OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles has also shown the indication of attachment between these two nanoparticles. The OI-POSS coated SiC nanoparticles were further reinforced into a thermoset resin system in order to evaluate mechanical and thermal properties of nanocomposites. The flexural strength, modulus, and glass transition temperature were found to be enhanced while SiC and OI-POSS coated SiC were infused into epoxy system compared to those properties of neat epoxy resin.

  7. Unusual Emission of Polystyrene-Based Alternating Copolymers Incorporating Aminobutyl Maleimide Fluorophore-Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we synthesized an unusual 2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (MIPOSS-NHBu monomer lacking conventional fluorescent groups. We then prepared poly(styrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(S-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] and poly(4-acetoxystyrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] copolymers through facile free radical copolymerizations using azobisisobutyronitrile as the initiator and tetrahydrofuran as the solvent. A poly(4-hydroxystyrene-alt-2-aminobutyl maleimide isobutyl POSS [poly(HS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu] copolymer was prepared through acetoxyl hydrazinolysis of poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu. We employed 1H, 13C, and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; differential scanning calorimetry; and photoluminescence spectroscopy to investigate the structures and the thermal and optical properties of the monomers and novel POSS-containing alternating copolymers. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the amino and dihydrofuran-2,5-dione group and clustering of the locked C=O groups from the POSS nanoparticles in the MIPOSS-NHBu units restricted the intramolecular motion of the polymer chain, causing it to exhibit strong light emission. As a result, the MIPOSS-NHBu monomer and the poly(AS-alt-MIPOSS-NHBu copolymer both have potential applicability in the detection of metal ions with good selectivity.

  8. Non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI uptake by T lymphocytes: evidence for the selective acquisition of oligomeric ferric citrate species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Arezes

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient in several biological processes such as oxygen transport, DNA replication and erythropoiesis. Plasma iron normally circulates bound to transferrin. In iron overload disorders, however, iron concentrations exceed transferrin binding capacity and iron appears complexed with low molecular weight molecules, known as non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI. NTBI is responsible for the toxicity associated with iron-overload pathologies but the mechanisms leading to NTBI uptake are not fully understood. Here we show for the first time that T lymphocytes are able to take up and accumulate NTBI in a manner that resembles that of hepatocytes. Moreover, we show that both hepatocytes and T lymphocytes take up the oligomeric Fe3Cit3 preferentially to other iron-citrate species, suggesting the existence of a selective NTBI carrier. These results provide a tool for the identification of the still elusive ferric-citrate cellular carrier and may also open a new pathway towards the design of more efficient iron chelators for the treatment of iron overload disorders.

  9. Fouling behaviors of polybenzimidazole (PBI)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membranes for engineering osmosis processes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Sicong

    2014-02-01

    This paper investigated the individual effects of reverse salt flux and permeate flux on fouling behaviors of as-spun and annealed polybenzimidazole (PBI)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hollow fiber membranes under forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) processes. Two types of membrane fouling had been studied; namely, inorganic fouling (CaSO4·2H2O gypsum scaling) during FO operations and organic fouling (sodium alginate fouling) during PRO operations. It is found that gypsum scaling on the membrane surface may be inhibited and even eliminated with an increase in reverse MgCl2 flux due to competitive formations of MgSO4° and CaSO4·2H2O. In contrast, the increase of reverse NaCl flux exhibits a slight enhancement on alginate fouling in both FO and PRO processes. Comparing to the reverse salt flux, the permeate flux always plays a dominant role in fouling. Therefore, lesser fouling has been observed on the membrane surface under the pressurized PRO process than FO process because the reduced initial flux mitigates the fouling phenomena more significantly than the enhancement caused by an increase in reverse NaCl flux. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Pivotal role of extended linker 2 in the activation of Gα by G protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianyun; Sun, Yutong; Zhang, J Jillian; Huang, Xin-Yun

    2015-01-02

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) relay extracellular signals mainly to heterotrimeric G-proteins (Gαβγ) and they are the most successful drug targets. The mechanisms of G-protein activation by GPCRs are not well understood. Previous studies have revealed a signal relay route from a GPCR via the C-terminal α5-helix of Gα to the guanine nucleotide-binding pocket. Recent structural and biophysical studies uncover a role for the opening or rotating of the α-helical domain of Gα during the activation of Gα by a GPCR. Here we show that β-adrenergic receptors activate eight Gαs mutant proteins (from a screen of 66 Gαs mutants) that are unable to bind Gβγ subunits in cells. Five of these eight mutants are in the αF/Linker 2/β2 hinge region (extended Linker 2) that connects the Ras-like GTPase domain and the α-helical domain of Gαs. This extended Linker 2 is the target site of a natural product inhibitor of Gq. Our data show that the extended Linker 2 is critical for Gα activation by GPCRs. We propose that a GPCR via its intracellular loop 2 directly interacts with the β2/β3 loop of Gα to communicate to Linker 2, resulting in the opening and closing of the α-helical domain and the release of GDP during G-protein activation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäntti, Maria H., E-mail: maria.jantti@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Mandrika, Ilona, E-mail: ilona@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Ratsupites Str. 1, Riga LV 1067 (Latvia); Kukkonen, Jyrki P., E-mail: jyrki.kukkonen@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  12. Oligomerization of optineurin and its oxidative stress- or E50K mutation-driven covalent cross-linking: possible relationship with glaucoma pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Gao

    Full Text Available The optineurin gene, OPTN, is one of the causative genes of primary open-angle glaucoma. Although oligomerization of optineurin in cultured cells was previously observed by gel filtration analysis and blue native gel electrophoresis (BNE, little is known about the characteristics of optineurin oligomers. Here, we aimed to analyze the oligomeric state of optineurin and factors affecting oligomerization, such as environmental stimuli or mutations in OPTN. Using BNE or immunoprecipitation followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, we demonstrated that both endogenous and transfected optineurin exist as oligomers, rather than monomers, in NIH3T3 cells. We also applied an in situ proximity ligation assay to visualize the self-interaction of optineurin in fixed HeLaS3 cells and found that the optineurin oligomers were localized diffusely in the cytoplasm. Optineurin oligomers were usually detected as a single band of a size equal to that of the optineurin monomer upon SDS-PAGE, while an additional protein band of a larger size was observed when cells were treated with H2O2. We showed that larger protein complex is optineurin oligomers by immunoprecipitation and termed it covalent optineurin oligomers. In cells expressing OPTN bearing the most common glaucoma-associated mutation, E50K, covalent oligomers were formed even without H2O2 stimulation. Antioxidants inhibited the formation of E50K-induced covalent oligomers to various degrees. A series of truncated constructs of OPTN was used to reveal that covalent oligomers may be optineurin trimers and that the ubiquitin-binding domain is essential for formation of these trimers. Our results indicated that optineurin trimers may be the basic unit of these oligomers. The oligomeric state can be affected by many factors that induce covalent bonds, such as H2O2 or E50K, as demonstrated here; this provides novel insights into the pathogenicity of E50K. Furthermore

  13. [Protective effect of taxifolin on H2O2-induced 
H9C2 cell pyroptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yanqiong; Wang, Xiaoli; Cai, Qian; Zhuang, Jian; Tan, Xiaohua; He, Wei; Zhao, Mingyi

    2017-12-28

    To explore the effect of taxifolin on H2O2-induced pyroptosis in H9C2 cells and the possible mechanisms.
 Methods: The H9C2 cells was divided into 3 groups: a control group, a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)group and a taxifolin group. The morphology of H9C2 cells was observed by inverted phase contrast microscope. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by JC-1 staining and flow cytometry. The alteration of the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected by specific mitochondrial probe. The protein levels of cysteinyl aspartate specific proteinase-1 (caspase-1)was determined by Western blot. The mRNA levels of interleukin-18 (IL-18), interleukin-1a (IL-1a), interleukin-1b (IL-1b), absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2), apoptosis-associated apeck-like protein (ASC), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3)and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 4 (NLRC4) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).
 Results: Compared with the control group, the morphology of H9C2 cells obviously changed in the H2O2-treated group, which was guadually improved in the presence of taxifolin. Compared with the control group, the mitochondrial membrane potential was markedly decreased in the H2O2-treated cells, accompanied by the increase ofROS (both PH2O2 group, the mitochondrial membrane potential changes in the taxifolin group was increased while the ROS was decreased, with significant difference (both PH2O2-treated group were significantly increased (all PH2O2-induced H9C2 cell pyroptosis through inhibition of AIM2, NLRP3 and NLRC4 in flammasome.

  14. Quaternary structure of the yeast pheromone receptor Ste2 in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneman, Michael R; Paprocki, Joel D; Biener, Gabriel; Yokoi, Koki; Shevade, Aishwarya; Kuchin, Sergei; Raicu, Valerică

    2017-09-01

    Transmembrane proteins known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been shown to form functional homo- or hetero-oligomeric complexes, although agreement has been slow to emerge on whether homo-oligomerization plays functional roles. Here we introduce a platform to determine the identity and abundance of differing quaternary structures formed by GPCRs in living cells following changes in environmental conditions, such as changes in concentrations. The method capitalizes on the intrinsic capability of FRET spectrometry to extract oligomer geometrical information from distributions of FRET efficiencies (or FRET spectrograms) determined from pixel-level imaging of cells, combined with the ability of the statistical ensemble approaches to FRET to probe the proportion of different quaternary structures (such as dimers, rhombus or parallelogram shaped tetramers, etc.) from averages over entire cells. Our approach revealed that the yeast pheromone receptor Ste2 forms predominantly tetramers at average expression levels of 2 to 25 molecules per pixel (2.8·10 -6 to 3.5·10 -5 molecules/nm 2 ), and a mixture of tetramers and octamers at expression levels of 25-100 molecules per pixel (3.5·10 -5 to 1.4·10 -4 molecules/nm 2 ). Ste2 is a class D GPCR found in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae of the mating type a, and binds the pheromone α-factor secreted by cells of the mating type α. Such investigations may inform development of antifungal therapies targeting oligomers of pheromone receptors. The proposed FRET imaging platform may be used to determine the quaternary structure sub-states and stoichiometry of any GPCR and, indeed, any membrane protein in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interactions between membrane receptors in cellular membranes edited by Kalina Hristova. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The LDL receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its codiscoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life.

  16. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in rheumatoid arthritis and its correlation with sonographic knee cartilage thickness and disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthiswary, Rajalingham; Rajalingam, Shamala; Hussein, Heselynn; Sridharan, Radhika; Asrul, Abdul Wahab

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the correlation of serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels with articular cartilage damage based on sonographic knee cartilage thickness (KCT) and disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 61 RA patients and 27 healthy controls were recruited in this study. Serum samples were obtained from all subjects to determine the serum COMP levels. All subjects had bilateral ultrasound scan of their knees. The KCT was based on the mean of measurements at three sites: the medial condyle, lateral condyle and intercondylar notch. Besides, the RA patients were assessed for their disease activity based on 28-joint-based Disease Activity Score (DAS 28). Serum COMP concentrations were significantly elevated in the RA patients compared to the controls (p = 0.001). The serum COMP levels had an inverse relationship with bilateral KCT in RA subjects and the healthy controls. COMP correlated significantly with disease activity based on DAS 28 (r = 0.299, p = 0.010), disease duration (r = 0.439, p = correlation between serum COMP and DAS 28 scores was comparable to the traditional markers of inflammation: erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (r = 0.372, p = 0.003) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.305, p = 0.017). The serum COMP is a promising biomarker in RA which reflects disease activity and damage to the articular cartilage.

  17. Multicore Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with Oligomeric Micelles: Characterization and Potential for the Extraction of Contaminants over a Wide Polarity Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naous, Mohamed; García-Gómez, Diego; López-Jiménez, Francisco José; Bouanani, Farida; Lunar, María Loreto; Rubio, Soledad

    2017-01-17

    Oligomeric micelles from sodium undecylenate (oSUD) were chemisorbed to magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) through a single-step synthetic route involving the simultaneous nanoparticle formation and functionalization in an aqueous medium. The resulting spherical nanoparticles (MNPs-oSUD) consisted of a concatenation of iron oxide cores, with an average size of 7.7 nm, bound by oSUD micelles (particle average diameter of ca. 200 nm). Micellar coverage was ∼50% of the MNP-oSUD (by weight) and offered multiple retention mechanisms (e.g., dispersion, hydrogen bonding, polar, and ionic) for solute solubilization while keeping it intact during analyte elution. The high density of micelles and variety of interactions provided by this sorbent rendered it highly efficient for the extraction of aromatic amines in a wide polarity range (log K ow values from -0.80 to 4.05) from textiles, urine, and wastewater. Extraction took 5 min, no cleanup or evaporation of the extracts was needed and the method, based on LC-MS/MS quantitation, proved matrix-independent. Recoveries for 17 aromatic amines in samples were in the range of 93%-123% while those with negative log K ow values were in the range of 69%-87%. Detection limits for aromatic amines in textiles (0.007-2 mg kg -1 ) were well below the limits legislated by the European Union (EU) (30 mg kg -1 ) and those in urine and wastewater (0.004-1.5 μg L -1 ) were at the level usually found in real-world applications. All the analyzed samples were positive in aromatic amines. The easy synthesis and excellent extraction properties of MNPs-oSUD anticipate their high potential not only for multiresidue analysis but also in other fields such as water remediation.

  18. Interaction of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine at the air/water interface: Thermodynamic and rheological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypiec, M; Georgiev, G As; Rojewska, M; Prochaska, K

    2017-10-01

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) derivatives containing open silsesquioxane cage bear great potential for biomedical applications and therefore their lateral interactions with phospholipids, major biomembranes and drug vehicles constituent, should be studied in detail. That is why the properties of surface films by two POSS-derivatives, POSS-polyethylene glycol (POSS-PEG) and POSS-perfluoroalkyl (POSS-OFP), pure and in presence of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) were studied using Langmuir surface balance. Side chains of opposite nature (PEG is hydrophilic; OFP is hydrophobic) were selected, so that to evaluate their impact on polymers' surface properties. Two types of measurements were performed: (i) the miscibility of POSS-derivatives with DPPC was evaluated via thermodynamic analysis of the surface pressure (π)-area (A) isotherms and (ii) the dilatational rheology of selected POSS-polymer containing films was studied by the stress relaxation method. Fourier transformation analysis of the relaxation transients allows to access films' dynamic interfacial properties in broad frequency range (10 -5 -1Hz). Film morphology was monitored with Brewster Angle Microscopy. PEG moiety enabled POSS-PEG to stably incorporate in DPPC films, modifying their equilibrium and dynamic properties. In contrast OFP chains excluded from interactions with other molecules and diminished PEG-OFP amphiphilicity. Therefore at high packing densities (π≥25mN/m) PEG-OFP was expelled from the air/water interface in DPPC/PEG-OFP mixtures, and the binary films equilibrium and dynamic surface properties were determined primarily by DPPC. Thus the choice of POSS side chains can play key role in biomedical applications depending on whether strong or weak incorporation of POSS-polymers in lipid environment is aimed for. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pleiotropic benefit of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols on vascular health--a randomized controlled clinical pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje R Weseler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases are expanding to a major social-economic burden in the Western World and undermine man's deep desire for healthy ageing. Epidemiological studies suggest that flavanol-rich foods (e.g. grapes, wine, chocolate sustain cardiovascular health. For an evidenced-based application, however, sound clinical data on their efficacy are strongly demanded. METHODS: In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study we supplemented 28 male smokers with 200 mg per day of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (MOF from grape seeds. At baseline, after 4 and 8 weeks we measured macro- and microvascular function and a cluster of systemic biomarkers for major pathological processes occurring in the vasculature: disturbances in lipid metabolism and cellular redox balance, and activation of inflammatory cells and platelets. RESULTS: In the MOF group serum total cholesterol and LDL decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05 by 5% (n = 11 and 7% (n = 9, respectively in volunteers with elevated baseline levels. Additionally, after 8 weeks the ratio of glutathione to glutathione disulphide in erythrocytes rose from baseline by 22% (n = 15, P<0.05 in MOF supplemented subjects. We also observed that MOF supplementation exerts anti-inflammatory effects in blood towards ex vivo added bacterial endotoxin and significantly reduces expression of inflammatory genes in leukocytes. Conversely, alterations in macro- and microvascular function, platelet aggregation, plasma levels of nitric oxide surrogates, endothelin-1, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, prostaglandin F2alpha, plasma antioxidant capacity and gene expression levels of antioxidant defense enzymes did not reach statistical significance after 8 weeks MOF supplementation. However, integrating all measured effects into a global, so-called vascular health index revealed a significant improvement of overall vascular health by MOF compared to placebo (P ≤ 0.05. CONCLUSION: Our

  20. Fabrication of boronate-decorated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes grafted cotton fiber for the selective enrichment of nucleosides in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Wei, Yinmao

    2016-06-01

    Various cotton fiber based boronate-affinity adsorbents are recently developed for the sample pretreatment of cis-diol-containing biomolecules, but most do not have efficient capacity due to limited binding sites on the surface of cotton fibers. To increase the density of boronate groups on the surface of cotton fiber, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes were used to modify cotton fiber to provide plentiful reactive sites for subsequent functionalization with 4-formylphenylboronic acid. The new adsorbent showed special recognition ability towards cis-diols and high adsorption capacity (175 μg/g for catechol, 250 μg/g for dopamine, 400 μg/g for adenosine). The in-pipette-tip solid-phase extraction was investigated under different conditions, including pH and ionic strength of solution, adsorbent amount, pipette times, washing solvent, and elution solvent. The in-pipette-tip solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was used to analyze four nucleosides in urine samples. Under the optimal extraction conditions, the detection limits were determined to be between 5.1 and 6.1 ng/mL (S/N  =  3), and the linearity ranged from 20 to 500 ng/mL for these analytes. The accuracy of the analytical method was examined by studying the relative recoveries of analytes in real urine samples with recoveries varying from 83 to 104% (RSD = 3.9-10.2%, n = 3). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs) modulating radiation-induced oxidative stress on functional and structural performance of eye in male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said, U.Z.; Soliman, S.M.; Azab, Kh.Sh.; El-Tahawy, N.A.

    2005-01-01

    Eye oxidative stress may play a major role in the etiology and pathogenesis of eye disorders such as macular degeneration and photic injury of retinal degeneration that lead to vision loss. Proanthocyanidins derived from pine bark and from grape seeds have various anti pathophysiological functions. This study was performed to evaluate the role of oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs) on the radiation-induced changes in rat eye tissues. OPCs were supplemented to rats (100 mg /kg body weight/ day) for 14 successive days before and 7 successive days after exposure to 7 Gy (single dose) of whole body gamma irradiation. The results revealed radiation-induced depletion in the activities of eye endogenous antioxidant enzymes and rise in pro-oxidant levels. Supplementation of OPCs pre- and post-irradiation has significantly reduced the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, xanthine oxidase, and significantly ameliorated the activities of xanthine dehydrogenase and reactive oxygen scavenging enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities in eye tissues. OPCs significantly ameliorated the radiation-induced changes in levels of insulin and glucose in the serum. The oxidative stress induced cellular damage as indicated by retardation in the responses of eye to photo stimulation as well as histopathological changes in the eye tissues. Severe intra-retinal hemorrhages, cornea swelling, disruption of photoreceptor layer of the retina and epithelial necrosis were seen. The eye tissues of rats that received OPCs supplement showed significant less severe histological damage and remarkable improvement in photo stimulation responses when compared to irradiated rats on the 7 T h and 21 s t days after exposure to gamma irradiation. According to the results obtained, it could be concluded that OPCs might protect the eye tissues from the oxidative stress possibly by virtue of its anti oxidative activity through augmentation of antioxidant

  2. Secondary and tertiary structure of nucleotide-binding domain of alpha subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofbauerová, Kateřina; Kopecký ml., Vladimír; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Ettrichová, Olga; Amler, Evžen

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 67, 4-5 (2002), s. 242-246 ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/01/0254; GA ČR GA204/01/1001 Grant - others:Volkswagen Foundation(DE) I/74 679 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Na+/K+- ATPase * ATP binding * molecular modeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.372, year: 2002

  3. Isolation of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat and kinase resistance gene analogues from sugarcane (Saccharum spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Neil C; Comstock, Jack C; Sood, Sushma G; Dang, Phat M; Chaparro, Jose X

    2008-01-01

    Resistance gene analogues (RGAs) have been isolated from many crops and offer potential in breeding for disease resistance through marker-assisted selection, either as closely linked or as perfect markers. Many R-gene sequences contain kinase domains, and indeed kinase genes have been reported as being proximal to R-genes, making kinase analogues an additionally promising target. The first step towards utilizing RGAs as markers for disease resistance is isolation and characterization of the sequences. Sugarcane clone US01-1158 was identified as resistant to yellow leaf caused by the sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV) and moderately resistant to rust caused by Puccinia melanocephala Sydow & Sydow. Degenerate primers that had previously proved useful for isolating RGAs and kinase analogues in wheat and soybean were used to amplify DNA from sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) clone US-01-1158. Sequences generated from 1512 positive clones were assembled into 134 contigs of between two and 105 sequences. Comparison of the contig consensuses with the NCBI sequence database using BLASTx showed that 20 had sequence homology to nuclear binding site and leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) RGAs, and eight to kinase genes. Alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences with similar sequences from the NCBI database allowed the identification of several conserved domains. The alignment and resulting phenetic tree showed that many of the sequences had greater similarity to sequences from other species than to one another. The use of degenerate primers is a useful method for isolating novel sugarcane RGA and kinase gene analogues. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of these genes in disease resistance.

  4. Transcriptional profiling of striatal neurons in response to single or concurrent activation of dopamine D2, adenosine A(2A) and metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptors: focus on beta-synuclein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Laia; Selga, Elisabet; García-Martínez, Juan Manuel; Amaral, Olavo B; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Alberch, Jordi; Canela, Enric I; Franco, Rafael; Noé, Véronique; Lluís, Carme; Ciudad, Carlos J; Ciruela, Francisco

    2012-10-25

    G protein-coupled receptor oligomerization is a concept which is changing the understanding of classical pharmacology. Both, oligomerization and functional interaction between adenosine A(2A,) dopamine D(2) and metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptors have been demonstrated in the striatum. However, the transcriptional consequences of receptors co-activation are still unexplored. We aim here to determine the changes in gene expression of striatal primary cultured neurons upon isolated or simultaneous receptor activation. Interestingly, we found that 95 genes of the total analyzed (15,866 transcripts and variants) changed their expression in response to simultaneous stimulation of all three receptors. Among these genes, we focused on the β-synuclein (β-Syn) gene (SCNB). Quantitative PCR verified the magnitude and direction of change in expression of SCNB. Since β-Syn belongs to the homologous synuclein family and may be considered a natural regulator of α-synuclein (α-Syn), it has been proposed that β-Syn might act protectively against α-Syn neuropathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Free Energy Barrier Caused by the Refolding of an Oligomeric Intermediate Controls the Lag Time of Amyloid Formation by hIAPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Arnaldo L; Lomont, Justin P; Tu, Ling-Hsien; Raleigh, Daniel P; Zanni, Martin T

    2017-11-22

    Transiently populated oligomers formed en route to amyloid fibrils may constitute the most toxic aggregates associated with many amyloid-associated diseases. Most nucleation theories used to describe amyloid aggregation predict low oligomer concentrations and do not take into account free energy costs that may be associated with structural rearrangements between the oligomer and fiber states. We have used isotope labeling and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to spectrally resolve an oligomeric intermediate during the aggregation of the human islet amyloid protein (hIAPP or amylin), the protein associated with type II diabetes. A structural rearrangement includes the F 23 G 24 A 25 I 26 L 27 region of hIAPP, which starts from a random coil structure, evolves into ordered β-sheet oligomers containing at least 5 strands, and then partially disorders in the fibril structure. The supercritical concentration is measured to be between 150 and 250 μM, which is the thermodynamic parameter that sets the free energy of the oligomers. A 3-state kinetic model fits the experimental data, but only if it includes a concentration independent free energy barrier >3 kcal/mol that represents the free energy cost of refolding the oligomeric intermediate into the structure of the amyloid fibril; i.e., "oligomer activation" is required. The barrier creates a transition state in the free energy landscape that slows fibril formation and creates a stable population of oligomers during the lag phase, even at concentrations below the supercritical concentration. Largely missing in current kinetic models is a link between structure and kinetics. Our experiments and modeling provide evidence that protein structural rearrangements during aggregation impact the populations and kinetics of toxic oligomeric species.

  6. The long N-terminus of the human monocarboxylate transporter 8 is a target of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation which regulates protein expression and oligomerization capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, Denise; Schmidt, Mathias; Fischer, Jana; Kleinau, Gunnar; Braun, Doreen; Schweizer, Ulrich; Moeller, Lars Christian; Biebermann, Heike; Fuehrer, Dagmar

    2016-10-15

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) equilibrates thyroid hormones between the extra- and the intracellular sides. MCT8 exists either with a short or a long N-terminus, but potential functional differences between both variants are yet not known. We, therefore, generated MCT8 constructs which are different in N-terminal length: MCT8(1-613), MCT8(25-613), MCT8(49-613) and MCT8(75-613). The M75G substitution prevents translation of MCT8(75-613) and ensures expression of full-length MCT8 protein. The K56G substitution was made to prevent ubiquitinylation. Cell-surface expression, localization and proteasomal degradation were investigated using C-terminally GFP-tagged MCT8 constructs (HEK293 and MDCK1 cells) and oligomerization capacity was determined using N-terminally HA- and C-terminally FLAG-tagged MCT8 constructs (COS7 cells). MCT8(1-613)-GFP showed a lower protein expression than the shorter MCT8(75-613)-GFP protein. The proteasome inhibitor lactacystin increased MCT8(1-613)-GFP protein amount, suggesting proteasomal degradation of MCT8 with the long N-terminus. Ubiquitin conjugation of MCT8(1-613)-GFP was found by immuno-precipitation. A diminished ubiquitin conjugation caused by K56G substitution resulted in increased MCT8(1-613)-GFP protein expression. Sandwich ELISA was performed to investigate if the bands at higher molecular weight observed in Western blot analysis are due to MCT8 oligomerization, which was indeed shown. Our data imply a role of the long N-terminus of MCT8 as target of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation affecting MCT8 amount and subsequently oligomerization capacity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrolyzable Tannins of Tamaricaceous Plants. 7.1 Structures and Cytotoxic Properties of Oligomeric Ellagitannins from Leaves of Tamarix nilotica and Cultured Tissues of Tamarix tetrandra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orabi, Mohamed A A; Taniguchi, Shoko; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Morio; Amakura, Yoshiaki; Hatano, Tsutomu

    2016-04-22

    Partially unacylated new oligomeric hydrolyzable tannins, nilotinin T2 (1, trimer) and nilotinin Q1 (2, tetramer), together with four known trimers, nilotinin T1 (3) and hirtellins T1-T3 (4-6), and a dimer, tamarixinin B (7), were isolated from the aqueous acetone extracts of leaves of Tamarix nilotica. Among them, the new trimer 1 and the known trimers 4 and 6, in addition to the partially unacylated new trimer nilotinin T3 (8), the known dimers nilotinin D3 (9) and tamarixinin C (10), and the monomer tellimagrandin I (11), were isolated from the cultured shoots of Tamarix tetrandra. The structures of the new hydrolyzable tannins were established by chromatographic analyses and extensive 1D and 2D NMR, HRESI-TOFMS, and ECD spectroscopic experiments. Among the new oligomeric tannins, the particular unacylated position of a glucose core is attributed to a possible biosynthetic route. Isolation of the same oligomeric tannins from cultured shoots of T. tetrandra emphasizes the unique biogenetic ability of the obtained cultures on production of the structurally and biologically characteristic tamaricaceous tannins commonly produced by the intact Tamarix plants. Additionally, tannins obtained in the present study together with gemin D (12) and 1,3-di-O-galloyl-4,6-O-(aS)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-β-d-glucose (13), from our previous investigation of the leaves of T. nilotica, exhibited variable tumor-specific cytotoxic effects. The ellagitannin trimers 4, 6, and 8 and the dimer 9 exerted predominant tumor-selective cytotoxic effects with high specificity toward human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

  8. Insight into the template effect of vesicles on the laccase-catalyzed oligomerization of N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine from Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ležaić, Aleksandra Janoševic; Luginbühl, Sandra; Bajuk-Bogdanović, Danica; Pašti, Igor; Kissner, Reinhard; Rakvin, Boris; Walde, Peter; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana

    2016-08-01

    We report about the first Raman spectroscopy study of a vesicle-assisted enzyme-catalyzed oligomerization reaction. The aniline dimer N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (= p-aminodiphenylamine, PADPA) was oxidized and oligomerized with Trametes versicolor laccase and dissolved O2 in the presence of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) vesicles (80-100 nm diameter) as templates. The conversion of PADPA into oligomeric products, poly(PADPA), was monitored during the reaction by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained are compared with UV/vis/NIR and EPR measurements. All three complementary methods indicate that at least some of the poly(PADPA) products, formed in the presence of AOT vesicles, resemble the conductive emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI-ES). The Raman measurements also show that structural units different from those of “ordinary” PANI-ES are present too. Without vesicles PANI-ES-like products are not obtained. For the first time, the as-prepared stable poly(PADPA)-AOT vesicle suspension was used directly to coat electrodes (without product isolation) for investigating redox activities of poly(PADPA) by cyclic voltammetry (CV). CV showed that poly(PADPA) produced with vesicles is redox active not only at pH 1.1-as expected for PANI-ES-but also at pH 6.0, unlike PANI-ES and poly(PADPA) synthesized without vesicles. This extended pH range of the redox activity of poly(PADPA) is important for applications.

  9. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    With the aim of forming the ‘lock-washer’ conformation of the origin-binding domain of SV40 large T antigen in solution, using structure-based analysis an intermolecular disulfide bridge was engineered into the origin-binding domain to generate higher order oligomers in solution. The 1.7 Å resolution structure shows that the mutant forms a spiral in the crystal and has the de novo disulfide bond at the protein interface, although structural rearrangements at the interface are observed relative to the wild type. The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS–PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner

  10. A S52P mutation in the 'α-crystallin domain' of Mycobacterium leprae HSP18 reduces its oligomeric size and chaperone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sandip K; Rehna, Elengikal A A; Panda, Alok K; Shiburaj, Sugathan; Dharmalingam, Kuppamuthu; Biswas, Ashis

    2013-12-01

    Mycobacterium leprae HSP18 is a small heat shock protein (sHSP). It is a major immunodominant antigen of M. leprae pathogen. Previously, we have reported the existence of two M. leprae HSP18 variants in various leprotic patients. One of the variants has serine at position 52, whereas the other one has proline at the same position. We have also reported that HSP18 having proline at position 52 (HSP18P(52)) is a nonameric protein and exhibits chaperone function. However, the structural and functional characterization of wild-type HSP18 having serine at position 52 (HSP18S(52)) is yet to be explored. Furthermore, the implications of the S52P mutation on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18 are not well understood. Therefore, we cloned and purified these two HSP18 variants. We found that HSP18S(52) is also a molecular chaperone and an oligomeric protein. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and far-UV CD measurements revealed that the S52P mutation altered the tertiary and secondary structure of HSP18. This point mutation also reduced the oligomeric assembly and decreased the surface hydrophobicity of HSP18, as revealed by HPLC and 4,4'-dianilino-1,1'-binaphthyl-5,5'-disulfonic acid binding studies, respectively. Mutant protein was less stable against thermal and chemical denaturation and was more susceptible towards tryptic cleavage than wild-type HSP18. HSP18P(52) had lower chaperone function and was less effective in protecting thermal killing of Escherichia coli than HSP18S(52). Taken together, our data suggest that serine 52 is important for the larger oligomerization and chaperone function of HSP18. Because both variants differ in stability and function, they may have different roles in the survival of M. leprae in infected hosts. © 2013 FEBS.

  11. Biodegradable and adjustable sol-gel glass based hybrid scaffolds from multi-armed oligomeric building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kascholke, Christian; Hendrikx, Stephan; Flath, Tobias; Kuzmenka, Dzmitry; Dörfler, Hans-Martin; Schumann, Dirk; Gressenbuch, Mathias; Schulze, F Peter; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Hacker, Michael C

    2017-11-01

    Biodegradability is a crucial characteristic to improve the clinical potential of sol-gel-derived glass materials. To this end, a set of degradable organic/inorganic class II hybrids from a tetraethoxysilane(TEOS)-derived silica sol and oligovalent cross-linker oligomers containing oligo(d,l-lactide) domains was developed and characterized. A series of 18 oligomers (Mn: 1100-3200Da) with different degrees of ethoxylation and varying length of oligoester units was established and chemical composition was determined. Applicability of an established indirect rapid prototyping method enabled fabrication of a total of 85 different hybrid scaffold formulations from 3-isocyanatopropyltriethoxysilane-functionalized macromers. In vitro degradation was analyzed over 12months and a continuous linear weight loss (0.2-0.5wt%/d) combined with only moderate material swelling was detected which was controlled by oligo(lactide) content and matrix hydrophilicity. Compressive strength (2-30MPa) and compressive modulus (44-716MPa) were determined and total content, oligo(ethylene oxide) content, oligo(lactide) content and molecular weight of the oligomeric cross-linkers as well as material porosity were identified as the main factors determining hybrid mechanics. Cytocompatibility was assessed by cell culture experiments with human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASC). Cell migration into the entire scaffold pore network was indicated and continuous proliferation over 14days was found. ALP activity linearly increased over 2weeks indicating osteogenic differentiation. The presented glass-based hybrid concept with precisely adjustable material properties holds promise for regenerative purposes. Adaption of degradation kinetics toward physiological relevance is still an unmet challenge of (bio-)glass engineering. We therefore present a glass-derived hybrid material with adjustable degradation. A flexible design concept based on degradable multi-armed oligomers was combined with an

  12. Structural models of zebrafish (Danio rerio NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT domains suggest differential ATP binding orientations: insights from computational modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Maharana

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1 and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved 'Lysine' at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds and Aspartic acid (Walker B formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. 'Proline' of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2 interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2.

  13. Misexpression of AtTX12 encoding a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain induces growth defects and expression of defense-related genes partially independently of EDS1 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang-Kee

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a tissue-specific GAL4/UAS activation tagging system was used for the characterization of genes which could induce lethality when ubiquitously expressed. A dominant mutant exhibiting stunted growth was isolated and named defective root development 1-D (drd1-D). The T-DNA tag was located within the promoter region of AtTX12, which is predicted to encode a truncated nucleotide-binding leucinerich repeat (NLR) protein, containing a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The transcript levels of AtTX12 and defense-related genes were elevated in drd1-D, and the misexpression of AtTX12 recapitulated the drd1-D phenotypes. In the presence of ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1), a key transducer of signals triggered by TIR-type NLRs, a low-level of AtTX12 misexpression induced strong defective phenotypes including seedling lethality whereas, in the absence of EDS1, a high-level of AtTX12 misexpression induced weak growth defects like dwarfism, suggesting that AtTX12 might function mainly in an EDS1-dependent and partially in an EDS1-independent manner. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(12): 693-698].

  14. Pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein mediates the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor inhibition of melatonin release in photoreceptive chick pineal cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, B.L.; Takahashi, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The avian pineal gland is a photoreceptive organ that has been shown to contain postjunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors that inhibit melatonin synthesis and/or release upon receptor activation. Physiological response and [32P]ADP ribosylation experiments were performed to investigate whether pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) were involved in the transduction of the alpha 2-adrenergic signal. For physiological response studies, the effects of pertussis toxin on melatonin release in dissociated cell cultures exposed to norepinephrine were assessed. Pertussis toxin blocked alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin-induced blockade appeared to be noncompetitive. One and 10 ng/ml doses of pertussis toxin partially blocked and a 100 ng/ml dose completely blocked norepinephrine-induced inhibition. Pertussis toxin-catalyzed [32P]ADP ribosylation of G-proteins in chick pineal cell membranes was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Membranes were prepared from cells that had been pretreated with 0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. In the absence of pertussis toxin pretreatment, two major proteins of 40K and 41K mol wt (Mr) were labeled by [32P]NAD. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of pineal cells abolished [32P] radiolabeling of the 40K Mr G-protein in a dose-dependent manner. The norepinephrine-induced inhibition of both cAMP efflux and melatonin release, as assessed by RIA of medium samples collected before membrane preparation, was also blocked in a dose-dependent manner by pertussis toxin. Collectively, these results suggest that a pertussis toxin-sensitive 40K Mr G-protein labeled by [32P]NAD may be functionally associated with alpha 2-adrenergic signal transduction in chick pineal cells

  15. Prokineticin-1 (PROK1) modulates interleukin (IL)-11 expression via prokineticin receptor 1 (PROKR1) and the calcineurin/NFAT signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian H; Evans, Jemma; Maldonado-Pérez, David; Critchley, Hilary O; Sales, Kurt J; Jabbour, Henry N

    2010-03-01

    Prokineticin-1 (PROK1) is a multifunctional secreted protein which signals via the G-protein coupled receptor, PROKR1. Previous data from our laboratory using a human genome survey microarray showed that PROK1-prokineticin receptor 1 (PROKR1) signalling regulates numerous genes important for establishment of early pregnancy, including the cytokine interleukin (IL)-11. Here, we have shown that PROK1-PROKR1 induces the expression of IL-11 in PROKR1 Ishikawa cells and first trimester decidua via the calcium-calcineurin signalling pathway in a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G(q/11)), extracellular signal-regulated kinases, Ca(2+) and calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T cells dependent manner. Conversely, treatment of human decidua with a lentiviral miRNA to abolish endogenous PROK1 expression results in a significant reduction in IL-11 expression and secretion. Importantly, we have also shown a regulatory role for the regulator of calcineurin 1 isoform 4 (RCAN1-4). Overexpression of RCAN1-4 in PROKR1 Ishikawa cells using an adenovirus leads to a reduction in PROK1 induced IL-11 indicating that RCAN1-4 is a negative regulator in the calcineurin-mediated signalling to IL-11. Finally, we have shown the potential for both autocrine and paracrine signalling in the human endometrium by co-localizing IL-11, IL-11Ralpha and PROKR1 within the stromal and glandular epithelial cells of non-pregnant endometrium and first trimester decidua. Overall we have identified and characterized the signalling components of a novel PROK1-PROKR1 signalling pathway regulating IL-11.

  16. Ion-Pair Oligomerization of Chromogenic Triangulenium Cations with Cyanostar-Modified Anions That Controls Emission in Hierarchical Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Bo; Hirsch, Brandon E.; Lee, Semin

    2017-01-01

    The hierarchical assembly of colored cationic molecules with receptor-modified counteranions can be used to control optical properties in materials. However, our knowledge of when the optical properties emerge in the hierarchical organization and the variety of cation-anion salts that are availab...

  17. Carbon Domains on MoS2/TiO2 System via Catalytic Acetylene Oligomerization: Synthesis, Structure, and Surface Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Cravanzola

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon domains have been obtained at the surface of a MoS2/TiO2 (Evonik, P25 system via oligomerization and cyclotrimerization reactions involved in the interaction of the photoactive material with acetylene. Firstly, MoS2 nanosheets have been synthesized at the surface of TiO2, via sulfidation of a molybdenum oxide precursor with H2S (bottom-up method. Secondly, the morphology and the structure, the optical and the vibrational properties of the obtained materials, for each step of the synthesis procedure, have been investigated by microscopy and spectroscopy methods. In particular, transmission electron microscopy images provide a simple tool to highlight the effectiveness of the sulfidation process, thus showing 1L, 2L, and stacked MoS2 nanosheets anchored to the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles. Lastly, in-situ FTIR spectroscopy investigation gives insights into the nature of the oligomerized species, showing that the formation of both polyenic and aromatic systems can be taken into account, being their formation promoted by both Ti and Mo catalytic sites. This finding gives an opportunity for the assembly of extended polyenic, polyaromatic, or mixed domains firmly attached at the surface of photoactive materials. The presented approach, somehow different from the carbon adding or doping processes of TiO2, is of potential interest for the advanced green chemistry and energy conversion/transport applications.

  18. Simultaneous separation and identification of oligomeric procyanidins and anthocyanin-derived pigments in raw red wine by HPLC-UV-ESI-MSn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, S; Losito, I; Gambacorta, G; La Notte, E; Palmisano, F; Zambonin, P G

    2006-07-01

    Samples of raw red wine (Primitivo di Manduria, Apulia, Southern Italy) were analysed without any pre-treatment (except 1:2 dilution with water) using HPLC with detection based on UV absorbance and Electrospray Ionisation Sequential Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MSn, with n = 1-3) in a series configuration. In particular, absorbance at 520 nm was monitored for UV detection in order to identify pigments responsible for wine colour. On the other hand, two subsequent stages of MS detection based on positive ions were adopted. The first consisted of an explorative MS acquisition, aimed at the individuation of the m/z ratios for positively charged compounds; the second was based on fragmentation of the detected ions within an ion trap analyser, followed by MS/MS and, if required, MS3 acquisitions. The synergy between UV detection and MSn analysis led to the identification of 41 pigments, which can be classified into five groups: grape anthocyanins, pyranoanthocyanins, vinyl-linked anthocyanin-flavanol pigments, ethyl-bridged anthocyanin-flavanol pigments and flavanol-anthocyanin compounds. Many isomeric and oligomeric structures were found within each group. A further class of compounds, not absorbing in the visible spectrum, could be also characterised by ESI-MSn and corresponded to B-type procyanidins, i.e. proanthocyanidins arising from C4-->C8/C4-->C6 couplings between catechin or epicatechin units. In particular, oligomeric structures (from dimers to pentamers), often present with several isomers, were identified and their fragmentation patterns clarified.

  19. Ultrafast preparation of a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-based ionic liquid hybrid monolith via photoinitiated polymerization, and its application to capillary electrochromatography of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingyu; Lei, Xiaoyun; Deng, Lijun; Li, Minsheng; Yao, Sicong; Wu, Xiaoping

    2018-06-06

    An ionic liquid hybrid monolithic capillary column was prepared within 7 min via photoinitiated free-radical polymerization of an ionic liquid monomer (1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium-bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide); VBIMNTF 2 ) and a methacryl substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-MA) acting as a cross-linker. The effects of composition of prepolymerization solution and initiation time on the porous structure and electroosmotic flow (EOF) of monolithic column were investigated. The hybrid monolith was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and FTIR. Owing to the introduction of a rigid nanosized POSS silica core and ionic liquids with multiple interaction sites, the monolithic column has a well-defined 3D skeleton morphology, good mechanical stability, and a stable anodic electroosmotic flow. The hybrid monolithic stationary phase was applied to the capillary electrochromatographic separation of various alkylbenzenes, phenols, anilines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The column efficiency is highest (98,000 plates/m) in case of alkylbenzenes. Mixed-mode retention mechanisms including hydrophobic interactions, π-π stacking, electrostatic interaction and electrophoretic mobility can be observed. This indicates the potential of this material in terms of efficient separation of analytes of different structural type. Graphical Abstract Preparation of a mixed-mode ionic liquid hybrid monolithic column via photoinitiated polymerization of methacryl substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-MA) and 1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium-bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (VBIMNTF 2 ) ionic liquid for use in capillary electrochromatography.

  20. Eicosanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamide (EHT prevents Alzheimer's disease-related cognitive and electrophysiological impairments in mice exposed to elevated concentrations of oligomeric beta-amyloid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesava Asam

    Full Text Available Soluble forms of oligomeric beta-amyloid (Aβ are thought to play a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Transgenic manipulation of methylation of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase, PP2A, was recently shown to alter the sensitivity of mice to AD-related impairments resulting from acute exposure to elevated levels of Aβ. In addition, eicosanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamide (EHT, a naturally occurring component from coffee beans that modulates PP2A methylation, was shown to confer therapeutic benefits in rodent models of AD and Parkinson's disease. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHT protects animals from the pathological effects of exposure to elevated levels of soluble oligomeric Aβ. We treated mice with EHT-containing food at two different doses and assessed the sensitivity of these animals to Aβ-induced behavioral and electrophysiological impairments. We found that EHT administration protected animals from Aβ-induced cognitive impairments in both a radial-arm water maze and contextual fear conditioning task. We also found that both chronic and acute EHT administration prevented Aβ-induced impairments in long-term potentiation. These data add to the accumulating evidence suggesting that interventions with pharmacological agents, such as EHT, that target PP2A activity may be therapeutically beneficial for AD and other neurological conditions.

  1. Data in support of the identification of neuronal and astrocyte proteins interacting with extracellularly applied oligomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein assemblies by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Redeker, Virginie; Fritz, Nicolas; Pieri, Laura; Almeida, Leandro G; Spolidoro, Maria; Liebmann, Thomas; Bousset, Luc; Renner, Marianne; Léna, Clément; Aperia, Anita; Melki, Ronald; Triller, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is the principal component of Lewy bodies, the pathophysiological hallmark of individuals affected by Parkinson disease (PD). This neuropathologic form of α-syn contributes to PD progression and propagation of α-syn assemblies between neurons. The data we present here support the proteomic analysis used to identify neuronal proteins that specifically interact with extracellularly applied oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn assemblies (conditions 1 and 2, respectively) (doi: 10.15252/embj.201591397[1]). α-syn assemblies and their cellular partner proteins were pulled down from neuronal cell lysed shortly after exposure to exogenous α-syn assemblies and the associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry using a shotgun proteomic-based approach. We also performed experiments on pure cultures of astrocytes to identify astrocyte-specific proteins interacting with oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn (conditions 3 and 4, respectively). For each condition, proteins interacting selectively with α-syn assemblies were identified by comparison to proteins pulled-down from untreated cells used as controls. The mass spectrometry data, the database search and the peak lists have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PRIDE: PXD002256 to PRIDE: PXD002263 and doi: 10.6019/PXD002256 to 10.6019/PXD002263.

  2. Changes in the oligomerization potential of the division inhibitor UgtP co-ordinate Bacillus subtilis cell size with nutrient availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, An-Chun; Zareh, Shannon Kian Gharabiklou; Wang, Yan Mei; Levin, Petra Anne

    2012-11-01

    How cells co-ordinate size with growth and development is a major, unresolved question in cell biology. In previous work we identified the glucosyltransferase UgtP as a division inhibitor responsible for increasing the size of Bacillus subtilis cells under nutrient-rich conditions. In nutrient-rich medium, UgtP is distributed more or less uniformly throughout the cytoplasm and concentrated at the cell poles and/or the cytokinetic ring. Under these conditions, UgtP interacts directly with FtsZ to inhibit division and increase cell size. Conversely, under nutrient-poor conditions, UgtP is sequestered away from FtsZ in punctate foci, and division proceeds unimpeded resulting in a reduction in average cell size. Here we report that nutrient-dependent changes in UgtP's oligomerization potential serve as a molecular rheostat to precisely co-ordinate B. subtilis cell size with nutrient availability. Our data indicate UgtP interacts with itself and the essential cell division protein FtsZ in a high-affinity manner influenced in part by UDP glucose, an intracellular proxy for nutrient availability. These findings support a model in which UDP-glc-dependent changes in UgtP's oligomerization potential shift the equilibrium between UgtP•UgtP and UgtP•FtsZ, fine-tuning the amount of FtsZ available for assembly into the cytokinetic ring and with it cell size. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Balanced nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 are required for a complete plant innate immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V García

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1. In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack.

  4. Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) regulate intestinal immunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie; LaCasse, Eric C; Seidelin, Jakob B

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family members, notably cIAP1, cIAP2, and XIAP, are critical and universal regulators of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mediated survival, inflammatory, and death signaling pathways. Furthermore, IAPs mediate the signaling of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain...

  5. Genotyping for NOD2 genetic variants and crohn disease: a metaanalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, Shiva; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg, and Leu1007fsinsC variants of the NOD2 gene (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2; alias, CARD15) influence the risk of Crohn disease. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to examine whether Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg, and Leu1007fsinsC are equally...

  6. Receptor-receptor interactions within receptor mosaics. Impact on neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, K; Marcellino, D; Rivera, A; Diaz-Cabiale, Z; Filip, M; Gago, B; Roberts, D C S; Langel, U; Genedani, S; Ferraro, L; de la Calle, A; Narvaez, J; Tanganelli, S; Woods, A; Agnati, L F

    2008-08-01

    Future therapies for diseases associated with altered dopaminergic signaling, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and drug addiction or drug dependence may substantially build on the existence of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions within dopamine receptor containing receptor mosaics (RM; dimeric or high-order receptor oligomers) where it is believed that the dopamine D(2) receptor may operate as the 'hub receptor' within these complexes. The constitutive adenosine A(2A)/dopamine D(2) RM, located in the dorsal striato-pallidal GABA neurons, are of particular interest in view of the demonstrated antagonistic A(2A)/D(2) interaction within these heteromers; an interaction that led to the suggestion and later demonstration that A(2A) antagonists could be used as novel anti-Parkinsonian drugs. Based on the likely existence of A(2A)/D(2)/mGluR5 RM located both extrasynaptically on striato-pallidal GABA neurons and on cortico-striatal glutamate terminals, multiple receptor-receptor interactions within this RM involving synergism between A(2A)/mGluR5 to counteract D(2) signaling, has led to the proposal of using combined mGluR5 and A(2A) antagonists as a future anti-Parkinsonian treatment. Based on the same RM in the ventral striato-pallidal GABA pathways, novel strategies for the treatment of schizophrenia, building on the idea that A(2A) agonists and/or mGluR5 agonists will help reduce the increased dopaminergic signaling associated with this disease, have been suggested. Such treatment may ensure the proper glutamatergic drive from the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus to the prefrontal cortex, one which is believed to be reduced in schizophrenia due to a dominance of D(2)-like signaling in the ventral striatum. Recently, A(2A) receptors also have been shown to counteract the locomotor and sensitizing actions of cocaine and increases in A(2A) receptors have also been observed in the nucleus accumbens after extended cocaine self-administration, probably

  7. Inorganic mercury dissociates preassembled Fas/CD95 receptor oligomers in T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemba, Stamatina E.; McCabe, Michael J.; Rosenspire, Allen J.

    2005-01-01

    Genetically susceptible rodents exposed to low burdens of inorganic mercury (Hg 2+ ) develop autoimmune disease. Previous studies have shown that low, noncytotoxic levels of Hg 2+ inhibit Fas-mediated apoptosis in T cells. These results suggest that inhibition of the Fas death receptor pathway potentially contributes to autoimmune disease after Hg 2+ exposure, as a consequence of disruption of peripheral tolerance. The formation of active death inducing signaling complexes (DISC) following CD95/Fas receptor oligomerization is a primary step in the Fas-mediated apoptotic pathway. Other recent studies have shown that Hg 2+ at concentrations that inhibit apoptosis also inhibit formation of active DISC, suggesting that inhibition of DISC is the mechanism responsible for Hg 2+ -mediated inhibition of apotosis. Preassociated Fas receptors have been implicated as key elements necessary for the production of functional DISC. We present evidence in this study showing that low and nontoxic concentrations of Hg 2+ induce the dissociation of preassembled Fas receptor complexes in Jurkat T cells. Thus, this Hg 2+ -induced event should subsequently decrease the amount of preassembled Fas available for DISC formation, potentially resulting in the attenuation of Fas-mediated apoptosis in T lymphocytes

  8. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood of ...

  9. Cooperative ethylene receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qian; Wen, Chi-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    The gaseous plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a family of five ethylene receptor members in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis. Genetic and biochemical studies suggest that the ethylene response is suppressed by ethylene receptor complexes, but the biochemical nature of the receptor signal is unknown. Without appropriate biochemical measures to trace the ethylene receptor signal and quantify the signal strength, the biological significance of the modulation of ethylene responses ...

  10. Role of Liver X Receptor in AD Pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián G Sandoval-Hernández

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the major cause of dementia worldwide. The pharmacological activation of nuclear receptors (Liver X receptors: LXRs or Retinoid X receptors: RXR has been shown to induce overexpression of the ATP-Binding Cassette A1 (ABCA1 and Apolipoprotein E (ApoE, changes that are associated with improvement in cognition and reduction of amyloid beta pathology in amyloidogenic AD mouse models (i.e. APP, PS1: 2tg-AD. Here we investigated whether treatment with a specific LXR agonist has a measurable impact on the cognitive impairment in an amyloid and Tau AD mouse model (3xTg-AD: 12-months-old; three months treatment. The data suggests that the LXR agonist GW3965 is associated with increased expression of ApoE and ABCA1 in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex without a detectable reduction of the amyloid load. We also report that most cells overexpressing ApoE (86±12% are neurons localized in the granular cell layer of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. In the GW3965 treated 3xTg-AD mice we also observed reduction in astrogliosis and increased number of stem and proliferating cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, we show that GW3965 rescued hippocampus long term synaptic plasticity, which had been disrupted by oligomeric amyloid beta peptides. The effect of GW3965 on synaptic function was protein synthesis dependent. Our findings identify alternative functional/molecular mechanisms by which LXR agonists may exert their potential benefits as a therapeutic strategy against AD.

  11. Single Site Silica Supported Tetramethyl Niobium by the SOMC Strategy: Synthesis, Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship in Ethylene Oligomerization Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Hamieh, Ali Imad Ali

    2017-06-06

    Silica supported Tetramethyl niobium complex [(≡SiO)NbMe4] 2 has been isolated by surface alkylation of [(≡SiO-)NbCl3Me] 1 with dimethyl zinc in pentane. 1 can be easily synthesized by grafting of NbCl3Me2 on to the surface of partially dehydroxylated silica by the SOMC strategy. Precise structural analysis was carried out by the FTIR, advance solid state NMR, elemental analysis and mass balance techniques (gas quantification after treating 2 with degassed water) . Complex 1 was found to be active in the ethylene oligomerization to produce up to C30, whereas to our surprise complex 2 selectively dimerizes ethylene into 1-butene in the absence of a co-catalyst at the same conversion levels.

  12. (Pressure + volume + temperature) properties for binary oligomeric solutions of poly(ethylene glycol mono-4-octylphenyl ether) with 1-octanol or acetophenone at pressures up to 50 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.-J.; Ku, T.-J.; Lin Homu

    2009-01-01

    Densities were measured with a high-pressure densitometer for two binary oligomeric systems of poly(ethylene glycol mono-4-octylphenyl ether) (PEGOPE) with 1-octanol or acetophenone at temperatures from 298.15 K to 348.15 K and pressures up to 50 MPa. While the excess volumes are negative in (acetophenone + PEGOPE) over the entire composition range, those are found to change from positive to negative with increasing mole fraction of the solvent in (1-octanol + PEGOPE). The pressure-effect on the liquid densities can be represented accurately by the Tait equation. Moreover, an empirical equation with two characteristic parameters correlates well the PVT data over the entire experimental conditions for each binary system. The experimental specific volumes were also correlated with the Flory-Orwoll-Vrij (FOV) and the Schotte equations of state to within the experimental uncertainty.

  13. Two intestinal specific nuclear factors binding to the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase and sucrase-isomaltase promoters are functionally related oligomeric molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, J T; Mitchelmore, C; Sjöström, H

    1994-01-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) are enterocyte-specific gene products. The identification of regulatory cis-elements in the promoter of these two genes has enabled us to carry out comparative studies of the corresponding intestinal-specific nuclear factors (NF-LPH1...... and SIF1-BP). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the two nuclear factors compete for binding on the same cis-elements. The molecular size of the DNA binding polypeptide is estimated to be approximately 50 kDa for both factors. In the native form the factors are found as 250 k......Da oligomeric complexes. Based on these results NF-LPH1 and SIF1-BP are suggested to be either identical or closely related molecules....

  14. Autosomal dominant precocious osteoarthropathy due to a mutation of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene: further expansion of the phenotypic variations of COMP defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaji, Hiroyuki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sanyudo Hospital, 6-1-219 Chuou, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-0045 (Japan); Nishimura, Gen [Department of Radiology, Nasu Chuou Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Watanabe, Sobei; Sasaki, Akira; Sano, Tokuhisa [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tohoku Kohsei-Nenkin Hospital, Miyagi (Japan); Mabuchi, Akihiko; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Ikegawa, Shiro [Laboratory for Bone and Joint Diseases, SNP Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Ohashi, Hirofumi [Division of Medical Genetics, Saitama Children' s Medical Center, Saitama (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We report on a Japanese family of four generations with an autosomal dominant precocious osteoarthropathy. The cardinal clinical manifestations of affected individuals were painful weight-bearing large joints, which started in late childhood or adolescence. The radiological hallmarks included coxa plana, mild epiphyseal dysplasia of the knee, and round talar domes with tibiotalar slant in childhood, which evolved into degenerative joint diseases in adulthood. The disease phenotype was cosegregated with a mutation of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene in the family members, who underwent molecular evaluation. COMP mutations have been reported in a mild form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED), Ribbing type, as well as allied disorders with more severe manifestations, such as MED Fairbank type and pseudoachondroplasia. Unlike previously reported cases with the Ribbing type, the present patients did not have short stature or brachydactyly. This report expands further the phenotypic variations of COMP defects. (orig.)

  15. Single Site Silica Supported Tetramethyl Niobium by the SOMC Strategy: Synthesis, Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship in Ethylene Oligomerization Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Hamieh, Ali Imad Ali; Dey, Raju; Nekoueishahraki, Bijan; Samantaray, Manoja; Chen, Yin; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Silica supported Tetramethyl niobium complex [(≡SiO)NbMe4] 2 has been isolated by surface alkylation of [(≡SiO-)NbCl3Me] 1 with dimethyl zinc in pentane. 1 can be easily synthesized by grafting of NbCl3Me2 on to the surface of partially dehydroxylated silica by the SOMC strategy. Precise structural analysis was carried out by the FTIR, advance solid state NMR, elemental analysis and mass balance techniques (gas quantification after treating 2 with degassed water) . Complex 1 was found to be active in the ethylene oligomerization to produce up to C30, whereas to our surprise complex 2 selectively dimerizes ethylene into 1-butene in the absence of a co-catalyst at the same conversion levels.

  16. Active site CP-loop dynamics modulate substrate binding, catalysis, oligomerization, stability, over-oxidation and recycling of 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamariah, Neelagandan; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank; Grüber, Gerhard

    2018-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) catalyse the rapid reduction of hydrogen peroxide, organic hydroperoxide and peroxynitrite, using a fully conserved peroxidatic cysteine (C P ) located in a conserved sequence Pxxx(T/S)xxC P motif known as C P -loop. In addition, Prxs are involved in cellular signaling pathways and regulate several redox-dependent process related disease. The effective catalysis of Prxs is associated with alterations in the C P -loop between reduced, Fully Folded (FF), and oxidized, Locally Unfolded (LU) conformations, which are linked to dramatic changes in the oligomeric structure. Despite many studies, little is known about the precise structural and dynamic roles of the C P -loop on Prxs functions. Herein, the comprehensive biochemical and biophysical studies on Escherichia coli alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C (EcAhpC) and the C P -loop mutants, EcAhpC-F45A and EcAhpC-F45P reveal that the reduced form of the C P -loop adopts conformational dynamics, which is essential for effective peroxide reduction. Furthermore, the point mutants alter the structure and dynamics of the reduced form of the C P -loop and, thereby, affect substrate binding, catalysis, oligomerization, stability and overoxidiation. In the oxidized form, due to restricted C P -loop dynamics, the EcAhpC-F45P mutant favours a decamer formation, which enhances the effective recycling by physiological reductases compared to wild-type EcAhpC. In addition, the study reveals that residue F45 increases the specificity of Prxs-reductase interactions. Based on these studies, we propose an evolution of the C P -loop with confined sequence conservation within Prxs subfamilies that might optimize the functional adaptation of Prxs into various physiological roles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of oligomeric herbicidal ionic liquids with MCPA and Dicamba anions on the community structure of autochthonic bacteria present in agricultural soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ławniczak, Ł., E-mail: lukasz.k.lawniczak@wp.pl [Department of Chemical Technology, Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Syguda, A., E-mail: Anna.Syguda@put.poznan.pl [Department of Chemical Technology, Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Borkowski, A., E-mail: a.borkowski@uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Geology, University of Warsaw, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland); Cyplik, P., E-mail: pcyplik@wp.pl [Department of Biotechnology and Food Microbiology, University of Life Sciences in Poznan, 60-627 Poznan (Poland); Marcinkowska, K., E-mail: k.marcinkowska@iorpib.poznan.pl [Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznan 60-318 (Poland); Wolko, Ł., E-mail: wolko@o2.pl [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Poznań University of Life Sciences in Poznan, 60-632 Poznan (Poland); Praczyk, T., E-mail: t.praczyk@iorpib.poznan.pl [Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznan 60-318 (Poland); Chrzanowski, Ł., E-mail: Lukasz.Chrzanowski@put.poznan.pl [Department of Chemical Technology, Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Pernak, J., E-mail: Juliusz.Pernak@put.poznan.pl [Department of Chemical Technology, Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan (Poland)

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs), which exhibit high efficacy in terms of weed control and low toxicity, but may be persistent due to limited biodegradability, on the community structure of autochthonic bacteria present in agricultural soil. Four different oligomeric HILs (with two types of cations and different ratio of herbicidal anions) were synthesized and characterized by employing {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. The results of biodegradation assay indicated that none of the tested HILs could be classified as readily biodegradable (biodegradation rate ranged from 0 to 7%). The conducted field studies confirmed that the herbicidal efficacy of the HILs was higher compared to the reference herbicide mixture by 10 to 30%, depending on the dose and weed species. After termination of field studies, the soil treated with the tested HILs was subjected to next generation sequencing in order to investigate the potential changes in the bacterial community structure. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in all studied samples. Treatment with the studied HILs resulted in an increase of Actinobacteria compared to the reference herbicidal mixture. Differenced among the studied HILs were generally associated with a significantly higher abundance of Bacteroidetes in case of 1-HIL-Dicamba 1/3 and Firmicutes in case of 2-HIL-Dicamba 1/3. - Highlights: • Impact of herbicidal ionic liquids on bacterial community structure was studied. • Oligomeric herbicidal ionic liquids were effective but not readily biodegradable. • Next generation sequencing was used to evaluate shifts in bacterial abundance. • Treatment during field trials resulted in changes at class and species level. • Use of herbicidal ionic liquids affects the structure of autochthonic soil bacteria.

  18. Data in support of the identification of neuronal and astrocyte proteins interacting with extracellularly applied oligomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein assemblies by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amulya Nidhi Shrivastava

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available α-Synuclein (α-syn is the principal component of Lewy bodies, the pathophysiological hallmark of individuals affected by Parkinson disease (PD. This neuropathologic form of α-syn contributes to PD progression and propagation of α-syn assemblies between neurons. The data we present here support the proteomic analysis used to identify neuronal proteins that specifically interact with extracellularly applied oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn assemblies (conditions 1 and 2, respectively (doi: 10.15252/embj.201591397 [1]. α-syn assemblies and their cellular partner proteins were pulled down from neuronal cell lysed shortly after exposure to exogenous α-syn assemblies and the associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry using a shotgun proteomic-based ap